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Sample records for antimicrobials general considerations

  1. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community. PMID:21282489

  2. Stability: general considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter is concerned with determining the stability properties of ideal MHD equilibria. The problem of stability can be stated qualitatively as follows. The existence of an MHD equilibrium state implies a situation where the sum of the forces acting on the plasma is zero. If the plasma is perturbed from this state, the resulting perturbed forces either restore the plasma to its original equilibrium (stability) or cause a further enhancement of the initial disturbance (instability). Chapter 8 begins with a discussion of a mathematical definition of stability particularly applicable to ideal MHD. Next, a short derivation is presented of the dispersion relation for waves in an infinite homogeneous MHD plasma. These waves play an important role in providing intuition into the dynamical behavior of an MHD plasma. Following this is a rather extensive discussion of the formulation of the general linearized stability problem, starting with the equations of motion and culminating with the development of the Energy Principle, a powerful method for testing stability. Having established the Energy Principle, it is then possible to address the role of plasma compressibility on ideal MHD stability in a general manner. This demonstrates the relationship between the ideal and collisionless MHD stability boundaries. Next, a rather subtle point is investigated concerning whether the region outside the main plasma core is more accurately described by a vacuum or by a relatively cold, but still perfectly conducting, force-free plasma. Finally, a brief discussion is presented of the general classification of ideal MHD instabilities

  3. Blastogenetic associations: General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Associations of anomalies, with VACTERL as the prototype, have been the source of much debate, including questions about the validity and definition of this category. Evidence is presented for a teratologic basis for associations involving interactions between disruptive events and specific vulnerabilities. Because the embryo is organized in time and space, differences in the timing, location, and severity of exposures will create variable sequelae for any specific vulnerability, creating associations. The blastogenetic stage of development involves distinct properties that affect the nature of associations arising during this time, including relatively undifferentiated developmental fields and causally nonspecific malformations. With this, single anomalies can be part of the spectrum of findings that comprise a specific association. A specific defect defines a subset of disturbances, biasing frequencies of other defects. Processes are basic, integrated, and general, so disruptions are often lethal, and can have multiple effects, accounting for high incidences of multiple anomalies, and overlaps between associations. Blastogenetic disturbances also do not affect the late "fine tuning" of minor anomalies, although pathogenetic sequences can occur. This model suggests that certain combinations of congenital anomalies can arise from causally nonspecific teratogenetic fields determined by timing, location, and vulnerabilities, rather than polytopic developmental fields. PMID:26174333

  4. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences. (orig.)

  5. General Considerations on the Oligopoly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Angelo Ioan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyzed the main aspects of oligopoly, in the case of n firms. The analysis has made, as a rule, for arbitrary marginal costs, each time, however, by considering these costs constant recovering well known results of the models presented: the Stackelberg model, the case of more production leaders, the price leader, the Cournot equilibrium for duopoly, the Cournot equilibrium for oligopoly or in the case of perfect competition and cartels. We also treat the problems above for the general case of cost function, again customizing the overall results for linear functions and obtaining the corresponding classical relations.

  6. General aspects of siting and safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The siting process from site selection to the different stages of review by the regulatory body is described. Special attention is payed to the role and responsibilities of the licensing authority. Next, the basic considerations involved in the siting process are reviewed. They include system planning, engineering, safety, environmental impact (including land use) and economics. Case studies illustrating different aspects of the siting process (e.g. site selection) are presented. (orig.)

  7. GENERAL CONSIDERATION OF GUILLIAIN BARRE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeel A. Gandhi, Brijal A. Maisuria, Rajesh G. Patel and Bhoomi Arora*

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare but important disease that can lead to life threatening respiratory failure. This review summarises the verified consideration of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS which are thought to be caused by direct autoimmune attack on peripheral nerves. Aim- Nerve conduction study helps differentiate the heterogeneous subtypes of GBS. Patients exhibit a progressive paralysis that reaches a plateau phase. Treatment and Result- Treatment with both intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange reduces the time taken for recovery to occur, although mortality remains around 8%, with about 20% of patients remaining disabled. Though no significant differences were found between patients with Guillain Barre syndrome treated with plasma exchange and patients treated with intravenous immune globulins either alone or in combination with high dose methylprednisolone. Conclusion- It can be concluded that tentative and the gap in current research should not be interpreted as proof that multidisciplinary care is ineffective. Further research is needed into appropriate study designs; outcome measurement; caregiver needs; and the evaluation of optimal settings, type, intensity or frequency and cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary care in the Guillain-Barré syndrome population.

  8. THE INTERNATIONAL TOURISTIC SERVICES – GENERAL CONSIDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Gabriela Turtureanu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Can be considered that the amplification of international dimension of touristic services andthe increasing of the role of this activities în the economic circuit is obtaining a important strategic dimension înthe context of development process of contemporary development.The accentuation of the internationalization process of contemporary production în general and of theproduction of touristic services în private, corroborated with the wide and mondial market globalization as aresult of intensification of the work division into a mondial economy more integrated and more globalized. Isrepresenting, without doubt, a important dimension of the services role în the increasing process andcontemporary economic development.

  9. [Some general considerations concerning Cuba's population policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana Martinez, L

    1978-01-01

    The policies developed in Cuba after the revolution that influenced population were primarily intended to alter basic structures hindering social and economic development rather than to affect population growth. Fertility has declined rapidly from 35.1/1000 in 1963 to a preliminary figure of 19.8/1000 in 1977, and interprovincial differences have significantly lessened. Factors influencing the decline include the increased participation of women in economic activities, improved access to contraception, the higher cultural level of couples and especially women made possible through adult education, and increased urbanization following the agrarian reform. Infant mortality declined from about 80/1000 live births in the late 1950s to 24.6/1000 live births in 1977, while mortality for 1-4 year olds is now 1.1/1000. Maternal mortality declined from 10.7/10,000 live births in 1965 to 4.6 in 1976. Expectation of life at birth was 70 years for both sexes in 1976. The most significant factors in the mortality decline appear to have been general improvements in material standards and the disappearance of nutritional deficiencies in children and mothers, creation of the National Health System which offers free health care nationwide, and improved educational levels. By the beginning of the century 40% of the urban population resided in places with over 2000 inhabitants. In 1953 the proportion was 51.4% and Havana contained 23% of the national population. The policy of the Revolution has been to exploit the natural resources of the entire country and to reform agriculture and livestock raising. The growth rate of the urban population between 1953 and 1970 of 3.1% was only slightly higher than the growth rate of 2.19% of the entire country. Havana grew by only 2.2% during the same time, and by only 1.3% between 1971-74. Intermediate cities increased their share of the total population from 10.6% in 1958 to 17.3% in 1970. Government programs to orient migration toward

  10. Pharmacokinetic considerations for antimicrobial therapy in patients receiving renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico; Viale, Pierluigi; Pavan, Federica; Furlanut, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), particularly continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH) and continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), are gaining increasing relevance in routine clinical management of intensive care unit patients. The application of CRRT, by leading to extracorporeal clearance (CL(CRRT)), may significantly alter the pharmacokinetic behaviour of some drugs. This may be of particular interest in critically ill patients presenting with life-threatening infections, since the risk of underdosing with antimicrobial agents during this procedure may lead to both therapeutic failure and the spread of breakthrough resistance. The intent of this review is to discuss the pharmacokinetic principles of CL(CRRT) of antimicrobial agents during the application of CVVH and CVVHDF and to summarise the most recent findings on this topic (from 1996 to December 2006) in order to understand the basis for optimal dosage adjustments of different antimicrobial agents. Removal of solutes from the blood through semi-permeable membranes during RRT may occur by means of two different physicochemical processes, namely, diffusion or convection. Whereas intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) is essentially a diffusive technique and CVVH is a convective technique, CVVHDF is a combination of both. As a general rule, the efficiency of drug removal by the different techniques is expected to be CVVHDF > CVVH > IHD, but indeed CL(CRRT) may vary greatly depending mainly on the peculiar physicochemical properties of each single compound and the CRRT device's characteristics and operating conditions. Considering that RRT substitutes for renal function in clearing plasma, CL(CRRT) is expected to be clinically relevant for drugs with dominant renal clearance, especially when presenting a limited volume of distribution and poor plasma protein binding. Consistently, CL(CRRT) should be clinically relevant particularly for most hydrophilic antimicrobial agents (e.g. beta

  11. Prospective study of use of perioperative antimicrobial therapy in general surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennessy, Brendan G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Perioperative antimicrobial therapy has demonstrated efficacy in reducing the rate of surgical site infections in clinical trials. With the emergence of antibiotic resistance, the risk of reaction, and the inevitable financial repercussions, use of prophylactic antibiotics is not a panacea, and their misuse may have considerable implications. The aim of this study was to assess the use of antibiotics in the perioperative period in both general and vascular surgery procedures. METHODS: A prospective study was undertaken of 131 patients with a mean age of 43 years (range one month-88 years), of whom 68 (51%) were male, who underwent twenty-seven different general or vascular surgery procedures over a four-week period. Each patient was evaluated from the time of antibiotic commencement through their operative procedure until the treatment was discontinued. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients (54%) received ten antibiotics, with 71 (97%) of these uses being prophylactic. Of the 15 appendectomies performed for uncomplicated appendicitis, the mean number of prophylactic antibiotic doses was 5.3 (range 1-12). Where they were documented, written postoperative directives were not adhered to in 18\\/27 prescriptions (66%). CONCLUSION: This study has demonstrated a lack of adherence to guidelines in the perioperative administration of antimicrobial agents. In addition, it calls attention to the economic implications of unnecessary prophylaxis.

  12. Antimicrobial drug use on Austrian dairy farms with special consideration of the use of "highest priority critically important antimicrobials".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obritzhauser, Walter; Trauffler, Martine; Raith, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Fuchs, Klemens; Köfer, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in livestock production is coming under growing criticism. Beside overall antimicrobial use, specific substances listed by the WHO as "highest priority critically important antimicrobials" (HPCIAs)--these include fluoroquinolones, macrolides, 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins, as well as glycopeptides--have been placed under specific restrictions and should only be applied in particular cases according to strict indication criteria. In this study, the consumption of antimicrobial substances on Austrian dairy farms was evaluated quantitatively. The data covered 8,027 prescription records on the use of antibiotics on 465 dairy farms. Eleven veterinary practices provided data from between four to 27 months during the period from 2008 to 2010 and the total consumption of antimicrobials was estimated. The amount of active substance(s) in grams used per livestock unit (g/LU) per year and the number of product-related daily doses used per livestock unit (n PrDD(LU)/LU) per year were determined as units of measurement. These parameters were estimated by applying Monte Carlo simulation techniques, respecting variances in annual working days of the veterinary practices as well as variances in the proportion of non-treated populations. Total antimicrobial consumption in the population-at-risk was determined to be 2.59 g/LU and 1.30 PrDD(LU)/LU per year. HPCIAs were used at a proportion of 24.6% (0.31 PrDD(LU)/LU) of the total consumption of antimicrobials for systemic and intramammary use. Of these, 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins were most frequently administered, particularly for the treatment of mastitis and foot diseases. The total consumption of antimicrobials in Austrian dairy cattle production is negligible compared to their use in pig and poultry production systems. However, the use of HPCIAs, especially 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins, should be minimised further. PMID:27344910

  13. 76 FR 59247 - Environmental Impact Considerations, Food Additives, and Generally Recognized As Safe Substances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Environmental Impact Considerations, Food Additives, and Generally Recognized As Safe Substances; Technical... considerations, food additives, and generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substances to correct minor errors in the... affecting certain regulations regarding environmental impact considerations (part 25), food additives...

  14. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON REGULATIONS AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR QUADRICYCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pavlovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new class of compact vehicles has been emerging and wide-spreading all around Europe: the quadricycle. These four-wheeled motor vehicles, originally derived from motorcycles, are a small and fuel-efficient mean of transportation used in rural or urban areas as an alternative to motorbikes or city cars. In some countries, they are also endorsed by local authorities and institutions which support small and environmentally-friendly vehicles. In this paper, several general considerations on quadricycles will be provided including the vehicle classification, evolution of regulations (as homologation, driver licence, emissions, etc, technical characteristics, safety requirements, most relevant investigations, and other additional useful information (e.g. references, links. It represents an important and actual topic of investigation for designers and manufacturers considering that the new EU regulation on the approval and market surveillance of quadricycles will soon enter in force providing conclusive requirements for functional safety environmental protection of these promising vehicles.

  15. Standard guide for general design considerations for hot cell equipment

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 The intent of this guide is to provide general design and operating considerations for the safe and dependable operation of remotely operated hot cell equipment. Hot cell equipment is hardware used to handle, process, or analyze nuclear or radioactive material in a shielded room. The equipment is placed behind radiation shield walls and cannot be directly accessed by the operators or by maintenance personnel because of the radiation exposure hazards. Therefore, the equipment is operated remotely, either with or without the aid of viewing. 1.1.2 This guide may apply to equipment in other radioactive remotely operated facilities such as suited entry repair areas, canyons or caves, but does not apply to equipment used in commercial power reactors. 1.1.3 This guide does not apply to equipment used in gloveboxes. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This guide is intended for persons who are tasked with the planning, design, procurement, fabrication, installation, or testing of equipment used in rem...

  16. Protection of loading and unloading machines. General considerations, radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this report states several general considerations regarding the protection during loading and unloading operations of an operating atomic pile, i.e. the introduction of a fuel element or a control bar into a pressurized enclosure, and the removal from a pressurized enclosure of a radioactive element the radioactivity of which decreases, and the transfer of this element into a pool. These handling operations are associated with different risks: external neutron or gamma irradiation, installation contamination, and effluent leakages presenting chemical or radioactive hazards. The authors indicate or address the admissible radiation level, the dose level at the vicinity of loading machines, the distribution of radiation sources, the distribution of dose rates between neutron and gamma rays, the material selection, issues related to heating, the subsequent transfer of the fuel to the storage pool, and the unloading of control bars with non fissile bodies. The second part addresses the radiation sources: gamma radiations from fission product, delayed neutrons, neutrons from the reactor, thermal capture gamma radiations, heating

  17. General requirements and considerations for a design concept in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Appalachian Compact, for which Pennsylvania is the host state, prohibits traditional shallow land burial. Low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) must be disposed of using engineered confinement. Draft criteria have been developed by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, with assistance from a Public Advisory Committee, to define the requirements for engineered confinement and other requirements for engineered confinement and other requirements for an acceptable disposal technology. This Draft Technology Design/Performance Criteria establishes Performance Objectives, Technical Requirements and presents Other Considerations which apply to the design concept for the disposal facility. These requirements are summarized

  18. 21 CFR 556.1 - General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General considerations; tolerances for residues of new animal drugs in food. 556.1 Section 556.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD General Provisions § 556.1 General considerations; tolerances...

  19. General considerations for neutron capture therapy at a reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to neutron beam intensity and quality, there are also a number of other significant criteria related to a nuclear reactor that contribute to a successful neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility. These criteria are classified into four main categories: Nuclear design factors, facility management and operations factors, facility resources, and non-technical factors. Important factors to consider are given for each of these categories. In addition to an adequate neutron beam intensity and quality, key requirements for a successful neutron capture therapy facility include necessary finances to construct or convert a facility for NCT, a capable medical staff to perform the NCT, and the administrative support for the facility. The absence of any one of these four factors seriously jeopardizes the overall probability of success of the facility. Thus nuclear reactor facility management considering becoming involved in neutron capture therapy, should it be proven clinically successful, should take all these factors into consideration. (author)

  20. Comparison between two concepts of angular glint:general considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chao; Yin Hongcheng; Huang Peikang

    2008-01-01

    Angular glint can be interpreted as a distortion of the radar echo signal phase front,or alternatively,a tilt of the direction of energy flow from the radial direction.As the complementarities and support of argumentation in our previous work,a general discussion about two concepts of angular glint is made based on electromagnetic theory to demonstrate that these two concepts are equivalent when geometrical optics approximation is used and the receiving antenna is linearly polarized.

  1. General consideration of effective plutonium utilization in future LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the potential of mixed oxide fueled light water reactors (MOX-LWRs), especially focusing on the high conversion type LWRs (HC-LWRs) such as FLWR are evaluated in terms of both economic aspect and effective use of plutonium. For economics consideration, relative economics positions of MOX-LWRs are clarified comparing the cost of electricity for uranium fueled LWRs (U-LWRs), MOX-LWRs and fast breeder reactors (FBRs) assuming future natural uranium price raise and variation of parameters such as construction cost and capacity factor. Also the economic superiority of MOX utilization against the uranium use is mentioned from the view point of plutonium credit concerning to the front-end fuel cycle cost. In terms of effective use of plutonium, comparative evaluations on plutonium mass balance in the cases of HC-LWR and high moderation type LWRs (HM-LWRs) taking into account plutonium quality (ratio of fissile to total plutonium) constraint in multiple recycling are performed as representative MOX utilization cases. Through this evaluation, the advantageous features of plutonium multiple recycling by HC-LWR are clarified. From all these results, merits of the introduction of HC-LWRs are discussed. (author)

  2. General Considerations of the Electrostatic Boundary Conditions in Oxide Heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takuya

    2011-08-19

    -VI' for semiconductors. As we will review, interfaces between different families creates a host of electrostatic issues. They can be somewhat avoided if, as in many semiconductor heterostructures, only one family is used, with small perturbations (such as n-type or p-type doping) around them. However, for most transition metal oxides, this is greatly restrictive. For example, LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} are both insulators in part due to strong electron correlations, and only in their solid solution does 'colossal magnetoresistance' emerge in bulk. Similarly, the metallic superlattice shown in Fig. 1(c) can be considered a nanoscale deconstruction of (La,Sr)TiO{sub 3} to the insulating parent compounds. Therefore the aspiration to arbitrarily mix and match perovskite components requires a basic understanding of, and ultimately control over, these issues. In this context, here we present basic electrostatic features that arise in oxide heterostructures which vary the ionic charge stacking sequence. In close relation to the analysis of the stability of polar surfaces and semiconductor heterointerfaces, the variation of the dipole moment across a heterointerface plays a key role in determining its stability. Different self-consistent assignments of the unit cell are presented, allowing the polar discontinuity picture to be recast in terms of an equivalent local charge neutrality picture. The latter is helpful in providing a common framework with which to discuss electronic reconstructions, local-bonding considerations, crystalline defects, and lattice polarization on an equal footing, all of which are the subject of extensive current investigation.

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations of antimicrobial drug therapy in cancer patients with kidney dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Frieder; Schröppel, Bernd; Ludwig, Ulla

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cancer have a high inherent risk of infectious complications. In addition, the incidence of acute and chronic kidney dysfunction rises in this population. Anti-infective drugs often require dosing modifications based on an estimate of kidney function, usually the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there is still no preferential GFR formula to be used, and in acute kidney injury there is always a considerable time delay between true kidney function and estimated GFR. In most cases, the anti-infective therapy should start with an immediate and high loading dose. Pharmacokinetic as well as pharmacodynamic principles must be applied for further dose adjustment. Anti-infective drugs with time-dependent action should be given with the target of high trough concentrations (e.g., beta lactam antibiotics, penems, vancomycin, antiviral drugs). Anti-infective drugs with concentration-dependent action should be given with the target of high peak concentrations (e.g., aminoglycosides, daptomycin, colistin, quinolones). Our group created a pharmacokinetic database, called NEPharm, hat serves as a reference to obtain reliable dosing regimens of anti-infective drugs in kidney dysfunction as well as renal replacement therapy. To avoid the risk of either too low or too infrequent peak concentrations, we prefer the eliminated fraction rule for dose adjustment calculations. PMID:26167456

  4. Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in a general intensive care unit in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria causing infections in patients at the intensive care units (ICUs) of Riyadh Military Hospital (RMH), as well as their antimicrobial resistance patterns for one year. A retrospective, cohort investigation was performed. Laboratory records from January to December 2009 were studied for the prevalence of MDR Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance in ICU patients from RMH, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 1210 isolates were collected from various specimens such as: respiratory (469), blood (400), wound/tissue (235), urinary (56), nasal swabs (35), and cerebro-spinal fluid (15). Regardless of the specimen, there was a high rate of nosocomial MDR organisms isolated from patients enrolled in the General ICU (GICU) in Riyadh. Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) comprised 40.9%, Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia) - 19.4%, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) formed 16.3% of these isolates. The P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus (methycillin sensitive and methycillin resistant), and Staphylococccus coagulase negative are the most common isolates recovered from clinical specimens in the GICU of RMH. Respiratory tract specimens represented nearly 39% of all the specimens collected in the ICU. The most common MDR organisms isolated in this unit were A. baumannii, and K. pneumoniae (Author).

  5. General Considerations on the Biosafety of Virus-derived Vectors Used in Gene Therapy and Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Baldo, Aline; van den Akker, Eric; Bergmans, Hans E.; Lim, Filip; Pauwels, Katia

    2013-01-01

    This introductory paper gathers general considerations on the biosafety of virus-derived vectors that are used in human gene therapy and/or vaccination. The importance to assess the potential risks for human health and the environment related to the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in this case genetically modified viral vectors is highlighted by several examples. This environmental risk assessment is one of the requirements within the European regulatory framework covering the con...

  6. A general consideration of the importance of nutrition for critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    DUMLU, Ersin Gürkan; Özdedeoğlu, Mesut; Bozkurt, Birkan; Tokaç, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common medical condition among intensive care unit patients. It should be monitored carefully, since early management of malnutrition can dramatically improve the medical condition of the patients. A general consideration of enteral feeding shows that it is much more useful than parenteral administration, because it is more physiological and poses a lower risk of hyperalimentation. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, we scanned all files and personal inform...

  7. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections in a general hospital: patient characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility, and treatment outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Samonis

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is acquiring increasing importance as a nosocomial pathogen. METHODS: We retrospectively studied the characteristics and outcome of patients with any type of S. maltophilia infection at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, between 1/2005-12/2010. S. maltophilia antimicrobial susceptibility was tested with the agar dilution method. Prognostic factors for all-cause in-hospital mortality were assessed with multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients (median age: 70.5 years; 64.7% males with S. maltophilia infection, not related to cystic fibrosis, were included. The 68 patients were hospitalized in medical (29.4%, surgical (26.5%, hematology/oncology departments (23.5%, or the intensive care units (ICU; 20.6%. The most frequent infection types were respiratory tract (54.4%, bloodstream (16.2%, skin/soft tissue (10.3%, and intra-abdominal (8.8% infection. The S. maltophilia-associated infection was polymicrobial in 33.8% of the cases. In vitro susceptibility was higher to colistin (91.2%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and netilmicin (85.3% each, and ciprofloxacin (82.4%. The empirical and the targeted treatment regimens were microbiologically appropriate for 47.3% and 63.6% of the 55 patients with data available, respectively. Most patients received targeted therapy with a combination of agents other than trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The crude mortality and the mortality and the S. maltophilia infection-related mortality were 14.7% and 4.4%, respectively. ICU hospitalization was the only independent prognostic factor for mortality. CONCLUSION: S. maltophilia infection in a general hospital can be associated with a good prognosis, except for the patients hospitalized in the ICU. Combination reigmens with fluoroquinolones, colistin, or tigecycline could be alternative treatment options to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole.

  8. Root canal retained restorations: 1. General considerations and custom-made cast posts and cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, D H; Dummer, P M

    1990-06-01

    The first article in this series reviews general considerations relating to the use of root canal retained restorations. The authors discuss factors affecting retention, the arguments for cast versus wrought posts, reinforcement of the tooth, and treatment planning. Clinical procedures for constructing custom-made cast posts and cores, using direct and indirect techniques, are also described. The three subsequent articles will deal with threaded and unthreaded prefabricated post-and-core systems, and root-face attachments for the retention of complete and partial overdentures. PMID:2079151

  9. General considerations on the biosafety of virus-derived vectors used in gene therapy and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Aline; van den Akker, Eric; Bergmans, Hans E; Lim, Filip; Pauwels, Katia

    2013-12-01

    This introductory paper gathers general considerations on the biosafety of virus-derived vectors that are used in human gene therapy and/or vaccination. The importance to assess the potential risks for human health and the environment related to the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in this case genetically modified viral vectors is highlighted by several examples. This environmental risk assessment is one of the requirements within the European regulatory framework covering the conduct of clinical trials using GMO. Risk assessment methodologies for the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified virus-derived vectors have been developed. PMID:24195604

  10. A general model for nano-cantilever switches with consideration of surface effects and nonlinear curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. F.; Wang, B. L.

    2015-02-01

    A general model for nano-cantilever switches with consideration of surface stress, nonlinear curvature, the location and length of the fixed electrode is developed. Some representative cantilever switch architectures are incorporated into this model. The governing equation is derived by using Hamilton principal and solved numerical. Results show that the influence of nonlinear curvature and surface effect on the pull-in instability and free vibration is significant for a switch with a large gap-length ratio and a short fixed electrode (the length of the fixed electrode is smaller than that of the cantilever nanobeam). The length and position of the fixed electrode have a significant effect on the pull-in parameters.

  11. Use of Aeromonas spp. as general indicators of antimicrobial susceptibility among bacteria in aquatic environments in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Masaru eUsui; Chie eTagaki; Akira eFukuda; Torahiko eOkubo; Chanchai eBoonla; Satoru eSuzuki; Kanako eSeki; Hideshige eTakada; Yutaka eTamura

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria (ARB), and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya Riv...

  12. General Practitioner Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme Study (GAPS): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Avent, Minyon L.; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Gilks, Charles; Del Mar, Chris; Halton, Kate; Sidjabat, Hanna; Hall, Lisa; Dobson, Annette; Paterson, David L.; van Driel, Mieke L.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a strong link between antibiotic consumption and the rate of antibiotic resistance. In Australia, the vast majority of antibiotics are prescribed by general practitioners, and the most common indication is for acute respiratory infections. The aim of this study is to assess if implementing a package of integrated, multifaceted interventions reduces antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in general practice. Methods/design This is a cluster randomised trial...

  13. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Köck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospitalized volunteers recruited from the general population in Germany. Participants provided nasal swabs at three time points (each separated by 4–6 months. Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and important nonfermenters were cultured and subjected to susceptibility testing. Factors potentially influencing bacterial colonization patterns were assessed. The overall prevalence of S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenters was 41.0, 33.4 and 3.7%, respectively. Thirteen participants (0.7% were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Enterobacteriaceae were mostly (>99% susceptible against ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (100%. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing isolates were not detected among Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Several lifestyle- and health-related factors (e.g. household size, travel, livestock density of the residential area or occupational livestock contact, atopic dermatitis, antidepressant or anti-infective drugs were associated with colonization by different microorganisms. This study unexpectedly demonstrated high nasal colonization rates with Enterobacteriaceae in the German general population, but rates of antibiotic resistance were low. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage was rare but highly associated with occupational livestock contact.

  14. The general public's perceptions and use of antimicrobials in Trinidad and Tobago

    OpenAIRE

    Parimi Neeta; Pereira Lexley M. Pinto; Prabhakar Parimi

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine the general public's perceptions and use of antibiotics in Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island republic in the Caribbean. Methods. This prospective study surveyed 824 randomly selected households listed in the telephone directory, from November 1998 to January 1999. Through telephone interviews we determined knowledge about antibiotics and beliefs concerning their safety and efficacy. We studied the influence of age, gender, education, and having private health insurance...

  15. Systemic antimicrobial therapy (minocycline as an adjunct to non-surgical approach to recurrent chronic generalized gingival hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag M Khatri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotic treatment has emerged as a powerful adjunct to conventional mechanical debridement for therapeutic management of the periodontal diseases. The conceptual basis for treating periodontal diseases as infections is particularly attractive in part because of substantial data indicating that these diseases may be associated with specific putative pathogens. Further, discrete groups of patients respond well to systemic antibiotics and exhibit improvement of clinical parameters, including attachment level and inflammation. This bacterial-host interaction, which is ever-so-present in periodontitis, directs us toward utilizing antimicrobial agents along with the routine mechanical debridement. This case report presents a case of a female patient with recurrence of the chronic generalized periodontitis with gingival enlargement, which is treated thrice by referral dentist. A through clinical examination was carried out pre-operatively and treatment was planned with systemic minocycline in conjunction with the conventional non-surgical approach. There was a significant reduction of pocket depth, gain in attachment with dramatic improvement clinically.

  16. Use of Aeromonas spp. as General Indicators of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Bacteria in Aquatic Environments in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Masaru; Tagaki, Chie; Fukuda, Akira; Okubo, Torahiko; Boonla, Chanchai; Suzuki, Satoru; Seki, Kanako; Takada, Hideshige; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya River, 2 sites at the mouth of Chao Phraya River, 3 sites in Ta Chin River, and 5 sites at city canals) and 12 sites (6 sites at city canals; 2 sites at chicken farms; 2 sites at pig farms; and 2 samples from sites at pig farms, which were subsequently treated at a biogas plant) in Thailand in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In total, 117 Aeromonas spp. were isolated from the water samples, and these organisms exhibited various antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Notably, there was a significant correlation between the environmental concentration of tetracyclines and the rates of tetracycline resistance in the isolated Aeromonas spp.; however, both the concentration and rates of tetracycline resistance in samples derived from pig farms were higher than those of samples harvested from other aquatic environments. These findings suggest that the high concentrations of antimicrobials observed in these aquatic environments likely select for ARGs. Furthermore, they indicate that Aeromonas spp. comprise an effective marker for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments. PMID:27433156

  17. Use of Aeromonas spp. as General Indicators of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Bacteria in Aquatic Environments in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Masaru; Tagaki, Chie; Fukuda, Akira; Okubo, Torahiko; Boonla, Chanchai; Suzuki, Satoru; Seki, Kanako; Takada, Hideshige; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya River, 2 sites at the mouth of Chao Phraya River, 3 sites in Ta Chin River, and 5 sites at city canals) and 12 sites (6 sites at city canals; 2 sites at chicken farms; 2 sites at pig farms; and 2 samples from sites at pig farms, which were subsequently treated at a biogas plant) in Thailand in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In total, 117 Aeromonas spp. were isolated from the water samples, and these organisms exhibited various antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Notably, there was a significant correlation between the environmental concentration of tetracyclines and the rates of tetracycline resistance in the isolated Aeromonas spp.; however, both the concentration and rates of tetracycline resistance in samples derived from pig farms were higher than those of samples harvested from other aquatic environments. These findings suggest that the high concentrations of antimicrobials observed in these aquatic environments likely select for ARGs. Furthermore, they indicate that Aeromonas spp. comprise an effective marker for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments. PMID:27433156

  18. Coherent states, quantum gravity and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, I: General considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Stottmeister, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This article, as the first of three, aims at establishing the (time-dependent) Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the sense of space adiabatic perturbation theory, for quantum systems constructed by techniques of the loop quantum gravity framework, especially the canonical formulation of the latter. The analysis presented here fits into a rather general framework, and offers a solution to the problem of applying the usual Born-Oppenheimer ansatz for molecular (or structurally analogous) systems to more general quantum systems (e.g. spin-orbit models) by means of space adiabatic perturbation theory. The proposed solution is applied to a simple, finite dimensional model of interacting spin systems, which serves as a non-trivial, minimal model of the aforesaid problem. Furthermore, it is explained how the content of this article, and its companion, affect the possible extraction of quantum field theory on curved spacetime from loop quantum gravity (including matter fields).

  19. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. I. General considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottmeister, Alexander; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    This article, as the first of three, aims at establishing the (time-dependent) Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the sense of space adiabatic perturbation theory, for quantum systems constructed by techniques of the loop quantum gravity framework, especially the canonical formulation of the latter. The analysis presented here fits into a rather general framework and offers a solution to the problem of applying the usual Born-Oppenheimer ansatz for molecular (or structurally analogous) systems to more general quantum systems (e.g., spin-orbit models) by means of space adiabatic perturbation theory. The proposed solution is applied to a simple, finite dimensional model of interacting spin systems, which serves as a non-trivial, minimal model of the aforesaid problem. Furthermore, it is explained how the content of this article and its companion affect the possible extraction of quantum field theory on curved spacetime from loop quantum gravity (including matter fields).

  20. Considerations in Applying the General Equilibrium Approach to Environmental Health Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE WAN; HONG-WEI YANG; TOSHIHIKO MASUI

    2005-01-01

    There are currently two commonly used approaches to assessing economic impacts of health damage resulting from environmental pollution: human capital approach (HCA) and willingness-to-pay (WTP). WTP can be further divided into averted expenditure approach (AEA), hedonic wage approach (HWA), contingent valuation approach (CVA) and hedonic price approach (HPA). A general review of the principles behind these approaches by the authors indicates that these methods are incapable of unveiling the mechanism of health impact from the point of view of national economy. On a basis of economic system, the shocks brought about by health effects of environmental pollution change the labor supply and medical expenditure, which in turn affects the level of production activity in each sector and the total final consumption pattern of the society. The general equilibrium approach within the framework of macroeconomic theory is able to estimate the health impact on national economy comprehensively and objectively. Its mechanism and applicability are discussed in detail by the authors.

  1. General considerations in ocular toxicity risk assessment from the toxicologists' viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Shoji; Otake, Seiji; Tomohiro, Masayuki; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Nomura, Mamoru

    2015-06-01

    Humans commonly obtain approximately 80% of external information from vision. Since loss of vision markedly decreases quality of life, risk assessments for visual toxicity of new drugs are extremely important. However, the ICH S4 guideline for nonclinical toxicity study of new drugs only indicates a brief instruction for ophthalmologic examinations, and submitted data for drug approval according only to this guideline are not always considered sufficient in light of ocular toxicity risk assessments. The eye is an assembly of many specialized sub-organs which have specific functions, and its integral maintenance of homeostasis plays an important role of visual function. When only a part of integrity of functions is lost, overall function of the eye might be commonly disturbed. Therefore, understanding of anatomy and physiology of these sub-organs may help know mechanisms of observed ocular changes. In ophthalmologic examinations in nonclinical toxicity studies, it is vital to understand the principles and features of each examination. Comparisons of findings between pre and post drug treatment as well as considerations of species differences, strain differences, age differences, and location/degree of abnormalities are essential. In addition, many kinds of spontaneous ocular findings are well known in experimental animals. To differentiate treatment-related changes from spontaneous findings, mastering basic skills for ophthalmologic examinations and taking advantage of collection of background data are necessary. For ocular toxicity risk assessments, while an evaluation of "sight-threatening" effects is most critical matter, "quality of vision" related findings also should be considered. To extrapolate animal data to human, clinical significances of ocular toxicity findings should be evaluated based on considerations for "species differences", "safety margins", "reversibility", and "risk-benefit balance". In addition, a detailed recording of features of lesions is

  2. CT in children – dose protection and general considerations when planning a CT in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorantin, E., E-mail: erich.sorantin@medunigraz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Medical University of Graz,Austria (Austria); Weissensteiner, S.; Hasenburger, G.; Riccabona, M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Medical University of Graz,Austria (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    Today CT represents about 10% of all ionizing radiation based imaging modalities, but delivers more than 50% of the total collective dose for diagnostic imaging. Compared to adults the radiation sensitivity of children is considerable higher than in adults. Additionally children differ from adults – factors like body size, mass, density, proportions as well as metabolism have to be mentioned. Children grow and maturate – all this components have to be mapped in examination protocols by Pediatric Radiology. The total dose of a CT examination depends on the settings of several factors such as the scout view, the scan length, exposure settings including automated exposure control, type of scanning (single slice, helical, volume mode), slice thickness, pitch values as well as on image reconstruction parameters. If intravenous contrast media injection is needed bolus tracking or timing represents another source of radiation. The aim of the paper is to present and discuss all aspects of defining a pediatric age and query adapted CT protocol particularly concerning all dose relevant factors in pediatric CT and their adjustment in children. Moreover hints are given concerning optimization of intravenous contrast media injection as well as special (low dose) imaging protocols.

  3. CT in children – dose protection and general considerations when planning a CT in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today CT represents about 10% of all ionizing radiation based imaging modalities, but delivers more than 50% of the total collective dose for diagnostic imaging. Compared to adults the radiation sensitivity of children is considerable higher than in adults. Additionally children differ from adults – factors like body size, mass, density, proportions as well as metabolism have to be mentioned. Children grow and maturate – all this components have to be mapped in examination protocols by Pediatric Radiology. The total dose of a CT examination depends on the settings of several factors such as the scout view, the scan length, exposure settings including automated exposure control, type of scanning (single slice, helical, volume mode), slice thickness, pitch values as well as on image reconstruction parameters. If intravenous contrast media injection is needed bolus tracking or timing represents another source of radiation. The aim of the paper is to present and discuss all aspects of defining a pediatric age and query adapted CT protocol particularly concerning all dose relevant factors in pediatric CT and their adjustment in children. Moreover hints are given concerning optimization of intravenous contrast media injection as well as special (low dose) imaging protocols

  4. Treatment considerations for early glottic carcinoma: lessons learned and a primer for the general otolaryngologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Nausheen; Sofer, Elazar; Chhetri, Dinesh K

    2014-02-01

    In this commentary, we review our experience with early glottic carcinomas in an attempt to identify points to consider when developing a treatment protocol and technical considerations in oncologic resection to maintain laryngeal function. We highlight several consistent themes: (1) difficult exposure is not always a contraindication to endoscopic resection; (2) depth of invasion may be apparent only intraoperatively; (3) radiation therapy should be offered for deeply invasive cancers requiring extensive cordectomy or for patients who cannot afford lengthy vocal downtime; however, (4) radiation therapy leads to acute dysphagia and collateral damage to the contralateral vocal fold that is avoided with surgery; (5) good voice can be obtained after healing if resection is limited to intramuscular cordectomy; (6) the key to optimal vocal results is adequate glottal closure; and (7) second look operations are occasionally necessary, and therefore preoperative counseling should include this possibility. Since both surgery and radiation therapy achieve excellent oncologic control, a patient-centered approach is preferred in management. PMID:24201059

  5. Kidney Disease and Youth Onset Type 2 Diabetes: Considerations for the General Practitioner

    OpenAIRE

    Dart, Allison B.; Sellers, Elizabeth A.; Heather J. Dean

    2012-01-01

    Youth onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) continues to increase worldwide, concomitant with the rising obesity epidemic. There is evidence to suggest that youth with T2DM are affected by the same comorbidities and complications as adults diagnosed with T2DM. This review highlights specifically the kidney disease associated with youth onset T2DM, which is highly prevalent and associated with a high risk of end-stage kidney disease in early adulthood. A general understanding of this complex disease by...

  6. Considerations on the general layout of CANDU type NPPs in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conception of the general layout is defined depending on the NPP structural units and networks inside and outside of the plant taking into account optimal technological and circulation flows as well as the security and safety standards. The paper considers also the issues related to: NPP siting, operational supply and transportation, interaction with the environmental conditions and other local human activities. The entire project aims to achieve an electricity generating facility with minimal investment and operational expenditures, optimal execution conditions, as well as, safety operation. (author). 5 figs., 1 tab., 14 refs

  7. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in enteric Escherichia coli from domestic pets and assessment of associated risk markers using a generalized linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Martins, Liliana R; Mahú, Maria I M; Costa, Ana L; Mendes, Angelo; Lopes, Elisabete; Mendonça, Denisa M V; Niza-Ribeiro, João J R; de Matos, Augusto J F; da Costa, Paulo Martins

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing global public health problem, which is caused by the use of antimicrobials in both human and animal medical practice. The objectives of the present cross-sectional study were as follows: (1) to determine the prevalence of resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from the feces of pets from the Porto region of Portugal against 19 antimicrobial agents and (2) to assess the individual, clinical and environmental characteristics associated with each pet as risk markers for the AMR of the E. coli isolates. From September 2009 to May 2012, rectal swabs were collected from pets selected using a systematic random procedure from the ordinary population of animals attending the Veterinary Hospital of Porto University. A total of 78 dogs and 22 cats were sampled with the objective of isolating E. coli. The animals' owners, who allowed the collection of fecal samples from their pets, answered a questionnaire to collect information about the markers that could influence the AMR of the enteric E. coli. Chromocult tryptone bile X-glucuronide agar was used for E. coli isolation, and the disk diffusion method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility. The data were analyzed using a multilevel, univariable and multivariable generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Several (49.7%) of the 396 isolates obtained in this study were multidrug-resistant. The E. coli isolates exhibited resistance to the antimicrobial agent's ampicillin (51.3%), cephalothin (46.7%), tetracycline (45.2%) and streptomycin (43.4%). Previous quinolone treatment was the main risk marker for the presence of AMR for 12 (ampicillin, cephalothin, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and aztreonam) of the 15 antimicrobials assessed. Coprophagic habits were also positively associated with an increased risk of AMR for six drugs, ampicillin, amoxicillin

  8. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: general considerations and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 21/4 Cr-1 Mo steel

  9. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: General considerations and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. (author)

  10. Theoretical Considerations on the Computation of Generalized Time-Periodic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pauly, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    We present both, theory and an algorithm for solving time-harmonic wave problems in a general setting. The time-harmonic solutions will be achieved by computing time-periodic solutions of the original wave equations. Thus, an exact controllability technique is proposed to solve the time-dependent wave equations. We discuss a first order Maxwell type system, which will be formulated in the framework of alternating differential forms. This enables us to investigate different kinds of classical wave problems in one fell swoop, such as acoustic, electro-magnetic or elastic wave problems. After a sufficient theory is established, we formulate our exact controllability problem and suggest a least-squares optimization procedure for its solution, which itself is solved in a natural way by a conjugate gradient algorithm operating in the canonical Hilbert space. Therefore, it might be one of the biggest advances of this approach that the proposed conjugate gradient algorithm does not need any preconditioning.

  11. General practitioners' management of mental disorders: A rewarding practice with considerable obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleury Marie-Josée

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care improvement is the cornerstone of current reforms. Mental disorders (MDs are a leading cause of morbidity worldwide and widespread in industrialised countries. MDs are treated mainly in primary care by general practitioners (GPs, even though the latter ability to detect, diagnose, and treat patients with MDs is often considered unsatisfactory. This article examines GPs' management of MDs in an effort to acquire more information regarding means by which GPs deal with MD cases, impact of such cases on their practices, factors that enable or hinder MD management, and patient-management strategies. Methods This study employs a mixed-method approach with emphasis on qualitative investigation. Based on a previous survey of 398 GPs in Quebec, Canada, 60 GPs representing a variety of practice settings were selected for further study. A 10-minute-long questionnaire comprising 27 items was administered, and 70-minute-long interviews were conducted. Quantitative (SPSS and qualitative (NVivo analyses were performed. Results At least 20% of GP visits were MD-related. GPs were comfortable managing common MDs, but not serious MDs. GPs' based their treatment of MDs on pharmacotherapy, support therapy, and psycho-education. They used clinical intuition with few clinical tools, and closely followed their patients with MDs. Practice features (salary or hourly fees payment; psycho-social teams on-site; strong informal networks, and GPs' individual characteristics (continuing medical education; exposure and interest in MDs; traits like empathy favoured MD management. Collaboration with psychologists and psychiatrists was considered key to good MD management. Limited access to specialists, system fragmentation, and underdeveloped group practice and shared-care models were impediments. MD management was seen as burdensome because it required more time, flexibility, and emotional investment. Strategies exist to reduce the burden (one

  12. A general approach to describe the antimicrobial agent release from highly swellable films intended for food packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, G G; Del Nobile, M A; Panizza, A; Corbo, M R; Nicolais, L

    2003-06-01

    A mathematical model able to describe the release kinetics of antimicrobial agents from crosslinked polyvinylalcohol (PVOH) into water is presented. The model was developed by taking into account the diffusion of water molecules into the polymeric film, the counter-diffusion of the incorporated antimicrobial agent from the film into water, and the polymeric matrix swelling kinetic. To validate the model the water sorption kinetics as well as the release kinetics of three antimicrobial agents (i.e., lysozyme, nisin and sodium benzoate, all approved to be used in contact with food) were determined at ambient temperature (25 degrees C). The three investigated active agents were entrapped in four films of PVOH with a different degree of crosslink. The model was successfully used to fit all the above sets of data, corroborating the validity of the hypothesis made to derive it. PMID:12767710

  13. Microemulsions for Colorectal Cancer Treatments. General Considerations and Formulation of Methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Sergio E; Rial-Hermida, M Isabel; Ramirez, Jorge C; Pazos, Alejandro; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Peralta, René D

    2016-01-01

    Microemulsions combine the advantages of emulsions with those of nanocarriers, overcoming the stability problems of the former and providing facile scalable systems with compartments adequate for high drug loadings. Recently, microemulsions are gaining attention in the formulation of anticancer drugs not only for topical treatment, but also for systemic delivery as well as for the development of theranostic systems. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, an updated review about general features, preparation, characterization and pharmaceutical applications, with a special focus on colorectal cancer, is provided. Second, a case study of formulation of methotrexate in microemulsions is presented. Various essential oils (menthol, trans-anethole, α-tocopherol) and surfactants (TPGS-1000, Maxemul 6112, Noigen RN-20) were investigated for the preparation of o/w microemulsions for the delivery of methotrexate, and the ability of methotrexate-loaded microemulsions to inhibit cancer cell growth was then evaluated. Disregarding the surfactants used, menthol and trans-anethole led to cytotoxic microemulsions, whereas α-tocopherol based-formulations induced cell proliferation. These findings highlight the role that the oily component may play in the efficacy and safety of the microemulsions. PMID:26349496

  14. The Antimicrobial Activity o f Honey o n Bacterial Isolates From Burns/Wound o f Patients Attending General Hospital, Ankpa, Kogi State. Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Aminu Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of honey samples from Ankpa, Enjema and Ojoku districts of Ankpa Local Government Area of Kogi State, Nigeria against coagulase negative Staphylococcus species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Proteus speciesobtained from 200 burns/wound patients attending General Hospital, Ankpa were determined. The sensitivity of honey to the test organisms ranges from 16mm to 19mm in diameter. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the honey samples on the bacterial isolates from Ankpa and Ojoku were 0.16 v/v and 0.32 v/v for honey from Enjema. The results of the study revealed that honey from the area understudy has high antimicrobial activity and it is recommended that pure natural honey should be stocked in hospitals/clinics so as to encourage its application in the treatment of burns/wound infections

  15. Sedation/general anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging in paediatrics patients - special considerations and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study requires the patient to remain motionless for extended periods of time, which can not be achieved in children without special care or drug-induced sleep. There are various methods for sedation / general anaesthesia (GA) in children with their different advantages and disadvantages. The aim of this study was to report our experience with sedation/GA in children who require MRI/computed-tomography (CT) studies. We performed a retrospective review of the sedation/GA records in 34 children aged from 6 months to 12 years; class ASA I-III, undergoing diagnostic MR/CT study. Demographic data, information regarding diagnosis, type of sedation/GA, use of premedication, time to readiness for the procedure after premedication administration, duration of procedure, and the recovery time were obtained. Any adverse events were noted. Imaging study in most of the patients (61.8%) was performed for neurological diseases (delayed neuropsychological development, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy). Sedation/GA with Propofol was administered in 50% (n=17) of patients, in 26.5% (n=9) - Ketamine plus Midazolam; in 20.6% (n=7) - Midazolam alone, and in 9% (n=1) - Thiopental. The time to readiness for the procedure and the recovery time were statistically significantly shorter for patients receiving Propofol, and the observed adverse respiratory events were mild in severity, when compared with patients receiving sedation/GA with another hypnotic agent (p<0.05).The evaluation of the respiratory system before sedation/GA should be carefully performed, as the respiratory diseases could increase the patients' risk of adverse events occurrence. Sedation/GA with Propofol is a method of choice in children with neurological disorders with seizures, increased intracranial pressure and myopathies, undergoing MR/CT study. Crucial for patients' safety and good clinical results is the medical professionals, delivering sedation/GA, to have the knowledge and practical

  16. Financing - general considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of the problems of financing a multinational regional fuel cycle centre (RFCC) are briefly discussed. Some of the points covered are: financing by participants; floating long-term loans on capital markets outside the countries of the participants; and export credits for the purchase of equipment manufactured outside the countries of the participants

  17. General safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the full filling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 4 of the document contains some details about the priority to safety, financial and human resources, human factors, quality assurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection and emergency preparedness

  18. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... US EPA US Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Pesticides Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us You are here: EPA Home » Pesticides » Antimicrobial Pesticides Antimicrobial Pesticides News and Highlights Disinfection Hierarchy Workshop - October 7 ...

  19. Considerations concerning ''de minimis'' quantities of radioactive waste suitable for dumping at sea under a general permit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the principles proposed by the ICRP of balancing the costs and detriments of any practice involving radioactivity, there must be some level of radioactivity below which considerations other than those of the radioactivity itself are of overriding importance. For very low-level radioactive wastes, it is necessary to define a quantitative criterion which allows practical implementation of these principles within the terms of the London Dumping Convention. It will be necessary therefore to consider how these requirements can be met by defining material that can be regarded as non-radioactive for the purposes of the London Dumping Convention, defining a category of radioactivity in wastes whose content is sufficiently low (de minimis) that it can be dumped under a general permit if its other characteristics so permit. It is stressed that even if a material has been deemed to contain less than de minimis quantities of radioactive materials its suitability for dumping due to it's other constituents must still be carried out. The question of defining such a de minimis level of radioactivity was considered by an Advisory Group meeting convened at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna from 2 to 6 July 1979

  20. Antimicrobial Graft Copolymer Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Amanda C; Madsen, Jeppe; Douglas, C W Ian; MacNeil, Sheila; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-01

    In view of the growing worldwide rise in microbial resistance, there is considerable interest in designing new antimicrobial copolymers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial activity and copolymer composition/architecture to gain a better understanding of their mechanism of action. Specifically, the antibacterial activity of several copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine [MPC] and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) toward Staphylococcus aureus was examined. Both block and graft copolymers were synthesized using either atom transfer radical polymerization or reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and characterized via (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography, rheology, and surface tensiometry. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using a range of well-known assays, including direct contact, live/dead staining, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), while transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the bacteria before and after the addition of various copolymers. As expected, PMPC homopolymer was biocompatible but possessed no discernible antimicrobial activity. PMPC-based graft copolymers comprising PHPMA side chains (i.e. PMPC-g-PHPMA) significantly reduced both bacterial growth and viability. In contrast, a PMPC-PHPMA diblock copolymer comprising a PMPC stabilizer block and a hydrophobic core-forming PHPMA block did not exhibit any antimicrobial activity, although it did form a biocompatible worm gel. Surface tensiometry studies and LDH release assays suggest that the PMPC-g-PHPMA graft copolymer exhibits surfactant-like activity. Thus, the observed antimicrobial activity is likely to be the result of the weakly hydrophobic PHPMA chains penetrating (and hence rupturing) the bacterial membrane. PMID:27409712

  1. Society for general microbiology - 148th ordinary meeting. Activities and actions of antimicrobial peptides. 26-30 March 2001, Edinburgh, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, J W; Sallenave, J M

    2001-06-01

    The rapidly expanding field of antimicrobial peptides is one that is attracting increasing interest from research groups around the world. The importance of antimicrobial agents in providing alternatives to conventional antibiotics has been highlighted in recent years by the emergence of a number of multidrug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Indeed, bacteria refractory to treatment by all known antibiotics are now a reality and the need for developing novel antimicrobial agents is urgent. This meeting brought together researchers working in a number of varied, but ultimately related areas. The functional diversity and putative mechanisms of action of antimicrobial peptides were discussed in depth, along with recent developments in the design of synthetic peptides with enhanced antimicrobial properties. Several ongoing studies were described, ranging from research into cystic fibrosis to work in the food industry. It was emphasized that cationic antimicrobial peptides have a range of properties to offer the world of scientific research and may play an important role in the ongoing battle against pathogenic microorganisms. Oral presentation sessions of the conference were co-chaired by Dr Deirdre A Devine (University of Leeds, UK) and Dr David G Smith (University of Edinburgh, UK). PMID:16001309

  2. Designing emissions trading in practice general considerations and experiences from the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS)

    OpenAIRE

    Heindl, Peter; Löschel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with designing emissions trading in practice. After a short introduction to the general idea of emissions trading, practical requirements for the introduction of an emissions trading scheme are considered, including the temporal and spatial dimension as well as administrative requirements and the role of markets. Historical developments regarding emissions trading are discussed. Currently, the largest trading scheme is the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) that aims to red...

  3. Occupational exposure limit for silver nanoparticles: considerations on the derivation of a general health-based value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, Brittany A; M Faustman, Elaine; Oberdörster, Günter; Workman, Tomomi; Griffith, William C; Kneuer, Carsten; Yu, Il Je

    2016-09-01

    With the increased production and widespread commercial use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), human and environmental exposures to silver nanoparticles are inevitably increasing. In particular, persons manufacturing and handling silver nanoparticles and silver nanoparticle containing products are at risk of exposure, potentially resulting in health hazards. While silver dusts, consisting of micro-sized particles and soluble compounds have established occupational exposure limits (OELs), silver nanoparticles exhibit different physicochemical properties from bulk materials. Therefore, we assessed silver nanoparticle exposure and related health hazards in order to determine whether an additional OEL may be needed. Dosimetric evaluations in our study identified the liver as the most sensitive target organ following inhalation exposure, and as such serves as the critical target organ for setting an occupational exposure standard for airborne silver nanoparticles. This study proposes an OEL of 0.19 μg/m(3) for silver nanoparticles derived from benchmark concentrations (BMCs) from subchronic rat inhalation toxicity assessments and the human equivalent concentration (HEC) with kinetic considerations and additional uncertainty factors. It is anticipated that this level will protect workers from potential health hazards, including lung, liver, and skin damage. PMID:26982810

  4. Reactor and /or accelerator: general remarks on strategic considerations in sourcing/producing radiopharmaceuticals and radiotracer for the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important sources of radionuclides in the world are particle accelerators and nuclear reactors. Since the late 1940's many radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals have been innovated and conceived, designed, produced and applied in important industrial and clinical/ biomedical settings. For example in the health area, reactor-produced radionuclides have become indispensable for diagnostic imaging involving, in its most recent and advanced development, radioimmunoscintigraphy, which exploits the exquisite ligand-specificity of monoclonal antibodies, reagents which in turn are the products of advances in biotechnology. Thus far, one of the most indispensable radiopharmaceuticals has been 99mTc, which is usually obtained as a daughter decay product of 99Mo. In January 1991, some questions about the stability of the worldwide commercial supply of 99Mo became highlighted when the major commercial world producer of 99Mo, Nordion International, shut down its facilities temporarily in Canada due to contamination in its main reactor building (see for instance relevant newsbrief in J. Nuclear Medicine (1991): 'Industry agrees to join DOE study of domestic moly-99 production'). With the above background, my remarks will attempt to open discussions on strategic considerations relevant to questions of 'self reliance' in radiotracers/radiopharmaceutical production in the Philippines. For instance, the relevant question of sourcing local radionuclide needs from a fully functioning multipurpose cyclotron facility within the country that will then supply the needs of the local industrial, biomedical (including research) and health sectors; and possibly, eventually acquiring the capability to export to nearby countries longer-lived radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals

  5. Food Animals and Antimicrobials: Impacts on Human Health

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Bonnie M.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Antimicrobials are valuable therapeutics whose efficacy is seriously compromised by the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. The provision of antibiotics to food animals encompasses a wide variety of nontherapeutic purposes that include growth promotion. The concern over resistance emergence and spread to people by nontherapeutic use of antimicrobials has led to conflicted practices and opinions. Considerable evidence supported the removal of nontherapeutic antimicrobial...

  6. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  7. General considerations on the care to the elderly victim of abuse Consideraciones generales sobre la atención al anciano víctima de maltrato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalis Fernández López

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A clear indicator of the magnitude of the aging world population, of which Cuba is not free, is that the average age of the population tends to grow every day. Despite the scientific and technical progress achieved in the field of medical science and health policy efforts to improve the health and welfare of the population, there are still conditions that generate negative phenomena such as violence and its various manifestations, it also affects the elderly. Many need medical care after an act of violence, but most are not identified as such and act is much less reported to the authorities, for which the perpetrators are not prosecuted by law. It is common to find some resistance in its recognition that comes from the clash of such data or suspicion and social representation of the family classic and institutions for the elderly. The prevention and treatment of abuse of older persons in an aging world is everyone's business. Given what is referred to this work is performed in order to provide general comments on senior citizen care mistreated.Una muestra evidente de la magnitud del envejecimiento de la población mundial, y de lo cual Cuba no está exenta, es que la edad media de la población tiende a crecer cada día más. A pesar del avance científico técnico alcanzado en el campo de las ciencias médicas y de los esfuerzos de las políticas sanitarias para mejorar las condiciones de salud y bienestar de la población, aún subsisten condiciones que generan fenómenos negativos, como la violencia y sus diferentes manifestaciones, que también afecta a los ancianos. Muchos necesitan atención médica después de un acto de violencia, pero la mayoría no son identificados como tal y el acto es mucho menos denunciado a las autoridades, por lo cual los victimarios no son juzgados por las leyes. Es frecuente encontrar una cierta resistencia en su reconocimiento, que proviene del choque entre tales datos o sospechas y la representación social

  8. The mond external field effect on the dynamics of the globular clusters: general considerations and application to NGC 2419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derakhshani, Kamran, E-mail: kderakhshani@iasbs.ac.ir [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P. O. Box 45195-1159 Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics toward the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio, we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an order of magnitude in terms of the total χ{sup 2} of surface brightness and velocity dispersion.

  9. The mond external field effect on the dynamics of the globular clusters: general considerations and application to NGC 2419

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics toward the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio, we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an order of magnitude in terms of the total χ2 of surface brightness and velocity dispersion.

  10. The MOND External Field Effect on the Dynamics of the Globular Clusters: General Considerations and Application to NGC 2419

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics towards the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an...

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance: Is the World UNprepared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Long Blurb: On September 21st 2016 the United Nations General Assembly convenes in New York, United States to tackle a looming and seemingly inevitable global challenge with the potential to threaten the health and wellbeing of all people: antimicrobial resistance. In an Editorial, the PLOS Medicine Editors reflect on the challenge of coordinating the response to antimicrobial resistance in order to ensure the viability of current antimicrobials and the development of new therapies against resistant pathogens. Short Blurb: In this month's Editorial, the PLOS Medicine Editors reflect on the upcoming United Nations General Assembly meeting which convenes to discuss the global challenge of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27618631

  12. Antimicrobial peptides in human skin disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kenshi, Yamasaki; Richard, L. Gallo

    2007-01-01

    The skin continuously encounters microbial pathogens. To defend against this, cells of the epidermis and dermis have evolved several innate strategies to prevent infection. Antimicrobial peptides are one of the primary mechanisms used by the skin in the early stages of immune defense. In general, antimicrobial peptides have broad antibacterial activity against gram-positive and negative bacteria and also show antifungal and antiviral activity. The antimicrobial activity of most peptides occur...

  13. Automation of antimicrobial activity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forry, Samuel P; Madonna, Megan C; López-Pérez, Daneli; Lin, Nancy J; Pasco, Madeleine D

    2016-03-01

    Manual and automated methods were compared for routine screening of compounds for antimicrobial activity. Automation generally accelerated assays and required less user intervention while producing comparable results. Automated protocols were validated for planktonic, biofilm, and agar cultures of the oral microbe Streptococcus mutans that is commonly associated with tooth decay. Toxicity assays for the known antimicrobial compound cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were validated against planktonic, biofilm forming, and 24 h biofilm culture conditions, and several commonly reported toxicity/antimicrobial activity measures were evaluated: the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50), the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Using automated methods, three halide salts of cetylpyridinium (CPC, CPB, CPI) were rapidly screened with no detectable effect of the counter ion on antimicrobial activity. PMID:26970766

  14. Antimicrobial seafood packaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman; Ho Lee, Myung; Park, Lnsik; Shin, Yangjai; Lee, Youn Suk

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms are the major cause of spoilage in most seafood products; however, only few microbes, called the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs), contribute to the offensive off-flavors associated with seafood spoilage. In food, microbial degradation manifests itself as spoilage, or changes in the sensory properties of a food product, rendering it unsuitable for human consumption. The use of antimicrobial substances can control the general microflora as well as specific microorganisms related to spoilage to provide products with higher safety and better quality. Many antimicrobial compounds have been evaluated in film structures for use in seafood, especially organic acids and their salts, enzymes, bacteriocins; some studies have considered inorganic compounds such as AgSiO2, zinc oxide, silver zeolite, and titanium oxide. The characteristics of some organic antimicrobial packaging systems for seafood and their antimicrobial efficiency in film structures are reviewed in this article. PMID:27478206

  15. General Considerations on Leisure Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurica Grigore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The leisure is a component of standard of living and quality of life, expresses the level of material and spiritual life, without it can’t beheld the multilateral development of the human, enforcing recovery functions of the organism, formative and instructive – educative, cultural andsocial. In pre-modern times, the free time was located on religious holidays and in the rest days established on the basis of religion (Sunday atChristians, Saturday at Jews, etc. The good of the individual towards trends any true democracy has in its structure, along with the materialcomponents and social and spiritual. In the economic and social framework, the reproduction of material conditions of existence is doubled by thehealth care, intelligent, creative force of the society members

  16. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON MONEY LAUNDERING

    OpenAIRE

    Eva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Lawyers are not immune to committing offences and the provisions of criminal law apply to them accordingly. The criminal liability of lawyers represents a natural aspect in the rule of law. Lawyers involved as defendants in criminal cases do not benefit from any special status or privileges compared to other defendants. In the international context of the fight against money laundering, the community law has submitted the profession of lawyer to two obligations concerning vigilance and denoun...

  17. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON MONEY LAUNDERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena EVA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lawyers are not immune to committing offences and the provisions of criminal law apply to them accordingly. The criminal liability of lawyers represents a natural aspect in the rule of law. Lawyers involved as defendants in criminal cases do not benefit from any special status or privileges compared to other defendants. In the international context of the fight against money laundering, the community law has submitted the profession of lawyer to two obligations concerning vigilance and denouncement. The assimilation of lawyer’s profession to financial or non-regulated professions entails the deformation of rules and principles specific to lawyers, as well as discussing the bases of any democratic society: the professional secrecy of lawyers and their independence.

  18. General Considerations on fiscal evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pripoaie Silviu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of performance of any economy involves the measurement and correlation of three basic elements: the rate of economic growth,the rate of inflation and unemployment rate. When the rate of growth (rate of real GDP is high, the production of goods and services is growing andtherefore increasing the number of jobs, decrease unemployment and raise living standards. If the economy is in recession phase, increasing fiscalpressure to ensure the necessary budgetary funds triggers complex economic mechanisms. Rules more strictly is that those who are not able tooperate in the normal economy to slide towards the underground economy, and this not because he wants to tax evasion, but because they simplycannot cope with new regulations. It is widely accepted in economic theory and practice the idea that reliability scale macroeconomic indicators of acountry is affected by size of underground economy and the various tests made so far on this subject, focusing either on the social aspect or theeconomic or moral, or emphasizes the illegal or the edge of legality. This has led to various studies in this area do not provide comparable data orprovide data to the contrary. Worldwide were put in place, however, some calculation methods provided that applied the same country and sameperiod, the results are rarely consistent, sometimes even in fundamentally different.

  19. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON RURAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Elena TUREAC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors like to stress some elements related to the concept of rural tourism which has nowadays become very important around the world. The rural tourism can revitalise the conventional concepts and views on tourism, and bring in a new dimension to the sustainable development of tourism. It has been realised that tourism can play a major role in many countries economies, especially in developing ones, where it can substantially contribute to the increase of the national income.In this respect, mention should be made that Romania has a lot of resources to develop this tourism branch: villages with well conserved traditions, folklore, wildlife, natural heritage. All these natural elements put in value together with investments in infrastructure have determined an increasing demand for the Romanian rural destinations.

  20. Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Mayrhofer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of the genus Bifidobacterium are frequently used as probiotics, for which the absence of acquired antimicrobial resistance has become an important safety criterion. This clarifies the need for antibiotic susceptibility data for bifidobacteria. Based on a recently published standard for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bifidobacteria with broth microdilution method, the range of susceptibility to selected antibiotics in 117 animal bifidobacterial strains was examined. Narrow unimodal MIC distributions either situated at the low-end (chloramphenicol, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin or high-end (kanamycin, neomycin concentration range could be detected. In contrast, the MIC distribution of trimethoprim was multimodal. Data derived from this study can be used as a basis for reviewing or verifying present microbiological breakpoints suggested by regulatory agencies to assess the safety of these micro-organisms intended for the use in probiotics.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    -the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...... of information brochures and the performance of more pragmatic studies in primary care with outcomes that are of clinicians' interest, such as complications and clinical outcomes....

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS Bacteria (NARMS) NARMS at Work Reports ...

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 08 Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) Chinese Translation - Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) French ...

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  5. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  7. Consideration of Development Path of Discipline Construction in General Colleges%普通高校学科建设发展途径思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎迪; 周静雷

    2012-01-01

    探讨了普通本科高校学科建设发展途径。从学科布局必须服务经济社会发展需要、提升学科水平必须以人;勺本、提升社会服务能力是普通本科高校的社会责任等方面进行了论述。认为高校学科建设与服务社会经济两者相辅相成,相互促进。结合本校实际,提出学科建设的三点思考,即学科准确定位、明确发展目标;树立科学发展观,明确发展理念;打造办学特色、彰显办学优势。%The development path of discipline construction in general colleges was discussed. Three aspects were focused to analysis as following: discipline layout must adapt to the needs of the economic and social development, people- oriented idea must be carried out to raise the level of the discipline, and improvement of the public service ability was the responsibility to the general colleges. It pointed out that discipline construction of the general colleges and the services of social economic should be existed side by side and played a part together. Combined with the actual of xi'an polytechnic university, three considerations were proposed: disciplining positioning accurately and objectives clearly, disciplining outlook scientific and ideas distinctly, building characteristics of the college brightly and manifesting advantages of college eminently.

  8. Methods of Antimicrobial Coating of Diverse Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of coating diverse substrate materials with antimicrobial agents have been developed. Originally intended to reduce health risks to astronauts posed by pathogenic microorganisms that can grow on surfaces in spacecraft, these methods could also be used on Earth for example, to ensure sterility of surgical inserts and other medical equipment. The methods involve, generally, chemical preparation of substrate surfaces to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the substrate surfaces via covalent bonds. Substrate materials that have been treated successfully include aluminum, glass, a corrosion-resistant nickel alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and poly(tetrafluoroethylene). Antimicrobial agents that have been successfully immobilized include antibiotics, enzymes, bacteriocins, bactericides, and fungicides. A variety of linkage chem istries were employed. Activity of antimicrobial coatings against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and fungi was demonstrated. Results of investigations indicate that the most suitable combination of antimicrobial agent, substrate, and coating method depends upon the intended application.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus – antimicrobial resistance and the immunocompromised child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil JC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available J Chase McNeilDepartment of Pediatrics, Section of Infectious Diseases, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Children with immunocompromising conditions represent a unique group for the acquisition of antimicrobial resistant infections due to their frequent encounters with the health care system, need for empiric antimicrobials, and immune dysfunction. These infections are further complicated in that there is a relative paucity of literature on the clinical features and management of Staphylococcus aureus infections in immunocompromised children. The available literature on the clinical features, antimicrobial susceptibility, and management of S. aureus infections in immunocompromised children is reviewed. S. aureus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are associated with higher HIV viral loads and a greater degree of CD4 T-cell suppression. In addition, staphylococcal infections in children with HIV often exhibit a multidrug resistant phenotype. Children with cancer have a high rate of S. aureus bacteremia and associated complications. Increased tolerance to antiseptics among staphylococcal isolates from pediatric oncology patients is an emerging area of research. The incidence of S. aureus infections among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients varies considerably by the organ transplanted; in general however, staphylococci figure prominently among infections in the early posttransplant period. Staphylococcal infections are also prominent pathogens among children with a number of immunodeficiencies, notably chronic granulomatous disease. Significant gaps in knowledge exist regarding the epidemiology and management of S. aureus infection in these vulnerable children.Keywords: pediatric, HIV, cancer, transplant

  10. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyue eCheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants, the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals.

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS Bacteria (NARMS) NARMS at Work Reports ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development ... Data Recent Publications NARMS Meetings NARMS Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Resources for You Windows Media Player ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts ... Accordingly, efforts are underway in both veterinary and human medicine to preserve the ... Antimicrobials Resources for You Windows ...

  14. Quantitative single-vesicle analysis of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager;

    2013-01-01

    Although the research field of antimicrobial peptides has attracted considerable scientific attention in the past decades, the microbicidal mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides still remain elusive. One of the keys to a more profound comprehension of the function of these peptides is a deeper und...... three canonical antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The results demonstrate an unprecedented level of insight into the molecular processes governing antimicrobial peptide-induced permeabilization of phospholipid membranes....

  15. [Antimicrobial peptide in dentisty. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, F Simain; Rompen, E; Heinen, E

    2009-12-01

    The use of antimicrobial substances has contributed to the development of multiple antimicrobial resistances (1), challenging the pharmaceutical industry to develop with new, innovative, and effective molecules. Discovered around 1980, molecules called natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear to hold great potential for the treatment of infections. These cationic peptides are able to stop the bacterial development and to control infections. The purpose of this review is to help improve the understanding of the way AMPs operate in the context of the development of new cures against viruses, bacteria, and mushrooms found in the human body in general and in the oral cavity in particular. PMID:20143750

  16. Occurrence, distribution, and sources of antimicrobials in a mixed-use watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, Nathanael P; Pagsuyoin, Sheree A; Bragg, Leslie M; Servos, Mark R

    2016-01-15

    The release into the environment of antimicrobial compounds from both human and agricultural sources is a growing global concern. The Grand River watershed, the largest mixed-use watershed in southern Ontario, receives runoff from intensive animal production as well as municipal wastewater effluents from a rapidly increasing human population. A survey of surface waters and wastewater effluents was conducted across the watershed to assess the occurrence and distribution of several antimicrobials (i.e., trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine, lincomycin, and monensin) and chemical indicators (i.e., ammonia, nitrate, ibuprofen, venlafaxine, atrazine) and to characterize exposure levels. The human antimicrobials trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole were detected in the urban areas of the main channel at mean concentrations of 8 ± 7 ng/L and 31 ± 24 ng/L, respectively, but at much lower concentrations in the agricultural tributaries. In contrast, the veterinary antimicrobial sulfamethazine was detected at a mean concentration of 11 ± 9 ng/L in the main channel, and at a much higher concentration in the agricultural tributaries. Lincomycin was detected in only two river samples and not in the effluents while monensin was not detected in all samples. The herbicide atrazine was detected at very low concentrations in the surface waters of both the tributaries and the main channel. The concentrations of the antimicrobials and chemical indicators generally increased downstream of the confluences with agricultural tributaries and effluent outfalls. In the wastewater effluents, the concentrations of trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, ibuprofen, and venlafaxine decreased with increasing treatment levels (i.e., secondary to tertiary) as indicated by ammonia/nitrate concentrations. There was a strong correlation among trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and venlafaxine in the main channel and in the wastewater effluents. While the environmental concentrations of antimicrobials in

  17. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Palza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial for treatment. Accordingly, efforts are underway in both veterinary and ... Consumers Health Professionals Science & ...

  19. Bioethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyser-Whalen, Ophra; Lawson, Erma; Macdonald, Arlene; Temple, Jeff R; Phelps, John Y

    2014-11-01

    The clinical literature notes that pregnancy has become an expected benefit of solid organ transplant. Establishing "best practices" in the management of this particular transplant population requires careful consideration of the ethical dimensions, broadly speaking, of posttransplant pregnancies and these women's lived experiences. In this article, we present the current clinical and social science posttransplant pregnancy research. We specifically address the psychosocial and ethical issues surrounding preconception counseling and posttransplant health quality of life and mothering and suggest areas for future research. PMID:25151472

  20. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  1. Antimicrobial and Antifungal Activity of Pelargonium roseum Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gâlea Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all the organisms under test, in some cases comparable with those of the reference antibiotics. There were no considerable differences between the antimicrobial activities of the oil obtained by distillation and commercially available Pelargonium oils.

  2. Antimicrobial Ionic Liquids with Fumarate Anion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyan He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of new antimicrobial drugs and increasing resistance of microbe to antimicrobial agents have been of some concern. The formulation studies of new antibacterial and antifungal agents have been an active research field. Ionic liquids are known as designed liquids with controllable physical/chemical/biological properties and specific functions, which have been attracting considerable interest over recent years. However, no attention has been made towards the preparation of ionic liquids with antimicrobial activities. In this paper, a new class of ionic liquids (ILs with fumarate anion was synthesized by neutralization of aqueous 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydroxide with equimolar monoester fumarate and characterized using NMR and thermal gravimetric analysis. The ILs are soluble in water and polar organic solvents and also soluble in the common ILs. The antimicrobial activities of the ILs are more active than commercially available potassium sorbate and are greatly affected by the alkyl chain length. The significant antimicrobial properties observed in this research suggest that the ILs may have potential applications in the modern biotechnology.

  3. Use and Misuse of Antimicrobial Drugs in Poultry and Livestock: Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Poole* and Cynthia Sheffield

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Food safety begins on the farm with management practices that contribute to an abundant, safe, and affordable food supply. To attain this goal antimicrobials have been used in all stages of food animal production in the United States and elsewhere around the world at one time or another. Among food–production animals antimicrobials are used for growth promotion, disease prophylaxis or disease treatment, and are generally administered to the entire flock or herd. Over many decades bacteria have become resistant to multiple antimicrobial classes in a cumulative manner. Bacteria exhibit a number of well characterized mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobials that include: 1 modification of the antimicrobial; 2 alteration of the drug target; 3 decreased access of drug to target; and 4 implementation of an alternative metabolic pathway not affected by the drug. The mechanisms of resistance are complex and depend on the type of bacterium involved (e.g. Gram–positive or Gram–negative and the class of drug. Some bacterial species have accumulated resistance to nearly all antimicrobial classes due to a combination of intrinsic and acquired processes. This has and will continue to lead to clinical failures of antimicrobial treatment in both human and animal medicine.

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial for treatment. Accordingly, efforts are underway in both veterinary and human medicine to preserve the effectiveness of these drugs. ...

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

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  8. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail.

  9. Scope of Hydrolysable Tannins as Possible Antimicrobial Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekambaram, Sanmuga Priya; Perumal, Senthamil Selvan; Balakrishnan, Ajay

    2016-07-01

    Hydrolysable tannins (HTs) are secondary metabolites from plants, which are roughly classified into gallotannins and ellagitannins having gallic acid and ellagic acid residues respectively attached to the hydroxyl group of glucose by ester linkage. The presence of hexahydroxydiphenoyl and nonahydroxyterphenoyl moieties is considered to render antimicrobial property to HTs. HTs also show considerable synergy with antibiotics. Nevertheless, they have low pharmacokinetic property. The present review presents the scope of HTs as future antimicrobial agent. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27062587

  10. Diversity, evolution and medical applications of insect antimicrobial peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Muhammed, Maged; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are short proteins with antimicrobial activity. A large portion of known AMPs originate from insects, and the number and diversity of these molecules in different species varies considerably. Insect AMPs represent a potential source of alternative antibiotics to address the limitation of current antibiotics, which has been caused by the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. To get more insight into AMPs, we investigated the diversity and evolutio...

  11. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT READING COMPREHENSION IN THE SUBJECT ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES / CONSIDERACIONES SOBRE LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Feliciana Mayo Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension is one of the general abilities of English language in the teaching-learning process. This skill constitutes a cultural and a work device, and it is the basis that helps to acquire of a great amount of knowledge. This methodological suggestion facilitates the development of reading comprehension due to that it is a system of exercises which are organized in a hierarchical way that leads the students to better decode the message expressed in a text. Reading comprehension ability makes easier to decode a message not only in English language but in Spanish language as well. LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES AUTORAS: DIRECCIÓN PARA CORRESPONDENCIA: Departamento de Idiomas. Universidad de Las Tunas, Cuba. E-mail graciela@ult.edu.cu Fecha de recepción: 21\t-\t08\t-\t2013 Fecha de aceptación:\t30\t-\t11\t-\t2013 RESUMEN La comprensión lectora es una de las habilidades generales en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del idioma inglés, esta constituye un instrumento de trabajo y de cultura y es la base que facilita el aprendizaje de un gran cúmulo de conocimientos. La presente alternativa metodológica facilita el desarrollo de la habilidad de comprensión lectora pues parte de un sistema de ejercicios jerárquicamente organizados, lo que conllevan al estudiante a una decodificación más acertada del mensaje expresado en los textos. El desarrollo de esta habilidad les permite la decodificación de información tanto en la lengua inglesa como en la lengua materna.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RD Rosa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP families are currently recognized, although the great majority (14 families comes from members of the order Decapoda. Crustacean AMPs are generally cationic, gene-encoded molecules that are mainly produced by circulating immune-competent cells (hemocytes or are derived from unrelated proteins primarily involved in other biological functions. In this review, we tentatively classified the crustacean AMPs into four main groups based on their amino acid composition, structural features and multi-functionality. We also attempted to summarize the current knowledge on their implication both in an efficient response to microbial infections and in crustacean survival.

  15. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class of...... antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which of these are...

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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  1. Percutaneous vertebroplasty: technical considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-jun TENG; Shi-cheng HE

    2005-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a relative new interventional technique, which is widely used in treatment of vertebral collapse caused by vertebral neoplasms and osteoporotic compression fractures. The general technical considerations of PVP techniques are discussed based on authors' experience obtained over 400 patients in the past years in this article, including preparation of PMMA, instrument of PVP, guidance and puncture approaches, and technique of the procedure, etc. The conclusion is that PVP is a safe procedure if the physicians handle it properly.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance in wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Vittecoq, M.; Godreuil, S.; Prugnolle, Franck; Durand, P.; Brazier, L; Renaud, N; Arnal, A.; Aberkane, S.; Jean-Pierre, H.; Gauthier-Clerc, M; Thomas, F.; Renaud, F.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of antimicrobial resistance is of major concern for human health and leads to growing economic costs. While it is increasingly hypothesized that wildlife could play an important role in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria dynamics, empirical data remain scarce. The present work builds on a systematic review of the available data in order to highlight the main information we have and to suggest research pathways that should be followed if we aim to fill the gaps in our current knowledg...

  3. Veterinary drug usage and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    countries, which leaves room for considerable reductions in some countries. The emergence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes due to the use of antimicrobial agents are well documented. In Denmark it has been possible to reduce the usage of antimicrobial agents for food animals significantly...

  4. [Algorithms, machine intelligence, big data : general considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radermacher, F J

    2015-08-01

    We are experiencing astonishing developments in the areas of big data and artificial intelligence. They follow a pattern that we have now been observing for decades: according to Moore's Law,the performance and efficiency in the area of elementary arithmetic operations increases a thousand-fold every 20 years. Although we have not achieved the status where in the singular sense machines have become as "intelligent" as people, machines are becoming increasingly better. The Internet of Things has again helped to massively increase the efficiency of machines. Big data and suitable analytics do the same. If we let these processes simply continue, our civilization may be endangerd in many instances. If the "containment" of these processes succeeds in the context of a reasonable political global governance, a worldwide eco-social market economy, andan economy of green and inclusive markets, many desirable developments that are advantageous for our future may result. Then, at some point in time, the constant need for more and faster innovation may even stop. However, this is anything but certain. We are facing huge challenges. PMID:26141245

  5. 20 CFR 332.2 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to an employee solely because of the application to him of a mileage or work restriction exist in train-and-engine service, yard service, dining-car service, sleeping-car service, and other Pullman-car... of an employee in any other service, the employee's lack of remuneration with respect to any...

  6. General Considerations on the Institution of Fiducia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Diana Papa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Of Roman origins, fiducia was under the form of a pact (the fiduciary pact secondary to atemporary transfer of property, by which a natural person preserved the property to the benefit of thetestator under a resolutory condition and during all the life of the testator; after the death of the testatorthe properties should be transferred either to the direct descendant, or to other person authorized by thetestator by legacy. The contemporary fiducia in the continental civil law has its origins in the Englishright in the specific institution in the common law of the trust, which designates the judicial rapportcreated by acts between the living or for a death cause from a person named founder who transfers two ormore goods under the control of an administrator to the benefit of a person or for a given purpose. TheRegulation in The New Civil Code Part III, Title IV, articles 773-791, followed the pattern of the FrenchLaw no. 2007-211 in 19th February 2007 which introduced in the French civil code, the Title XIV “Onfiducia”. The Romanian legislator took in an adapted form the provisions of the French normative actoperating some important changes or additions.

  7. Massive spheres : some general considerations and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple relations for rest-mass density and redshift for cold spherical stars have been obtained. On the basis of these relations, the gravitational binding of Tolman's various models has been calculated. The maximum binding is found to occur when (P/rho)sub(c)=1. Tolman's IV, V and VI solutions have been used to construct neutron star models under the limiting physical condition dP/drho=1. The well known theorem on chemical potential has been derived in a simple manner. Lastly, Zeldovich's assertion, that a given number of baryons can be arranged in such a manner that the system may have an arbitrarily small energy, has been proved to be erroneous. (auth.)

  8. 16 CFR 255.1 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... convey any express or implied representation that would be deceptive if made directly by the advertiser... to halt the continued publication of deceptive representations when they are discovered....

  9. 5 CFR 2634.401 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... trust is considered to be “diversified” if it can be demonstrated, to the satisfaction of the Director... regulations. (2) Independence of trustees and other fiduciaries. Under the Act and § 2634.406 of this subpart... independence of trustees is facilitated by limiting the entities which may serve in this capacity to...

  10. Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Post-Acute Long-Term Care Setting: Case Discussion and Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Nicole J; Heil, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Improving the use of antimicrobial medications in the post-acute long-term care setting is critical for combating resistance and reducing adverse events in older adults. Antimicrobial stewardship refers to a set of commitments and actions designed to optimize the treatment of infectious diseases while minimizing the adverse effects associated with antimicrobial medication use. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend all nursing homes take steps to improve antimicrobial prescribing practices and reduce inappropriate use. The current article highlights initiatives and clinical considerations through a case discussion. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42 (7), 10-14.]. PMID:27337183

  11. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  12. Antimicrobial stewardship: Limits for implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Bhanu

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programme (ASP) is a multifaceted approach to improve patients' clinical outcomes, prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and reduce hospital costs by prudent and focused antimicrobial use. Development of local treatment guidelines according to local ecology, rapid

  13. Substandard/Counterfeit Antimicrobial Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2015-01-01

    Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs are a growing global problem. The most common substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials include beta-lactams (among antibiotics) and chloroquine and artemisin derivatives (among antimalarials). The most common type of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs have a reduced amount of the active drug, and the majority of them are manufactured in Southeast Asia and Africa. Counterfeit antimicrobial drugs may cause increased mortality and morbidity and ...

  14. Quaternary Salts of Chitosan: History, Antimicrobial Features, and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas de Britto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid to water-soluble derivatives of chitosan at its applications. The chemical characteristics and the antimicrobial properties of these salts can play significant role in pharmacological and food areas mainly as carriers for drug delivery systems and as antimicrobial packaging materials. In the current paper, a historical sequence of the main preparative methods, physical chemistry aspects, and antimicrobial activity of chitosan quaternized derivatives are presented and briefly discussed. In general, the results indicated that the quaternary derivatives had better inhibitory effects than the unmodified chitosan.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance-a threat to the world's sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasovský, Dušan; Littmann, Jasper; Zorzet, Anna; Cars, Otto

    2016-08-01

    This commentary examines how specific sustainable development goals (SDGs) are affected by antimicrobial resistance and suggests how the issue can be better integrated into international policy processes. Moving beyond the importance of effective antibiotics for the treatment of acute infections and health care generally, we discuss how antimicrobial resistance also impacts on environmental, social, and economic targets in the SDG framework. The paper stresses the need for greater international collaboration and accountability distribution, and suggests steps towards a broader engagement of countries and United Nations agencies to foster global intersectoral action on antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27416324

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF TINOSPORA CRISPA ROOT EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Iqbal Chittur Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of ethanol, distilled water, methanol and chloroform crude extracts of the roots of Tinospora crispa. Antimicrobial activity was examined by disc diffusion method against gram positive bacterial strains of Streptococcus pneumonia, gram negative bacterial strains of Escherichia coli and fungal strains of Candida albicans. The maximum zone of inhibition was obtained with ethanol extract against Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumonia followed by chloroform extract against the same organisms. Whilst distilled water extract showed a minimal zone of inhibition, methanol extract showed a moderate zone of inhibition against the bacterial strains used. The values were compared with a standard antibiotic. The ethanol extract also showed the maximum zone of inhibition against the growth of Candida albicans, whereas the lowest activity was shown with distilled water crude extract. Methanol and chloroform crude extracts showed considerably moderate activities against the fungal strain, as compared to the standard antibiotic used.

  18. Effectiveness of the actions of antimicrobial's control in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Edilson Floriano dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various strategies to improve the effectiveness of antibiotics in hospitals. In general, the implementation of guidelines for appropriate antibiotic therapy and the participation of infectious disease (ID physicians deserve considerable attention. This study was a prospective ecological time-series study that evaluates the effectiveness of the ID physician's opinion to rationalize and control the use of antibiotics in medical-surgical intensive care units (ICU, and the impact of their intervention on treatment expenditures. There was significant change in the pattern of use of antimicrobials, this pattern approximating that of a medical-surgical ICU that participates in the ICARE (Intensive Care Antimicrobial Resistance Epidemiology Project. For example, there was a significant increase in the consumption of antimicrobials of the ampicillin group (Relative Risk [RR]=3.39; 95% CI: 2.34-4.91 and antipseudomonal penicillins (RR=2.89; 95% CI: 1.70-4.92. On the other hand, there was a significant reduction in the consumption of 3rd/4th generation cephalosporins (RR=0.66; 95% CI: 0.57-0.77 and carbapenems (RR=0.43; 95% CI: 0.33-0.56. On average, for every patient-day antibiotic expense was reduced 37.2% during calendar year 2001, when compared with 2000. The ID specialists' opinion and the adoption of guidelines for empirical antibiotic therapy of hospital-acquired pneumonia contributed to a reduction in the use of antimicrobials in medical-surgical ICU. However, further studies that have more control over confounding variables are needed to help determine the relevance of these discoveries.

  19. Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs in Health Care Systems

    OpenAIRE

    MacDougall, Conan; Polk, Ron E.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs in hospitals seek to optimize antimicrobial prescribing in order to improve individual patient care as well as reduce hospital costs and slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance. With antimicrobial resistance on the rise worldwide and few new agents in development, antimicrobial stewardship programs are more important than ever in ensuring the continued efficacy of available antimicrobials. The design of antimicrobial management programs should be based o...

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  1. Antimicrobial properties of berries

    OpenAIRE

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta

    2007-01-01

    Berries, especially their antimicrobial properties, have been studied intensively at VTT over the past ten years in several research projects. In these in vitro studies phenolic berry extracts of common Nordic berries selectively inhibited the growth of harmful bacteria and human intestinal pathogens, without affecting the growth of beneficial lactic acid bacteria.

  2. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of modern topical antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Vorontsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To measure minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values for modern topical antimicrobials against common ocular pathogens.Methods.Antimicrobials most commonly used in ophthalmology (fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are dose-dependent drugs, i.e., the rate of microbial death increases in direct proportion to their concentrations. To determine MICs, we applied Hi Comb MIC Test (E-test. 105 patients aged 2 months through 7 years which were diagnosed with various inflammatory disorders of anterior segment were  xamined. MIC values for most commonly used antimicrobials, i.e., ciprofloxacin / Cipromed (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, ofloxacin / Floxal (Baush & Lomb, Rochester, New-York, levofloxacin / Signicef (Sentiss Pharma, Gurgaon, India, moxifloxacin / Vigamox (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, gatifloxacin / Zymar (Allergan, Irvine, California, and tobramycin / Tobrex (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, were measured.Results. The analysis revealed that the most effective antibacterial drug against microbial isolates in children (i.e., Staphylococci spp. was levofloxacin. MIC for this agent against Streptococci spp. and Gram-negative microbes was low as well. Moxifloxacin is preferred for the treatment of ocular inflammation provoked by Streptococci spp. as MIC of this antimicrobial against Streptococci spp. was the lowest. MIC of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative flora was the lowest. These data demonstrate generally recognized high efficacy of this drug. MIC value for tobramycin against all bacterial isolates was the highest.

  3. DRAMP: a comprehensive data repository of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linlin; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Meifeng; Zhou, Jie; Lao, Xingzhen; Zheng, Heng; Xu, Hanmei

    2016-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms results in an urgent need for substitutes to conventional antibiotics with novel modes of action and effective activities. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), produced by a wide variety of living organisms acting as a defense mechanism against invading pathogenic microbes, are considered to be such promising alternatives. AMPs display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and a low propensity for developing resistance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of AMPs is essential to exploit them as antimicrobial drugs. Considering this, we developed a comprehensive user-friendly data repository of antimicrobial peptides (DRAMP), which holds 17349 antimicrobial sequences, including 4571 general AMPs, 12704 patented sequences and 74 peptides in drug development. Entries in the database have detailed annotations, especially detailed antimicrobial activity data (shown as target organism with MIC value) and structure information. Annotations also include accession numbers crosslinking to Pubmed, Swiss-prot and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The website of the database comes with easy-to-operate browsing as well as searching with sorting and filtering functionalities. Several useful sequence analysis tools are provided, including similarity search, sequence alignment and conserved domain search (CD-Search). DRAMP should be a useful resource for the development of novel antimicrobial peptide drugs. PMID:27075512

  4. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are enhanced even better through secondary bonding relationships. Further, polymer blend compatibilization is considered due to similar molecular relationships and polarities. With compatibilization of triclosan in polymers a more uniform stability for nonpolar triclosan in the polymer solid state is retained by the antimicrobial for extremely low release with minimum solubility into aqueous solution. As a result, triclosan is projected for long extended lifetimes as an antimicrobial polymer additive. Further, triclosan rapid alternating ether bond rotations disrupt secondary bonding between chain monomers in the resin state to reduce viscosity and enhance polymer blending. Thus, triclosan is considered for a polymer additive with multiple properties to be an antimicrobial with additional benefits as a nonpolar toughening agent and a hydrophobic wetting agent. The triclosan material relationships with alternating ether bond rotations are described through a complete different form of medium by comparisons with known antimicrobial properties that upset bacterial cell membranes through rapid fluctuating mechanomolecular energies. Also, triclosan bond entanglements with secondary bonding can produce structural defects in weak bacterial lipid membranes requiring pliability that can then interfere with cell division. Regarding applications with polymers, triclosan can be incorporated by mixing into a resin system before cure, melt mixed with thermoplastic polymers

  5. THE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS / EL LIDERAZGO EDUCATIVO. CONSIDERACIONES GENERALES

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique José Marañón Rodríguez; Eriberto Bauzá Vázquez; Ramón Pastor Morell González

    2013-01-01

    The present article treats some questions related with the leadership and the educative leadership. It is only an approach to the topic that requires of its continuity to be able to treat it more thoroughly. Given the demands of the pedagogic pattern in which the formation of professionals is sustained -at the moment, in the Cuban university in the new called universialisation - that is focused in the dimensions: instructive, educational and developmental, it confers a degree of such integral...

  6. THE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS / EL LIDERAZGO EDUCATIVO. CONSIDERACIONES GENERALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique José Marañón Rodríguez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article treats some questions related with the leadership and the educative leadership. It is only an approach to the topic that requires of its continuity to be able to treat it more thoroughly. Given the demands of the pedagogic pattern in which the formation of professionals is sustained -at the moment, in the Cuban university in the new called universialisation - that is focused in the dimensions: instructive, educational and developmental, it confers a degree of such integrality that requires that the professor's list causes in the student a transformation process in which, through the appropriation and construction of the experience and the culture, takes place the growth and the personal development, effect that could be achieved, among other, with the development of the educative leadership.RESUMENEl presente artículo trata algunas cuestiones relacionadas con el liderazgo y el liderazgo educativo. Es sólo un acercamiento al tema que requiere de su continuidad para poder tratarlo más ampliamente. Dadas las exigencias del modelo pedagógico en que se sustenta la formación de profesionales en la universidad cubana –actualmente en nuevo estadio de universalización- que se enfoca en las dimensiones: instructiva, educativa y desarrolladora, le confieren un grado de integralidad tal, que requiere que el rol del profesor provoque en el estudiante un proceso de transformación en el que, a través de la apropiación y construcción de la experiencia y la cultura se produzca el crecimiento y el desarrollo personal, efecto que podría lograrse, entre otros, con el desarrollo del liderazgo educativo.

  7. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanli; Zhou, Jinan; Qu, Yilin; Yang, Xinguang; Shi, Guojing; Wang, Xiuhong; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical) are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid). These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold) the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability. PMID:27045517

  8. Quantifying antimicrobial resistance at veal calf farms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B Bosman

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine a sampling strategy to quantify the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on veal calf farms, based on the variation in antimicrobial resistance within and between calves on five farms. Faecal samples from 50 healthy calves (10 calves/farm were collected. From each individual sample and one pooled faecal sample per farm, 90 selected Escherichia coli isolates were tested for their resistance against 25 mg/L amoxicillin, 25 mg/L tetracycline, 0.5 mg/L cefotaxime, 0.125 mg/L ciprofloxacin and 8/152 mg/L trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (tmp/s by replica plating. From each faecal sample another 10 selected E. coli isolates were tested for their resistance by broth microdilution as a reference. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the odds of testing an isolate resistant between both test methods (replica plating vs. broth microdilution and to evaluate the effect of pooling faecal samples. Bootstrap analysis was used to investigate the precision of the estimated prevalence of resistance to each antimicrobial obtained by several simulated sampling strategies. Replica plating showed similar odds of E. coli isolates tested resistant compared to broth microdilution, except for ciprofloxacin (OR 0.29, p ≤ 0.05. Pooled samples showed in general lower odds of an isolate being resistant compared to individual samples, although these differences were not significant. Bootstrap analysis showed that within each antimicrobial the various compositions of a pooled sample provided consistent estimates for the mean proportion of resistant isolates. Sampling strategies should be based on the variation in resistance among isolates within faecal samples and between faecal samples, which may vary by antimicrobial. In our study, the optimal sampling strategy from the perspective of precision of the estimated levels of resistance and practicality consists of a pooled faecal sample from 20 individual animals, of which

  9. Combating antimicrobial resistance: antimicrobial stewardship program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Chun-Ming; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Yen, Muh-Yong; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Yen, Che-Chieh; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2012-04-01

    Multi-drug-resistant organisms are increasingly recognized as a global public health issue. Healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial resistance are also current challenges to the treatment of infectious diseases in Taiwan. Government health policies and the health care systems play a crucial role in determining the efficacy of interventions to contain antimicrobial resistance. National commitment to understand and address the problem is prerequisite. We analyzed and reviewed the antibiotic resistance related policies in Taiwan, USA, WHO and draft antimicrobial stewardship program to control effectively antibiotic resistance and spreading in Taiwan. Antimicrobial stewardship program in Taiwan includes establishment of national inter-sectoral antimicrobial stewardship task force, implementing antimicrobial-resistance management strategies, surveillance of HAI and antimicrobial resistance, conducting hospital infection control, enforcement of appropriate regulations and audit of antimicrobial use through hospital accreditation, inspection and national health insurance payment system. No action today, no cure tomorrow. Taiwan CDC would take a multifaceted, evidence-based approach and make every effort to combat antimicrobial resistance with stakeholders to limit the spread of multi-drug resistant strains and to reduce the generation of antibiotic resistant bacteria in Taiwan. PMID:22483434

  10. Use of antimicrobials in the treatment of reproductive diseases in cattle and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyörälä, S; Taponen, J; Katila, T

    2014-09-01

    Use of antimicrobials for veterinary indications related to reproduction in cattle and horses is reviewed. Antimicrobial compounds are widely used to treat and prevent infections of reproductive organs. Total amounts of antimicrobials for such purposes, estimated by weight, are low compared with major uses in food animals. The most common reproduction-related indication in cattle is mastitis. The number of intramammary products available for treatment of mastitis in the European Union is high. Metritis and endometritis also require antimicrobial treatment of cattle and specific products for intrauterine administration are available. The traditions and practices associated with the use of these products vary considerably among different countries. Parenteral antimicrobial treatment is used to treat acute clinical mastitis and puerperal metritis. Pharmacological characteristics of the antimicrobial administered parenterally are critical to achieve and maintain therapeutic concentrations in the target organs. In mares, the most common indications associated with reproduction are endometritis, retained placenta and placentitis. The number of authorized antimicrobial products for horses is limited. Horses are treated individually and off-label use of antimicrobials is very common. In veterinary indications related to reproduction, treatment practices exist that cannot be considered to be evidence-based or responsible use of antimicrobials. Not all products for local treatment have proven efficacy data. Examples of unnecessary uses are routine treatment of cows with retained placenta and use of post-breeding antibiotic treatments in mares. PMID:25220745

  11. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    OpenAIRE

    RD Rosa; MA Barracco

    2010-01-01

    Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs) are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP fam...

  12. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are ...

  13. Antimicrobial Drugs in the Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-10-19

    Survey participants in the United Kingdom admitted keeping leftover antimicrobial drugs for future use and taking them without medical advice. Dr. J. Todd Weber, director of CDC's Office of Antimicrobial Resistance, advises against the practice, which can be dangerous and can promote antimicrobial drug resistance.  Created: 10/19/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/26/2006.

  14. Spectrum and activity of novel antimicrobial peptidomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line

    Antibiotics have been an effective weapon against bacterial infections for over 50 years. However, bacterial resistance towards conventional antibiotics has increased considerably within the last decades and the number of antibacterial agents available for treating complicated bacterial infections...... is becoming increasingly limited. In the search for alternatives therapies, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have received considerable attention since they target the bacterial Achilles’ heel i.e. their distinct membrane structure. These host defence molecules are ubiquitous in nature by forming part...... permeabilization or disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. The resulting changes to the cell surface were visualised with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Importantly, our leakage studies were performed with viable bacterial cells and using a concentration that was close to the Minimum Inhibitory...

  15. DETERMINATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACTS FROM SOME KINDS OF RAW MATERIALS WITH TANNINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyko NN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data about determination of antimicrobial activity of extracts from some kinds of raw materials (13 plants with tannins. It was determined some kinds of technological parameters of extracts (concentration of total solids and density. A simple to use valuation method of antimicrobial properties of extracts – well method has been suggested and applied; for quantitative estimation of antimicrobial activity of extracts and compare them with each other, special mathematic method (vector algebra theory has been applied. It was determined parameters of antimicrobial properties of extracts: a complex indicator of medication antimicrobial activity for quantitative estimation of antimicrobial effect - A, and correlation coefficient - r (degree of similarity to the standard, which demonstrate the spectrum of antimicrobial activity of medication. It has been selected the most promising extracts that have the medium antimicrobial activity, which obtained from the root of bergenia crassifolia А=1.89; the root of potentilla erecta А=1.92; the bark of corylus avellana А=1.76; the leaf of cotinus coggygria А=2.21. Low level of antimicrobial activity has been demonstrated by the extract obtained from the cone of alnus incana А=0.78, r=0.58. It is noted antimicrobial properties of the solutions of tannin and gallic acids 0.5% m / m in 70% vol. ethanol, that showed respectively moderate and low strength antimicrobial properties: А=1.65, r=0.99 and А=1.26, r=0.91. This potentially allows to predict the antimicrobial properties of extracts from plants containing derivatives of tannin and gallic acids on their concentration in them. It has been shown in general that raw materials that contain different kinds of tannins have possibility to use in complex phytochemical medications as antimicrobial component.

  16. Quantitative single-vesicle analysis of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    understanding of their interactions with phospholipid membranes. In this study, the membrane-permeabilizing effects of antimicrobial peptides were scrutinized by combining two biophysical techniques. Confocal fluorescence microscopy to visualize leakage from individual surface-immobilized lipid vesicles was......Although the research field of antimicrobial peptides has attracted considerable scientific attention in the past decades, the microbicidal mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides still remain elusive. One of the keys to a more profound comprehension of the function of these peptides is a deeper...... three canonical antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The results demonstrate an unprecedented level of insight into the molecular processes governing antimicrobial peptide-induced permeabilization of phospholipid membranes....

  17. Linalool Affects the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Anna; Tambor, Krzysztof; Herman, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    The high concentrations of essential oils are generally required to receive microbial purity of the products (cosmetics, medicine). On the other hand, their application due to the high concentration of essential oils may be limited by changes in organoleptic and textural quality of the products, as well as they cause irritation and allergies in users. Addition of linalool to essential oil may significantly enhance its antimicrobial effectiveness and reduce their concentrations in products, taking advantage of their synergistic and additive effects. The aim of the study was to compare antimicrobial activity of essential oil alone and in combination with linalool. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris, Juniperus communis, Pelargonium graveolens, Citrus bergamia, Citrus grandis, Lavandula angustifolia, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia, Syzygium aromaticum, linalool and their combination was investigated against bacteria and fungi using the disc diffusion method. The addition of linalool to S. aromaticum oil in a synergistic manner enhanced its antimicrobial efficacy against P. aeruginosa and A. brasiliensis. Moreover, the additive interaction between this oil and linalool was observed against S. aureus, E. coli and C. albicans. It was also found that linalool in an additive manner increased the antimicrobial effectiveness of T. vulgaris oil against P. aeruginosa. The antimicrobial properties of mixture of essential oils with their active constituents may be used for creating new strategies to maintain microbiological purity of products. PMID:26553262

  18. Experimental Hall design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General requirements for experimental halls at the Fermilab Collider are set forth, and specific designs for two halls are presented, one for the Detector Group's large ''W detector'' and the other for several smaller setups and for ep experiments. The physics which cannot be studied with the W detector is surveyed, and it is recommended that the second area incorporate a transposed geometry to allow small angle experiments. The most important recommendations are (1) that the halls have good access and the possibility of changing entire setups during short shutdowns, (2) that both equal energy (anti pp) and unequal energy (pp, ep) experiments be accommodated, (3) that construction take place during the superconducting ring installation, (4) that the halls incorporate assembly areas in which detectors can be built and serviced during machine operation and (5) that detailed design, including radiation safety calculations and muon background measurements, begin immediately. Some basic questions concerning the nature of the experimental halls needed for colliding beam experiments at Fermilab are discussed. General requirements and design considerations are dealt with first, followed by specific proposals for the layout of actual halls

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Shuttleworth, R; Taylor, M.; Jones, D M

    1980-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 78 strains of Clostridium difficile isolated from patients with and without gastrointestinal symptoms were determined and compared. Strains from patients with symptoms were more likely to show resistance to antibiotics. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains were found to be similar.

  20. Engineering Antimicrobials Refractory to Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant superbugs are a persistent problem in modern health care, demonstrating the need for a new class of antimicrobials that can address this concern. Triple-acting peptidoglycan hydrolase fusions are a novel class of antimicrobials which have qualities well suited to avoiding resis...

  1. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Laverty, Garry; Gilmore, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy serves as a valuable tool for assessing the structural integrity and viability of eukaryotic cells. Through the use of calcein AM and the DNA stain 4,6-diamidino-2 phenylindole (DAPI), cell viability and membrane integrity can be qualified. Our group has previously shown the ultra-short cationic antimicrobial peptide H-OOWW-NH2; the amphibian derived 27-mer peptide Maximin-4and the ultra-short lipopeptide C12-OOWW-NH2 to be effective against a range of bacterial biofil...

  2. Antimicrobial peptides from frog skin: biodiversity and therapeutic promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladram, Ali; Nicolas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    More than a thousand antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been reported in the last decades arising from the skin secretion of amphibian species. Generally, each frog species can express its own repertoire of AMPs (typically, 10-20 peptides) with differing sequences, sizes, and spectrum of action, which implies very rapid divergence, even between closely related species. Frog skin AMPs are highly potent against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, and fungi by permeating and destroying their plasma membrane and/or inactivating intracellular targets. These peptides have attracted considerable interest as a therapeutic alternative to conventional anti-infective agents. However, efforts to obtain a new generation of drugs using these peptides are still challenging because of high associated R&D costs due to their large size (up to 46 residues) and cytotoxicity. This review deals with the biodiversity of frog skin AMPs and assesses the therapeutic possibilities of temporins, the shortest AMPs found in the frog skin, with 8-17 residues. Such short sequences are easily amenable to optimization of the structure and to solution-phase synthesis that offer reduced costs over solid-phase chemistry. PMID:27100511

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Engberg, J.

    Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice ...... acquired resistance genes, has not become widespread so far. However, resistance genes originating from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species have been found, showing the potential for acquired resistance to emerge in Campylobacter.......Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice...... for the treatment of infections, macrolides and fluoroquinolones has emerged as a clinical problem and interventions to reduce this are recommended. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is mediated by chromosomal mutations. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents, mediated by...

  4. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy for general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Mark I; Armitage, Gary C

    2016-06-01

    There remains a high prevalence of mild-to-moderate forms of periodontal diseases in both developed and developing countries. Although many periodontal specialty practices currently place strong emphasis on implant surgery, periodontal plastic surgery and esthetics, general dentists and hygienists have often assumed more responsibility than periodontal specialty practices for the diagnosis, treatment, assessment and maintenance, and possible referral, of their patients. To address these current trends and challenges, this volume of Periodontology 2000 presents a series of topics on the basic biological principles of periodontal disease, as well as on approaches to diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment, in what is called 'conservative' or 'noninvasive' periodontal therapy. These topics include risk assessment of the periodontal condition; reduction, elimination and/or control of etiologies and risk factors, including mechanical, antimicrobial and host-modulation approaches; considerations for evaluation of clinical outcomes based on treatment approaches; and selected topics in laser therapy, halitosis and gingival recession. PMID:27045427

  5. Characteristics of Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs at Veterans Affairs Hospitals: Results of a Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ann F; Graber, Christopher J; Jones, Makoto; Zhang, Yue; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Madaras-Kelly, Karl; Samore, Matthew; Kelly, Allison; Glassman, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are variably implemented. OBJECTIVE To characterize variations of antimicrobial stewardship structure and practices across all inpatient Veterans Affairs facilities in 2012 and correlate key characteristics with antimicrobial usage. DESIGN A web-based survey regarding stewardship activities was administered to each facility's designated contact. Bivariate associations between facility characteristics and inpatient antimicrobial use during 2012 were determined. SETTING Total of 130 Veterans Affairs facilities with inpatient services. RESULTS Of 130 responding facilities, 29 (22%) had a formal policy establishing an ASP, and 12 (9%) had an approved ASP business plan. Antimicrobial stewardship teams were present in 49 facilities (38%); 34 teams included a clinical pharmacist with formal infectious diseases (ID) training. Stewardship activities varied across facilities, including development of yearly antibiograms (122 [94%]), formulary restrictions (120 [92%]), stop orders for antimicrobial duration (98 [75%]), and written clinical pathways for specific conditions (96 [74%]). Decreased antimicrobial usage was associated with having at least 1 full-time ID physician (P=.03), an ID fellowship program (P=.003), and a clinical pharmacist with formal ID training (P=.006) as well as frequency of systematic patient-level reviews of antimicrobial use (P=.01) and having a policy to address antimicrobial use in the context of Clostridium difficile infection (P=.01). Stop orders for antimicrobial duration were associated with increased use (P=.03). CONCLUSIONS ASP-related activities varied considerably. Decreased antibiotic use appeared related to ID presence and certain select practices. Further statistical assessments may help optimize antimicrobial practices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:647-654. PMID:26905338

  6. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in minor and major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Righi, E; Astilean, A; Corcione, S; Petrolo, A; Farina, E C; De Rosa, F G

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a frequent cause of morbidity following surgical procedures. Gram-positive cocci, particularly staphylococci, cause many of these infections, although Gram-negative organisms are also frequently involved. The risk of developing a SSI is associated with a number of factors, including aspects of the operative procedure itself, such as wound classification, and patient-related variables, such as preexisting medical conditions. Antimicrobial prophylaxis (AP) plays an important role in reducing SSIs, especially if patient-related risk factors for SSIs are present. The main components of antimicrobial prophylaxis are: timing, selection of drugs and patients, duration and costs. Compliance with these generally accepted preventive principles may lead to overall decreases in the incidence of these infections. Ideally the administration of the prophylactic agent should start within 30 minutes from the surgical incision. The duration of the AP should not exceed 24 hours for the majority of surgical procedures. The shortest effective period of prophylactic antimicrobial administration is not known and studies have demonstrated that post-surgical antibiotic administration is unnecessary. Furthermore, there were no proven benefits in multiple dose regimens when compared to single-dose regimens. The choice of an appropriate prophylactic antimicrobial agent should be based primarily on efficacy and safety. Broad spectrum antibiotics should be avoided due to the risk of promoting bacterial resistance. Cephalosporins are the most commonly used antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis; specifically, cefazolin or cefuroxime are mainly used in the prophylaxis regimens for cardio-thoracic surgery, vascular surgery, hip or knee arthroplasty surgery, neurosurgical procedures and gynecologic and obstetric procedures. A review of the prophylactic regimens regarding the main surgical procedures is presented. PMID:24561611

  7. Antimicrobial activity of antiproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J M

    2002-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass neutrophil elastase inhibitors have been shown to be important in the control of lung inflammation. In addition to inhibiting the enzyme neutrophil elastase, these low-molecular-mass compounds (10 kDa) have been shown to have other activities. For example, secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor/SKALP (skin-derived antileucoproteinase)/elafin have also been shown to have "defensin"-like antimicrobial activities. Indeed, these inhibitors have antimicrobial properties in vitro against bacteria, fungi and, potentially, HIV. In addition, we have shown, using an adenovirus-mediated gene transfer overexpression strategy, that elafin is also active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice in vivo. The mechanism of action is currently under investigation. In addition to these direct or indirect effects on microbes, it has been shown that lipopolysaccharide is able to up-regulate SPLI production in macrophages in vitro, and that the addition of recombinant SLPI to human monocytes or the transfection of macrophages with SPLI can down-regulate pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor, presumably to limit self-damaging excessive inflammation. Using viral gene transfer vectors, we are currently investigating the potential of these inhibitors in various models of inflammation in vivo. PMID:12023836

  8. Antimicrobial drugs usage in a tertiary care hospital –A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priestly Vivekkumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence of resistant organisms is alarmingly high all over the world. Irrational and inappropriate prescription of antimicrobials is the major contributing factor for developing drug resistance in addition to poor patient compliance. It is the high time to create awareness of antimicrobial resistance among physicians and patients. Encouraging physicians/surgeons to undergo training programmes on infectious disease control periodically would be beneficial to combat the resistant organisms, so called super bugs.Objectives: To assess the pattern of antimicrobial usage in a tertiary care hospital, to determine whether antimicrobials are prescribed judiciously.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to determine the current antimicrobial prescribing practices at Tagore Medical College Hospital. A randomised sample of 100 inpatient case sheets of General Medicine, OBG, General Surgery, Paediatrics, Chest Medicine, Skin, and ENT from Medical Records Department was analysed with respect to oral and parenteral (iv administration of antimicrobials.Results: In this study, 53% were males and 47% were females. Majority of patients were middle aged (17-60yrs. A total of 16 antimicrobials were prescribed for 100 inpatients. The most frequently used were Metronidazole and Ciprofloxacin. Duration of treatment was minimum 3 days, maximum of 13 days and mean duration was 5.5 days. The common route by which antimicrobials were administered was Parenteral as the patients were inpatients. The Parenteral (iv drugs were Metronidazole (52%, Ciprofloxacin (42%, Cefotaxime (27%, Amikacin (7%, Ceftriaxone (7%. Among 100 prescriptions, 63% were empirical prescriptions, 12% were directed and 25% were targeted prescriptions.Conclusions: The most frequently used antimicrobials were Metronidazole and Ciprofloxacin and the condition for which the antimicrobials were commonly used was acute gastroenteritis. The proportion of targeted prescriptions was low

  9. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  10. Modeling Unobserved Consideration Sets for Household Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new method to model consumers' consideration and choice processes. We develop a parsimonious probit type model for consideration and a multinomial probit model for choice, given consideration. Unlike earlier models of consideration ours is not prone to the curse of dimensionality, while we allow for very general structures of unobserved dependence in consideration among brands. In addition, our model allows for state dependence and marketing mix effects on consideration. Unique t...

  11. 5 CFR 330.206 - Job consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Job consideration. 330.206 Section 330..., SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Reemployment Priority List (RPL) § 330.206 Job consideration. (a)(1) An... of an overseas duty tour in the agency rotation program. In this case, the employee may apply for...

  12. 7 CFR 1735.92 - Accounting considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting considerations. 1735.92 Section 1735.92... All Acquisitions and Mergers § 1735.92 Accounting considerations. (a) Proper accounting shall be... in the absence of such a commission, as required by RUS based on Generally Accepted...

  13. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified ...

  14. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    OpenAIRE

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. Objectives To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are diffe...

  15. Antimicrobial Potential Of Azadirachta Indica Against Pathogenic Bacteria And Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Drugs from natural sources are used for treating various diseases since the ancient times. From the literature it is clear that various type of pharmacological and biological activities are associated with Azadirachta indica. Theleave oil of A. indica is known to have good antimicrobial potential. The oil of A. indica leaves, was tested against the different infectious microorganisms [Gram positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria], such as bacterial strains; S. aureus, E. coli, B. cerus, P. vulgaris, S. typhi, K. pneumonae, S. dysenterae and Fungal strains; F. oxysporum, A. flavus, A. fumigates, A. niger, C. albicans, Cladosporium sp., M. canis, M. gypseum, T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, P. notatum and P. citrinum etc.The results showed that level of antimicrobial activities of the A.indica oil depends on both the protein and carbohydrate contents. Generally, the high level of protein and carbohydrate contents of extract had better antimicrobial activities.

  16. Antimicrobial stewardship programs in health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Conan; Polk, Ron E

    2005-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs in hospitals seek to optimize antimicrobial prescribing in order to improve individual patient care as well as reduce hospital costs and slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance. With antimicrobial resistance on the rise worldwide and few new agents in development, antimicrobial stewardship programs are more important than ever in ensuring the continued efficacy of available antimicrobials. The design of antimicrobial management programs should be based on the best current understanding of the relationship between antimicrobial use and resistance. Such programs should be administered by multidisciplinary teams composed of infectious diseases physicians, clinical pharmacists, clinical microbiologists, and infection control practitioners and should be actively supported by hospital administrators. Strategies for changing antimicrobial prescribing behavior include education of prescribers regarding proper antimicrobial usage, creation of an antimicrobial formulary with restricted prescribing of targeted agents, and review of antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to prescribers. Clinical computer systems can aid in the implementation of each of these strategies, especially as expert systems able to provide patient-specific data and suggestions at the point of care. Antibiotic rotation strategies control the prescribing process by scheduled changes of antimicrobial classes used for empirical therapy. When instituting an antimicrobial stewardship program, a hospital should tailor its choice of strategies to its needs and available resources. PMID:16223951

  17. Intrinsic Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in the Superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Justine L.; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria pose a serious threat in the clinic. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens that possess high intrinsic resistance. Though many studies have focused on understanding the acquisition of bacterial resistance upon exposure to antimicrobials, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are not well understood. In this study, we subjected the model opportunistic superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa to 14 antimicrobials under highly controlled conditions and assessed its response using expression- and fitness-based genomic approaches. Our results reveal that gene expression changes and mutant fitness in response to sub-MIC antimicrobials do not correlate on a genomewide scale, indicating that gene expression is not a good predictor of fitness determinants. In general, fewer fitness determinants were identified for antiseptics and disinfectants than for antibiotics. Analysis of gene expression and fitness data together allowed the prediction of antagonistic interactions between antimicrobials and insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling these interactions. PMID:26507235

  18. Commercial development considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, electricity from a nuclear plant has been less expensive than that from a fossil-fuel plant. However, there are other, noneconomic factors that tend to discourage building nuclear power plants. Aside from uranium price and market considerations, other factors that influence the commercial development of a uranium property include estimated capital and operating costs, production lead time, and financial considerations. 8 tables

  19. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Francolini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with antimicrobial agents or synthesis of polymers bearing antimicrobial moieties, were discussed. The future application of these polymers either in industrial or healthcare settings could result in an extremely positive impact not only at the economic level but also for the improvement of quality of life.

  20. Benchmarking antimicrobial drug use at university hospitals in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahović-Palcevski, V; Dumpis, U; Mitt, P; Gulbinovic, J; Struwe, J; Palcevski, G; Stimac, D; Lagergren, A; Bergman, U

    2007-03-01

    A point-prevalence survey of five European university hospitals was performed to benchmark antimicrobial drug use in order to identify potential problem areas in prescribing practice and to aid in establishing appropriate and attainable goals. All inpatients at the university hospitals of Rijeka (Croatia), Tartu (Estonia), Riga (Latvia), Vilnius (Lithuania) and Karolinska-Huddinge (Sweden) were surveyed for antimicrobial drug use during a single day. The frequency of antimicrobial drug use was 24% in Rijeka, 30% in Tartu, 26% in Riga, 14% in Vilnius and 32% in Huddinge. Surgical patients were treated with antimicrobial agents more often than medical patients in Riga (53% vs. 31%), Tartu (39% vs. 26%) and Vilnius (54% vs. 25%). Two-thirds of patients in Rijeka, Tartu, Riga and Vilnius, and fewer than half of the patients in Huddinge, received antimicrobial agents intravenously. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents were used most commonly in Rijeka. The prevalence of nosocomial infections treated with antibiotics was 9% at Huddinge, and 3-5% at the other centres. Benchmarking antimicrobial drug use at five university hospitals identified differences and problem areas. The high rates of intravenous administration, poor compliance with guidelines, and prolonged surgical prophylaxis were general problems that deserved specific attention at all centres. A change in prescription practices may reduce unnecessary drug use and decrease antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17391382

  1. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from horses: Epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, T W; Clegg, P D; Williams, N J; Pinchbeck, G L

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant threat to the continued successful use of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of bacterial infections. While the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from man has been studied extensively, less work has been undertaken in companion animals, particularly horses. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been identified as a cause of infections, with a low prevalence of nasal carriage by horses in the community but higher for hospitalised horses. Molecular characterisation has shown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains either to be predominantly of types associated with horses or of sequence type ST398. Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (including multidrug-resistant and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates) have caused infections and been documented in faecal carriage by horses, with many significant resistance mechanisms identified. More sporadic reports and molecular characterisation exist for resistance in other bacteria such as enterococci, Salmonella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species. Limited work has been undertaken evaluating risk factors and much of the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from horses remains to be determined. PMID:26084443

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tasiemski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the characterization and/or the function of AMPs in the numerically and economically most representative group which are arthropods. Annelids are among the first coelomates and are therefore of special phylogenetic interest. Compared to other invertebrate groups, data on annelid’s immunity reveal heavier emphasis on the cellular than on the humoral response suggesting that immune defense of annelids seems to be principally developed as cellular immunity.This paper gives an overview of the variety of AMPs identified in the three classes of annelids, i.e. polychaetes, oligochaetes and achaetes. Their functions, when they have been studied, in the humoral or cellular response of annelids are also mentioned.

  3. Antimicrobials in urogenital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Wullt, Björn; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and male genital infections are amongst the most prevalent infections. A prudent antibiotic policy therefore has a large impact on society. The clinical classification in uncomplicated cystitis, uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated UTI and genital infections is useful, also for the right choice of antibiotic treatment. In this regard pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects have to be considered. Nowadays in uncomplicated cystitis antibiotics exclusively reserved for this indication are preferred, such as fosfomycin trometamol, nitrofurantoin and pivmecillinam, in order to reduce antibiotic pressure in this extremely frequent entity. In complicated UTI a broad bacterial spectrum has to be considered. Different antibiotic substances should be used for treatment, such as penicillins, with β-lactamase inhibitors, cephalosporins or carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides or cotrimoxazole, if tested susceptible. For genital infections the pharmacokinetic properties of the antibiotics should especially be considered, such as in prostatitis, where mainly fluoroquinolones and macrolides show sufficient pharmacokinetic parameters for treatment of bacterial infections. Furthermore in genital infections fastidious organisms, such as Chlamydia or Mycoplasma spp. have to be considered with respect to their antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:22019184

  4. Extension of Shelf Life and Control of Human Pathogens in Produce by Antimicrobial Edible Films and Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides general information about edible films and coatings, and their use with fruits and vegetables to control human pathogens. It reviews potential antimicrobial phytochemicals used in edible films and coatings, and summarizes methods for measuring the antimicrobial activity and ph...

  5. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:9210661

  6. Cystic fibrosis - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002437.htm Cystic fibrosis - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening disease that causes ...

  7. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  8. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements for...

  9. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  10. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline

  11. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Iolanda Francolini; Antonella Piozzi

    2013-01-01

    The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with...

  12. Antimicrobial resistance—a threat to the world’s sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasovský, Dušan; Littmann, Jasper; Zorzet, Anna; Cars, Otto

    2016-01-01

    This commentary examines how specific sustainable development goals (SDGs) are affected by antimicrobial resistance and suggests how the issue can be better integrated into international policy processes. Moving beyond the importance of effective antibiotics for the treatment of acute infections and health care generally, we discuss how antimicrobial resistance also impacts on environmental, social, and economic targets in the SDG framework. The paper stresses the need for greater international collaboration and accountability distribution, and suggests steps towards a broader engagement of countries and United Nations agencies to foster global intersectoral action on antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27416324

  13. Antimicrobial resistance of thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Engberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice...... for the treatment of infections, macrolides and fluoroquinolones has emerged as a clinical problem and interventions to reduce this are recommended. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is mediated by chromosomal mutations. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents, mediated by...... acquired resistance genes, has not become widespread so far. However, resistance genes originating from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species have been found, showing the potential for acquired resistance to emerge in Campylobacter....

  14. Modeling Unobserved Consideration Sets for Household Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    van Nierop, J.E.M.; Paap, Richard; Bronnenberg, B.; FRANSES, Philip Hans

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new method to model consumers' consideration and choice processes. We develop a parsimonious probit type model for consideration and a multinomial probit model for choice, given consideration. Unlike earlier models of consideration ours is not prone to the curse of dimensionality, while we allow for very general structures of unobserved dependence in consideration among brands. In addition, our model allows for state dependence and marketing mix effects on considerati...

  15. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  16. Lack of Antimicrobial Resistance in Yersinia pestis Isolates from 17 Countries in the Americas, Africa, and Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Urich, Sandra K.; Chalcraft, Linda; Schriefer, Martin E.; Yockey, Brook M.; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague, a fulminant disease that is often fatal without antimicrobial treatment. Plasmid (IncA/C)-mediated multidrug resistance in Y. pestis was reported in 1995 in Madagascar and has generated considerable public health concern, most recently because of the identification of IncA/C multidrug-resistant plasmids in other zoonotic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate no resistance in 392 Y. pestis isolates from 17 countries to eight antimicrobials used for t...

  17. Amphiphilic Peptide Interactions with Complex Biological Membranes : Effect of peptide properties on antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    With increasing problem of resistance development in bacteria against conventional antibiotics, as well as problems associated with diseases either triggered or enhanced by infection, there is an urgent need to identify new types of effective therapeutics for the treatment of infectious diseases and its consequences. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides have attracted considerable interest as potential new antibiotics in this context. While antimicrobial function of such peptides is b...

  18. General considerations of the choice of dose limits, averaging areas and weighting factors for the skin in the light of revised skin cancer risk figures and experimental data on non-stochastic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent biological data from man and pig on the non-stochastic effects following exposure with a range of β-emitters are combined with recent epidemiological analyses of skin cancer risks in man to form a basis for suggested improved protection criteria following whole- or partial-body skin exposures. Specific consideration is given to the choice of an organ weighting factor for evaluation of effective dose-equivalent. Since stochastic and non-stochastic end-points involve different cell types at different depths in the skin, the design of an ideal physical dosemeter may depend on the proportion of the body skin exposed and the radiation penetrating power. Possible choices of design parameters for skin dosemeters are discussed. Limitation of skin exposure from small radioactive sources ('hot particles') is addressed using animal data. (author)

  19. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance: "Prediction Is Very Difficult, Especially about the Future"1

    OpenAIRE

    Courvalin, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of bacteria towards resistance to antimicrobial drugs, including multidrug resistance, is unavoidable because it represents a particular aspect of the general evolution of bacteria that is unstoppable. Therefore, the only means of dealing with this situation is to delay the emergence and subsequent dissemination of resistant bacteria or resistance genes. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs in bacteria can result from mutations in housekeeping structural or regulatory genes. Alternativ...

  20. Strategic measures for the control of surging antimicrobial resistance in Hong Kong and mainland of China

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Vincent CC; Wong, Sally CY; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are either highly prevalent or increasing rapidly in Hong Kong and China. Treatment options for these bacteria are generally limited, less effective and more expensive. The emergence and dynamics of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacteria circulating between animals, the environment and humans are not entirely known. Nonetheless, selective pressure by antibiotics on the microbiomes of animal and human, and their associated environments (especially farms and...

  1. Sodium concrete reaction: structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structural-chemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  2. PLANT PRODUCTS AS ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ionela Daciana Ciocan; Ion Bara

    2007-01-01

    Plants produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites, many of which have antimicrobial activity.Some of this compounds are constitutive, existing in healthy plants in their biologically active forms. Others such as cyanogenic glycosides and glucosinolates, occur as inactive precursors and are activated in response to tissue damage or pathogen attack.

  3. An Antimicrobial Susceptibility Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, James J.; O'Donnell, Edward D.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized system is described which is used to store, manipulate and retrieve antimicrobial susceptibility data in the clinical microbiology lab. Features include facilitated input of susceptibility data, rapid generation of reports, realtime access to data, and enhanced retrieval of information for Infection Control.

  4. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Resveratrol Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Chalal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew. Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold. The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups and antimicrobial activity.

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE TRENDS IN SALMONELLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Since the early 1990’s there has been increasing awareness and concern regarding the development of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria of public health significance. Reports targeting zoonotic bacteria, and in particular Salmonella species, suggest that resistance is trending upwar...

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Rhodobryum ontariense

    OpenAIRE

    Sabovljević Aneta; Pejin Boris; Vujičić Milorad; Ćirić Ana; Glamočlija Jasmina; Soković Marina; Sabovljević Marko

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of dimethyl sulfoxide extract of moss Rhodobryum ontariense (Kindb.) Kindb. was evaluated by microdilution method against eight bacterial (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter cloacae, Listeria monocytogens, Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus flavus and Staphylococcus aureus) and five fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium funiculosum, Penicillium ochrochloron and Trichoderma viride). The ...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  9. Antimicrobial activity of Securidaca longipedunculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajali, U; Chukwurah, B K C

    2004-11-01

    The folk herbal uses of Securidaca longipedunculata in the treatment of diarrhea, boils, gonorrhea, and cough prompted phytochemical analyses and antimicrobial activity screening of extracts of the root. Some flavonoids isolated showed activity against many micro-organisms. These flavonoids were isolated using chromatographic methods. PMID:15636189

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Enterococci Isolated From Patients in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saderi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Enterococci are one of the most common nosocomial pathogens and the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains has been increasing. Objectives We studied the antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci isolated from different clinical specimens of patients in Tehran. Materials and Methods From the beginning of April 2013 to the end of June 2013, a total of 146 enterococci were isolated from the Pars General Hospital in Tehran. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates against ampicillin, clindamaycin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, linezolid, nitrofurantoin, tetracycline, and vancomycin was determined using the disk diffusion method according to the guidelines of clinical laboratory standards institute (CLSI. Results The rates of resistance were high to clindamycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin (97.2%, 89%, and 74.5%, respectively; moderate to ciprofloxacilin and levofloxacilin (40.6% and 36.4%, respectively; and low to ampicillin and nitrofurantoin (13.8% and 3.5%, respectively. All isolates were linezolid sensitive. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE accounted for 9.6% of the isolates. Conclusions VRE and a high rate of resistance to some of antimicrobial agents were found among the enterococci isolated from patients in Tehran. These findings highlight the importance of regular supervision of antimicrobial susceptibilities.

  11. Silver nanoparticles in aquatic environments: Physiochemical behavior and antimicrobial mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chiqian; Hu, Zhiqiang; Deng, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    Nanosilver (silver nanoparticles or AgNPs) has unique physiochemical properties and strong antimicrobial activities. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the physicochemical behavior (e.g., dissolution and aggregation) and antimicrobial mechanisms of nanosilver in aquatic environments. The inconsistency in calculating the Gibbs free energy of formation of nanosilver [ΔGf(AgNPs)] in aquatic environments highlights the research needed to carefully determine the thermodynamic stability of nanosilver. The dissolutive release of silver ion (Ag(+)) in the literature is often described using a pseudo-first-order kinetics, but the fit is generally poor. This paper proposes a two-stage model that could better predict silver ion release kinetics. The theoretical analysis suggests that nanosilver dissolution could occur under anoxic conditions and that nanosilver may be sulfidized to form silver sulfide (Ag2S) under strict anaerobic conditions, but more investigation with carefully-designed experiments is required to confirm the analysis. Although silver ion release is likely the main antimicrobial mechanism of nanosilver, the contributions of (ion-free) AgNPs and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation to the overall toxicity of nanosilver must not be neglected. Several research directions are proposed to better understand the dissolution kinetics of nanosilver and its antimicrobial mechanisms under various aquatic environmental conditions. PMID:26519626

  12. Antimicrobial potentials of some plant species of the Bignoniaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binutu, O A; Lajubutu, B A

    1994-09-01

    The methanol extracts of the leaves and stem bark of four Bignoniaceae plants Jacaranda mimosifolia D. Dol., Tecoma stans Linn., Tabebuia rosea (Bertol) D.C., and Crescentia cujete Linn. were studied for their antimicrobial activity using a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Extracts of both the leaves and stem bark of majority of plant species studied showed variable but remarkable broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. However, methanol extracts of Tecoma stans leaves was found to be effective against only Candida albicans at the concentrations employed. It was observed that the extracts of stem bark generally showed better antimicrobial activity than those of the leaves and some organisms were selectively more sensitive to the extracts than others. Preliminary phytochemical screening of these plants revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids, quinones and traces of saponins. The antimicrobial activity observed are discussed in relation to the chemical constituents reportedly isolated from these plants and their traditional uses. PMID:7604753

  13. Will antimicrobial resistance of BRD pathogens impact BRD management in the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Gordon W

    2014-12-01

    Resistance is a qualitative interpretation of antimicrobial activity in vitro. Critical to management of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the clinical response in vivo. Attempts to connect activity in vitro to response in vivo have been complicated by the complexity of BRD, interpretation of antimicrobial activity in vitro, and inconsistent measures of clinical success or failure. During recent history, the discovery, development, and commercialization of antimicrobials have decreased. In response to resistance, voluntary and imposed restrictions on use of antimicrobials have been implemented. Resistance can be reversed using technology and knowledge of mechanisms of resistance. Perhaps approaches that reverse resistance will be used in clinical management of BRD in the future. The short answer to the question posed in the title is, 'yes.' Since antimicrobial drugs were discovered, resistance has been a consideration for selection of treatment of any infectious disease and BRD is not unique. In the opinion of the author, the more important question is, 'How will antimicrobial resistance of BRD pathogens impact BRD management in the future?' PMID:25410262

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriocins and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosinos, Eleftherios H.; Mataragas, Marios; Paramithiotis, Spiros

    Bacteriocins are peptides or proteins that exert an antimicrobial action against a range of microorganisms. Their production can be related to the antagonism within a certain ecological niche, as the producer strain, being itself immune to its action, generally gains a competitive advantage. Many Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms have been found to produce bacteriocins. The former, and especially the ones produced by lactic acid bacteria, has been the field of intensive research during the last decades mainly due to their properties that account for their suitability in food preservation and the benefits arising from that, and secondarily due to the broader inhibitory spectrum compared to the ones produced by Gramnegative microorganisms.

  15. Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacteria to antimicrobial feed additives.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaraja, T. G.; Taylor, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacterial species to avoparcin, narasin, salinomycin, thiopeptin, tylosin, virginiamycin, and two new ionophore antibiotics, RO22-6924/004 and RO21-6447/009, were determined. Generally, antimicrobial compounds were inhibitory to gram-positive bacteria and those bacteria that have gram-positive-like cell wall structure. MICs ranged from 0.09 to 24.0 micrograms/ml. Gram-negative bacteria were resistant at the highest concentration tested (48.0 micrograms...

  16. Acanthamoeba and bacteria produce antimicrobials to target their counterpart

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Junaid; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background In the microbial ecosystem, microbes compete for space and nutrients. Consequently, some have developed the ability to kill or inhibit the growth of other competing microbes by producing antimicrobial substances. As the ‘producer’ species are generally immune to these substances, their compounds act on the competing microbial species and give the producer more space and access to nutrients for growth. Many currently used antibiotics were developed by exploiting this potential of ce...

  17. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sekhar, SM; N Vyas; Unnikrishnan, MK; Rodrigues, GS; Mukhopadhyay, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are major public health problems and knowledge of microbes that cause infections are helpful to determine proper antibiotic therapy. Aims: The aim was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of microbes in DFIs. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted for a period of 6 months at the Department of General Surgery, KMC hospital, Manipal University, Manipal, India. During this period, 108 patients having DFIs admitte...

  18. A population-based nested case control study on recurrent pneumonias in children with severe generalized cerebral palsy: ethical considerations of the design and representativeness of the study sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benninga Marc A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In children with severe generalized cerebral palsy, pneumonias are a major health issue. Malnutrition, dysphagia, gastro-oesophageal reflux, impaired respiratory function and constipation are hypothesized risk factors. Still, no data are available on the relative contribution of these possible risk factors in the described population. This paper describes the initiation of a study in 194 children with severe generalized cerebral palsy, on the prevalence and on the impact of these hypothesized risk factors of recurrent pneumonias. Methods/Design A nested case-control design with 18 months follow-up was chosen. Dysphagia, respiratory function and constipation will be assessed at baseline, malnutrition and gastro-oesophageal reflux at the end of the follow-up. The study population consists of a representative population sample of children with severe generalized cerebral palsy. Inclusion was done through care-centres in a predefined geographical area and not through hospitals. All measurements will be done on-site which sets high demands on all measurements. If these demands were not met in "gold standard" methods, other methods were chosen. Although the inclusion period was prolonged, the desired sample size of 300 children was not met. With a consent rate of 33%, nearly 10% of all eligible children in the Netherlands are included (n = 194. The study population is subtly different from the non-participants with regard to severity of dysphagia and prevalence rates of pneumonias and gastro-oesophageal reflux. Discussion Ethical issues complicated the study design. Assessment of malnutrition and gastro-oesophageal reflux at baseline was considered unethical, since these conditions can be easily treated. Therefore, we postponed these diagnostics until the end of the follow-up. In order to include a representative sample, all eligible children in a predefined geographical area had to be contacted. To increase the consent rate, on

  19. Chernobyl: Geographic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the geographic considerations that could effect the long range consequences of the Chernobyl accident. First, the explosion and fire lofted the radionuclides that were released, so the areas that should have been most severely effected were the areas that were downwind of the accident. Curiously, the Soviets have not mentioned the number of casualties from these areas. A second consideration is that Chernobyl is located upstream from the Dnieper River which is the source for six major reservoirs. These reservoirs provide drinking water, industrial and irrigation water, and recreational and commercial fishing for over six million people. The Soviets say that they have taken measures to prevent the radioactive contamination of the Dnieper but they neglected to explain the methods used to accomplish this feat

  20. Security consideration for virtualization

    OpenAIRE

    Gebhardt, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Virtualization is not a new technology, but has recently experienced a resurgence of interest among industry and research. New products and technologies are emerging quickly, and are being deployed with little considerations to security concerns. It is vital to understand that virtualization does not improve security by default. Hence, any aspect of virtualization needs to undergo constant security analysis and audit. Virtualization is a changeable and very dynamic field wit...

  1. Targeting therapy to minimize antimicrobial use in preweaned calves: effects on health, growth, and treatment costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, A C B; Moore, D A; Besser, T E; Sischo, W M

    2009-09-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial use in food animals is questioned because of the potential for development of resistant bacteria and future inability to use some antimicrobials for human or animal disease. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of raising preweaned dairy calves without antimicrobials in the milk and minimizing therapeutic antimicrobial treatment on morbidity, mortality, weight gain, and treatment costs. Newborn calves (n = 358) were allocated to 1 of 4 groups, housed outdoors in individual hutches, and monitored for 28 d. Calves in the conventional therapy (CT) group were treated as per dairy protocol with sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, spectinomycin, penicillin, and bismuth-pectin for diarrhea. The targeted therapy (TT) group included bismuth-pectin for diarrhea and antimicrobial treatment only in cases of fever or depressed attitude. Within CT and TT groups, calves were equally assigned to receive neomycin and tetracycline in their milk for the first 2 wk of life (AB-milk) or no antimicrobials (NoAB-milk). Daily health evaluations included fecal consistency, respiratory disease, attitude, and hydration status as well as milk and grain consumption. A negative binomial model evaluated the total number of days with diarrhea days in each group. General linear models were used to assess average daily weight gain and grain consumption. Conventionally treated calves had 70% more days with diarrhea than TT calves, and AB-milk calves had 31% more days with diarrhea compared with NoAB-milk calves. The TT calves tended to have a higher average daily gain by 28 d and consumed more grain compared with CT calves. If antimicrobials were used only for diarrhea cases with fever, inappetence, or depression and no in-milk antimicrobials were used, a $10 per calf savings could be realized. Targeting antimicrobial therapy of calf diarrhea cases is prudent not only to save the drugs for future use but also to prevent the potential for

  2. A Study of Anti-Microbial Effect of Pycnocycla Spinosa's Fruit Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jalali, Ph.D.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Infectious diseases account for approximately one-half of all deaths in tropical country. In developed country, despite the progress made on the control of disease, incidence of epidemics due to drug resistant microorganisms and unknown diseases spreading microbes pose enormous public health concerns. On the other hand, in spite of improvements in food production hygiene, food safety is increasingly an important health issue. There is, therefore, still a need for new antimicrobial agent to reduce or eliminate foodborne pathogen as well as food spoilage microorganisms. Historically, plants play a major role in primary health-care as therapeutic remedies in developing countries. The screening of plant extracts has been of great interest to scientists for the discovery of new drugs effective in the treatment of infectious disease. Umbelleferea is known to be a potential source for the antimicrobial agents. The present study attempts to investigate the antimicrobial activity of Pycnocycla spinosa as a member of Umbelleferea against selected microorganisms.Materials and Methods: The plants were collected from Isfahan and different solvent extracts of plants were prepared. Then, the antimicrobial activity of extract was determined, using disk diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by tube dilution method.Results: Results demonstrated that different extracts of plants indicate antimicrobial activity against bucillu subtilis, aspergiluse niger and candida albicans. Generally, the antimicrobial activity of the plant’s fruit extracts is considered medium.Conclusion: Pycnocycla spinosa fruit's extract showed medium antimicrobial activity. Hydroalcoholic extract of the fruit demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity. This may reflect a low concentration of active components in extracts. Further studies are needed to investigate antimicrobial activity of the plant's essential oil and other parts

  3. Diversity, evolution and medical applications of insect antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Muhammed, Maged; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are short proteins with antimicrobial activity. A large portion of known AMPs originate from insects, and the number and diversity of these molecules in different species varies considerably. Insect AMPs represent a potential source of alternative antibiotics to address the limitation of current antibiotics, which has been caused by the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. To get more insight into AMPs, we investigated the diversity and evolution of insect AMPs by mapping their phylogenetic distribution, allowing us to predict the evolutionary origins of selected AMP families and to identify evolutionarily conserved and taxon-specific families. Furthermore, we highlight the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a whole-animal model in high-throughput screening methods to identify AMPs with efficacy against human pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumanii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus We also discuss the potential medical applications of AMPs, including their use as alternatives for conventional antibiotics in ectopic therapies, their combined use with antibiotics to restore the susceptibility of multidrug-resistant pathogens, and their use as templates for the rational design of peptidomimetic drugs that overcome the disadvantages of therapeutic peptides.The article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160593

  4. Size-dependent antimicrobial effects of novel palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Clara P; Walker, Katherine A; Obare, Sherine O; Docherty, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0 ± 0.1 nm, 2.5 ± 0.2 nm and 3.1 ± 0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions (2.5 × 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9) M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥ 10(-5) M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants from East and Central Part of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimala Subba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of extract of eleven plants were examined against four common bacterials. The ethanolic extracts of various plants such as Cissus repens, Hedyotis scandens, Jatropha curcas, Morus alba, Inula cappa, Equisetum ramosissimum, Osyris wightiana, Alternantheria sessilis and Hibiscus lampas investigated individually for antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method. These were investigated against selected species of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Klebsiella pneumoniae to find the inhibitory activities of the microbes. The ethanolic extract of C. repens showed considerably high activity against P. vulgaris, E. coli and S. aureus than other extracts.

  6. A STUDY OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF VARIOUS PLANT LEAVES AGAINST SELECTED MICROBIAL SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Valarmathy,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of extract of leaves were examined against four common bacterial isolates. The ethanolic extracts of various leaves such as Moringa oleifera (Murungai , Musa paradisiaca (Banana, Azardiratica indica (Neem, Cynodon dactylon(Grass, Alternanthera sessilis (Ponnangkani, Anisochilus carnosus (Karpooravalli, investigated individually for antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method .These were investigated against selected species of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Vibrio cholerae, Klebsiella pneumoniae to find the inhibitory activities of the microbes. The ethanolic extract of Azardiratica indica showed considerably high activity against Escherichia coli than other extracts. These results were compared with standard antibiotic Penicillin. But the extract showed higher activity than the given standard antibiotic.

  7. General considerations about the tritium activity levels observed in France and about the sampling and measurement techniques used by IRSN in the framework of the environment monitoring of the 2M Process site at Saint-Maur-des-Fosses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A building of 2M Process company at Saint-Maur-des-Fosses (France) has been accidentally contaminated after the handling of a tritium contaminated device. The consequence has been a tritium release inside and in the close environment of the building. Since November 5, on request of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has performed tritium measurements in water, air and plants sampled in the vicinity of the building in order to delimit the contaminated area and to follow its decay during and after the cleansing of the building. In order to give help to the interpretation of the results of this monitoring action, this note supplies some general information about tritium and its activity levels usually encountered in France (air, rainwater, surface waters, plants, drinking water, foodstuff), and about the sampling and measurement techniques used by IRSN in the framework of the periodical environment monitoring of the 2M Process site. (J.S.)

  8. Cholic acid derivatives: novel antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P B; Li, C

    2000-02-01

    Mimics of squalamine and polymyxin B (PMB) have been prepared from cholic acid in hope of finding new antimicrobial agents. The squalamine mimics include the polyamine and sulphate functionalities found in the parent antibiotic, however, the positions relative to the steroid nucleus have been exchanged. The PMB mimics include the conservation of functionality among the polymyxin family of antibiotics, the primary amine groups and a hydrophobic chain. Although the squalamine and PMB mimics are morphologically dissimilar, they display similar activities. Both are simple to prepare and demonstrate broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms. Specific examples may be inactive alone, yet effectively permeabilise the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria rendering them sensitive to hydrophobic antibiotics. Problems associated with some of the squalamine and PMB mimics stem from their haemolytic activity and interactions with serum proteins, however, examples exist without these side effects which can sensitise Gram-negative bacteria to hydrophobic antibiotics. PMID:11060676

  9. STUDY OF PRESCRIBING PATTERNS OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN THE PAEDIATRIC WARDS AT TERTIARY TEACHING CARE HOSPITAL, GUJARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Prajapati* and J.D. Bhatt

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescription of drugs, which needs to be continuously assessed and refined according to disease progression. It not only reflects the physician’s knowledge about drugs but also his/her skill in diagnose and attitude towards selecting the most appropriate cost-effective treatment. Antimicrobials are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in hospital. As per literature, they account for over 50% of total value of drugs sold in our country. Such studies have been sparse from Gujarat and hence, this study was undertaken.Methods: Retrospective study was carried out by collecting 350 prescriptions containing antimicrobial agents in paediatric department at Sir Sayajirao General (SSG Hospital, Vadodara to assess the prescribing patterns of antimicrobial agents. All information about the drugs details recorded in pre-tested Proforma that was finalized by our Pharmacology department. Results: Total 350 prescriptions containing 690 antimicrobial drugs were prescribed in patients during study. Of them aminoglycosides (233; 33.77% was frequently prescribed followed by β-lactam group (191; 27.68 and cephalosporins (176; 25.5%. Average numbers of antimicrobials per prescription was 1.97.Out of 690 antimicrobial prescribed, 576(83.48% were prescribed by generic name, while 114(16.52% were prescribed by trade name. Total numbers of antimicrobial prescribed by parenteral route were 599 (86.81%, while only 91(13.18% antimicrobial agents were prescribed by oral route. Out of 350 prescriptions two or more than two antimicrobial agents were prescribed in 249(71.14% prescriptions, while 101(28.85% prescriptions constitute one antimicrobial agent. Conclusion: Results indicates need for improving the prescribing pattern of drugs and minimizing the use of antimicrobial agents. It is suggested that further detail analysis to judge the rationality of the therapy is necessary.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yannick Fleury; Patrick Le Chevalier; Benjamin Brillet; Eric Balnois; Camille Jégou; Florie Desriac

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated ...

  11. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, K.; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphyl...

  12. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND ITS GLOBAL SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery during the 20th century, antimicrobial agents (antibiotics and related medicinal drugs have substantially reduced the threat posed by infectious diseases. The use of these “wonder drugs”, combined with improvements in sanitation, housing, and nutrition, and the advent of widespread immunization programmes, has led to a dramatic drop in deaths from diseases that were previously widespread, untreatable, and frequently fatal. Over the years, antimicrobials have saved the lives and eased the suffering of millions of people. By helping to bring many serious infectious diseases under control, these drugs hav also contributed to the major gains in life expectancy experienced during the latter part of the last century. These gains are now seriously jeopardized by another recent development: the emergence and spread of microbes that are resistant to cheap and effective first-choice, or “first- line” drugs. The bacterial infections which contribute most to human disease are also those in which emerging microbial resistance is most evident: diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory tract infections, meningitis, sexually transmitted infections, and hospital-acquired infections. Some important examples include penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multi-resistant salmonellae, and multi-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of resistance to drugs commonly used to treat malaria is of particular concern, as is the emerging resistance to anti-HIV drugs. Treatment, resu.lting in prolonged illness and greater risk of death, Treatment failures also lead to longer periods of infectivity, which increase the numbers of infected people moving in the community and thus expose the general population to the risk of contracting a resistant strain of infection. When infections become resistant to first-line antimicrobials, treatment has to be switched

  13. Cultural Considerations in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈嫔荣

    2009-01-01

    Language is the expression of human communication through which knowledge, belief, and behavior can be experi-enced, explained, and shared. It influences the way the speakers perceive the world. But as it has been long taken for granted, translation deals only with language. Cultural perspective, however, has never been brought into discussion. This paper first analyses the definitions of translation and culture, and then discusses why we should take culture into consideration and in the end, two translating strategies:domestication and foreignization are introduced.

  14. Cultural Considerations in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈嫔荣

    2009-01-01

    Language is the expression of human communication through which knowledge, belief, and behavior can be experi- enced, explained, and shared. It influences the way the speakers perceive the world. But as it has been long taken for granted, translation deals only with language. Cultural perspective, however, has never been brought into discussion. This paper first analyses the definitions of translation and culture, and then discusses why we should take culture into consideration and in the end, two translating strategies: domestication and foreignization are introduced.

  15. Part 8. Deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses considerations of fast breeder reactor development and deployment from a national perspective. Nations vary greatly in their expertise and interest relative to nuclear power, and hence a single set of steps to be taken by a nation in decision-making on breeder development and deployment cannot be presented. The approach taken in this report is to present discussions on key factors influencing the breeder development and deployment decisions, especially in non-breeder nations, by drawing upon historical perspectives of the Light Water Reactor for comparison

  16. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  17. Antimicrobial activity of Argemone ochroleuca Sweet (Chicalote)

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Daniel REYES; Celia Jimena PEÑA; Canales, Margarita; Jiménez, Manuel; Samuel MERÁZ; Tzasna HERNANDEZ

    2011-01-01

    Argemone ochroleuca Sweet (Papaveraceae) is used to treat eye infection, respiratory and dermatological disorders in Tepotzotlán, State of México (México). The aim of this work was to investigate antimicrobial activity of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts from aerial parts of A. ochroleuca. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against thirteen bacteria and nine fungal strains. Only methanol extract showed antimicrobial activity. S. aureus (MIC= 125 ¿g/mL) and C. neoformans (MIC=...

  18. Antimicrobial resistance in Libya: 1970-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw; Rahouma, Amal; Tawil, Khaled; Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Franka, Ezzedin

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is a major health problem that affects the whole world. Providing information on the past state of antimicrobial resistance in Libya may assist the health authorities in addressing the problem more effectively in the future. Information was obtained mainly from Highwire Press (including PubMed) search for the period 1970-2011 using the terms ‘antibiotic resistance in Libya’, ‘antimicrobial resistance in Libya’, ‘tuberculosis in Libya’, and ‘primary and acqui...

  19. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  20. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Novel remedies in the battle against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains are urgently needed, and one obvious approach involves antimicrobial peptides and mimics hereof. The impact of a- and ß-peptoid as well as ß(3)-amino acid modifications on the activity profile against ß......-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...... inactive peptides. Nevertheless, differences in hemolytic activities indicate that a careful choice of backbone design constitutes a significant parameter in the search for effective cationic antimicrobial peptidomimetics targeting specific bacteria....

  1. Spermicidal Activity of the Safe Natural Antimicrobial Peptide Subtilosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Chikindas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, a condition affecting millions of women each year, is primarily caused by the gram-variable organism Gardnerella vaginalis. A number of organisms associated with BV cases have been reported to develop multidrug resistance, leading to the need for alternative therapies. Previously, we reported the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin has proven antimicrobial activity against G. vaginalis, but not against the tested healthy vaginal microbiota of lactobacilli. After conducting tissue sensitivity assays using an ectocervical tissue model, we determined that human cells remained viable after prolonged exposures to partially-purified subtilosin, indicating the compound is safe for human use. Subtilosin was shown to eliminate the motility and forward progression of human spermatozoa in a dose-dependent manner, and can therefore be considered a general spermicidal agent. These results suggest subtilosin would be a valuable component in topical personal care products aimed at contraception and BV prophylaxis and treatment.

  2. Antimicrobial and fluoride release capacity of orthodontic bonding materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Machado Caldeira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and fluoride releasing capacity of 3 bonding materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty nine specimens with standardized surface smoothness and dimensions were prepared. The antimicrobial capacity of the materials against S. mutans, L. casei and C. albicans was evaluated by determining the percentage of growth inhibition of these microorganisms in an inoculated medium, obtained by optical density readouts on a spectrophotometer. The potential to interfere in microbial growth on the surface of the studied materials was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The fluoride release capacity in ultrapure water for 14 days was analyzed by means of ion chromatography. RESULTS: The PLUS group presented the highest percentage of microbial inhibition and the most contamination-free surface. The FUJI group presented the best fluoride release capacity. CONCLUSIONS: The TransbondTM Plus Color Change was the one that presented the best general behavior considering the evaluated aspects.

  3. Design considerations for mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two companion reports deal with design considerations for improving performance of mechanical face seals, one of family of devices used in general area of fluid sealing of rotating shafts. One report deals with basic seal configuration and other with lubrication of seal.

  4. A review of poly(lactic acid)-based materials for antimicrobial packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawakkal, Intan S M A; Cran, Marlene J; Miltz, Joseph; Bigger, Stephen W

    2014-08-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) can be synthesized from renewable bio-derived monomers and, as such, it is an alternative to conventional petroleum-based polymers. Since PLA is a relatively new polymer, much effort has been directed toward its development in order to make it an acceptable and effective option to the more traditional petroleum-based polymers. Commercially, PLA has received considerable attention in food packaging applications with a focus on films and coatings that are suitable for short shelf life and ready-to-eat food products. The potential for PLA to be used in active packaging has also been recognized by a number of researchers. This review focuses on the use of PLA in antimicrobial systems for food packaging applications and explores the engineering characteristics and antimicrobial activity of PLA films incorporated and/or coated with antimicrobial agents. PMID:25039867

  5. Non-proliferation considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reiterates the Indian viewpoint that consideration of ''proliferation resistance'' is outside the terms of reference of Working Group 4 as agreed at the Washington Conference. The discussions in WG4 should therefore cover only safeguards aspects. The paper goes on to critisize the various assessment factors introduced in INFCE/DEP./WG-4/104 and the various alternative technologies proposed. The Indian view is reinstated that if a country requires reprocessing based on its nuclear energy programmes and priorities, there should be no hindrance. International safeguards should be applied to all nuclear materials in all countries without discrimination or differentiation between civil and military programmes. The paper concludes that non-proliferation is essentially a political matter and has no technical solution

  6. Percutaneous Penetration - Methodological Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, Rikke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2014-01-01

    developed to replace methods involving experimental animals. The results obtained from these methods are decided not only by the chemical or product tested, but to a significant degree also by the experimental set-up and decisions made by the investigator during the planning phase. The present Mini......Studies on percutaneous penetration are needed to assess the hazards after unintended occupational skin exposures to industrial products as well as the efficacy after intended consumer exposure to topically applied medicinal or cosmetic products. During recent decades, a number of methods have been......Review discusses some of the existing and well-known experimental in vitro and in vivo methods for studies of percutaneous penetration together with some more recent and promising methods. After this, some considerations and recommendations about advantages and limitations of the different methods and their...

  7. Microbiology--Safety Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sheryl K.

    This paper discusses the risk assessment associated with microbiology instruction based on grade level, general control measures, appropriate activities for middle school and high school students, the preparation and sterilization of equipment, and safe handling techniques. Appended are instructions and figures on making wire loops and the…

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Woo; Lee, Joon Ha; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species. PMID:27167617

  9. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species. PMID:27167617

  10. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Woo Kim

    Full Text Available Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST, Gene Ontology (GO, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species.

  11. Antimicrobial use in swine production and its effect on the swine gut microbiota and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Chénier, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobials have been used in swine production at subtherapeutic levels since the early 1950s to increase feed efficiency and promote growth. In North America, a number of antimicrobials are available for use in swine. However, the continuous administration of subtherapeutic, low concentrations of antimicrobials to pigs also provides selective pressure for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and resistance determinants. For this reason, subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in livestock remains a source of controversy and concern. The swine gut microbiota demonstrates a number of changes in response to antimicrobial administration depending on the dosage, duration of treatment, age of the pigs, and gut location that is sampled. Both culture-independent and -dependent studies have also shown that the swine gut microbiota contains a large number of antimicrobial resistance determinants even in the absence of antimicrobial exposure. Heavy metals, such as zinc and copper, which are often added at relatively high doses to swine feed, may also play a role in maintaining antimicrobial resistance and in the stability of the swine gut microbiota. This review focuses on the use of antimicrobials in swine production, with an emphasis on the North American regulatory context, and their effect on the swine gut microbiota and on antimicrobial resistance determinants in the gut microbiota. PMID:26414105

  12. The relationship between prior antimicrobial prescription and meningitis: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David; Ashworth, Mark; Dregan, Alex; White, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research into the role of the human microbiome in maintaining health has identified the potentially harmful impact of antimicrobials. Aim The association with bacterial and viral meningitis following antimicrobial prescription during the previous year was investigated to determine whether antimicrobials have a deleterious effect on the nasopharyngeal microbiome. Design and setting A case-control study (1:4 cases to controls) was conducted examining the rate of previous antimicrobial exposure in cases of meningitis and in a matched control group. Data from a UK primary care clinical database were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Results A total of 7346 cases of meningitis were identified, 3307 (45%) viral, 1812 (25%) bacterial, and 2227 (30%) unspecified. The risks of viral (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.24 to 2.68) or bacterial (AOR 1.98; 95% CI = 1.71 to 2.30) meningitis were both increased following antimicrobial prescription in the preceding year. Patients who received ≥4 antimicrobial prescriptions in the preceding year were at significantly increased risk of all types of meningitis (AOR 2.85; 95% CI = 2.44 to 3.34), bacterial meningitis (AOR 3.06; 95% CI = 2.26 to 4.15) and viral meningitis (AOR 3.23; 95% CI = 2.55 to 4.08) compared to their matched controls. Conclusion There was an increased risk of meningitis following antimicrobial prescription in the previous year. It is possible that this increase was due to an effect of antimicrobials on the microbiome or reflected an increased general susceptibility to infections in these patients. PMID:26965030

  13. Nanoscale imaging and hydrophobicity mapping of the antimicrobial effect of copper on bacterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2016-09-01

    Copper has a long historical role in the arena of materials with antimicrobial properties. Various forms of copper ranging from surfaces to impregnation in textiles and particles, have attracted considerable interest owing to their versatility, potency, chemical stability, and low cost. However, the effects and mechanisms of their antimicrobial action is still unclear. In this study, the effect of copper particles on Escherichia coli was studied at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Time-lapse AFM images at the single cell level show the morphological changes on live E. coli during antimicrobial treatment, in which for the first time, this process was followed in situ on the same cell over time. AFM-based hydrophobicity mapping further showed that incubating cells with Cu decreased the surface hydrophobicity with an increase of incubation time. Specifically, we are able to visualize both morphology and physico-chemical nature of the bacterial cell surface change in response to copper treatment, leading to the membrane damage and cytoplasm leakage. Overall, the time-lapse AFM imaging combined with hydrophobicity mapping approach presented here provides spatio-temporal insight into the antimicrobial mechanisms of copper at the single cell level, and can be applied to design of better metallic antimicrobial materials as well as investigate different microorganisms. PMID:27258941

  14. Purification and Characterization of a New Antimicrobial Peptide from Skin Secretions of Bufo Kavirensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zare Zardini

    2014-04-01

    Results: A novel antimicrobial peptide was obtained from skin secretions. This peptide is composed of 20 amino acids. This peptide does not present any similarity with the other antimicrobial peptides from the amphibians. Thus, it was named Maximin Bk. The peptide was subjected to antimicrobial activity assays. The Buforin–Kpeptide showed considerable antimicrobial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria (minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC, 8.1 to 20.78 µg/ml as well as fungi (MIC, 25.7 to 35.6 mg/ml. Moreover, this peptide showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative than against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. Maximin Bk showed virtually low hemolytic activity, which, at a concentration of 100 μg/mL, induced 5% hemolysis. Thus, a very slight haemolytic activity was obtained against human erythrocytes. Conclusion: On the basis of the biological effects, Buforin–Kcan can be regarded as the potent agent for treatment of various microbial diseases.

  15. CONSIDERATIONS ON URBAN SOILS

    OpenAIRE

    Radu Lacatusu

    2005-01-01

    Urban soil is an material that has been manipulated, disturbed or transported by man’s activities in the urban environment and is used as a medium for plant growth and for constructions. The physical, chemical, and biological properties are generally less favorable as a rooting medium than soil found on the natural landscape. The main characteristics of urban soils are: great vertical and spatial variability; modified soil structure leading to compaction; presence of a surface crust; modified...

  16. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  17. Next-Generation Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Belkum, Alex van; Dunne, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has emerged as one of the most-significant health care problems of the new millennium, and the clinical microbiology laboratory plays a central role in optimizing the therapeutic management of patients with infection. This minireview explores the potential value of innovative methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms that could provide valuable alternatives to existing methodologies in the very near future.

  18. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H S; Choi, B S; Kwon, K C; Lee, S O; Kwak, H J; Lee, C H

    2000-08-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue 2 are reported. The synthesis of 2 was accomplished from bisnoralcohol 3. The spermidine moiety was introduced via reductive amination of an appropriately functionalized 3beta-aminosterol with spermidinyl aldehyde 17 utilizing sodium triacetoxyborohydride as the reducing agent. Compound 2 shows weaker antimicrobial activity than squalamine. PMID:11003150

  19. Antimicrobial activity of Ethiopian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bernášková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    In vitro antimicrobial activity of eighteen Ethiopian medicinal plant species that were selected based on ethnobotanical information on their traditional use to treat infectious diseases was determined by the broth microdilution method. The antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts of selected plants against potentially pathogenic microorganism such as Bacillus cereus, Bacteroides fragilis, Candida albicans, Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytog...

  20. Sixty years of antimicrobial use in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This, the last in our series of feature articles celebrating 125 years of Veterinary Record, aims to provide an overview of antimicrobial use in animals. Starting with a journey through the history of antimicrobial use in animals, Luca Guardabassi gives his opinion on the current zoonotic risks...

  1. Enzyme-Responsive Polymeric Vesicles for Bacterial-Strain-Selective Delivery of Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yamin; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses serious public health concerns and antibiotic misuse/abuse further complicates the situation; thus, it remains a considerable challenge to optimize/improve the usage of currently available drugs. We report a general strategy to construct a bacterial strain-selective delivery system for antibiotics based on responsive polymeric vesicles. In response to enzymes including penicillin G amidase (PGA) and β-lactamase (Bla), which are closely associated with drug-resistant bacterial strains, antibiotic-loaded polymeric vesicles undergo self-immolative structural rearrangement and morphological transitions, leading to sustained release of antibiotics. Enhanced stability, reduced side effects, and bacterial strain-selective drug release were achieved. Considering that Bla is the main cause of bacterial resistance to β-lactam antibiotic drugs, as a further validation, we demonstrate methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)-triggered release of antibiotics from Bla-degradable polymeric vesicles, in vitro inhibition of MRSA growth, and enhanced wound healing in an in vivo murine model. PMID:26694087

  2. General considerations on the enforcement (application) of law

    OpenAIRE

    Berlingher Remus Daniel; Sabau Georgeta Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Law is a system of norms developed and/or recognized by the state as norms guiding human behaviour according to the values of that particular society, establishing rights and obligations, principles and definitions, structures and relationships of social organization and activity that must be obeyed and which, when necessary, are insured by the coercive force of the state. Thus, the development of this system of norms is not an end in itself, but is intended to regulate all social relations, ...

  3. General Considerations on the Influence of Prices on Business

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Elena TUREAC

    2006-01-01

    In most companies, there is an ongoing conflict between managers in charge of covering costs (finance and accounting) and managers in charge of satisfying customers (marketing and sales). Accounting journals warn on prices that fail to cover full costs, while marketing journals argue that customer willingness to pay must be the sole driver of prices. The conflict between these views wastes company resources and leads to pricing decisions that are imperfect compromises. Profitable pricing invo...

  4. General outstanding considerations on legal issues applied to autonomous vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Martinesco, Andrea; Etgens, Victor H.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Even if there are many differences between the autonomous vehicles and aviation, we have tried to show that the long history of automation in airplanes can be a source of inspiration to understand some legal aspects necessary to allow autonomous cars on the streets. Independent on the technological evolution, the premise of this work is to ask the questions that must be faced if a fatal accident involving an autonomous vehicle occurs. In this sense, criminal issues w...

  5. Dyslexia in general practice education: considerations for recognition and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    Dyslexia is a common developmental learning difficulty, which persists throughout life. It is highly likely that those working in primary care will know, or even work with someone who has dyslexia. Dyslexia can impact on performance in postgraduate training and exams. The stereotypical characteristics of dyslexia, such as literacy difficulties, are often not obvious in adult learners. Instead, recognition requires a holistic approach to evaluating personal strengths and difficulties, in the context of a supportive relationship. Strategies to support dyslexic learners should consider recommendations made in formal diagnostic reports, and aim to address self-awareness and coping skills. PMID:27306461

  6. Metabolic acidosis: neo-considerations for general surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L C E; Abah, U; Bean, E; Gupta, S

    2012-11-01

    Hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis is a documented complication of neobladder formation. However, it usually improves with time and is mild. Severe and persistent metabolic acidosis may manifest when patients undergo further surgery for other reasons. Neobladder formation following radical cystectomy or cystoprostatectomy is becoming increasingly common, and surgeons treating patients with neobladders should recognise and treat metabolic acidosis with intravenous fluids and bicarbonate. PMID:23131216

  7. General Consideration on Legal Tax Evasion vs. Tax Fraud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavia-Daniela Steriopol

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is a brief overview of tax evasion as a complex social and economicphenomenon, of utmost importance, that today’s states confront with; its consequences seek to limitas much as possible, by legal and fiscal means, the eradication, which, at this point, is virtuallyimpossible. Tax evasion can be analysed from two points of view, the legal and the illegal aspect ofthe phenomenon or the fiscal fraud. The “fiscal paradises” had a very important role in the last years’activity.

  8. General Consideration on Legal Tax Evasion vs. Tax Fraud

    OpenAIRE

    Octavia-Daniela Steriopol; Varvara Licuta Coman; Mirela Costache

    2010-01-01

    The article is a brief overview of tax evasion as a complex social and economic phenomenon, of utmost importance, that today’s states confront with; its consequences seek to limit as much as possible, by legal and fiscal means, the eradication, which, at this point, is virtually impossible. Tax evasion can be analysed from two points of view, the legal and the illegal aspect of the phenomenon or the fiscal fraud. The “fiscal paradises” had a very important role in the last years’ activity....

  9. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators - general and anesthetic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy G. Rapsang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia, special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary.

  10. General Considerations on the Influence of Prices on Business

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Elena Tureac

    2006-01-01

    In most companies, there is an ongoing conflict between managers in charge of covering costs (finance and accounting) and managers incharge of satisfying customers (marketing and sales). Accounting journals warn on prices that fail to cover full costs, while marketing journals arguethat customer willingness to pay must be the sole driver of prices. The conflict between these views wastes company resources and leads to pricingdecisions that are imperfect compromises. Profitable pricing involve...

  11. General Considerations on the Influence of Prices on Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Elena Tureac

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In most companies, there is an ongoing conflict between managers in charge of covering costs (finance and accounting and managers incharge of satisfying customers (marketing and sales. Accounting journals warn on prices that fail to cover full costs, while marketing journals arguethat customer willingness to pay must be the sole driver of prices. The conflict between these views wastes company resources and leads to pricingdecisions that are imperfect compromises. Profitable pricing involves an integration of costs and customer value. To achieve that integration,however, both need to let go of misleading ideas and to form a common vision of what profitability means.

  12. General considerations on the enforcement (application of law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlingher Remus Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Law is a system of norms developed and/or recognized by the state as norms guiding human behaviour according to the values of that particular society, establishing rights and obligations, principles and definitions, structures and relationships of social organization and activity that must be obeyed and which, when necessary, are insured by the coercive force of the state. Thus, the development of this system of norms is not an end in itself, but is intended to regulate all social relations, guide human behaviours and achieve the aims of the law. The enforcement of law is the process of translating legal rules into practice, through which the subjects of law obey and execute legal norms, and state authorities apply them, depending on their competence. The enforcement of law depends on a number of factors that shape law, such as its natural framework of existence, the historical context and the ethnic and national particularities of that community’s development, the economic factor or framework, the framework and particularities of the political system, the cultural-ideological framework or factor, the international framework or factor, etc.

  13. INSURANCE MARKET. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF INSURANCES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARINEL NEDELUŢ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Insurance is a contract made by a company or society, or by the state, to provide a guarantee for loss, damage, illness, death etc in return for regular payments. In other words it is a means by which one pays a relatively small known cost for protection against an uncertain and much larger cost. Still, this contract (insurance policy makes it possible for the insured to cover only losses that are measurable in terms of money and caused strictly by hazardous events, independent from own doing. If no such events should happen, the benefits won’t exist in a tangible, material form, but will take the shape of security against ruin. Since the insurance industry has developed more during the last decade due to the powerful players that have entered the market, the services provided by the insurance companies, and not only their products have evolved a lot in order to meet the requirements of the consumers, and to make them familiar with this type of investments. Therefore all the means of advertising became essential in this process of implementation and familiarization with this area of activity: mass-media advertising, insurance brokerage companies, the internet are all parts of this process.

  14. Stainless steels: general considerations and rates of crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the different types of stainless steels, and presents the laws governing the rates of crack growth for several stainless steels extensively used for the manufacture of structures in nuclear power plants. The laws are not discussed in detail in the report. After a brief review of the development of stainless steels, the main categories of stainless steels, their mechanical characteristics and corrosion resistance, are presented. Finally, the rates of crack growth are presented for various stainless steels, mainly austenitic. The study overall aim is an investigation of the cracking in the 900 MWe primary pump thermal barriers and shafts

  15. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitrat V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virginie Vitrat,1 Serge Hautefeuille,2 Cécile Janssen,1 David Bougon,2 Michel Sirodot,2 Leonardo Pagani1,3 1Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Infectious Diseases Unit, 2Intensive Care Unit, Annecy-Genevois Hospital Center (CHANGE, Annecy, France; 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Bolzano Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy Abstract: Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. Keywords: ICU, antimicrobial therapies, antimicrobial stewardship, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, antimicrobial resistance, early diagnosis

  16. Synergistic combination dry powders for inhaled antimicrobial therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Desmond; Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chan, Hak-Kim; Tan, Reginald B. H.

    2013-06-01

    Combination products play an important role in medicine as they offer improved clinical effectiveness, enhanced patient adherence, and reduced administrative costs. In combination antimicrobial therapy, the desired outcome is to extend the antimicrobial spectrum and to achieve a possible synergistic effect. However, adverse antagonistic species may sometimes emerge from such combinations, leading to treatment failure. Therefore, it is crucial to screen the drug candidates for compatibility and possible antagonistic interactions. This work aims to develop a novel synergistic dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation for antimicrobial combination therapy via the pulmonary route. Binary and ternary combinations were prepared via spray drying on a BUCHI® Nano Spray Dryer B-90. All powders were within the respirable size range, and were consisted of spherical particles that were slightly corrugated. The powers yielded fine particle fractions (of the loaded dose) of over 40% when dispersed using an Aerolizer® DPI at 60 L/min. Time-kill studies carried out against common respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii at 1x the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) over 24 hours revealed no antagonistic behavior for both combinations. While the interactions were generally found to be indifferent, a favorable synergistic effect was detected in the binary combination when it was tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria.

  17. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  18. A STUDY OF PRESCRIPTION PATTERN OF ANTIMICROBIAL USAGE IN EAR, NOSE AND THROAT INFECTIONS OF A RURAL TEACHING HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Guru Prasad; Kulkarni; Rajasekhar; Rajesh; Raghavendra,; Vinodraj; Advaitha; Nikhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Infections of the ear, nose and throat (E.N.T) are common clinical problems occurring in the general population. Prescription pattern study of ENT infections was conducted in ENT OPD of a rural teaching hospital with the objective of evaluating prescribing pattern of drugs and to study the rationality of the antimicrobial therapy. The study showed that in the 768 prescriptions, the AMAs (Antimicrobial agents) were indicated therapeutically in 79.68%, prophylactically in 9.16% ...

  19. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuirulan Pushpanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries.

  1. Antimicrobial outcomes in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Stalder, Kenneth R.; Woloszko, Jean

    2015-03-01

    Plasma is referred to as the fourth state of matter and is frequently generated in the environment of a strong electric field. The result consists of highly reactive species--ions, electrons, reactive atoms and molecules, and UV radiation. Plasma Medicine unites a number of fields, including Physics, Plasma Chemistry, Cell Biology, Biochemistry, and Medicine. The treatment modality utilizes Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP), which is able to sterilize and treat microbes in a nonthermal manner. These gas-based plasma systems operate at close to room temperature and atmospheric pressure, making them very practical for a range of potential treatments and are highly portable for clinical use throughout the health care system. The hypothesis is that gas based plasma kills bacteria, fungus, and viruses but spares mammalian cells. This paper will review systematic work which shows examples of systems and performance in regards to antimicrobial effects and the sparing of mammalian cells. The mechanism of action will be discussed, as well as dosing for the treatment of microbial targets, including sterilization processes, another important healthcare need. In addition, commercial systems will be overviewed and compared, along with evidence-based, patient results. The range of treatments cover wound treatment and biofilms, as well as antimicrobial treatment, with little chance for resistance and tolerance, as in drug regimens. Current clinical studies include applications in dentistry, food treatment, cancer treatment, wound treatment for bacteria and biofilms, and systems to combat health care related infections.

  2. Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs: Role in Optimizing Infectious Disease Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kubin, Christine J.

    2008-01-01

    Given increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance and the resulting limited treatment options, the treatment of hospital-acquired infections poses a significant challenge to healthcare providers. Optimization and conservation of current antimicrobials are necessary. Antimicrobial stewardship programs aim to optimize the use of antimicrobial agents through a multidisciplinary effort utilizing different strategies (prospective audit and feedback, formulary restriction and preauthorization, ed...

  3. CONSIDERATIONS ON URBAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lacatusu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban soil is an material that has been manipulated, disturbed or transported by man’s activities in the urban environment and is used as a medium for plant growth and for constructions. The physical, chemical, and biological properties are generally less favorable as a rooting medium than soil found on the natural landscape. The main characteristics of urban soils are: great vertical and spatial variability; modified soil structure leading to compaction; presence of a surface crust; modified soil reaction, usually elevated; restricted aeration and water drainage; modified abundance of chemical elements, interrupted nutrient cycling and soil organism activity; presence of anthropic materials contaminants and pollutants; modified soil temperature regime. The urbic horizon is designated as U (always capital letter and for indication of processes are used different small letters. It is necessary elaboration a new classification of urban soils for our country.

  4. Some Generalities About Generality

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2015-01-01

    We survey a variety of cosmological problems where the issue of generality has arisen. This is aimed at providing a wider context for many claims and deductions made when philosophers of science choose cosmological problems for investigation. We show how simple counting arguments can be used to characterise parts of the general solution of Einstein's equations when various matter fields are present and with different spatial topologies. Applications are described to the problem of singularities, static cosmological models, cosmic no hair theorems, the late-time isotropisation of cosmological models, and the number of parameters needed to describe a general astronomical universe.

  5. Nutritional considerations for ultraendurance performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, E A

    1991-06-01

    The nutritional considerations of the ultraendurance athlete center around proper caloric and nutrient intake during training as well as adequate energy and fluid replacement during competition to maintain optimal performance. Energy needs of ultraendurance athletes during training vary widely, depending upon duration, intensity, and type of exercise training. These athletes may train several hours daily, thus risking inadequate caloric intake that can lead to chronic fatigue, weight loss, and impaired physical performance. It is not known whether protein needs are increased in ultraendurance athletes as a result of extended exercise training. Additionally, micronutrient needs may be altered for these athletes while dietary intake is generally over the RDA because of high caloric intake. Prior to competition, ultraendurance athletes should consider glycogen supercompensation and a prerace meal eaten 4 hrs before as a means of improving performance. Carbohydrate feedings during prolonged exercise can significantly affect performance. During events lasting over several hours, sodium sweat losses and/or the consumption of sodium-free fluids may precipitate hyponatremia. PMID:1844990

  6. Benzofuran as a promising scaffold for the synthesis of antimicrobial and antibreast cancer agents: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadamali Khodarahmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzofuran as an important heterocyclic compound is extensively found in natural products as well as synthetic materials. Since benzofuran drivatives display a diverse array of pharmacological activities, an interest in developing new biologically active agents from benzofuran is still under consideration. This review highlights recent findings on biological activities of benzofuran derivatives as antimicrobial and antibreast cancer agents and lays emphasis on the importance of benzofurans as a major source for drug design and development.

  7. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF PLANTS BELONGING TO LAMIACEAE JUSS. FAMILY

    OpenAIRE

    Shanayda M.I.; Pokryshko O.V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. One of the important sources of therapeutic and prophylactic agents of modern medicines are essential oils of medicinal plants. Essential oils are the main group of biologically active substances of a number of plants belonging to Lamiaceae Juss. Family. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae Family many scientists associated with containing of essential oils. In this regard, considerable interest presents the comparative analysis of the antimicrobial ...

  8. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Folkesson

    Full Text Available Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  9. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  10. The use of polyurethane foam as an antimicrobial dressing material in hand surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebil Yesiloglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane foam is generally used in negative pressure-assisted wound closure therapy. It provides an antimicrobial environment around the wound, while reducing the rate of skin maceration. The authors used polyurethane foam in routine hand dressings after hand surgery operations that were performed for both congenital and acquired purposes. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(3.000: 91-92

  11. Antimicrobial activities of tea catechins and theaflavins and tea extracts against Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of seven green tea catechins and four black tea theaflavins, generally referred to as flavonoids, as well as the aqueous extracts (infusions) of 36 commercial black, green, oolong, white, and herbal teas against Bacillus cereus (strain RM3190) incubated at 2...

  12. Engineering radioecology: Methodological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term ''radioecology'' has been widely recognized in scientific and technical societies. At the same time, this scientific school (radioecology) does not have a precise/generally acknowledged structure, unified methodical basis, fixed subjects of investigation, etc. In other words, radioecology is a vast, important but rather amorphous conglomerate of various ideas, amalgamated mostly by their involvement in biospheric effects of ionizing radiation and some conceptual stereotypes. This paradox was acceptable up to a certain time. However, with the termination of the Cold War and because of remarkable political changes in the world, it has become possible to convert the problem of environmental restoration from the scientific sphere in particularly practical terms. Already the first steps clearly showed an imperfection of existing technologies, managerial and regulatory schemes; lack of qualified specialists, relevant methods and techniques; uncertainties in methodology of decision-making, etc. Thus, building up (or maybe, structuring) of special scientific and technological basis, which the authors call ''engineering radioecology'', seems to be an important task. In this paper they endeavored to substantiate the last thesis and to suggest some preliminary ideas concerning the subject matter of engineering radioecology

  13. Considerations on Contemporary University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor PĂTRĂUŢĂ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available University is the place where learning, training, culture and research are represented in the most serious reason that should be open not only to a certain age, but must provide viable alternatives for continuing education and lifelong learning for all age groups. We must have regard not only a university student, but for all those willing and capable of personal and spiritual development, without slipping, however, to the status of a "school for all. "Providing lifelong education is one of the objectives achieved so far than the Romanian higher education. In general, when talking about the University tend to relate either to the requirements of socio-economic or other levels of organization of education in order to define and clarify the changes and transformations that they know and must know their higher education. The state of the academic community need to reflect the understanding of change processes taking place in university education, new educational rationality, arising as a result of assimilation by the University of new goals and objectives.

  14. Considerations about energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As in any branch also in nuclear reactors there are attempts to forecast future as from the technology point of view so from the amount and economic effectiveness of planned capacities. It is frequently forgotten that electricity and maybe further products from nuclear energy cannot be easy stored and that there is strong feedback among overall economy and energy in its different forms and general decrease of production leads to the decrease of electricity (oil, gas) use and even to the greater decrease of its prices. This altogether is leading to the demand of deeper understanding of the energy flow, including cross-frontier trade and supply and R and D planning including very long time intervals to keep industry and life standard, which may need new technology development and bringing to the functioning new industry branches. There are described various aspects of the problem and possible conclusions for us in the situation of growing public demands and decreasing raw material base. Material is based on works and presentations from the INPRO collaborative project RMI 'Meeting energy needs in the period of raw materials insufficiency during the twenty first century' and older works. (Author)

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Drosera rotundifolia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Kačániová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Droseracae spp. is widely used in folk medicine. In the present study, the antimicrobial activities of the four Drosera rotundifolia L. (D8.11, D15.12, 18.10, 8.11 samples were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion method against grampositive bacteria (Bacillus thurigiensis, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and gramnegative bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella enteritidis.  The results of the disk diffusion method showed very different activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract Drosera rotundifolia L. against Salmonella enteritidis was found at Drosera rotundifolia (D8.11.

  16. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  17. THE COMMUNICATIVE STYLE OF STAFF LEADERS. SOME GENERAL THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE LIGHT OF THE ACTIVITY OF DIRECTION / EL ESTILO DE COMUNICACIÓN DEL DIRECTIVO. ALGUNAS CONSIDERACIONES TEÓRICAS GENERALES A LA LUZ DE LA ACTIVIDAD DE DIRECCIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Peña Valdés

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the communication style of the staff directive, farther beyond the interpretations made by some authors, considering it as a style of direction. Some ideas about the activity of direction in education are focused, as a natural scenery where the activity of communication is conceived, developed, evaluated and feedback, in contrast to some other authors and works that do it from a perspective of a style of direction without a rigorous scientific foundation, and without establishing the limits between one classification and the other, this is a well discussed issue, on authors point of view is the least important. Our considerations are based on the idea that every person has its own way of communicating that any position one may take is intertwined to the natural method and in some occasion’s reductions ideas singularize it. We are in favour of the criterion that the style of communication of staff leaders is an indissoluble and inseparable aspect of directing competence. Some arguments are offered in this level of analysis; the indicators and categories through which the first can be assessed, departing from the individuals of the activity of direction’s behaviour are offered, as well as a matrix for the collection of the data and their alternatives for processing them.

  18. The impact of antimicrobial allergy labels on antimicrobial usage in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Trubiano, Jason A; Leung, Vivian K.; Chu, Man Y.; Leon J. Worth; Slavin, Monica A.; Thursky, Karin A

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic allergy labels are associated with sub-optimal prescribing patterns and poorer clinical outcomes in non-cancer populations, but the effect of labelling on antimicrobial usage in patients with cancer is unknown. Findings A retrospective review of hospitalized patients admitted to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (2010-2012) identified 23 % of cancer patients (n = 198) with an antimicrobial allergy label (AA). Comparison of those with an antimicrobial allergy label to tho...

  19. Environmental Consideration in Tax Policy Design

    OpenAIRE

    John Whalley

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses how environmental considerations will affect tax policy in the decades ahead. It argues that in the future, interactions between tax and environmental policy are likely to go well beyond recent discussion of double dividend issues and internalization of environmental externalities via tax policy will be the goal, which inevitably will involve the particular rather than the general. As a result, notions of neutrality which dominate current thinking on tax design will come ...

  20. Antimicrobial dihydroisocoumarins from Crassocephalum biafrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabopda, Turibio K; Fotso, Gislain W; Ngoupayo, Joseph; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2009-09-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the CHCl (3)-soluble extract of the stem bark of Crassocephalum biafrae (Asteraceae) resulted in the isolation of three new dihydroisocoumarins, named biafraecoumarins A ( 1), B ( 2), and C ( 3); two known triterpenes ( 4 and 5); and a known ceramide ( 6). The structures of the new compounds were established as 7-but-15-enyl-6,8-dihydroxy-3( R)-penta-9,11-dienylisochroman-1-one ( 1), 7-butyl-6,8-dihydroxy-3( R)-penta-9,11-dienylisochroman-1-one ( 2), and 7-butyl-6,8-dihydroxy-3( R)-pent-10-enylisochroman-1-one ( 3) using spectroscopic data. Compounds 1- 3 exhibit low to significant antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas picketti, Trichphyton longifusus, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani, Candida albicans, and Candida glabrata. PMID:19350487

  1. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, A; Mares, M; Rios, J L; Canton, E; Gobernado, M

    1987-04-01

    The antimicrobial in vitro activity of 14 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids was investigated by agar diffusion and agar dilution methods against several genera of microorganisms that included Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lysteria, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Shigella, Mycobacterium and Candida. Anolobine was the most active compound against grampositive bacteria with MIC90 between 12 and 50 mg/l; less active were anonaine, lysicamine and liriodenine. All the alkaloids of the noraporphine and oxoaporphine groups, with the exception of isopiline, showed activity against Mycobacterium phlei (MIC 6-25 mg/l). Candida albicans ATCC26555 was inhibited by anonaine, nornantenine and xylopine (MIC 3-12 mg/l). None of the alkaloids tested had a significant activity against gramnegative rods. The action against susceptible microorganisms was bactericidal. PMID:3615557

  2. Antimicrobial activities of Barringtonia acutangula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Polfreman, David; MacGeachan, Jodie; Gray, Alexander I

    2005-06-01

    Crude extracts and VLC fractions from the stem bark of Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn (Fam. Lecythidaceae) were screened for their antimicrobial activities against two Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria and two fungi using a microdilution titre assay. Among the crude extracts, petroleum ether extract showed good activity against all test organisms. The VLC fraction PE 16 was found to be very effective against Bacillus subtilis (MIC=25 microg/ml) and Aspergillus niger (MIC=12.5 microg/ml). The activities were compared to standard antibiotics-kanamycin and fluconazole. The major compound from PE16 was identified as 12, 20(29)-lupadien-3-ol by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:16114086

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Rhodobryum ontariense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabovljević Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of dimethyl sulfoxide extract of moss Rhodobryum ontariense (Kindb. Kindb. was evaluated by microdilution method against eight bacterial (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter cloacae, Listeria monocytogens, Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus flavus and Staphylococcus aureus and five fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium funiculosum, Penicillium ochrochloron and Trichoderma viride. The extract was proven to be active against all the bacteria and funghi tested but to varying degrees. It showed better inhibitory activity compared to the known antifungal drug against T. viride (MIC 100 and 200 μg/ml, respectively. This finding implies that R. ontariense could be considered as a promising material for natural antifungal products.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Different Antimicrobial Peptides against a Range of Pathogenic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbensgaard, Anna Elisabeth; Mordhorst, Hanne; Overgaard, Michael Toft;

    2015-01-01

    The rapid emergence of resistance to classical antibiotics has increased the interest in novel antimicrobial compounds. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent an attractive alternative to classical antibiotics and a number of different studies have reported antimicrobial activity data of various...... AMPs, but there is only limited comparative data available. The mode of action for many AMPs is largely unknown even though several models have suggested that the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play a crucial role in the attraction and attachment of the AMP to the bacterial membrane in Gram...... among the different peptides. Further, the antimicrobial activity of a selection of cationic AMPs was investigated in various E. coli LPS mutants....

  5. An antimicrobial stewardship program reduces antimicrobial therapy duration and hospital stay in surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güerri-Fernández, R; Villar-García, J; Herrera-Fernández, S; Trenchs-Rodríguez, M; Fernández-Morato, J; Moro, L; Sancho, J; Grande, L; Clará, A; Grau, S; Horcajada, J P

    2016-06-01

    We report a quasi-experimental study of the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program in two surgical wards, with a pre-intervention period with just assessment of prescription and an intervention period with a prospective audit on antibiotic prescription model. There was a significant reduction of length of stay and the total days of antimicrobial administration. There were no differences in mortality between groups. The antimicrobial stewardship program led to the early detection of inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment and was associated with a significant reduction in length of stay and the total duration of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27167764

  6. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sarah S

    2016-07-01

    Management of common infections and optimal use of antimicrobial agents are presented, highlighting new evidence from the medical literature that enlightens practice. Primary therapy of staphylococcal skin abscesses is drainage. Patients who have a large abscess (>5 cm), cellulitis or mixed abscess-cellulitis likely would benefit from additional antibiotic therapy. When choosing an antibiotic for outpatient management, the patient, pathogen and in vitro drug susceptibility as well as tolerability, bioavailability and safety characteristics of antibiotics should be considered. Management of recurrent staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections is vexing. Focus is best placed on reducing density of the organism on the patient's skin and in the environment, and optimizing a healthy skin barrier. With attention to adherence and optimal dosing, acute uncomplicated osteomyelitis can be managed with early transition from parenteral to oral therapy and with a 3-4 week total course of therapy. Doxycycline should be prescribed when indicated for a child of any age. Its use is not associated with dental staining. Azithromycin should be prescribed for infants when indicated, whilst being alert to an associated ≥2-fold excess risk of pyloric stenosis with use under 6 weeks of age. Beyond the neonatal period, acyclovir is more safely dosed by body surface area (not to exceed 500 mg/m(2)/dose) than by weight. In addition to the concern of antimicrobial resistance, unnecessary use of antibiotics should be avoided because of potential later metabolic effects, thought to be due to perturbation of the host's microbiome. PMID:27263076

  7. Comparative performance of a panel of commercially available antimicrobial nanocoatings in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molling, Johan W; Seezink, Jacques W; Teunissen, Birgit EJ; Muijrers-Chen, Inhua; Borm, Paul JA

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance against the classic antibiotics is posing an increasing challenge for the prevention and treatment of infections in health care environments. The introduction of antimicrobial nanocoatings with active ingredients provides alternative measures for active killing of microorganisms, through a preventive hygiene approach. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a panel of antimicrobial coatings available on the European market. Methods A comparative, biased selection of commercially available antimicrobial coatings was tested for antimicrobial efficiency. Suppliers were contacted to deliver their coatings on glass and/or stainless steel substrates. In total, 23 coatings from eleven suppliers were received, which were investigated for their effect on the growth of Escherichia coli, using the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 22196 protocol. Results The majority of nanomaterial-containing coatings (n=13) contained nanosilver (n=12), while only one had photocatalytic TiO2 as the active particle. The differences in antimicrobial activity among all of the coatings, expressed as log reduction values, varied between 1.3 and 6.6, while the variation within the nanomaterial-based group was between 2.0 and 6.2. Although nanosilver coatings were on average very effective in reducing the number of viable bacteria after challenge, the strongest log reduction (6.6) was seen with a coating that has immobilized, covalently bound quaternary ammonium salt in its matrix. Besides these two compounds, coatings containing TiO2, poly(dimethylsiloxane), triclosan, or zinc pyrithione evoked 100% killing of E. coli. Conclusion Our findings indicate that nanosilver dominates the nanoparticle-based coatings and performs adequately. However, considering the unknowns in relation to ecotoxicological emission and effects, it needs further consideration before widespread application into different

  8. Comparative performance of a panel of commercially available antimicrobial nanocoatings in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molling JW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Johan W Molling, Jacques W Seezink, Birgit EJ Teunissen, Inhua Muijrers-Chen, Paul JA Borm Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands Background: Bacterial resistance against the classic antibiotics is posing an increasing challenge for the prevention and treatment of infections in health care environments. The introduction of antimicrobial nanocoatings with active ingredients provides alternative measures for active killing of microorganisms, through a preventive hygiene approach. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a panel of antimicrobial coatings available on the European market. Methods: A comparative, biased selection of commercially available antimicrobial coatings was tested for antimicrobial efficiency. Suppliers were contacted to deliver their coatings on glass and/or stainless steel substrates. In total, 23 coatings from eleven suppliers were received, which were investigated for their effect on the growth of Escherichia coli, using the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22196 protocol. Results: The majority of nanomaterial-containing coatings (n=13 contained nanosilver (n=12, while only one had photocatalytic TiO2 as the active particle. The differences in antimicrobial activity among all of the coatings, expressed as log reduction values, varied between 1.3 and 6.6, while the variation within the nanomaterial-based group was between 2.0 and 6.2. Although nanosilver coatings were on average very effective in reducing the number of viable bacteria after challenge, the strongest log reduction (6.6 was seen with a coating that has immobilized, covalently bound quaternary ammonium salt in its matrix. Besides these two compounds, coatings containing TiO2, poly(dimethylsiloxane, triclosan, or zinc pyrithione evoked 100% killing of E. coli. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that nanosilver dominates the nanoparticle-based coatings and performs adequately

  9. Ethical Dimensions of Diagnosing: Considerations for Clinical Mental Health Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Victoria E.; Hoffman, Rachel M.; Eriksen, Karen

    2010-01-01

    There are numerous ethical considerations inherent within the process of assigning a "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) diagnosis. In this article, general ethics considerations such as informed consent and confidentiality, accuracy of diagnosis, and…

  10. In vitro activity of cefmetazole, cefotetan, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and other antimicrobial agents against anaerobic bacteria from endometrial cultures of women with pelvic infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohm-Smith, M J; Sweet, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The MICs of the new antimicrobial agents cefmetazole, cefotetan, and amoxicillin-clauvulanic acid were compared with the MICs of other antimicrobial agents against anaerobic bacteria from endometrial cultures from women with pelvic inflammatory disease or endometritis. The activity of cefmetazole was similar to that of cefoxitin and generally greater than that of cefotetan. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was generally more active than all cephamycins tested.

  11. Absolute configuration and antimicrobial activity of acylhomoserine lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomini, Armando M; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2008-06-01

    (S)-N-Heptanoylhomoserine lactone is an uncommon acyl odd-chain natural product employed by many Gram-negative bacteria as a signaling substance in chemical communication mechanisms known as quorum sensing. The absolute configuration determination of the metabolite produced by the phytopathogen Pantoea ananatis Serrano is reported herein. As with all other substances of this class, the lactone moiety possesses S configuration, corroborating the hypothesis that it shares the same biosynthetic pathway as the (S)-N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone and also that some LuxI homologues can accept both hexanoyl- and heptanoyl-ACP as precursors. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of enantiomeric acylhomoserine lactones against three Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus) revealed important features between absolute configuration and antimicrobial activity. The N-heptanoylhomoserine lactone was considerably less active than the 3-oxo derivatives. Surprisingly, non-natural (R)-N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)homoserine lactone was as active as the S enantiomer against B. cereus, while the synthetic racemic product was less active than either enantiomer. PMID:18465897

  12. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing in Denmark and Aragón (in northeastern Spain), with the objective of assessing inappropriate prescribing....

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Helicobacter suis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermoote, Miet; Pasmans, Frank; Flahou, Bram; Van Deun, Kim; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2011-12-15

    Helicobacter suis is a very fastidious porcine gastric pathogen, which is also considered to be of zoonotic importance. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility cannot be determined using standard assays, as this agent only grows in a biphasic medium with an acidic pH. Therefore, a combined agar and broth dilution method was used to analyse the activity of nine antimicrobial agents against nine H. suis isolates. After 48 h microaerobic incubation, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by software-assisted calculation of bacterial growth. Only for enrofloxacin a bimodal distribution of MICs was demonstrated, indicating acquired resistance in one strain, which showed an AGT→AGG (Ser→Arg) substitution at codon 99 of gyrA. In conclusion, the assay developed here is suitable for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of H. suis isolates, although activity of acid sensitive antimicrobial agents may be higher than predicted from MIC endpoints. PMID:21733643

  14. SecA inhibitors: next generation antimicrobials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixuan Chen; Arpana Chaudhary; Jianmei Cui; Jinshan Jin; Yinghsin Hsieh; Hsiuchin Yang; Yingju Huang; Phang C. Tai; Binghe Wang

    2012-01-01

    Health problems caused by bacterial infection have become a major public health concern in recent years due to the widespread emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains.Therefore,the need for the development of new types of antimicrobial agents,especially those with a novel mechanism of action,is urgent.SecA,one of the key components of the secretion (Sec) pathway,is a new promising target for antimicrobial agent design.In recent years,promising leads targeting SecA have been identified and the feasibility of developing antimicrobial agents through the inhibition of SecA has been demonstrated.We hope this review will help stimulate more research in this area so that new antimicrobials can be obtained by targeting SecA.

  15. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkarsha S. Shivsharan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Micro-organisms have tendency to produce antimicrobial substances which show biological activity against other kind of micro-organisms. This phenomenon of bacterial antagonism is observed in lactic acid bacteria with competitive advantages. The lactic acid bacteria are commonly present in many fermented products, fruits and milk products. The variety of antimicrobial substances produced by lactic acid bacteria showing good inhibition capacity include production of lactic acid, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide, diacetyl and bacteriocin. Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria are the subject of intense research because of their antimicrobial activity against food born bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium botulinum and several others .Bacteriocins may be bacteriostatic or bactericidal with narrow or broad range of activity. The main of the study was to study the antimicrobial activity of such lactic acid bacterial isolates.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of UMFix tissue fixative

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, T J; Morales, A. R.; Nadji, M.; Nassiri, M.; Vincek, V.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial effects of UMFix, an alcohol based tissue fixative, on various microorganisms. The UMFix solution was compared with 10% neutral buffered formalin.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of some Iranian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Pirbalouti Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of eight plant species which are endemic in Iran. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts of eight Iranian traditional plants, including Hypericum scabrum, Myrtus communis, Pistachia atlantica, Arnebia euchroma, Salvia hydrangea, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus daenensis and Kelussia odoratissima, were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albicans by agar disc diffusion and serial dilution assays. Most of the extracts showed a relatively high antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria and fungi. Of the plants studied, the most active extracts were those obtained from the essential oils of M. communis and T. daenensis. The MIC values for active extract and essential oil ranged between 0.039 and 10 mg/ml. It can be said that the extract and essential oil of some medicinal plants could be used as natural antimicrobial agents in food preservation. .

  18. Substaniation of antimicrobial dressings use in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliy G.K.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial materials incorporate in their structure modern antiseptics, which have the ability of dischargeng in the environment and provide death of opportunistic microorganisms. The results of the research of antimicrobial qualities of modern dressings, which include decamethoxine, chlorhexidine digluconate, furagin are shown. It was found that strains of Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia spp., Pseudomonas spp. are of high sensitivity to decamethoxin in dressing materials in comparison with textile materials, finished with chlorhexidine digluconate, furagin. The kinetics of decamethoxin release from antimicrobial materials is presented in the article. It was proven, that the release of decametoxin from antimicrobial materials in the environment occurs due to the diffusion and hydrolytic destruction of polymers in aqueous phase, which continues during 15 days.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of human α-defensin 5 and its linear analogs: N-terminal fatty acylation results in enhanced antimicrobial activity of the linear analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Basil; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-09-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5) exhibits broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and plays an important role in mucosal immunity of the small intestine. Although there have been several studies, the structural requirements for activity and mechanism of bacterial killing is yet to be established unequivocally. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of HD5 and linear analogs. Cysteine deletions attenuated the antibacterial activity considerably. Candidacidal activity was affected to a lesser extent. Fatty acid conjugated linear analogs showed antimicrobial activity comparable activity to HD5. Effective surface charge neutralization of bacteria was observed for HD5 as compared to the non-fatty acylated linear analogs. Our results show that HD5 and non-fatty acylated linear analogs enter the bacterial cytoplasm without causing damage to the bacterial inner membrane. Although fatty acylated peptides exhibited antimicrobial activity comparable to HD5, their mechanism of action involved permeabilization of the Escherichia coli inner membrane. HD5 and analogs had the ability to bind plasmid DNA. HD5 had greater binding affinity to plasmid DNA as compared to the analogs. The three dimensional structure of HD5 favors greater interaction with the bacterial cell surface and also with DNA. Antibacterial activity of HD5 involves entry into bacterial cytoplasm and binding to DNA which would result in shut down of the bacterial metabolism leading to cell death. We show how a moderately active linear peptide derived from the α-defensin HD5 can be engineered to enhance antimicrobial activity almost comparable to the native peptide. PMID:26206286

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima (Asteraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Jeana M.E.; Chang, Marilene R.; Brito, Daniela Z.; Katyuce S. Farias; Damasceno-Junior, Geraldo A.; Izabel C.C. Turatti; Norberto P. Lopes; Santos, Edson A.; Carollo, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima - an abundant plant from the Brazilian Pantanal region - against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The crude extracts and fractions showed activity in all tested microorganisms. The chloroform fraction of the leaves and roots showed the most antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, with an MI...

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Drosera rotundifolia L.

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslava Kačániová; Dominika Ďurechová; Nenad Vuković; Attila Kántor; Jana Petrová; Lukáš Hleba; Alexander Vatľák

    2014-01-01

    Droseracae spp. is widely used in folk medicine. In the present study, the antimicrobial activities of the four Drosera rotundifolia L. (D8.11, D15.12, 18.10, 8.11) samples were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion method against grampositive bacteria (Bacillus thurigiensis, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes) and gramnegative bacteria (Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella enteritidis).  The results of the disk diffusion method show...

  2. Phytochemical and Antimicrobial Studies of Chlorophytum borivilianum

    OpenAIRE

    Guno Sindhu Chakraborthy; Vidhu Aeri

    2009-01-01

    Extracts of leaves and stems of Chlorophytum borivilianum were subjected to preliminary phytochemical screening and in-vitro antimicrobial studies. The results of the preliminary investigation revealed the presence of alkaloids, glycosides, steroidal nucleus, saponins and tannins in both parts. The methanolic extract of leaf and stems part were investigated for antimicrobial activity using agar disc diffusion method. Six clinical strains of human pathogenic microorganisms, comprising 3 Gram +...

  3. Leaves Antimicrobial Activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Mahboubeh; Sarmadi, Marziyeh; Bernard, Françoise; Ebrahimi pour, Gholam Hossein; Shaker Bazarnov, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) is an important medicinal plant. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of ethanolic and aqueous extracts from licorice leaves were studied compared to root extracts activities. Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans were used as test organisms. Antimicrobial activity was tested by paper disc agar diffusion and serial dilution methods in orde...

  4. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Virginie Vitrat,1 Serge Hautefeuille,2 Cécile Janssen,1 David Bougon,2 Michel Sirodot,2 Leonardo Pagani1,3 1Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Infectious Diseases Unit, 2Intensive Care Unit, Annecy-Genevois Hospital Center (CHANGE), Annecy, France; 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Bolzano Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy Abstract: Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobi...

  5. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vitrat V; Hautefeuille S; Janssen C; Bougon D; Sirodot M; Pagani L

    2014-01-01

    Virginie Vitrat,1 Serge Hautefeuille,2 Cécile Janssen,1 David Bougon,2 Michel Sirodot,2 Leonardo Pagani1,3 1Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Infectious Diseases Unit, 2Intensive Care Unit, Annecy-Genevois Hospital Center (CHANGE), Annecy, France; 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Bolzano Central Hospital, Bolzano, Italy Abstract: Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial t...

  6. The antimicrobial activity of Physalis peruviana L.

    OpenAIRE

    Göztok, Ferda; Zengin, Fikriye

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activity of Physalis peruviana L. was investigated. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated according to the microdilution method by using Bacillus megaterium DMS 32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DMS 50071, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Klebsiella pneumoniae FMC 5, Proteus vulgaris FMC 1, Enterobacter aeregenes CCM 2531, Candida albicans FMC 17, Candida globrata ATCC 66032, Candida tropicalis ATCC 13803, Trichophyton sp. and Epidermaphyton sp. In the end of experim...

  7. Antimicrobial Effects of Honey on Bacillus Cereus

    OpenAIRE

    This paper should be cited as: Javadzadeh M, Najafi M, Rezaei M, Dastoor M, Behzadi AS, Amiri A . [ Antimicrobial Effects of Honey on Bacillus Cereus ]. MLJ. 201 4 ; 8 ( 2 ): 55 - 61 [Article in Persian] Javadzadeh, M. (MSc; M Najafi; Rezaei, M. (MSc; Dastoor, M. (BSc; Behzadi, AS. (MSc; Amiri, A. (MSc

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Honey is a healthy and nutritious food that has been used for a long time as a treatment for different diseases. One of the applied properties of honey is its antimicrobial effect, which differs between different types of honey due to variation of phenolic and antioxidant compositions. This study aimed to assess antimicrobial effect of honey on Bacillus cereus, considering its chemical properties. Material and Methods: Three samples of honey (A1 and A2 of Khorasan Ra...

  8. Mechanism of action of cyclic antimicrobial peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz i Cirac, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis is the result of the combination of experimental and computational techniques with the aim of understanding the mechanism of action of de novo cyclic decapeptides with high antimicrobial activity. By experimental techniques the influence of the replacement of the phenylalanine for tryptophan residue in their antimicrobial activity was tested and the stability in human serum was also analyzed, in order to evaluate their potential therapeutic application as antitumor agents. ...

  9. Antimicrobial activity of some Iranian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasemi Pirbalouti Abdollah; Jahanbazi Parvin; Enteshari Shekoofeh; Malekpoor Fatemeh; Hamedi Behzad

    2010-01-01

    The major aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of eight plant species which are endemic in Iran. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts of eight Iranian traditional plants, including Hypericum scabrum, Myrtus communis, Pistachia atlantica, Arnebia euchroma, Salvia hydrangea, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus daenensis and Kelussia odoratissima, were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albi...

  10. Antimicrobial activity of peach and grapevine defensins

    OpenAIRE

    Nanni, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of the plants. Plant defensins are a large family of antimicrobial peptides with several interesting features, such as small dimension, high stability and broad spectrum of action. The discovery of new molecules and the study of their mechanism of action allow to consider them attractive for biotechnological applications. In this PhD thesis a defensin from Prunus persica (PpDFN1) and four novel DEFensin Li...

  11. Seaweed extracts as antimicrobial agents in aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Vatsos, Ioannis N.; Rebours, Celine

    2014-01-01

    In the last 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in using various seaweed extracts as prophylactic and/or therapeutic agents in aquaculture. Up until now, most studies on the direct antimicrobial effect of seaweeds have taken place in various parts of Asia, particularly in India. All groups of seaweeds exhibit significant antimicrobial properties against many infectious agents of fish and shrimp, but the genera that appear to exhibit a broader range of antibacterial proper...

  12. Antimicrobial activity of amazonian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Amanda A; Segovia, Jorge FO; Sousa, Vespasiano YK; Mata, Elida CG; Gonçalves, Magda CA; Bezerra, Roberto M; Junior, Paulo OM; Kanzaki, Luís IB

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aqueous extracts of currently utilized Amazonian medicinal plants were assayed in vitro searching for antimicrobial activity against human and animal pathogenic microorganisms. Methods Medium resuspended lyophilized aqueous extracts of different organs of Amazonian medicinal plants were assayed by in vitro screening for antimicrobial activity. ATCC and standardized microorganisms obtained from Oswaldo Cruz Foundation/Brazil were individually and homogeneously grown in agar plat...

  13. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Fennel and Geranium Volatile Oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essential oils of fennel and geranium were gamma irradiated with doses of 0,10,20,30 and 40 kGy. The studied oils were tested for their antimicrobial activities against some pathogenic microorganisms (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, Fusarium oxysporium, Trichoderma viride and Pseudomonas citri). Both oils were used in four concentrations of 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 ppm. The investigated oils showed different inhibition effects against the tested microorganisms. Gamma irradiated oils increased the antimicrobial activity with different magnitudes. Generally, increasing oil concentration increased antimicrobial activity of the used oils and that of 4000 ppm was the most effective one. The essential oils were analyzed by G.C. to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the oil components. (authors)

  14. The in vitro fitness cost of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli varies with the growth conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2009-01-01

    H and at high-salt concentrations. Strains with an impaired rpoS demonstrated a reduced fitness only during growth in a high-salt concentration. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that bacterial fitness cost in association with antimicrobial resistance generally increases under stressful growth......The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of stressful growth conditions on the fitness cost of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli BJ4 caused by chromosomal mutations and plasmid acquisition. The fitness cost of chromosomal streptomycin resistance increased...... conditions. However, the growth potential of bacteria with antimicrobial resistances did not increase in a straightforward manner in these in vitro experiments and is therefore probably even more difficult to predict in vivo....

  15. The effects of tertiary wastewater treatment on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, L.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dalsgaard, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of tertiary wastewater treatment on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria were investigated in two large-scale municipal treatment plants during a period of six months. Total and relative numbers of resistant bacteria were determined in raw sewage, treated sewage and...... with a genus-specific DNA probe. Independent of the different antibiotics and media used, the total numbers of resistant bacteria in treated sewage were 10-1000 times lower than in raw sewage. Based on linear regression analysis of data on bacteriological counts, the prevalences of antimicrobial-resistant...... antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Acinetobacter isolates. Based on logistic regression analysis, isolates from treated sewage and digested sludge were generally not significantly more resistant compared with isolates from raw sewage. Based on these evidences, it was concluded that tertiary wastewater...

  16. Lack of antimicrobial resistance in Yersinia pestis isolates from 17 countries in the Americas, Africa, and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urich, Sandra K; Chalcraft, Linda; Schriefer, Martin E; Yockey, Brook M; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague, a fulminant disease that is often fatal without antimicrobial treatment. Plasmid (IncA/C)-mediated multidrug resistance in Y. pestis was reported in 1995 in Madagascar and has generated considerable public health concern, most recently because of the identification of IncA/C multidrug-resistant plasmids in other zoonotic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate no resistance in 392 Y. pestis isolates from 17 countries to eight antimicrobials used for treatment or prophylaxis of plague. PMID:22024826

  17. Vaccine development in Staphylococcus aureus: taking the biofilm phenotype into consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Harro, Janette M; Peters, Brian M.; O'May, Graeme A.; Archer, Nathan; Kerns, Patrick; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine development against pathogenic bacteria is an imperative initiative as bacteria are gaining resistance to current antimicrobial therapies and few novel antibiotics are being developed. Candidate antigens for vaccine development can be identified by a multitude of high-throughput technologies that were accelerated by access to complete genomes. While considerable success has been achieved in vaccine development against bacterial pathogens, many species with multiple virulence factors a...

  18. The antimicrobial possibilities of green tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda C Reygaert

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Green tea is a popular drink, especially in Asian countries, although its popularity continues to spread across the globe. The health benefits of green tea, derived from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, have been studied for many years. Fairly recently, researchers have begun to look at the possibility of using green tea in antimicrobial therapy, and the potential prevention of infections. The particular properties of catechins found in the tea have shown promise for having antimicrobial effects. There are four main catechins (polyphenols found in green tea: (--epicatechin (EC, (--epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG, (--epigallocatechin (EGC, and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG. Three of these, ECG, EGC, and EGCG have been shown to have antimicrobial effects against a variety of organisms. These catechins have exhibited a variety of antimicrobial mechanisms. The results of studies on the antimicrobial effects of green tea have shown that the potential for preventive and therapeutic purposes is present. Further data collection on studies performed with human consumption during the course of infections, and studies on the occurrence of infections in populations that consume regular amounts of green tea will be necessary to complete the picture of its antimicrobial possibilities.

  19. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarten, J

    2012-04-01

    It is almost impossible to imagine veterinary medicine today without the use of antimicrobials. Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobials found their way into the veterinary world. They have brought many benefits for the health and welfare of both animals and people, such as the lessening of pain and suffering, reduction in shedding of (zoonotic) bacteria and the containment of potentially large-scale epidemics. Indirectly, they also contribute to food security, protection of livelihoods and animal resources, and poverty alleviation. Given the broad range of animal species under veterinary care and the enormous variety of infectious agents, a complete range of antimicrobials is needed in veterinary medicine. Losing products, either through the occurrence of resistance or through a prohibition on their use, will have serious consequences for the health and welfare of all animals. It will also seriously affect people who depend on these animals. It is a great challenge to everyone involved to stop the growing trend of antimicrobial resistance and to safeguard the effectiveness of antimicrobials for the future. Transparent and responsible use of antimicrobials, together with continuous monitoring and surveillance of the occurrence of resistance, are key elements of any strategy. The current situation also urges us to re-think unsustainable practices and to work on the development of alternatives, in the interests of the health and welfare of both animals and people. PMID:22849278

  20. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  1. Understanding the mechanisms and drivers of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alison H; Moore, Luke S P; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Steinbakk, Martin; Regmi, Sadie; Karkey, Abhilasha; Guerin, Philippe J; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat to human health and biosecurity from antimicrobial resistance, an understanding of its mechanisms and drivers is needed. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance in microorganisms is a natural phenomenon, yet antimicrobial resistance selection has been driven by antimicrobial exposure in health care, agriculture, and the environment. Onward transmission is affected by standards of infection control, sanitation, access to clean water, access to assured quality antimicrobials and diagnostics, travel, and migration. Strategies to reduce antimicrobial resistance by removing antimicrobial selective pressure alone rely upon resistance imparting a fitness cost, an effect not always apparent. Minimising resistance should therefore be considered comprehensively, by resistance mechanism, microorganism, antimicrobial drug, host, and context; parallel to new drug discovery, broad ranging, multidisciplinary research is needed across these five levels, interlinked across the health-care, agriculture, and environment sectors. Intelligent, integrated approaches, mindful of potential unintended results, are needed to ensure sustained, worldwide access to effective antimicrobials. PMID:26603922

  2. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  3. Advanced LBB methodology and considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    LBB applications have existed in many industries and more recently have been applied in the nuclear industry under limited circumstances. Research over the past 10 years has evolved the technology so that more advanced consideration of LBB can now be given. Some of the advanced considerations for nuclear plants subjected to seismic loading evaluations are summarized in this paper.

  4. Ethical considerations in cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follath, F

    2009-12-01

    patients and healthy subjects for the general population seen in everyday practice? Increasingly, the economic aspects of long-term prevention and problems of a fair allocation of limited healthcare resources are also important issues giving rise to contrasting views among patients, doctors, insurance providers and politicians. What are the priorities and who should decide? Ethical considerations relating to the above questions in CV prevention are discussed in this article. PMID:19500153

  5. Mechanistic antimicrobial approach of extracellularly synthesized silver nanoparticles against gram positive and gram negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamboli, Dhawal P.; Lee, Dae Sung, E-mail: daesung@knu.ac.kr

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Bacterial extracelluar enzymes stabilized the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). • AgNPs formation was characterized by analytical techniques such as UV–vis, TEM, and FTIR. • AgNPs showed obvious antimicrobial activity against both gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. • A mechanism of AgNPs’ antimicrobial activity was proposed. -- Abstract: The development of eco-friendly and reliable processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles has attracted considerable interest in nanotechnology. In this study, an extracellular enzyme system of a newly isolated microorganism, Exiguobacterium sp. KNU1, was used for the reduction of AgNO{sub 3} solutions to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The extracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The AgNPs were approximately 30 nm (range 5–50 nm) in size, well-dispersed and spherical. The AgNPs were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects on different gram negative and gram positive bacteria using the minimum inhibitory concentration method. Reasonable antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was observed. The morphological changes occurred in all the microorganisms tested. In particular, E. coli exhibited DNA fragmentation after being treated with the AgNPs. Finally, the mechanism for their bactericidal activity was proposed according to the results of scanning electron microscopy and single cell gel electrophoresis.

  6. Design of embedded-hybrid antimicrobial peptides with enhanced cell selectivity and anti-biofilm activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and their low prognostic to induce antibiotic resistance which is the most common source of failure in bacterial infection treatment along with biofilms. The method to design hybrid peptide integrating different functional domains of peptides has many advantages. In this study, we designed an embedded-hybrid peptide R-FV-I16 by replacing a functional defective sequence RR7 with the anti-biofilm sequence FV7 embedded in the middle position of peptide RI16. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid the peptide R-FV-I16 had potent antimicrobial activity over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as anti-biofilm activity. More importantly, R-FV-I16 showed lower hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Fluorescent assays demonstrated that R-FV-I16 depolarized the outer and the inner bacterial membranes, while scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy further indicated that this peptide killed bacterial cells by disrupting the cell membrane, thereby damaging membrane integrity. Results from SEM also provided evidence that R-FV-I16 inherited anti-biofilm activity from the functional peptide sequence FV7. Embedded-hybrid peptides could provide a new pattern for combining different functional domains and showing an effective avenue to screen for novel antimicrobial agents.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of selected marine macroalgae against some pathogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Omer Abdalla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of six marine macroalgae belonging to green algae (Chlorophyceae, brown algae (Phaeophyceae and the red algae (Rhodophyceae collected from the intertidal area of the Sudanese Red Sea coast near Port Sudan. Methods: Methanol was used for extracting the active principles of the algae and the disc diffusion method was performed to examine the activity and the minimum inhibitory concentration of the samples against four pathogenic bacteria and two fungi. Results: All tested algal extracts exhibited considerable bioactivity and inhibited the growth of all pathogenic microorganisms under investigation. The green alga Caulerpa racemosa produced the maximum inhibition zone (21 mm against Candida albicans while the red alga Laurencia papillosa showed low antimicrobial activity with the minimum inhibition zone of 10 mm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested algal extracts did not show any special antimicrobial influence on the selected microorganisms when they were considered as Grampositive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi but the most efficient methanolic extracts in inhibiting microbial growth were those of green macroalgae followed by the brown and the red macroalgae respectively. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that the tested marine macroalgae from Sudanese Red Sea coast may represent a potential and alternative source for secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity.

  8. Prevalence and characterization of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from conventional and organic vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sara; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2014-10-01

    To compare the characteristics and to identify the epidemiological relationships of Escherichia coli isolated from organic and conventional vegetables, the antimicrobial resistance and genetic properties of E. coli were investigated from 2010 to 2011. E. coli was isolated from 1 of 111 (0.9%) organic vegetables and from 20 of 225 (8.9%) conventional vegetables. The majority of strains were isolated from the surrounding farming environment (n=27/150 vs. 49/97 in organic vs. conventional samples). The majority of the vegetable strains were isolated from the surrounding farming environments. E. coli isolated from organic vegetables showed very low antimicrobial resistance rates except for cephalothin, ranging from 0% to 17.9%, while the resistance rates to cephalothin (71%) were extremely high in both groups. E. coli isolates expressed various resistance genes, which most commonly included blaTEM, tet(A), strA, strB, and qnrS. However, none of the isolates harbored tet(D), tet(E), tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), or qnrA. The transferability of tet gene, tet(A), and tet(B) was identified in tetracycline-resistant E. coli, and the genetic relationship was confirmed in a few cases from different sources. With regard to the lower antimicrobial resistance found in organic produce, this production mode seems able to considerably reduce the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria on vegetables. PMID:25140978

  9. STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS NASAL CARRIAGE AMONG INJECTING AND NON-INJECTING DRUG USERS AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Varshochi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus Aureus (SA is one of the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in human beings. Approximately 20% of healthy persons are persistent carriers and 60% are intermittent carriers of SA. Nasal cavity is one of the most important sites of its colonization. Intravenous (IV drug abuse has been proposed as a risk factor for colonization of SA in the nasal mucosa. The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of SA carriers in nasal cavity among IV and non-IV drug abusers (addicts, as well as to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the positive cases. In a cross-sectional analysis of 300 drug addicts (Group I: 100 non-injecting addicts, Group II: 100 IV injecting drug addicts in rehab, Group III: 100 IV injecting drug addicts not in rehab in the infectious diseases clinics of Tabriz’s Imam Reza and Sina teaching hospitals and the rehabilitation center of Razi hospital, were investigated. Hospitalized addicts, insulin-dependent diabetic cases, HIV positive patients and those on chronic hemodialysis were excluded. The nasal mucosal sample was prepared from each case for SA isolation and its antimicrobial susceptibility was investigated by antibiogram. Eighty-four cases (28% were culture positive for SA, including 26 cases in group one, 32 cases in group two and 26 cases in group three (p = 0.55. There was only one MRSA isolate present in all the cases studied (1.2%. No resistance to linozolid, rifampin and vancomycin was observed. The resistance to erythromycin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, co-trimoxazol and gentamicin were 3.6, 4.8, 2.4, 3.6, 1.2 and 2.4% respectively. No statistically significant differences existed between the three groups in antibacterial susceptibility pattern. Sensitivity to oxacillin using the E-test results and disc diffusion were completely consistent. The percentage of carries of SA in the anterior nasal mucosa among IV and non-IV drug addicts is not considerably higher than the

  10. Spectral Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity of Some Schiff Bases Derived from 4-Chloro-2-aminophenol and Various Salicylaldehyde Derivatives%Spectral Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity of Some Schiff Bases Derived from 4-Chloro-2-aminophenol and Various Salicylaldehyde Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cinarli, Adem; Gurbuz, Demet; Tavman, Aydin; Birteksoz, A. Seher

    2012-01-01

    A series of N-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-(3/4/5-substituted)-salicylaldimines (I--XI) were synthesized using appropriate synthetic route. Their structures were characterized by FT-IR, UV-Visible, ESI-MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and analytical methods. The crystal structure of N-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-5-bromo- salicylaldimine (V) was determined by X-ray diffraction at room temperature. Relationship between the melting points and the structures of the compounds was examined. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis. Antifungal activities were reported for Candida albicans. Schiff bases showed considerable antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, S, epidermidis and C. albicans. N-(5-Chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-salieylaldimine (II) has the broadest and highest antimicrobial activity according to the others.

  11. Quaternized Chitosan as an Antimicrobial Agent: Antimicrobial Activity, Mechanism of Action and Biomedical Applications in Orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CS is a linear polysaccharide with good biodegradability, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, which makes it potentially useful for biomedical applications, including an antimicrobial agent either alone or blended with other polymers. However, the poor solubility of CS in most solvents at neutral or high pH substantially limits its use. Quaternary ammonium CS, which was prepared by introducing a quaternary ammonium group on a dissociative hydroxyl group or amino group of the CS, exhibited improved water solubility and stronger antibacterial activity relative to CS over an entire range of pH values; thus, this quaternary modification increases the potential biomedical applications of CS in the field of anti-infection. This review discusses the current findings on the antimicrobial properties of quaternized CS synthesized using different methods and the mechanisms of its antimicrobial actions. The potential antimicrobial applications in the orthopedic field and perspectives regarding future studies in this field are also considered.

  12. Utility considerations for tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Southern Nuclear Company has a long-standing commitment to nuclear power and is interested in pursuing the possible use of one of its existing commercial reactors as an alternative for reinitiating the production of tritium to support the nation's defense program requirements. We understand that Congress and the administration agree on the need to replenish the nation's supply of tritium and that a number of production options are under consideration. This paper discusses the financial considerations, legal and regulatory considerations for the production of tritium utilizing a commercial power reactor

  13. Oral administration of antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in E. coli from chicken--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, C; Burow, E; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobials play an important role in animal and human health care. It was the aim of this systematic review to assess the effects of oral administration of antimicrobials on the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) from chickens. Moreover, the effects of the administration of more than one antimicrobial and of different dosages were studied. Literature was searched in November 2012 from the electronic databases ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus and a national literature database (DIMDI) as well as the database ProQuest LLC. The search was updated in March 2014. Original studies describing a treatment (A) and a control group of either non-treatment (C) or initial value (0) and determining AMR in E. coli at different sample points (SP) were included. The literature search resulted in 35 full text articles on the topic, seven (20%) of which contained sufficient information on the administered antimicrobial and the impact of treatment on AMR. Most papers described the use of more than one antimicrobial, several dosages, controls (non-treatment or pre-treatment) and measured AMR at different SPs leading to a total of 227 SPs on the impact of the use of antimicrobials on AMR in chickens. 74% of the SPs (168/227) described a higher AMR-rate in E. coli from treated animals than from controls. After the administration of a single antimicrobial, AMR increased at 72% of the SPs. Administration of more than one antimicrobial increased AMR at 82% of the SPs. Higher dosages were associated with similar or higher AMR rates. The limited number of studies for each antimicrobial agent and the high variability in the resistance effect call for more well designed studies on the impact of oral administration on AMR development and spread. PMID:25433717

  14. General Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is a General Dentist? Article Chapters What Is a General Dentist? General ... Reviewed: January 2012 ?xml:namespace> Related Articles: General Dentists FAGD and MAGD: What Do These Awards Mean? ...

  15. Regulatory Considerations in Toxicological Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathological assessment of the nervous system is included in several US Environmental Protection Agency [US EPA or Agency] and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] testing guidelines for health effects of chemicals. A variety of considerations are importan...

  16. Considerable Life Extension versus Immortality

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Rantanen

    2012-01-01

    The ethical desirability of considerable life extension by medical technology has become an increasingly discussed topic in bioethics during recent years. Immortality can be seen as a maximum of life extension. Because of this, many authors use the term 'immortality' for referring to a lifespan that is considerably longer than our current one. However, being literally immortal would be very different from living for hundreds, or even thousands, of years. The arguments that have been made abou...

  17. NUTRITION CONSIDERATIONS IN FOOD SELECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Rimal, Arbindra; Fletcher, Stanley M.; McWatters, Kay H.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of nutrition consideration to households in food selection is instrumental in the development of information programs to promote public health and to market healthy food. Using a national telephone survey of 2880 U.S. households, this study examines the role and influence of socio-economic characteristics and lifestyle on a household meal plannerÂ’s consideration of four dietary components in food selection. Household income, children in households, geographic location, and gen...

  18. Membrane interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carriers of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Katharina; Pochert, Alexander; Lindén, Mika; Davoudi, Mina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Membrane interactions are critical for the successful use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to elucidate these, we here investigate effects of nanoparticle charge and porosity on AMP loading and release, as well as consequences of this for membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects. Anionic mesoporous silica particles were found to incorporate considerable amounts of the cationic AMP LLGDFFRKSKEKIGKEFKRIVQRIKDFLRNLVPRTES (LL-37), whereas loading is much lower for non-porous or positively charged silica nanoparticles. Due to preferential pore localization, anionic mesoporous particles, but not the other particles, protect LL-37 from degradation by infection-related proteases. For anionic mesoporous nanoparticles, membrane disruption is mediated almost exclusively by peptide release. In contrast, non-porous silica particles build up a resilient LL-37 surface coating due to their higher negative surface charge, and display largely particle-mediated membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects. For positively charged mesoporous silica nanoparticles, LL-37 incorporation promotes the membrane binding and disruption displayed by the particles in the absence of peptide, but also causes toxicity against human erythrocytes. Thus, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as AMP delivery systems requires consideration of membrane interactions and selectivity of both free peptide and the peptide-loaded nanoparticles, the latter critically dependent on nanoparticle properties. PMID:27174622

  19. Antimicrobial prescribing by dentists in Wales, UK: findings of the first cycle of a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, A L; Barnes, E; Howells, E P; Rockey, A M; Karki, A J; Wilson, M J; Lewis, M A O; Cowpe, J G

    2016-07-01

    Objective To describe the findings of the first cycle of a clinical audit of antimicrobial use by general dental practitioners (GDPs).Setting General dental practices in Wales, UK.Subjects and methods Between April 2012 and March 2015, 279 GDPs completed the audit. Anonymous information about patients prescribed antimicrobials was recorded. Clinical information about the presentation and management of patients was compared to clinical guidelines published by the Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme (SDCEP).Results During the data collection period, 5,782 antimicrobials were prescribed in clinical encounters with 5,460 patients. Of these 95.3% were antibiotic preparations, 2.7% were antifungal agents, and 0.6% were antivirals. Of all patients prescribed antibiotics, only 37.2% had signs of spreading infection or systemic involvement recorded, and 31.2% received no dental treatment. In total, 79.2% of antibiotic, 69.4% of antifungal, and 57.6% of antiviral preparations met audit standards for dose, frequency, and duration. GDPs identified that failure of previous local measures, patient unwillingness or inability to receive treatment, patient demand, time pressures, and patients' medical history may influence their prescribing behaviours.Conclusions The findings of the audit indicate a need for interventions to support GDPs so that they may make sustainable improvements to their antimicrobial prescribing practices. PMID:27388087

  20. An institutional review of antimicrobial stewardship interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Henry; Phe, Kady; Laine, Gregory A; Russo, Hannah R; Putney, Kimberly S; Tam, Vincent H

    2016-09-01

    In order to combat increasing rates of bacterial resistance, many institutions have implemented antimicrobial stewardship programmes (ASPs) to improve antibiotic use. To ascertain the potential impact of our stewardship programme at Baylor St Luke's Medical Center (Houston, TX), antimicrobial-related interventions were analysed over a 4-year period. ASP recommendations related to antimicrobial therapy from 2009 to 2012 were retrieved from the hospital electronic database and were retrospectively reviewed. The number of interventions for each time period was adjusted to the hospital census data. The interventions were randomly assessed and categorised for clinical significance based on established institutional guidelines. In total, 14654 non-duplicate antimicrobial therapy interventions were retrieved, of which 11874 (81.0%) were audited for accuracy. Approximately 13 interventions were made per 1000 patient-days, but there were no significant patterns observed regarding the number of interventions performed from month to month (range 8-21). The most frequent types of interventions were related to inappropriate dosing (39.0%), antimicrobial selection (20.5%) and drug allergy (13.0%). Serious adverse drug events (ADEs) were potentially avoided in 20.7% of all interventions. Cumulative potential cost avoidance was more than US$6.5 million. In our institution, proper drug and dose selection were the major components of the ASP. Without focusing solely on reduction of drug acquisition costs, implementation of an ASP could still be cost effective by improving the quality of patient care and avoiding ADEs with serious consequences. PMID:27530844

  1. Antimicrobial Characteristics of Heated Eggshell Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yuki; Takada, Daisuke; Namai, Satoe; Sawai, Jun; Kikuchi, Mikio; Hotta, Mikinori

    2015-01-01

    Eggshells have high bioavailability and can be used as a source of calcium. The main component is CaCO3, which, when heated, is converted to CaO. Seashells are also mainly composed of CaCO3 and were previously found to exhibit antimicrobial activity after being heated. In this study, heated eggshell powder (HESP) was found to have antimicrobial activity against bacterial vegetative cells, fungi and bacterial spores. Parameters, such as the minimum inhibitory concentration, were determined with kinetic analysis using an indirect conductimetric assay. Moreover, HESP was able to kill the Bacillus subtilis spores. There were no significant differences in the activity between HESP, heated scallop-shell powder and pure CaO. The MIC values for HESP against bacteria and fungi were 0.29-0.43 and 1.3-1.5 mg/mL, respectively. Against B. subtilis spores, a reduction of two orders of magnitude of viability was confirmed following 20 min of treatment at 10 mg/mL at 60 ℃. The active oxygen generated from the HESP slurry was examined with chemiluminescence. The intensity of this increased with increasing concentrations of the HESP slurry. This suggests that HESP could be used as a natural antimicrobial agent. Although a high pH is the main contributor to this antimicrobial activity, active oxygen species generated from HESP are likely to be the main antimicrobial agents.. PMID:26699855

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Maleki Dizaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of two South African honeys produced from indigenous Leucospermum cordifolium and Erica species on selected micro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobler Sias R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Honey has been shown to have wound healing properties which can be ascribed to its antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity can be effective against a broad spectrum of bacterial species especially those of medical importance. It has also been shown that there is considerable variation in the antimicrobial potency of different types of honey, which is impossible to predict. With this in mind we tested the antimicrobial activity of honeys produced from plants grown in South Africa for their antibacterial properties on selected standard strains of oral micro-organisms. Methods The honeys used were produced from the blossoms of Eucalyptus cladocalyx (Bluegum trees, an indigenous South African plant Leucospermum cordifolium (Pincushion, a mixture of wild heather shrubs, mainly Erica species (Fynbos and a Leptospermum scoparium (Manuka honey. Only pure honey which had not been heated was used. The honeys were tested for their antimicrobial properties with a broth dilution method. Results Although the honeys produced some inhibitory effect on the growth of the micro-organisms, no exceptionally high activity occurred in the South African honeys. The carbohydrate concentration plays a key role in the antimicrobial activity of the honeys above 25%. However, these honeys do contain other antimicrobial properties that are effective against certain bacterial species at concentrations well below the hypertonic sugar concentration. The yeast C. albicans was more resistant to the honeys than the bacteria. The species S. anginosus and S. oralis were more sensitive to the honeys than the other test bacteria. Conclusion The honeys produced from indigenous wild flowers from South Africa had no exceptionally high activity that could afford medical grade status.

  4. A trend analysis of antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from several livestock species in Belgium (2011-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Jean-Baptiste; Jaspers, Stijn; Butaye, Patrick; Wattiau, Pierre; Méroc, Estelle; Aerts, Marc; Imberechts, Hein; Vermeersch, Katie; Van der Stede, Yves

    2015-12-01

    A temporal trend analysis was performed on antimicrobial resistance data collected over 4 consecutive years (2011-2014) in the official Belgian antimicrobial resistance monitoring programme. Commensal Escherichia coli strains were isolated from faecal samples of four livestock categories (veal calves, young beef cattle, broiler chickens and slaughter pigs) and the trends of resistance profiles were analysed. The resistance prevalence remained high (>50%) during the study period for ampicillin in veal calves and chickens, for ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid in chickens, for sulfamethoxazole in veal calves, chickens and pigs and for tetracycline in veal calves. Using logistic regression and Generalized Estimating Equation and after p value adjustment for multiple testing (Linear step-up method), statistically significant decreasing temporal trends were observed for several of the 11 tested antimicrobials in several livestock categories: in veal calves (10/11), in chickens (6/11) and in pigs (5/11). A significant increasing trend was observed for the prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin in chickens. Multi-resistance, considered as the resistance to at least three antimicrobials of different antibiotic classes, was observed in the four livestock categories but was significantly decreasing in veal calves, chickens and pigs. Overall, the prevalence of resistance and of multi-resistance was lowest in the beef cattle livestock category and highest in broiler chickens. These decreasing temporal trends of antimicrobial resistance might be due to a decrease of the total antimicrobial consumption for veterinary use in Belgium which was reported for the period between 2010 and 2013. The methodology and statistical tools developed in this study provide outputs which can detect shifts in resistance levels or resistance trends associated with particular antimicrobial classes and livestock categories. Such outputs can be used as objective evidence to evaluate the possible

  5. Antimicrobial resistances do not affect colonization parameters of intestinal E. coli in a small piglet group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schierack Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although antimicrobial resistance and persistence of resistant bacteria in humans and animals are major health concerns worldwide, the impact of antimicrobial resistance on bacterial intestinal colonization in healthy domestic animals has only been rarely studied. We carried out a retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility status and the presence of resistance genes in intestinal commensal E. coli clones from clinically healthy pigs from one production unit with particular focus on effects of pheno- and/or genotypic resistance on different nominal and numerical intestinal colonization parameters. In addition, we compared the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes with the occurrence of virulence associated genes typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Results In general, up to 72.1% of all E. coli clones were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole or tetracycline with a variety of different resistance genes involved. There was no significant correlation between one of the nominal or numerical colonization parameters and the absence or presence of antimicrobial resistance properties or resistance genes. However, there were several statistically significant associations between the occurrence of single resistance genes and single virulence associated genes. Conclusion The demonstrated resistance to the tested antibiotics might not play a dominant role for an intestinal colonization success in pigs in the absence of antimicrobial drugs, or cross-selection of other colonization factors e.g. virulence associated genes might compensate "the cost of antibiotic resistance". Nevertheless, resistant strains are not outcompeted by susceptible bacteria in the porcine intestine. Trial Registration The study was approved by the local animal welfare committee of the "Landesamt für Arbeitsschutz, Gesundheitsschutz und technische Sicherheit" Berlin

  6. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by photo-excitation of endogenous porphyrins: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rehab M; Bhayana, Brijesh; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the most common pathogens that cause nosocomial infections and is responsible for about 10% of all hospital-acquired infections. In the present study, we investigated the potential development of tolerance of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobial blue light by carrying 10 successive cycles of sublethal blue light inactivation. The high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis was performed to identify endogenous porphyrins in P. aeruginosa cells. In addition, we tested the effectiveness of antimicrobial blue light in a mouse model of nonlethal skin abrasion infection by using a bioluminescent strain of P. aeruginosa. The results demonstrated that no tolerance was developed to antimicrobial blue light in P. aeruginosa after 10 cycles of sub-lethal inactivation. HPLC analysis showed that P. aeruginosa is capable of producing endogenous porphyrins in particularly, coproporphyrin III, which are assumed to be responsible for the photodynamic effects of blue light alone. P. aeruginosa infection was eradicated by antimicrobial blue light alone (48 J/cm(2) ) without any added photosensitizer molecules in the mouse model. In conclusion, endogenous photosensitization using blue light should gain considerable attention as an effective and safe alternative antimicrobial therapy for skin infections. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:562-568, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26891084

  7. Susceptibility of Gardnerella vaginalis biofilms to natural antimicrobials subtilosin, ε-poly-L-lysine, and lauramide arginine ethyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Cheryian, Thomson; Algburi, Ammar; Wirawan, Ruth E; Takhistov, Paul; Sinko, Patrick J; Chikindas, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common vaginal infection associated with numerous gynecological and obstetric complications. This condition is characterized by the presence of thick adherent vaginal biofilms, composed mainly of Gardnerella vaginalis. This organism is thought to be the primary aetiological cause of the infection paving the way for various opportunists to colonize the niche. Previously, we reported that the natural antimicrobials subtilosin, ε-poly-L-lysine, and lauramide arginine ethyl ester selectively inhibit the growth of this pathogen. In this study, we used plate counts to evaluate the efficacy of these antimicrobials against established biofilms of G. vaginalis. Additionally, we validated and compared two rapid methods (ATP viability and resazurin assays) for the assessment of cell viability in the antimicrobial-treated G. vaginalis biofilms. Out of the tested antimicrobials, lauramide arginine ethyl ester had the strongest bactericidal effect, followed by subtilosin, with clindamycin and polylysine showing the weakest effect. In comparison to plate counts, ATP viability and resazurin assays considerably underestimated the bactericidal effect of some antimicrobials. Our results indicate that these assays should be validated for every new application. PMID:23024575

  8. Variation in antioxidant and antimicrobial activities in Lantana camara L. flowers in relation to extrac- tion methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha Manzoor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The present work was designed to appraise how different extraction solvents and techniques affect the extractability of antioxidant and antimicrobial components from Lantana camara (L. camard flowers. Material and methods. Four extraction solvents including 100% methanol, 80% methanol, 100% ethanol and 80% ethanol coupled with three extraction techniques namely stirring, microwave-assisted stirring and ultrasonic-assisted stirring employed to isolate extractable components from the flowers of L. camara. The extracts produced were evaluated for their antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes. Results and discussion. The yield of extractable components varied over a wide range 4.87-30.00% in relation to extraction solvent and techniques. The extracts produced contained considerable amounts of total phenolics (8.28-52.34 mg GAE/100 g DW and total flavonoids (1.24-7.88 mg CE/100 g DW. Furthermore, a promising antioxidant activity in terms of DPPH° scavenging, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation and reducing power, as well as antimicrobial potential of the extracts were recorded against the selected bacterial and fungal strains. Conclusions. It was concluded that both extraction solvent and techniques employed affected the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of the extracts from L. camara flowers. With few exceptions, overall methanolic extracts produced by ultrasonic-assisted stirring offered superior activities followed by the microwave-as- sisted stirring and then stirring. The results advocate the use of appropriate extraction strategies to recover potent antioxidant and antimicrobial agents from the flowers of L. camara for nutraceutical and therapeutic.

  9. EMERGING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITAL A THREAT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Vichal Rastogi; Pankaj Kumar Mishra; Shalini Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial resistance(AMR) threatens the health of many throughout the world, since both old and new infectious diseases remain a formidable public health threat. When pathogenic microorganisms can multiply beyond some critical mass in the face of invading antimicrobials, treatment outcome is compromised. This phenomenon is referred as antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the overall antimicrobial resistance in bacteri...

  10. Contemporary food safety trends: Antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović Jelena; Milanov Dubravka; Ratajac Radomir

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a daunting public health threat affecting both human and animal health and it is a cause for concern wherever antimicrobial agents are in use. The usage of antimicrobial drugs in food producing animals could result in a significant food safety issue - antimicrobial resistance among zoonotic bacteria in these animals. The resistant bacteria may then be transmitted to humans through the food supply and increase risk of treatment failures. Campylobacter spp. and Salmo...

  11. Association between Antimicrobial Consumption and Resistance in Escherichia coli▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Miika; Nyberg, Solja T; Huovinen, Pentti; Paakkari, Pirkko; Hakanen, Antti J.

    2008-01-01

    During a 9-year study period from 1997 through 2005, the association between antimicrobial resistance rates in Escherichia coli and outpatient antimicrobial consumption was investigated in 20 hospital districts in Finland. A total of 754,293 E. coli isolates, mainly from urine samples, were tested for antimicrobial resistance in 26 clinical microbiology laboratories. The following antimicrobials were studied: ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, trimethoprim,...

  12. Antimicrobial Stewardship for a Geriatric Behavioral Health Population

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen Ellis; Georgina Rubal-Peace; Victoria Chang; Eva Liang; Nicolas Wong; Stephanie Campbell

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health concern. Antimicrobial stewardship and multi-disciplinary intervention can prevent inappropriate antimicrobial use and improve patient care. Special populations, especially older adults and patients with mental health disorders, can be particularly in need of such intervention. The purpose of this project was to assess the impact of pharmacist intervention on appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing on a geriatric psychiatric unit (GPU)....

  13. Occurrence of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in beef cattle storage ponds and swine treatment lagoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuping; Zhang, Chiqian [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Parker, David B. [USDA Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, NE (United States); Snow, Daniel D. [Water Sciences Laboratory, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Zhou, Zhi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Li, Xu, E-mail: xuli@unl.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Livestock manure treatment and storage structures are potential environmental sources of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, the occurrence of antimicrobials and ARGs was investigated in the water and the sludge compartments of beef cattle storage ponds and swine lagoons. Analysis was focused on two families of antimicrobials (sulfonamide and tetracycline) and the corresponding ARGs (sul1, sul2, tetO, tetQ and tetX). Results showed that the pseudo-partitioning coefficients of tetracyclines were higher than those of sulfonamides, suggesting different distributions of these two classes of antimicrobials between water and sludge. The ARGs tested were detected in nearly all ponds and lagoons, with the highest relative abundance in sul2 at 6.3 × 10{sup −1} copies per 16S rRNA gene. A positive correlation was observed between total sul genes and total sulfonamides in water while the correlation was negative in sludge. No significant correlation was found between total tet genes and total tetracyclines in either water or sludge, but significant correlations were observed for certain individual tet genes. Ammonia concentrations strongly correlated with all ARGs except tetX. This study provided quantitative information on the occurrence of antimicrobials and ARGs in the liquid and solid compartments of typical manure treatment and storage structures. - Highlights: • Partitioning of antimicrobials between water and sludge is compound specific. • Antimicrobial resistance genes occurred in both water and sludge. • The ARG abundance varied more substantially in swine lagoons than in cattle ponds. • Correlations between ARGs and antimicrobials are system dependent.

  14. Fluorescein dye derivatives and their nanohybrids: Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Nabel A; Abou Kana, Maram T H; Abd-Elaal, Ali A; Elwahy, Ahmed H M

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescein (resorcinolphthalein) is a synthetic organic photoactive dye compound soluble in water, alcohol and polar solvents. It is widely used as a fluorescent tracer in medicinal and biological applications and tumor infected tissues tracer. In this study, fluorescein (F) was condensed by five coupling agents namely: p,p-phenylene diamine, p-hydroxy aniline, o-hydroxy aniline, p-methoxy aniline and p-methyl aniline in a molar ratio of 2(F):1 (coupling agent). The chemical structures of the synthesized fluorescein derivatives were confirmed using: microelemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. The synthesized compounds were loaded on chemically prepared silver nanoparticles via reduction reaction of silver nitrate. The structures and properties of the formed fluorescein derivatives silver nanohybrids were determined using: UV/Vis spectroscopy, TEM images and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The synthesized compounds and their nanohybrids were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against different bacterial strains and fungi. The results showed that the formed fluorescein derivatives silver nanohybrids are in moderate diameter range, and the loading of the synthesized compounds protect the silver nanoparticles against coagulation. The antimicrobial activity against the studied microorganisms was comparable to the standard used. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity was increased considerably in case of using fluorescein derivatives silver nanohybrids. The antimicrobial activities were correlated to the chemical structures of the compounds, diameter of the formed nanohybrids and to the nature of the tested bacterial strains. The mechanism of the antimicrobial action of the synthesized compounds and their nanohybrids was proposed. PMID:27450296

  15. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain......Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de...... diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  16. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore;

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de......-novo-sequenced isolates.ResultsWhen testing the 1862 GenBank files, the method identified the resistance genes with an ID = 100% (100% identity) to the genes in ResFinder. Agreement between in silico predictions and phenotypic testing was found when the method was further tested on 23 isolates of five different bacterial...

  17. Bacterial strategies of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Fu, Chih-Iung; Otto, Michael

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a key component of the host's innate immune system, targeting invasive and colonizing bacteria. For successful survival and colonization of the host, bacteria have a series of mechanisms to interfere with AMP activity, and AMP resistance is intimately connected with the virulence potential of bacterial pathogens. In particular, because AMPs are considered as potential novel antimicrobial drugs, it is vital to understand bacterial AMP resistance mechanisms. This review gives a comparative overview of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strategies of resistance to various AMPs, such as repulsion or sequestration by bacterial surface structures, alteration of membrane charge or fluidity, degradation and removal by efflux pumps.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160595

  18. Comparing antimicrobial exposure based on sales data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondt, Nico; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær; Puister-Jansen, Linda F.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of making meaningful comparisons of the veterinary use of antimicrobial agents among countries, based on national total sales data. Veterinary antimicrobial sales data on country level and animal census data in both Denmark and the Netherlands were combined...... with information about estimated average dosages, to make model calculations of the average number of treatment days per average animal per year, at first based on the assumption that the treatment incidence is the same in all species and production types. Secondly, the exposure in respectively animals for meat...... incidences calculated from detailed use data per animal species from the national surveillance programmes in these two countries, to assess their accuracy and relevancy.In Denmark and in the Netherlands, although the computed antimicrobial exposure would seem to be a reasonable estimation of the exposure...

  19. Development of antimicrobial optimum glass ionomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of glass ionomer for restorations in dentistry for lower income population is a well established practice in public clinics of Brazil. However the average price of this kind of material and its low durability still have a negative impact on public health for being imported and frequently replaced it becomes expensive for the manufacturers and for public agencies. In glass ionomer the main antimicrobial agent is fluoride, which is released gradually. The material used for filling provides an average life of five years and its durability can be increased if the ionomer contains other oligodynamic elements. It was formulated, merged a new optimized glass ionomer which was characterized by X-ray diffraction, ion measurement and antimicrobial activity. This new product showed promising results, that pointed structural stability an increase of antimicrobial efficiency. (author)

  20. The Antimicrobial Activity of Porphyrin Attached Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lesley

    2008-03-01

    We are interested in testing the antimicrobial activity of a porphyrin that is attached to a polymer. The porphyrin (5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-pryridyl)) was synthesized from methyl 4-formyl benzoate, 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, and pyrrole and attached to a copolymer of polystyrene/poly(vinyl benzyl chloride), which was synthesized by free radical polymerization. The antimicrobial activity of the polymer-attached porphyrin was then determined for gram-negative E. Coli grown to 0.80 OD. In this procedure, glass slides were coated with polymer-attached porphyrin via dip-coating, and the E. Coli bacteria were plated in Luria Broth media. The plates were subsequently exposed to light overnight before they were incubated as porphyrins act as photo-sensitizers when irradiated with light. The polymer-attached porphyrin did exhibit antimicrobial activity and parameters that affect its efficiency will be discussed.

  1. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Gao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (PCR essential oil obtained using an improved Clevenger type apparatus were studied. Among the five different PCRs examined the highest yield of essential oil was found in Chachi 2004 (harvested and stored in 2004 and the lowest in Chachi 2008 (harvested and stored in 2008. Fifty three different volatile compounds were determined, including terpenic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters. D-limonene, one of terpenes, was the major constituent in PCR. The antioxidant capacity of PCR essential oil varied considerably with the duration of storage time, and the oil from Chachi 1994 has the strongest ferric-reducing antioxidant power. In addition, the essential oil possessed varying degrees of antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, except Streptococcus faecalis, while had no effect on Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae.

  2. Antimicrobial and analgesic activities of Wendlandia thyrsoidea leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraja Basavanakote

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The leaves of Wendlandia thyrsoidea were extracted with different solvents and screened for their antimicrobial and analgesic activities. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated using the minimum inhibitory concentration method and the analgesic activity was carried out by the acetic acid-induced writhing method. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited potent antimicrobial activity, whereas, the methanol extract showed a significant analgesic activity.

  3. Phytochemical, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities of different citrus juice concentrates

    OpenAIRE

    Oikeh, Ehigbai I.; Omoregie, Ehimwenma S; Oviasogie, Faith E.; Oriakhi, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for new antimicrobial compounds is ongoing. Its importance cannot be overemphasized in an era of emerging resistant pathogenic organisms. This study therefore investigated the phytochemical composition and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of different citrus juice concentrates. Fruit juices of Citrus tangerine (tangerine), Citrus paradisi (grape), Citrus limon (lemon), and Citrus aurantifolia (lime) were evaluated. Antimicrobial activities against five bacterial an...

  4. Antimicrobial compounds as side products from the agricultural processing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sumthong, Pattarawadee

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial compounds have many applications, in medicines, food, agriculture, livestock, textiles, paints, and wood protectants. Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading. Consequently there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. Most antibiotics have been developed from microorganisms. Plants also represent an important source for finding novel antimicrobial compounds, as plants in their permanent fight with microorganisms in their env...

  5. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Some Nigerian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Aladesanmi, A J; Iwalewa, E O; Adebajo, A C; Akinkunmi, E O; Taiwo, B J; Olorunmola, F O; Lamikanra, A

    2006-01-01

    Ten Nigerian plants suggested from their ethnomedical uses to possess antimicrobial and antioxidant activities were studied for their anti-microbial and anti-oxidant properties. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Escherichia coli NCTC 10418, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Candida pseudotropicalis and Trichophyton rubrum (clinical isolate). Trichilia heudelotti leaf extract showed both antibacterial and antifungal activities and was t...

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves is associated with antimicrobial drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, A B; Wagenaar, J A; Stegeman, J A; Vernooij, J C M; Mevius, D J

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between farm management factors, including antimicrobial drug usage, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the faeces of white veal calves. Ninety E. coli isolates from one pooled sample per farm (n = 48) were tested for their phenotypical resistance against amoxicillin, tetracycline, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). Logistic regression analysis revealed the following risk factors (P 40 ADD/pc, tetracyclines (tetracycline, OR 13·1; amoxicillin, OR 6·5). In this study antimicrobial resistance in commensal E. coli was mainly associated with antimicrobial drug use. PMID:24152540

  7. Using genomics to identify novel antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W H; Lillehoj, H S; Gay, C G

    2016-04-01

    There is a critical need in animal agriculture to develop novel antimicrobials and alternative strategies that will help to reduce the use of antibiotics and address the challenges of antimicrobial resistance. High-throughput gene expression analysis is providing new tools that are enabling the discovery of host-derived antimicrobial peptides. Examples of gene-encoded natural antibiotics that have gained attention include antimicrobial peptides such as human granulysin and its multi-species homolog, namely NK-lysin, which provide a protective response against a broad range of microbes and are a principal component of innate immunity in vertebrates. Both granulysin and NK-lysin are localised in cytolytic granules in natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Host-derived NK-lysins that were first described in mammals are also found in avian species, and they have been shown to have antimicrobial activities that could potentially be used to control important poultry pathogens. Morphological alterations observed following chicken NK-lysin binding to Eimeria sporozoites and Escherichia coli membranes indicate damage and disruption of cell membranes, suggesting that NK-lysin kills pathogenic protozoans and bacteria by direct interaction. Genotype analysis revealed that chicken NK-lysin peptides derived from certain alleles were more effective at killing pathogens than those derived from others, which could potentially affect susceptibility to diseases. Although the host-derived antimicrobial peptides described in this paper may not, by themselves, be able to replace the antibiotics currently used in animal production, their use as specific treatments based on their known mechanisms of action is showing promising results. PMID:27217171

  8. Susceptibility of different bacterial species isolated from food animals to copper sulphate, zinc chloride and antimicrobial substances used for disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hasman, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    showed that Danish bacterial isolates from livestock so far have not or have only to a limited degree developed resistance to antimicrobial compounds commonly used for disinfection. Acquired copper resistance was only found in enterococci. There were large differences in the intrinsic susceptibility of...... susceptibilities to the different antimicrobial agents. Large variations were observed in the susceptibility of the different bacterial species to the different compounds. Staphylococci were in general very susceptible to all antimicrobial compounds tested. The Salmonella isolates were in general less susceptible......A total of 569 different bacterial isolates (156 Salmonella, 202 E. coli, 43 S. aureus, 38 S. hyicus, 52 E. faecalis, 78 E faecium) were tested for susceptibility to copper sulphate, benzalkonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine using MIC determinations. A total of 442 isolates were...

  9. Benzofuranyl Esters: Synthesis, Crystal Structure Determination, Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Chidan Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of five new 2‐(1‐benzofuran‐2‐yl‐2‐oxoethyl 4-(un/substitutedbenzoates 4(a–e, with the general formula of C8H5O(C=OCH2O(C=OC6H4X, X = H, Cl, CH3, OCH3 or NO2, was synthesized in high purity and good yield under mild conditions. The synthesized products 4(a–e were characterized by FTIR, 1H-, 13C- and 1H-13C HMQC NMR spectroscopic analysis and their 3D structures were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These compounds were screened for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The tested compounds showed antimicrobial ability in the order of 4b < 4a < 4c < 4d < 4e and the highest potency with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC value of 125 µg/mL was observed for 4e. The results of antioxidant activities revealed the highest activity for compound 4e (32.62% ± 1.34% in diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging, 4d (31.01% ± 4.35% in ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assay and 4a (27.11% ± 1.06% in metal chelating (MC activity.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of neem (Azadirachta indica) callus and leaf extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory-prepared neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) callus extract along with neem leaf extracts were investigated for their antimicrobial activity. Various extract concentrations (5, 10, 20 mg/ml) were determined for their rate and extent of inhibition kinetics against staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. Bacterial suspensions were serially diluted and, inoculated with appropriate concentration, incubated for time intervals for up to 24 h and plated on the corresponding medium. Results obtained showed that callus extracts of A. indica wiped out all viable cells of C. albicans within 18 h at concentration of 20 mg/ml , while S. aureus showed very high response to the extracts at all concentrations to reach complete elimination within 4 h. The E coli cells were not completely eliminated by extracts even after 24 h. Similar kinetics was shown by leaf extracts but in slight rate as compared to the callus extract. In general both extracts possessed antimicrobial activity with notable efficient rates. (Author)

  11. Antimicrobial coatings — obtaining and characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cornelia Guran; Alexandra Pica; Denisa Ficai; Anton Ficai; Cezar Comanescu

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present inorganic–organic hybrid coatings with polymer matrix (water soluble) that contain silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The structure and morphology of coating materials were determined by infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Therefore, the antimicrobial activities and mechanisms of coatings for several pathogenic bacteria (Bacilius cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) were investigated. It was demonstrated that the obtained material with silver nanoparticles keep their antimicrobial effect even if they are subjected to several cycles of washing with water and detergent.

  12. Antimicrobial hasubanalactam alkaloid from Stephania glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Rawat, Usha

    2009-03-01

    A novel hasubanalactam alkaloid, named glabradine, has been isolated from the tubers of Stephania glabra, together with three known quaternary protoberberine alkaloids, palmatine, dehydrocorydalmine and stepharanine. The structure of glabradine was assigned as 7-O-demethyl-N,O-dimethyloxostephinine, by means of rigorous spectroscopic analysis including 2 D NMR measurements. It was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. mutans, Microsporum gypseum, M. canis and Trichophyton rubrum and displayed potent antimicrobial activity superior to those of novobiocin and erythromycin used as positive controls. PMID:19148860

  13. Antimicrobial Stewardship for the Infection Control Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jerod L; Kaye, Keith S; LaPlante, Kerry L; Pogue, Jason M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic misuse is a serious patient safety concern and a national public health priority. Years of indiscriminant antibiotic use has promoted selection for antibiotic resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile This crisis has led to clinicians being faced with managing untreatable infections, often in the most vulnerable patient populations. This review summarizes the goals of antimicrobial stewardship programs, the essential members needed to initiate a program, various antimicrobial stewardship strategies, the role of the infection control practitioner in stewardship, barriers to its implementation and maintenance, approaches to measure the impact of a program, and the steps needed to initiate a program. PMID:27515147

  14. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications.

  15. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María José; Falqué, Elena; Domínguez, Herminia

    2016-03-01

    Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications. PMID:27005637

  16. Octenidine dihydrochloride: chemical characteristics and antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan

    2016-03-01

    The empiric use of antibiotics is being restricted due to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. However, topical antiseptics are less likely to induce resistance, owing to their unspecific mode of action and the high concentrations in which they can be used. One such antiseptic, octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT), can be used either prophylactically or therapeutically on the skin, mucosa and wounds. Evidence to support its use comes from in-vitro, animal and clinical studies on its safety, tolerability and efficacy. This article summarises the physical, chemical and antimicrobial properties of OCT in the context of wound care. PMID:26949863

  17. Antimicrobial price variation: Conundrum of medical profession!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rataboli P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacoeconomics plays a pivotal role in clinical practice. High medicine prices can adversely affect a patient′s finances and compliance. The Indian pharmaceutical industry has become a cornucopia of medicines with wide variation in prices for the same medicine marketed under different brand names. Price list of available antimicrobial brands was procured from a commercial drug directory. Average price of widely prescribed oral antimicrobials was found and price variation between different brands was calculated. The variation in medicine prices was found to be from 95% lower to more than 350% higher than the average price. Implications of price variation in clinical practice are discussed and remedial measures suggested.

  18. Considerations on the modelling of environmental radiocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modelling radionuclide transfer within the natural environment involves three general steps: model formulation, its fitting using appropriate experimental data and model validation. The last process typically involves a sensitivity analysis and is used to modify model formulation and to direct future experimental effort. A wide variety of models exists appropriate to a number of different applications. Recently, attention has been directed to the development of principles for establishing local, regional and global upper bounds to doses. Here important considerations in model choice are the spatial detail required within the model, the links between models of differing resolution and the availability of suitable experimental data. We illustrate the model-building stages and discuss the above considerations in transfer modelling using radiocarbon which is produced and released as part of the nuclear fuel cycle. Its long half life of 5730 years, its mobility in the environment and its incorporation into man via the food chain make it of some considerable radiological significance. We consider local modelling of 14C transfer using a Gaussian plume model, while its global dispersal is modelled using a large globally-averaged compartmental model. The global analysis is used to make short term predictions of 14C specific activities to 2050 and longer-term predictions over a period of 10,000 years. We discuss the validation of these models and attempt to quantify the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties in the model predictions. (26 refs., 2 figs.)

  19. Chernobyl - considerations of an insurer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author underlines the insurers' reactions after the Chernobyl accident. Firstly, their reactions as providers of security for loss and destruction in power plants and for third party liability: offers of financial cover have not been affected - quite the contrary - since 26 April 1986. He then refers to their consideration of the detrimental consequences: Chernobyl has revealed a new aspect of nuclear incidents - the addition of various types of expenditure quite apart from compensation of personal injury or property may considerably increase their economic impact (NEA)

  20. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some new indazolone derivatives from 1-(3,5-Dibromo-2-hydroxy-4 methyl phenyl) ethanone

    OpenAIRE

    Pawar MP; Vyas K; Shah NM; Nimavat KS

    2012-01-01

    Indazolone nucleus is present in various therapeutically important drug candidates. Chalcones are possessing versatile pharmacological activities like anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, cytotoxic, anticancer, antimalarial. While the bromoacetophenone nucleus bears very good antimicrobial activity. With consideration of all these facts we synthesized new derivatives of bromo acetophenone nucleus, which reacts with aromatic aldehydes to obtained chalcone. This was furthe...

  1. Comparison of individual and pooled samples for quantification of antimicrobial resistance genes in swine feces by high-throughput qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Julie; Mellerup, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl;

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable societal interest in the careful monitoring of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) levels in human and animal populations. Sampling and data analysis can be both costly and time consuming. Optimization of sample pooling procedures is therefore important to reduce costs and anal...

  2. Usage of antimicrobials and occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria from mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Hammer, Anne Sofie; Sørensen, Charlotte Mark;

    2009-01-01

    The usage of antimicrobials for treatment of mink and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens in mink was investigated. The aim of the study was to provide data, which may serve as a basis for the formulation of recommendations for prudent Use of...... antimicrobial's for mink. A total of 164 haemolytic staphylococci. 49 haemolytic streptococci. 39 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 13 Pasteurella multocida. and 1093 Escherichia coli isolates front Danish mink were included in the Study. A high frequency of resistance among S. intermedius was found for tetracyclines (54.......7%). followed by penicillin (21.7%), lincosamides (20.4%), macrolides (19.1%), and spectinomycin (18.5%). Very low frequencies of resistance were recorded for other antimicrobials. The highest frequency among the E. coli isolates was recorded for ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides, and tetracyclines...

  3. Molecular target of synthetic antimicrobial oligomer in bacterial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Gordon, Vernita; Som, Abhigyan; Cronan, John; Tew, Gregory; Wong, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprises a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. It has been shown that natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic analogs have demonstrated broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity via permeating bacterial membranes selectively. Synthetic antimicrobials with tunable structure and toxicological profiles are ideal for investigations of selectivity mechanisms. We investigate interactions and self-assembly using a prototypical family of antimicrobials based on phenylene ethynylene. Results from synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results and in vitro microbicidal assays on genetically modified `knock-out' bacteria will be presented.

  4. Ethical considerations in revision rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The problems that arise when reviewing another surgeon's work, the financial aspects of revision surgery, and the controversies that present in marketing and advertising will be explored. The technological advances of computer imaging and the Internet have introduced new problems that require our additional consideration. PMID:22872552

  5. Considerations on Writing Test Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣

    2005-01-01

    Writing test , wins its popularity in measuring the mastery of one's language ability. In view of the significant role writing playing in a test , some considerations on writing test construction are presented in this paper which anticipates the effective ways for measuring one's complex language ability of application.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance of Faecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Pig Farms with Different Durations of In-feed Antimicrobial Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J F; Boland, F; Egan, J; Fanning, S; Markey, B K; Leonard, F C

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial use and resistance in animal and food production are of concern to public health. The primary aims of this study were to determine the frequency of resistance to 12 antimicrobials in Escherichia coli isolates from 39 pig farms and to identify patterns of antimicrobial use on these farms. Further aims were to determine whether a categorization of farms based on the duration of in-feed antimicrobial use (long-term versus short-term) could predict the occurrence of resistance on these farms and to identify the usage of specific antimicrobial drugs associated with the occurrence of resistance. Escherichia coli were isolated from all production stages on these farms; susceptibility testing was carried out against a panel of antimicrobials. Antimicrobial prescribing data were collected, and farms were categorized as long term or short term based on these. Resistance frequencies and antimicrobial use were tabulated. Logistic regression models of resistance to each antimicrobial were constructed with stage of production, duration of antimicrobial use and the use of 5 antimicrobial classes included as explanatory variables in each model. The greatest frequencies of resistance were observed to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and streptomycin with the highest levels of resistance observed in isolates from first-stage weaned pigs. Differences in the types of antimicrobial drugs used were noted between long-term and short-term use farms. Categorization of farms as long- or short-term use was sufficient to predict the likely occurrence of resistance to 3 antimicrobial classes and could provide an aid in the control of resistance in the food chain. Stage of production was a significant predictor variable in all models of resistance constructed and did not solely reflect antimicrobial use at each stage. Cross-selection and co-selection for resistance was evident in the models constructed, and the use of trimethoprim/sulphonamide drugs in particular was

  7. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter to...

  8. The antimicrobial activity of Prunella vulgaris extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubi Mohaddese

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Prunella vulgaris ( Labiatae family or self-heal is traditionally used for different ailments such as eye pain and inflammation, headache, dizziness, sore throat and wound healing. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of extracts (methanol, ethanol and aqueous were determined by a spectrophotometer. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by micro broth dilution assay. The total phenolic content of P. vulgaris extracts were higher in aqueous extract (156.5 mg GAC/g followed by ethanol extract and methanol extract. The TFC content of P. vulgaris methanol extract (82.8 mg QE/g was higher than ethanol extract (22.7 mg QE/g and aqueous extract (16.2 mg QE/g. The antimicrobial activity of methanol or ethanol extracts was higher than aqueous extract from P. vulgaris. The sensitivity of microorganisms to different extracts is related to type of pathogens. There is no positive relation between total phenolic content and its antimicrobial activity. Prunella vulgaris ethanolic extract as a source of phenolic and flavonoid contents can be used as an antimicrobial agent.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in echinoderm host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important effector molecules in innate immunity. Here we briefly summarize characteristic traits of AMPs and their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity. Echinoderms live in a microbe-rich marine environment and are known to express a wide range of AMPs. We address two novel AMP families from coelomocytes of sea urchins: cysteine-rich AMPs (strongylocins) and heterodimeric AMPs (centrocins). These peptide families have conserved preprosequences, are present in both adults and pluteus stage larvae, have potent antimicrobial properties, and therefore appear to be important innate immune effectors. Strongylocins have a unique cysteine pattern compared to other cysteine-rich peptides, which suggests a novel AMP folding pattern. Centrocins and SdStrongylocin 2 contain brominated tryptophan residues in their native form. This review also includes AMPs isolated from other echinoderms, such as holothuroidins, fragments of beta-thymosin, and fragments of lectin (CEL-III). Echinoderm AMPs are crucial molecules for the understanding of echinoderm immunity, and their potent antimicrobial activity makes them potential precursors of novel drug leads. PMID:25445901

  10. Antimicrobial resistance transfer in transport media.

    OpenAIRE

    George, B A; Fagerberg, D J; Sanem, J A

    1981-01-01

    Five different transport media (buffered glycerol saline, Amies, Cary and Blair, Stuart, and modified Stuart) were tested to determine if antimicrobial resistance transfer could occur among bacteria in the media. Transfer of resistance occurred in all of the media, except buffered glycerol saline, within 2 h of holding both at room temperature and 4 degrees C.

  11. Medicinal and antimicrobial properties of mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medicinal mushrooms or their extracts are used or studied for possible treatments of diseases. Some mushroom constituents including polysaccharides, glycoproteins and proteoglycans, modulate immune system responses and inhibit tumor growth. In preliminary research, whereas various other species of mushrooms produce antiviral, antimicrobial, anticancer, antihyperglycemic, cardioprotective, antidiabetic properties, as well as antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory compounds. (author)

  12. The quest for optimal antimicrobial therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Petrus Gerardus Maria

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of sulphonam ides and penicillin in the 1930's, and their widespread use in clinical practice during World War II a plethora of new antimicrobial agents have entered the market. Initial optim ism has faded that these new drugs would eliminate infectious diseases as killer disease

  13. Health council report 'Antimicrobial growth promoters'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch, W; Degener, JE

    1999-01-01

    The Health Council of the Netherlands has issued a report on the risk of development of resistance among bacteria as result of the use of antibiotics as growth promotors in livestock farming. The committee appointed by the Health Council conclude that the use of antimicrobial growth promotors contri

  14. Dealing with antimicrobial resistance - the Danish experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Flemming; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2000-01-01

    Following the discovery in 1994 and 1995 that use of the glycopeptide antimicrobial avoparcin for growth promotion was associated with the occurrence of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium in food animals and in food, the Danish Minister of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries banned the use of ...

  15. Structural Basis for Antimicrobial Activity of Lasiocepsin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monincová, Lenka; Buděšínský, Miloš; Čujová, Sabína; Čeřovský, Václav; Veverka, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2014), s. 301-308. ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0536; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * Lasioglossum laticeps * membranes * NMR spectroscopy * ShK family Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.088, year: 2014

  16. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon as...

  17. Antimicrobial activity of two bactenecins against spirochetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Scocchi, M; Romeo, D; Cinco, M

    1993-01-01

    Bac5 and Bac7 are antimicrobial peptides of bovine neutrophils that act on enteric gram-negative bacteria. We report here that these two peptides immobilize and kill Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira biflexa with MBCs of 6 to 25 micrograms/ml. Conversely, although both peptides bind to Borrelia burgdorferi, the organism is resistant to their action.

  18. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    fluoroquinolones, which are used for empirical treatment of diarrhea in humans. Resistance to vancomycin and Synercid((R)) in enterococci is associated with use of similar drugs as growth promoters in food animals. Danish food animal producers have terminated the use of antimicrobial growth promoters. This has...

  19. Antimicrobial-resistant Shigella infections from Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajbakhsh, Mercedeh; García Migura, Lourdes; Rahbar, Mohammad;

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we wanted to assess the level of antimicrobial resistance, the presence of genes encoding resistance to cephalosporins and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), and genetic relatedness among Shigella isolates obtained from Iranian patients. ; Methods: A total of...

  20. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF FEW SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dash G. K; Murthy P.N.

    2011-01-01

    The petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts of leaves of Ageratum conyzoides Linn (Fam: Asteraceae), Argemone mexicana Linn. (Fam: Papaveraceae), Heliotropium indicum Linn (Fam: Boraginaceae) and stem barks of Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Brown (Fam: Apocynaceae) were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Stapphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger respectively. The results indicated t...

  1. Use of Biopolymers in Antimicrobial Food Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illness and food recalls continue to push for innovative ways to inhibit microbial growth in foods. As an additional hurdle to food processes, antimicrobial food packaging can play an important role in reducing the risk of pathogen contamination of processed foods. In...

  2. Novel properties of antimicrobial peptide anoplin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Barbora; Burketová, Lenka; Novotná, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 444, č. 4 (2014), s. 520-524. ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/1693 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Anoplin * Antimicrobial peptide * Antifungal Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.297, year: 2014

  3. Prevalence of antimicrobial residues in eggs, tissue and feed samples in the State of Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 238 locally produced and imported eggs, tissue (meat, poultry and aquacultured fish) and feed and feedstuffs samples were collected at different seasonal periods from different farms and retail outlets in Kuwait and screened for presence of beta-lactams, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, streptomycin, macrolides and chloramphenicol (799 tests) using Charm II system. The results indicated that all of the 222 tests performed on table egg samples were negative for the analyzed antimicrobial residues indicating adherence to the guidelines for microbial use and withdrawal. Similarly, all of the 268 tests performed on tissue samples were negative for the analyzed antimicrobial residues except for chloramphenicol. These chloramphenicol positive samples, all of the 66 tests performed were negative for beta-lactams residues. Out of the 79 feed and feedstuff samples analyzed for teracyclines residues, broiler diet and concentrate samples (5%) were above the tetracyclines MRL (100 ppb.). On the other hands, results have revealed a widespread of sulfonamide residues and to a less extent chloramphenicol in tested feed and feedstuff samples. The Charm II system was reliable for rapid screening of antimicrobial residues. In general, results obtained in our study necessitate more effective and well planned national antimicrobial residues surveillance programs focusing particularly on samples imported from highly risk sources. (author)

  4. Maximin 9, a novel free thiol containing antimicrobial peptide with antimycoplasma activity from frog Bombina maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ying-Xia; Jin, Yang; Lai, Ren; Zhang, Yun

    2005-08-15

    Amphibian skin is a rich resource of antimicrobial peptides, like maximins and maximin Hs from frog Bombina maxima. Novel cDNA clones encoding a precursor protein, which comprises a novel maximin peptide (maximin 9) and reported maximin H3, were isolated from two constructed skin cDNA libraries of B. maxima. The predicted primary structure of maximin 9 is GIGRKFLGGVKTTFRCGVKDFASKHLY-NH2. A surprising substitution is at position 16, with a free cysteine in maximin 9 rather than usual conserved glycine in other reported maximins. Maximin 9, the homodimer form and its Cys16 to Gly16 mutant were synthesized and their antimicrobial activities were evaluated. Unlike previously reported maximin 3, the tested bacterial and fungal strains were resistant to maximin 9, its homodimer and the Cys16 to Gly16 mutant (with MICs>100 microM). On the other hand, interestingly, while eight clinical Mollicutes strains were generally resistant to maximin 9 homodimer and its Cys16 to Gly16 mutant, most of them are sensitive to maximin 9 at a peptide concentration of 30 microM, especially in the presence of dithiothreitol. These results indicate that the presence of a reactive Cys residue in maximin 9 is important for its antimycoplasma activity. The diversity of antimicrobial peptide cDNA structures encountered in B. maxima skin cDNA libraries and the antimicrobial specificity differences of the peptides may reflect well the species' adaptation to the unique microbial environments. PMID:16061233

  5. NATURAL ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT USE IN THE PRESERVATION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvia Nereyda Rodríguez Sauceda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Today has been a need to find alternatives of conservation, because it has been associated with consumption of poison chemical preservatives. The demand for minimally processed fresh products is increasing, and interest in natural antimicrobial agents (derived from plants, so now looking for the combination of two or more factors that interact additively or synergistically controlling population microbial, allowing it to fresh produce similar products with less additives, it should be noted that the rate of microbial spoilage depends not only on microorganisms but also the chemical combination of product and type of initial microbial load. That is why the main aim of food processing is to provide comfort to humans through a safe, nutritionally adequate and meet the expectations of taste, aroma and appearance, so the use of natural food additives involves the isolation, purification, stabilization and incorporation of these compounds to food antimicrobial purposes, without adversely affecting the sensory characteristics. In general, every time we discover more plants or parts thereof which contain natural antimicrobials, such as including phenolic compounds from bark, stems, leaves, flowers, organic acids present in fruits and phytoalexins produced in plants, so as will not only safer, but better food quality and type of antimicrobials that are regarded as potentially safer sources.

  6. Assessment of the Antimicrobial Activity of Algae Extracts on Bacteria Responsible of External Otitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pane

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available External otitis is a diffuse inflammation around the external auditory canal and auricle, which is often occurred by microbial infection. This disease is generally treated using antibiotics, but the frequent occurrence of antibiotic resistance requires the development of new antibiotic agents. In this context, unexplored bioactive natural candidates could be a chance for the production of targeted drugs provided with antimicrobial activity. In this paper, microbial pathogens were isolated from patients with external otitis using ear swabs for over one year, and the antimicrobial activity of the two methanol extracts from selected marine (Dunaliella salina and freshwater (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata microalgae was tested on the isolated pathogens. Totally, 114 bacterial and 11 fungal strains were isolated, of which Staphylococcus spp. (28.8% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa (24.8% were the major pathogens. Only three Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus strains and 11 coagulase-negative Staphylococci showed resistance to methicillin. The two algal extracts showed interesting antimicrobial properties, which mostly inhibited the growth of isolated S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp. with MICs range of 1.4 × 109 to 2.2 × 1010 cells/mL. These results suggest that the two algae have potential as resources for the development of antimicrobial agents.

  7. Identification of natural antimicrobial agents to treat dengue infection: In vitro analysis of latarcin peptide activity against dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hussin A. Rothan; Bahrani, Hirbod; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there have been considerable advances in the study of dengue virus, no vaccines or anti-dengue drugs are currently available for humans. Therefore, new approaches are necessary for the development of potent anti-dengue drugs. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with potent antiviral activities are potential hits-to-leads for antiviral drug discovery. We performed this study to identify and characterise the inhibitory potential of the latarcin peptide (Ltc 1, SMWSGMWRRKLK...

  8. Antimicrobial Efficiency of Edible Films in Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cristian VODNAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, several applications of materials in food packaging and food safety are reviewed, including: polymers as high barrier packaging materials, natural substances as potent antimicrobial agents, and the efficiency of antimicrobial films in food industry. Active antimicrobial food packaging systems are supposed not only to passively protect food products against environmental factors, but also to inhibit or retard microbial growth on the food surface, extending the shelf life of products. Edible films can be incorporated into conventional food packaging systems with a dual purpose as an edible and antimicrobial component. Applications of antimicrobial films to fruits, vegetables and meat products have received increasing interest because films can serve as carriers for various natural antimicrobials that can maintain fresh quality, extend product shelf life and reduce the risk of pathogen growth. In the future, eco-friendly antimicrobial packaging films are promising food packaging materials because its biodegradability provides sustainable development for a modern community.In this article, several applications of materials in food packaging and food safety are reviewed, including: polymers as high barrier packaging materials, natural substances as potent antimicrobial agents, and the efficiency of antimicrobial films in food industry. Active antimicrobial food packaging systems are supposed not only to passively protect food products against environmental factors, but also to inhibit or retard microbial growth on the food surface, extending the shelf life of products. Edible films can be incorporated into conventional food packaging systems with a dual purpose as an edible and antimicrobial component. Applications of antimicrobial films to fruits, vegetables and meat products have received increasing interest because films can serve as carriers for various natural antimicrobials that can maintain fresh quality, extend product shelf

  9. Repurposing celecoxib as a topical antimicrobial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed N. Seleem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new antibiotics and alternative strategies to combat multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens, which are a growing clinical issue. Repurposing existing approved drugs with known pharmacology and toxicology is an alternative strategy to accelerate antimicrobial research and development. In this study, we show that celecoxib, a marketed inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive pathogens from a variety of genera, including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Listeria, Bacillus, and Mycobacterium, but not against Gram-negative pathogens. However, celecoxib is active against all of the Gram-negative bacteria tested, including strains of, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas, when their intrinsic resistance is artificially compromised by outer membrane permeabilizing agents such as colistin. The effect of celecoxib on incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules in Staphylococcus aureus was examined. The primary antimicrobial mechanism of action of celecoxib was the dose-dependent inhibition of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis. Further, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of celecoxib in a methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA infected Caenorhabditis elegans whole animal model. Topical application of celecoxib (1 and 2% significantly reduced the mean bacterial count in a mouse model of MRSA skin infection. Further, celecoxib decreased the levels of all inflammatory cytokines tested, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-1 beta, and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 in wounds caused by MRSA infection. Celecoxib also exhibited synergy with many conventional antimicrobials when tested against four clinical isolates of S. aureus. Collectively, these results demonstrate that celecoxib alone, or in combination with traditional antimicrobials, has a potential to use as a topical drug for the treatment of bacterial skin infections.

  10. The antimicrobial effects of cinnamon oil against multi-drug resistant Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is generally no kill-step when preparing salad vegetables, so there is a risk for foodborne illness outbreaks due to consumption of these vegetables. Some essential oils have antimicrobial activities and could provide a natural way to reduce pathogens on fresh produce. The use of a cinnamon ...

  11. Survey on antimicrobial residues in raw milk and antimicrobial use in dairy farms in the Emilia-Romagna region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Serraino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This survey investigated the antimicrobials most commonly used in dairy herds and antimicrobial residues most frequently detected in milk to evaluate the suitability of rapid screening tests to determine antimicrobial residues in milk. The investigation was carried out in 45 dairy herds consulting the farm administration records and in a national dairy industry collecting milk from almost all the dairy farms studied. Data were recorded on: i treatments with drugs containing antimicrobials during the 12 months prior to the visit; ii antimicrobial active substances present in the drugs; iii data from routine controls to detect antimicrobial residues (52,771 samples. The antimicrobial classes most commonly used were penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, sulphonamides, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides and lyncosamides; the most frequently used antimicrobial not belonging to any of the previous groups was riphaximin. Sixty-four samples collected from milk trucks yielded antimicrobial residues exceeding the detection limit of the screening test used: sulphonamide residues were the most prevalent (3.4%, followed by tetracycline (0.3% and penicillins and cephalosporins (0.03%. The antimicrobial classes most commonly used on dairy farms are the same as the residues most frequently detected in milk. The association of several commercially available rapid test kits proved satisfactory for determination of the veterinary antimicrobial drugs most used on dairy farms but at least five kits are required. Therefore, knowledge of the most frequently used veterinary drugs and periodic monitoring are required for the dairy industry to develop a targeted and effective control plan.

  12. Oral antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in porcine E. coli--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, E; Simoneit, C; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2014-03-01

    Administration of antimicrobials to livestock increases the risk of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in commensal bacteria. Antimicrobials in pig production are usually administered per pen via feed which implies treatment of sick alongside with healthy animals. The objective of this systematic literature review was to investigate the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in Escherichia coli of swine. Studies published in peer reviewed journals were retrieved from the international online databases ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and the national electronic literature data base of Deutsches Institut für Medizinische Dokumentation und Information. The studies were assessed using the eligibility criteria English or German language, access to full paper version, defined treatment and control group (initial value or non-treatment) as well as administration and resistance testing of the same antimicrobial class. In the qualitative synthesis, only studies were included presenting the summary measures odds ratio or prevalence of resistance, the category of the applied antimicrobial and the dosage. An effect of the antimicrobial on AMR in E. coli was evaluated as an "increase", "no effect" or "decrease" if the odds or alternatively the prevalence ratio were >1.0, 1.0 or <1.0, respectively. Eleven studies, describing 36 different trials, fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were finally assessed. An increase of AMR in E. coli was found in 10 out of 11 trials comparing AMR after with AMR prior to oral treatment and in 22 of the 25 trials comparing orally treated with untreated groups. Effects expressed as odds or prevalence ratios were highest for the use of aminoglycosides, quinolones and tetracycline. There was no clear association between the reported dosage and AMR towards tetracycline. Information on antimicrobial substance and dosage was missing in 4 and 5 of the 11 finally selected studies. The 36 identified trials were inhomogenous in usage and

  13. Key considerations for preventing suicide in older adults: consensus opinions of an expert panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete; Conwell, Yeates;

    2011-01-01

    : A set of new key considerations is divided into: universal, selective, and indicated prevention as well as a section on general considerations. CONCLUSIONS: The suggestions span a wide range and are offered for consideration by local groups preparing new interventions, as well as large scale public...

  14. Consideration Sets and Competitive Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Eliaz, K.; Spiegler, R.

    2006-01-01

    We study a market model in which competing �firms use costly marketing devices to influence the set of alternatives which consumers perceive as relevant. Consumers in our model are boundedly rational in the sense that they have an imperfect perception of what is relevant to their decision problem. They apply well-defined preferences to a "consideration set", which is a function of the marketing devices employed by the firms. We examine the implications of this behavioral model in the co...

  15. Self-Neglect: Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mary Rose; Leahy-Warren, Patricia; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Self-neglect is a significant international public health issue. Estimates suggest that there may be over one million cases per year in the United States. Aging populations will put more people at risk of self-neglect. This chapter presents background literature, self-neglect definitions and policy context, risk factors, and a brief overview of research on perspectives of self-neglect from both clients and community health and social care professionals. A case study is presented from the perspective of an individual and is used to explore ethical issues therein. A person-centered assessment within a multidisciplinary team approach is required for building a therapeutic relationship with clients. Capacity is a central issue in the management of responses to self-neglect. Ethical considerations of importance for community health and social care professionals include beneficence and nonmaleficence, autonomy and capacity, and respect for people's rights and dignity. A model of ethical justification is presented to explain dilemmas, challenges, and actions. Competence of professionals, multidisciplinary team working, informed consent, privacy, confidentiality, and best interest are also critical considerations. Effective decision making by an interdisciplinary team of professionals needs to be person-centered and give due consideration to the best interest of self-neglecting clients. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an in-depth discussion and examination of ethical issues and challenges relating to self-neglecting clients. PMID:26673378

  16. Molecular Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Producing Antimicrobial Agents from Bakasang, An Indonesian Traditional Fermented Fish Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Joan Lawalata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTwenty seven strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from bakasang, Indonesian traditional fermented fish product. In general, LAB have inhibitory activity againts pathogenic bacteria and spoilage bacteria. Screening for antimicrobia activity of isolates were performed with well-diffusion method. One isolate that was designed as Pediococcus BksC24 was the strongest against bacteria pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. This strain was further identified by 16S rRNA gen sequence comparison. Isolates LAB producing antimicrobial agents from bakasang were identified as Pediococcus acidilactici.Keywords : Bakasang, LAB, antimicrobial, phenotypic characteristics, 16S rRNA gene

  17. Three essays on resource economics. Demand systems for energy forecasting: Practical considerations for estimating a generalized logit model, To borrow or not to borrow: A variation on the MacDougal-Kemp theme, and, Valuing reduced risk for households with children or the retired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Weifeng

    This thesis presents papers on three areas of study within resource and environmental economics. "Demand Systems For Energy Forecasting" provides some practical considerations for estimating a Generalized Logit model. The main reason for using this demand system for energy and other factors is that the derived price elasticities are robust when expenditure shares are small. The primary objective of the paper is to determine the best form of the cross-price weights, and a simple inverse function of the expenditure share is selected. A second objective is to demonstrate that the estimated elasticities are sensitive to the units specified for the prices, and to show how price scales can be estimated as part of the model. "To Borrow or Not to Borrow: A Variation on the MacDougal-Kemp Theme" studies the impact of international capital movements on the conditional convergence of economies differing from each other only in initial wealth. We found that in assets, income, consumption and utility, convergence obtains, with and only with, the absence of international capital movement. When a rich country invests in a poor country, the balance of debt increases forever. Asset ownership is increased in all periods for the lender, and asset ownership of the borrower is deceased. Also, capital investment decreases the lender's utility for early periods, but increases it forever after a cross-over point. In contrast, the borrower's utility increases for early periods, but then decreases forever. "Valuing Reduced Risk for Households with Children or the Retired" presents a theoretical model of how families value risk and then exams family automobile purchases to impute the average Value of a Statistical Life (VSL) for each type of family. Data for fatal accidents are used to estimate survival rates for individuals in different types of accidents, and the probabilities of having accidents for different types of vehicle. These models are used to determine standardized risks for

  18. 21 CFR 25.15 - General procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Agency Actions Requiring Environmental Consideration § 25.15 General procedures. (a) All... application or petition. An EA adequate for filing is one that addresses the relevant environmental issues....

  19. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial potentials of Lactobacillus helveticus strains isolated from traditional cheese in Sinkiang China against food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xin; Evivie, Smith Etareri; Muhammad, Zafarullah; Luo, Guang-Wen; Liang, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Na-Na; Huo, Gui-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus, an obligatory hetero-fermentative LAB, is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) and is gaining popularity for application in dairy products. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play a remarkable role in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria in food products, without disturbing the sensory attributes of the food. In this study, the screening of the antimicrobial potential of Lactobacillus helveticus KLDS 1.8701 against four food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43889 in vitro was inspected using the Oxford cup method and mixed culture inhibition assays. The organic acid production and antimicrobial potential of the cell-free supernatants (CFS) have been evaluated via different treatments and analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The analysis results revealed that KLDS 1.8701 exhibited the highest antimicrobial potential compared to other antimicrobial strains. The antimicrobial activity of KLDS 1.8701 resulted from the organic acids in the culture and CFS. From the study, it was found that carbon sources, as well as organic acid production, accelerate the antimicrobial activity of KLDS 1.8701 and the fructooligosaccharides (FOS) were considered the best for improving the proliferation of KLDS 1.8701 and supporting its antimicrobial action. Results of the mixed culture inhibition assays showed that part of the antimicrobial activity resulted from the inhibitory action of the bacteria itself in culture, and this action required cellular contact between the food-borne pathogens and KLDS 1.8701. Conversely, the results of the antimicrobial spectrum assay revealed that some Lactobacilli remained unaffected by KLDS 1.8701. KLDS 1.8701 might also be favorable for use as a supplementary starter in fermented dairy productions. Furthermore, KLDS 1.8701 could survive well under GI tract conditions

  20. Engaging hospitalists in antimicrobial stewardship: Lessons from a multihospital collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Megan R; Rohde, Jeffrey M; Jacobsen, Diane; Barron, James R; Ko, Christin; Goonewardene, Michael; Rosenberg, David J; Srinivasan, Arjun; Flanders, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Inappropriate antimicrobial use in hospitalized patients contributes to antimicrobial-resistant infections and complications. We sought to evaluate the impact, barriers, and facilitators of antimicrobial stewardship best practices in a diverse group of hospital medicine programs. This multihospital initiative included 1 community nonteaching hospital, 2 community teaching hospitals, and 2 academic medical centers participating in a collaborative with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. We conducted multimodal physician education on best practices for antimicrobial use including: (1) enhanced antimicrobial documentation, (2) improved quality and accessibility of local clinical guidelines, and (3) a 72-hour antimicrobial "timeout." Implementation barriers included variability in physician practice styles, lack of awareness of stewardship importance, and overly broad interventions. Facilitators included engaging hospitalists, collecting real time data and providing performance feedback, and appropriately limiting the scope of interventions. In 2 hospitals, complete antimicrobial documentation in sampled medical records improved significantly (4% to 51% and 8% to 65%, P < 0.001 for each comparison). A total of 726 antimicrobial timeouts occurred at 4 hospitals, and 30% resulted in optimization or discontinuation of antimicrobials. With careful attention to key barriers and facilitators, hospitalists can successfully implement effective antimicrobial stewardship practices. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:576-580. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:27130473

  1. Surface modification and properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films by antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Liqiang; Zhu, Liangjun; Min, Sijia; Liu, Lin; Cai, Yurong; Yao, Juming

    2008-03-01

    The Bombyx mori silk fibroin films (SFFs) were modified by a Cecropin B ( CB) antimicrobial peptide, (NH 2)-NGIVKAGPAIAVLGEAAL-CONH 2, using the carbodiimide chemistry method. In order to avoid the dissolution of films during the modification procedure, the SFFs were first treated with 60% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution, resulting a structural transition from unstable silk I to silk II. The investigation of modification conditions showed that the surface-modified SFFs had the satisfied antimicrobial activity and durability when they were activated by EDC·HCl/NHS solution followed by a treatment in CB peptide/PBS buffer (pH 6.5 or 8) solution at ambient temperature for 2 h. Moreover, the surface-modified SFFs showed the smaller contact angle due to the hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides coupled on the film surface, which is essential for the cell adhesion and proliferation. AFM results indicated that the surface roughness of SFFs was considerably increased after the modification by the peptides. The elemental composition analysis results also suggested that the peptides were tightly coupled to the surface of SFFs. This approach may provide a new option to engineer the surface-modified implanted materials preventing the biomaterial-centered infection (BCI).

  2. Surface modification and properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films by antimicrobial peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bombyx mori silk fibroin films (SFFs) were modified by a Cecropin B (CB) antimicrobial peptide, (NH2)-NGIVKAGPAIAVLGEAAL-CONH2, using the carbodiimide chemistry method. In order to avoid the dissolution of films during the modification procedure, the SFFs were first treated with 60% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution, resulting a structural transition from unstable silk I to silk II. The investigation of modification conditions showed that the surface-modified SFFs had the satisfied antimicrobial activity and durability when they were activated by EDC.HCl/NHS solution followed by a treatment in CB peptide/PBS buffer (pH 6.5 or 8) solution at ambient temperature for 2 h. Moreover, the surface-modified SFFs showed the smaller contact angle due to the hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides coupled on the film surface, which is essential for the cell adhesion and proliferation. AFM results indicated that the surface roughness of SFFs was considerably increased after the modification by the peptides. The elemental composition analysis results also suggested that the peptides were tightly coupled to the surface of SFFs. This approach may provide a new option to engineer the surface-modified implanted materials preventing the biomaterial-centered infection (BCI)

  3. Synthesis of antimicrobial monophase silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanopowders for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Vojislav; Janaćković, Djordje; Dimitrijević, Suzana; Tanasković, Sladjana B.; Mitrić, Miodrag; Pavlović, Mirjana S.; Krstić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dragoljub; Raičević, Slavica

    2011-02-01

    Monophase silver-doped hydroxyapatite (AgxCa10-x(PO4)6(OH)2; 0.002 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) nanoparticles were prepared using a neutralization method and investigated with respect to potential medical applications. This method consists of dissolving Ag2O in solution of H3PO4, and the slow addition to suspension of Ca(OH)2 was applied for the purpose of homogenous distribution of silver ions. Characterization studies from XRD, TEM and FTIR spectra showed that obtained crystals are monophase hydroxyapatites and that particles of all samples are of nano size, with average length of 70 nm and about 15-25 nm in diameter. Antimicrobial studies have demonstrated that all silver-doped hydroxyapatite samples exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity in vitro against the following pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The hydroxyapatite sample with the highest content of silver has shown the highest antimicrobial activity; killed all cells of E. coli and brought to more than 99% reduction in viable counts of S. aureus and C. albicans. The atomic force microscopic studies illustrate that silver-doped hydroxyapatite sample causes considerable morphological changes of microorganism cells which might be the cause of cells' death. Hemolysis ratios of the silver-doped hydroxyapatite samples were below 3%, indicating good blood compatibility and that are promising as biomaterials.

  4. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of leaf extract of Valeriana wallichii DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuda, Fazli; Iqbal, Zafar; Zakiullah; Khan, Ayub; Nasir, Fazli

    2012-10-01

    Valeriana wallichii DC (Valerianaceae) is one of the most widely used traditional remedies for various complications associated with nervous system and digestion. No antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory studies have so far been carried out on the aerial parts of the plant. The present work was focused to evaluate the antimicrobial (antifungal and antibacterial) and anti-inflammatory properties of V. wallichii using reported methods. Chloroform fraction (VW-2) and hexane fraction (VW-3) exhibited significant activity against S. aureus and B. subtilus, respectively. The chloroform fraction (VW-2) showed significant activity against S. aureus with 0.27 mg/ml MIC, where 0.31 mg/ml MIC was deduced for VW-3 fraction against B. subtilus. VW-3 fraction was also found to be the most potent inhibitor of M. canis, showing 70% inhibition with an MIC value of 0.19 mg/ml. Considerable inhibitory activity was also observed for VW-2 and water fraction (VW-6) against M. canis and A. flavus. A remarkable anti-inflammatory like activity was observed for the crude extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg at all observed durations. Other doses of the sample also showed excellent activity. Looking to these results it may be concluded that V. wallichii may be a potential source for activity guided isolation of natural products with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory-like properties. PMID:23009985

  5. 1,2-disubstituted imidazolines with heterocyclic fragments as antimicrobial additives for jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, V.N.; Kelarev, V.I.; Kuatbekov, A.M. [and others

    1995-09-01

    The most promising and convenient method for protecting hydrocarbon fuels against damage by microorganisms is the use of antimicrobial additives that are effective for extended periods in the storage and transportation of fuels. Imidazoline derivatives manifest high biocidal activities in petroleum distillate fuels, with the activity depending considerably on the nature and structure of the radicals linked to the imidazoline ring. One example of a highly effective additive is AID 9-12, the basic components of which are 1,2-disubstituted imidazolines obtained by the condensation of polyethylenepolyamines with an n-C{sub 9} - C{sub 12} fraction of synthetic fatty acids. At low concentrations in jet fuels, this additive exhibits high activities against microbial damage without having any adverse effects on the physicochemical or service properties of the fuels. Also effective as antimicrobial additives for jet fuels are imidazolines with sterically hindered phenol fragments or with naphthyl or benzyl radicals. In our search for effective antimicrobial additives, we have investigated a series of 1,2-disubstituted imidazolines with heterocyclic fragments. In this paper, we report the results of our investigation.

  6. Surface modification and properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films by antimicrobial peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Liqiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha Higher Education Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhu Liangjun; Min Sijia [College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Liu Lin; Cai Yurong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha Higher Education Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yao Juming [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha Higher Education Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China)], E-mail: yaoj@zstu.edu.cn

    2008-03-15

    The Bombyx mori silk fibroin films (SFFs) were modified by a Cecropin B (CB) antimicrobial peptide, (NH{sub 2})-NGIVKAGPAIAVLGEAAL-CONH{sub 2}, using the carbodiimide chemistry method. In order to avoid the dissolution of films during the modification procedure, the SFFs were first treated with 60% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution, resulting a structural transition from unstable silk I to silk II. The investigation of modification conditions showed that the surface-modified SFFs had the satisfied antimicrobial activity and durability when they were activated by EDC.HCl/NHS solution followed by a treatment in CB peptide/PBS buffer (pH 6.5 or 8) solution at ambient temperature for 2 h. Moreover, the surface-modified SFFs showed the smaller contact angle due to the hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides coupled on the film surface, which is essential for the cell adhesion and proliferation. AFM results indicated that the surface roughness of SFFs was considerably increased after the modification by the peptides. The elemental composition analysis results also suggested that the peptides were tightly coupled to the surface of SFFs. This approach may provide a new option to engineer the surface-modified implanted materials preventing the biomaterial-centered infection (BCI)

  7. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E; Kroghsbo, S; Wang, M; Sondergaard, T E

    2015-12-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the oCelloScope system, to perform rapid AST. The oCelloScope system demonstrated a very high accuracy (96% overall agreement) when determining the resistance profiles of four reference strains, nine clinical isolates, including multi-drug-resistant isolates, and three positive blood cultures. AST of clinical isolates (168 antimicrobial agent-organism combinations) demonstrated 3.6% minor, no major and 1.2% very major errors of the oCelloScope system compared to conventional susceptibility testing, as well as a rapid and correct phenotypic detection of strains with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) profiles. The net average time-to-result was 108 min, with 95% of the results being available within 180 min. In conclusion, this study strongly indicates that the oCelloScope system holds considerable potential as an accurate and sensitive AST method with short time-to-result, enabling same-day targeted antimicrobial therapy, facilitating antibiotic stewardship and better patient management. A full-scale validation of the oCelloScope system including more isolates is necessary to assess the impact of using it for AST. PMID:26407621

  8. In vitro antimicrobial activity on clinical microbial strains and antioxidant properties of Artemisia parviflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahameethunisa Abdul R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisia parviflora leaf extracts were evaluated for potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Antimicrobial susceptibility assay was performed against ten standard reference bacterial strains. Antioxidant activity was analyzed using the ferric thiocyanate and 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays. Radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content were compared. Phytochemical analyses were performed to identify the major bioactive constitution of the plant extract. Results Hexane, methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of A. parviflora leaves exhibited good activity against the microorganisms tested. The n-hexane extract of A. parviflora showed high inhibition of the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri. Methanol extract showed strong radical scavenging and antioxidant activity, other extracts showed moderate antioxidant activity. The major derivatives present in the extracts are of terpenes, steroids, phenols, flavonoids, tannins and volatile oil. Conclusions The results obtained with n-hexane extract were particularly significant as it strongly inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa, E. coli and S. flexneri. The major constituent of the n-hexane extract was identified as terpenes. Strong antioxidant activity could be observed with all the individual extracts. The antimicrobial and antioxidant property of the extracts were attributed to the secondary metabolites, terpenes and phenolic compounds present in A. parviflora and could be of considerable interest in the development of new drugs.

  9. Synthesis of antimicrobial monophase silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanopowders for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monophase silver-doped hydroxyapatite (AgxCa10-x(PO4)6(OH)2; 0.002 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) nanoparticles were prepared using a neutralization method and investigated with respect to potential medical applications. This method consists of dissolving Ag2O in solution of H3PO4, and the slow addition to suspension of Ca(OH)2 was applied for the purpose of homogenous distribution of silver ions. Characterization studies from XRD, TEM and FTIR spectra showed that obtained crystals are monophase hydroxyapatites and that particles of all samples are of nano size, with average length of 70 nm and about 15-25 nm in diameter. Antimicrobial studies have demonstrated that all silver-doped hydroxyapatite samples exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity in vitro against the following pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The hydroxyapatite sample with the highest content of silver has shown the highest antimicrobial activity; killed all cells of E. coli and brought to more than 99% reduction in viable counts of S. aureus and C. albicans. The atomic force microscopic studies illustrate that silver-doped hydroxyapatite sample causes considerable morphological changes of microorganism cells which might be the cause of cells' death. Hemolysis ratios of the silver-doped hydroxyapatite samples were below 3%, indicating good blood compatibility and that are promising as biomaterials.

  10. Synthesis of antimicrobial monophase silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanopowders for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Vojislav, E-mail: voyo@vinca.rs [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Janackovic, Djordje; Dimitrijevic, Suzana [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tanaskovic, Sladjana B. [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mitric, Miodrag; Pavlovic, Mirjana S. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Krstic, Aleksandra [Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jovanovic, Dragoljub [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Raicevic, Slavica [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-02-15

    Monophase silver-doped hydroxyapatite (Ag{sub x}Ca{sub 10-x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; 0.002 {<=} x {<=} 0.04) nanoparticles were prepared using a neutralization method and investigated with respect to potential medical applications. This method consists of dissolving Ag{sub 2}O in solution of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, and the slow addition to suspension of Ca(OH){sub 2} was applied for the purpose of homogenous distribution of silver ions. Characterization studies from XRD, TEM and FTIR spectra showed that obtained crystals are monophase hydroxyapatites and that particles of all samples are of nano size, with average length of 70 nm and about 15-25 nm in diameter. Antimicrobial studies have demonstrated that all silver-doped hydroxyapatite samples exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity in vitro against the following pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The hydroxyapatite sample with the highest content of silver has shown the highest antimicrobial activity; killed all cells of E. coli and brought to more than 99% reduction in viable counts of S. aureus and C. albicans. The atomic force microscopic studies illustrate that silver-doped hydroxyapatite sample causes considerable morphological changes of microorganism cells which might be the cause of cells' death. Hemolysis ratios of the silver-doped hydroxyapatite samples were below 3%, indicating good blood compatibility and that are promising as biomaterials.

  11. Bioprotective properties of seaweeds: In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity against food borne bacteria in relation to polyphenolic content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesika Periyanaina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years chemical preservatives have been used in food, to act as either antimicrobials or antioxidants or both. In general, consumers regard additive-free foods as safer since preservatives can cause health hazards like asthma and cancer and are suspected to be mutagenic and neurotoxic. The present study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of methanolic extracts of seaweeds, with a view to developing safer food preservatives. Methods Ten edible seaweeds, which have wide pharmaceutical application, were collected from Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Tamil Nadu, India and evaluated for antioxidant and antimicrobial activity against food borne pathogens. Results The results indicate that Gelidiella acerosa has the highest antioxidant activity while Haligra sps exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 96. Conclusion Quantitative analysis of the total phenolic content of the seaweeds indicated that Gelidella acerosa and Haligra sps have high phenolic contents, which correlated to their respective antioxidant and antimicrobial activity

  12. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of some new indazolone derivatives from 1-(3,5-Dibromo-2-hydroxy-4 methyl phenyl ethanone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar MP

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Indazolone nucleus is present in various therapeutically important drug candidates. Chalcones are possessing versatile pharmacological activities like anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, cytotoxic, anticancer, antimalarial. While the bromoacetophenone nucleus bears very good antimicrobial activity. With consideration of all these facts we synthesized new derivatives of bromo acetophenone nucleus, which reacts with aromatic aldehydes to obtained chalcone. This was further derivatized to indazolone. All synthesized compounds were confirmed by spectral data and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were screened for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against A. niger. All synthesized compounds showed good to moderate antimicrobial activity.

  13. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of bacteria with antimicrobial activities from the Mediterranean sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, U; Schmid, M; Wagner, M; Fieseler, L; Gernert, C; Hacker, J

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activities from the marine sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Aplysina cavernicola. The obtained 27 isolates could be subdivided into eight phylogenetically different clusters based on comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rDNA genes. The sponge isolates were affiliated with the low (Bacillus) and high G+C Gram-positive bacteria (Arthobacter, Micrococcus), as well as the alpha-Proteobacteria (unknown isolate) and gamma-Proteobacteria (Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas). One novel Bacillus species was identified and two species were closely related to previously uncharacterized strains. Isolates with antimicrobial activity were numerically most abundant in the genera Pseudoalteromonas and the alpha-Proteobacteria. The sponge isolates show antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative reference strains but not against the fungus Candida albicans. A general pattern was observed in that Gram-positive bacteria inhibited Gram-positive strains while Gram-negative bacteria inhibited Gram-negative isolates. Antimicrobial activities were also found against clinical isolates, i.e. multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from hospital patients. The high recovery of strains with antimicrobial activity suggests that marine sponges represent an ecological niche which harbors a hitherto largely uncharacterized microbial diversity and, concomitantly, a yet untapped metabolic potential. PMID:11311441

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Serbian Propolis Evaluated by Means of MIC, HPTLC, Bioautography and Chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristivojević, Petar; Dimkić, Ivica; Trifković, Jelena; Berić, Tanja; Vovk, Irena; Milojković-Opsenica, Dušanka; Stanković, Slaviša

    2016-01-01

    New information has come to light about the biological activity of propolis and the quality of natural products which requires a rapid and reliable assessment method such as High Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprinting. This study investigates chromatographic and chemometric approaches for determining the antimicrobial activity of propolis of Serbian origin against various bacterial species. A linear multivariate calibration technique, using Partial Least Squares, was used to extract the relevant information from the chromatographic fingerprints, i.e. to indicate peaks which represent phenolic compounds that are potentially responsible for the antimicrobial capacity of the samples. In addition, direct bioautography was performed to localize the antibacterial activity on chromatograms. The biological activity of the propolis samples against various bacterial species was determined by a minimum inhibitory concentration assay, confirming their affiliation with the European poplar type of propolis and revealing the existence of two types (blue and orange) according to botanical origin. The strongest antibacterial activity was exhibited by sample 26 against Staphylococcus aureus, with a MIC value of 0.5 mg/mL, and Listeria monocytogenes, with a MIC as low as 0.1 mg/mL, which was also the lowest effective concentration observed in our study. Generally, the orange type of propolis shows higher antimicrobial activity compared to the blue type. PLS modelling was performed on the HPTLC data set and the resulting models might qualitatively indicate compounds that play an important role in the activity exhibited by the propolis samples. The most relevant peaks influencing the antimicrobial activity of propolis against all bacterial strains were phenolic compounds at RF values of 0.37, 0.40, 0.45, 0.51, 0.60 and 0.70. The knowledge gained through this study could be important for attributing the antimicrobial activity of propolis to specific chemical

  15. Commercial considerations in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field with immense promise. Using the example of an early tissue-engineered skin implant, Dermagraft, factors involved in the successful commercial development of devices of this type are explored. Tissue engineering has to strike a balance between tissue culture, which is a resource-intensive activity, and business considerations that are concerned with minimizing cost and maximizing customer convenience. Bioreactor design takes place in a highly regulated environment, so factors to be incorporated into the concept include not only tissue culture considerations but also matters related to asepsis, scaleup, automation and ease of use by the final customer. Dermagraft is an allogeneic tissue. Stasis preservation, in this case cryopreservation, is essential in allogeneic tissue engineering, allowing sterility testing, inventory control and, in the case of Dermagraft, a cellular stress that may be important for hormesis following implantation. Although the use of allogeneic cells provides advantages in manufacturing under suitable conditions, it raises the spectre of immunological rejection. Such rejection has not been experienced with Dermagraft. Possible reasons for this and the vision of further application of allogeneic tissues are important considerations in future tissue-engineered cellular devices. This review illustrates approaches that indicate some of the criteria that may provide a basis for further developments. Marketing is a further requirement for success, which entails understanding of the mechanism of action of the procedure, and is illustrated for Dermagraft. The success of a tissue-engineered product is dependent on many interacting operations, some discussed here, each of which must be performed simultaneously and well. PMID:17005024

  16. Circuit considerations for repetitive railguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honih, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Railgun electromagnetic launchers have significant military and scientific potential. They provide direct conversion of electrical energy to projectile kinetic energy, and they offer the hope of achieving projectile velocities greatly exceeding the limits of conventional guns. With over 10 km/sec already demonstrated, railguns are attracting attention for tactical and strategic weapons systems and for scientific equation-of-state research. The full utilization of railguns will require significant improvements in every aspect of system design - projectile, barrel, and power source - to achieve operation on a large scale. This paper will review fundamental aspects of railguns, with emphasis on circuit considerations and repetitive operation.

  17. Legal considerations in utility stranded cost securitizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.B.; Jameson, J.M.; Yoong, D.K.L.

    1997-10-01

    The effects that state and federal law provisions, and accounting, tax and bankruptcy considerations have on securitization of utility stranded costs are complex and demand careful attention from government, utilities and their advisors. Although the legal structuring of a utility securitization is more involved than that of most other securitizations, its documentation is not particularly more complicated. To facilitate the movement towards a competitive electricity generation marketplace, many investor-owned utilities, regulators and state lawmakers are considering securitizations as a means of recovering stranded costs. Securitizations generally, and securitizations of stranded costs in particular, are subject to many legal requirements, all of which need to be satisfied in order to structure and consummate a successful transaction. Utility executives, regulators and lawmakers need to be cognizant of the legal requirements that will strongly influence the structure and success of any stranded cost legislation or securitization they propose. As of this writing, no U.S. stranded cost securitizations have been completed.

  18. Nuclear energy: considerations about nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general view of historical aspects of nuclear energy and the arrangements to assure its use for peaceful purposes are presented. Then the internal character of nuclear energy in a juride context is demonstrated; some consideration about the international organizations and conventions and the Brazilian Legislation in the nuclear area are examined. It also deals with the political aspects of nuclear trade and the function of IAEA in this are. Furthermore the restrictions imposed by Non-Proliferation Treaty-NPT, the objectures of the Tlatelolco Treaty and ''London Club'' guidelines. Afterwards the bilateral cooperation under taken by countries and its agreements are discussed. Besides some aspects of agreements made between United States, France Germany and Brazil are discussed

  19. Consideration of aging in probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment is a standardised tool for assessment of safety of nuclear power plants. It is a complement to the safety analyses. Standard probabilistic models of safety equipment assume component failure rate as a constant. Ageing of systems, structures and components can theoretically be included in new age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment, which generally causes the failure rate to be a function of age. New age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment models, which offer explicit calculation of the ageing effects, are developed. Several groups of components are considered which require their unique models: e.g. operating components e.g. stand-by components. The developed models on the component level are inserted into the models of the probabilistic safety assessment in order that the ageing effects are evaluated for complete systems. The preliminary results show that the lack of necessary data for consideration of ageing causes highly uncertain models and consequently the results. (author)

  20. Implicit equity considerations in radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maturity of the practice of protecting against radiation provides a vehicle for testing both the definition of implied preference and the usefulness of any quantitative results. The author reviews the 50-year background and the rationale for imposing radiation standards. He analyzes the procedure for making quantitative risk estimates and their use to determine implied risk preference for occupational, individual, and population exposure. Equity did not emerge as a consideration in the early days when the threshold concept dominated, but did become an issue when different standards were set for workers and members of the general public; i.e., for voluntary/involuntary exposure. Intergeneration inequities have only recently become a critical issue. They arise because radioactive wastes have no productive value, but the strategic weapons program has assured some degree of social continuity. 19 references, 7 tables

  1. Real estate, assets and taxes: some considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. PALADINI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are two propositions in Italy for which there is broad consensus among both scholars and among economic policy makers. The first is that, with respect to other countries, the tax burden is relatively low compared to the share of government expenditure, and therefore increase the levy is necessary, in addition to spending reductions. The second is that this increase in taxation should be done so as not to hit the incomes of middle-income workers, on which the tax burden is already high and has grown considerably in recent years. An increase in the taxes in the real estate sector is thus an attractive proposition and indeed reform in this area is one of the most debated issues in recent years. In the present work the author offers several observations to show how some of the choices related to this issue, however, should be framed in a broader view which invests more general options.

  2. Smallpox: clinical highlights and considerations for vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox virus has gained considerable attention as a potential bioterrorism agent. Recommendations for smallpox (vaccinia vaccination presume a low risk for use of smallpox as a terrorist biological agent and vaccination is currently recommended for selected groups of individuals such as health care workers, public health authorities, and emergency/rescue workers, among others. Information about adverse reactions to the smallpox vaccine is based upon studies completed during the 1950s and 1960s. The prevalence of various diseases has changed over the last four decades and new disease entities have been described during this period. The smallpox vaccination may be contra-indicated in many of these conditions. This has made pre-screening of potential vaccines necessary. It is believed that at present, the risks of vaccine-associated complications far outweigh the potential benefits of vaccination in the general population.

  3. Antimicrobial therapy in patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastene, Bruno; Duclos, Gary; Martin, Claude; Leone, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Providing antibiotics is a life-saving intervention in patients with septic shock. Cultures as clinically appropriate before antimicrobial therapy are required. Guidelines recommend providing broad-spectrum antibiotics within the first hour after recognition of shock. The site of infection, the patient's history and clinical status, and the local ecology all affect the choice of empirical treatment. The appropriateness of this choice is an important determinant of patient outcome. At 48-96h, the antimicrobial treatment should be systematically reassessed based on the clinical course and culture results. Cessation, de-escalation, continuation, or escalation are discussed according to these variables. Unnecessary treatment should be avoided to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens. PMID:27062114

  4. Assessing the antimicrobial activities of Ocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choyam, Shilja; Lokesh, Dhanashree; Kempaiah, Bettadaiah Bheemakere; Kammara, Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a zone of inhibition on a solid substrate indicates the bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides such as bacteriocin and enterocin. The indicator strain plays a significant role in bacteriocin assays. Other characteristics of bacteriocins, such as their dispersal ability and the different zymogram components, also affect bacteriocin assays. However, universal well diffusion assays for antimicrobials, irrespective of their ability to diffuse (bacteriocin and enterocin), do not exist. The ability of different zymography components to generate non-specific activities have rarely been explored in the literature. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the impact of major factors (diffusion and rate of diffusion) in a solid substrate bioassay, and to document the adverse effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate in zymograms used to estimate the approximate molecular weight of bacteriocins. PMID:26441952

  5. Assessing the antimicrobial activities of Ocins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilja eChoyam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a zone of inhibition on a solid substrate indicates the bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides such as bacteriocin and enterocin. The indicator strain plays a significant role in bacteriocin assays. Other characteristics of bacteriocins, such as their dispersal ability and the different zymogram components, also affect bacteriocin assays. However, universal well diffusion assays for antimicrobials, irrespective of their ability to diffuse (bacteriocin, enterocin, do not exist. The ability of different zymography components to generate non-specific activities have rarely been explored in the literature. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the impact of two major factors (diffusion and no diffusion in a solid substrate bioassay, and to document the adverse effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate in zymograms used to estimate the approximate molecular weight of bacteriocins.

  6. Nisin and its Antimicrobial Effect in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamparsun Hampikyan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Nisin is a bacteriocin which is produced by Lactococcus lactis and takes its place in I. class bacteriocins which are known as lantibiotics. Nisin has antimicrobial and bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of gram positive bacteria and spores of Clostridium spp. and Bacillus spp. According to toxicity studies nisin is considered not toxic to humans. Its first established used was as a preservative in processed cheese products and since than numerous other applications in various foods such as meat and meat products, poultry products, sea products and beverages such as beer, wine have been used safely. In this review, the characteristics of nisin, its usage in food and its antimicrobial effect are considered. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(2.000: 142-147

  7. Nisin and its Antimicrobial Effect in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamparsun Hampikyan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Nisin is a bacteriocin which is produced by Lactococcus lactis and takes its place in I. class bacteriocins which are known as lantibiotics. Nisin has antimicrobial and bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of gram positive bacteria and spores of Clostridium spp. and Bacillus spp. According to toxicity studies nisin is considered not toxic to humans. Its first established used was as a preservative in processed cheese products and since than numerous other applications in various foods such as meat and meat products, poultry products, sea products and beverages such as beer, wine have been used safely. In this review, the characteristics of nisin, its usage in food and its antimicrobial effect are considered. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(2: 142-147

  8. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Klaus R; Jørgensen, Erik;

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time......, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility, with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effect within 6 minutes and within 30 minutes in...... complex samples from pigs suffering from catheter associated urinary tract infections. The oCelloScope system provides a fast high-throughput screening method to detect bacterial susceptibility that may entail earlier diagnosis and introduction of appropriate targeted therapy and thus combat the threat...

  9. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  10. Leaves Antimicrobial Activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Mahboubeh; Sarmadi, Marziyeh; Bernard, Françoise; Ebrahimi Pour, Gholam Hossein; Shaker Bazarnov, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) is an important medicinal plant. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of ethanolic and aqueous extracts from licorice leaves were studied compared to root extracts activities. Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans were used as test organisms. Antimicrobial activity was tested by paper disc agar diffusion and serial dilution methods in order to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The root and leave extracts showed activity against Candida albicans, and tested gram-positive bacteria in a dose dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of the leaves was the most active extract against gram-positive bacteria. Its effectiveness against strains provides hope that it can serve as an alternative therapeutic agent. PMID:24381608

  11. Condensing Heat Exchanger with Hydrophilic Antimicrobial Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-layer antimicrobial hydrophilic coating is applied to a substrate of anodized aluminum, although other materials may form the substrate. A silver layer is sputtered onto a thoroughly clean anodized surface of the aluminum to about 400 nm thickness. A layer of crosslinked, silicon-based macromolecular structure about 10 nm thickness overlies the silver layer, and the outermost surface of the layer of crosslinked, silicon-based macromolecular structure is hydroxide terminated to produce a hydrophilic surface with a water drop contact angle of less than 10.degree.. The coated substrate may be one of multiple fins in a condensing heat exchanger for use in the microgravity of space, which has narrow channels defined between angled fins such that the surface tension of condensed water moves water by capillary flow to a central location where it is pumped to storage. The antimicrobial coating prevents obstruction of the capillary passages.

  12. Mechanisms of biofilm resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, T F; O'Toole, G A

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms attached to a surface. It has become clear that biofilm-grown cells express properties distinct from planktonic cells, one of which is an increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. Recent work has indicated that slow growth and/or induction of an rpoS-mediated stress response could contribute to biocide resistance. The physical and/or chemical structure of exopolysaccharides or other aspects of biofilm architecture could also confer resistance by exclusion of biocides from the bacterial community. Finally, biofilm-grown bacteria might develop a biofilm-specific biocide-resistant phenotype. Owing to the heterogeneous nature of the biofilm, it is likely that there are multiple resistance mechanisms at work within a single community. Recent research has begun to shed light on how and why surface-attached microbial communities develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. PMID:11166241

  13. Design and Application of Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Andre; Neundorf, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an interesting class of antibiotics characterized by their unique antibiotic activity and lower propensity for developing resistance compared to common antibiotics. They belong to the class of membrane-active peptides and usually act selectively against bacteria, fungi and protozoans. AMPs, but also peptide conjugates containing AMPs, have come more and more into the focus of research during the last few years. Within this article, recent work on AMP conjugates is reviewed. Different aspects will be highlighted as a combination of AMPs with antibiotics or organometallic compounds aiming to increase antibacterial activity or target selectivity, conjugation with photosensitizers for improving photodynamic therapy (PDT) or the attachment to particles, to name only a few. Owing to the enormous resonance of antimicrobial conjugates in the literature so far, this research topic seems to be very attractive to different scientific fields, like medicine, biology, biochemistry or chemistry. PMID:27187357

  14. Design and Application of Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Reinhardt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an interesting class of antibiotics characterized by their unique antibiotic activity and lower propensity for developing resistance compared to common antibiotics. They belong to the class of membrane-active peptides and usually act selectively against bacteria, fungi and protozoans. AMPs, but also peptide conjugates containing AMPs, have come more and more into the focus of research during the last few years. Within this article, recent work on AMP conjugates is reviewed. Different aspects will be highlighted as a combination of AMPs with antibiotics or organometallic compounds aiming to increase antibacterial activity or target selectivity, conjugation with photosensitizers for improving photodynamic therapy (PDT or the attachment to particles, to name only a few. Owing to the enormous resonance of antimicrobial conjugates in the literature so far, this research topic seems to be very attractive to different scientific fields, like medicine, biology, biochemistry or chemistry.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeana M.E. Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Aspilia latissima - an abundant plant from the Brazilian Pantanal region - against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The crude extracts and fractions showed activity in all tested microorganisms. The chloroform fraction of the leaves and roots showed the most antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, with an MIC of 500 μg/mL. This fraction was submitted to bioautographic assays to characterize the activity of the compounds. Two bands from the leaves (L-A and L-B and three bands from the roots (R-C, R-D and R-E were bioactive. Within the root-derived bands, the terpene derivatives stigmasterol, kaurenoic acid and kaura-9(11, 16-dien-18-oic acid were identified. Antibiotic activity of A. latissima is reported for the first time.

  16. Forces in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced by an observer in general coordinates. The general force is then applied to the local co-moving coordinate system of a uniformly accelerating observer, leading to an expression of the inertial force experienced by the observer. Next, applying the general force in Schwarzschild coordinates is shown to lead to familiar expressions of the gravitational force. As a more complex demonstration, the general force is applied to an observer in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates near a rotating, Kerr black hole. It is then shown that when the angular momentum of the black hole goes to zero, the force on the observer reduces to the force on an observer held stationary in Schwarzschild coordinates. As a final consideration, the force on an observer moving in rotating coordinates is derived. Expressing the force in terms of Christoffel symbols in rotating coordinates leads to familiar expressions of the centrifugal and Coriolis forces on the observer. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate level students, as well as those undergraduate students having experience with general relativity and tensor analysis.

  17. Isolation and identification of antimicrobial compound from Mentha longifolia L. leaves grown wild in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bayati Firas A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mentha longifolia L. (Lamiaceae leaves have been traditionally implemented in the treatment of minor sore throat and minor mouth or throat irritation by the indigenous people of Iraq, although the compounds responsible for the medicinal properties have not been identified. In the present study, an antimicrobial compound was isolated and characterized, and its biological activity was assessed. Methods The compound was isolated and characterized from the extracted essential oil using different spectral techniques: TLC, FTIR spectra and HPLC. Antimicrobial activity of the compound was assessed using both disc diffusion and microdilution method in 96 multi-well microtiter plates. Results A known compound was isolated from the essential oil of the plant and was identified as (- menthol. The isolated compound was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against seven selected pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the yeast Candida albicans. Menthol at different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20 was active against all tested bacteria except for P. aeruginosa, and the highest inhibitory effect was observed against S. mutans (zone of inhibition: 25.3 mm using the disc diffusion method. Minimal inhibitory concentration MIC values ranged from 15.6–125.0 μg/ml, and the most promising results were observed against S. aureus and S. mutans (MIC 15.6 μg/ml while, S. faecalis, S. pyogenis and L. acidophilus ranked next (MIC 31.2 μg/ml. Furthermore, menthol achieved considerable antifungal activity against the yeast C. albicans (zone of inhibition range: 7.1–18.5 mm; MIC: 125.0. Conclusion The isolation of an antimicrobial compound from M. longifolia leaves validates the use of this plant in the treatment of minor sore throat and minor mouth or throat irritation.

  18. Photocatalytic and antimicrobial Ag/ZnO nanocomposites for functionalization of textile fabrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibănescu, Mariana [Centre of Nanostructures and Functional Materials-CNMF, Faculty of Materials and Environment Engineering, “Dunărea de Jos” University of Galaţi, 111 Domnească Street, 800201 Galaţi (Romania); Muşat, Viorica, E-mail: viorica.musat@ugal.ro [Centre of Nanostructures and Functional Materials-CNMF, Faculty of Materials and Environment Engineering, “Dunărea de Jos” University of Galaţi, 111 Domnească Street, 800201 Galaţi (Romania); Textor, Torsten [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West gGmbH, DTNW, Adlerstr. 1, 47798 Krefeld (Germany); CENIDE, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Badilita, Viorel [National R and D Institute for Non-ferrous and Rare Metals Nanostructured Materials Laboratory, Ilfov (Romania); Mahltig, Boris [Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Higher silver doping smaller nanoparticles size and weaker agglomeration. • Higher silver concentration higher optical absorbance and band gap energy. • Small amouts of silver have considerably increased the antimicobial activity. • The photocatalytic activity is consistent with the increase of antimicrobial activity. - Abstract: The utilization of ZnO nanoparticles with photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity for textile treatment has received much attention in recent years. Since silver is a well-known but more expensive antibacterial material, it is of interest to study the extent to which a small amount of silver increases the photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity of the less expensive zinc oxide nanoparticles. This paper reports on the preparation of Ag/ZnO composite nanoparticles by reducing silver on the surface of commercial ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in isopropanol. Crystalline structure, particle size and band gap energy of as-prepared composite nanoparticles were investigated by X-ray diffraction and UV–Vis absorption measurements. Long term stable sols of ZnO and Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were prepared and applied as liquid coating agent for textile treatment, in combination with inorganic–organic hybrid polymer binder sols prepared from the precursors 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The coating process was carried out on cotton fabrics and cotton/polyester blended fabrics using the pad–dry–cure method. The photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles, as prepared or applied on textile fabrics, was studied through the degradation of the dye methylene blue (MB) in water under the UV irradiation. The antimicrobial activity of the nanoparticles applied on textile fabrics, was tested against the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus.

  19. Photocatalytic and antimicrobial Ag/ZnO nanocomposites for functionalization of textile fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Higher silver doping smaller nanoparticles size and weaker agglomeration. • Higher silver concentration higher optical absorbance and band gap energy. • Small amouts of silver have considerably increased the antimicobial activity. • The photocatalytic activity is consistent with the increase of antimicrobial activity. - Abstract: The utilization of ZnO nanoparticles with photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity for textile treatment has received much attention in recent years. Since silver is a well-known but more expensive antibacterial material, it is of interest to study the extent to which a small amount of silver increases the photocatalytic and antimicrobial activity of the less expensive zinc oxide nanoparticles. This paper reports on the preparation of Ag/ZnO composite nanoparticles by reducing silver on the surface of commercial ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in isopropanol. Crystalline structure, particle size and band gap energy of as-prepared composite nanoparticles were investigated by X-ray diffraction and UV–Vis absorption measurements. Long term stable sols of ZnO and Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were prepared and applied as liquid coating agent for textile treatment, in combination with inorganic–organic hybrid polymer binder sols prepared from the precursors 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The coating process was carried out on cotton fabrics and cotton/polyester blended fabrics using the pad–dry–cure method. The photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles, as prepared or applied on textile fabrics, was studied through the degradation of the dye methylene blue (MB) in water under the UV irradiation. The antimicrobial activity of the nanoparticles applied on textile fabrics, was tested against the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus

  20. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and total phenolic contents of Calophyllum symingtonianum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nissad Attoumani; Deny Susanti; Muhammad Taher

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the total phenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the extracts from Calophyllum symingtonianum.Methods:The extracts were tested for their antioxidant activity by the DPPH radical scavenging assay and the β-carotene bleaching assay, while the antimicrobial activity was determined by disc diffusion method.Results:All the tested extracts showed antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The extracts showed moderate antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with zone of inhibition values of 10, 11 and 12 mm for n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts respectively at 30 µg/disc. N-hexane showed low antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 mm) at 30 µg/disc. The total phenolic test showed that methanol has high phenolic content (162.25 mg GAE/g of extract) compared to the other extracts.Conclusions:The ability of the extracts to inhibit microbial growth at a concentration of 30 µg/disc indicated the its potent antimicrobial activity.

  1. Development of chitosan-based antimicrobial leather coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Isabel P; Amaral, Joana S; Pinto, Vera; Ferreira, Maria José; Barreiro, Maria Filomena

    2013-10-15

    The development of antimicrobial coatings for footwear components is of great interest both from industry and consumer's point of view. In this work, antimicrobial leather materials were developed taking advantage of chitosan intrinsic antimicrobial activity and film forming capacity. Considering the specificities of the leather tanning industry, different coating technologies, namely drum, calender and spray, were tested, being the best results achieved with the drum. This last approach was further investigated to assess the effect of chitosan content, type of solubilizing acid, and impregnation time on the achieved antimicrobial capacity. Considering chitosan price (economic reasons) and the obtained results (antimicrobial activity and coating effectiveness, as inspected by SEM), the impregnation in the drum using a chitosan content of 1% (w/v) in a formic acid solution during 2h, is proposed as the best option for obtaining leather with antimicrobial capacity. PMID:23987468

  2. Antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from Swietenia macrophylla leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Darah; Lee, Chong Chai; Sheh-Hong, Lim

    2014-02-01

    The endophytic fungi isolated from leaves of Swietenia macrophylla of different ages were examined for antimicrobial activity. The agar plug diffusion assay was used for primary screening, followed by the disc diffusion method. A total of 461 filamentous endophytic fungi were isolated and cultured to examine their antimicrobial properties. In the primary screen, 315 isolates (68.3%) exhibited activity against at least one of the test pathogenic microorganisms. The percentage of isolates exhibiting antimicrobial activity increased with leaf age. Endophytic fungal assemblages, as well as those isolates exhibiting antimicrobial properties appeared to increase with leaf age. The main antimicrobial compounds were produced extracellularly by the endophytic fungi. The results suggest that healthy leaves at older stages of growth can be a potential source for the isolation of endophytic fungi with antimicrobial properties. PMID:24689302

  3. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Shorea kunstleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Suria Daud

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of stembark of Shorea kunstleri (S. kunstleri together with analysis of phytochemical and total phenolic contents. Methods: Extraction was conducted with different solvent polarity of n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM and methanol by using Soxhlet extraction. Total phenolic content was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu method. Free radical scavenging activity and inhibition of lipid peroxidation were evaluated with DPPH radical scavenging and ferric thiocyanate assays, respectively. Antimicrobial activities were performed using disc diffusion method, minimum inhibition concentration (MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, and minimum fungicidal concentration. Results: S. kunstleri stembark extracts revealed presence of steroids, terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, and phenolic compounds. Methanol extract exhibited the highest total phenolic content and free radical scavenging activity resulting in phenolic content of (8.340±0.003 g GAE/100 g of extract and (95.90±1.07% DPPH inhibition (IC50 value of 18.6 µg/mL, respectively. Ferric thiocyanate assay of n-hexane, DCM, and methanol extracts indicated lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity of (74.20±0.35%, (74.00±0.10%, and (72.80±0.27%, respectively. In antimicrobial and antifungal tests, methanol extract showed inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis with inhibition zones of 10-12, 18-22, and 18-19 mm, respectively. The MIC test of methanol extract showed highest inhibition against Candida albicans and S. aureus (0.04 and 0.08 mg/mL, respectively while DCM extract exhibited the highest activity towards Candida tropicalis (MIC value of 0.63 mg/mL. Taken together, MBC test of methanol extract strongly demonstrated bactericidal effect against S. aureus with MBC value of 0.08 mg/mL. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that stembark extracts of S. kunstleri possessed antioxidant

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lazaridis, Themis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or ...

  5. Antimicrobial Compounds to Combat Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Muqing; Guo, Ying; Powell, Charles A.; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) is associated with the fastidious bacterium,Candidatus Liberibacter, (Las) that is transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect (Citrus Psyllid). An ideal solution to combat citrus HLB is to completely eliminate the bacteria after a single course of the chemotherapy, either active directly on the bacteria or indirectly through induction of host defense compounds. Twenty-seven antimicrobial compounds were screened to test for in vivo activities against HLB bacterium while ...

  6. Nisin and its Antimicrobial Effect in Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Hamparsun Hampikyan; Hilal Colak

    2007-01-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin which is produced by Lactococcus lactis and takes its place in I. class bacteriocins which are known as lantibiotics. Nisin has antimicrobial and bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of gram positive bacteria and spores of Clostridium spp. and Bacillus spp. According to toxicity studies nisin is considered not toxic to humans. Its first established used was as a preservative in processed cheese products and since than numerous other applications in various foo...

  7. Hypoxic radiosensitization by the antimicrobial methyl paraben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, G.P.; Sade, N.

    1984-08-01

    The antimicrobial preservative, methyl paraben (methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate) sensitizes anoxic buffered suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus to gamma-radiation. The maximal response at an 0.5 mM concentration represents a 150 percent increase in response over that for deoxygenated suspensions without additive, and 80 percent of the response for aerated suspensions alone. Methyl paraben is not toxic to the test organism under the present test conditions.

  8. Hypoxic radiosensitization by the antimicrobial methyl paraben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antimicrobial preservative, methyl paraben (methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate) sensitizes anoxic buffered suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus to gamma-radiation. The maximal response at an 0.5 mM concentration represents a 150 percent increase in response over that for deoxygenated suspensions without additive, and 80 percent of the response for aerated suspensions alone. Methyl paraben is not toxic to the test organism under the present test conditions

  9. Strategies for antimicrobial drug delivery to biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire; Low, Wan Li; Gupta, Abhishek; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Radecka, Iza; Britland, Stephen T; Raj, Prem; Kenward, Ken M A

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are formed by the attachment of single or mixed microbial communities to a variety of biological and/or synthetic surfaces. Biofilm micro-organisms benefit from many advantages of the polymicrobial environment including increased resistance against antimicrobials and protection against the host organism's defence mechanisms. These benefits stem from a number of structural and physiological differences between planktonic and biofilm-resident microbes, but two main factors are the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and quorum sensing communication. Once formed, biofilms begin to synthesise EPS, a complex viscous matrix composed of a variety of macromolecules including proteins, lipids and polysaccharides. In terms of drug delivery strategies, it is the EPS that presents the greatest barrier to diffusion for drug delivery systems and free antimicrobial agents alike. In addition to EPS synthesis, biofilm-based micro-organisms can also produce small, diffusible signalling molecules involved in cell density-dependent intercellular communication, or quorum sensing. Not only does quorum sensing allow microbes to detect critical cell density numbers, but it also permits co-ordinated behaviour within the biofilm, such as iron chelation and defensive antibiotic activities. Against this backdrop of microbial defence and cell density-specific communication, a variety of drug delivery systems have been developed to deliver antimicrobial agents and antibiotics to extracellular and/or intracellular targets, or more recently, to interfere with the specific mechanisms of quorum sensing. Successful delivery strategies have employed lipidic and polymeric-based formulations such as liposomes and cyclodextrins respectively, in addition to inorganic carriers e.g. metal nanoparticles. This review will examine a range of drug delivery systems and their application to biofilm delivery, as well as pharmaceutical formulations with innate antimicrobial properties

  10. The antimicrobial efficiency of silver activated sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đolić, Maja B.; Rajaković-Ognjanović, Vladana N.; Štrbac, Svetlana B.; Rakočević, Zlatko Lj.; Veljović, Đorđe N.; Dimitrijević, Suzana I.; Rajaković, Ljubinka V.

    2015-12-01

    This study is focused on the surface modifications of the materials that are used for antimicrobial water treatment. Sorbents of different origin were activated by Ag+-ions. The selection of the most appropriate materials and the most effective activation agents was done according to the results of the sorption and desorption kinetic studies. Sorption capacities of selected sorbents: granulated activated carbon (GAC), zeolite (Z), and titanium dioxide (T), activated by Ag+-ions were following: 42.06, 13.51 and 17.53 mg/g, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of Ag/Z, Ag/GAC and Ag/T sorbents were tested against Gram-negative bacteria E. coli, Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and yeast C. albicans. After 15 min of exposure period, the highest cell removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, 98.8 and 93.5%, respectively. Yeast cell inactivation was unsatisfactory for all three activated sorbents. The antimicrobial pathway of the activated sorbents has been examined by two separate tests - Ag+-ions desorbed from the activated surface to the aqueous phase and microbial cell removal caused by the Ag+-ions from the solid phase (activated surface sites). The results indicated that disinfection process significantly depended on the microbial-activated sites interactions on the modified surface. The chemical state of the activating agent had crucial impact to the inhibition rate. The characterization of the native and modified sorbents was performed by X-ray diffraction technique, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The concentration of adsorbed and released ions was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficiency of activated sorbents was related not only to the concentration of the activating agent, but moreover on the surface characteristics of the material, which affects the distribution and the accessibility of the activating agent.

  11. From antimicrobial to anticancer peptides. A review.

    OpenAIRE

    Diana eGaspar; A. Salomé eVeiga; Miguel A.R.B. eCastanho

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms. Although AMPs have been essentially studied and developed as potential alternatives for fighting infectious diseases, their use as anticancer peptides (ACPs) in cancer therapy either alone or in combination with other conventional drugs has been regarded as a therapeutic strategy to explore. As human cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide, an urgent need of new, selective...

  12. Antimicrobial Diterpenoids of Wedelia trilobata (L.) Hitchc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Fei; Ding, Jia-Yin; Li, Ya-Ting; Hao, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Continued interest in the metabolites of Wedelia trilobata (L.) Hitchc, a notoriously invasive weed in South China, led to the isolation of twenty-six ent-kaurane diterpenoids, including seven new ones 1-7. Their structures and relative configuration were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. The antimicrobial activities of all isolated diterpenoids were evaluated against a panel of bacteria and fungi. PMID:27070557

  13. Antimicrobial peptides from plants and insects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Martina; Doležílková, Ivana; Neubauerová, Tereza; Ciencialová, Alice; Macek, Tomáš; Koutek, Bohumír; Jiráček, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2007), s. 26-27. ISSN 1213-6670. [Konference experimentální biologie rostlin, dny fyziologie rostlin /11./. 09.07.2007-12.07.2007, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0832 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * RP-HPLC * screening * fleshfly Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  14. The antimicrobial possibilities of green tea

    OpenAIRE

    Reygaert, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a popular drink, especially in Asian countries, although its popularity continues to spread across the globe. The health benefits of green tea, derived from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, have been studied for many years. Fairly recently, researchers have begun to look at the possibility of using green tea in antimicrobial therapy, and the potential prevention of infections. The particular properties of catechins found in the tea have shown promise for having antimicr...

  15. Empirical antimicrobial therapy of acute dentoalveolar abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Matijević Stevo; Lazić Zoran; Kuljić-Kapulica Nada; Nonković Zorka

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim. The most common cause of acute dental infections are oral streptococci and anaerobe bacteria. Acute dentoalveolar infections are usually treated surgically in combination with antibiotics. Empirical therapy in such infections usually requires the use of penicillin-based antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficiency of amoxicillin and cefalexin in the empirical treatment of acute odontogenic abscess and to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility ...

  16. Antimicrobial Polymer Composites for Medical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kaali, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The current study and discuss the long-term properties of biomedical polymers in vitro and invivo and presents means to design and manufacture antimicrobial composites. Antimicrobialcomposites with reduced tendency for biofilm formation should lead to lower risk for medicaldevice associated infection.The first part analyse in vivo degradation of invasive silicone rubber tracheostomy tubes andpresents degradation mechanism, degradation products and the estimated lifetime of thematerials.. It w...

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Trigonella Species

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhee Shyam Dangi; Dasharath Oulkar; Prashant Dhakephalkar; Sanjay Kumar Singh; Kaushik Banerjee; Dattatray Naik; Shubhada Tamhankar; Suryaprakasa Rao

    2016-01-01

    The genus Trigonella includes many medicinal and aromatic plant species used in traditional as well as veterinary medicines for different diseases, alone or in combination with other remedies. The crude methanol extracts of 15 Trigonella species were assayed for antimicrobial activity against four medicinally important multidrug resistant clinical isolates, five plant pathogenic bacteria and five fungi.Three species showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity inhibiting all the test bac...

  18. Antimicrobial activity of galls of Quercus infectoria

    OpenAIRE

    Fırat Zafer Mengeloğlu; Umre Metin; Nesibe Özdemir; M. Kadir Oduncu

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Gall oak (Quercus infectoria) is a species of tree belonging to fagaceae family and its galls has been used in the treatment of burn wounds traditionally. In this study, it is aimed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the extract of oak galls on some microorganisms.Materials and methods: With using microdilution method, a solution which was obtained by boiling the galls was studied on 20 staphylococci, 20 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 20 Candida albicans isolates which were ...

  19. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Shorea kunstleri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siti Suria Daud; Muhammad Taher; Deny Susanti

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of stembark of Shorea kunstleri (S. kunstleri) together with analysis of phytochemical and total phenolic contents. Methods:Extraction was conducted with different solvent polarity of n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM) and methanol by using Soxhlet extraction. Total phenolic content was determined using Folin-Ciocalteu method. Free radical scavenging activity and inhibition of lipid peroxidation were evaluated with DPPH radical scavenging and ferric thiocyanate assays, respectively. Antimicrobial activities were performed using disc diffusion method, minimum inhibition concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and minimum fungicidal concentration. Results:S. kunstleri stembark extracts revealed presence of steroids, terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, and phenolic compounds. Methanol extract exhibited the highest total phenolic content and free radical scavenging activity resulting in phenolic content of (8.340±0.003) g GAE/100 g of extract and (95.90±1.07)% DPPH inhibition (IC50 value of 18.6 µg/mL), respectively. Ferric thiocyanate assay of n-hexane, DCM, and methanol extracts indicated lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity of (74.20±0.35)%, (74.00±0.10)%, and (72.80±0.27)%, respectively. In antimicrobial and antifungal tests, methanol extract showed inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis with inhibition zones of 10-12, 18-22, and 18-19 mm, respectively. The MIC test of methanol extract showed highest inhibition against Candida albicans and S. aureus (0.04 and 0.08 mg/mL, respectively) while DCM extract exhibited the highest activity towards Candida tropicalis (MIC value of 0.63 mg/mL). Taken together, MBC test of methanol extract strongly demonstrated bactericidal effect against S. aureus with MBC value of 0.08 mg/mL. Conclusions:The study demonstrated that stembark extracts of S. kunstleri possessed antioxidant and

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisia absinthium L.

    OpenAIRE

    Başaran DÜLGER; CEYLAN, Murat; ALITSAOUS, Moustafa

    1999-01-01

    In this study, extracts of Artemisia absinthium L. were prepared with ethyl acetate, acetone, chloroform and ethanol and antimicrobial activities of these extracts were examined on test microorgansims as follows: Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 7966, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117, Escherihia coli ATCC 11230, Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048, Corynebacterium xerosis CCM 2824, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13022, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 8427, Serratia marcescens NRRL 3284, Bacillus cereus A...