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Sample records for antimicrobial-resistant escherichia coli

  1. Antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commensal bacteria contribute to the distribution and persistence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. This study monitored antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from the faeces of on-farm and slaughter cattle and beef. A total of 342 (89.5%) E. coli isolates were obtained from 382 samples.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-07-19

    Jul 19, 2012 ... Commensal bacteria contribute to the distribution and persistence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. This study monitored antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from the faeces of on-farm and slaughter cattle and beef. A total of 342 (89.5%) E. coli isolates were obtained.

  3. Associations between Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes, Antimicrobial Resistance Genes, and Virulence Genes of Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Grow-Finish Pigs ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Leigh B.; Waldner, Cheryl L.; Reid-Smith, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli often carries linked antimicrobial resistance genes on transmissible genetic elements. Through coselection, antimicrobial use may select for unrelated but linked resistance or virulence genes. This study used unconditional statistical associations to investigate the relationships between antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance genes in 151 E. coli isolates from healthy pigs. Phenotypic resistance to each drug was significantly associated with phenotyp...

  4. Association between antimicrobial resistance and virulence in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge; Mendonça, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The treatment of E. coli infections is now threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The dissemination of resistance is associated with genetic mobile elements, such as plasmids, that may also carry virulence determinants. A proficient pathogen should be virulent, resistant to antibiotics, and epidemic. However, the interplay between resistance and virulence is poorly understood. This review aims to critically discuss the association and linked transmission of both resistance and virulence traits in strains from extraintestinal infections in E. coli, and intestinal pathotypes. Despite the numerous controversies on this topic, findings from research published to date indicate that there is a link between resistance and virulence, as illustrated by the successful E. coli ST131 epidemic clone. Perhaps the most commonly accepted view is that resistance to quinolones is linked to a loss of virulence factors. However, the low virulent phylogenetic groups might be more prone to acquire resistance to quinolones. Specific characteristics of the E. coli genome that have yet to be identified may contribute to such genetic linkages. Research based on bacterial populations is sorely needed to help understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the association between resistance and virulence, that, in turn, may help manage the future disseminations of infectious diseases in their entirety.

  5. Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli in Public Beach Waters in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Turgeon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human exposure to antimicrobial-resistant bacteria may result in the transfer of resistance to commensal or pathogenic microbes present in the gastrointestinal tract, which may lead to severe health consequences and difficulties in treatment of future bacterial infections. It was hypothesized that the recreational waters from beaches represent a source of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli for people engaging in water activities.

  6. Human Health Hazards from Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A. M.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2009-01-01

    Because of the intensive use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production, meat is frequently contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Humans can be colonized with E. coli of animal origin, and because of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents, these bacteria may...... cause infections for which limited therapeutic options are available. This may lead to treatment failure and can have serious consequences for the patient. Furthermore, E. coli of animal origin may act as a donor of antimicrobial resistance genes for other pathogenic E. coli. Thus, the intensive use...

  7. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of non-clinical Escherichia coli strains from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine resistance profiles of Escherichia coli strains isolated from clinically healthy chickens in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria. A total of 324 E. coli strains isolated from cloaca swabs from 390 chickens were tested against 16 antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. The antibiotics ...

  9. Association between antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Escherichia coli obtained from blood and faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Skjøt, Line; Sandvang, Dorthe; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates obtained from faeces (n = 85) and blood (n = 123) were susceptibility tested against 17 antimicrobial agents and the presence of 9 virulence genes was determined by PCR. Positive associations between several antimicrobial resistances and 2 VF genes (iutA and traT) were...

  10. Sucralose Increases Antimicrobial Resistance and Stimulates Recovery of Escherichia coli Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yilin; Li, Rongyan; Jiang, Mingshan; Wang, Xiuhong

    2017-07-01

    Because of heavy use of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistance in bacteria has become of great concern. The effect of some widely used food additives such as sucralose on bacteria in the gut and the environment has also drawn increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the interaction between antimicrobials and sucralose impacting antimicrobial resistance and mutation of Escherichia coli (E. coli). To examine antimicrobial resistance and mutation frequency, different subinhibitory concentrations of sucralose were added to cultures of E.coli BW25113 that were then treated with antimicrobials, oxolinic acid, or moxifloxacin. Then the E.coli were assayed for bacterial survival and recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Pre-treatment of E.coli BW25113 with 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sucralose increased the survival rate in oxolinic acid or moxifloxacin. A 1/3 MIC of sucralose increased rifampicin-resistant mutation rate of E.coli BW25113 after 72 h, while rifampicin-resistant mutation rate was increased when co-treated with 1/8 MIC, 1/4 MIC, 1/3 MIC sucralose, and oxolinic acid after 24 h. Sucralose can increase the antimicrobial resistance and mutation frequency of E.coli to some antimicrobials.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Brown Paul D; McLaughlin Wayne; Miles Tricia D

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Antimicrobial usage is considered the most important factor promoting the emergence, selection and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in both veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic basis of tetracycline resistance in faecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy broiler chickens and compare these data with isolates obtained from hospitalized patients in Jamaica. Results Eighty-two E. coli stra...

  12. Virulence factors, antimicrobial resistance, and plasmid content of Escherichia coli isolated in swine commercial farms

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,M.M.; Drescher,G.; Maboni,F; Weber,S.S.; Schrank,A.; Vainstein,M.H.; Schrank,I.S.; Vargas,A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolates were evaluated. A total of 80 E. coli isolates were evaluated, being 64 from clinical samples (intestinal content and fragments of organs from diarrheic piglets), seven from feces of clinically healthy piglets and sows, and nine environmental samples (five from facilities, two from feed, one from insect, and one from waste). Molecular characterization was performed by PCR detection of fimbriae and toxin genes...

  13. Multiple antimicrobial resistance among Avian Escherichia coli strains in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Camarda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 101 Escherichia (E. coli isolates from broilers, laying hens and turkeys which had died from colibacillosis, collected from 37 intensive and rural farms in Albania, were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility toward 12 different molecules. The highest levels of resistance were observed for Erythromycin (E (100% Amoxicillin (AMX (99.1%, Tetracycline (TE 30 (96.07%, Streptomycin (STR (93.07% and Neomycin (N30 (85.15%. Considerable resistance was also detected for fluoroquinolones. Moreover, 73.33% of E. coli resistant to at least one fluoroquinolone were also resistant to the two other fluoroquinolones checked. No evident differences were found between the E. coli from intensive and from rural farms. Multiple antibiotic resistance was expressed by all the E. coli tested. 23.63% and 17.39% of E. coli isolated from intensive and rural farms, respectively, were resistant towards all the drugs tested. These data would seem to indicate incorrect use of antibiotics on poultry farms in Albania.

  14. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli from chicken and swine, China, 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Shen, Zhangqi; Zhang, Chunping; Song, Li; Wang, Bing; Shang, Jun; Yue, Xiuying; Qu, Zhina; Li, Xinnan; Wu, Liqin; Zheng, Yongjun; Aditya, Anand; Wang, Yang; Xu, Shixin; Wu, Congming

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance trend in Escherichia coli from food animals in China. During 2008-2015, a total of 15,130 E. coli were isolated from chicken and swine from seven provinces. The susceptibilities of these isolates to nine classes of antimicrobial agents were determined using broth microdilution susceptibility method. The findings of this study include: (1) multi-drug resistance was highly prevalent in E. coli; (2) these E. coli isolates showed high resistant rate (>80%) to several old drugs, including ampicillin, tetracycline and sulfisoxazole; (3) increasing resistance to colistin, florfenicol and ceftiofur was observed; (4) the E. coli isolates from different provinces had different resistance patterns. All these data highlight the rising problem of antimicrobial resistance. It is urgent to improve the management of animal production and enhance the proper use of antimicrobials in China as well as the other countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Current perspectivesin pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Haishen; Hong, Xiaoping; Li, Xuefen

    2015-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging pathogen that causes acute and persistent diarrhea in children and adults. While the pathogenic mechanisms of EAEC intestinal colonization have been uncovered (including bacterial adhesion, enterotoxin and cytotoxin secretion, and stimulation of mucosal inflammation), those of severe extraintestinal infections remain largely unknown. The recent emergence of multidrug resistant EAEC represents an alarming public health threat and clinical challenge, and research on the molecular mechanisms of resistance is urgently needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clonality, virulence and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from Mirzapur, Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattaway, Marie Anne; Day, Michaela; Mtwale, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigates the virulence and antimicrobial resistance in association with common clonal complexes (CCs) of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) isolated from Bangladesh. The aim was to determine whether specific CCs were more likely to be associated with putative...... virulence genes and/or antimicrobial resistance.Methodology. The presence of 15 virulence genes (by PCR) and susceptibility to 18 antibiotics were determined for 151 EAEC isolated from cases and controls during an intestinal infectious disease study carried out between 2007-2011 in the rural setting...... between the presence of virulence or antimicrobial resistance genes in isolates of EAEC from cases versus controls. However, when stratified by clonal complex (CC) one CC associated with cases harboured more virulence factors (CC40) and one CC harboured more resistance genes (CC38) than the average...

  17. Contamination of Canadian private drinking water sources with antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Brenda L; Louie, Marie; Salvadori, Marina I; McEwen, Scott A; Neumann, Norman; Sibley, Kristen; Irwin, Rebecca J; Jamieson, Frances B; Daignault, Danielle; Majury, Anna; Braithwaite, Shannon; Crago, Bryanne; McGeer, Allison J

    2013-06-01

    Surface and ground water across the world, including North America, is contaminated with bacteria resistant to antibiotics. The consumption of water contaminated with antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been associated with the carriage of resistant E. coli in people who drink it. To describe the proportion of drinking water samples submitted from private sources for bacteriological testing that were contaminated with E. coli resistant to antibiotics and to determine risk factors for the contamination of these water sources with resistant and multi-class resistant E. coli. Water samples submitted for bacteriological testing in Ontario and Alberta Canada were tested for E. coli contamination, with a portion of the positive isolates tested for antimicrobial resistance. Households were invited to complete questionnaires to determine putative risk factors for well contamination. Using multinomial logistic regression, the risk of contamination with E. coli resistant to one or two classes of antibiotics compared to susceptible E. coli was higher for shore wells than drilled wells (odds ratio [OR] 2.8) and higher for farms housing chickens or turkeys (OR 3.0) than properties without poultry. The risk of contamination with multi-class resistant E. coli (3 or more classes) was higher if the properties housed swine (OR 5.5) or cattle (OR 2.2) than properties without these livestock and higher if the wells were located in gravel (OR 2.4) or clay (OR 2.1) than in loam. Housing livestock on the property, using a shore well, and having a well located in gravel or clay soil increases the risk of having antimicrobial resistant E. coli in E. coli contaminated wells. To reduce the incidence of water borne disease and the transmission of antimicrobial resistant bacteria, owners of private wells need to take measures to prevent contamination of their drinking water, routinely test their wells for contamination, and use treatments that eliminate bacteria. Copyright

  18. Evaluation of Petrifilm™ Select E. coli Count Plate medium to discriminate antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli

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    Jensen Lars

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening and enumeration of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli directly from samples is needed to identify emerging resistant clones and obtain quantitative data for risk assessment. Aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of 3M™ Petrifilm™ Select E. coli Count Plate (SEC plate supplemented with antimicrobials to discriminate antimicrobial-resistant and non-resistant E. coli. Method A range of E. coli isolates were tested by agar dilution method comparing the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC for eight antimicrobials obtained by Mueller-Hinton II agar, MacConkey agar and SEC plates. Kappa statistics was used to assess the levels of agreement when classifying strains as resistant, intermediate or susceptible. Results SEC plate showed that 74% of all strains agreed within ± 1 log2 dilution when comparing MICs with Mueller-Hinton II media. High agreement levels were found for gentamicin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and cefotaxime, resulting in a kappa value of 0.9 and 100% agreement within ± 1 log2 dilution. Significant variances were observed for oxytetracycline and sulphamethoxazole. Further tests showed that the observed discrepancy in classification of susceptibility to oxytetracycline by the two media could be overcome when a plate-dependent breakpoint of 64 mg/L was used for SEC plates. For sulphamethoxazole, SEC plates provided unacceptably high MICs. Conclusion SEC plates showed good agreement with Mueller-Hinton II agar in MIC studies and can be used to screen and discriminate resistant E. coli for ampicillin, cephalothin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, cefotaxime and gentamicin using CLSI standardized breakpoints, but not for sulphamethoxazole. SEC plates can also be used to discriminate oxytetracycline-resistant E. coli if a plate-dependent breakpoint value of 64 mg/L is used.

  19. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Salmonella in Ontario smallholder chicken flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebert, L; Martz, S-L; Janecko, N; Deckert, A E; Agunos, A; Reid, A; Rubin, J E; Reid-Smith, R J; McEwen, S A

    2018-02-01

    Surveillance is an important component of an overall strategy to address antimicrobial resistant bacteria in food animals and the food chain. The poultry market has many points of entry into the Canadian food chain, and some production practices are underrepresented in terms of surveillance. For example, pathogen carriage and antimicrobial resistance surveillance data are limited in smallholder chicken flocks raised for slaughter at provincially inspected abattoirs. In Canada, antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolated from commercial broiler chicken flocks, slaughtered at federally inspected abattoirs, is monitored by the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS). The objective of this study was to establish baseline information of antimicrobial resistance presence in E. coli and Salmonella isolated from smallholder flocks in Ontario, utilizing CIPARS collection and isolation methodologies, and to compare findings with CIPARS federally inspected abattoir data from Ontario, Canada. Five chickens per flock were sampled from 205 smallholder flocks. Of 1,025 samples, the E. coli prevalence was 99% (1,022/1,025), and 47% (483/1,022) of positive E. coli isolates were resistant to one or more of the 14 antimicrobials. Furthermore, as compared to results reported for the CIPARS commercial flocks, E. coli isolates from smallholder flocks had significantly lower resistance prevalence to six of 14 individual antimicrobials. Recovery of E. coli did not differ between federally inspected and provincially inspected flocks. Salmonella prevalence at the bird level in smallholder flocks was 0.3% (3/1,025), significantly lower (p ≪ 0.0001, 95% CI 0.080%-0.86%) than federally inspected commercial flocks. The overall differences found between the commercial and smallholder flocks may be explained by differences in poultry husbandry practices and hatchery sources. © 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada

  20. Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin Spreading in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnik, David; Clermont, Olivier; Guillard, Thomas; Launay, Adrien; Danilchanka, Olga; Pons, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Lebreton, François; Kadlec, Kristina; Roux, Damien; Jiang, Deming; Dion, Sara; Aschard, Hugues; Denamur, Maurice; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Schwarz, Stefan; Tenaillon, Olivier; Andremont, Antoine; Picard, Bertrand; Mekalanos, John; Brisse, Sylvain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the great concern about the impact of human activities on the environment, we studied 403 commensal Escherichia coli/Escherichia clade strains isolated from several animal and human populations that have variable contacts to one another. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a decrease of diversity 1) in strains isolated from animals that had an increasing contact with humans and 2) in all strains that had increased antimicrobial resistance. A specific B1 phylogroup clonal complex (CC87, Institut Pasteur schema nomenclature) of animal origin was identified and characterized as being responsible for the increased antimicrobial resistance prevalence observed in strains from the environments with a high human-mediated antimicrobial pressure. CC87 strains have a high capacity of acquiring and disseminating resistance genes with specific metabolic and genetic determinants as demonstrated by high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping. They are good mouse gut colonizers but are not virulent. Our data confirm the predominant role of human activities in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environmental bacterial strains and unveil a particular E. coli clonal complex of animal origin capable of spreading antimicrobial resistance to other members of microbial communities. PMID:26613786

  1. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Gregory H; McDermott, Patrick F; Li, Cong; Chen, Yuansha; Tadesse, Daniel A; Mukherjee, Sampa; Bodeis-Jones, Sonya; Kabera, Claudine; Gaines, Stuart A; Loneragan, Guy H; Edrington, Tom S; Torrence, Mary; Harhay, Dayna M; Zhao, Shaohua

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of WGS in identifying resistance genotypes of MDR Escherichia coli and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured for phenotypic resistance to 15 antimicrobials with the Sensititre(®) system. Isolates with resistance to at least four antimicrobials in three classes were selected for WGS using an Illumina MiSeq. Genotypic analysis was conducted with in-house Perl scripts using BLAST analysis to identify known genes and mutations associated with clinical resistance. Over 30 resistance genes and a number of resistance mutations were identified among the E. coli isolates. Resistance genotypes correlated with 97.8% specificity and 99.6% sensitivity to the identified phenotypes. The majority of discordant results were attributable to the aminoglycoside streptomycin, whereas there was a perfect genotype-phenotype correlation for most antibiotic classes such as tetracyclines, quinolones and phenicols. WGS also revealed information about rare resistance mechanisms, such as structural mutations in chromosomal copies of ampC conferring third-generation cephalosporin resistance. WGS can provide comprehensive resistance genotypes and is capable of accurately predicting resistance phenotypes, making it a valuable tool for surveillance. Moreover, the data presented here showing the ability to accurately predict resistance suggest that WGS may be used as a screening tool in selecting anti-infective therapy, especially as costs drop and methods improve. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli on household and small-scale chicken farms in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, V.T.; Carrique-Mas, J.J.; Ngo, T.H; Ho, H.M.; Ha, T.T.; Campbell, J.I.; Nguyen, T.N.; Hoang, N.N.; Pham, V.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Hardon, A.; Thai, Q.H.; Schultsz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli isolates on household and small-scale chicken farms, common in southern Vietnam, and to investigate the association of antimicrobial resistance with farming practices and antimicrobial usage. Methods:

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli on household and small-scale chicken farms in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Thi Hoa, Ngo; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James I; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Hardon, Anita; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli isolates on household and small-scale chicken farms, common in southern Vietnam, and to investigate the association of antimicrobial resistance with farming practices and antimicrobial usage. METHODS:

  4. Genetic elements associated with antimicrobial resistance among avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Awad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian-pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC are pathogenic strains of E. coli that are responsible for one of the most predominant bacterial disease affecting poultry worldwide called avian colibacillosis. This study describes the genetic determinants implicated in antimicrobial resistance among APEC isolated from different broiler farms in Egypt. Methods A total of 116 APEC were investigated by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance patterns to 10 antimicrobials, and the genetic mechanisms underlying the antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes. Results Antibiogram results showed that the highest resistance was observed for ampicillin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and chloramphenicol. The detected carriage rate of integron was 29.3% (34/116. Further characterization of gene cassettes revealed the presence gene cassettes encoding resistance to trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, streptomycin/spectinomycin (aadA1, aadA2, aadA5, aadA23, and streptothricin (sat2. To our knowledge, this the first description of the presence of aadA23 in APEC isolates. Analysis of other antimicrobial resistance types not associated with integrons revealed the predominance of resistance genes encoding resistance to tetracycline (tetA and tetB, ampicillin (bla TEM, chloramphenicol (cat1, kanamycin (aphA1, and sulphonamide (sul1 and sul2. Among ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, the S83L mutation was the most frequently substitution observed in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA (56.3%. The bla TEM and bla CTX−M−1 genes were the most prevalent among APEC isolates producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESβL. Conclusions These findings provided important clues about the role of integron-mediated resistance genes together with other independent resistance genes and chromosomal mutations in shaping the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from poultry farms in Egypt.

  5. Genetic elements associated with antimicrobial resistance among avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Amal; Arafat, Nagah; Elhadidy, Mohamed

    2016-11-25

    Avian-pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are pathogenic strains of E. coli that are responsible for one of the most predominant bacterial disease affecting poultry worldwide called avian colibacillosis. This study describes the genetic determinants implicated in antimicrobial resistance among APEC isolated from different broiler farms in Egypt. A total of 116 APEC were investigated by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance patterns to 10 antimicrobials, and the genetic mechanisms underlying the antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes. Antibiogram results showed that the highest resistance was observed for ampicillin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and chloramphenicol. The detected carriage rate of integron was 29.3% (34/116). Further characterization of gene cassettes revealed the presence gene cassettes encoding resistance to trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12), streptomycin/spectinomycin (aadA1, aadA2, aadA5, aadA23), and streptothricin (sat2). To our knowledge, this the first description of the presence of aadA23 in APEC isolates. Analysis of other antimicrobial resistance types not associated with integrons revealed the predominance of resistance genes encoding resistance to tetracycline (tetA and tetB), ampicillin (bla TEM ), chloramphenicol (cat1), kanamycin (aphA1), and sulphonamide (sul1 and sul2). Among ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, the S83L mutation was the most frequently substitution observed in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA (56.3%). The bla TEM and bla CTX-M-1 genes were the most prevalent among APEC isolates producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESβL). These findings provided important clues about the role of integron-mediated resistance genes together with other independent resistance genes and chromosomal mutations in shaping the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from poultry farms in Egypt.

  6. Multiple antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli and Salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Presumptive isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using 13 panels of antibiotics for both E. coli and Salmonella spp. Results showed that the overall isolation rate of Salmonella spp. was 12 (11.4%), broiler chickens had higher isolation rate 9 (12.0%) of Salmonella than local chickens. However, the ...

  7. Antimicrobial resistance profiles among Escherichia coli strains isolated from commercial and cooked foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Lee, Jip-Ho; Park, Sang-Hoon; Song, Mi-Ok; Park, Sun-Hee; Jung, Hyo-Won; Park, Geon-Yong; Choi, Sung-Min; Kim, Moo-Sang; Chae, Young-Zoo; Park, Seog-Gee; Lee, Young-Ki

    2012-10-15

    A total of 4330 food samples of which microbiological standard for Escherichia coli is negative in Korea were determined for the frequency of E. coli. Ninety six samples (2.2%) were positive for E. coli. Detection rate of E. coli varied significantly by food type and ranged from 0.3% to 10.9%. Seasoned raw meat (yukhoe) and cold bean-soup had the highest prevalence for E. coli (10.9%) followed by gimbap (5.2%), meat broth for cold noodle (2.9%) and sprout (2.1%). E. coli isolates (n=96) were investigated for their phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance patterns. Seventeen E. coli isolates (17.7%) were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents tested. High rates of resistance to the following drugs were observed: tetracycline (15.6%), streptomycin (12.5%), ampicillin (10.4%), nalidixic acid (9.4%) and ticarcillin (9.4%). All ampicillin resistant isolates were screened for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production by the combination disk test. None of the E. coli isolates produced ESBLs. Seventeen out of 96 E. coli isolates which were resistant to at least one antibiotic were investigated by PCR for the presence of 3 classes of antimicrobial resistance genes (tetracycline, aminoglycosides and beta-lactams). The tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB were found in 7 and 5 isolates, respectively. The aminoglycoside resistance genes, strA/B, aphA1, aadA and aac(3)-IV were found in 9, 5, 2 and 2 isolates, respectively. The beta-lactam resistance gene, bla(TEM) was found in 7 isolates. Results of this study show that 13 E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant (to three or more antibiotics) and 12 isolates carried at least one antimicrobial resistance gene. These isolates can act as the reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes and facilitate the dissemination of these genes to other pathogenic and commensal bacteria. Adequate intervention to reduce microbial contamination of these foods is strongly recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B

  8. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli from farm-raised diarrheic sika deer in Northeastern China.

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    Rui Li

    Full Text Available In China, overuse and/or abuse of antimicrobials are common in stockbreeding, which possess high risks of antimicrobial-resistant contaminations. The serogroups, major virulence genes, and antimicrobial resistant patterns of the antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli were investigated in the feces of diarrheic farm-raised sika deer from 50 farms in three Northeastern provinces of China. A total of 220 E. coli isolates were obtained and characterized. Twenty-eight O serogroups were identified from the obtained E. coli isolates with O2, O26, O128, O142 and O154 being dominant. Nearly all the isolates were resistant to at least four of the tested antimicrobials. More than 90% of the E. coli isolates carried at least one of the tested virulence genes. About 85% of the E. coli isolates carried one or more antimicrobial-resistant genes responsible for resistant phenotypes of sulfonamides, streptomycin/spectionomycin or tetracycline. The antimicrobial resistant level and pathogenic group occurrences of the obtained E. coli isolates were higher than that of livestock and wild animals reported in some developed countries. Thus, the fecal-carrying antimicrobial-resistant E. coli from the farm-raised sika deer is potentially a significant contamination source for freshwater systems and food chain, and may pose great health risks for human and animals in Northeastern China.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from different parts of the digestive tract of sheep

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    E. Afshari-Safavi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate differences in resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from different parts of sheep digestive tract, the intestinal tracts of 24 sheep were sampled at various locations (duode-num, jejunum, caecum, colon and rectum after slaughter. Samples were cultured on MacConkey agar and obtained colonies were confirmed as E. coli based on the biochemical tests results. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial agent susceptibility to 10 antibiotics (colistin, gentamicin, oxytetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, enrofloxacin, ampicillin, cephotaxime, neomycin and florfenicol, using disc diffusion method. The tested E. coli resistant to colistin, ampicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid were isolated more frequently from large intestine (rectum than from small intestine (duodenum (P<0.05. In conclusion, antimicrobial resistance pattern of generic E. coli inhabiting the intestinal tract of sheep depends on sampling location, which should be considered in interpreting the results of antimicrobial resistance tests of E. coli isolated from the faecal samples and generalising results to bacteria colonised in other parts of the digestive tract

  10. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence, and phylogenetic characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from clinically healthy swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Khin Khin; Koowattananukul, Chailai; Chansong, Nisit; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2012-11-01

    A total of 344 commensal Escherichia coli isolates from clinically healthy pigs were examined for antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, class 1 integrons, resistance genes, virulence gene profile, and phylogenetic groups. The majority of E. coli isolates were resistant to tetracycline (96.2%) and ampicillin (91.6%). Up to 98% were multidrug resistant. Seventy-three percent of the isolates carried class 1 integrons. Inserted-gene cassette arrays in variable regions included incomplete sat, aadA22, aadA1, dfrA12-aadA2, and sat-psp-aadA2, of which the aadA2 gene cassette was most prevalent (42.9%). Horizontal transfer was detected in eight E. coli isolates carrying class 1 integrons with dfrA12-aadA2 gene cassette array. Sixteen resistance genes were identified among the E. coli isolates with corresponding resistance phenotype. Ten virulence genes (including elt, estA, estB, astA, faeG, fasA, fedA, eaeA, paa, and sepA) were detected, of which fasA was most commonly found (98.3%). Most of the E. coli isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B1. Significantly positive associations were observed between some virulence genes and some resistance phenotypes and genotypes (p antimicrobial resistance-encoding genes and virulence determinants.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Escherichia coli and enterococci from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhouani, Hajer; Igrejas, Gilberto; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Pacheco, Rui; Monteiro, Ricardo; Sargo, Roberto; Brito, Francisco; Torres, Carmen; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the study were to analyse the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and the mechanisms implicated, as well as the virulence factors, in faecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. from red foxes. From 52 faecal samples, 22 E. coli (42.3%) and 50 enterococci (96.2%) isolates were recovered (one/sample). A high percentage of E. coli isolates exhibited resistance to streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or ampicillin (54-27%), and they harboured the aadA, tet(A) and/or tet(B), sul1 and blaTEM resistance genes, respectively. The E. coli isolates were ascribed to the 4 major phylogroups, D (41% of isolates), A (31.8%), B1 (18.2%) and B2 (9.1%), and carried the fimA (63.3%) or aer (13.6%) virulence genes. Among enterococcal isolates, Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (50%). A high percentage of enterococcal isolates showed tetracycline resistance (88%) harbouring different combinations of tet(M) and tet(L) genes. The erm(B) or the aph(3')-IIIa gene were identified in most of our erythromycin- or kanamycin-resistant enterococci, respectively. This report suggests the role of red foxes from rural areas in the cycle of transmission and spread of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli and enterococci into the environment, representing a reservoir of these antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Moderate prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from lettuce, irrigation water, and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Callens, Benedicte; Dewulf, Jeroen; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-11-01

    Fresh produce is known to carry nonpathogenic epiphytic microorganisms. During agricultural production and harvesting, leafy greens can become contaminated with antibiotic-resistant pathogens or commensals from animal and human sources. As lettuce does not undergo any inactivation or preservation treatment during processing, consumers may be exposed directly to all of the (resistant) bacteria present. In this study, we investigated whether lettuce or its production environment (irrigation water, soil) is able to act as a vector or reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Over a 1-year period, eight lettuce farms were visited multiple times and 738 samples, including lettuce seedlings (leaves and soil), soil, irrigation water, and lettuce leaves were collected. From these samples, 473 isolates of Escherichia coli were obtained and tested for resistance to 14 antimicrobials. Fifty-four isolates (11.4%) were resistant to one or more antimicrobials. The highest resistance rate was observed for ampicillin (7%), followed by cephalothin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, and streptomycin, with resistance rates between 4.4 and 3.6%. No resistance to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, or kanamycin was observed. One isolate was resistant to cefotaxime. Among the multiresistant isolates (n = 37), ampicillin and cephalothin showed the highest resistance rates, at 76 and 52%, respectively. E. coli isolates from lettuce showed higher resistance rates than E. coli isolates obtained from soil or irrigation water samples. When the presence of resistance in E. coli isolates from lettuce production sites and their resistance patterns were compared with the profiles of animal-derived E. coli strains, they were found to be the most comparable with what is found in the cattle reservoir. This may suggest that cattle are a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli strains in plant primary production.

  13. Baicalin inhibits Escherichia coli isolates in bovine mastitic milk and reduces antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q Y; Yuan, F W; Liang, T; Liang, X C; Luo, Y R; Jiang, M; Qing, S Z; Zhang, W M

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of baicalin on Escherichia coli in vitro and the effects of baicalin treatment on antimicrobial resistance of the E. coli isolates. Through isolation, purification, and identification, a total of 56 E. coli strains were isolated from 341 mastitic milk samples. The study of inhibition effect of baicalin on the E. coli strains in vitro was focused on permeability and morphology of the isolates using an alkaline phosphatase kit and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the resistance spectrum of the isolates to the common antimicrobial agents was tested at sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of baicalin by the agar dilution method. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were amplified by PCR before and after incubation with baicalin. The results revealed that baicalin has certain inhibitory effects on the isolates in vitro. The alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity was significantly increased from 1.246 to 2.377 U/100 mL, and the surface of E. coli was concave and shriveled. Analysis of the resistance spectrum and PCR amplification showed that, after administration with baicalin, the sensitivity of most strains to the selected antimicrobial agents was enhanced. Strikingly, the drug-resistant genes from 71.43% (40/56) of these isolates were found to have drug-resistant genes to different extents. Altogether, the current study confirmed both the inhibitory effect on Escherichia coli in vitro and the reduction of antimicrobial resistance by baicalin. This is the first comprehensive study to report on baicalin, a traditional Chinese medicine that acts on E. coli isolated from the mastitic milk samples. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MOLECULAR-PHYLOGENETIC CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF Escherichia coli ISOLATED FROM GOATS WITH DIARRHEA

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    Rodrigo Almeida Guimarães

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal diarrhea determines significant changes in feed conversion, causing productivity loss in caprine herds. The antimicrobial resistance in bacteria is characterized as an important public health issue; therefore, Escherichia coli may be characterized as an important pathogen due to expressing virulence mechanisms responsible for significant clinical conditions in humans and animals. The present study evaluated the presence of E. coli among 117 caprine fecal samples and analyzed the isolates for antimicrobial resistance. Suggestive colonies were submitted to biochemical screening followed by genotypic group determination and phylogenetic analysis; further, the samples were submitted to antimicrobials susceptibility test. E. coli, Salmonella spp, Shigella sonnei and Enterobacter aerogenes were identified. E. coli isolates were phylogenetically classified as B2 (9/39, D (19/39, B1 (7/39 e A (4/29 groups. The analysis of the isolates also revealed the presence of K99 (04/39 and Stx (02/39 virulence factors. Antimicrobial susceptibility test revealed sensitive isolates to Chloramphenicol, Streptomycin, Amoxicillin and Ciprofloxacin, being all resistant to Lincomycin, Vancomycin and Penicillin. The results support the need of establishing restricted protocols for antimicrobial use, a fundamental procedure for health improvement in Brazilian caprine herds.

  15. Antimicrobial-resistant patterns of Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains in the aquatic Lebanese environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harakeh, Steve; Yassine, Hadi; El-Fadel, Mutasem

    2006-01-01

    This study is the first to be conducted in Lebanon on the isolation and molecular characterization and the antimicrobial resistance profile of environmental pathogenic bacterial strains. Fifty-seven samples of seawater, sediment, crab, and fresh water were collected during the spring and summer seasons of 2003. The isolation of Escherichia coli and Salmonella using appropriate selective media revealed that 94.7% of the tested samples were contaminated with one or both of the tested bacteria. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was then used to identify the species of both bacteria using various sets of primers. Many pathogenic E. coli isolates were detected by PCR out of which two were identified as O157:H7 E. coli. Similarly, the species of many of the Salmonella isolates was molecularly identified. The confirmed isolates of Salmonella and E. coli were then tested using the disk diffusion method for their susceptibility to four different antimicrobials revealing high rates of antimicrobial resistance. - First report of antibiotic resistance in bacteria in the environment in Lebanon

  16. Antimicrobial resistance prevalence of pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli in food-producing animals in Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Chantziaras, Ilias; Dewulf, Jeroen; Boyen, Filip; Callens, Benedicte; Butaye, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this article, detailed studies on antimicrobial resistance to commensal E. coli (in pigs, meat-producing bovines, broiler chickens and veal calves) and pathogenic E. coli (in pigs and bovines) in Belgium are presented for 2011. Broiler chicken and veal calf isolates of commensal E. coli demonstrated higher antimicrobial resistance prevalence than isolates from pigs and bovines. Fifty percent of E. coli isolates from broiler chickens were resistant to at least five antimicrobials, whereas s...

  17. Molecular detection and antimicrobial resistance of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheal cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslani, Mehdi M.; Salmanzadeh-Ahrabi, S.; Jafari, F.; Zali, Reza M.; Mani, M.; Alikhani, Yousef M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify and classify Iranian isolates of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) on the basis of presence of virulence genes and to determine antibiotic susceptibility of isolated strains. The current cross-sectional study was conducted in 2005 at the Pasteur Institute, Tehran, Iran. One hundred and ninety-three diarrheagenic E. coli isolated from diarrheal patients in different regions of Iran were included in current study. Virulence factors genees for diarrheagenic E. coli were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 193 diarrheagenic E. coli detected by PCR, 86(44.5%) were Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), 74 (38.4%) enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), 19 (9.8%) enteroaggregative E. coli and 14 (7.3%) enterotoxigenic E. coli isolates. Susceptibility to 12 clinically important antimicrobial agents was determined for 193 strains of diarrhheagenic E. coli. A high incidence of resistance to tetracycline (63%), ampicillin (62%), streptomycin (56%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (44.5%), trimetoprim/sulphamethoxazole (39.5%) and cephalothin (37%) was observed. The STEC and EPEC strains with high resistance to tetracycline and ampicillin but highly susceptible to quinolones are among the most important causative agent of diarrhea in Iran. This study suggests that antimicrobial resistance is wide spread among E. coli strains colonizing Iranian patients. Guidelines for appropriate use of antibiotics in developing countries require updating. (author)

  18. Effects of in-feed chlortetracycline prophylaxis of beef cattle on animal health and antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns have been raised that in-feed chlortetracycline (CTC) may increase antimicrobial resistance (AMR), specifically tetracycline-resistant (TETr) Escherichia coli, and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GCr) E. coli. We evaluated the impact of a 5-day in-feed CTC prophylaxis on animal h...

  19. Densities and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from marine waters and beach sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Vanessa da Costa; Zampieri, Bruna Del Busso; Ballesteros, Eliete Rodrigues; Pinto, Aline Bartelochi; de Oliveira, Ana Julia Fernandes Cardoso

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial resistance is a rising problem all over the world. Many studies have showed that beach sands can contain higher concentration of microorganisms and represent a risk to public health. This paper aims to evaluate the densities and resistance to antimicrobials of Escherichia coli strains, isolated from seawater and samples. The hypothesis is that microorganisms show higher densities in contaminated beach sands and more antimicrobial resistance than the water column. Density, distribution, and antimicrobial resistance of bacteria E. coli were evaluate in seawater and sands from two recreational beaches with different levels of pollution. At the beach with higher degree of pollution (Gonzaguinha), water samples presented the highest densities of E. coli; however, higher frequency of resistant strains was observe in wet sand (71.9 %). Resistance to a larger number of antimicrobial groups was observe in water (betalactamics, aminoglycosides, macrolides, rifampicins, and tetracyclines) and sand (betagalactamics and aminoglycosids). In water samples, highest frequencies of resistance were obtain against ampicilin (22.5 %), streptomycin (15.0 %), and rifampicin (15.0 %), while in sand, the highest frequencies were observe in relation to ampicilin (36.25 %) and streptomycin (23.52 %). At the less polluted beach, Ilha Porchat, highest densities of E. coli and higher frequency of resistance were obtain in wet and dry sand (53.7 and 53.8 %, respectively) compared to water (50 %). Antimicrobial resistance in strains isolated from water and sand only occurred against betalactamics (ampicilin and amoxicilin plus clavulanic acid). The frequency and variability of bacterial resistance to antimicrobials in marine recreational waters and sands were related to the degree of fecal contamination in this environment. These results show that water and sands from beaches with a high index of fecal contamination of human origin may be potential sources of contamination by pathogens

  20. Investigation of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from Tibetan pigs.

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    Peng Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from free-ranging Tibetan pigs in Tibet, China, and analyzed the influence of free-ranging husbandry on antimicrobial resistance. METHODS: A total of 232 fecal samples were collected from Tibetan pigs, and the disk diffusion method was used to examine their antimicrobial resistance. Broth microdilution and agar dilution methods were used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations for antimicrobial agents for which disks were not commercially available. RESULTS: A total of 129 E. coli isolates and 84 Enterococcus isolates were recovered from the fecal samples. All E. coli isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and 40.4% were resistant to tetracycline. A small number of isolates were resistant to florfenicol (27.9%, ampicillin (27.9%, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (19.4%, nalidixic acid (19.4%, streptomycin (16.2% and ceftiofur (10.9%, and very low resistance rates to ciprofloxacin (7.8%, gentamicin (6.9%, and spectinomycin (2.3% were observed in E. coli. All Enterococcus isolates, including E. faecium, E. faecalis, E. hirae, and E. mundtii, were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and vancomycin, but showed high frequencies of resistance to oxacillin (92.8%, clindamycin (82.1%, tetracycline (64.3%, and erythromycin (48.8%. Resistance rates to florfenicol (17.9%, penicillin (6.0%, ciprofloxacin (3.6%, levofloxacin (1.2%, and ampicillin (1.2% were low. Only one high-level streptomycin resistant E. faecium isolate and one high-level gentamicin resistant E. faecium isolate were observed. Approximately 20% and 70% of E. coli and Enterococcus isolates, respectively, were defined as multidrug-resistant. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, E. coli and Enterococcus isolated from free-ranging Tibetan pigs showed relatively lower resistance rates than those in other areas of China, where more intensive farming practices are

  1. Investigation of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from Tibetan pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Wu, Dongfang; Liu, Kunyao; Suolang, Sizhu; He, Tao; Liu, Xuan; Wu, Congming; Wang, Yang; Lin, Degui

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from free-ranging Tibetan pigs in Tibet, China, and analyzed the influence of free-ranging husbandry on antimicrobial resistance. A total of 232 fecal samples were collected from Tibetan pigs, and the disk diffusion method was used to examine their antimicrobial resistance. Broth microdilution and agar dilution methods were used to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations for antimicrobial agents for which disks were not commercially available. A total of 129 E. coli isolates and 84 Enterococcus isolates were recovered from the fecal samples. All E. coli isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and 40.4% were resistant to tetracycline. A small number of isolates were resistant to florfenicol (27.9%), ampicillin (27.9%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (19.4%), nalidixic acid (19.4%), streptomycin (16.2%) and ceftiofur (10.9%), and very low resistance rates to ciprofloxacin (7.8%), gentamicin (6.9%), and spectinomycin (2.3%) were observed in E. coli. All Enterococcus isolates, including E. faecium, E. faecalis, E. hirae, and E. mundtii, were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and vancomycin, but showed high frequencies of resistance to oxacillin (92.8%), clindamycin (82.1%), tetracycline (64.3%), and erythromycin (48.8%). Resistance rates to florfenicol (17.9%), penicillin (6.0%), ciprofloxacin (3.6%), levofloxacin (1.2%), and ampicillin (1.2%) were low. Only one high-level streptomycin resistant E. faecium isolate and one high-level gentamicin resistant E. faecium isolate were observed. Approximately 20% and 70% of E. coli and Enterococcus isolates, respectively, were defined as multidrug-resistant. In this study, E. coli and Enterococcus isolated from free-ranging Tibetan pigs showed relatively lower resistance rates than those in other areas of China, where more intensive farming practices are used. These results also revealed that free

  2. Clonality, virulence and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from Mirzapur, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaway, Marie Anne; Day, Michaela; Mtwale, Julia; White, Emma; Rogers, James; Day, Martin; Powell, David; Ahmad, Marwa; Harris, Ross; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Wain, John; Jenkins, Claire; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the virulence and antimicrobial resistance in association with common clonal complexes (CCs) of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) isolated from Bangladesh. The aim was to determine whether specific CCs were more likely to be associated with putative virulence genes and/or antimicrobial resistance. The presence of 15 virulence genes (by PCR) and susceptibility to 18 antibiotics were determined for 151 EAEC isolated from cases and controls during an intestinal infectious disease study carried out between 2007-2011 in the rural setting of Mirzapur, Bangladesh (Kotloff KL, Blackwelder WC, Nasrin D, Nataro JP, Farag TH et al.Clin Infect Dis 2012;55:S232-S245). These data were then analysed in the context of previously determined serotypes and clonal complexes defined by multi-locus sequence typing. Overall there was no association between the presence of virulence or antimicrobial resistance genes in isolates of EAEC from cases versus controls. However, when stratified by clonal complex (CC) one CC associated with cases harboured more virulence factors (CC40) and one CC harboured more resistance genes (CC38) than the average. There was no direct link between the virulence gene content and antibiotic resistance. Strains within a single CC had variable virulence and resistance gene content indicating independent and multiple gene acquisitions over time. In Bangladesh, there are multiple clonal complexes of EAEC harbouring a variety of virulence and resistance genes. The emergence of two of the most successful clones appeared to be linked to either increased virulence (CC40) or antimicrobial resistance (CC38), but increased resistance and virulence were not found in the same clonal complexes.

  3. Antimicrobial resistant Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli recovered from dairy operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a major public health concern and animal agriculture is often implicated as a source of resistant bacteria. The primary objective of this study was to determine prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella and E. coli from healthy animals on dairy farms i...

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in clinical Escherichia coli isolates from poultry and livestock, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrah Kamal Yassin

    Full Text Available Poultry and livestock are the most important reservoirs for pathogenic Escherichia coli and use of antimicrobials in animal farming is considered the most important factor promoting the emergence, selection and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms. The aim of our study was to investigate antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolated from food animals in Jiangsu, China. The disc diffusion method was used to determine susceptibility to 18 antimicrobial agents in 862 clinical isolates collected from chickens, ducks, pigs, and cows between 2004 and 2012. Overall, 94% of the isolates showed resistance to at least one drug with 83% being resistance to at least three different classes of antimicrobials. The isolates from the different species were most commonly resistant to tetracycline, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and ampicillin, and showed increasing resistance to amikacin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin. They were least resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (3.4% and ertapenem (0.2%. MDR was most common in isolates from ducks (44/44, 100%, followed by chickens (568/644, 88.2%, pigs (93/113, 82.3% and cows (13/61, 21.3%. Our finding that clinical E. coli isolates from poultry and livestock are commonly resistant to multiple antibiotics should alert public health and veterinary authorities to limit and rationalize antimicrobial use in China.

  5. Prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli from raw vegetables in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour-Klingbeil, Dima; Kuri, Victor; Fadlallah, Sukayna; Matar, Ghassan M

    2016-04-28

    Fresh produce has been implicated in a number of documented outbreaks of foodborne illness caused by bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) have been detected on vegetables, raising concerns about the prevalence of E. coli contamination in produce, which can take place at various points from farm to fork. This study aimed to detect the presence of STEC and multidrug-resistant (MDR) E. coli on fresh vegetables and water from different sources along the fresh produce supply chain in Lebanon. E. coli isolates (n = 60) were group serotyped using trivalent antisera (trivalent 1 [O111+O55+O26], trivalent 2 [O86+O119+O127], trivalent 3 [O125; O126; O128], and trivalent 4 [O114+O124+O142]) and tested for stx1 and stx2 genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Resistance to antimicrobial agents was determined using the disk diffusion method. The virulence genes stx1 and stx2 were not detected in any of the isolates. However, 60% of the isolates were MDR and predominantly observed in trivalent 2 (32%). It is postulated that the inadequate post-harvest washing contributed to transmission of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli at wholesale and retail levels. Fresh vegetables harbor MDR E. coli and their consumption poses risks of increasing the reservoir of antimicrobial resistance in the intestines of the Lebanese population. Greater emphasis should be placed on vigilant sanitation measures at the consumption level, and effective national risk mitigation strategies are crucial to minimize fecal contamination in the early stages of production, particularly in the post-harvest washing processes.

  6. Characterization and antimicrobial resistance analysis of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from Italian turkey flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanardi, Davide; Lupini, Caterina; Pesente, Patrizia; Rossi, Giulia; Ortali, Giovanni; Catelli, Elena

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) in a finishing turkey commercial farm, carrying out longitudinal surveys involving 3 consecutive flocks. The diversity and the distribution of the E. coli strains detected during colisepticemia outbreaks were examined. The strains were isolated, serogrouped, assessed for the presence of virulence-associated genes, typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and antimicrobial resistance analysis was then carried out. Escherichia coli O78 and O2 were predominantly found. Moreover, based on the somatic antigens used in the study, strains were recovered that were nontypeable. On one occasion, an E. coli O111 strain was found in turkeys. The E. coli isolates differed in terms of antibiotic resistance and RAPD profile. All strains possessed the virulence genes that enabled them to be considered APEC. Strains not only differed between flocks, but also within the same flock. These findings point out the importance of addressing colibacillosis therapy on the basis of a sensitivity test.

  7. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance patterns and class 1 integrons in Escherichia coli O26 isolated from humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gillespie, Barbara E; Nguyen, Lien T; Headrick, Susan I; Murinda, Shelton E; Oliver, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    Antimicrobial resistance patterns and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and class 1 integrons in 35 Escherichia coli O26 isolated from humans and food-producing animals were evaluated. All isolates were resistant to cefaclor, cefalothin and sulfonamide and were susceptible to amikacin, gentamicin, cefmetazole, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and trimethoprim. Most isolates were resistant to aztreonam, ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin and kanamycin. All ampicillin- and streptomycin-resistant E. coli O26 carried ampC and strA-strB gene sequences, respectively. Florfenicol- and chloramphenicol-resistant isolates carried floR but not cmlA. Class1 integrons were identified in 14% of E. coli O26 isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the presence of multiple antimicrobial resistance genes in E. coli O26 isolated from human and animal origins.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance in equine faecal Escherichia coli isolates from North West England

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    Williams Nicola J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli isolates of equine faecal origin were investigated for antibiotic resistance, resistance genes and their ability to perform horizontal transfer. Methods In total, 264 faecal samples were collected from 138 horses in hospital and community livery premises in northwest England, yielding 296 resistant E. coli isolates. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods in order to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC. PCR amplification was used to detect genes conferring resistance to: ampicillin (TEM and SHV beta-lactamase, chloramphenicol (catI, catII, catIII and cml, tetracycline (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetD, tet E and tetG, and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA9, dfrA12, dfrA13, dfr7, and dfr17. Results The proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates, and multidrug resistant isolates (MDR was significantly higher in hospital samples compared to livery samples (MDR: 48% of hospital isolates; 12% of livery isolates, p dfr, TEM beta-lactamase, tet and cat, conferring resistance to trimethoprim, ampicillin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol, respectively. Within each antimicrobial resistance group, these genes occurred at frequencies of 93% (260/279, 91%, 86.8% and 73.5%, respectively; with 115/296 (38.8% found to be MDR isolates. Conjugation experiments were performed on selected isolates and MDR phenotypes were readily transferred. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that E. coli of equine faecal origin are commonly resistant to antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. Furthermore, our results suggest that most antibiotic resistance observed in equine E. coli is encoded by well-known and well-characterized resistant genes common to E. coli from man and domestic animals. These data support the ongoing concern about antimicrobial resistance, MDR, antimicrobial use in veterinary medicine and the zoonotic risk that horses could potentially pose to

  9. Determinants of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Faeces and Urine of Women with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, Casper D. J.; Beerepoot, Mariëlle A. J.; Prins, Jan M.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Stobberingh, Ellen E.

    2012-01-01

    For women with recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI), the contribution of antibiotic use versus patient-related factors in determining the presence of antimicrobial resistance in faecal and urinary Escherichia coli, obtained from the same patient population, has not been assessed yet. Within the

  10. Epidemiology of Antimicrobial Resistance among Escherichia coli Strains in Trans-Nzoia County, Kenya

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    Collins Kibenei Kipkorir, Philip Bett, Patrick O. Onyango

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility profile and the genetic basis to antimicrobial resistance, targeting blaTEM gene expression of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli among patients suffering from gastroenteritis in Kitale County Referral Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was adopted. A total of 103 fecal specimens were collected from participants ranging in age from two weeks to 82 years. E. coli was isolated and identified based on phenotypic and biochemical properties. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of blaTEM gene. Results: The prevalence of E. coli was 90.2% and age of the patient explained 53% of variation in prevalence. Isolates of diarrheagenic E. coli showed varied degree of susceptibility with sulfamethoxazole at 97%, co-trimoxazole 96%, ampicillin 84%, chloramphenicol 27%, tetracycline 16%, kanamycin 10% and streptomycin 9%. However, E. coli was highly sensitive to gentamicin at 96.8%. Approximately 42.2% of E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant to sulfamethoxazole, co-trimoxazole, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, kanamycin and streptomycin. All isolates that were resistant to ampicillin harbored blaTEM gene suggesting genetic mediation. Conclusion: The observed pattern of resistance to antibiotics points to the need to regulate their use and arrest buildup of resistant genes within the population. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(3: 107-112

  11. Antimicrobial Resistant Pattern of Escherichia Coli Strains Isolated from Pediatric Patients in Jordan

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    Mohammad Alshara

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate antimicrobial resistant pattern of Escherichia coli (E. coli strains isolated from clinical specimens of Jordanian pediatric patients during the period from January to December 2008. A total of 444 E. coli strains were isolated from clinical specimens and tested for their susceptibility to different antimicrobial drugs. Overall, high resistance rate was observed for ampicillin (84%, followed by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (74.3%, cotrimoxazole (71%, nalidixic acid (47.3%, cephalothin (41%. Lower resistance rates were observed for amikacin (0% followed by Cefotaxime (11%, Ceftriaxone (11.7%, ciprofloxacin (14.5%, Norfloxacin (16.5%, gentamicin (17.3% cephalexin (20.9%, Ceftazidime (22.5%, cefixime (29.6%, and cefaclor (32.8%. Ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and cotrimoxazole were found to be ineffective at in vitro inhibition of the E. coli of pediatric origin. Amikacin was highly effective for E. coli with susceptibility rate of 100%. The majority of E. coli strains were susceptible to third generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones.

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Wild Animals in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Zając, Magdalena; Lalak, Anna; Skarżyńska, Magdalena; Samcik, Ilona; Kwit, Renata; Jabłoński, Artur; Bocian, Łukasz; Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Szulowski, Krzysztof

    2017-11-29

    Antimicrobial resistance was tested in Escherichia coli isolated from feces (n = 660) of red deer, roe deer, fallow deer, European bison, and wild boar shot in regional forests in Poland during two winter hunting seasons. Indicator E. coli (n = 542) was resistant against 11 of 14 tested compounds, mostly sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, ampicillin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline (1.3-6.6% range). No significant differences were observed between boar and ruminant isolates. Most of deer and bison isolates showed no resistance. Selective screening of wildlife samples revealed 1.7% prevalence of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli found mostly in wild boars. They produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (bla CTX-M-1 , bla CTX-M-15 ) and plasmid-mediated AmpC-type cephalosporinase (bla CMY-2 ). The majority of the isolates originated from boars shot in a narrow time frame and space; therefore, common antimicrobial selection pressure in the environment was assumed. Three E. coli isolates carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (qnrS1/S3). No transferable colistin resistance mechanisms were found in two resistant E. coli. Transferability of resistance was proved in a single pAmpC-positive isolate carrying IncI1-alpha 95 kb plasmid. No cephalosporin-resistant E. coli harbored pathogenicity markers; therefore, they might be considered a vector of resistance determinants, but not a pathogen themselves.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolated from animals at slaughter

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    Dariusz eWasyl

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli (N = 3430 isolated from slaughtered broilers, laying hens, turkeys, swine, and cattle in Poland has been run between 2009 and 2012. Based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC microbiological resistance to each of 14 tested antimicrobials was found reaching the highest values for tetracycline (43.3%, ampicillin (42.3%, and ciprofloxacin (39.0% whereas the lowest for colistin (0.9%, cephalosporins (3.6 ÷ 3.8%, and florfenicol (3.8%. The highest prevalence of resistance was noted in broiler and turkey isolates, whereas it was rare in cattle. That finding along with resistance patterns specific to isolation source might reflect antimicrobial consumption, usage preferences or management practices in specific animals. Regression analysis has identified changes in prevalence of microbiological resistance and shifts of MIC values. Critically important fluoroquinolone resistance was worrisome in poultry isolates, but did not change over the study period. The difference (4.7% between resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid indicated the scale of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Cephalosporin resistance were found in less than 3.8% of the isolates but an increasing trends were observed in poultry and MIC shift in the ones from cattle. Gentamycin resistance was also increasing in E. coli of turkey and cattle origin although prevalence of streptomycin resistance in laying hens decreased considerably. Simultaneously, decreasing MIC for phenicols observed in cattle and layers isolates as well as tetracycline values in E. coli from laying hens prove that antimicrobial resistance is multivariable phenomenon not only directly related to antimicrobial usage. Further studies should elucidate the scope of commensal E. coli as reservoirs of resistance genes, their spread and possible threats for human and animal health.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolated from animals at slaughter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Zając, Magdalena; Szulowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli (N = 3430) isolated from slaughtered broilers, laying hens, turkeys, swine, and cattle in Poland has been run between 2009 and 2012. Based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) microbiological resistance to each of 14 tested antimicrobials was found reaching the highest values for tetracycline (43.3%), ampicillin (42.3%), and ciprofloxacin (39.0%) whereas the lowest for colistin (0.9%), cephalosporins (3.6 ÷ 3.8%), and florfenicol (3.8%). The highest prevalence of resistance was noted in broiler and turkey isolates, whereas it was rare in cattle. That finding along with resistance patterns specific to isolation source might reflect antimicrobial consumption, usage preferences or management practices in specific animals. Regression analysis has identified changes in prevalence of microbiological resistance and shifts of MIC values. Critically important fluoroquinolone resistance was worrisome in poultry isolates, but did not change over the study period. The difference (4.7%) between resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid indicated the scale of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Cephalosporin resistance were found in less than 3.8% of the isolates but an increasing trends were observed in poultry and MIC shift in the ones from cattle. Gentamycin resistance was also increasing in E. coli of turkey and cattle origin although prevalence of streptomycin resistance in laying hens decreased considerably. Simultaneously, decreasing MIC for phenicols observed in cattle and layers isolates as well as tetracycline values in E. coli from laying hens prove that antimicrobial resistance is multivariable phenomenon not only directly related to antimicrobial usage. Further studies should elucidate the scope of commensal E. coli as reservoirs of resistance genes, their spread and possible threats for human and animal health. PMID:23935596

  15. The in vitro fitness cost of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli varies with the growth conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of stressful growth conditions on the fitness cost of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli BJ4 caused by chromosomal mutations and plasmid acquisition. The fitness cost of chromosomal streptomycin resistance increased...... significantly when the bacteria were grown under all stress conditions tested, while the cost in 1/3 Luria–Bertani was not significantly changed in a streptomycin+rifampicin mutant. The increase in the fitness cost depended in a nonregular manner on the strain/stress combination. The fitness cost of plasmid......-encoded resistance on R751 did not differ significantly, and was generally less under stressful growth conditions than in rich media. The fitness cost associated with R751 with the multiple drug resistance cassette from Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 increased significantly only under stressful conditions at low p...

  16. Antimicrobial resistance in faecal enterococci and Escherichia coli isolates recovered from Iberian wolf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A; Igrejas, G; Radhouani, H; Correia, S; Pacheco, R; Santos, T; Monteiro, R; Guerra, A; Petrucci-Fonseca, F; Brito, F; Torres, C; Poeta, P

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report the antimicrobial resistance, the molecular mechanisms associated and the detection of virulence determinants within faecal Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli isolates of Iberian wolf. Enterococci (n = 227) and E. coli (n = 195) isolates were obtained from faecal samples of Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus). High rates of resistance were detected for tetracycline and erythromycin among the enterococci isolates, and most of resistant isolates harboured the tet(M) and/or tet(L) and erm(B) genes, respectively. The blaTEM, tet(A) and/or tet(B), and aadA or strA-strB genes were detected among most ampicillin-, tetracycline- or streptomycin-resistant E. coli isolates, respectively. E. coli isolates were ascribed to phylogroups A (n = 56), B1 (91), B2 (13) and D (35). The occurrence of resistant enterococci and E. coli isolates in the faecal flora of Iberian wolf, including the presence of resistant genes in integrons, and virulence determinants was showed in this study. Iberian wolf might act as reservoir of certain resistance genes that could be spread throughout the environment. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli in Mexico: how serious is the problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Llanes, Joel; Varon, Joseph; Velarde Félix, Jesús Salvador; González-Ibarra, Fernando Pavel

    2012-02-13

    This study aimed to determine the resistance patterns of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Mexico to several antibiotics and research some therapeutic options. Positive cultures for E. coli isolated from bronchial secretions, urine, central catheter, blood, and infected wounds in the Culiacan General Hospital, Sinaloa, Mexico from 30 June 2004 to 1 July 2007 were studied. Resistance against multiple antibiotics was measured and compared by gender and the hospital unit where the bacteria were isolated. In total, 1511 specimens were analyzed from men (45.4%) and women (54.5%), of which 251 were positive for E. coli. Antimicrobial resistance was highest in the neurosurgery service (58.4%). Samples included sputum (14.7%), bronchial secretions (17.9%), wounds (35.4%), urine/Foley catheter tip (35.5%), central catheter tips (5.6%), and blood cultures (7.2%). Resistance to ampicillin was highest at 91% followed by ciprofloxacin at 80.6%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole at 70.2%, piperacillin/tazobactam at 14.4%, and imipenem at 6.8%. Trimethoprim should not be recommended as an empiric option for E. coli infections and the benefit of quinolones is low. It is important to understand the resistance of the bacteria in each medical center, consider its frequency in each service within the same hospital, and take all necessary measures to ensure and create a clinical attitude of prevention.

  18. Vaginal versus Obstetric Infection Escherichia coli Isolates among Pregnant Women: Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Virulence Profile.

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    Emma Sáez-López

    Full Text Available Vaginal Escherichia coli colonization is related to obstetric infections and the consequent development of infections in newborns. Ampicillin resistance among E. coli strains is increasing, which is the main choice for treating empirically many obstetric and neonatal infections. Vaginal E. coli strains are very similar to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli with regards to the virulence factors and the belonging to phylogroup B2. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and the genetic virulence profile of 82 E. coli isolates from 638 vaginal samples and 63 isolated from endometrial aspirate, placental and amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women with obstetric infections. The prevalence of E. coli in the vaginal samples was 13%, which was significant among women with associated risk factors during pregnancy, especially premature preterm rupture of membranes (p<0.0001. Sixty-five percent of the strains were ampicillin-resistant. The E. coli isolates causing obstetric infections showed higher resistance levels than vaginal isolates, particularly for gentamicin (p = 0.001. The most prevalent virulence factor genes were those related to the iron uptake systems revealing clear targets for interventions. More than 50% of the isolates belonged to the virulent B2 group possessing the highest number of virulence factor genes. The ampicillin-resistant isolates had high number of virulence factors primarily related to pathogenicity islands, and the remarkable gentamicin resistance in E. coli isolates from women presenting obstetric infections, the choice of the most appropriate empiric treatment and clinical management of pregnant women and neonates should be carefully made. Taking into account host-susceptibility, the heterogeneity of E. coli due to evolution over time and the geographical area, characterization of E. coli isolates colonizing the vagina and causing obstetric infections in different regions may help to develop interventions and avoid the

  19. Virulence Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli from Cheese Made from Unpasteurized Milk in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Anna C L P; Puño-Sarmiento, Juan J; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Gazal, Luís E S; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Navarro, Armando; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Fagan, Eder P; Nakazato, Gerson

    2018-02-01

    Cow raw milk cheese is widely eaten in Brazil. These products may be contaminated with pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we investigated the presence of Escherichia coli in raw milk cheese from different States in Brazil. From 147 "Minas" cheese samples, 28 cheeses were positive for E. coli. Among 39 E. coli isolates of the cheeses, one was positive for eae and negative for bpfA and efa1/lifA using PCR, and so was classified as atypical Enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC). Two other isolates were positive for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) genes. The aEPEC isolate belongs to serogroup O127 and was classified in A phylogenetic group, and ExPEC isolates were found in O73:H12 (EC-2 strain) and O64474:H8 (EC-9 strain) serotype. This ExPEC belongs to A and C phylogenetic group, respectively. Most of E. coli strains belonged to Clermont phylogenetic groups A (28.2%), C, and E (23.1%). Six strains (15.4%) of E. coli were positive for group B1 and two (5.1%) for B2. E. coli isolates presented an aggregative (46.0%) and diffuse (12.6%) adherence pattern to HeLa cells, and the other isolates did not show adhesion (41.4%). Four E. coli isolates (10.3%) were shown to produce moderate biofilm. The antimicrobial resistance rate was tetracycline (25.6%), followed by ampicillin (17.9%), cefoxitin (7.7%), nalidixic acid (5.1%), and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (2.6%). One strain was resistant to three antimicrobials (tetracycline, ampicillin, and nalidixic acid). The presence of these microorganisms, the O127 strain, and a new serogroup in Brazil is a potential risk for public health.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance in clinical Escherichia coli isolated from companion animals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Sugiyono; Jordan, David; Mitchell, Tahlia; Wong, Hui San; Abraham, Rebecca J; Kidsley, Amanda; Turnidge, John; Trott, Darren J; Abraham, Sam

    2017-11-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli have become a major public health concern to both humans and animal health. While the frequency of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in clinical E. coli is monitored regularly in human medicine, current frequency of AMR in companion animals remains unknown in Australia. In this study we conducted antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) and where possible, determined potential risk factors for MDR infection among 883 clinical Escherichia coli isolated from dogs (n=514), cats (n=341) and horses (n=28). AST was undertaken for 15 antimicrobial agents according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines and interpreted using epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) as well as CLSI veterinary and human clinical breakpoints. The AST revealed complete absence of resistance to carbapenems while resistance to amikacin was observed at a low level in isolates from dogs (1.6%) and cats (1.5%) compared to horses (10.7%). Among dog isolates, resistance to fluoroquinolones ranged from 9.1%-9.3% whereas among cat isolates, it ranged from 3.2%-5%. Among dog isolates, the proportion showing a 3rd generation cephalosporin (3GC) non-wild type phenotype was significantly higher (Presistance was 18.1%, 11.7% and 42.9% in dog, cat and horse isolates, respectively. Risk factor analysis revealed that MDR E. coli isolated from UTI were positively associated with chronicity of infection and previous antimicrobial treatment. Dogs and cats with chronic UTI that had been previously treated with antimicrobials were eight times and six times more likely to be infected with MDR E. coli compared to dogs and cats with non-chronic UTI, and no history of antimicrobial treatment, respectively. This study revealed that pre-existing disease condition and prior antimicrobial use were the major risks associated with UTI with MDR E. coli in companion animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microarray Evaluation of Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence of Escherichia coli Isolates from Portuguese Poultry

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    Nuno Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of 174 Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy Portuguese Gallus gallus was evaluated. Resistance profiles were determined against 33 antimicrobials by microbroth dilution. Resistance was prevalent for tetracycline (70% and ampicillin (63%. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL phenotype was observed in 18% of the isolates. Multidrug resistance was found in 56% of isolates. A subset of 74 isolates were screened by DNA microarrays for the carriage of 88 antibiotic resistance genes and 62 virulence genes. Overall, 37 different resistance genes were detected. The most common were tet(A (72%, blaTEM (68%, and sul1 (47%, while 21% isolates harbored an ESBL gene (blaCTX-M group 1, group 2, or group 9. Of these, 96% carried the increased serum survival (iss virulence gene, while 89% presented the enterobactin siderophore receptor protein (iroN, 70% the temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (tsh, and 68% the long polar fimbriae (lpfA virulence genes associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. In conclusion, prevalence of antibiotic resistant E. coli from the microbiota of Portuguese chickens was high, including to extended spectrum cephalosporins. The majority of isolates seems to have the potential to trigger extraintestinal human infection due to the presence of some virulence genes. However, the absence of genes specific for enteropathogenic E. coli reduces the risk for human intestinal infection.

  2. Risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli from preweaned dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duse, Anna; Waller, Karin Persson; Emanuelson, Ulf; Unnerstad, Helle Ericsson; Persson, Ylva; Bengtsson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate calf and farm factors associated with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in the feces of preweaned dairy calves in Sweden. In particular, we investigated the effects of feeding calves colostrum and milk from cows treated with antimicrobials. The secondary objective was to describe the prevalence of resistant E. coli in feces of preweaned dairy calves in Sweden. Fecal samples from 3 calves, aged 7 to 28d, from 243 farms were analyzed for the within-sample prevalence of E. coli resistant to nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and cefotaxime using selective agars supplemented with antimicrobials. In addition, resistance to 12 antimicrobials was tested in one randomly selected E. coli isolate per calf. Information was collected from the farmers via questionnaires regarding the use of colostrum and milk from cows treated with antimicrobials as calf feed and other uses of antimicrobials in the herd. Multivariable zero-inflated negative binomial and logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of various risk factors for shedding of resistant E. coli. Escherichia coli resistant to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, or cefotaxime were isolated from 90, 49, and 11% of the calves, respectively. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial was found in a random isolate of E. coli from 48% of the calves. Feeding colostrum from cows treated with antimicrobials at drying off did not affect the prevalence of resistant E. coli. In contrast, feeding milk from cows treated with antimicrobials during lactation resulted in significantly more nalidixic acid- and streptomycin-resistant E. coli than when such milk was discarded; no significant effect was seen for other resistance traits. Furthermore, an interaction was found between feeding milk from cows treated with antimicrobials and use of fluoroquinolones in cows. In general, the prevalence of resistance was lower for older calves and calves on small farms. Other factors

  3. Antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from humans and foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benevides Melo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has increased in recent years, raising the concern of public health authorities. We conducted a study of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from human and food samples to assess the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and to determine the genotype and clonal relationship of 84 E. coli isolates (48 from humans and 36 from foods. An antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using the disk diffusion method. Virulence factors were evaluated by multiplex PCR, and the clonal relationship among the resistant isolates was studied by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone. Overall, 26%, 20.2%, 15.4% and 6% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and cephalotin, respectively. Twenty two percent of the isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. Multiple-drug resistance was mostly observed in the human isolates and involved the antibiotics ampicillin and tetracycline. None of the six virulence genes were identified among the isolates. Analysis of genetic diversity by PFGE of 31 resistant isolates, revealed 29 distinct restriction patterns. In conclusion, E. coli from humans and foods are resistant to commonly used antibiotics and are highly genetically diverse. In this setting, inappropriate use of antibiotics may be a cause of high resistance rate instead of clonal spread.

  4. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of Escherichia coli and salmonella isolated from diarrheic calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari, A.R.M.I.H.; Rahman, M.M.; Islam, Md Zohorul

    2014-01-01

    . The diarrhea and other clinical signs seen with the disease are caused by the interaction of any of several possible infectious causes. This study was carried out to isolate, identify and detect the antimicrobial resistant profile of E. coli and Salmonella from diarrheic calves. A total of one hundred...... and twenty five fecal specimens were collected directly from the rectum of diarrheic calves. Of the samples collected 35 (25%) and 11 (8.8%) was found positive for E. coli and Salmonella respectively. Antimicrobial resistance of these two isolate was found against Amoxycillin and Tetracycline whereas a high...

  5. Effect of preweaned dairy calf housing system on antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R V; Siler, J D; Ng, J C; Davis, M A; Warnick, L D

    2014-12-01

    Group housing of preweaned dairy calves is a growing practice in the United States. The objective of this practice is to increase the average daily gain of calves in a healthy and humane environment while reducing labor requirements. However, feeding protocols, commingling of calves, and occurrence of disease in different calf-housing systems may affect the prevalence of antimicrobial drug-resistant bacteria. This study evaluated the effect of a group pen-housing system and individual pen-housing system on antimicrobial resistance trends in fecal Escherichia coli of preweaned dairy calves and on the prevalence of environmental Salmonella. Twelve farms from central New York participated in the study: 6 farms using an individual pen-housing system (IP), and 6 farms using a group pen-housing system (GP). A maximum of 3 fecal E. coli isolates per calf was tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial drugs using a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay. Calves in GP had a significantly higher proportion of E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid, whereas calves in IP had a significantly higher proportion of E. coli resistant to ampicillin, ceftiofur, gentamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline. Calf-housing system had an effect on resistance to individual antimicrobial drugs in E. coli, but no clear-cut advantage to either system was noted with regard to overall resistance frequency. No outstanding difference in the richness and diversity of resistant phenotypes was observed between the 2 calf-housing systems. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Escherichia coli isolates from sick chickens in China: changes in antimicrobial resistance between 1993 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Weiqiu; Yin, Jiajun; Zhang, Ning; Geng, Shizhong; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Yanhong; Gao, Song; Jiao, Xinan

    2014-10-01

    The use of antimicrobials for the control of infectious disease has increased in recent decades. Understanding trends in antimicrobial resistance provides clues about the relationship between antimicrobial use and the emergence of resistance. We examined the resistance of 540 Escherichia coli isolates to 19 antimicrobials that represent 11 classes of antimicrobial agents. The isolates were collected from chickens between 1993 and 2013 in China. Overall, >96.7% of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the tested compounds, and 87.2% of them displayed multidrug resistance (MDR) representing five to six antimicrobial classes. A high proportion of E. coli isolates were resistant to tetracycline (90.6%), nalidixic acid (80.6%), ampicillin (77.2%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (76.9%), and streptomycin (72.8%). Only 3.0% of the isolates were resistant to nitrofurantoin, and none was resistant to meropenem. Resistance to amikacin, ampicillin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin, nalidixic acid, piperacillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole significantly increased from 1993 to 2013 (P <0.01). There was an increasing trend in MDR over the 20 year period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance determinants among Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus isolated from Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The importance of Salmonella, Campylobacter, E.coli, and Enterococcus as carriers of antimicrobial resistance is well known, but limited work has been done to examine the relationship between this phenotypic characteristic and genotypic attributes among strains isolated in similar set...

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli on household and small-scale chicken farms in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Vinh Trung; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Ho, Huynh Mai; Ha, Thanh Tuyen; Campbell, James I.; Nguyen, Thi Nhung; Hoang, Ngoc Nhung; Pham, Van Minh; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Hardon, Anita; Thai, Quoc Hieu; Schultsz, Constance

    2015-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli isolates on household and small-scale chicken farms, common in southern Vietnam, and to investigate the association of antimicrobial resistance with farming practices and antimicrobial usage. We collected data on

  9. Effects of chlortetracycline and copper supplementation on antimicrobial resistance of fecal Escherichia coli from weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agga, G E; Scott, H M; Amachawadi, R G; Nagaraja, T G; Vinasco, J; Bai, J; Norby, B; Renter, D G; Dritz, S S; Nelssen, J L; Tokach, M D

    2014-06-01

    Feed-grade chlortetracycline (CTC) and copper are both widely utilized in U.S. pig production. Cluster randomized experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of CTC and copper supplementation in weaned pigs on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among fecal Escherichia coli. Four treatment groups: control, copper, CTC, or copper plus CTC were randomly allocated to 32 pens with five pigs per pen. Fecal samples were collected weekly from three pigs per pen for six weeks. Two E. coli isolates per fecal sample were tested for phenotypic and genotypic resistance against antibiotics and copper. Data were analyzed with multilevel mixed effects logistic regression, multivariate probit analysis and discrete time survival analysis. CTC-supplementation was significantly (99% [95% CI=98-100%]) associated with increased tetracycline resistance compared to the control group (95% [95% CI=94-97%]). Copper supplementation was associated with decreased resistance to most of the antibiotics tested, including cephalosporins, over the treatment period. Overall, 91% of the E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (resistant to ≥3 antimicrobial classes). tetA and blaCMY-2 genes were positively associated (Ppigs exhibited high levels of antibiotic resistance, with diverse multi-resistant phenotypic profiles. The roles of copper supplementation in pig production, and pco-mediated copper resistance among E. coli in particular, need to be further explored since a strong negative association of pco with both tetA and blaCMY-2 points to opportunities for selecting a more innocuous resistance profile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Paul D

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial usage is considered the most important factor promoting the emergence, selection and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in both veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic basis of tetracycline resistance in faecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy broiler chickens and compare these data with isolates obtained from hospitalized patients in Jamaica. Results Eighty-two E. coli strains isolated from faecal samples of broiler chickens and urine and wound specimens of hospitalized patients were analyzed by agar disc diffusion to determine their susceptibility patterns to 11 antimicrobial agents. Tetracycline resistance determinants were investigated by plasmid profiling, transformations, and amplification of plasmid-borne resistance genes. Tetracycline resistance occurred at a frequency of 82.4% in avian isolates compared to 43.8% in human isolates. In addition, among avian isolates there was a trend towards higher resistance frequencies to kanamycin and nalidixic acid (p E. coli. Tetracycline resistance was mediated by efflux genes tetB and/or tetD. Conclusion The present study highlights the prevalence of multiple drug resistant E. coli among healthy broiler chickens in Jamaica, possibly associated with expression of tetracycline resistance. While there did not appear to be a common source for multiple drug resistance in the strains from avian or human origin, the genes encoding resistance are similar. These results suggest that genes are disseminated in the environment and warrant further investigation of the possibility for avian sources acting as reservoirs for tetracycline resistance.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance profiles and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Phuong Hoai; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; DO Nguyen, Phuc; Nguyen, Ngan Ly Hoang; Nguyen, Dao Thi Anh; LE, Ninh Hoang; VAN Dang, Chinh; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2017-03-18

    In this study, we attempted to isolate Escherichia coli from healthy adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and characterized its antimicrobial resistance profile, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genotype, phylogenetic grouping and virulence gene profile. A total of 103 E. coli isolates were obtained, and most of them were antimicrobial resistant such to streptomycin (80.6%), tetracycline (67.0%), ampicillin (65.0%), sulfamethoxsazole/trimethoprim (48.5%), nalidixic acid (43.7%), chloramphenicol (34.0%), cefotaxime (15.5%), ciprofloxacin (15.5%), kanamycin (12.6%), ceftazidime (10.7%), fosfomycin (4.9%) and gentamicin (2.9%). However, all these E. coli strains were susceptible to imipenem. Surprisingly, of 103 strains, 74 (71.8%) and 43 (41.7%) strains showed resistance to more than 3 and 5 classes of antimicrobials, respectively. Furthermore, 10 E. coli strains were ESBL-producers and positive for bla CTX-M genes (7 for bla CTX-M-9 and 3 for bla CTX-M-1 ), while five were additionally positive for bla TEM genes. S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that 7 and 3 strains of E. coli carry bla CTX-M genes on their large plasmid and chromosome, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis exhibited that majority of the E. coli strains was grouped into A (44.7%), followed by B1 (23.3%), B2 (18.4%) and D (13.6%). Virulence genes associated with diarrheagenic E. coli, such as astA, EAF, eaeA, elt and eagg were also detected in ESBL-producing E. coli as well as antimicrobial resistant strains. These data suggest that commensal E. coli of healthy human could be a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance determinants and some of them might be harmful to human.

  12. Diversity of Plasmids and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C R; Davis, J A; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M

    2015-09-01

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of genetic elements in antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from healthy companion animals. In our previous study, from May to August, 2007, healthy companion animals (155 dogs and 121 cats) from three veterinary clinics in the Athens, GA, USA area were sampled and multidrug-resistant E. coli (n = 36; MDR, resistance to ≥ 2 antimicrobial classes) were obtained. Of the 25 different plasmid replicon types tested by PCR, at least one plasmid replicon type was detected in 94% (34/36) of the MDR E. coli; four isolates contained as many as five different plasmid replicons. Nine replicon types (FIA, FIB, FII, I2, A/C, U, P, I1 and HI2) were identified with FIB, FII, I2 as the most common pattern. The presence of class I integrons (intI) was detected in 61% (22/36) of the isolates with eight isolates containing aminoglycoside- and/or trimethoprim-resistance genes in the variable cassette region of intI. Microarray analysis of a subset of the MDR E. coli (n = 9) identified the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides (aac, aad, aph and strA/B), β-lactams (ampC, cmy, tem and vim), chloramphenicol (cat), sulfonamides (sulI and sulII), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D) and regulator, tetR] and trimethoprim (dfrA). Antimicrobial resistance to eight antimicrobials (ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, streptomycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and five plasmid replicons (FIA, FIB, FII, I1 and I2) were transferred via conjugation. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, intI and transferable plasmid replicons indicate that E. coli from companion animals may play an important role in the

  13. Population structure of Japanese extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli and its relationship with antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasufumi; Noguchi, Taro; Tanaka, Michio; Kanahashi, Toru; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    To define the population structure of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in Japan and its relationship with antimicrobial resistance and the major resistance mechanisms for fluoroquinolones and β-lactams, we designed a multicentre prospective study. A total of 329 ExPEC isolates were collected at 10 Japanese acute-care hospitals during December 2014. We defined the clonal groups of ExPEC by fumC and fimH sequencing (CH typing). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 18 agents and the detection of mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) and β-lactamases were performed. Among the study isolates, 103 CH types were found, and CH40-30 (25%) and another 10 CH types (35% in total) constituted the major ExPEC population. Ciprofloxacin non-susceptibility, ESBLs and MDR phenotypes were found in 34%, 22% and 33%, respectively. CH40-30, corresponding to the C/H30 clade of the global pandemic ST131 clone, was associated with four QRDR mutations (100%) and bla CTX-M (60%) and was the most frequent type in 15 antimicrobial-non-susceptible populations (dominating 39%-75% of each population, the highest prevalence for ciprofloxacin), the ESBL producers (70%) and the MDR isolates (59%). Isolates that were non-susceptible to nalidixic acid and low-level resistant to ciprofloxacin with one or two QRDR mutations represented 16% of the study isolates and were distributed among the eight major and non-major CH types. More than half of the ExPEC population in Japan consisted of 11 major clones. Of these clones, the CH40-30-ST131-C/H30 clone was the predominant antimicrobial-resistant population. The presence of major clones with low-level ciprofloxacin resistance supports the potential future success of a non-ST131 fluoroquinolone-resistant clone. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of Escherichia coli and salmonella isolated from diarrheic calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari, A.R.M.I.H.; Rahman, M.M.; Islam, Md Zohorul

    2014-01-01

    . The diarrhea and other clinical signs seen with the disease are caused by the interaction of any of several possible infectious causes. This study was carried out to isolate, identify and detect the antimicrobial resistant profile of E. coli and Salmonella from diarrheic calves. A total of one hundred......Neonatal calf diarrhea (NCD) is a common disease affecting the newborn calf and the most critical period is in the first few days following birth of the calf which is also known as calf scours. Keeping animals in close confinement where the opportunity for transmission of causative agents of NCD...... and twenty five fecal specimens were collected directly from the rectum of diarrheic calves. Of the samples collected 35 (25%) and 11 (8.8%) was found positive for E. coli and Salmonella respectively. Antimicrobial resistance of these two isolate was found against Amoxycillin and Tetracycline whereas a high...

  15. Virulence factors, serogroups and antimicrobial resistance properties of Escherichia coli strains in fermented dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, Farhad Safarpoor; Yazdani, Farshad; Mozafari, Jalal; Valizadeh, Yousef

    2014-04-07

    From a clinical perspective, it is essential to know the microbial safety of fermented dairy products. Doogh and kashk are fermented dairies. These products are used by millions of people but their microbial qualities are unknown. Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is one of the most commonly detected pathogens in the cases of food poisoning and food-borne illnesses. The present investigation was carried out in order to study the molecular characterization and antimicrobial resistance properties of STEC strains isolated from fermented dairy products. Six hundred fermented dairy samples were collected and immediately transferred to the laboratory. All samples were cultured immediately and those that were E. coli-positive were analyzed for the presence of O157 , O26, O103, O111, O145, O45, O91, O113, O121 and O128 STEC serogroups, tetA, tetB, blaSHV, CITM, cmlA, cat1, aadA1, dfrA1, qnr, aac (3)-IV, sul1 and ereA antibiotic resistance genes and stx1, stx2, eaeA, ehly, cnf1, cnf2, iutA, cdtB, papA, traT, sfaS and fyuA virulence factors using PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed also using disk diffusion methodology with Mueller-Hinton agar. Fifty out of 600 (8.33%) dairy samples harbored E. coli. In addition, yoghurt was the most commonly contaminated dairy. O157 (26%) and O26 (12%) were the most commonly detected serogroups. A significant difference was found between the frequency of Attaching and Effacing E. coli and Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (P resistance against tetracycline (tetA and tetB) (76% and 70%, respectively), cephalothin (blaSHV) (38%), ampicillin (CITM) (36%) and gentamicin (aac (3)-IV) (32%) were the most commonly detected. High resistance levels to tetracycline (84%), penicillin (46%), ampicillin (38%) and streptomycin (36%) were observed. Fermented dairy products can easily become contaminated by antibiotic resistant STEC strains. Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in Iran. Clinicians should

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of antimicrobial resistance in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strains from ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alberto; Horcajo, Pilar; Jurado, Sonia; De la Fuente, Ricardo; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, José A; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Orden, José A

    2011-01-01

    Two hundred and twenty-six attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains (20 enterohemorrhagic E. coli and 206 atypical enteropathogenic E. coli) isolated from calves, lambs, and goat kids with diarrhea and from healthy cattle, sheep, and goats were tested for their resistance to 10 antimicrobial agents by the disc diffusion method. Resistant and intermediate strains were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of the major resistance genes. The overall percentage of resistant strains to tetracycline, streptomycin, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole was very high (>65%). Moreover, a high level of resistance (approximately 30%) to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was also detected. The AEEC strains were very susceptible (>90%) to gentamicin and colistin. Because AEEC from ruminants can cause diseases in human beings, the high frequency of antimicrobial resistance detected in the current study is a source of concern. For each antimicrobial agent, the predominant resistance genes in the resistant strains were ampicillin, bla(TEM) (97.1%); tetracycline, tetA (76.7%); gentamicin, aac(3)II (80%); streptomycin, strA/strB (76.7%) and aadA (71.7%); chloramphenicol, catI (85.1%); trimethoprim, dhfrI (76.3%); and sulfamethoxazole, sul1 (60%) and sul2 (63.3%). In the majority of cases, resistance to a given antimicrobial, except for streptomycin, was caused by a single gene. A negative association between tetA and tetB, between aac(3)II and aac(3)IV, and between dhfrI and dhfrV was observed. The present study gives baseline data on frequency and molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in AEEC strains from ruminants.

  17. Potential enterovirulence and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from aquatic environments in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Raquel Costa de Luca; Regua-Mangia, Adriana Hamond

    2014-08-15

    Escherichia coli contamination in aquatic ecosystems has emerged as a relevant concern of public health impact, especially in developing areas. In this study, E. coli isolates were recovered from residential, industrial, agricultural, hospital wastewaters and recreational waters and, further characterized according to diarrheagenic potential, phylotyping and antimicrobial resistance phenotype. Among the total 178 E. coli isolates, antimicrobial resistance was detected in 37% to at least one of the 11 antimicrobials tested. The highest percentage of resistant E. coli was recovered from agricultural wastewaters (57.7%) followed by recreational waters (56.4%), hospital (34.5%), residential (22.7%) and industrial wastewaters (22.2%). Twenty-three resistance profiles (I-XXIII) were detected and 17 isolates exhibited the MDR phenotype. 11.2% of the total E. coli isolates carried diarrheagenic markers: astA (7.3%, 13/178), stx1 (2.8%, 05/178), escV (2.2%, 04/178) and estIa (0.6%, 01/178). All isolates harbored the uidA gene. E. coli isolates were mostly found in phylogenetic groups A (91.6%, 163/178) followed by groups D (5%, 09/178) and B2 (3.4%, 06/178). Specific gene combinations characterized E. coli pathotypes as ETEC (01/20), ATEC (04/20) and STEC (05/20) which belonged to A (75%, 15/20), D (15%, 03/20) and B2 (10%, 02/20) phylogroups. Our results revealed the widespread distribution of E. coli in aquatic systems in Rio de Janeiro. The circulation of pathogenic E. coli and antimicrobial resistance within bacterial population represents high risk to ecosystem and human health and highlights epidemiological surveillance and sanitary improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Regional, Seasonal, and Temporal Variations in the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Pigs at Slaughter in Denmark (1997-2005)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abatih, E. N.; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and discuss regional, seasonal, and temporal trends in the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from pigs at slaughter in Denmark between 1997 and 2005. Data on antimicrobial-resistant E. coli were obtained from the Danish Integrated...... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme database. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to detect the presence and evaluate the significance of regional, seasonal, and annual trends in the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli for four drugs. Associations between resistance...... of resistant E. coli as compared to the other seasons of the year. Our study provides evidence of statistically significant regional, seasonal, and temporal variations for ampicillin- and streptomycin-resistant E. coli isolated from pigs at slaughter in Denmark between 1997 and 2005....

  19. Prevalence and genetic relatedness of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from animals, foods and humans in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, T R; Haraldsson, G; Fridriksdottir, V; Kristinsson, K G; Gunnarsson, E

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of resistant bacteria in food products in Iceland is unknown, and little is known of the prevalence in production animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic relatedness of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli from healthy pigs and broiler chicken, pork, broiler meat, slaughterhouse personnel and outpatients in Iceland. A total of 419 E. coli isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using a microbroth dilution method (VetMIC), and resistant strains were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All samples were screened for enrofloxacin-resistant strains with selective agar plates. The resistance rates among E. coli isolates were moderate to high from caecal and meat samples of pigs (54.1% and 28%), broilers (33.6% and 52%) and slaughterhouse personnel (39.1%), whereas isolates from outpatients showed moderate resistance rates (23.1%). Of notice was resistance to quinolones (minimum inhibitory concentrations: nalidixic acid > or = 32, ciprofloxacin > or = 0.12 and enrofloxacin > or = 0.5), particularly among broiler and broiler meat isolates (18.2% and 36%), as there is no known antimicrobial selection pressure in the broiler production in Iceland. The majority (78.6%) of the resistant E. coli isolates was genotypically different, based on PFGE fingerprint analyses and clustering was limited. However, the same resistance pattern and pulsotype were found among isolates from broiler meat and a slaughterhouse worker, indicating spread of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli from animals to humans. Diverse resistance patterns and pulsotypes suggest the presence of a large population of resistant E. coli in production animals in Iceland. This study gives baseline information on the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli from production animals, and their food products in Iceland and the moderate to high resistance rates emphasize the need for continuing surveillance. Further studies on the

  20. Genetic Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli and Cryptic Clades in Birds with Diverse Human Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Michaela D J; Pi, Hongfei; Vangchhia, Belinda; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J; Johnson, James R; Gordon, David M

    2015-08-01

    The manner and extent to which birds associate with humans may influence the genetic attributes and antimicrobial resistance of their commensal Escherichia communities through strain transmission and altered selection pressures. In this study, we determined whether the distribution of the different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups and cryptic clades, the occurrence of 49 virulence associated genes, and/or the prevalence of resistance to 12 antimicrobials differed between four groups of birds from Australia with contrasting types of human association. We found that birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas had similar Escherichia communities. The Escherichia communities of backyard domestic poultry were phylogenetically distinct from the Escherichia communities sourced from all other birds, with a large proportion (46%) of poultry strains belonging to phylogenetic group A and a significant minority (17%) belonging to the cryptic clades. Wild birds sampled from veterinary and wildlife rehabilitation centers (in-care birds) carried Escherichia isolates that possessed particular virulence-associated genes more often than Escherichia isolates from birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas. The Escherichia isolates from both the backyard poultry and in-care birds were more likely to be multidrug resistant than the Escherichia isolates from wild birds. We also detected a multidrug-resistant E. coli strain circulating in a wildlife rehabilitation center, reinforcing the importance of adequate hygiene practices when handling and caring for wildlife. We suggest that the relatively high frequency of antimicrobial resistance in the in-care birds and backyard poultry is due primarily to the use of antimicrobials in these animals, and we recommend that the treatment protocols used for these birds be reviewed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance genes in marine bacteria and human uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a region of intensive aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Rioseco, Maria Luisa; Kalsi, Rajinder K; Godfrey, Henry P; Cabello, Felipe C

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobials are heavily used in Chilean salmon aquaculture. We previously found significant differences in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria between sediments from an aquaculture and a non-aquaculture site. We now show that levels of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARG) are significantly higher in antimicrobial-selected marine bacteria than in unselected bacteria from these sites. While ARG in tetracycline- and florfenicol-selected bacteria from aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites were equally frequent, there were significantly more plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes per bacterium and significantly higher numbers of qnrB genes in quinolone-selected bacteria from the aquaculture site. Quinolone-resistant urinary Escherichia coli from patients in the Chilean aquacultural region were significantly enriched for qnrB (including a novel qnrB gene), qnrS, qnrA and aac(6')-1b, compared with isolates from New York City. Sequences of qnrA1, qnrB1 and qnrS1 in quinolone-resistant Chilean E. coli and Chilean marine bacteria were identical, suggesting horizontal gene transfer between antimicrobial-resistant marine bacteria and human pathogens. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Antimicrobial Resistance Characteristics and Phylogenetic Groups of Escherichia coli Isolated From Diarrheic Calves in Southeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedeh Naderi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance is one of the main challenges in diarrheal diseases in human and animals. Regardless to the main reason of the disease, approximately all antimicrobial actions including treatment, control and prevention are mostly centralized against Escherichia coli (E. coli strains. Objectives: This work purposed to antimicrobial resistance (AR and determinate virulence genes and phylogenetic groups in E. coli isolates (n=170 obtained from calves with diarrhea. Materials and methods: Isolates were molecular characterized for 17 AR genes and 3 phylogenetic sequences. AR phenotyping were performed on all strains for 12 antimicrobial agents by using disc diffusion method. Results: All AR genes but qnrS were identified with different prevalence in E. coli isolates that the most common genes were aadA (20%, blaTEM (11.7% and sulII (11.2 % belonging to aminoglycoside, β-lactamase and sulphonamide families, respectively. Resistance to the penicillin and sulphamethoxazole drugs was found in 100% of isolates and followed by tetracycline (73.5%, streptomycin (60%, trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole (56.5% and kanamycin (53.5%. The phylogenetic groups A and B1 considerably surrounded the majority of isolates with the frequency of 65.8% and 30.6%, respectively. Conclusions: In Iran, diarrheic calves have an important role as reservoir of resistant E. coli strains against the some drugs which are registered for treatment of calf diarrhea.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance trends among Escherichia coli isolates obtained from dairy cattle in the northeastern United States, 2004-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Aprea, Victor A; Altier, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends among bacteria isolated from food animals and people is necessary to inform risk analyses and guide public policy regarding antimicrobial use. Our objectives were to describe the antimicrobial resistance status of Escherichia coli isolates from dairy cattle in the northeastern United States and to identify trends in resistance to selected antimicrobial agents over time. We collected data retrospectively for all bovine E. coli isolates that were obtained from samples submitted to Cornell University's Animal Health Diagnostic Center between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2011. We investigated temporal trends in the prevalence of resistant E. coli for each antimicrobial agent using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 3373 bovine E. coli isolates from clinical samples submitted during the study period. Overall resistance to each antimicrobial agent ranged from 2.7% (enrofloxacin) to 91.3% (oxytetracycline). There was evidence of a significantly decreasing trend in prevalence of resistance to several agents: chlortetracycline, florfenicol, neomycin, oxytetracycline, spectinomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. However, a significantly increasing trend in prevalence of resistance to enrofloxacin was also evident. These results do not support the idea that current antimicrobial use practices on dairy operations are driving a general increase in the emergence and dissemination of drug-resistant E. coli in the region served by the laboratory. However, resistance to some drugs remained consistently high during the study period, and increasing resistance to enrofloxacin is a key area of concern.

  4. Associations between anti-microbial resistance phenotypes, anti-microbial resistance genotypes and virulence genes of Escherichia coli isolates from Pakistan and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, M; Wang, L P; Wang, S; Hussain, S; Memon, J; Kashif, J; Lu, C-P

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between phenotypic resistance, genotypic resistance and virulence genes of Escherichia coli isolates in Jiangsu province, China and Punjab province Pakistan. A total of 62 E. coli isolates were characterized for phenotypic resistance, genotypic resistance and virulence factor genes. The anti-microbial resistance phenotype and genotypes in relation to virulence factor genes were assessed by statistical analysis. Of 20 tested virulence genes, twelve were found and eight were not found in any isolates. sitA and TspE4C2 were the most prevalent virulence genes. Of the 13 anti-microbial agents tested, resistance to ampicillin, sulphonamide and tetracycline was the most frequent. All isolates were multiresistant, and 74% were resistant to trimethoprim and sulphamethaxazole. Phenotypically, tetracycline-, cefotaxime- and trimethoprim-resistant isolates had increased virulence factors as compared with susceptible isolates. Genotypically, resistant genes Tem, ctx-M, Tet, Sul 1, dhfr1, Cat2 and flo-R showed the association with the virulence genes. Almost all classes of anti-microbial-resistant genes have a high association with virulence. Resistant isolates have more virulent genes than the susceptible isolates. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes and PFGE-profiling of Escherichia coli isolates from South Korean cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Won; Byun, Jae-Won; Jung, Myounghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of Escherichia coli with potential pathogenicity in cattle farm in South Korea, a total of 290 E. coli isolates were isolated from cattle farms over a period of 2 years in South Korea. These were examined for phenotypic and genotypic characteristics including antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype, and gene profiles of virulence and antimicrobial resistance. The most dominant virulence gene was f17 (26.2%), followed by stx2 (15.9%), ehxA (11.0%), stx1 (8.3%), eae (5.2%), and sta (4.1%). Some shiga-toxin producing E. coli isolates possessed eae (15.9%). All isolates except for one showed resistance to one or more antimicrobials, with 152 isolates exhibiting multidrug-resistance. The most prevalent resistance phenotype detected was streptomycin (63.1%), followed by tetracycline (54.5%), neomycin (40.3%), cephalothin (32.8%), amoxicillin (30.0%), ampicillin (29.7%), and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (16.6%). The associated resistance determinants detected were strA-strB (39.0%), tet(E) (80.0%), tet(A) (27.6%), aac(3)-IV (33.1%), aphA1 (21.4%), bla TEM (23.8%), and sul2 (22.1%). When investigated by O serotyping and PFGE molecular subtyping, the high degree of diversity was exhibited in E. coli isolates. These results suggest that E. coli isolates from South Korean cattle farms are significantly diverse in terms of virulence and antimicrobial resistance. In conclusion, the gastroinstestinal flora of cattle could be a significant reservoir of diverse virulence and antimicrobial resistance determinants, which is potentially hazardous to public health.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Swine and Wild Small Mammals in the Proximity of Swine Farms and in Natural Environments in Ontario, Canada▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak, Gosia K.; Boerlin, Patrick; Janecko, Nicol; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Jardine, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Wild animals not normally exposed to antimicrobial agents can acquire antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria through contact with humans and domestic animals and through the environment. In this study we assessed the frequency of antimicrobial resistance in generic Escherichia coli isolates from wild small mammals (mice, voles, and shrews) and the effect of their habitat (farm or natural area) on antimicrobial resistance. Additionally, we compared the types and frequency of antimicrobial resi...

  7. Extraintestinal Pathogenic and Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli Contamination of 56 Public Restrooms in the Greater Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Muhanad; Owens, Kris; Gajewski, Abby; Clabots, Connie; Johnston, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    How extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) and antimicrobial-resistant E. coli disseminate through the population is undefined. We studied public restrooms for contamination with E. coli and ExPEC in relation to source and extensively characterized the E. coli isolates. For this, we cultured 1,120 environmental samples from 56 public restrooms in 33 establishments (obtained from 10 cities in the greater Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN, metropolitan area in 2003) for E. coli and compared...

  8. The changing pattern of antimicrobial resistance within 42,033 Escherichia coli isolates from nosocomial, community and urology patient-specific urinary tract infections, Dublin, 1999-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Ivor M

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the changing pattern of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection over an eleven year period, and to determine whether E. coli antibiotic resistance rates vary depending on whether the UTI represents a nosocomial, community acquired or urology patient specific infection.

  9. Probable secondary transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli between people living with and without pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeon Soo; Park, Young Kyung; Park, Yong Ho; Park, Kun Taek

    2017-03-18

    Companion animals are considered as one of the reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant (AR) bacteria that can be cross-transmitted to humans. However, limited information is available on the possibility of AR bacteria originating from companion animals being transmitted secondarily from owners to non-owners sharing the same space. To address this issue, the present study investigated clonal relatedness among AR E. coli isolated from dog owners and non-owners in the same college classroom or household. Anal samples (n=48) were obtained from 14 owners and 34 non-owners; 31 E. coli isolates were collected (nine from owners and 22 from non-owners). Of 31 E. coli, 20 isolates (64.5%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and 16 isolates (51.6%) were determined as multi-drug resistant E. coli. Six isolates (19.4%) harbored integrase genes (five harbored class I integrase gene and one harbored class 2 integrase gene, respectively). Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic analysis identified three different E. coli clonal sets among isolates, indicating that cross-transmission of AR E. coli can easily occur between owners and non-owners. The findings emphasize a potential risk of spread of AR bacteria originating from pets within human communities, once they are transferred to humans. Further studies are needed to evaluate the exact risk and identify the risk factors of secondarily transmission by investigating larger numbers of isolates from pets, their owners and non-owners in a community.

  10. Virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli strains isolated from hen egg shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande Burgos, María José; Fernández Márquez, Maria Luisa; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-12-05

    Eggs may contain extraintestinal pathogenic (ExPEC) and diarrheogenic (DEC) Escherichia coli which in addition may carry antibiotic resistance. The wide use of biocides and disinfectants in the food industry may induce biocide tolerance in bacteria. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biocide tolerance and antibiotic resistance in E. coli from hen egg shells. A total of 27 isolates obtained from a screening of 180 eggs were studied. Seven isolates carried both eae and bfpA genes of typical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains, while 14 isolates only carried eae associated with atypical EPEC strains. Shiga toxin genes stx and stx2 were detected in four isolates. Heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxin genes as well as aggR were also detected. Several isolates had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) that were higher than the wild-type for the biocide hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HDP, 18.52%) or the commercial disinfectant P3 oxonia (OX, 14.81%). Antibiotic resistance was detected for ampicillin (37.03%), streptomycin (37.03%), tetracycline (37.03%), chloramphenicol (11.11%), nalidixic acid (18.51%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (14.81%). Eight isolates (29.63%) were biocide tolerant and antibiotic resistant. Efflux pump genes detected included acrB (96.29%), mdfA (85.18%) and oxqA (37.03%), in addition to quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) resistance genes qacA/B (11.11%) and qacE (7.40%). Antibiotic resistance genes detected included bla CTX-M-2 (22.22%), bla TEM (3.70%), bla PSE (3.70%), tet(A) (29.63%), tet(B) (29.63%), tet(C) (7.40%), tet(E) (11.11%), aac(6')-Ib (3.70%), sul1 (14.81%), dfrA12 (3.70%) and dfrA15 (3.70%). Most isolates (96.30%) carried more than one genetic determinant of resistance. The most frequent combinations were efflux pump components acrB and mdfA with tetracycline resistance genes (33.33% of isolates). Isolates carrying QAC resistance genes also carried between 4 and 8 of the additional antimicrobial resistance genes

  11. Molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of healthy dogs after enrofloxacin or amoxicillin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Sherine A; Debavalya, Nipattra; Suh, Sang-Jin; Oryazabal, Omar A; Boothe, Dawn M

    2012-11-01

    Escherichia coli respond to selective pressure of antimicrobial therapy by developing resistance through a variety of mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to characterize the genetic mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in fecal E. coli after the routine use of 2 popular antimicrobials. Fourteen resistant E. coli isolates, representing predominant clones that emerged in healthy dogs' feces after treatment with either amoxicillin (11 E. coli isolates) or enrofloxacin (3 E. coli isolates), were tested for mutations in DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and in topoisomerase IV (parC) and for the presence of β-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(PSE-1) and bla(CTX-M)) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib, and qepA), by polymerase chain reaction. Escherichia coli isolates cultured following amoxicillin therapy only expressed single-drug resistance to β-lactams, while the isolates cultured from dogs receiving enrofloxacin therapy expressed multidrug resistance (MDR). The use of RND efflux pump inhibitors increased the susceptibility of the 3 MDR E. coli isolates to doxycycline, chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin, which indicates a role of the efflux pump in the acquisition of the MDR phenotype. Amplification and sequencing of AcrAB efflux pump regulators (soxR, soxS, marR, and acrR) revealed only the presence of a single mutation in soxS in the 3 MDR isolates.

  12. Identification and molecular characterization of antimicrobial-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from retail meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Fang; Li, Fan

    2011-04-01

    Ten (2.7%) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) were isolated from 370 samples of raw minced beef, mutton, pork, and chicken from the Jilin region of China; and additional 10 E. coli O157:H7 isolates were previously isolated from different Jilin regions. Seventeen of the isolates were multiresistant, exhibiting resistance to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, gentamycin, and streptomycin. Class 1 integrons were detected in nine (45.0%) of the STEC isolates and consisted of serogroups O157, O62, O113, O149, and O70. Integrons containing amplicons of a 0.5-1.5 or 1.0 kb gene cassette were found in seven (77.8%) of the integron-containing isolates. Sequencing analysis revealed that these gene cassettes encode genes conferring resistance to trimethoprim (dfrA1) and streptomycin (aadA1). The 0.5 kb cassette described here was found to encode a putative transporter peptide in the STEC. Seventeen isolates contained plasmids with different bands, and transfer by conjugation between strains of E. coli demonstrated that class 1 integrons located on mobile plasmids could contribute to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance to ampicillin, gentamycin, streptomycin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim amongst STEC. These data revealed the high prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant STEC isolates in Jilin's surrounding regions, providing important and useful surveillance information reflecting antimicrobial selection pressure. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  13. Carriage of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli in dogs: Prevalence, associated risk factors and molecular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedley, Amy L; Dawson, Susan; Maddox, Thomas W; Coyne, Karen P; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Clegg, Peter; Nuttall, Tim; Kirchner, Miranda; Williams, Nicola J

    2017-02-01

    Resistance to antimicrobials, in particular that mediated by extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and AmpC β-lactamases are frequently reported in bacteria causing canine disease as well as in commensal bacteria, which could be a potential health risk for humans they come into contact with. This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence and investigate the molecular characteristics of ESBL and plasmid encoded AmpC (pAmpC)-producing E. coli in the mainland UK vet-visiting canine population and, using responses from detailed questionnaires identify factors associated with their carriage. Faecal samples were cultured for antimicrobial resistant (AMR), ESBL and pAmpC-producing E. coli. A subset of ESBL and pAmpC-producing isolates were subjected to multi-locus sequence typing and DNA microarray analyses. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to construct models to identify risk factors associated with multidrug resistant (MDR, resistance to three or more antimicrobial classes), fluoroquinolone resistant, ESBL and AmpC-producing E. coli. AMR E.coli were isolated from 44.8% (n=260) of samples, with 1.9% and 7.1% of samples carrying ESBL and pAmpC-producing E. coli, respectively. MDR E. coli were identified in 18.3% of samples. Recent use of antimicrobials and being fed raw poultry were both identified as risk factors in the outcomes investigated. A number of virulence and resistance genes were identified, including genes associated with extra-intestinal and enteropathogenic E. coli genotypes. Considering the close contact that people have with dogs, the high levels of AMR E. coli in canine faeces may be a potential reservoir of AMR bacteria or resistance determinants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Isolation, genotyping, and antimicrobial resistance of zoonotic shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli

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    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an enteric pathogen linked to outbreaks of human gastroenteritis with diverse clinical spectra. Traditional culture and isolation methods, including selective enrichment and differential plating, have enabled the effective recovery of STEC. Ruminants ...

  15. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves is associated with antimicrobial drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A.B.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Stegeman, J.A.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Mevius, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between farm management factors, including antimicrobial drug usage, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the faeces of white veal calves. Ninety E. coli isolates from one pooled sample per farm (n = 48) were tested for

  16. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves is associated with antimicrobial drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A B; Wagenaar, J. A.; Stegeman, J A; Vernooij, J C M; Mevius, D J

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between farm management factors, including antimicrobial drug usage, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the faeces of white veal calves. Ninety E. coli isolates from one pooled sample per farm (n = 48) were tested for

  17. Detection of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance patterns in shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates from sheep

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    Marcos R.A. Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In order to detect virulence factors in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC isolates and investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile, rectal swabs were collected from healthy sheep of the races Santa Inês and Dorper. Of the 115 E. coli isolates obtained, 78.3% (90/115 were characterized as STEC, of which 52.2% (47/90 carried stx1 gene, 33.3% (30/90 stx2 and 14.5% (13/90 both genes. In search of virulence factors, 47.7% and 32.2% of the isolates carried the genes saa and cnf1. According to the analysis of the antimicrobial resistance profile, 83.3% (75/90 were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. In phylogenetic classification grouped 24.4% (22/90 in group D (pathogenic, 32.2% (29/90 in group B1 (commensal and 43.3% (39/90 in group A (commensal. The presence of several virulence factors as well as the high number of multiresistant isolates found in this study support the statement that sheep are potential carriers of pathogens threatening public health.

  18. Risk of Transmission of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli from Commercial Broiler and Free-Range Retail Chicken in India

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    Arif Hussain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli infections are a growing public health concern. This study analyzed the possibility of contamination of commercial poultry meat (broiler and free-range with pathogenic and or multi-resistant E. coli in retail chain poultry meat markets in India. We analyzed 168 E. coli isolates from broiler and free-range retail poultry (meat/ceca sampled over a wide geographical area, for their antimicrobial sensitivity, phylogenetic groupings, virulence determinants, extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL genotypes, fingerprinting by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC PCR and genetic relatedness to human pathogenic E. coli using whole genome sequencing (WGS. The prevalence rates of ESBL producing E. coli among broiler chicken were: meat 46%; ceca 40%. Whereas, those for free range chicken were: meat 15%; ceca 30%. E. coli from broiler and free-range chicken exhibited varied prevalence rates for multi-drug resistance (meat 68%; ceca 64% and meat 8%; ceca 26%, respectively and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC contamination (5 and 0%, respectively. WGS analysis confirmed two globally emergent human pathogenic lineages of E. coli, namely the ST131 (H30-Rx subclone and ST117 among our poultry E. coli isolates. These results suggest that commercial poultry meat is not only an indirect public health risk by being a possible carrier of non-pathogenic multi-drug resistant (MDR-E. coli, but could as well be the carrier of human E. coli pathotypes. Further, the free-range chicken appears to carry low risk of contamination with antimicrobial resistant and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC. Overall, these observations reinforce the understanding that poultry meat in the retail chain could possibly be contaminated by MDR and/or pathogenic E. coli.

  19. A high prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli isolated from pigs and a low prevalence of antimicrobial resistant E. coli from cattle and sheep in Great Britain at slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enne, Virve I; Cassar, Claire; Sprigings, Katherine; Woodward, Martin J; Bennett, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial resistance and expressed and unexpressed resistance genes among commensal Escherichia coli isolated from healthy farm animals at slaughter in Great Britain was investigated. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among the isolates varied according to the animal species; of 836 isolates from cattle tested only 5.7% were resistant to one or more antimicrobials, while only 3.0% of 836 isolates from sheep were resistant to one or more agents. However, 92.1% of 2480 isolates from pigs were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. Among isolates from pigs, resistance to some antimicrobials such as tetracycline (78.7%), sulphonamide (66.9%) and streptomycin (37.5%) was found to be common, but relatively rare to other agents such as amikacin (0.1%), ceftazidime (0.1%) and coamoxiclav (0.2%). The isolates had a diverse range of resistance gene profiles, with tet(B), sul2 and strAB identified most frequently. Seven out of 615 isolates investigated carried unexpressed resistance genes. One trimethoprim-susceptible isolate carried a complete dfrA17 gene but lacked a promoter for it. However, in the remaining six streptomycin-susceptible isolates, one of which carried strAB while the others carried aadA, no mutations or deletions in gene or promoter sequences were identified to account for susceptibility. The data indicate that antimicrobial resistance in E. coli of animal origin is due to a broad range of acquired genes.

  20. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus : bad news and good news from the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net, formerly EARSS), 2002 to 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagliotti, C.; Balode, A.; Baquero, F.; Degener, J.; Grundmann, H.; Gur, D.; Jarlier, V.; Kahlmeter, G.; Monen, J.; Monnet, D. L.; Rossolini, G. M.; Suetens, C.; Weist, K.; Heuer, O.

    2011-01-01

    Based on data collected by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net) and the former EARSS, the present study describes the trends in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and occurrence of invasive infections caused by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in the

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic profiling of antimicrobial resistance in enteric Escherichia coli communities isolated from finisher pigs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M G; Jordan, D; Gibson, J S; Cobbold, R N; Chapman, T A; Abraham, S; Trott, D J

    2016-10-01

    To assess herd-to-herd variation in antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and associated antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in faecal commensal Escherichia coli communities isolated from Australian slaughter-age pigs. Hydrophobic grid-membrane filtration (HGMF) was used to screen populations of E. coli isolated from faecal samples obtained from pigs prior to or at slaughter. Multiplex PCRs were applied to the pooled DNA extracted from the samples to identify specific ARGs. Pooled faecal samples from 30 finishers, from 72 different Australian pig farms, produced 5003 isolates for screening. HGMF techniques and image analysis were used to confirm E. coli resistance phenotypes to four antimicrobial agents (ampicillin, gentamicin, florfenicol and ceftiofur) using selective agars. Multiplex PCRs were performed on DNA from pooled samples for 35 ARGs associated with seven chemical classes. The prevalence of E. coli isolates showing no resistance to any of the drugs was 50.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) 41.8-58.6%). Ceftiofur resistance was very low (1.8%; CI 0.8-3.9%) and no ARGs associated with 3rd-generation cephalosporin resistance were detected. By contrast, ampicillin (29.4%, CI 22.8-37.0%), florfenicol (24.3%, CI 17.8-32.3%) and gentamicin (CI 17.5%, 10.7-27.2%) resistance prevalence varied greatly between farms and associated ARGs were common. The most common combined resistance phenotype was ampicillin-florfenicol. The use of registered antimicrobials in Australian pigs leads to the enteric commensal populations acquiring associated ARGs. However, despite a high intensity of sampling, ARGs imparting resistance to the critically important 3rd-generation cephalosporins were not detected. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  2. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Raw Milk and Raw Milk Cheese in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombarak, Rabee A; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Elbagory, Abdel-Rahman M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine antimicrobial resistance and characterize the implicated genes in 222 isolates of Escherichia coli from 187 samples of raw milk and the two most popular cheeses in Egypt. E. coli isolates were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials by a disk diffusion method. Among the 222 E. coli isolates, 66 (29.7%) were resistant to one or more antimicrobials, and half of these resistant isolates showed a multidrug resistance phenotype (resistance to at least three different drug classes). The resistance traits were observed to tetracycline (27.5%), ampicillin (18.9%), streptomycin (18.5%), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (11.3%), cefotaxime (4.5%), kanamycin (4.1%), ceftazidime (3.6%), chloramphenicol (2.3%), nalidixic acid (1.8%), and ciprofloxacin (1.4%). No resistance to fosfomycin and imipenem was observed. Tetracycline resistance genes tetA, tetB, and tetD were detected in 53 isolates, 9 isolates, and 1 isolate, respectively, but tetC was not detected. Aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, aadA, and aphA1 were detected in 41, 41, 11, and 9 isolates, respectively. Sulfonamide resistance genes sul1, sul2, and sul3 were detected in 7, 25, and 3 isolates, respectively. Of 42 ampicillin-resistant isolates, bla TEM , bla CTX-M , and bla SHV were detected in 40, 9, and 3 isolates, respectively, and 10 (23.8%) ampicillin-resistant isolates were found to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Each bla gene of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli was further subtyped to be bla CTX-M-15 , bla CTX-M-104 , bla TEM-1 , and bla SHV-12 . The class 1 integron was also detected in 28 resistant isolates, and three different patterns were obtained by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Sequencing analysis of the variable region revealed that four isolates had dfrA12/orfF/aadA2, two had aadA22, and one had dfrA1/aadA1. These data suggest that antimicrobial-resistant E. coli are widely distributed in the milk production

  3. Distribution of virulence determinants among antimicrobial-resistant and antimicrobial-susceptible Escherichia coli implicated in urinary tract infections

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    SAM Stephenson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC rely on the correlation of virulence expression with antimicrobial resistance to persist and cause severe urinary tract infections (UTIs. Objectives: We assessed the virulence pattern and prevalence among UPEC strains susceptible and resistant to multiple antimicrobial classes. Methods: A total of 174 non-duplicate UPEC strains from patients with clinically significant UTIs were analysed for susceptibility to aminoglycoside, antifolate, cephalosporin, nitrofuran and quinolone antibiotics for the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and for the presence of six virulence determinants encoding adhesins (afimbrial, Type 1 fimbriae, P and S-fimbriae and toxins (cytotoxic necrotising factor and haemolysin. Results: Relatively high resistance rates to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, cephalothin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (82%, 78%, 62% and 59%, respectively were observed. Fourteen distinct patterns were identified for the virulence determinants such as afaBC, cnfI, fimH, hylA, papEF and sfaDE. The toxin gene, cnfI (75.3%, was the second most prevalent marker to the adhesin, fimH (97.1%. The significant association of sfaDE/hylA (P < 0.01 among antimicrobial resistant and susceptible strains was also observed notwithstanding an overall greater occurrence of virulence factors among the latter. Conclusions: This study provides a snapshot of UPEC complexity in Jamaica and highlights the significant clonal heterogeneity among strains. Such outcomes emphasise the need for evidence-based strategies in the effective management and control of UTIs.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in faecal Escherichia coli isolates from farmed red deer and wild small mammals. Detection of a multiresistant E. coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C A; González-Barrio, D; Tenorio, Carmen; Ruiz-Fons, F; Torres, C

    2016-04-01

    Eighty-nine Escherichia coli isolates recovered from faeces of red deer and small mammals, cohabiting the same area, were analyzed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing. Antimicrobial resistance was detected in 6.7% of isolates, with resistances to tetracycline and quinolones being the most common. An E. coli strain carrying blaCTX-M-1 as well as other antibiotic resistant genes included in an unusual class 1 integron (Intl1-dfrA16-blaPSE-1-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH-IS440-sul3-orf1-mef(B)Δ-IS26) was isolated from a deer. The blaCTX-M-1 gene was transferred by conjugation and transconjugants also acquired an IncN plasmid. This strain was typed as ST224, which seems to be well adapted to both clinical and environmental settings. The phylogenetic distribution of the 89 strains varied depending on the animal host. This work reveals low antimicrobial resistance levels among faecal E. coli from wild mammals, which reflects a lower selective pressure affecting these bacteria, compared to livestock. However, it is remarkable the detection of a multi-resistant ESBL-E. coli with an integron carrying clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes, which can contribute to the dissemination of resistance determinants among different ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance and Novel Point Mutation in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Mangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Kogaluru Shivakumaraswamy; Deekshit, Vijaya Kumar; Venugopal, Moleyuru Nagarajappa; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2017-12-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria is usually associated with mutations in the topoisomerase regions. We report a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains. E. coli isolated from the environment in and around Mangalore, India, were examined for their antimicrobial resistance profile to 12 antibiotics and for the antibiotic resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 67 E. coli isolated, 24 (35.8%) were sensitive to all antibiotics and 43 (64.2%) showed resistance to at least one of the 12 antibiotics used in the study. One isolate (EC10) was resistant to nine of the 12 antibiotics used. Resistance to nalidixic acid was the most common (34.32%), followed by nitrofurantoin (26.86%), tetracycline (22.38%), ampicillin (20.89%), cotrimoxazole (13.43%), ciprofloxacin (11.94%), gentamicin (10.44%), piperacillin/tazobactam (7.46%), chloramphenicol (7.46%), and cefotaxime (4.47%). Least resistance was observed for meropenem (1.49%) and none of the isolates showed resistance to imipenem. All the isolates harbored resistance genes corresponding to their antimicrobial resistance. Few quinolone-resistant isolates carried single point mutation (ser83Leu) and some had double point mutation (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn) in gyrA. A third novel point mutation was also observed at position 50 with the change in the amino acid from tyrosine to cysteine (Tyr50Cys) in gyrA region. The study throws light on a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. While the study helps to understand the risk and occurrence of antibiotic resistance among gram-negative bacteria from the environment, the alarming rate of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a cause of concern in addressing infections.

  6. [Aspects of the antimicrobial resistence profile in infections with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Cristina G; Dorobăţ, Carmen; Matei, Mioara; Teodor, Andra; Luca, V; Miftode, Egidia

    2011-01-01

    Infections in diabetic patient remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, triggering and maintaining a prolonged metabolic imbalance. Emergence of extented spectrum beta-lactmase (ESBL) in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major concern, because of the atypical manner infection acts in this group of imunodepressed patients and also for the limited therapeutic solutions. For this reason we have evaluated the profile of antimicrobial resistance of these pathogens in both diabetic and non diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a retrospective case control study, the antibiotic susceptibility pattern in isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. from different biological products in 49 diabetics and 150 non-diabetics admitted in The Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iaşi over a period of two years. Most of strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. ESBL positive were found in uroculture. Significant differences in E. coli resistance rate between diabetics and nondiabetics were noted for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin (31,4% vs.13,98%, p=0,04, respectively 52,9% vs. 24,46%, p=0,004). More isolates of ESBL positive K. pneumoniae were found in diabetic patients (50% vs. 24%). Ciprofloxacin resistance of K. pneumoniae was significantly higher in diabetics (75% vs 39%; p=0,05). There was no resistance in E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates to imipenem in the diabetic group. The high resistance rate to quinolones and 3rd generation cefalosporins limits their use for the treatment of Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae infections. Other alternatives for empiric therapy in community and nosocomial-acquired infections in diabetic patient remains carbapenems, aminoglycosides and colimycin.

  7. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Chickens in Iran

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    Reza Talebiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial agents are used extremely in order to reduce the great losses caused by Escherichia coli infections in poultry industry. In this study, 318 pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC strains isolated from commercial broiler flocks with coli-septicemia were examined for antimicrobials of both veterinary and human significance by disc diffusion method. Multiple resistances to antimicrobial agents were observed in all the isolates. Resistance to the antibiotics was as follows: Tylosin (88.68%, Erythromycin (71.70%, Oxytetracycline (43.40%, Sulfadimethoxine-Trimethoprim (39.62%, Enrofloxacin (37.74%, Florfenicol (35.85%, Chlortetracycline (33.96%, Doxycycline (16.98%, Difloxacin (32.08%, Danofloxacin (28.30%, Chloramphenicol (20.75%, Ciprofloxacin (7.55%, and Gentamicin (5.66%. This study showed resistance against the antimicrobial agents that are commonly applied in poultry, although resistance against the antibiotics that are only applied in humans or less frequently used in poultry was significantly low. This study emphasizes on the occurrence of multiple drug resistant E. coli among diseased broiler chickens in Iran. The data revealed the relative risks of using antimicrobials in poultry industry. It also concluded that use of antibiotics must be limited in poultry farms in order to reduce the antibiotic resistances.

  8. Risk factors for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella spp and Escherichia coli in pet dogs from volunteer households in Ontario, Canada, in 2005 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Erin K; Pearl, David L; Janecko, Nicol; Finley, Rita L; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Weese, J Scott; Peregrine, Andrew S

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine pet-related management factors associated with the carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella spp and Escherichia coli in a population of pet dogs. SAMPLE 138 dogs from 84 households in Ontario, Canada. PROCEDURES From October 2005 through May 2006, dogs and households in Ontario, Canada, were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Fecal samples were submitted for culture of Salmonella spp and E coli, which provided 515 bacterial isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Multilevel logistic regression models with random effects for household and dog were created to identify pet-related management factors associated with antimicrobial resistance. RESULTS Bacterial species, feeding a homemade diet or adding homemade food to the diet, feeding a raw diet or adding anything raw to the diet, feeding a homemade raw food diet, and feeding raw chicken in the past week were significant risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in this population of dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, several potentially important pet-related risk factors for the carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella spp and E coli in pet dogs were identified. Further evaluation of risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in dogs may lead to development of evidence-based guidelines for safe and responsible dog ownership and management to protect the public, especially pet owners who are immunocompromised.

  9. Association of virulence factors, phylogenetic groups and antimicrobial resistance markers in Escherichia coli from Badin city, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Nahid, Fouzia; Zahra, Rabaab

    2017-02-01

    Escherichia coli, the most frequent cause of UTIs has extensive genetic substructure and can be assigned to eight phylogroups, A, B1, B2, C, D, E, F and Escherichia cryptic clade I. We investigated the distribution of virulence determinants and antimicrobial resistance genes in relation to phylogenetic groups. A total of 77 E. coli isolates were collected from Civil Hospital Badin, Pakistan. Isolates were assigned phylogroups using quadruplex PCR method, while virulence and antibiotic resistance genes, bla CTX-M and bla NDM-1 were also detected using PCR. Thirty-four isolates were assigned to group B2, while 23, 2, 1, 7 and 10 isolates were assigned to F, B1, A/C, clade I/II and negative, respectively. Among virulence genes, prevalence of papC (83%) was highest followed by aer (57%), papGII (16%), papGIII (14%), cnf (9%), hly (5%) and sfa (6%). Of these isolates, 23% and 9% were positive for bla CTX-M and bla NDM-1 , respectively.

  10. Characterization of the variable region in the class 1 integron of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water

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    Natália Canal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fecal bacteria are considered to be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes in the aquatic environment and could horizontally transfer these genes to autochthonous bacteria when carried on transferable and/or mobile genetic elements. Such circulation of resistance genes constitutes a latent public health hazard. The aim of this study was to characterize the variable region of the class 1 integron and relate its genetic content to resistance patterns observed in antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from the surface waters of Patos Lagoon, Southern Brazil. Genetic diversity of the isolates and presence of the qacEΔ1 gene, which confers resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds, were also investigated. A total of 27 isolates were analyzed. The variable region harbored dfrA17, dfrA1 and dfrA12 genes, which confer resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA1, aadA5 and aadA22 genes that encode resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin. Most of the isolates were considered resistant to quaternary ammonium compounds and all of them carried the qacE Δ1 gene at the 3′ conserved segment of the integron. ERIC-PCR analyses of E. coli isolates that presented the integrons showed great genetic diversity, indicating diverse sources of contamination in this environment. These results suggest that fecal bacteria with class 1 integrons in aquatic environments are potentially important reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance genes and may transfer these elements to other bacteria that are capable of infecting humans.

  11. Impact of UV and Peracetic Acid Disinfection on the Prevalence of Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Wastewater Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm2 and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters. PMID:24727265

  12. Detection of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Related Genes in E. coli Strains Belonging to B2 Phylogroup Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Combination with Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes

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    Hamid Staji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:  This study was conducted to detect the prevalence of EHEC virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance profile of Escherichia coli strains belonging to B2 phylogroup implicated in Urinary tract infections in Semnan, Iran.Methods:   From 240 urine samples 160 E. coli strains were isolated, biochemically. Then, E. coli isolates were examined by Multiplex-PCR for phylogenetic typing and detection of virulence genes (hly, stx1, stx2, eae associated with Enterohemorrhagic E. coli. Finally, Antimicrobial resistance of E. coli isolates were characterized using Disk Diffusion method.  Results:  From 160 E. coli isolates, 75 strains (47% were assigned to B2 phylogenetic group and prevalence of virulence genes were as follow: hly (21.3%, stx1 (16%, stx2 (10.6% and eae (6.7%, subsequently.  Phenotypic antimicrobial resistance of B2 isolates showed that all isolates were sensitive to Meropenem and Furazolidone and then highest frequency of resistance was observed to Streptomycin, Oxytetracycline, Neomycin, Nalidixic acid and Ampicillin (98.7% to 49.3%. Also low resistance prevalence was observed in case of Ceftizoxime, Lincospectin, Imipenem, Chloramphenicol and flurefenicole (16% to 1.3%.Conclusion:   The data suggest a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance in UPEC strains belonging to B2 phylogroup even for the antimicrobials using in pet and farm animals and their potential to cause EHEC specific clinical symptoms which may represent a serious health risk since these strains can be transmitted to GI tract and act as a reservoir for other uropathogenic E. coli and commensal strains.

  13. Frequency of antimicrobial resistance and integron gene cassettes in Escherichia coli isolated from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wencheng; Li, Caiwu; Yang, Xin; Wang, Yongxiang; Cheng, Guangyang; Zeng, Jinxin; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Chen, Yanpeng; Cai, Run; Huang, Qianru; Feng, Lan; Wang, Hongning; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Guiquan; Chen, Yanxi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Heming

    2018-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is considered as a common opportunistic pathogen, which causes seriously intestinal infections to giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and other animals. The aim of this investigation was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance and integron gene cassettes in E. coli isolated from the faeces of giant pandas in China. A total of 89 E. coli were isolated, after diagnosis of isolates and genomes were extracted. All the isolates were screened for the presence of related drug-resistance genes and integron gene cassettes through the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and sequencing. In addition, antimicrobial resistance testing was performed according to the standard disk diffusion method (CLSI 2013). The results demonstrated that all the isolates were multi-drug resistance (MDR). High resistance proportions of the E. coli isolates were to streptomycin (93%), cefazolin (90%), amikacin (75%), tetracycline (65%), ampicillin (62%), cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (54%, each). With respect to the various resistance genes; bla CTX-M , sul1, ant (3')-Ia, tetA, qnrB, tetE, floR, aac (6')-Ib, sul2, rmtA, cmlA, rmtB and tetC were identified with the respective frequencies of 44%, 45%, 38%, 37%, 35%, 27%, 26%, 20%, 18%, 15%, 10%, 7% and 4%. None of the isolates was positive for qnrA and cfr genes. Moreover, a further investigation of integron revealed that the emergence of class 1 and 2 integrons were in 47% and 8% isolates, respectively. While class 3 integron was not screened. Six types of containing in class 1 integron specific gene cassettes (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, dfrA17-aadA5, aadA1, aadA5, dfrA1 and dfrA7) were identified. However, only one gene cassette (dfrA1-sat2-aadA1) was detected in class 2 integron. These finding emphasize that a high level of E. coli isolates harbored antibiotics resistance and integron gene cassettes, which may bring so many potential threats to the health of giant pandas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli in the beef jerky production line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fernanda Pereira; Voloski, Flávia Liége Schütz; Ramires, Tassiana; Haubert, Louise; Reta, Giulia Giugliani; Mondadori, Rafael Gianella; Silva, Wladimir Padilha da; Conceição, Rita de Cássia Dos Santos da; Duval, Eduarda Hallal

    2017-05-01

    Intense manipulation during beef jerky production increases the possibility of contamination with pathogenic microorganisms. This study evaluated the contamination by thermotolerant coliforms, Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp., on processing surfaces and raw materials during beef jerky production, as well as in the final product. Thermotolerant coliforms were found on all surfaces tested and in the raw material. Escherichia coli was identified in 6.7% of the surface samples, while Salmonella spp. was found in 3.3% of the surface samples and 8.6% of raw material samples. Virulence genes were detected in Salmonella spp. isolates. One Salmonella spp. isolate was resistant to sulfonamide, while one E. coli isolate was multiresistant, including the presence of resistance genes sul2, strA, strB, tetA and tetB. The presence of coliforms demonstrates failings in hygienic-sanitary procedures. The presence of pathogenic microorganisms causing foodborne diseases in the production line indicates persistent contamination in the production plant. Although the drying process applied to beef jerky should guarantee the safety of the final product, the presence of multiresistant pathogenic microorganisms, presenting virulence genes, should be a matter of concern. Because beef jerky is a ready-to-eat product, a failure in the production process may cause such microorganisms to pose a public health risk. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Markov Networks of Collateral Resistance: National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Surveillance Results from Escherichia coli Isolates, 2004-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Love

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR is an important component of public health. Antimicrobial drug use generates selective pressure that may lead to resistance against to the administered drug, and may also select for collateral resistances to other drugs. Analysis of AMR surveillance data has focused on resistance to individual drugs but joint distributions of resistance in bacterial populations are infrequently analyzed and reported. New methods are needed to characterize and communicate joint resistance distributions. Markov networks are a class of graphical models that define connections, or edges, between pairs of variables with non-zero partial correlations and are used here to describe AMR resistance relationships. The graphical least absolute shrinkage and selection operator is used to estimate sparse Markov networks from AMR surveillance data. The method is demonstrated using a subset of Escherichia coli isolates collected by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System between 2004 and 2012 which included AMR results for 16 drugs from 14418 isolates. Of the 119 possible unique edges, 33 unique edges were identified at least once during the study period and graphical density ranged from 16.2% to 24.8%. Two frequent dense subgraphs were noted, one containing the five β-lactam drugs and the other containing both sulfonamides, three aminoglycosides, and tetracycline. Density did not appear to change over time (p = 0.71. Unweighted modularity did not appear to change over time (p = 0.18, but a significant decreasing trend was noted in the modularity of the weighted networks (p < 0.005 indicating relationships between drugs of different classes tended to increase in strength and frequency over time compared to relationships between drugs of the same class. The current method provides a novel method to study the joint resistance distribution, but additional work is required to unite the underlying biological and genetic

  16. Regional, seasonal, and temporal variations in the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from pigs at slaughter in Denmark (1997-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatih, E N; Emborg, H D; Jensen, V F; Lo Fo Wong, D M A; Ersbøll, A K

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and discuss regional, seasonal, and temporal trends in the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from pigs at slaughter in Denmark between 1997 and 2005. Data on antimicrobial-resistant E. coli were obtained from the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme database. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to detect the presence and evaluate the significance of regional, seasonal, and annual trends in the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli for four drugs. Associations between resistance and explanatory variables region, season, and the year of isolate sampling were analyzed using a logistic regression model. The Cochran-Armitage test provided evidence of significant temporal trends for ampicillin-resistant E. coli (an increasing trend, p streptomycin-resistant E. coli (a decreasing trend, p E. coli increased over time for all seasons (p E. coli were captured over time. On the other hand, a significant decreasing trend in prevalence of streptomycin-resistant E. coli was observed for the spring, summer, and winter months (p 0.05). The prevalence of ampicillin-resistant E. coli was observed to increase over time for the various regions, whereas that for streptomycin-resistant E. coli presented an overall significant decrease over time. The estimated odds ratios from the logistic regression model indicated varying risks for the occurrence of resistance by season and by region. The winter months were associated with an increased risk for the occurrence of resistant E. coli as compared to the other seasons of the year. Our study provides evidence of statistically significant regional, seasonal, and temporal variations for ampicillin- and streptomycin-resistant E. coli isolated from pigs at slaughter in Denmark between 1997 and 2005.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and resistance gene determinants in clinical Escherichia coli from different animal species in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Roland; Kuhnert, Peter; Boerlin, Patrick

    2003-01-02

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on a total of 581 clinical Escherichia coli isolates from diarrhea and edema disease in pigs, from acute mastitis in dairy cattle, from urinary tract infections in dogs and cats, and from septicemia in laying hens collected in Switzerland between 1999 and 2001. Among the 16 antimicrobial agents tested, resistance was most frequent for sulfonamides, tetracycline, and streptomycin. Isolates from swine presented significantly more resistance than those from the other animal species. The distribution of the resistance determinants for sulfonamides, tetracycline, and streptomycin was assessed by hybridization and PCR in resistant isolates. Significant differences in the distribution of resistance determinants for tetracycline (tetA, tetB) and sulfonamides (sulII) were observed between the isolates from swine and those from the other species. Resistance to sulfonamides could not be explained by known resistance mechanisms in more than a quarter of the sulfonamide-resistant and sulfonamide-intermediate isolates from swine, dogs and cats. This finding suggests that one or several new resistance mechanisms for sulfonamides may be widespread among E. coli isolates from these animal species. The integrase gene (intI) from class I integrons was detected in a large proportion of resistant isolates in association with the sulI and aadA genes, thus demonstrating the importance of integrons in the epidemiology of resistance in clinical E. coli isolates from animals.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from chickens with colibacillosis in and around Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Bamusi; Mafirakureva, Prettimore; Mbanga, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Colibacillosis, a disease caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), can lead to great economic losses in the poultry industry. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance patterns in APEC in Zimbabwe. From 503 chickens diagnosed with colibacillosis, 103 E. coli isolates were obtained. Isolation and identification of E. coli were carried out using microscopy and biochemical tests. The disc diffusion method was used to determine antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates to 8 commercial antibiotics. Many isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antibiotic. Antibiogram profiles indicated maximum resistance to tetracycline (100%), bacitracin (100%), and cloxacillin (100%) and a high prevalence of resistance to ampicillin (94.1%). However; there were high prevalences of sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (100%) and gentamycin (97.1%). The isolates showed moderate rates of sensitivity to chloramphenicol and neomycin. All isolates in this study showed multidrug resistance because they were all resistant to 3 or more antibiotics. Seven multidrug resistance patterns were observed. The most common pattern (resistance to ampicillin, bacitracin, cloxacillin, and tetracycline) was exhibited by 30 isolates. Our findings show that there is emerging drug resistance in APEC associated with colibacillosis in Zimbabwe. The observed high level of multidrug resistance could hamper the treatment of colibacillosis in Zimbabwe.

  19. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli from Tagus estuary (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anabela; Santos, André; Tacão, Marta; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel; Correia, António

    2013-09-01

    Fecal pollution of surface waters is a current world-wide public health concern and may contribute for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. The Tagus estuary located in the south of Portugal is one of the largest wetlands in the west coast of Europe. In this study, water samples were collected from seven stations with different anthropic pressures along the estuary and evaluated for water quality indicator bacteria. Escherichia coli isolates (n=350) were typed by REP-PCR. Representatives of each REP profile (n=220) were evaluated phenotypically for resistance to 17 antibiotics and characterized in terms of phylogenetic group. Resistant isolates were screened for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (tet(A), tet(B), sul1, sul2, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aacA4-cr, bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M), bla(CMY-like), bla(IMP), bla(VIM)) and integrase genes (intI1 and intI2). The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for streptomycin and tetracycline followed by β-lactams and sulphonamides. Among E. coli isolates, 65.16% were resistant to at least one of the 17 antibiotics tested and approximately 19% were multiresistant. In our E. coli population phylo-groups A and D were predominant and characterized by higher prevalence of the antibiotic resistance. intI1 and intI2 genes were found in 12% of the isolates with prevalence of class 1 integrons. A strong correlation between the prevalence of integrons and multiresistance was observed. Differences in terms of antibiotic resistance between phylogenetic groups and between sampling sites were statistically significant. The results demonstrate a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance among E. coli circulating in the Tagus estuary with emphasis on the occurrence of resistance to last-resort antibiotics and on the high incidence of multiresistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial resistance profiles of escherichia coli isolates of broiler chickens at slaughter in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Chunu; McFall, Margaret; King, Robin; Irwin, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Alberta, Canada. Cecal contents of broiler chickens from 24 flocks were collected at slaughter between January and March 2005 for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing against a panel of 15 antimicrobials using a broth microdilution technique. Of 600 E. coli isolates tested, 475 (79.2%) were resistant to one or more antimicrobials, 326 (54.3%) were resistant to three or more antimicrobials, 65 (10.8%) were resistant to five or more antimicrobials, and 15 (2.5%) were resistant to seven or more antimicrobials. The most common resistance was to tetracycline (69.2%), followed by streptomycin (48.2%), kanamycin (40.3%), and sulfisoxazole (38.0%). None of the E. coli isolates were resistant to amikacin, ceftriaxone, or ciprofloxacin. Of the isolates that were resistant to two or more antimicrobials, the most common multidrug resistance patterns were streptomycinte-tracycline (44.0%), streptomycin-sulfisoxazole-tetracycline (30.7%), and kanamycin-streptomycin-sulfisoxazole-tetracycline (23.5%). Resistance to tetracycline and kanamycin (odds ratio = 46.7, P = 0.0001) was highly associated, followed by resistance to streptomycin and sulfisoxazole (odds ratio = 12.0, P = 0.0001), and streptomycin and tetracycline (odds ratio = 10.3, P = 0.0001). The flock level prevalence of resistance varied from 16.7% for chloramphenicol to 100.0% for ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. The results of this study provided baseline information on antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli isolates of broiler chickens at slaughter in Alberta, which can serve as a bench mark for future research.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance and class 1 and 2 integrons in Escherichia coli from meat turkeys in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, A; Giovanardi, D; Dotto, G; Grilli, G; Montesissa, C; Boldrin, C; Salata, C; Giacomelli, M

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the presence of class 1 and 2 integrons in 48 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains isolated from meat turkeys during three sequential production cycles. Thirty avian faecal E. coli (AFEC) strains from the first cycle were also analysed. Strains were tested for AMR against 25 antimicrobials by disk diffusion test and were screened for the presence of integrons and associated gene cassettes by polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing. Genetic relatedness of isolates was established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. High levels of resistance were detected to tetracyclines, penicillins and sulphonamides in APEC and AFEC. Resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins and phenicols was variable, based on the antimicrobial drug and the isolate (APEC vs. AFEC). Full susceptibility to colistin was detected. Multidrug resistance of up to seven antimicrobial classes was exhibited by APEC (93.8%) and AFEC (100%). Nearly 44% of strains tested positive for class 1 and/or class 2 integrons containing the dfrA, aadA and sat2 genes, alone or in combination, coding for streptomycin/spectinomycin, trimethoprim and streptothricin resistance, respectively. The estX and orfF genes of unknown function were also detected. A significant association was found between the presence of integrons and the resistance to aminoglycosides and potentiated sulphonamides. The results of this study showed that AMR, multidrug resistance and class 1 and 2 integrons are widespread among pathogenic and commensal E. coli from Italian turkeys. More attention should be addressed to limit the use of antimicrobials in turkeys and the AMR of turkey E. coli.

  2. Molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in enterococci and Escherichia coli isolates from European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nuno; Igrejas, Gilberto; Figueiredo, Nicholas; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Radhouani, Hajer; Rodrigues, Jorge; Poeta, Patrícia

    2010-09-15

    A total of 44 Escherichia coli and 64 enterococci recovered from 77 intestinal samples of wild European rabbits in Portugal were analyzed for resistance to antimicrobial agents. Resistance in E. coli isolates was observed for ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, streptomycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. None of the E. coli isolates produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The bla(TEM), aadA, aac(3)-II, tet(A) and/or tet(B), and the catA genes were demonstrated in all ampicillin, streptomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol-resistant isolates respectively, and the sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 genes in 4 of 5 sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistant isolates. Of the enterococcal isolates, Enterococcus faecalis was the most prevalent detected species (39 isolates), followed by E. faecium (21 isolates) and E. hirae (4 isolates). More than one-fourth (29.7%) of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline; 20.3% were resistant to erythromycin, 14.1% were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 10.9% were resistant to high-level-kanamycin. Lower level of resistance (streptomycin. No vancomycin-resistance was detected in the enterococci isolates. Resistance genes detected included aac(6')-aph(2''), ant(6)-Ia, tet(M) and/or tet(L) in all gentamicin, streptomycin and tetracycline-resistant isolates respectively. The aph(3')-IIIa gene was detected in 6 of 7 kanamycin-resistant isolates, the erm(B) gene in 11 of 13 erythromycin-resistant isolates and the vat(D) gene in the quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium isolate. This survey showed that faecal bacteria such as E. coli and enterococci of wild rabbits could be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genotyping and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli O157 originating from cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbaut, Katrijn; Houf, Kurt; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Zutter, Lieven

    2011-06-01

    During a Escherichia coli O157 prevalence study on cattle farms, 324 E. coli O157 isolates were collected from 68 out of 180 cattle farms. All isolates harbored the eaeA gene and the enterohemolysin (ehxA) gene. The majority of the strains only contained vtx2 (245 isolates), the combination of vtx1 and vtx2 was detected in 50 isolates, and in 29 isolates none of the vtx genes was present. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that at a similarity level of 98% the isolates grouped into 83 different genotypes, 76 of which were only detected on one farm. Twenty-two out of the 68 positive farms harbored isolates belonging to more than one PFGE type, with a maximum of four different PFGE types. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 10 antimicrobial agents were determined on a subset of 116 isolates, that is, one isolate per positive age category per farm. Acquired resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was detected in 18 isolates and within a farm, only one resistance pattern was observed. All these 18 isolates were resistant toward streptomycin, and 16 of them also showed resistance toward sulfisoxazole. Six isolates were resistant to three or more antimicrobial agents.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in community and nosocomial Escherichia coli urinary tract isolates, London 2005 – 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wareham David W

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is the commonest cause of community and nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI. Antibiotic treatment is usually empirical relying on susceptibility data from local surveillance studies. We therefore set out to determine levels of resistance to 8 commonly used antimicrobial agents amongst all urinary isolates obtained over a 12 month period. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefalexin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim and cefpodoxime was determined for 11,865 E. coli urinary isolates obtained from community and hospitalised patients in East London. Results Nitrofurantoin was the most active agent (94% susceptible, followed by gentamicin and cefpodoxime. High rates of resistance to ampicillin (55% and trimethoprim (40%, often in combination were observed in both sets of isolates. Although isolates exhibiting resistance to multiple drug classes were rare, resistance to cefpodoxime, indicative of Extended spectrum β-lactamase production, was observed in 5.7% of community and 21.6% of nosocomial isolates. Conclusion With the exception of nitrofurantoin, resistance to agents commonly used as empirical oral treatments for UTI was extremely high. Levels of resistance to trimethoprim and ampicillin render them unsuitable for empirical use. Continued surveillance and investigation of other oral agents for treatment of UTI in the community is required.

  5. Phylogenetic group, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli associated with bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongxia; Liu, Gang; Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Yong; Ali, Tariq; Chen, Wei; Yin, Jinhua; Han, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Escherichia coli is an important pathogen involved in the etiology of bovine mastitis. A total of 70 E. coli isolates recovered from clinical and subclinical mastitis samples were characterized with respect to their phylogenic group, virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility. Based on the presence of the specific genes chuA, yjaA and TspE4.C2, these isolates were found to belong to three different groups: group A(25), group B1(41) and group D(4). Twenty-five (35.7%) isolates harbored at least one virulence gene, and the most prevalent virulence genes were f17A, irp2, astA, iucD and colV. The irp2-coding gene was more often detected in group A than in group B1 isolates; in contrast, colV was identified more often in group B1 isolates. The majority of isolates (87.1%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial compound. Forty-seven isolates (67.1%) were resistant to streptomycin, and those from group B1 were more resistant to streptomycin than isolates from group A. The latter feature was supported by the distribution of streptomycin resistance genes observed in group B1 compared to group A. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Swine and Wild Small Mammals in the Proximity of Swine Farms and in Natural Environments in Ontario, Canada▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Gosia K.; Boerlin, Patrick; Janecko, Nicol; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Jardine, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Wild animals not normally exposed to antimicrobial agents can acquire antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria through contact with humans and domestic animals and through the environment. In this study we assessed the frequency of antimicrobial resistance in generic Escherichia coli isolates from wild small mammals (mice, voles, and shrews) and the effect of their habitat (farm or natural area) on antimicrobial resistance. Additionally, we compared the types and frequency of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from swine on the same farms from which wild small mammals were collected. Animals residing in the vicinity of farms were five times more likely to carry E. coli isolates with tetracycline resistance determinants than animals living in natural areas; resistance to tetracycline was also the most frequently observed resistance in isolates recovered from swine (83%). Our results suggest that E. coli isolates from wild small mammals living on farms have higher rates of resistance and are more frequently multiresistant than E. coli isolates from environments, such as natural areas, that are less impacted by human and agricultural activities. No Salmonella isolates were recovered from any of the wild small mammal feces. This study suggests that close proximity to food animal agriculture increases the likelihood that E. coli isolates from wild animals are resistant to some antimicrobials, possibly due to exposure to resistant E. coli isolates from livestock, to the resistance genes of these isolates, or to antimicrobials through contact with animal feed. PMID:19047381

  7. Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from swine and wild small mammals in the proximity of swine farms and in natural environments in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Gosia K; Boerlin, Patrick; Janecko, Nicol; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Jardine, Claire

    2009-02-01

    Wild animals not normally exposed to antimicrobial agents can acquire antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria through contact with humans and domestic animals and through the environment. In this study we assessed the frequency of antimicrobial resistance in generic Escherichia coli isolates from wild small mammals (mice, voles, and shrews) and the effect of their habitat (farm or natural area) on antimicrobial resistance. Additionally, we compared the types and frequency of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from swine on the same farms from which wild small mammals were collected. Animals residing in the vicinity of farms were five times more likely to carry E. coli isolates with tetracycline resistance determinants than animals living in natural areas; resistance to tetracycline was also the most frequently observed resistance in isolates recovered from swine (83%). Our results suggest that E. coli isolates from wild small mammals living on farms have higher rates of resistance and are more frequently multiresistant than E. coli isolates from environments, such as natural areas, that are less impacted by human and agricultural activities. No Salmonella isolates were recovered from any of the wild small mammal feces. This study suggests that close proximity to food animal agriculture increases the likelihood that E. coli isolates from wild animals are resistant to some antimicrobials, possibly due to exposure to resistant E. coli isolates from livestock, to the resistance genes of these isolates, or to antimicrobials through contact with animal feed.

  8. Associations of antimicrobial uses with antimicrobial resistance of fecal Escherichia coli from pigs on 47 farrow-to-finish farms in Ontario and British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Akwar, Holy T.; Poppe, Cornelis; Wilson, Jeff; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Dyck, Monica; Waddington, Josh; Shang, Dayue; McEwen, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the associations between antimicrobial use and other management practices in pigs and antimicrobial resistance in generic Escherichia coli recovered from feces of weaner and finisher pigs on 39 purposefully selected farrow-to-finish farms in Ontario and 8 in British Columbia. Antimicrobials (n = 13), most frequently penicillins and tetracycline, were administered to different age groups of pigs on study farms through various routes of administration. Logistic regression wa...

  9. Drug use and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered in Quebec, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Boulianne, Martine; Arsenault, Julie; Daignault, Danielle; Archambault, Marie; Letellier, Ann; Dutil, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted of chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered at federal processing plants in the province of Quebec, Canada. The objectives were to estimate prevalence of drug use at hatchery and on farm and to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates and factors associated with AMR. Eighty-two chicken flocks and 59 turkey flocks were sampled. At the hatchery, the most used antimicrobial was ceftiofur in chickens (76% of...

  10. Association Between Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Animals and Blood Stream Isolates from Humans in Europe: An Ecological Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    infections in humans, especially those resistant to antimicrobials, have an animal origin.Methods: We analyzed the correlation between the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections in humans and in E. coli isolates from poultry, pigs, and cattle between 2005.......74) in pig and human isolates. In cattle isolates, only ampicillin resistance (r=0.72) was significantly correlated to human isolates. When usage of antimicrobials in humans was analyzed with antimicrobial resistance among human isolates, only correlations between fluoroquinolones (r=0.90) and third......Background: In addition to medical antimicrobial usage, the use of antimicrobials in food animals contributes to the occurrence of resistance among some bacterial species isolated from infections in humans. Recently, several studies have indicated that a large proportion of Escherichia coli causing...

  11. Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli in Pigs Receiving Oral Antimicrobial Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Elke; Käsbohrer, Annemarie

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this literature review was to identify risk factors in addition to antimicrobial treatment for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurrence in commensal Escherichia coli in pigs. A variety of studies were searched in 2014 and 2015. Studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed against eligibility criteria such as observation or experiment (no review), presentation of risk factors in addition to (single dosage) antimicrobial use, risk factors for but not resulting from AMR, and the same antimicrobial used and tested. Thirteen articles (nine on observational, four on experimental studies) were finally selected as relevant. It was reported that space allowance, production size/stage, cleanliness, entry of animals and humans into herds, dosage/frequency/route of administration, time span between treatment and sampling date, herd size, distance to another farm, coldness, and season had an impact on AMR occurrence. Associations were shown by one to four studies per factor and differed in magnitude, direction, and level of significance. The risk of bias was unclear in nearly half of the information of observational studies and in most of the information from experimental studies. Further research on the effects of specific management practices is needed to develop well-founded management advice.

  12. Clonal Diversity, Virulence Potential and Antimicrobial Resistance ofEscherichia coliCausing Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infection in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena T; Baschera, Melinda; Zurfluh, Katrin; Hächler, Herbert; Nüesch, Hansjakob; Stephan, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clonal structure, virulence potential and antibiotic susceptibility of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates causing community acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in unselected primary care patients in Switzerland. Methods: We performed multilocus sequence typing, virulence factor determination, and phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance testing on 44 non-duplicate UPEC isolates. Results: Twenty-seven different sequence types (STs) were identified. Major UPEC clones were represented by 19 (43.2%) of the isolates, including E. coli ST131, ST69 (both 13.6%), ST73 (6.8%), ST10 (4.5%), ST127, ST140, (both 2.3%). Five (11.4%) isolates belonged to ST141. Aggregate virulence factor (VF) scores were highest among isolates belonging to ST127 and ST141. Overall, 50% of the isolates were susceptible to all 12 antimicrobials tested, and all isolates remained susceptible to fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin. Resistance to sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin were found in 31.8, and 15.9% of the isolates, respectively. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes were detected in ST69 and ST131 and included aac(6 ' )-Ib-cr (2.3% of all isolates) bla CTX-M-14 and bla CTX-M-15 (9%), and mph(A) (13.6%). None of the isolates tested positive for mcr-1 or mcr-2 . Conclusions: Our results show that CAUTI in Switzerland is caused by a wide variety of UPEC STs for which fosfomycin remains a good treatment option. We suggest that ST141 is an emerging clone associated with UTI in the community, and warrants closer attention. Moreover, the high rate of E. coli harboring mph(A) from patients without a history of antimicrobial therapy or hospitalization indicates that UPEC is an important reservoir for mph(A) .

  13. Clonal Diversity, Virulence Potential and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli Causing Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infection in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena T. Nüesch-Inderbinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clonal structure, virulence potential and antibiotic susceptibility of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC isolates causing community acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI in unselected primary care patients in Switzerland.Methods: We performed multilocus sequence typing, virulence factor determination, and phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance testing on 44 non-duplicate UPEC isolates.Results: Twenty-seven different sequence types (STs were identified. Major UPEC clones were represented by 19 (43.2% of the isolates, including E. coli ST131, ST69 (both 13.6%, ST73 (6.8%, ST10 (4.5%, ST127, ST140, (both 2.3%. Five (11.4% isolates belonged to ST141.Aggregate virulence factor (VF scores were highest among isolates belonging to ST127 and ST141. Overall, 50% of the isolates were susceptible to all 12 antimicrobials tested, and all isolates remained susceptible to fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin. Resistance to sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin were found in 31.8, and 15.9% of the isolates, respectively. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes were detected in ST69 and ST131 and included aac(6′-Ib-cr (2.3% of all isolates blaCTX−M−14 and blaCTX−M−15 (9%, and mph(A (13.6%. None of the isolates tested positive for mcr-1 or mcr-2.Conclusions: Our results show that CAUTI in Switzerland is caused by a wide variety of UPEC STs for which fosfomycin remains a good treatment option. We suggest that ST141 is an emerging clone associated with UTI in the community, and warrants closer attention. Moreover, the high rate of E. coli harboring mph(A from patients without a history of antimicrobial therapy or hospitalization indicates that UPEC is an important reservoir for mph(A.

  14. Effect of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Prophylaxis on Antimicrobial Resistance of Fecal Escherichia coli in HIV-Infected Patients in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpeth, Susan C.; Thielman, Nathan M.; Ramadhani, Habib O.; Hamilton, John D.; Ostermann, Jan; Kisenge, Peter R.; Shao, Humphrey J.; Reller, L. Barth; Itemba, Dafrosa K.; Sam, Noel E.; Bartlett, John A.; Shao, John F.; Crump, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) reduces morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected persons in Africa, but its impact on antimicrobial resistance is of concern. Methods HIV-uninfected (group A), HIV-infected but not requiring SXT (group B), and HIV-infected and eligible for SXT (group C) adults were recruited into a prospective observational cohort study in Moshi, Tanzania. Stool was examined for Escherichia coli nonsusceptible to SXT at baseline and at weeks 1, 2, 4, and 24. General estimating equation models were used to assess differences in susceptibility over time and cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Results Of 181 subjects, 118 (65.1%) were female and the median (range) age was 36 (20 to 72) years. At baseline, E. coli nonsusceptible to SXT was isolated from 23 (53.5%) of 43 patients in group A, 25 (67.6%) of 37 patients in group B, and 37 (64.9%) of 57 patients in group C. The odds ratios (P value) for SXT nonsusceptibility in group C at weeks 1, 2, 4, and 24 compared with baseline were 3.4 (0.013), 3.0 (0.019), 2.9 (0.030), and 1.5 (0.515), respectively. SXT nonsusceptibility was associated with nonsusceptibility to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and nalidixic acid (P ≤ 0.006). Conclusion In Tanzania, carriage of fecal E. coli nonsusceptible to SXT is common before SXT prophylaxis. Initiation of SXT leads to further loss of susceptibility to SXT and to other antimicrobials. PMID:18285712

  15. Patterns of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from cases of calf enteritis during the spring-calving season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, James F; Boland, Fiona; Buckley, James F; Butler, Francis; Egan, John; Fanning, Séamus; Markey, Bryan K; Leonard, Finola C

    2014-05-14

    Neonatal enteritis is a common condition of young calves and can be caused by pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. We hypothesised that on-farm antimicrobial use would result in an increased frequency of resistance in these strains during the calving season. We also sought to determine if the frequency of resistance reflected on-farm antimicrobial use. Faecal samples were collected from cases of calf enteritis on 14 spring-calving dairy farms during two 3 week periods: Period 1 - February 11th through March 2nd 2008 and Period 2 - April 14th through May 5th 2008. E. coli were cultured from these samples, pathogenic strains were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out on these pathogenic isolates. Antimicrobial prescribing data were collected from each farm for the previous 12 months as an indicator of antimicrobial use. The correlation between antimicrobial use and resistance was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between resistance, sampling period and pathotype. Penicillins and aminopenicillins, streptomycin, and tetracyclines were the most frequently prescribed antimicrobials and the greatest frequencies of resistance were detected to these 3 antimicrobial classes. A strong correlation (ρ=0.879) was observed between overall antimicrobial use and frequencies of antimicrobial resistance on farms. Sampling period was significant in the regression model for ampicillin resistance while pathotype was significant in the models for streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole resistance. The frequencies of resistance observed have implications for veterinary therapeutics and prudent antimicrobial use. Resistance did not increase during the calving season and factors other than antimicrobial use, such as calf age and bacterial pathotype, may influence the occurrence of resistance in pathogenic E. coli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. Genetic elements associated with antimicrobial resistance in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC from Brazil

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    Aranda Katia RS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently observed an association of resistance with a certain enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC serotypes and identified a conjugative plasmid, similar to plasmid pED208, that was conserved among archival O111:H2/NM and O119:H2 strains of diverse geographical origin. In this study, we sought to determine the prevalence and distribution of this plasmid among a collection of EPEC isolates from Brazil, as well as to study the susceptibilities of these isolates to antimicrobial agents. Results Resistance was more commonly seen in typical EPEC than atypical strains. The most prevalent resistances were to ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin and the sulfonamides. Markers for the EPEC conjugative multiresistance plasmid, were detected in 21 (30% of typical but only 4 (5% of atypical strains (p = 0.001, Chi-squared test. This plasmid, previously reported from only O111 and O119 strains was found in O55 and O127 strains and was associated with the presence of class 1 integrons. Conclusion Our data suggest a limited but expanding host range for the EPEC resistance plasmid.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of F4+ Escherichia coli isolated from Swine in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppi, A; Bonilauri, P; Dottori, M; Gherpelli, Y; Biasi, G; Merialdi, G; Maioli, G; Martelli, P

    2015-02-01

    Four-hundred and forty-two F4+ pathogenic Escherichia coli were isolated in a period of 10 years (2002-2011), from pigs that were suffering from diarrhoea belonging to Italian swine herds. The strains were analysed for their susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials using the disc diffusion method. During the study period, a statistically significant proportion of isolates resistant to enrofloxacin (14.5-89.3%), marbofloxacin (5.4-60.7%), flumequine (49.1-92.9%), danofloxacin (21.6-80%), florfenicol (9.8-64.3%), thiamphenicol (50-92%) and cefquinome (3.8-44%) was recorded. An increase in resistance (not statistically significant) to gentamicin (63.6-85.7%), apramycin (61.8-82.1%), trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (75-89.3%), tetracycline (97-100%) and erythromycin (92.4-100%) was also observed. Based on antimicrobial multiresistance, the strains were collected into three groups: I. resistant to 2-5 antimicrobials; II. resistant to 6-8 antimicrobials; III. resistant to 9-12 antimicrobials. The number of isolates belonging to the first group showed a statistically significant decrease (P resistance (P resistance. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance, Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Productivity, and Class 1 Integrons in Escherichia coli from Healthy Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkaew, Kanjana; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Nakajima, Chie; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Administration of antimicrobials to food-producing animals increases the risk of higher antimicrobial resistance in the normal intestinal flora of these animals. The present cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains and to characterize class 1 integrons in Escherichia coli in healthy swine in Thailand. All 122 of the tested isolates had drug-resistant phenotypes. High resistance was found to ampicillin (98.4% of isolates), chloramphenicol (95.9%), gentamicin (78.7%), streptomycin (77.9%), tetracycline (74.6%), and cefotaxime (72.1%). Fifty-four (44.3%) of the E. coli isolates were confirmed as ESBL-producing strains. Among them, blaCTX-M (45 isolates) and blaTEM (41 isolates) were detected. Of the blaCTX-M-positive E. coli isolates, 37 carried the blaCTX-M-1 cluster, 12 carried the blaCTX-M-9 cluster, and 5 carried both clusters. Sequence analysis revealed blaTEM-1, blaTEM-135, and blaTEM-175 in 38, 2, and 1 isolate, respectively. Eighty-seven (71%) of the 122isolates carried class 1 integrons, and eight distinct drug-resistance gene cassettes with seven different integron profiles were identified in 43 of these isolates. Gene cassettes were associated with resistance to aminoglycosides (aadA1, aadA2, aadA22, or aadA23), trimethoprim (dfrA5, dfrA12, or dfrA17), and lincosamide (linF). Genes encoding β-lactamases were not found in class 1 integrons. This study is the first to report ESBL-producing E. coli with a class 1 integron carrying the linF gene cassette in swine in Thailand. Our findings confirm that swine can be a reservoir of ESBL-producing E. coli harboring class 1 integrons, which may become a potential health risk if these integrons are transmitted to humans. Intensive analyses of animal, human, and environmental isolates are needed to control the spread of ESBL-producing E. coli strains.

  19. The streptomycin-sulfadiazine-tetracycline antimicrobial resistance element of calf-adapted Escherichia coli is widely distributed among isolates from Washington state cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, Artashes R; Besser, Thomas E; Call, Douglas R

    2008-01-01

    Association of specific antimicrobial resistance patterns with unrelated selective traits has long been implicated in the maintenance of antimicrobial resistance in a population. Previously we demonstrated that Escherichia coli strains with a specific resistance pattern (resistant to streptomycin, sulfadiazine, and tetracycline [SSuT]) have a selective advantage in dairy calf intestinal environments and in the presence of a milk supplement commonly fed to the calves. In the present study we identified the sequence of the genetic element that confers the SSuT phenotype and show that this element is present in a genetically diverse group of E. coli isolates, as assessed by macrorestriction digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This element was also found in E. coli isolates from 18 different cattle farms in Washington State. Using in vitro competition experiments we further demonstrated that SSuT strains from 17 of 18 farms were able to outcompete pansusceptible strains. In a separate set of experiments, we were able to transfer the antimicrobial resistance phenotype by electroporation to a laboratory strain of E. coli (DH10B), making that new strain more competitive during in vitro competition with the parental DH10B strain. These data indicate that a relatively large genetic element conferring the SSuT phenotype is widely distributed in E. coli from cattle in Washington State. Furthermore, our results indicate that this element is responsible for maintenance of these traits owing to linkage to genetic traits that confer a selective advantage in the intestinal lumens of dairy calves.

  20. Escherichia coli Isolates from Broiler Chicken Meat, Broiler Chickens, Pork, and Pigs Share Phylogroups and Antimicrobial Resistance with Community-Dwelling Humans and Patients with Urinary Tract Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L.; Kurbasic, A.; Skjot-Rasmussen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Phylogroup B2 and D isolates are associated with UTI. It has been proposed that E. coli causing UTI could have an animal origin. The objective of this study was to investigate the phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance...... = 197) and imported broiler chicken meat (n = 86), Danish broiler chickens (n = 138), Danish (n = 177) and imported pork (n = 10), and Danish pigs (n = 145) were tested for phylogroups (A, B1, B2, D, and nontypeable [NT] isolates) and antimicrobial susceptibility. Phylogroup A, B1, B2, D, and NT...... isolates were detected among all groups of isolates except for imported pork isolates. Antimicrobial resistance to three (for B2 isolates) or five antimicrobial agents (for A, B1, D, and NT isolates) was shared among isolates regardless of origin. Using cluster analysis to investigate antimicrobial...

  1. Influence of oral hygiene in patients with fixed appliances in the oral carriage of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli and Enterococcus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeta, Patricia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Martins, Eugénio; Araújo, Carlos; Carvalho, Carlos; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vinué, Laura; López, Maria; Torres, Carmen

    2009-10-01

    The aim was to study the oral carriage of Enterococcus and Escherichia coli isolates and their content in antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes in patients with fixed appliances and in healthy volunteers. Samples from supragingival plaques/tooth surfaces/fixed orthodontic appliances were taken in patients with fixed appliances (n = 46) and in healthy volunteers (n = 55). Samples were seeded on specific media for enterococcal and E. coli recovery, and 1 isolate of each type per sample was selected. Antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance, bacteriocins, and virulence factors were checked by polymerase chain reaction. Enterococci or E. coli were not recovered from healthy volunteers. Nevertheless, 10 isolates (5 E. faecium, 3 E. faecalis, and 2 E. coli) were obtained from 19.5% of patients with fixed appliances, and poor oral hygiene was evidenced in all of the these patients. Percentages of antimicrobial resistance and the resistance genes detected among the enterococci were: erythromycin: 100%, erm(B); kanamycin: 75%, aph(3')-IIIa; tetracycline: 50%, tet(L) with/without tet(M); streptomycin: 37%, ant(6)-Ia; chloramphenicol: 12%, catA. One E. coli isolate showed a phenotype of multiresistance containing 5 resistance genes and class 1 and 2 integrons. All enterococci produced gelatinase, and 4 isolates contained genes encoding enterocins L50A/B and P. The esp virulence gene was found in 1 multiresistant E. faecalis isolate. Poor or improper oral hygiene in individuals with fixed appliances favors the oral carriage of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli and enterococci. Additional investigations are needed to assess its implication in human health.

  2. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Subclinical Infection in Pigs: Bacteriological and Genotypic Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moredo, Fabiana A; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Márquez, Gabriela C; Sanz, Marcelo; Colello, Rocío; Etcheverría, Analía; Padola, Nora L; Quiroga, María A; Perfumo, Carlos J; Galli, Lucía; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the major pathogen responsible for neonatal diarrhea, postweaning diarrhea, and edema disease in pigs. Although it can be harmless, ETEC is also present in the intestines of other animal species and humans, causing occasional diarrhea outbreaks. The evaluation of this pathogen's presence in food sources is becoming an increasingly important issue in human health. In order to determine the prevalence of ETEC in nondiarrheic pigs, 990 animals from 11 pig farms were sampled. Using end-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), eltA, estI genes, or both, were detected in 150 (15.2%) animals. From the positive samples, 40 (26.6%) ETEC strains were isolated, showing 19 antibiotic-resistance patterns; 52.5% of these strains had multiple antibiotic resistances, and 17.5% carried the intI2 gene. The most prevalent genotypes were rfb(O157)/estII/aidA (32.5%) and estI/estII (25.0%). The estII gene was identified most frequently (97.5%), followed by estI (37.5%), astA (20.0%), and eltA (12.5%). The genes coding the fimbriae F5, F6, and F18 were detected in three single isolates. The aidA gene was detected in 20 ETEC strains associated with the estII gene. Among the isolated ETEC strains, stx(2e)/estI, stx(2e)/estI/estII, and stx(2e)/estI/estII/intI2 genotypes were identified. The ETEC belonged to 12 different serogroups; 37.5% of them belonged to serotype O157:H19. Isolates were grouped by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR into 5 clusters with 100.0% similarity. In this study, we demonstrated that numerous ETEC genotypes cohabit and circulate in swine populations without clinical manifestation of neonatal diarrhea, postweaning diarrhea, or edema disease in different production stages. The information generated is important not only for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes, but also for understanding the dynamics and ecology of ETEC in pigs in different production stages that can be potentially transmitted to humans

  3. Effects of Menthol Supplementation in Feedlot Cattle Diets on the Fecal Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli.

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    C C Aperce

    Full Text Available The pool of antimicrobial resistance determinants in the environment and in the gut flora of cattle is a serious public health concern. In addition to being a source of human exposure, these bacteria can transfer antibiotic resistance determinants to pathogenic bacteria and endanger the future of antimicrobial therapy. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance genes on mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, facilitates spread of resistance. Recent work has shown in vitro anti-plasmid activity of menthol, a plant-based compound with the potential to be used as a feed additive to beneficially alter ruminal fermentation. The present study aimed to determine if menthol supplementation in diets of feedlot cattle decreases the prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria in feces. Menthol was included in diets of steers at 0.3% of diet dry matter. Fecal samples were collected weekly for 4 weeks and analyzed for total coliforms counts, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and the prevalence of tet genes in E. coli isolates. Results revealed no effect of menthol supplementation on total coliforms counts or prevalence of E. coli resistant to amoxicillin, ampicillin, azithromycin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and sulfamethoxazole; however, 30 days of menthol addition to steer diets increased the prevalence of tetracycline-resistant E. coli (P < 0.02. Although the mechanism by which menthol exerts its effects remains unclear, results of our study suggest that menthol may have an impact on antimicrobial resistance in gut bacteria.

  4. Identification and antimicrobial resistance prevalence of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains from treated wastewater effluents in Eastern Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefisoye, Martins A; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem impeding the effective prevention/treatment of an ever-growing array of infections caused by pathogens; a huge challenge threatening the achievements of modern medicine. In this paper, we report the occurrence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli strains isolated from discharged final effluents of two wastewater treatment facilities in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Standard disk diffusion method was employed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of 223 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed E. coli isolates against 17 common antibiotics in human therapy and veterinary medicine. Seven virulence associated and fourteen antibiotic resistance genes were also evaluated by molecular methods. Molecular characterization revealed five pathotypes of E. coli in the following proportions: enterotoxigenic ETEC (1.4%), enteropathogenic EPEC (7.6%), enteroaggregative EAEC (7.6%), neonatal meningitis (NMEC) (14.8%), uropathogenic (41.7%), and others (26.9%). Isolates showed varying (1.7-70.6%) degrees of resistance to 15 of the test antibiotics. Multidrug resistance was exhibited by 32.7% of the isolates, with the commonest multiple antibiotic-resistant phenotype (MARP) being AP-T-CFX (12 isolates), while multiple antibiotic-resistant indices (MARI) estimated are 0.23 (Site 1) and 0.24 (Site 2). Associated antibiotic resistance genes detected in the isolates include: strA (88.2%), aadA (52.9%), cat I (15%), cmlA1 (4.6%), blaTEM (56.4%), tetA (30.4%), tetB (28.4%), tetC (42.2%), tetD (50%), tetK (11.8%), and tetM (68.6%). We conclude that municipal wastewater effluents are important reservoirs for the dissemination of potentially pathogenic E. coli (and possibly other pathogens) and antibiotic resistance genes in the aquatic milieu of the Eastern Cape and a risk to public health. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular determination of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from raw meat in Addis Ababa and Bishoftu, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messele, Yohannes Equar; Abdi, Reta Duguma; Yalew, Shimels Tikuye; Tegegne, Desiye Tesfaye; Emeru, Bezina Arega; Werid, Gebremeskel Mamu

    2017-08-15

    Consumption of meat contaminated by E. coli causes a serious illness and even death to affected individuals. Recently the emerging of antibiotic resistant foodborne E. coli poses serious public health risks worldwide. However, little is known about the antibiotic resistance profile of E. coli in Ethiopia. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) status of E. coli isolated from different type of meat. Overall 292 samples were collected from December 2015 to April 2016 from slaughterhouses to determine the prevalence and AMR of E. coli isolated from raw beef, mutton, chevon and chicken meat from Addis Ababa and Bishoftu, Ethiopia. The isolates were screened for AMR against commonly used antibiotics circulating in the Ethiopian market. Both phenotypic and genotypic approach were employed for AMR detection using disc diffusion test and PCR respectively. The prevalence of E. coli was 63 (21.6%), indicating one sample in every five samples harbors E. coli. Among these, the highest E. coli isolates was observed in chicken meat samples (37.0%; 27), followed by mutton (23.3%; 17), chevon (20.6%; 15) and beef (5.5%; 4). Results of disk diffusion test on the 63 isolates showed that only 4.8% of them were not resistance to all antimicrobials tested. Multiple drug resistance (resistance to ≥3 drugs) was 46.0%. Significantly high resistance to ampicillin (71.4%) and tetracycline (47.6%) was observed. Identification of genes associated with AMR was also done using PCR. The prevalence of E. coli isolates harboring resistance gene responsible for tetracycline (tet(A)), beta lactams (blaCMY) and sulphanamide (sulI) antibiotics were found 65.1, 65.1 and 54.0%, respectively. Twenty-five out of the 63 (39.7% %) E. coli isolates have got antimicrobial resistance gene to three or more classes of drugs. The associations of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes was also determined. The detection of resistance trait against

  6. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O157:H7- from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Nguyen, Lien T; Headrick, Susan I; Murinda, Shelton E; Oliver, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes including O157:H7 (n = 129) from dairy cows, cull dairy cow feces, cider, salami, human feces, ground beef, bulk tank milk, bovine feces, and lettuce; and O157:H7- (n = 24) isolated from bovine dairy and bovine feedlot cows were evaluated for antimicrobial resistance against 26 antimicrobials and the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetD, tetE, tetG, floR, cmlA, strA, strB, sulI, sulII, and ampC). All E. coli exhibited resistance to five or more antimicrobial agents, and the majority of isolates carried one or more target antimicrobial resistance gene(s) in different combinations. The majority of E. coli showed resistance to ampicillin, aztreonam, cefaclor, cephalothin, cinoxacin, and nalidixic acid, and all isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol and florfenicol. Many STEC O157:H7 and O157:H7-isolates were susceptible to amikacin, carbenicillin, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, fosfomycin, moxalactam, norfloxacin, streptomycin, tobramycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. The majority of STEC O157:H7 (79.8%) and O157:H7- (91.7%) carried one or more antimicrobial resistance gene(s) regardless of whether phenotypically resistant or susceptible. Four tetracycline resistant STEC O157:H7 isolates carried both tetA and tetC. Other tetracycline resistance genes (tetB, tetD, tetE, and tetG) were not detected in any of the isolates. Among nine streptomycin resistant STEC O157:H7 isolates, eight carried strA-strB along with aadA, whereas the other isolate carried aadA alone. However, the majority of tetracycline and streptomycin susceptible STEC isolates also carried tetA and aadA genes, respectively. Most ampicillin resistant E. coli of both serotypes carried ampC genes. Among sulfonamide resistance genes, sulII was detected only in STEC O157:H7 (4 of 80 sulfonamide-resistant isolates) and sulI was detected in O157:H7- (1 of 16 sulfonamide resistant isolates). The emergence and

  7. Comparison of Commensal Escherichia coli Isolates from Adults and Young Children in Lubuskie Province, Poland: Virulence Potential, Phylogeny and Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Ewa Bok

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Commensal Escherichia coli population is a dynamic structure which may be important in the pathogenesis of extraintestinal infections. The aim of this study was the comparison of genetic diversity of commensal E. coli isolates from two age group—adults and young children. E. coli strains were isolated on MacConkey agar and identified by biochemical tests. Determination of four major phylogenetic groups, identification of virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance determinants were performed by using multiplex or simplex PCR. Phenotypic analysis of resistance was based on disc-diffusion method. The prevalence of virulence genes was significantly higher among isolates from adults than from young children. Phylogroup B2 predominated among E. coli from adults, whereas phylogroup A was the most common in isolates from young children. The analyses of antimicrobial resistance revealed that resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent and multidrug-resistance were detected significantly more frequent in the isolates from adults than from young children. This study documented that the commensal E. coli isolates from adults showed greater genetic diversity than from young children and constitutes a substantial reservoir of the virulence genes typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  8. Multivariable Analysis of the Association Between Antimicrobial Use and Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Apparently Healthy Pigs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Kohei; Goto, Masaki; Ozawa, Manao; Kawanishi, Michiko; Koike, Ryoji; Asai, Tetsuo; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between antimicrobial agent use and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from healthy pigs using data from 2004 to 2007 in the Japanese Veterinary Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (JVARM). Fecal E. coli isolates from 250 pigs (one isolate each from a pig per farm) were examined for antimicrobial resistance. Information on the use of antimicrobials within preceding 6 months and types of farms recorded in JVARM was collected and statistically analyzed against the resistance patterns. In the univariate analysis, associations between both therapeutic and feed additive use of antimicrobials, and resistance to dihydrostreptomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, ampicillin, cefazolin, ceftiofur, oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, colistin, and bicozamycin, and husbandry factors were investigated. In multivariable analysis, generalized estimating equations were used to control geographical intraclass correlation. Confounding for structurally unrelated associations was tested using generalized linear models. The results suggested direct and cross selections in the associations between use of aminoglycosides in reproduction farms and resistance to kanamycin, use of tetracyclines in larger farms and resistance to oxytetracycline, use of beta-lactams and resistance to ampicillin, use of phenicols and resistance to chloramphenicol, and use of fluoroquinolones and resistance to nalidixic acid and enrofloxacin. Coselection was suggested in the use of tetracyclines and chloramphenicol resistance. The associations between use of beta-lactams and dihydrostreptomycin resistance, use of macrolides and ampicillin and oxytetracycline resistance, and use of colistin and kanamycin resistance were significant, but were confounded by the simultaneous use of homologous antimicrobials.

  9. Epidemiology of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Raccoons (Procyon lotor and the Environment on Swine Farms and Conservation Areas in Southern Ontario.

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    Kristin J Bondo

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to livestock, human and environmental health. Although resistant bacteria have been detected in wildlife, their role in the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance is not clear. Our objective was to investigate demographic, temporal and climatic factors associated with carriage of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli in raccoons and the environment. We collected samples from raccoon paws and feces and from soil, manure pit and dumpsters on five swine farms and five conservation areas in Ontario, Canada once every five weeks from May to November, 2011-2013 and tested them for E. coli and susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials. Of samples testing positive for E. coli, resistance to ≥ 1 antimicrobials was detected in 7.4% (77/1044; 95% CI, 5.9-9.1 of raccoon fecal samples, 6.3% (23/365; 95% CI, 4.0-9.3 of paw samples, 9.6% (121/1260; 8.0-11.4 of soil samples, 57.4% (31/54; 95% CI, 43.2-70.8 of manure pit samples, and 13.8% (4/29; 95% CI, 3.9-31.7 of dumpster samples. Using univariable logistic regression, there was no significant difference in the occurrence of resistant E. coli in raccoon feces on conservation areas versus farms; however, E. coli isolates resistant to ≥ 1 antimicrobials were significantly less likely to be detected from raccoon paw samples on swine farms than conservation areas and significantly more likely to be detected in soil samples from swine farms than conservation areas. Resistant phenotypes and genotypes that were absent from the swine farm environment were detected in raccoons from conservation areas, suggesting that conservation areas and swine farms may have different exposures to resistant bacteria. However, the similar resistance patterns and genes in E. coli from raccoon fecal and environmental samples from the same location types suggest that resistant bacteria may be exchanged between raccoons and their environment.

  10. Epidemiology of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and the Environment on Swine Farms and Conservation Areas in Southern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondo, Kristin J; Pearl, David L; Janecko, Nicol; Boerlin, Patrick; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Parmley, Jane; Jardine, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to livestock, human and environmental health. Although resistant bacteria have been detected in wildlife, their role in the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance is not clear. Our objective was to investigate demographic, temporal and climatic factors associated with carriage of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli in raccoons and the environment. We collected samples from raccoon paws and feces and from soil, manure pit and dumpsters on five swine farms and five conservation areas in Ontario, Canada once every five weeks from May to November, 2011-2013 and tested them for E. coli and susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials. Of samples testing positive for E. coli, resistance to ≥ 1 antimicrobials was detected in 7.4% (77/1044; 95% CI, 5.9-9.1) of raccoon fecal samples, 6.3% (23/365; 95% CI, 4.0-9.3) of paw samples, 9.6% (121/1260; 8.0-11.4) of soil samples, 57.4% (31/54; 95% CI, 43.2-70.8) of manure pit samples, and 13.8% (4/29; 95% CI, 3.9-31.7) of dumpster samples. Using univariable logistic regression, there was no significant difference in the occurrence of resistant E. coli in raccoon feces on conservation areas versus farms; however, E. coli isolates resistant to ≥ 1 antimicrobials were significantly less likely to be detected from raccoon paw samples on swine farms than conservation areas and significantly more likely to be detected in soil samples from swine farms than conservation areas. Resistant phenotypes and genotypes that were absent from the swine farm environment were detected in raccoons from conservation areas, suggesting that conservation areas and swine farms may have different exposures to resistant bacteria. However, the similar resistance patterns and genes in E. coli from raccoon fecal and environmental samples from the same location types suggest that resistant bacteria may be exchanged between raccoons and their environment.

  11. [Antimicrobial resistance monitoring in Lower Saxony (ARMIN): first trends for MRSA, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and VRE from 2006 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, M; Wagner, D; Dreesman, J; Pulz, M

    2011-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most important health topics of the past few years. To identify regional trends of antimicrobial resistance in inpatient and outpatient care, the Governmental Institute of Public Health of Lower Saxony (Germany) launched the sentinel system ARMIN (Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring in Lower Saxony). Currently 9 laboratories participate as sentinel sites and contribute single case data of their microbiological results. Data are presented by an interactive data query in the internet. From 2006 to 2010 laboratories reported about 800 000 diagnostic test results. The proportion of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) among all Staphylococcus aureus increased from 19.5% in 2006 to 23.4% in 2010 for inpatient care in Lower Saxony. During the same period Escherichia coli resistance to cefotaxime for inpatient care increased from 3.0% to 8.8%. Enterococcus faecium resistance to vancomycin decreased from 13.6% to 5.6%. Currently the emphasis of ARMIN is on the description of trends and on the information of prescribing physicians. A quality circle was established to improve standardisation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Concerning Increase in Antimicrobial Resistance in Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated from Young Animals during 1980-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirila, Flore; Tabaran, Alexandra; Fit, Nicodim; Nadas, George; Mihaiu, Marian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Cătoi, Cornel; Reget, Oana Lucia; Dan, Sorin Daniel

    2017-09-27

    This study was conducted in order to assess the antimicrobial resistance patterns of E. coli isolated from young animals affected between 1980 and 2016. The selected isolates for this study (n=175) carried stx 1 /stx 2 genes and the most prevalent type of pathogenic E. coli found belonged to serogroup O101, antigen (K99)-F41 positive. All STEC-positive isolates were tested for susceptibility to 11 antimicrobials. Multidrug resistance (MDR) increased from 11% during the 1980s to 40% between 2000 and 2016. Resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was the most frequent co-resistance phenotype (37%). Co-resistance to tetracycline and sulfonamide was found in 21% of E. coli isolates, while the MDR pattern to tetracycline, sulfonamide, and streptomycin was observed in 12% of the strains tested. Only 8% of isolates were co-resistant to tetracycline, ampicillin, streptomycin, and sulfonamide. The most common resistance genes found were those encoding for tetracycline, sulphonamides, and streptomycin, with 54% (n=95) of the tested isolates containing at least one of the genes encoding tetracycline resistance. A total of 87% of E. coli that tested positive for tetracycline (tetA, tetB, and tetC) and sulphonamide (sul1) resistance genes were isolated between 2000 and 2016. A large number of isolates (n=21) carried int1 and a nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that all class 1 integron gene cassettes carried sul1, tet, and dfrA1 resistance genes. An increase was observed in the level of resistance to antimicrobials in Romania, highlighting the urgent need for a surveillance and prevention system for antimicrobial resistance in livestock in Eastern Europe.

  13. Virulence, Antimicrobial Resistance Properties and Phylogenetic Background of Non-H7 Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O157

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdous, Mithila; Kooistra-Smid, Mirjam; Zhou, Kai; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E.coli) O157 that do not produce Shiga toxin and do not possess flagellar antigen H7 are of diverse H serotypes. In this study, the antibiotic resistance properties, genotype of a set of virulence associated genes and the phylogenetic background of E. coli O157:non-H7 groups were

  14. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...... pathogenic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E, coli. (C) Elsevier, Paris....

  15. Association between antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from food animals and blood stream isolates from humans in Europe: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Antonio R; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank M; McEwen, Scott A; Hendriksen, Rene S; Hald, Tine; Wegener, Henrik C

    2011-12-01

    In addition to medical antimicrobial usage, the use of antimicrobials in food animals contributes to the occurrence of resistance among some bacterial species isolated from infections in humans. Recently, several studies have indicated that a large proportion of Escherichia coli causing infections in humans, especially those resistant to antimicrobials, have an animal origin. We analyzed the correlation between the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections in humans and in E. coli isolates from poultry, pigs, and cattle between 2005 and 2008 for 11 countries, using available surveillance data. We also assessed the correlation between human antimicrobial usage and the occurrence of resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections. Strong and significant correlations between prevalences of resistance to ampicillin (r=0.94), aminoglycosides (r=0.72), third-generation cephalosporins (r=0.76), and fluoroquinolones (r=0.68) were observed for human and poultry E. coli isolates. Similar significant correlations were observed for ampicillin (r=0.91), aminoglycosides (r=0.73), and fluoroquinolone resistance (r=0.74) in pig and human isolates. In cattle isolates, only ampicillin resistance (r=0.72) was significantly correlated to human isolates. When usage of antimicrobials in humans was analyzed with antimicrobial resistance among human isolates, only correlations between fluoroquinolones (r=0.90) and third-generation cephalosporins (r=0.75) were significant. Resistance in E. coli isolates from food animals (especially poultry and pigs) was highly correlated with resistance in isolates from humans. This supports the hypothesis that a large proportion of resistant E. coli isolates causing blood stream infections in people may be derived from food sources.

  16. Risk of Transmission of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli from Commercial Broiler and Free-Range Retail Chicken in India

    OpenAIRE

    Arif Hussain; Sabiha Shaik; Amit Ranjan; Nishant Nandanwar; Sumeet K. Tiwari; Mohammad Majid; Ramani Baddam; Ramani Baddam; Insaf A. Qureshi; Torsten Semmler; Lothar H. Wieler; Mohammad A. Islam; Dipshikha Chakravortty; Niyaz Ahmed; Niyaz Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli infections are a growing public health concern. This study analyzed the possibility of contamination of commercial poultry meat (broiler and free-range) with pathogenic and or multi-resistant E. coli in retail chain poultry meat markets in India. We analyzed 168 E. coli isolates from broiler and free-range retail poultry (meat/ceca) sampled over a wide geographical area, for their antimicrobial sensitivity, phylogenetic groupings, virulence determinants, e...

  17. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...

  18. Drug use and antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulianne, Martine; Arsenault, Julie; Daignault, Danielle; Archambault, Marie; Letellier, Ann; Dutil, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted of chicken and turkey flocks slaughtered at federal processing plants in the province of Quebec, Canada. The objectives were to estimate prevalence of drug use at hatchery and on farm and to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in cecal Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates and factors associated with AMR. Eighty-two chicken flocks and 59 turkey flocks were sampled. At the hatchery, the most used antimicrobial was ceftiofur in chickens (76% of flocks) and spectinomycin in turkeys (42% of flocks). Virginiamycin was the antimicrobial most frequently added to the feed in both chicken and turkey flocks. At least 1 E. coli isolate resistant to third-generation cephalosporins was present in all chicken flocks and in a third of turkey flocks. Resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfisoxazole was detected in > 90% of flocks for E. coli isolates. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was observed to bacitracin, erythromycin, lincomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tetracycline in both chicken and turkey flocks for Enterococcus spp. isolates. No resistance to vancomycin was observed. The use of ceftiofur at hatchery was significantly associated with the proportion of ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates in chicken flocks. In turkey flocks, ceftiofur resistance was more frequent when turkeys were placed on litter previously used by chickens. Associations between drug use and resistance were observed with tetracycline (turkey) in E. coli isolates and with bacitracin (chicken and turkey), gentamicin (turkey), and tylosin (chicken) in Enterococcus spp. isolates. Further studies are needed to provide producers and veterinarians with alternative management practices and tools in order to reduce the use of antimicrobial feed additives in poultry.

  19. Epidemiology of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and the Environment on Swine Farms and Conservation Areas in Southern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, David L.; Janecko, Nicol; Boerlin, Patrick; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Parmley, Jane; Jardine, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to livestock, human and environmental health. Although resistant bacteria have been detected in wildlife, their role in the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance is not clear. Our objective was to investigate demographic, temporal and climatic factors associated with carriage of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli in raccoons and the environment. We collected samples from raccoon paws and feces and from soil, manure pit and dumpsters on five swine farms and five conservation areas in Ontario, Canada once every five weeks from May to November, 2011–2013 and tested them for E. coli and susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials. Of samples testing positive for E. coli, resistance to ≥ 1 antimicrobials was detected in 7.4% (77/1044; 95% CI, 5.9–9.1) of raccoon fecal samples, 6.3% (23/365; 95% CI, 4.0–9.3) of paw samples, 9.6% (121/1260; 8.0–11.4) of soil samples, 57.4% (31/54; 95% CI, 43.2–70.8) of manure pit samples, and 13.8% (4/29; 95% CI, 3.9–31.7) of dumpster samples. Using univariable logistic regression, there was no significant difference in the occurrence of resistant E. coli in raccoon feces on conservation areas versus farms; however, E. coli isolates resistant to ≥ 1 antimicrobials were significantly less likely to be detected from raccoon paw samples on swine farms than conservation areas and significantly more likely to be detected in soil samples from swine farms than conservation areas. Resistant phenotypes and genotypes that were absent from the swine farm environment were detected in raccoons from conservation areas, suggesting that conservation areas and swine farms may have different exposures to resistant bacteria. However, the similar resistance patterns and genes in E. coli from raccoon fecal and environmental samples from the same location types suggest that resistant bacteria may be exchanged between raccoons and their environment. PMID:27829035

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance, Virulence Factors and Genetic Diversity of Escherichia coli Isolates from Household Water Supply in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.K. Talukdar (Prabhat Kumar); M. Rahman (Mahdia); A. Nabi (Ashikun); Z. Islam (Zhahirul); M.M. Hoque (Mahfuzul); H.P. Endtz (Hubert)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Unsafe water supplies continue to raise public health concerns, especially in urban areas in low resource countries. To understand the extent of public health risk attributed to supply water in Dhaka city, Bangladesh, Escherichia coli isolated from tap water samples collected

  1. Study of Sensibility and Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection in Tabriz City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Molaabaszadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  Background & Objective: Urinary infection is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases, and Escherichia coli is the most important cause of urinary infections. This study was done with the aim of surveying the amount of susceptibility and resistance among the strains of Escherichia coli isolated from those who referred to the private laboratories in the Iranian city of Tabriz.   Materials & Methods: This survey was done periodically during the first 6 months of the year 2010. Samples were obtained in a sterile manner and were subjected to all necessary pathological tests. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility was conducted with disk diffusion standard method, and the results were analyzed.   Results: Totally, 5701 Escherichia coli strains were identified. The highest sensitivity to Imipenem was 90.95%, Nitrofurantoin 85.97%, and Cefotaxime 71.02% and the highest resistance to Ampicillin was 83.95%, Tetracycline 80.97%, and Co-trimoxazole 63.92%.   Conclusion: Our results suggest that the cause of the high resistance of Escherichia coli strains to Ampicillin and Tetracycline could be the consumption of these antibiotics. Therefore, abstaining from overuse of unnecessary antibiotics and production of new-generation and cost-effective antibiotics are recommend. 

  2. Antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in dogs given antibiotics for chronic dermatological disorders, compared with non-treated control dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saijonmaa-Koulumies L

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial resistance in canine staphylococci, Escherichia coli and enterococci, which were isolated from 22 dogs with pyoderma and a history of previous antibiotic treatment, compared to bacterial isolates from 56 non-treated control dogs. Two isolates of each bacterial species per dog were investigated, if detected. Staphylococcal isolates from dogs with pyoderma (35 isolates were more resistant to sulphatrimethoprim than the isolates from controls (56 isolates (57% vs. 25%, p E. coli was detected (24 and 74 isolates from treated and control dogs, respectively, but the differences were not significant. Resistance for macrolide-lincosamides was approximately 20% among staphylococci in both groups. Resistance to ampicillin among enterococci was 4%–7%. The age of the dogs might have an impact on resistance: multiresistance among staphylococcal isolates from younger dogs (≤5 years was more common than in older dogs (≥6 years (24%, vs. 0%, 63 and 27 isolates, respectively, p = 0.02. Staphylococci in younger dogs were more resistant to tetracycline (48% vs. 11%, p E. coli from older dogs tended to be more resistant, although a significant difference was detected only in resistance to tetracycline (13% vs. 2% of 40 and 50 isolates respecthely, p = 0.04. The results of this small study indicate that resistance in canine staphylococci in the capital area of Finland is comparable with many other countries in Europe. Resistance in indicator bacteria, E. coli and enterococci, was low.

  3. Virulence, Antimicrobial Resistance Properties and Phylogenetic Background of Non-H7 EnteropathogenicEscherichia coliO157.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Mithila; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M D; Zhou, Kai; Rossen, John W A; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli ( E .coli) O157 that do not produce Shiga toxin and do not possess flagellar antigen H7 are of diverse H serotypes. In this study, the antibiotic resistance properties, genotype of a set of virulence associated genes and the phylogenetic background of E. coli O157:non-H7 groups were compared. Whole genome sequencing was performed on fourteen O157:non-H7 isolates collected in the STEC-ID-net study. The genomes were compared with E. coli O157 genomes and a typical Enteropathogenic E. coli (tEPEC) genome downloaded from NCBI. Twenty-six (86%) of the analyzed genomes had the intimin encoding gene eae but of different types mostly correlating with their H types, e.g., H16, H26, H39, and H45 carried intimin type ε, β, κ, and α, respectively. They belonged to several E. coli phylogenetic groups, i.e., to phylogenetic group A, B1, B2, and D. Seven (50%) of our collected O157:non-H7 isolates were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Several mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, insertion elements, and pathogenicity islands, carrying a set of virulence and resistance genes were found in the E. coli O157:non-H7 isolates. Core genome phylogenetic analysis showed that O157:non-H7 isolates probably evolved from different phylogenetic lineages and were distantly related to the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. We hypothesize that independent acquisition of mobile genetic elements by isolates of different lineages have contributed to the different molecular features of the O157:non-H7 strains. Although distantly related to the STEC O157, E. coli O157:non-H7 isolates from multiple genetic background could be considered as pathogen of concern for their diverse virulence and antibiotic resistance properties.

  4. Antimicrobial-resistant faecal Escherichia coli in wild mammals in central Europe: multiresistant Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum ß-lactamases in wild boars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Literak, I.; Dolejska, Monika; Radimersky, T.

    2010-01-01

    mg l-1 of cefotaxime. From plates with positive growth, one isolate was recovered and identified as E. coli. Susceptibility to 12 antibiotics was tested using the disk diffusion method. Resistance genes, class 1 and 2 integrons and gene cassettes were detected in resistant isolates by polymerase......(TEM-52b). The bla(CTX-M-1) genes were carried on approx. 90 kb IncI1 conjugative plasmids. Conclusions: Antibiotic-resistant E. coli occured in populations of wild mammals in various prevalences. Significance and Impact of the Study: Wild mammals are reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant E. coli including......Aims: To determine the presence of antibiotic-resistant faecal Escherichia coli in populations of wild mammals in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Methods and Results: Rectal swabs or faeces collected during 2006-2008 from wild mammals were spread on MacConkey agar and MacConkey agar containing 2...

  5. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial resistance of faecal and urinary Escherichia coli isolated from dogs and humans in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Tramuta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During this study, 109 faecal Escherichia coli samples isolated from 61 dogs and 48 humans were characterised according to phylogenetic group, extraintestinal virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. The isolates from dogs were predominantly distributed within phylogroup B1 (36%, while the majority of human strains belonged to phylogroup B2 (54%. The prevalence of cnf1, hlyA, papC and sfa virulence genes was significantly associated with the group B2. Canine isolates showed multidrug resistance (MDR more frequently than human strains. Since group B2 contains most of the strains that cause extraintestinal infections, all 46 B2 faecal strains were confronted against an addition population of 57 urinary E. coli strains belonging to the same phylogroup. The comparison shows that there was no significant difference in the occurrence of virulence factors or in the distribution of antibiotic resistance between faecal and urinary E. coli isolates fromd dogs. At the same time, a highly significant association was detected between multiple resistence and the source of the strains and between MDR and E. coli isolated from urine in human. This study highlighted similar features of E. coli isolated across sources and hosts. The data suggest a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance in faecal strains, which may represent a serious health risk since these strains can function as a reservoir for uropathogenic E. coli.

  6. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in primary care, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba, Gloria; Holm, Anne; Hansen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). Data from the current National Surveillance program in Denmark (DANMAP) may not accurately represent the prevalence of resistant E. coli in primary care, because only urine samples from complicated...... 485 (96%) patients. According to the European Urinalysis Standards, 261 (54%) patients had positive bacteriuria. The most common uropathogen in patients with uncomplicated (uUTI) and complicated (cUTI) urinary tract infection was E. coli 105 (69%) and 76 (70%), respectively. Eighty-two (45%) of 181 E......: Observational study carried out from December 2014 to December 2015. Thirty-nine general practices from The Capital Region of Denmark included adult patients with urinary tract symptoms and suspected UTI. All urine samples were sent to the central laboratory Statens Serum Institut (SSI). Significant bacteriuria...

  7. Major diseases, extensive misuse, and high antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli in large- and small-scale dairy cattle farms in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, Mohammad M; Bani Salman, Alaa E; Davis, Margaret A; Roess, Amira A

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the major diseases, antimicrobial use, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in dairy cattle in Jordan. Forty-three (large, n = 21; small, n = 22) farms were surveyed. A validated questionnaire was administered to the herdsmen to elicit information about disease prevalence, antimicrobial knowledge, and antimicrobial use. In addition, fecal samples were collected from 5 lactating animals on each farm. A total of 520 E. coli isolates were tested for resistance to 12 antimicrobials. From the herdsmen's perspective, the diseases that require use of veterinary services in large and small production systems were mastitis (51.2%), metritis (51.2%), and enteritis (39.5%), and the most commonly used antimicrobials were oxytetracycline and streptomycin. Dairy herdsmen (83.7%) reported that it is easy to purchase antimicrobials without a veterinary prescription and 97.7% of them more frequently changed the antimicrobial drug rather than increasing the dose when presented with nonresponse to treatment. Escherichia coli isolates exhibited high resistance to streptomycin (47.5%), tetracycline (45.4%), and ampicillin (34.2%). Less than 10% of isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol, kanamycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and ceftriaxone. Overall, 64.6 and 37.1% of the E. coli isolates exhibited resistance to ≥1 antimicrobial and multidrug resistance (resistance to ≥3 antimicrobial classes), respectively. The isolates exhibited 107 antimicrobial resistance profiles. This study indicates that antimicrobials are frequently misused in dairies in Jordan and that resistance among commensal E. coli toward antimicrobials of human and veterinary importance is high. Therefore, educational programs for herdsmen and enacting regulations and guidelines are necessary to promote the judicious use of antimicrobials in dairy animals in Jordan. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Five-Year Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Urinary Escherichia coli at an Australian Tertiary Hospital: Time Series Analyses of Prevalence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasugba, Oyebola; Mitchell, Brett G; Mnatzaganian, George; Das, Anindita; Collignon, Peter; Gardner, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the antimicrobial resistance temporal trends and seasonal variation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infections (UTIs) over five years, from 2009 to 2013, and compares prevalence of resistance in hospital- and community-acquired E. coli UTI. A cross sectional study of E. coli UTIs from patients attending a tertiary referral hospital in Canberra, Australia was undertaken. Time series analysis was performed to illustrate resistance trends. Only the first positive E. coli UTI per patient per year was included in the analysis. A total of 15,022 positive cultures from 8724 patients were identified. Results are based on 5333 first E. coli UTIs, from 4732 patients, of which 84.2% were community-acquired. Five-year hospital and community resistance rates were highest for ampicillin (41.9%) and trimethoprim (20.7%). Resistance was lowest for meropenem (0.0%), nitrofurantoin (2.7%), piperacillin-tazobactam (2.9%) and ciprofloxacin (6.5%). Resistance to amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, gentamicin and piperacillin-tazobactam were significantly higher in hospital- compared to community-acquired UTIs (9.3% versus 6.2%; 15.4% versus 9.7%; 5.2% versus 3.7% and 5.2% versus 2.5%, respectively). Trend analysis showed significant increases in resistance over five years for amoxycillin-clavulanate, trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, cefazolin, ceftriaxone and gentamicin (Presistance (augmented Dickey-Fuller statistic = 4.136; P = 0.006). An association between ciprofloxacin resistance, cefazolin resistance and ceftriaxone resistance with older age was noted. Given the relatively high resistance rates for ampicillin and trimethoprim, these antimicrobials should be reconsidered for empirical treatment of UTIs in this patient population. Our findings have important implications for UTI treatment based on setting of acquisition.

  9. Impact of third-generation-cephalosporin administration in hatcheries on fecal Escherichia coli antimicrobial resistance in broilers and layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Sandrine; Jouy, Eric; Larvor, Emeline; Eono, Florent; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Kempf, Isabelle

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the impact of the hatchery practice of administering third-generation cephalosporin (3GC) on the selection and persistence of 3GC-resistant Escherichia coli in poultry. We studied 15 3GC-treated (TB) and 15 non-3GC-treated (NTB) broiler flocks and 12 3GC-treated (TL) and 10 non-3GC-treated (NTL) future layer flocks. Fecal samples from each flock were sampled before arrival on the farm (day 0), on day 2, on day 7, and then twice more. E. coli isolates were isolated on MacConkey agar without antibiotics and screened for 3GC resistance, and any 3GC-resistant E. coli isolates were further analyzed. 3GC-resistant E. coli isolates were found in all 3GC-treated flocks on at least one sampling date. The percentages of 3GC-resistant E. coli isolates were significantly higher in TB (41.5%) than in NTB (19.5%) flocks and in TL (49.5%) than in NTL (24.5%) flocks. In the day 2 samples, more than 80% of the E. coli strains isolated were 3GC resistant. 3GC-resistant E. coli strains were still detected at the end of the follow-up period in 6 out of 27 3GC-treated and 5 out of 25 non-3GC-treated flocks. Many 3GC-resistant E. coli strains were resistant to tetracycline, and there were significant differences in the percentages of resistance to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, streptomycin, or gentamicin between treated and nontreated flocks. blaCTX-M and blaCMY-2 were the most frequently detected genes. These results clearly demonstrated that 3GC-resistant strains are introduced early in flocks and that the use of 3GC in hatcheries promotes the selection of 3GC-resistant E. coli. Measures must be implemented to avoid the spread and selection of 3GC-resistant strains. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Characterization of integron-mediated antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated from a captive population of Amur tigers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Chen, Jianfei; Wang, Yulong; Zhang, Yanlong; Liu, Dan; Hua, Yuping

    2013-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify and characterize integrons and integrated resistance gene cassettes among multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a captive population of Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) in China. In addition, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons was assessed in E. coli strains (n = 61) isolated from a captive population of Amur tigers in Heilongjiang Amur Tiger Park, China. Among the isolates, 52.46% (32 of 61) were positive for intI1, but no isolates carried intI2 or intI3. Most isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, aztreonam, and polymyxin B, while they also exhibited high incidence rates of resistance to ampicillin, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and dihydrofolate reductase. Sequencing analysis revealed three gene cassettes, which encoded resistance to dihydrofolate reductase (dfrA15), dihydrofolate reductase (dfrA12), and adenyltransferase (aadA2). The gene cassette arrays dfrA15 (31%) and dfrA12-aadA2 (19%) were most prevalent among these isolates.

  11. Induction of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli and Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Strains after Adaptation to Disinfectant Commonly Used on Farms in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung, Nguyen T.; Thuy, Cao T.; Trung, Nguyen V.; Campbell, James; Baker, Stephen; Thwaites, Guy; Hoa, Ngo T.; Carrique-Mas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In Vietnam, commercial disinfectants containing quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are commonly used in pig and poultry farms to maintain hygiene during production. We hypothesized that sustained exposure to sub-bactericidal concentrations of QAC-based disinfectants may result in increased levels of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among Enterobacteriacea due to the increase of efflux pump expression. To test this hypothesis we exposed six antimicrobial-susceptible Escherichia coli (E. coli) and six antimicrobial-susceptible non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) isolates to increasing concentrations of a commonly used commercial disinfectant containing a mix of benzalkonium chloride and glutaraldehyde. Over the 12-day experiment, strains exhibited a significant change in their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the disinfectant product (mean increase of 31% (SD ± 40)) (p = 0.02, paired Wilcoxon test). Increases in MIC for the disinfectant product were strongly correlated with increases in MIC (or decreases in inhibition zone) for all antimicrobials (Pearson’s correlation coefficient 0.71–0.83, all p inhibitor, resulted in reductions in the prevalence of AMR ranging from 0.7% to 3.3% in these organisms, indicating a small contribution of efflux pumps on the observed prevalence of AMR on farms. These results suggest that the mass usage of commercial disinfectants, many of which contain QACs, is potentially a contributing factor on the generation and maintenance of AMR in animal production in Vietnam. PMID:27025637

  12. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolated in newly-hatched chickens and effect of amoxicillin treatment during their growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Belenguer, Ana; Doménech, Eva; Villagrá, Arantxa; Fenollar, Alejandro; Ferrús, Maria Antonia

    2016-08-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animals is the major determinant for the propagation of resistant bacteria in the animal reservoir. However, other factors may also play a part, and in particular vertical spread between the generations has been suggested to be an important transmission pathway. The objective of this paper was to determine the resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from newly-hatched chickens as well as to study the antibiotic pressure effect when amoxicillin was administered during their growing period. With this aim, meconium from 22 one-day-old Ross chickens was analysed. In addition, during their growth period, amoxicillin treatments at days 7, 21 and 35 were carried out. Results showed a high number of E. coli-resistant strains were isolated from the treated one-day-old chickens, and were the highest for β-lactams group, followed by quinolone and tetracyclines. After treatment with amoxicillin, the highest percentage of resistances were detected for this antibiotic compared to the others analysed, with significant differences in resistance percentages between control and treated broilers detected in relation to ampicillin, cephalothin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Differences in resistances to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid between control and treated animals were not observed and there was lack of resistance for amikacin and ceftriaxone. These results suggest the possibility of vertical transmission of resistant strains to newly-hatched chicks from parent flocks, and seem to indicate that the treatment with amoxicillin increased the resistance of E. coli to other antibiotics.

  13. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance and class 1 integrons among commensal Escherichia coli isolates from infants and elderly persons

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    Kõljalg Siiri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of our study was to compare the presence of the intI1 gene and its associations with the antibiotic resistance of commensal Escherichia coli strains in children with/without previous antibiotic treatments and elderly hospitalized/healthy individuals. Methods One-hundred-and-fifteen intestinal E. coli strains were analyzed: 30 strains from 10 antibiotic-naive infants; 27 from 9 antibiotic-treated outpatient infants; 30 from 9 healthy elderly volunteers; and 28 from 9 hospitalized elderly patients. The MIC values of ampicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and sulfamethoxazole were measured by E-test and IntI1 was detected by PCR. Results Out of the 115 strains, 56 (49% carried class 1 integron genes. Comparing persons without medical interventions, we found in antibiotic-naive children a significantly higher frequency of integron-bearing strains and MIC values than in healthy elderly persons (53% versus 17%; p Conclusion The prevalence of integrons in commensal E. coli strains in persons without previous medical intervention depended on age. The resistance of integron-carrying and non-carrying strains is more dependent on influencing factors (hospitalization and antibiotic administration in particular groups than merely the presence or absence of integrons.

  14. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in primary care, Denmark.

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    Córdoba, Gloria; Holm, Anne; Hansen, Frank; Hammerum, Anette M; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-10-10

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). Data from the current National Surveillance program in Denmark (DANMAP) may not accurately represent the prevalence of resistant E. coli in primary care, because only urine samples from complicated cases may be forwarded to the microbiological departments at hospitals for diagnostic examination. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of resistant E. coli to the most commonly used antimicrobial agents in primary care in a consecutive sample of patients from general practice. Observational study carried out from December 2014 to December 2015. Thirty-nine general practices from The Capital Region of Denmark included adult patients with urinary tract symptoms and suspected UTI. All urine samples were sent to the central laboratory Statens Serum Institut (SSI). Significant bacteriuria was interpreted according to the European Urinalysis Standards. Susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) standards. From the 39 general practices 505 patients were recruited. Completed data were obtained from 485 (96%) patients. According to the European Urinalysis Standards, 261 (54%) patients had positive bacteriuria. The most common uropathogen in patients with uncomplicated (uUTI) and complicated (cUTI) urinary tract infection was E. coli 105 (69%) and 76 (70%), respectively. Eighty-two (45%) of 181 E. coli isolates were resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics and 50 out of 82 isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. The highest resistance-rate was found against ampicillin 34% (95% CI 24;42) in uUTI and 36% (24;46) in cUTI. There were no differences in the distribution of resistance between uncomplicated and complicated cases. The prevalence of resistance was similar to the one reported in DANMAP 2014. In E. coli from uUTI there is high resistance rates to

  15. The prevalence of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and antimicrobial resistance patterns of nonverocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella in Ontario broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R J; McEwen, S A; Clarke, R C; Meek, A H

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella in Ontario broiler chickens was determined by culturing cloacal samples from 500 individual birds selected from 50 poultry farms. Resistance to antimicrobials was determined for each of the isolates. In addition, abattoir and farm-level management data were obtained to evaluate variables that may be considered risk factors for infection. The variables selected included: Percentage of birds condemned at slaughter, percentage of birds dead-on-arrival, bird weight, truck number, farm size, hatchery source, litter source and type, feed source, mortality levels, type of water drinker, water sanitization, down time, barn clean out and history of antibiotic treatment. None of the cloacal samples revealed the presence of verocytotoxin-producing E. coli, though 19/500 (3.8%) contained Salmonella organisms. Nine different Salmonella serotypes were isolated; the most common being S. hadar, S. heidelberg and S. mbandaka. Resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was common among Salmonella (63%) and E. coli (25.2%) isolates. Resistance to two or more antimicrobials occurred in 420/500 (84%) of the E. coli isolates. No statistically significant associations between abattoir or farm-level management variables and the Salmonella-status of farms were demonstrated. PMID:2686829

  16. Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolated from Miranda donkey (Equus asinus): an old problem from a new source with a different approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Isabel; Campo, Rosa Del; Sousa, Margarida; Silva, Nuno; Carrola, João; Marinho, Catarina; Santos, Tiago; Carvalho, Sílvia; Nóvoa, Miguel; Quaresma, Miguel; Pereira, José Eduardo; Cobo, Marta; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2017-03-01

    The Miranda donkey (Equus asinus) is an endangeredasinine from Miranda do Douro region, located in the north east of Portugal. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from these animals. In March 2014, a total of 66 faecal samples were recovered from independent animals. Antibiotic resistance was determined by the disc diffusion method. Carriage of genes coding for antibiotic-resistant and virulent factors was analysed by PCR. A total of 66 E. coli and 41 enterococcal isolates were detected, with Enterococcus faecium (61 %) and Enterococcus hirae (24 %) being the most prevalent species. For enterococcal isolates, high percentages of resistance rates to tetracycline (68.3 %), quinupristin/dalfopristin (51.2 %) and ciprofloxacin (48.8 %) were observed. The genes erm(A) and/or erm(B), tet(M) and/or tet(L), vat(D) and/or vat(E) and aph(3')-IIIa were also found. The most frequent virulence gene detected was gel(E), followed by ace, cpd and hyl. Escherichia coli isolates were highly resistant to streptomycin (78 %), whereas 39 % of them exhibited resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracycline. Genes sul1 and/or sul2 were detected in 66.7 % of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant isolates. The virulence genes detected were fim(A) (46 %) and cnf1 (27 %). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing antibiotic resistance among Escherichiacoli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from the Miranda donkey in Portugal, indicating possible antibiotic-resistant bacterial reservoirs. However, the detection of these resistances presents a low risk for other animals and human beings in that rural area.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors and genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolates from household water supply in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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    Prabhat Kumar Talukdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unsafe water supplies continue to raise public health concerns, especially in urban areas in low resource countries. To understand the extent of public health risk attributed to supply water in Dhaka city, Bangladesh, Escherichia coli isolated from tap water samples collected from different locations of the city were characterized for their antibiotic resistance, pathogenic properties and genetic diversity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 233 E. coli isolates obtained from 175 tap water samples were analysed for susceptibility to 16 different antibiotics and for the presence of genes associated with virulence and antibiotic resistance. Nearly 36% (n = 84 of the isolates were multi-drug(≥ 3 classes of antibiotics resistant (MDR and 26% (n = 22 of these were positive for extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL. Of the 22 ESBL-producers, 20 were positive for bla CTX-M-15, 7 for bla OXA-1-group (all had bla OXA-47 and 2 for bla CMY-2. Quinolone resistance genes, qnrS and qnrB were detected in 6 and 2 isolates, respectively. Around 7% (n = 16 of the isolates carried virulence gene(s characteristic of pathogenic E. coli; 11 of these contained lt and/or st and thus belonged to enterotoxigenic E. coli and 5 contained bfp and eae and thus belonged to enteropathogenic E. coli. All MDR isolates carried multiple plasmids (2 to 8 of varying sizes ranging from 1.2 to >120 MDa. Ampicillin and ceftriaxone resistance were co-transferred in conjugative plasmids of 70 to 100 MDa in size, while ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline resistance were co-transferred in conjugative plasmids of 50 to 90 MDa. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed diverse genetic fingerprints of pathogenic isolates. SIGNIFICANCE: Multi-drug resistant E. coli are wide spread in public water supply in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Transmission of resistant bacteria and plasmids through supply water pose serious threats to public health in

  18. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat in Iran: serogroups, virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momtaz, Hassan; Jamshidi, Alireza

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the virulence factors, serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat samples. A total of 422 chicken meat samples were collected from 5 townships of Iran. Specimens were immediately transferred to the laboratory in a cooler with an ice pack. Samples were cultured, and the positive culture samples were analyzed by PCR assays. Finally, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using the disk diffusion method in Mueller-Hinton agar. According to the results, out of 422 samples, 146 (34.59%) were confirmed to be E. coli positive and among E. coli-positive samples, 51 (34.93%) and 31 (21.23%) were from attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) subgroups, respectively. All of the EHEC-positive samples had all stx1, eaeA, and ehly virulence genes, whereas only 5 (9.80%) of AEEC subgroup had all stx1, stx2, and eaeA genes. As the data revealed, O157 was the most prevalent and O111 was the least prevalent strains in the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) population. Among STEC strains, sulI and blaSHV had the highest and lowest incidence rate, respectively. There was a high resistance to tetracycline (76.82%), followed by chloramphenicol (73.17%) and nitrofurantoin (63.41%), but there was low resistance to cephalotine (7.31%) antibiotics in isolated strains. Results shows that the PCR technique has a high performance for detection of serogroups, virulence genes, and antibiotic resistance genes in STEC strains. This study is the first prevalence report of detection of virulence genes, serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties of STEC strains isolated from chicken meat samples in Iran. Based on the results, chicken meat is one of the main sources of STEC strains and its virulence factors in Iran, so an accurate meat inspection would reduce disease outbreaks.

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance of Faecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Pig Farms with Different Durations of In-feed Antimicrobial Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J F; Boland, F; Egan, J; Fanning, S; Markey, B K; Leonard, F C

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial use and resistance in animal and food production are of concern to public health. The primary aims of this study were to determine the frequency of resistance to 12 antimicrobials in Escherichia coli isolates from 39 pig farms and to identify patterns of antimicrobial use on these farms. Further aims were to determine whether a categorization of farms based on the duration of in-feed antimicrobial use (long-term versus short-term) could predict the occurrence of resistance on these farms and to identify the usage of specific antimicrobial drugs associated with the occurrence of resistance. Escherichia coli were isolated from all production stages on these farms; susceptibility testing was carried out against a panel of antimicrobials. Antimicrobial prescribing data were collected, and farms were categorized as long term or short term based on these. Resistance frequencies and antimicrobial use were tabulated. Logistic regression models of resistance to each antimicrobial were constructed with stage of production, duration of antimicrobial use and the use of 5 antimicrobial classes included as explanatory variables in each model. The greatest frequencies of resistance were observed to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and streptomycin with the highest levels of resistance observed in isolates from first-stage weaned pigs. Differences in the types of antimicrobial drugs used were noted between long-term and short-term use farms. Categorization of farms as long- or short-term use was sufficient to predict the likely occurrence of resistance to 3 antimicrobial classes and could provide an aid in the control of resistance in the food chain. Stage of production was a significant predictor variable in all models of resistance constructed and did not solely reflect antimicrobial use at each stage. Cross-selection and co-selection for resistance was evident in the models constructed, and the use of trimethoprim/sulphonamide drugs in particular was

  20. Comparison of the Prevalences and Antimicrobial Resistances of Escherichia coli Isolates from Different Retail Meats in the United States, 2002 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickenstaff, K.; Bodeis-Jones, S.; Gaines, S. A.; Tong, E.; McDermott, P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates were recovered from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System retail meat program and examined for antimicrobial susceptibility. Retail meat samples (n = 11,921) from four U.S. states collected during 2002 to 2008, consisting of 2,988 chicken breast, 2,942 ground turkey, 2,991 ground beef, and 3,000 pork chop samples, were analyzed. A total of 8,286 E. coli isolates were recovered. The greatest numbers of samples contaminated with the organism were chicken (83.5%) and turkey (82.0%), followed by beef (68.9%) and pork (44.0%). Resistance was most common to tetracycline (50.3%), followed by streptomycin (34.6%), sulfamethoxazole-sulfisoxazole (31.6%), ampicillin (22.5%), gentamicin (18.6%), kanamycin (8.4%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (6.4%), and cefoxitin (5.2%). Less than 5% of the isolates had resistance to trimethoprim, ceftriaxone, ceftiofur, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin. All isolates were susceptible to amikacin. Compared to beef and pork isolates, the poultry meat isolates had a greater percentage of resistance to all tested drugs, with the exception of chloramphenicol, to which pork isolates had the most resistance. More than half of the turkey isolates (56%) were resistant to multidrugs (≥3 classes) compared to 38.9% of chicken, 17.3% of pork, and 9.3% of beef isolates. The blaCMY gene was present in all ceftriaxone- and ceftiofur-resistant isolates. The cmlA, flo, and catI genes were present in 45%, 43%, and 40% of chloramphenicol-resistant isolates, respectively. Most nalidixic acid-resistant isolates (98.5%) had a gyrA mutation in S83 or D87 or both, whereas only 6.7% had a parC mutation in either S80 or E84. The results showed that E. coli was commonly present in the retail meats, and antimicrobial resistance profiles differed according to the animal origin of the isolates. PMID:22247155

  1. Distribution and Relationships of Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants among Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant or Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Rivers and Sewage Treatment Plants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Masato; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kuroda, Makoto; Fujii, Yuki; Murata, Misato; Lee, Ken-Ichi; Joshua, Derrick Ian; Balakrishna, Keshava; Bairy, Indira; Subramanian, Kaushik; Krishnan, Padma; Munuswamy, Natesan; Sinha, Ravindra K; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Guruge, Keerthi S

    2016-05-01

    To determine the distribution and relationship of antimicrobial resistance determinants among extended-spectrum-cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant or carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from the aquatic environment in India, water samples were collected from rivers or sewage treatment plants in five Indian states. A total of 446 E. coli isolates were randomly obtained. Resistance to ESC and/or carbapenem was observed in 169 (37.9%) E. coli isolates, which were further analyzed. These isolates showed resistance to numerous antimicrobials; more than half of the isolates exhibited resistance to eight or more antimicrobials. The blaNDM gene was detected in 14/21 carbapenem-resistant E. coli isolates: blaNDM-1 in 2 isolates, blaNDM-5 in 7 isolates, and blaNDM-7 in 5 isolates. The blaCTX-M gene was detected in 112 isolates (66.3%): blaCTX-M-15 in 108 isolates and blaCTX-M-55 in 4 isolates. We extracted 49 plasmids from selected isolates, and their whole-genome sequences were determined. Fifty resistance genes were detected, and 11 different combinations of replicon types were observed among the 49 plasmids. The network analysis results suggested that the plasmids sharing replicon types tended to form a community, which is based on the predicted gene similarity among the plasmids. Four communities each containing from 4 to 17 plasmids were observed. Three of the four communities contained plasmids detected in different Indian states, suggesting that the interstate dissemination of ancestor plasmids has already occurred. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the blaNDM-positive plasmids detected in this study with known sequences of related plasmids suggested that various mutation events facilitated the evolution of the plasmids and that plasmids with similar genetic backgrounds have widely disseminated in India. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolated from Miranda Donkey (Equus asinus): an old problem from a new source with a different approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Isabel; Del Campo, Rosa; Sousa, Margarida; Silva, Nuno; Carrola, João; Marinho, Catarina; Santos, Tiago; Carvalho, Silvia; Nóvoa, Miguel; Quaresma, Miguel; Pereira, José Eduardo; Cobo, Marta; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patricia

    2017-01-05

    The Miranda Donkey (Equus asinus) is an endangered asinine from Miranda do Douro region, located in North East of Portugal. We study the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and virulence genes in Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. isolates from these animals. In March 2014, a total of 66 faecal samples were recovered from independent animals. Antibiotic resistance was determined by the disk diffusion method. Carriage of genes codifying for antibiotic resistant and virulent factors was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 66 E. coli and 41 enterococci isolates were detected, being the most prevalent species Enterococcus faecium (61%) and Enterococcus hirae (24%). For enterococcal isolates, high percentages of resistant rates to tetracycline (68.3%), quinupristin/dalfopristin (51.2%) and ciprofloxacin (48.8%) were observed. The erm(A) and/or erm(B), tet(M) and/or tet(L), vat(D) and/or vat(E) and aph(3')-IIIa genes were also found. The most frequent virulence gene detected was gel(E), followed by ace, cpd and hyl. E. coli isolates were highly resistant to streptomycin (78%), whereas 39% of them exhibited resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracycline. sul1 and/or sul2 genes were detected in 66.7% of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistant isolates. The virulence genes detected were fim(A) (46%) and cnf1 (27%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing antibiotic resistance among E. coli and Enterococcus spp. Isolates from Miranda Donkey in Portugal, pointed out as possible antibiotic-resistant bacteria reservoirs. Although the detection of these resistances they present low risk for other animals as well as for human being, in that rural area context.

  3. Survey of Minas frescal cheese from Southwest Minas Gerais for virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates

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    Mõnica Hitomi Okura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The soft cheese Minas frescal is one of the most popular cheese in Brazil, which is typically manufactured in small dairy farms under unsatisfactory hygiene conditions. To assess the risk involved in consumption of this cheese, virulence markers were investigated in 330 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 30 Minas frescal cheeses inspected by official government agency (SIF - serviço de inspeção federal, from 50 cheeses not inspected by SIF and 31 cheeses not inspected by SIF with spice added, all of them collected in the southwest of Minas Gerais State. The E. coli isolates were screened for the presence of Shiga toxin-encoding (stx 1 and stx 2, intimin (eae genes and for the presence of (pap, sfa, afa genes related to adhesion in epithelial cells. The only gene detected by PCR was the sfa gene at one isolate. The strains were also screened for resistance to 9 antimicrobial drugs. Predominant resistance was to cephalothin, tetracycline and streptomycin. Multidrug resistance was found among isolates from cheese with SIF (16.6%, cheese without SIF (8.0% and cheese without SIF with spice added (30.0% what is a reason for concern due to the high consumption of raw milk cheese by the Brazilian population.

  4. Prevalence and patterns of antimicrobial resistance of fecal Escherichia coli among pigs on 47 farrow-to-finish farms with different in-feed medication policies in Ontario and British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Akwar, Holy T.; Poppe, Cornelis; Wilson, Jeff; Reid-Smith, Richard J.; Dyck, Monica; Waddington, Josh; Shang, Dayue; McEwen, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and patterns of antimicrobial resistance in pigs on farms that medicated swine ration and those that did not. A total of 940 isolates of Escherichia coli from 188 pooled fecal samples obtained from weaner and finisher pigs on 47 farrow-to-finish swine farms (34 farms used in-feed medication and 13 did not) were tested for susceptibility to 21 antimicrobials using a breakpoint concentration method. The prevalence of resistance ...

  5. Temporal Trends in Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence-Associated Traits within the Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 Clonal Group and Its H30 and H30-Rx Subclones, 1968 to 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bente; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Leihof, Rikke Fleron

    2014-01-01

    To identify possible explanations for the recent global emergence of Escherichia coli sequence type (ST) 131 (ST131), we analyzed temporal trends within ST131 O25 for antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes, biofilm formation, and the H30 and H30-Rx subclones. For this, we surveyed the WHO E....... coli and Klebsiella Centre's E. coli collection (1957 to 2011) for ST131 isolates, characterized them extensively, and assessed them for temporal trends. Overall, antimicrobial resistance increased temporally in prevalence and extent, due mainly to the recent appearance of the H30 (1997) and H30-Rx...... occurred only after 2000 and 2002, respectively, in association with the H30 and H30-Rx subclones, which were characterized by multidrug resistance (including extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase [ESBL] production: H30-Rx) and absence of biofilm production. Capsular antigen K100 occurred exclusively among H30...

  6. Feeding of waste milk to Holstein calves affects antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli and Pasteurella multocida isolated from fecal and nasal swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynou, G; Bach, A; Terré, M

    2017-04-01

    The use of milk containing antimicrobial residues in calf feeding programs has been shown to select for resistant fecal Escherichia coli in dairy calves. However, information is scarce about the effects of feeding calves waste milk (WM) on the prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of fecal E. coli and nasal Pasteurella multocida isolates from calves fed either milk replacer (MR) or WM in 8 commercial dairy farms (4 farms per feeding program). Fecal and nasal swabs were collected from 20 ± 5 dairy calves at 42 ± 3.2 d of age, and from 10 of these at approximately 1 yr of age in each study farm to isolate the targeted bacteria. Furthermore, resistance of E. coli isolates from calf-environment and from 5 calves at birth and their dams was also evaluated in each study farm. Resistances were tested against the following antimicrobial agents: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, colistin, doxycycline (DO), enrofloxacin (ENR), erythromycin, florfenicol, imipenem, and streptomycin. A greater number of fecal E. coli resistant to ENR, florfenicol, and streptomycin and more multidrug-resistant E. coli phenotypes were isolated in feces of calves fed WM than in those fed MR. However, the prevalence of fecal-resistant E. coli was also influenced by calf age, as it increased from birth to 6 wk of age for ENR and DO and decreased from 6 wk to 1 yr of age for DO regardless of the feeding program. From nasal samples, an increase in the prevalence of colistin-resistant P. multocida was observed in calves fed WM compared with those fed MR. The resistance patterns of E. coli isolates from calves and their dams tended to differ, whereas similar resistance profiles among E. coli isolates from farm environment and calves were observed. The findings of this study suggest that feeding calves WM fosters the presence of resistant bacteria in the lower gut and respiratory tracts of dairy calves

  7. Resistencia a los antimicrobianos de aislamientos de Escherichia coli obtenidos de cerdos de la República Argentina Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from pigs in Argentina

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    F.A. Moredo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 69 aislamientos de Escherichia coli provenientes de cerdos clínicamente sanos o con signología clínica no compatible con diarreas causadas por este microorganismo, con el objetivo de determinar el patrón de resistencia a los antimicrobianos frecuentemente utilizados en medicina veterinaria y humana. Se empleó el método de difusión en agar. Se observaron elevados porcentajes de resistencia frente a ampicilina, estreptomicina y tetraciclina, antimicrobianos utilizados en las explotaciones porcinas, y frente a trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol y cloranfenicol, compuestos que han dejado de utilizarse hace varios años. El 62% de los aislamientos mostró multirresistencia. Los resultados obtenidos en el presente trabajo corroboran la hipótesis de que la distribución fenotípica de la resistencia y, posiblemente, la de sus determinantes genéticos están directamente influenciadas por los tratamientos antimicrobianos utilizados.Sixty-nine Escherichia coli isolates from healthy pigs or with clinical signs non-compatible with diarrhea caused by this microorganism, were studied. The purpose was to determine the resistance profile against antimicrobials frequently used in veterinary and human medicine. The agar diffusion method was used. High resistance percentages against antimicrobials used in swine farms such as ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline were observed, as well as against trimetoprim-sulfametoxazole and chloramphenicol, compounds that were stopped being used several years ago. Sixty two percent of isolates showed multidrug-resistance. The results obtained in this work corroborate the hypothesis that the phenotypic distribution of resistance and possibly that of its genetic determinants, are directly influenced by the antimicrobial treatments used.

  8. Induction of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli and Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Strains after Adaptation to Disinfectant Commonly Used on Farms in Vietnam

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    Nguyen T. Nhung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Vietnam, commercial disinfectants containing quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs are commonly used in pig and poultry farms to maintain hygiene during production. We hypothesized that sustained exposure to sub-bactericidal concentrations of QAC-based disinfectants may result in increased levels of antimicrobial resistance (AMR among Enterobacteriacea due to the increase of efflux pump expression. To test this hypothesis we exposed six antimicrobial-susceptible Escherichia coli (E. coli and six antimicrobial-susceptible non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS isolates to increasing concentrations of a commonly used commercial disinfectant containing a mix of benzalkonium chloride and glutaraldehyde. Over the 12-day experiment, strains exhibited a significant change in their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the disinfectant product (mean increase of 31% (SD ± 40 (p = 0.02, paired Wilcoxon test. Increases in MIC for the disinfectant product were strongly correlated with increases in MIC (or decreases in inhibition zone for all antimicrobials (Pearson’s correlation coefficient 0.71–0.83, all p < 0.01. The greatest increases in MIC (or decreases in inhibition zone were observed for ampicillin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol, and the smallest for gentamicin, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole. The treatment of 155 representative E. coli isolates from farmed and wild animals in the Mekong Delta (Vietnam with phenyl-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN, a generic efflux pump inhibitor, resulted in reductions in the prevalence of AMR ranging from 0.7% to 3.3% in these organisms, indicating a small contribution of efflux pumps on the observed prevalence of AMR on farms. These results suggest that the mass usage of commercial disinfectants, many of which contain QACs, is potentially a contributing factor on the generation and maintenance of AMR in animal production in Vietnam.

  9. Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli in Iranian Pediatric Patients With and Without Diarrhea: O-Serogroups, Virulence Factors and Antimicrobial Resistance Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormanesh, Banafshe; Siroosbakhat, Soheila; Karimi Goudarzi, Peyman; Afsharkhas, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli is an important human pathogen cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in humans is a significant public health. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial resistance properties of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) strains with respect to their seasonal, age and geographical distributions in Iranian pediatric patients with and without diarrhea. Patients and Methods: Four hundred and eighty swab samples were taken from pediatric patients with and without diarrhea of four major provinces of Iran. Swab samples were immediately cultured and the positive culture samples were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Finally, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method in Mueller-Hinton agar. Results: In total, 118 out of 200 diarrheic stool samples (59%) and 77 out of 280 non-diarrheic stool samples (27.5%) were positive for E. coli. Samples taken from one to ten months old cases (73.33%) and those from Shiraz province (81.13%) were the most commonly infected. Samples taken in the summer season (91.66%) were the most commonly infected. A significant difference was shown between AEEC and EHEC strains of E. coli. The genes encoding Shiga toxins and intimin protein were the most commonly detected in all strains. O26 (33.33%), O111 (18.18%) and O91 (12.12%) serogroups had the highest incidence in patients with and without diarrhea. Prevalence of the genes that encode resistance against ampicillin (CITM), gentamicin (aac(3)-IV) and tetracycline (tetA) were 80.30%, 75.75% and 65.15%, respectively. The STEC strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (84.84%), gentamycin (78.78%), tetracycline (50%) and sulfamethoxazole (40.90%) antibiotics. We found that 55.08% of diarrheic and 1.29% of non-diarrheic E. coli isolates were

  10. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from two paediatric cohort studies in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Anicia M; Rivera, Fulton P; Pons, Maria J; Riveros, Maribel; Gomes, Cláudia; Bernal, María; Meza, Rina; Maves, Ryan C; Huicho, Luis; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Lanata, Claudio F; Gil, Ana I; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, being of special concern in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of resistance in 205 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates from two cohort studies in children Peru. ETEC were identified by an in-house multiplex real-time PCR. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was tested by disk diffusion; mechanisms of resistance were evaluated by PCR. ETEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin (64%), cotrimoxazole (52%), tetracycline (37%); 39% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. Heat-stable toxin producing (ETEC-st) (48%) and heat-labile toxin producing ETEC (ETEC-lt) (40%) had higher rates of multidrug resistance than isolates producing both toxins (ETEC-lt-st) (21%), pPeru. However, further development of resistance should be closely monitored. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in enteric Escherichia coli from domestic pets and assessment of associated risk markers using a generalized linear mixed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Martins, Liliana R; Mahú, Maria I M; Costa, Ana L; Mendes, Angelo; Lopes, Elisabete; Mendonça, Denisa M V; Niza-Ribeiro, João J R; de Matos, Augusto J F; da Costa, Paulo Martins

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing global public health problem, which is caused by the use of antimicrobials in both human and animal medical practice. The objectives of the present cross-sectional study were as follows: (1) to determine the prevalence of resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from the feces of pets from the Porto region of Portugal against 19 antimicrobial agents and (2) to assess the individual, clinical and environmental characteristics associated with each pet as risk markers for the AMR of the E. coli isolates. From September 2009 to May 2012, rectal swabs were collected from pets selected using a systematic random procedure from the ordinary population of animals attending the Veterinary Hospital of Porto University. A total of 78 dogs and 22 cats were sampled with the objective of isolating E. coli. The animals' owners, who allowed the collection of fecal samples from their pets, answered a questionnaire to collect information about the markers that could influence the AMR of the enteric E. coli. Chromocult tryptone bile X-glucuronide agar was used for E. coli isolation, and the disk diffusion method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility. The data were analyzed using a multilevel, univariable and multivariable generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Several (49.7%) of the 396 isolates obtained in this study were multidrug-resistant. The E. coli isolates exhibited resistance to the antimicrobial agent's ampicillin (51.3%), cephalothin (46.7%), tetracycline (45.2%) and streptomycin (43.4%). Previous quinolone treatment was the main risk marker for the presence of AMR for 12 (ampicillin, cephalothin, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and aztreonam) of the 15 antimicrobials assessed. Coprophagic habits were also positively associated with an increased risk of AMR for six drugs, ampicillin, amoxicillin

  12. Transferability of antimicrobial resistance from multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from cattle in the USA to E. coli and Salmonella Newport recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate conjugative transfer of cephalosporin resistance among (n=100) strains of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli (MDRE) to Salmonella Newport and E. coli DH5-alpha recipients. To accomplish this, phenotypic and genotypic profiles were determined for MDRE, ...

  13. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and integron gene cassettes in Escherichia coli isolated from yaks (Poephagus grunniens) in Aba Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zou, Wencheng; Zeng, Jinxin; Xie, Shengze; An, Tianwu; Luo, Xiaolin; Chen, Danyu; Feng, Lan; Cheng, Guangyang; Cai, Run; Huang, Qianru; Wang, Hongning

    2017-10-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the most relevant opportunistic pathogenic bacteria as it may cause severe morbidity and mortality in yaks (poephagus grunniens). In recent years, several kinds of antibiotics have been widely used in Tibetan areas to treat the bacterial diseases, resulting in serious repercussions on the bacterial antibiotic resistance in yaks. This investigation was conducted in order to determine the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and integron gene cassettes in E. coli isolated from yaks in Aba Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Aba TAP), China. A total of 278 non-duplicated fresh samples were collected from the yaks in Aba TAP for the isolation and identification of E. coli isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is performed by using the disc diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines (CLSI, 2013). Various antibiotic resistance genes and integron gene cassettes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Overall, a total of 228 E. coli bacteria were isolated from the fresh faeces of yaks in four different geographical regions. 58% of those isolates showed multi-drug resistance capabilities (MDR) in our study. These isolated bacteria showed a high resistance rate to streptomycin (84%), cefotaxime (79%), amikacin (61%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (54%). The most common antimicrobial resistance genes in the isolates were bla CTX-M , sul1, aph (3')-IIa, aac (3)-IIa, aac (6')-Ib, tetB, with respective detection rates of 65%, 46%, 35%, 13%, 11%, and 10%. Furthermore, 66% and 6% of the strains carried Class 1 and 2 integrons, respectively. However, the class 3 integron was not detected. Gene cassette arrays in the class 1 integron included aadA1, aadA7, aadA5, aadA17, dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA12-aadA2 and dfrA17-aadA5. The most prevalent gene cassette was aadA1 (20%). For the class 2 integron, dfrA1-sat2-aadA1 (6%) and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (0.4%) were also

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serogroups O157 and O26 isolated from human cases of diarrhoeal disease in England, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Martin; Doumith, Michel; Jenkins, Claire; Dallman, Timothy J; Hopkins, Katie L; Elson, Richard; Godbole, Gauri; Woodford, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are zoonotic and transmission to humans occurs via contaminated food or contact with infected animals. In this study, WGS data were used to predict antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in STEC from symptomatic human cases to assess the extent of transmission of antibiotic-resistant E. coli from animals to humans. WGS data from 430 isolates of STEC were mapped to genes known to be associated with phenotypic AMR. Susceptibility testing was performed by a breakpoint method on all viable isolates exhibiting resistance to at least one antimicrobial. 327/396 (82.6%) of STEC O157 and 22/34 (64.7%) of STEC O26 lacked identifiable resistance genes and were predicted to be fully susceptible to 11 diverse classes of antimicrobials. For the remaining 81 isolates, 74 were phenotypically tested and there was concordance between WGS-predicted resistance and expression of phenotypic resistance. The most common resistance profile was ampicillin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulphonamide and tetracycline occurring in 25 (5.8%) isolates. Resistance to other antimicrobials, including resistance to chloramphenicol (2.1%), resistance to azithromycin (0.2%) and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (2.6%), was less frequent. Three isolates were identified as ESBL producers. β-Lactams, trimethoprim/sulphonamides and tetracyclines account for the majority of therapeutic antimicrobials sold for veterinary use and this may be a risk factor for the presence of AMR in domestically acquired human clinical isolates of STEC. Isolates that were resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamide, tetracycline and azithromycin and had reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were associated with cases who reported recent travel abroad. © Crown copyright 2016.

  15. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes detected in Campylobacter coli, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolated from the same animal sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The potential spread of antimicrobial resistant bacteria through the food chain is concerning. Animals may provide an environment for the exchange of antimicrobial resistance (AR) genes among bacteria; therefore a study was developed to identify AR genes found in common among commensal a...

  16. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs.

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    Marianne Sunde

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331 isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241 produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9 than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3, (p<0.01, Chi-square test. Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination

  17. Genetic Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance identified in Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Enteroccocus spp. isolated from U.S. food animals.

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    Jonathan Gray Frye

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AR in bacteria isolated from U.S. food animals has increased over the last several decades as have concerns of AR foodborne zoonotic human infections. Resistance mechanisms identified in U.S. animal isolates of Salmonella enterica included resistance to aminoglycosides (e.g. alleles of aacC, aadA, aadB, ant, aphA, and StrAB, -lactams (e.g. blaCMY-2, TEM-1, PSE-1, chloramphenicol (e.g. floR, cmlA, cat1, cat2, folate pathway inhibitors (e.g. alleles of sul and dfr, and tetracycline (e.g. alleles of tet(A, (B, (C, (D, (G and tetR. In the U.S., multidrug resistance (MDR mechanisms in Salmonella animal isolates were associated with integrons, or mobile genetic elements (MGEs such as IncA/C plasmids which can be transferred among bacteria. It is thought that AR Salmonella originates in food animals and is transmitted through food to humans. However, some AR Salmonella isolated from humans in the U.S. have different AR elements than those isolated from food animals, suggesting a different etiology for some AR human infections. The AR mechanisms identified in isolates from outside the U.S. are also predominantly different. For example the extended spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs are found in human and animal isolates globally; however, in the U.S., ESBLs thus far have only been found in human and not food animal isolates. Commensal bacteria in animals including Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. may be reservoirs for AR mechanisms. Many of the AR genes and MGEs found in E. coli isolated from U.S. animals are similar to those found in Salmonella. Enterococcus spp. isolated from animals frequently carry MGEs with AR genes, including resistances to aminoglycosides (e.g. alleles of aac, ant, and aph, macrolides (e.g. erm(A, erm(B,and msrC, and tetracyclines (e.g. tet(K, (L, (M, (O, (S. Continuing investigations are required to help understand and mitigate the impact of AR bacteria on human and animal health.

  18. Genetic mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance identified in Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Enteroccocus spp. isolated from U.S. food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Jonathan G.; Jackson, Charlene R.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria isolated from U.S. food animals has increased over the last several decades as have concerns of AR foodborne zoonotic human infections. Resistance mechanisms identified in U.S. animal isolates of Salmonella enterica included resistance to aminoglycosides (e.g., alleles of aacC, aadA, aadB, ant, aphA, and StrAB), β-lactams (e.g., blaCMY−2, TEM−1, PSE−1), chloramphenicol (e.g., floR, cmlA, cat1, cat2), folate pathway inhibitors (e.g., alleles of sul and dfr), and tetracycline [e.g., alleles of tet(A), (B), (C), (D), (G), and tetR]. In the U.S., multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Salmonella animal isolates were associated with integrons, or mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as IncA/C plasmids which can be transferred among bacteria. It is thought that AR Salmonella originates in food animals and is transmitted through food to humans. However, some AR Salmonella isolated from humans in the U.S. have different AR elements than those isolated from food animals, suggesting a different etiology for some AR human infections. The AR mechanisms identified in isolates from outside the U.S. are also predominantly different. For example the extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are found in human and animal isolates globally; however, in the U.S., ESBLs thus far have only been found in human and not food animal isolates. Commensal bacteria in animals including Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. may be reservoirs for AR mechanisms. Many of the AR genes and MGEs found in E. coli isolated from U.S. animals are similar to those found in Salmonella. Enterococcus spp. isolated from animals frequently carry MGEs with AR genes, including resistances to aminoglycosides (e.g., alleles of aac, ant, and aph), macrolides [e.g., erm(A), erm(B), and msrC], and tetracyclines [e.g., tet(K), (L), (M), (O), (S)]. Continuing investigations are required to help understand and mitigate the impact of AR bacteria on human

  19. Transferability of antimicrobial resistance from multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from cattle in the USA to E. coli and Salmonella Newport recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, T L; Callaway, T R; Norman, K N; Scott, H M; Loneragan, G H; Ison, S A; Beier, R C; Harhay, D M; Norby, B; Nisbet, D J

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate conjugative transfer of cephalosporin resistance among 100 strains of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (MDRE) to Salmonella enterica serotype Newport and E. coli DH5α recipients. Phenotypic and genotypic profiles were determined for MDRE as well as for Salmonella Newport (trSN) and E. coli DH5α (trDH) transconjugants. Of 95 MDRE donor isolates, 26 (27%) and 27 (28%) transferred resistance to trSN and trDH recipients, respectively. A total of 27 MDRE (27%) were confirmed as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers based on the double-disk synergy assay and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). WGS was performed on 25 of the ESBL-producing isolates, showing that 2 isolates carried bla CTX-M-6 , 22 possessed bla CTX-M-32 and 1 was negative for bla CTX-M genes. Fourteen of the ESBLs sequenced were qnrB19. Differential transfer of IncA/C and IncN from MDRE32 was observed between trSN32 and trDH32. IncN-positive trDH32 displayed an ESBL phenotype, whereas IncA/C-positive trSN32 displayed an AmpC phenotype. The rate of ESBL transfer to trSN and trDH recipients was 11% and 96%, respectively. Twenty-seven MDRE were phenotypically identified as ESBL-producers. WGS of 25 MDRE revealed that 2 and 22 isolates carried bla CTX-M-6 and bla CTX-M-32 , respectively. One multidrug-resistant isolate exhibited conversion from an AmpC phenotype to an ESBL phenotype with the transfer of only the IncN plasmid. The rate of resistance transfer to Salmonella or E. coli recipients was nearly identical. However, the ESBL phenotype was transferred with significantly greater prevalence to E. coli compared with Salmonella Newport (96% and 11%, respectively). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance determinants of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) and of multidrug-resistant E. coli from foods of animal origin illegally imported to the EU by flight passengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, B; Szmolka, A; Smole Možina, S; Kovač, J; Strauss, A; Schlager, S; Beutlich, J; Appel, B; Lušicky, M; Aprikian, P; Pászti, J; Tóth, I; Kugler, R; Wagner, M

    2015-09-16

    The aim of this study was to reveal phenotype/genotype characteristics of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) and multidrug resistant E. coli in food products of animal origin confiscated as illegal import at Austrian, German and Slovenian airports. VTEC isolates were obtained by using ISO guidelines 16654:2001 for O157 VTEC or ISO/ TS13136:2012 for non-O157 VTEC, with additional use of the RIDASCREEN® Verotoxin immunoassay. The testing of 1526 samples resulted in 15 VTEC isolates (1.0%) primarily isolated from hard cheese from Turkey and Balkan countries. Genotyping for virulence by using a miniaturized microarray identified a wide range of virulence determinants. One VTEC isolate (O26:H46) possessing intimin (eae) and all other essential genes of Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE) was designated as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). None of the other VTEC strains belonged to serogroups O157, O145, O111, O104 or O103. VTEC strains harbored either stx(1) (variants stx1(a) or stx(1c)) or st(x2) (variants stx(2a), stx(2b), stx(2a/d) or stx(2c/d)) genes. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) demonstrated high genetic diversity and identified three new sequence types (STs): 4505, 4506 and 4507. Food samples collected from the Vienna airport were also tested for E. coli quantities using the ISO 16649:2001, and for detection of multidrug resistant phenotypes and genotypes. The resulting 113 commensal E. coli isolates were first tested in a pre-screening against 6 selected antimicrobials to demonstrate multidrug resistance. The resulting 14 multidrug resistant (MDR) E. coli isolates, representing 0.9% of the samples, were subjected to further resistance phenotyping and to microarray analyses targeting genetic markers of antimicrobial resistance and virulence. Genotyping revealed various combinations of resistance determinants as well as the presence of class 1, class 2 integrons. The isolates harbored 6 to 11 antibiotic

  1. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance among isolates of Escherichia coli O157: H7 from feces and hides of super-shedders and low-shedding pen-mates in two commercial beef feedlots

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    Stanford Kim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cattle shedding at least 104 CFU Escherichia coli O157:H7/g feces are described as super-shedders and have been shown to increase transmission of E. coli O157:H7 to other cattle in feedlots. This study investigated relationships among fecal isolates from super-shedders (n = 162, perineal hide swab isolates (PS from super-shedders (n = 137 and fecal isolates from low-shedder (4 CFU/g feces pen-mates (n = 496 using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. A subsample of these fecal isolates (n = 474 was tested for antimicrobial resistance. Isolates of E. coli O157:H7 were obtained from cattle in pens (avg. 181 head at 2 commercial feedlots in southern Alberta with each steer sampled at entry to the feedlot and prior to slaughter. Results Only 1 steer maintained super-shedder status at both samplings, although approximately 30% of super-shedders in sampling 1 had low-shedder status at sampling 2. A total of 85 restriction endonuclease digestion clusters (REPC; 90% or greater similarity and 86 unique isolates (P = 0.94. Only 2/21 super-shedders had fecal isolates in the same REPC at both samplings. Fecal and PS isolates from individual super-shedders generally belonged to different REPCs, although fecal isolates of E. coli O157:H7 from super- and low-shedders showed greater similarity (P P = 0.69, although all super-shedder isolates with antimicrobial resistance (n = 3 were resistant to multiple antimicrobials. Conclusions Super-shedders did not have increased antimicrobial resistance compared to low-shedder pen mates. Our data demonstrated that PFGE profiles of individual super-shedders varied over time and that only 1/162 steers remained a super-shedder at 2 samplings. In these two commercial feedlots, PFGE subtypes of E. coli O157:H7 from fecal isolates of super- and low-shedders were frequently different as were subtypes of fecal and perineal hide isolates from super-shedders.

  2. Microbial Quality and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Isolated from Traditional Ice Cream in Hamadan City, West of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadimi; Heshmati; Azizi Shafa; Nooshkam

    2016-01-01

    Background Foodborne diseases are one of the most major public health concerns in the world. Ice cream flavors, especially the traditional ones, have a high potential for the transmission of the pathogenic bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study is to investigate the microbiological status and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from traditional ice cream. ...

  3. Microbial Quality and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli Isolated from Traditional Ice Cream in Hamadan City, West of Iran

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    Ghadimi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Foodborne diseases are one of the most major public health concerns in the world. Ice cream flavors, especially the traditional ones, have a high potential for the transmission of the pathogenic bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study is to investigate the microbiological status and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from traditional ice cream. Methods A total of 114 traditional ice creams were randomly collected from retail stores in Hamadan, Iran. Samples were investigated for the total bacteria count (TBC and contamination with the coliform, Enterobacteriaceae and Salmonella as well as the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Results The count of Enterobacteriaceae (89.47%, mold and yeast (50%, coliform (40.35% and TBC (28.07% of samples was higher than Iran’s standard. Salmonella was not found in all samples. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was confirmed in 50% and 37.72% of samples, respectively. Collected Escherichia coli had the highest antibiotic resistance to ampicillin 67.44%, nalidixic acid 39.53% and co-amoxyclav 37.21%. Staphylococcus aureus showed a higher antibiotic resistance to penicillin (82.46% of isolates and oxacillin (38% of isolates. Conclusions The results showed high contamination levels of traditional ice cream with spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms as well as considerable resistance of isolated Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to common antibiotics. Therefore, good hygienic practice during processing and personal hygiene should be considered to improve the quality of ice cream. In addition, it is necessary that the regulatory authorities carry out more control on the production centers of traditional ice cream.

  4. Characterization and Antimicrobial-Resistance Profile of Escherichia coli O157 and O157: H7 Isolated from Modified Atmosphere Packaged Meat Samples

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    Özgür Çadırcı

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-like toxin producing Escherichia coli is still an important public issue which causes extremely dangerous health problems. This study was planned in order to examine the inhibitory effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging application on E. coli O157 and O157: H7. The purposes of the present study were to detect E. coli O157 and O157: H7 strains from ground and cubed beef. A total of 100 MAP cattle meat products (50 minced meat, 50 meat cubes were collected from the markets and butchers in Samsun province between May and October 2013. According to results, 1(1/50-2% E. coli O157 and 1(1/50-2% E. coli O157: H7 strains isolated from 50 ground beef samples, while 1 (1/50-2% E. coli O157 strain was identified from 50 cubed beef samples. It was determined that E. coli O157 isolate obtained from the MAP ground beef carried stx1, stx2 genes; E. coli O157: H7 isolate carried stx1, stx2, eaeA and hylA genes while E. coli O157 isolate obtained from the MAP cubed meat only carried the stx2 gene. In antibiogram test, both E. coli O157 isolates were resistant to streptomycin and one E. coli O157: H7 isolate was resistant to streptomycin, cephalothin and tetracycline. As a consequence; in order to protect public health, products should be kept in proper hygienic and technical conditions during sale and storage and use of uncontrolled antibiotics should be avoided.

  5. Trend and seasonality of community-acquired Escherichia coli antimicrobial resistance and its dynamic relationship with antimicrobial use assessed by ARIMA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio Egea, María Ángeles; Huertas Vaquero, María; Carranza González, Rafael; Herráez Carrera, Óscar; Redondo González, Olga; Arias Arias, Ángel

    2017-12-04

    We studied the trend and seasonality of community-acquired Escherichia coli resistance and quantified its correlation with the previous use of certain antibiotics. A time series study of resistant community-acquired E. coli isolates and their association with antibiotic use was conducted in a Primary Health Care Area from 2008 to 2012. A Poisson regression model was constructed to estimate the trend and seasonality of E. coli resistance. A significant increasing trend in mean E. coli resistance to cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and nitrofurantoin was observed. Seasonal resistance to ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was significantly higher in autumn-winter. There was a delay of 7, 10 and 12 months between the use of cotrimoxazole (P<0.038), fosfomycin (P<0.024) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (P<0.015), respectively, and the occurrence of E. coli resistance. An average delay of 10 months between the previous use of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cotrimoxazole and fosfomycin and the appearance of resistant community-acquired E. coli strains was detected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli.

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    Keerthi S Guruge

    Full Text Available Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and

  7. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruge, Keerthi S.; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I.; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  8. Comparison of the selection of antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli during enrofloxacin administration with a local drug delivery system or with intramuscular injections in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béraud, Romain; Huneault, Louis; Bernier, Dave; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann; del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated, for the first time, the selection of antibiotic resistance in fecal Escherichia coli, a potential reservoir of genes of resistance, during the prolonged exposure to fluoroquinolones after the implantation of a local drug delivery system (LDDS) in a swine model. Fourteen pigs were randomly assigned to group IM (5 mg/kg/day of intramuscular enrofloxacin--EFX) or LD (surgical implantation of EFX-polymethyl-methacrylate peri-femoral implants). Blood samples were collected daily for determination of plasma EFX and ciprofloxacin (CFX) concentrations. Fecal samples were collected daily to determine the E. coli counts and the susceptibility patterns of its isolates as evaluated by antibiotic disk diffusion tests. In both groups, EFX administration significantly reduced the bacterial counts after 2 days. During recolonization, the bacterial counts remained lower than baseline in group IM but not significantly, and almost reached pre-treatment levels in group LD. Susceptibility to EFX, CFX, and nalidixic acid of recolonizing E. coli in LD pigs slightly decreased but remained within the limit of "susceptible" isolates. In contrast, quinolone susceptibility of recolonizing E. coli in IM pigs dropped dramatically (P intramuscular exposure to fluoroquinolones significantly decreased the susceptibility of E. coli to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P administration of fluoroquinolones.

  9. Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis profiles of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli isolated from different retail foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Nakamura, Hiromi; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2017-05-16

    Diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) isolates were recovered from local retail markets and the Osaka Municipal Central Wholesale Market in Japan. Retail food samples were collected for analysis in Osaka Japan from 2005 to 2008 and consisted of 32 beef, 28 pork, 20 poultry, 136 fish, 66 fruits and vegetables and 51 ready-to-eat (RTE) food samples. A total of 82 DEC strains were recovered from 64 (19%) food samples with the highest prevalence in poultry (100%, 20/20), followed by pork (54%, 15/28), beef (28%, 9/32), fruits and vegetables (12%, 8/66), fish (6.6%, 9/136) and RTE foods (5.9%, 3/51). Most of the strains belonged to E. coli possessing the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1) gene (EAST1EC; n=62, Pcoli (EPEC; n=16, Pcoli (STEC), 1 to EAEC and 2 to enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains. Of the 82 DEC isolates, 22 O and 13H serogroups were detected, including some specific serogroups (O91, O103, O115, O119, O126, and O157) which have been associated with human diarrheal infections. Phylogenetic group A and B1 were predominant among the DEC isolates. Antimicrobial resistance to tetracycline was most common (49%), followed by nalidixic acid (28%), ampicillin (24%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (20%), and cephalothin (18%). All isolates were susceptible to aztreonam. Of the resistant strains, 44% (22/50) demonstrated resistance to >3 antimicrobial agents. Isolates resistant to >5 antimicrobials were only found in the meat samples, while isolates from the fruits and vegetables as well as RTE foods showed resistance to only 1 or 2 antimicrobial agents. Sixty one percent of EAST1EC, 56% of EPEC and all of the EAEC and ETEC were resistant to at least 1 antimicrobial agent. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was used in this study for genotyping of DEC. The 82 isolates collected for this study showed 77 distinct MLVA profiles located among 3 branches. The Simpson's Index of Diversity (D) was 99.9% at its highest. The

  10. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Josephine Okorie-Kanu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella species in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu State and to determine the resistance of these pathogens to antimicrobials commonly used in human and veterinary practices in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 340 raw table eggs comprising 68 composite samples (5 eggs per composite sample were collected from five selected farms (13 composite samples from the farms and 10 retail outlets (55 composite samples from the retail outlets in the study area over a period of 4-month (March-June, 2014. The eggs were screened for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species following standard procedures within 24 h of sample collection. Isolates obtained were subjected to in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test with 15 commonly used antimicrobials using the disk diffusion method. Results: About 37 (54.4% and 7 (10.3% of the 68 composite samples were positive for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species, respectively. The shells showed significantly higher (p0.05. The organisms obtained showed a multiple drug resistance. They were completely resistant to nitrofurantoin, sulfamethoxazole/ trimethoprim, penicillin G and oxacillin. In addition to these, Salmonella spp. also showed 100% resistance to tetracycline. The pathogenic E. coli isolates obtained were 100% susceptible to gentamicin, neomycin, ciprofloxacin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid while Salmonella spp. showed 100% susceptibility to erythromycin, neomycin, and rifampicin. Both organisms showed varying degrees of resistance to streptomycin, amoxicillin, vancomycin, and doxycycline. Conclusion: From the results of the study, it can be concluded that the raw table eggs marketed for human consumption in Enugu State, Nigeria is contaminated with pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species that showed multiple drug resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in

  11. Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance Characteristics of the Sequence Type 131-H30 Subclone Among Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Collected From US Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Jay, Arianna; Weissman, Scott J; Adler, Amanda L; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Baseman, Janet G; Zerr, Danielle M

    2018-01-18

    Escherichia coli sequence type (ST) 131-H30 is a globally important pathogen implicated in rising rates of multidrug resistance among E. coli causing extraintestinal infections. Previous studies have focused on adults, leaving the epidemiology of H30 among children undefined. We used clinical data and isolates from a case-control study of extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant E. coli conducted at 4 US children's hospitals to estimate the burden and identify host correlates of infection with H30. H30 isolates were identified using 2-locus genotyping; host correlates were examined using log-binomial regression models stratified by extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance status. A total of 339 extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant and 1008 extended-spectrum cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli isolates were available for analyses. The estimated period prevalence of H30 was 5.3% among all extraintestinal E. coli isolates (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6%-7.1%); H30 made up 43.3% (81/187) of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates in this study. Host correlates of infection with H30 differed by extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance status: Among resistant isolates, age ≤5 years was positively associated with H30 infection (relative risk [RR], 1.83 [95% CI, 1.19-2.83]); among susceptible isolates, age ≤5 years was negatively associated with H30 (RR, 0.48 [95% CI, .27-.87]), while presence of an underlying medical condition was positively associated (RR, 4.49 [95% CI, 2.43-8.31]). ST131-H30 is less common among extraintestinal E. coli collected from children compared to reported estimates among adults, possibly reflecting infrequent fluoroquinolone use in pediatrics; however, it is similarly dominant among ESBL-producing isolates. The H30 subclone appears to disproportionately affect young children relative to other extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant E. coli. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the

  12. Resistência a antimicrobianos dependente do sistema de efluxo multidrogas em Escherichia coli isoladas de leite mastítico Antimicrobial resistance dependent on multidrugs efflux in Escherichia coli isolated from the mastitic milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.S. Moreira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Identificaram-se e caracterizaram-se a resistência e a multirresistência aos principais antimicrobianos usados no tratamento de mastite bovina causada por Escherichia coli. A concentração inibitória mínima (MIC e o sistema de efluxo foram detectados pelas curvas de crescimento, com base na densidade óptica, em diferentes concentrações da droga e na presença e na ausência do desacoplador da força próton-motora (PMF. E. coli 1 foi resistente à neomicina e à gentamicina; E. coli 3 e 4, à tetraciclina e à estreptomicina; e E. coli 2 e 6 à gentamicina. E. coli 5 apresentou modelo de sensibilidade. Observou-se que MICs de todos os antimicrobianos dos multirresistentes (E. coli 1, 3 e 4 diminuíram na presença do desacoplador, o que sugere sistema de efluxo multidrogas. Após cura, apenas E. coli 1 apresentou modelo de sensibilidade, porém não houve alterações das MICs, antes e após adição do desacoplador. Os resultados indicam possível presença de mecanismo de resistência dependente da PMF codificado, ou parte dele, em plasmídeo.Resistance and multiresistance to main antimicrobials used for treating bovine mastitis caused by Escherichia coli were identified and characterized. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and efflux systems were detected by the use of growth curves based on optical density at different drug concentrations and both presence and absence of uncoupler of the proton-motive force (PMF. E. coli 1 was resistant to neomycin and gentamycin, E. coli 3 and 4 were resistant to tetracycline and streptomycin, whereas E. coli 2 and 6 were resistant to gentamycin. E. coli 5 showed sensibility model. MICs of all antimicrobials of the multiresistant samples (E. coli 1, 3, and 4 were decreased in presence of the uncoupler, therefore suggesting the presence of the multidrug efflux system. After healing, only E. coli 1 showed sensibility model, however no alteration occurred in MIC(s before and after adding the

  13. Shiga (Vero-toxin producing Escherichia coli isolated from the hospital foods; virulence factors, o-serogroups and antimicrobial resistance properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ranjbar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the presence of the weak, diabetic and immunosuppressive patients in hospitals, hospital foods should have a high quality and safety. Cooking a lot of foods higher than daily requirement, storage of cooked foods in an inappropriate condition and presence of nurses and servants in distribution of food to patients are the main reasons caused contamination of hospital foods. Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli is one of the common cause of food poisoning in hospitals. The present research was carried out to study the distribution of virulence factors, O-serogroups and antibiotic resistance properties in STEC strains recovered from Iranian hospital food samples. Methods Five-hundred and eighty raw and cooked food samples were collected and immediately transferred to the laboratory. E. coli-positive strains were subjected to PCR and disk diffusion method. Results Thirty-nine out of 580 (6.72% hospital food samples were contaminated with E. coli. Raw (20% and cooked meat (6% were the most commonly contaminated samples. Raw samples had the higher prevalence of E. coli (P <0.01. Samples which were collected in the summer season had the highest prevalence of bacteria (64.10%. Significant difference was seen between the prevalence of EHEC and AEEC subtypes (P <0.01. The most commonly detected virulence factors in both EHEC and AEEC subtypes were stx1 and eae. The most commonly detected serogroups were O26 (43.75% and O157 (25% and there were no positive results for O103, O145, O91, O113 and O128 serogroups. Aac (3-IV (100%, CITM (100% and tetA (62.50% were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes. STEC strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (93.75%, gentamycin (93.75%, tetracycline (87.50% and ciprofloxacin (81.25%. All of the STEC strains were resistant to at least 3 antibiotics, while the prevalence of resistance against more than 12 antibiotics were 12.50%. Conclusions High

  14. Susceptibility to disinfectants in antimicrobial-resistant and -susceptible isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from poultry-ESBL/AmpC-phenotype of E. coli is not associated with resistance to a quaternary ammonium compound, DDAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, N; Boss, J; Lettmann, S; Fritz, B; Schwaiger, K; Bauer, J; Hölzel, C S

    2017-06-01

    The spread of bacteria that are simultaneously resistant to disinfectants and antimicrobials would constitute an unsettling scenario. In order to explore an association between antimicrobial resistance and reduced susceptibility to biocides/microbicides (disinfectants) in agriculture, we investigated Escherichia coli (n = 438) and enterococci (n = 120) isolated from six different flocks of the same poultry farm with known history of antimicrobial treatment. Susceptibility to disinfectants (formic acid and a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), didecyldimethylammoniumchloride-DDAC) was assessed by macrodilution according to guidelines of the German Veterinary Society. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were screened (i) for reduced biocide susceptibility and (ii) for an association of biocide susceptibility and antimicrobial resistance including the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and the hyperproduction of AmpC-type beta-lactamases. DDAC inhibited ESBL/AmpC(hyper)-producing E. coli (n = 53) from poultry at similar or slightly lower inhibitory concentrations, compared with non-ESBL/AmpC strains (median MIC = 0·36 vs 1·44 mg l -1 ). In contrast, DDAC-MICs were positively correlated with several other antibiotic MICs (e.g. piperacillin and sulphamethoxazole + trimethoprim in E. coli, chloramphenicol in E. faecalis) and increased DDAC-MICs were statistically linked to high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci (streptomycin high level). DDAC-MICs did not correlate with the presence of the integron marker qacEDelta1. This study provides indication that residual disinfectant might be able to select antimicrobial-resistant enterococci, but not ESBL-/AmpC (hyper)producing E. coli from poultry. While ESBL-/AmpC-E. coli were inhibited at disinfectant concentrations comparable to or lower than wildtype values, low concentrations of QACs might be able to select other antimicrobial-resistant E. coli

  15. Wild birds as biological indicators of environmental pollution: antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli and enterococci isolated from common buzzards (Buteo buteo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhouani, Hajer; Poeta, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Pacheco, Rui; Sargo, Roberto; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2012-06-01

    A total of 36 Escherichia coli and 31 enterococci isolates were recovered from 42 common buzzard faecal samples. The E. coli isolates showed high levels of resistance to streptomycin and tetracycline. The following resistance genes were detected: bla(TEM) (20 of 22 ampicillin-resistant isolates), tet(A) and/or tet(B) (16 of 27 tetracycline-resistant isolates), aadA1 (eight of 27 streptomycin-resistant isolates), cmlA (three of 15 chloramphenicol-resistant isolates), aac(3)-II with/without aac(3)-IV (all seven gentamicin-resistant isolates) and sul1 and/or sul2 and/or sul3 [all eight sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim-resistant (SXT) isolates]. intI1 and intI2 genes were detected in four SXT-resistant isolates. The virulence-associated genes fimA (type 1 fimbriae), papC (P fimbriae) and aer (aerobactin) were detected in 61.1, 13.8 and 11.1% of the isolates, respectively. The isolates belonged to phylogroups A (47.2%), B1 (8.3%), B2 (13.9%) and D (30.5%). For the enterococci isolates, Enterococcus faecium was the most prevalent species (48.4%). High levels of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance were found among our isolates (87 and 81%, respectively). Most of the tetracycline-resistant strains carried the tet(M) and/or tet(L) genes. The erm(B) gene was detected in 80% of erythromycin-resistant isolates. The vat(D) and/or vat(E) genes were found in nine of the 17 quinupristin-dalfopristin-resistant isolates. The enterococcal isolates showing high-level resistance for kanamycin, gentamicin and streptomycin contained the aph(3')-IIIa, aac(6')-aph(2″) and ant(6)-Ia genes, respectively. This report reveals that common buzzards seem to represent an important reservoir, or at least a source, of multi-resistant E. coli and enterococci isolates, and consequently may represent a considerable hazard to human and animal health by transmission of these isolates to waterways and other environmental sources via their faecal deposits.

  16. Escherichia coli išskyrimas iš sveikų šunų ir sergančių virškinamojo trakto ligomis

    OpenAIRE

    Narbutas, Kipras

    2016-01-01

    Aim of investigation: to isolate Escherichia coli from healthy and with gastrointestinal disease canine and determine antimicrobial resistance. Objectives: to isolate E. coli from healthy and with gastrointestinal disease canine. Determine multiple antimicrobial resistances from healthy dogs. Determine multiple antimicrobial resistances from canine with gastrointestinal disease. Compare isolated E. coli antimicrobial resistance from healthy and diseased dogs. Methods: a pure culture of ...

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella and E. coli from Pennsylvania dairy herds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens is an increasing public health concern. The objective of this study was to examine antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella and E. coli isolates from Pennsylvania dairy herds. Manure composite samples were collected from 76 farms: on each farm one sample...

  18. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in Canadian commercial meat, companion, laboratory, and shelter rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and its association with routine antimicrobial use in commercial meat rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylie, Jennifer; McEwen, Scott A; Boerlin, Patrick; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Weese, J Scott; Turner, Patricia V

    2017-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in zoonotic (e.g. Salmonella spp.), pathogenic, and opportunistic (e.g. E. coli) bacteria in animals represents a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistant bacteria and resistance genes to bacteria infecting humans and other animals. This study evaluated the prevalence of E. coli and Salmonella enterica, and the presence of associated AMR in commercial meat, companion, research, and shelter rabbits in Canada. Associations between antimicrobial usage and prevalence of AMR in bacterial isolates were also examined in commercial meat rabbits. Culture and susceptibility testing was conducted on pooled fecal samples from weanling and adult commercial meat rabbits taken during both summer and winter months (n=100, 27 farms), and from pooled laboratory (n=14, 8 laboratory facilities), companion (n=53), and shelter (n=15, 4 shelters) rabbit fecal samples. At the facility level, E. coli was identified in samples from each commercial rabbit farm, laboratory facility, and 3 of 4 shelters, and in 6 of 53 companion rabbit fecal samples. Seventy-nine of 314 (25.2%; CI: 20.7-30.2%) E. coli isolates demonstrated resistance to >1 antimicrobial agent. At least one E. coli isolate resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent was present in samples from 55.6% of commercial farms, and from 25% of each laboratory and shelter facilities, with resistance to tetracycline being most common; no resistance was identified in companion animal samples. Salmonella enterica subsp. was identified exclusively in pooled fecal samples from commercial rabbit farms; Salmonella enterica serovar London from one farm and Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky from another. The S. Kentucky isolate was resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, streptomycin, and tetracycline, whereas the S. London isolate was pansusceptible. Routine use of antimicrobials on commercial meat rabbit farms was not significantly associated with the

  19. Escherichia coli in Europe: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Allocati, Nerino; Masulli, Michele; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli str...

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance of Urinary Escherichia coli Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  1. Virulence factors, antimicrobial resistance, and plasmid content of Escherichia coli isolated in swine commercial farms Fatores de virulência, resistência aos antimicrobianos, presença de plasmídeos em Escherichia coli isoladas de amostras clínicas e ambientais de suínos

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    M.M. Costa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolates were evaluated. A total of 80 E. coli isolates were evaluated, being 64 from clinical samples (intestinal content and fragments of organs from diarrheic piglets, seven from feces of clinically healthy piglets and sows, and nine environmental samples (five from facilities, two from feed, one from insect, and one from waste. Molecular characterization was performed by PCR detection of fimbriae and toxin genes and plasmid content determination. The isolates were also characterized according to their resistance or sensitivity to the following drugs: ampicillin, trimethoprim:sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, amikacine, colistin, norfloxacin, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, cefalexin, trimethoprim, neomycin, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin. From 80 E. coli isolates, 53.8% were classified as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2.5% were shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, and 43.8% showed a non specific pattern and were unclassified. One fecal isolate from non-diarrheic piglet was classified as ETEC by PCR. Clinical isolates showed resistance mainly for tetracycline and trimethoprim:sulfamethoxazole. Plasmidial DNA was observed in 70 isolates, being 78.5% of clinical isolates, 8.57% of non-diarrheic feces, and 12.8% of environment.Os fatores de virulência e a resistência aos antimicrobianos foram avaliados em Escherichia coli. Um total de 80 isolados de E. coli, sendo 64 de amostras clínicas (conteúdo intestinal e fragmentos de órgãos de leitões diarreicos, sete das fezes de porcas e leitões saudáveis e nove de amostras ambientais (cinco de instalações, dois de alimentos, um de inseto e um de esterqueira. A caracterização molecular feita pela PCR objetivou detectar fimbrias e toxinas, bem como a determinação do conteúdo de plasmídeos. Os isolados foram caracterizados quanto à resistência ou sensibilidade às seguintes drogas: ampicilina, sulfazotrim

  2. Antimicrobial resistance risk factors and characterisation of faecal E. coli isolated from healthy Labrador retrievers in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Vanessa M; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Nuttall, Tim; McEwan, Neil; Dawson, Susan; Williams, Nicola J

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistant bacteria are increasingly detected from canine samples but few studies have examined commensal isolates in healthy community dogs. We aimed to characterise faecal Escherichia coli from 73 healthy non-veterinarian-visiting and non-antimicrobial treated Labrador retrievers, recruited from dog shows in the North West United Kingdom between November 2010 and June 2011. Each enrolled dog provided one faecal sample for our study. E. coli were isolated from 72/73 (99%) faecal samples. Disc diffusion susceptibility tests were determined for a range of antimicrobials, including phenotypic extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC-production. PCR assay detected phylogenetic groups and resistance genes (blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaOXA, blaCIT, qnr), and conjugation experiments were performed to investigate potential transfer of mobile genetic elements. Multivariable logistic regression examined potential risk factors from owner-questionnaires for the presence of antimicrobial resistant faecal E. coli. Antimicrobial resistant, multi-drug resistant (≥3 antimicrobial classes; MDR) and AmpC-producing E. coli were detected in 63%, 30% and 16% of samples, respectively. ESBL-producing E. coli was detected from only one sample and conjugation experiments found that blaCTX-M and blaCIT were transferred from commensal E. coli to a recipient strain. Most isolates were phylogenetic groups B1 and A. Group B2 isolates were associated with lower prevalence of resistance to at least one antimicrobial (Presistance (3GCR) (OR: 10.9; 95% CI: 2.2-54.0). AMR E. coli were surprisingly prevalent in this group of non-antimicrobial treated and non-veterinarian-visiting dogs and consumption of raw meat was a significant risk factor for antimicrobial resistance. These findings are of concern due to the increasing popularity of raw-meat canine diets, and the potential for opportunistic infection, zoonotic transmission and transmission of antimicrobial resistant

  3. Antimicrobial resistance in E. coli and Salmonella spp. isolates from calves in southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hervé-Claude

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Description of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli and Salmonella spp. isolates from calves <30 days of age from southern Chile. Material and methods: Necropsy and microbiology reports of 107 calves <30 days of age received at the Animal Pathology Institute between 2002 and 2015 were considered. Additionally, an antimicrobial resistance score was generated to allow comparisons among isolates with different antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Results: There was no clear trend in antimicrobial resistance during the study period, with similar levels of resistance for E. coli, β-hemolytic E. coli and Salmonella spp. Approximately 50% of isolates were sensitive to antimicrobials, and between 19 and 36% of samples showed possible extended- or pan- drug resistance. Multiple different antimicrobial resistance patterns were found, including 32 for E. coli, 17 for β-hemolytic E. coli and 10 for Salmonella spp. Conclusions: Overall, E. coli samples were most sensitive to ceftriaxone; β-hemolytic E. coli to florfenicol; and Salmonella spp. to gentamicin. In contrast, these agents were resistant to amoxicillin, ampicillin and oxytetracycline respectively. This study is unique in its approach and provides useful information for veterinarians and producers on the antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria posing a serious threat to calves. These results can help field veterinarians to control and treat bacterial diarrhea in calves.

  4. Comparison of Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles among Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing and Acquired AmpC β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Canadian Intensive Care Units▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Patricia J.; Nichol, Kim; DeCorby, Melanie; Mataseje, Laura; Mulvey, Michael R.; Hoban, Daryl J.; Zhanel, George G.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance profiles were compared among 18 extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) and 27 acquired AmpC β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates collected from Canadian intensive care units from 2005 to 2006. ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were more likely to be gentamicin resistant (P < 0.03), fluoroquinolone resistant (P < 0.0001), and multidrug resistant (P < 0.0001) than AmpC-producing E. coli isolates. PMID:18299417

  5. Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants among Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia, and Enterococcus using PCR and Microarray Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia, and Enterococcus can be important carriers of antimicrobial resistance. Limited work has been done to examine the relationship among strains co-cultured from the gastrointestinal tract of individual animals. To address this, 1284 isolates were collected from s...

  6. Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  7. Anti-microbial resistance of non-clinical E. coli isolates from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-microbial resistance profiles of non-clinical E. coli isolates were studied in an 8 years old commercial layer poultry farm in Imo state, Nigeria currently stocking about 6000 birds of different strains and ages, housed in 4 separate buildings. Isolates were screened against 12 antibiotics using the disc diffusion method.

  8. Antibiotic resistant Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A hundred and four indigenous chicken rectal swabs were analysed, of which 67.3% were contaminated with Escherichia coli and 12.5% with Salmonella typhimurium. Seventy Escherichia coli isolates showed resistance phenotypes to one, two or more antibiotics. The most common antimicrobial resistance pattern ...

  9. Oral administration of antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in E. coli from chicken--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, C; Burow, E; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobials play an important role in animal and human health care. It was the aim of this systematic review to assess the effects of oral administration of antimicrobials on the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) from chickens. Moreover, the effects of the administration of more than one antimicrobial and of different dosages were studied. Literature was searched in November 2012 from the electronic databases ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus and a national literature database (DIMDI) as well as the database ProQuest LLC. The search was updated in March 2014. Original studies describing a treatment (A) and a control group of either non-treatment (C) or initial value (0) and determining AMR in E. coli at different sample points (SP) were included. The literature search resulted in 35 full text articles on the topic, seven (20%) of which contained sufficient information on the administered antimicrobial and the impact of treatment on AMR. Most papers described the use of more than one antimicrobial, several dosages, controls (non-treatment or pre-treatment) and measured AMR at different SPs leading to a total of 227 SPs on the impact of the use of antimicrobials on AMR in chickens. 74% of the SPs (168/227) described a higher AMR-rate in E. coli from treated animals than from controls. After the administration of a single antimicrobial, AMR increased at 72% of the SPs. Administration of more than one antimicrobial increased AMR at 82% of the SPs. Higher dosages were associated with similar or higher AMR rates. The limited number of studies for each antimicrobial agent and the high variability in the resistance effect call for more well designed studies on the impact of oral administration on AMR development and spread. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Low rates of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in wildlife in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, surrounded by villages with high prevalence of multiresistant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in people and domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrechtova, Katerina; Papousek, Ivo; De Nys, Helene; Pauly, Maude; Anoh, Etile; Mossoun, Arsene; Dolejska, Monika; Masarikova, Martina; Metzger, Sonya; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Wittig, Roman M; Klimes, Jiri; Cizek, Alois; Leendertz, Fabian H; Literak, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance genes can be found in all ecosystems, including those where antibiotic selective pressure has never been exerted. We investigated resistance genes in a collection of faecal samples of wildlife (non-human primates, mice), people and domestic animals (dogs, cats) in Côte d'Ivoire; in the chimpanzee research area of Taï National Park (TNP) and adjacent villages. Single bacteria isolates were collected from antibiotic-containing agar plates and subjected to molecular analysis to detect Enterobacteriaceae isolates with plasmid-mediated genes of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR). While the prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli in the villages was 27% in people (n = 77) and 32% in dogs (n = 38), no ESBL-producer was found in wildlife of TNP (n = 75). PMQR genes, mainly represented by qnrS1, were also present in human- and dog-originating isolates from the villages (36% and 42% in people and dogs, respectively), but no qnrS has been found in the park. In TNP, different variants of qnrB were detected in Citrobacter freundii isolates originating non-human primates and mice. In conclusion, ESBL and PMQR genes frequently found in humans and domestic animals in the villages were rather exceptional in wildlife living in the protected area. Although people enter the park, the strict biosecurity levels they are obliged to follow probably impede transmission of bacteria between them and wildlife.

  11. Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanga, Peter Lokamar; Onyuka, Jackson; Webale, Mark Kilongosi; Were, Tom; Budambula, Valentine

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of E. coli pathotypes and Shigella sero-groups and their antimicrobial profiles among diarrheic children in Nairobi city, Kenya. Although diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and Shigella sero-groups are leading causes of diarrhea in children under five years in developing countries, their distribution and antimicrobial resistance vary from place to place and over time in a given region. In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled diarrheic children (n=354) under five years seeking treatment at Mbagathi Hospital, Nairobi city, Kenya,. Stool samples were collected from all children for bacterial culture. Bacterial isolation and identification was performed by conventional microbiological methods. Polymerase chain amplification was used to detect aspU, aggR, andpcvd432 for EAEC, est and elt for ETEC, eae for EPEC, stx for EHEC, and ipaH for EIEC and Shigella species. Antimicrobial profile was determined by disk diffusion method. The prevalence of EAEC, ETEC, EPEC (eae), EIEC (ipaH) was 21.2%, 10.5%, 4.5%, and 0.6%, respectively, while that of mixed infection was 0.6%for ETEC/EAEC and 0.3%for EAEC/EPEC/ETEC. No EHEC strain was isolated. Pathogenetic analysis for EAEC showed that5.9% carried aspU,8.2% possessed both aspU and aggR and 7.1% had a combination of aspU, aggR andpcvd432 while that of ETEC was 2.3% for elt, 6.5% for both elt and est and 1.7% for est. The combination of aspU with aggR, elt and est, and pcvd432 with aggR, aspU and est was 0.3% for each case of ETEC/EAEC mixed infection. The aspU gene co-existed with aggR, pcvd432, eae and elt in the EAEC/EPEC/ETEC mixed infection. The prevalence of S. boydii , S. dysenteriae , S. flexneriand, S. sonnei was 0.8%, 0.6%, 1.7%, and 0.8%, respectively. No E. coli pathotype and shigella co-infection was detected. In addition, both E. coli pathotypes and Shigella species were resistant to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and

  12. Campylobacter coli in Swine Production: Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms and Molecular Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Siddhartha; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance, to evaluate and compare the use of two genotyping methods for molecular epidemiology purposes, and to determine the genotypic diversity of Campylobacter coli of porcine origin. A total of 100 C. coli isolates from swine were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobials using the agar dilution method and genotyped using two high-resolution fingerprinting approaches: multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electr...

  13. Oral antimicrobials increase antimicrobial resistance in porcine E. coli--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, E; Simoneit, C; Tenhagen, B-A; Käsbohrer, A

    2014-03-01

    Administration of antimicrobials to livestock increases the risk of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in commensal bacteria. Antimicrobials in pig production are usually administered per pen via feed which implies treatment of sick alongside with healthy animals. The objective of this systematic literature review was to investigate the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in Escherichia coli of swine. Studies published in peer reviewed journals were retrieved from the international online databases ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed, Scopus and the national electronic literature data base of Deutsches Institut für Medizinische Dokumentation und Information. The studies were assessed using the eligibility criteria English or German language, access to full paper version, defined treatment and control group (initial value or non-treatment) as well as administration and resistance testing of the same antimicrobial class. In the qualitative synthesis, only studies were included presenting the summary measures odds ratio or prevalence of resistance, the category of the applied antimicrobial and the dosage. An effect of the antimicrobial on AMR in E. coli was evaluated as an "increase", "no effect" or "decrease" if the odds or alternatively the prevalence ratio were >1.0, 1.0 or antimicrobial substance and dosage was missing in 4 and 5 of the 11 finally selected studies. The 36 identified trials were inhomogenous in usage and provision of information on sample size. Oral administration of antimicrobials increases the risk of AMR in E. coli from swine. There is however a lack of studies on the impact of dosage and longitudinal effects of treatment. The published studies have a number of issues concerning their scientific quality. More high quality research is needed to better address and quantifiy the effect of orally administered antimicrobials on AMR in swine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cunzhong; Hou, Jiafa

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Escherichia coli virulence affects the roles of sex hormone receptors in female dogs with simulated pyometra. A total of 33 healthy, nulliparous, crossbred female dogs were divided into four groups, with 10 dogs in each of the three experimental groups and 3 dogs in the control group. Estradiol was administrated to female dogs in group 1 continuously at 0.6-4.8 mg/kg twice daily for 12 days (the dose doubled every three days), followed by intramuscular injection of 0.2-1.8 mg/kg progesterone. The progesterone was administrated with an initial dose of 0.2 µg/kg and increased 0.2 mg/kg every three days, twice daily until the maximum of 1.8 mg/kg for 24 days and maintained at 1.8 mg/kg for 19 days. Progesterone only was administrated at 1.8 mg/kg in group 2 (twice daily) for 55 continuous days and only estradiol was administered with an initial dose of 0.6 µg/kg (dose doubled every 3 days for 12 days) in group 3 twice daily and maintained at 4.8 mg/kg for the following 43 days. A strongly virulent E. coli strain, nau-b, and a weakly virulent strain, nau-i, were screened. On the 12th day of diestrus, 5 female dogs in each of the experimental groups were inoculated with E. coli nau-i strain, while the other five in each group were inoculated with nau-b strain. Histopathological changes of uterine tissues were microscopically observed 50 days after E. coli inoculation and hormone receptor expression levels were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Simulated pyometra was observed in dogs administrated with progesterone alone or progesterone combined with estradiol. The clinical symptoms and histopathological observation demonstrated that inoculation with strongly virulent E. coli strain, nau-b, caused earlier onset of pyometra symptoms and more severe pyometra symptoms compared with the weakly virulent E. coli strain, nau-i. Furthermore, estrogen and progesterone receptor levels in dogs with pyometra

  15. Celulitis in Japanese Quails (coturnix coturnix japonica for Eschorichia coli: virulence factors, sensibility and profile antimicrobial resistance /Celulite em codornas (coturnix coturnix japonica causada por Escherichia coli: fatores de virulência, sensibilidade e perfil de resistência antimicrobiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda Carlos Vidotto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten E. coli strains isolated from celulitis lesion s of Japanese quails were to evaluated antimicrobia l resistance to twent y six drugs , to pathogenicity of strains in SPF chickens embryonated eggs and virulence factors. The antimicrobials of higher efficiency wer e ampicillin, florfenicol and the lesser efficiency were erythromycin, oxacilin, lincomicin, novobiocin, penicillin, sulfonamidas, trimethoprim+sulfomethoxazo/e and tetracyicline. The majority of E. coli strains were serum resistance, the others virulence factors, hemolisin and congo red affinity, were lesser frequent on the studied strains. Pathogenicity of E. coli strains, evaluated to DL50 in embryonated eggs, had varied of 8x10 2 the 3,2x10.Dez cepas de E. coli isoladas de lesões de celulite em codornas foram avaliadas quanto a resistência antimicrobiana frente a vinte e seis drogas, a patogenicidade das amostras em ovos embrionários de galinha SPF e quanto aos fatores de virulência: hemolisinas, resistência sérica e afinidade ao vermelho congo Os antimicrobianos de maior eficiência foram ampicilinar florfenicol e os menos eficientes foram eritromicina, oxacilina. lincomicina, novobiocina. penicsilna, sulfonamida, sulfomethoxazole+ trimetoprim e tetraciclina. A maioria das amostras de E. coli foram resistentes ao soro, os outros fatores do virulência, hemolisina e afinidade ao vermelho-congo, foram menos freqüentes nas amostras estudadas. A patogenicidade das amostras de E. coli estimada através da DL50 em ovos embrionados, variaram de 8x10* a 3.2x10a.

  16. Antimicrobial resistances do not affect colonization parameters of intestinal E. coli in a small piglet group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schierack Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although antimicrobial resistance and persistence of resistant bacteria in humans and animals are major health concerns worldwide, the impact of antimicrobial resistance on bacterial intestinal colonization in healthy domestic animals has only been rarely studied. We carried out a retrospective analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility status and the presence of resistance genes in intestinal commensal E. coli clones from clinically healthy pigs from one production unit with particular focus on effects of pheno- and/or genotypic resistance on different nominal and numerical intestinal colonization parameters. In addition, we compared the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes with the occurrence of virulence associated genes typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Results In general, up to 72.1% of all E. coli clones were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole or tetracycline with a variety of different resistance genes involved. There was no significant correlation between one of the nominal or numerical colonization parameters and the absence or presence of antimicrobial resistance properties or resistance genes. However, there were several statistically significant associations between the occurrence of single resistance genes and single virulence associated genes. Conclusion The demonstrated resistance to the tested antibiotics might not play a dominant role for an intestinal colonization success in pigs in the absence of antimicrobial drugs, or cross-selection of other colonization factors e.g. virulence associated genes might compensate "the cost of antibiotic resistance". Nevertheless, resistant strains are not outcompeted by susceptible bacteria in the porcine intestine. Trial Registration The study was approved by the local animal welfare committee of the "Landesamt für Arbeitsschutz, Gesundheitsschutz und technische Sicherheit" Berlin

  17. The effect of hospital effluent on antimicrobial resistant E. coli within a municipal wastewater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S; Morris, C; Morris, D; Cormican, M; Cummins, E

    2013-03-01

    There is a concern that hospital effluent potentially containing antimicrobial compounds, antimicrobial resistant (AMR) bacteria and genetic determinants of resistance may contribute to the emergence, dissemination and persistence of AMR bacteria in municipal wastewaters. Hence, it is of interest to investigate the effect, if any, hospital effluent has on the percentage of AMR bacteria within wastewater. Water from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) (one receives and treats hospital effluent (WWTPhe) and the second does not (WWTPc)) were examined for E. coli expressing resistance to seven antimicrobials (ampicillin, streptomycin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulphonamide and ciprofloxacin). A two-sample t-test showed that AMR E. coli are present in WWTP influent and effluent, irrespective of receiving hospital effluent, and are being released into the environment (no statistical difference in count between the two WWTPs). The effect of hospital effluent on resistance varies for each AMR bacteria. Excluding tetracycline, sulphonamide and ciprofloxacin, the results suggest that the release of hospital effluent does not significantly affect the frequency with which AMR E. coli are detected in effluent. For some hospital specific antimicrobial agents, such as ciprofloxacin, the release of hospital effluent is associated with an increased proportion of antimicrobial resistance. The results suggest resistance to AMR E. coli may already be well developed in the community, making the effect of hospital effluent on AMR E. coli indistinguishable. However, for hospital specific antimicrobials, there may be a selective effect and hence limiting the release of hospital effluent containing such antimicrobials may impact the proportion of antimicrobial resistance. This research has provided statistical evidence to support necessary mitigation and remediation of antimicrobial residue release and subsequent resistance in the environment.

  18. Effect of visible range electromagnetic radiations on Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli is the agent responsible for a range of clinical diseases. With emerging antimicrobial resistance, other treatment options including solar/photo-therapy are becoming increasingly common. Visible Range Radiation Therapy/Colour Therapy is an emerging technique in the field of ...

  19. Search for Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are important zoonotic bacteria responsible for enteric infections in humans. The present study investigated the possible role of kittens in the zoonotic transmission of antimicrobial resistant EHEC O157 and Salmonella enterica to human using ...

  20. Molecular Epidemiological and Phylogenetic Associations of Two Novel Putative Virulence Genes, iha and iroNE. coli, among Escherichia coli Isolates from Patients with Urosepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, James R.; Russo, Thomas A.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Carlino, Ulrike; Bilge, Sima S.; Vary, James C.; Stell, Adam L.

    2000-01-01

    Two novel putative Escherichia coli virulence genes, iha and iroN from E. coli (iroNE. coli), were detected in 55 and 39%, respectively, of 67 E. coli isolates from patients with urosepsis. iha and iroNE. coli exhibited divergent associations with other putative virulence genes, phylogenetic markers, host characteristics, and antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and eradication regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tetsufumi; Aoki, Wataru; Mizuno, Takashi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Ohno, Junki; Nakai, Tsunehiro; Nomiya, Takao; Fujii, Miki; Fusegawa, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Kazuya; Hamada, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoshinori

    2017-02-01

    Campylobacter spp. are zoonotic pathogens, however, knowledge about their presence and antimicrobial resistance in nonhuman primates is limited. Our animal facility purchased cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from various Asian countries: China, Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Colonization by Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 238 of the monkeys from 2009 to 2012 and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out for these isolates. Furthermore, we eradicated these pathogens from these monkeys. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 47 monkeys from three specific countries: China, Cambodia, and Indonesia, with respective isolation rates of 15%, 36%, and 67%. Two monkeys, which were each infected with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, showed clinical symptoms of diarrhea and bloody feces. In total, 41 isolates of C. coli and 17 isolates of C. jejuni were detected. Antimicrobial susceptibility varied: in the monkeys from China, erythromycin (ERY)-, tetracycline (TET)-, and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli, in the monkeys from Cambodia, amoxicillin-intermediate, TET- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli and amoxicillin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni, and in the monkeys from Indonesia, ciprofloxacin-resistant C. coli and TET- and ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni were common (>75%). Multiresistant isolates of C. coli were found in monkeys from all countries and multiresistant isolates of C. jejuni were found in monkeys from Indonesia. The eradication rate with azithromycin was comparable to that with gentamicin (GEN) by oral administration, and was higher than those with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) and chloramphenicol (CHL). From the perspective of zoonosis, we should acknowledge multiresistant Campylobacter spp. isolated from the monkeys as a serious warning. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Wild Birds as biological indicators of environmental pollution: biotyping and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from Audouin's gulls (Larus Audouinii living in the Bay of Gallipoli (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Camarda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available E. Coli biotyping and antimicrobial succeptibility tests were performed on fortyeight cloacal swabs collected from a popoulation of Audouin's gulls ((Larus Audouinii living in the Bay of Gallipoli (Lecce, Italy. The aim was to assess the pathogenic potential of the strains the gulls carry and shed into the environment and to gain a better understanding of the microbial pollution of the aera they live in.

  3. Wild Birds as biological indicators of environmental pollution: biotyping and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolated from Audouin's gulls (Larus Audouinii living in the Bay of Gallipoli (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio Mallia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available E. Coli biotyping and antimicrobial succeptibility tests were performed on fortyeight cloacal swabs collected from a popoulation of Audouin's gulls ((Larus Audouinii living in the Bay of Gallipoli (Lecce, Italy. The aim was to assess the pathogenic potential of the strains the gulls carry and shed into the environment and to gain a better understanding of the microbial pollution of the aera they live in.

  4. Escherichia coli pathotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli strains are important commensals of the intestinal tract of humans and animals; however, pathogenic strains, including diarrhea-inducing E. coli and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Intestinal E. coli pathotypes may cause a dehydrating watery diarrhea, or more severe diseases su...

  5. Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from poultry in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Martina; Salata, Cristiano; Martini, Marco; Montesissa, Clara; Piccirillo, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of Campylobacter isolates from broilers and turkeys reared in industrial farms in Northern Italy, given the public health concern represented by resistant campylobacters in food-producing animals and the paucity of data about this topic in our country. Thirty-six Campylobacter jejuni and 24 Campylobacter coli isolated from broilers and 68 C. jejuni and 32 C. coli from turkeys were tested by disk diffusion for their susceptibility to apramycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, cephalothin, cefotaxime, ceftiofur, cefuroxime, ampicillin, amoxicillin+clavulanic acid, nalidixic acid, flumequine, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, tiamulin, clindamycin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole+trimethoprim, chloramphenicol. Depending on the drug, breakpoints provided by Comité de l'antibiogramme de la Société Française de Microbiologie, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and the manufacturer were followed. All broiler strains and 92% turkey strains were multidrug resistant. Very high resistance rates were detected for quinolones, tetracycline, and sulfamethoxazole+trimethoprim, ranging from 65% to 100% in broilers and from 74% to 96% in turkeys. Prevalence of resistance was observed also against ampicillin (97% in broilers, 88% in turkeys) and at least three cephalosporins (93-100% in broilers, 100% in turkeys). Conversely, no isolates showed resistance to chloramphenicol and tiamulin. Susceptibility prevailed for amoxicillin+clavulanic acid and aminoglycosides in both poultry species, and for macrolides and clindamycin among turkey strains and among C. jejuni from broilers, whereas most C. coli strains from broilers (87.5%) were resistant. Other differences between C. jejuni and C. coli were observed markedly in broiler isolates, with the overall predominance of resistance in C. coli compared to C. jejuni. This study provides updates and novel data on the AMR of broiler and

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... least 10 countries (Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan, Norway, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden and the United Kingdom ... plan Global report on surveillance Country situation analysis Policy to combat antimicrobial resistance More on antimicrobial resistance ...

  7. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli selected by tylosin treatment at a pig farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, P; Heiska, H; Olkkola, S; Myllyniemi, A-L; Hänninen, M-L

    2010-11-20

    Limited knowledge is available regarding the dynamics of macrolide resistance under farm conditions with natural Campylobacter populations. We examined the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli at a large pig farm. Faeces were sampled from untreated sows and piglets (n=57), weaned pigs treated with tylosin (n=68) and pigs of the same group 3-5 weeks after withdrawal of tylosin (n=15). Additionally, 48 weaned pigs were sampled after tylosin had not been administered for 7 months at the farm. MICs for seven antimicrobials were determined, isolates were genotyped by PFGE and mutations conferring macrolide resistance were identified. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was higher (Ptylosin had not been administered for 7 months. Resistance to erythromycin and streptomycin also decreased (Ptylosin treatment. In conclusion, tylosin treatment of pigs selected for a high-level of resistance to erythromycin and resistance to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and streptomycin also increased in C. coli isolates within a few days. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of resistance gene transfer from heat-treated Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Jouy, Eric; Kempf, Isabelle

    2018-04-02

    Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli may be present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of heat treatment, simulating food preparation, on the possibility of antimicrobial resistance genes being transferred from E. coli cells. The study was performed on antimicrobial-resistant E. coli cells in suspension in a sterile saline solution. The stability of resistance genes and the possibility of their transfer by transformation or conjugation were analyzed. Results showed that antimicrobial-resistant E. coli cells managing to survive after a few minutes at 60 °C retained their antimicrobial resistance. No plasmid could be transferred by conjugation from antimicrobial-resistant E. coli cells heated to 60 °C for ten or more minutes. Twelve electroporation experiments were performed using a bacterial suspension heated to 70 °C for 30 min. Genes coding for resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, tetracycline or sulfonamides were transferred to an E. coli DH5α recipient on two occasions. In conclusion we showed that heat-treated E. coli may occasionally transfer resistance genes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Associations of antimicrobial use with antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli from grow-finish pigs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, M; Makita, K; Tamura, Y; Asai, T

    2012-10-01

    To determine associations between antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter coli, 155 isolates were obtained from the feces of apparently healthy grow-finish pigs in Japan. In addition, data on the use of antibiotics collected through the national antimicrobial resistance monitoring system in Japan were used for the analysis. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors to antimicrobial resistance in C. coli in pigs for the following antimicrobials: ampicillin, dihydrostreptomycin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol, and enrofloxacin. The data suggested the involvement of several different mechanisms of resistance selection. The statistical relationships were suggestive of co-selection; use of macrolides was associated with enrofloxacin resistance (OR=2.94; CI(95%): 0.997, 8.68) and use of tetracyclines was associated with chloramphenicol resistance (OR=2.37; CI(95%): 1.08, 5.19). The statistical relationships were suggestive of cross-resistance: use of macrolides was associated with erythromycin resistance (OR=9.36; CI(95%): 2.96, 29.62) and the use of phenicols was associated with chloramphenicol resistance (OR=11.83; CI(95%): 1.41, 99.44). These data showed that the use of antimicrobials in pigs selects for resistance in C. coli within and between classes of antimicrobials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Campylobacter coli in Organic and Conventional Pig Production in France and Sweden: Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Kempf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter coli in conventional and organic pigs from France and Sweden. Fecal or colon samples were collected at farms or at slaughterhouses and cultured for Campylobacter. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and gentamicin were determined by microdilution for a total of 263 French strains from 114 pigs from 50 different farms and 82 Swedish strains from 144 pigs from 54 different farms. Erythromycin resistant isolates were examined for presence of the emerging rRNA methylase erm(B gene. The study showed that within the colon samples obtained in each country there was no significant difference in prevalence of Campylobacter between pigs in organic and conventional productions [France: conventional: 43/58 (74%; organic: 43/56 (77% and Sweden: conventional: 24/36 (67%; organic: 20/36 (56%]. In France, but not in Sweden, significant differences of percentages of resistant isolates were associated with production type (tetracycline, erythromycin and the number of resistances was significantly higher for isolates from conventional pigs. In Sweden, the number of resistances of fecal isolates was significantly higher compared to colon isolates. The erm(B gene was not detected in the 87 erythromycin resistant strains tested.

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Escherichia coli Escherichia_coli_L.png Escherichia_coli_NL.png Escherichia..._coli_S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+co...li&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  12. Characterisation of commensal Escherichia coli isolated from apparently healthy cattle and their attendants in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madoshi, Balichene; Kudirkiene, Egle; Mtambo, Madundo

    2016-01-01

    While pathogenic types of Escherichia coli are well characterized, relatively little is known about the commensal E. coli flora. In the current study, antimicrobial resistance in commensal E. coli and distribution of ERIC-PCR genotypes among isolates of such bacteria from cattle and cattle...... attendants on cattle farms in Tanzania were investigated. Seventeen E. coli genomes representing different ERIC-PCR types of commensal E. coli were sequenced in order to determine their possible importance as a reservoir for both antimicrobial resistance genes and virulence factors. Both human and cattle...... specific. The most frequent plasmids replicon genes found in strains from both hosts were of IncF type, which are commonly associated with carriage of antimicrobial and virulence genes. Commensal E. coli from cattle and attendants were found to share same genotypes and to carry antimicrobial resistance...

  13. Correlations between Income inequality and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Andrew; Herbert, Annie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if correlations exist between income inequality and antimicrobial resistance. This study's hypothesis is that income inequality at the national level is positively correlated with antimicrobial resistance within developed countries. Income inequality data were obtained from the Standardized World Income Inequality Database. Antimicrobial resistance data were obtained from the European antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network and outpatient antimicrobial consumption data, measured by Defined daily Doses per 1000 inhabitants per day, from the European Surveillance of antimicrobial Consumption group. Spearman's correlation coefficient (r) defined strengths of correlations of: > 0.8 as strong, > 0.5 as moderate and > 0.2 as weak. Confidence intervals and p values were defined for all r values. Correlations were calculated for the time period 2003-10, for 15 European countries. Income inequality and antimicrobial resistance correlations which were moderate or strong, with 95% confidence intervals > 0, included the following. Enterococcus faecalis resistance to aminopenicillins, vancomycin and high level gentamicin was moderately associated with income inequality (r= ≥0.54 for all three antimicrobials). Escherichia coli resistance to aminoglycosides, aminopenicillins, third generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones was moderately-strongly associated with income inequality (r= ≥0.7 for all four antimicrobials). Klebsiella pneumoniae resistance to third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones was moderately associated with income inequality (r= ≥0.5 for all three antimicrobials). Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistance and income inequality were strongly associated (r=0.87). As income inequality increases in European countries so do the rates of antimicrobial resistance for bacteria including E. faecalis, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus. Further studies are needed to confirm these

  14. Prevalence and patterns of antimicrobial resistance of fecal Escherichia coil among pigs on 47 farrow-to-finish farms with different in-feed medication policies in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akwar, Holy T; Poppe, Cornelis; Wilson, Jeff; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Dyck, Monica; Waddington, Josh; Shang, Dayue; McEwen, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and patterns of antimicrobial resistance in pigs on farms that medicated swine ration and those that did not. A total of 940 isolates of Escherichia coli from 188 pooled fecal samples obtained from weaner and finisher pigs on 47 farrow-to-finish swine farms (34 farms used in-feed medication and 13 did not) were tested for susceptibility to 21 antimicrobials using a breakpoint concentration method. The prevalence of resistance varied widely (0.0% to 81.3%) among the antimicrobials tested. Ninety percent of all the isolates tested were resistant to one or more antimicrobials. The most common multi-drug resistance patterns were to 2 to 6 antimicrobials. Resistance was significantly more frequent (P pigs compared to finisher pigs. These findings indicate that resistance to a broad range of antimicrobials was prevalent among fecal E. coli isolates of pigs on study farms, and that this constitutes a potential reservoir for resistance genes that could spread to pathogens. The findings also provide further evidence that use of medication in swine rations provides selective pressure for antimicrobial resistance in E. coli in pigs.

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals Common Antimicrobial Resistant Campylobacter coli Population in Antimicrobial-Free (ABF) and Commercial Swine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the population biology of antimicrobial resistant (AR) Campylobacter coli isolated from swine reared in the conventional and antimicrobial-free (ABF) swine production systems at farm, slaughter and environment. A total of 200 C. coli isolates selected from fecal, environmental, and carcass samples of ABF (n = 100) and conventional (n = 100) swine production systems were typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Sequence data from seven housekeeping genes was analyzed for the identification of allelic profiles, sequence types (STs) and clonal complex determination. Phylogenetic trees were generated to establish the relationships between the genotyped isolates. A total of 51 STs were detected including two novel alleles (glnA 424 and glyA 464) and 14 novel STs reported for the first time. The majority of the C. coli isolates belonged to ST-854 (ABF: 31, conventional: 17), and were grouped in clonal complex ST-828 (ABF: 68%, conventional: 66%). The mean genetic diversity (H) for the ABF (0.3963+/−0.0806) and conventional (0.4655+/−0.0714) systems were similar. The index of association () for the ABF ( = 0.1513) and conventional ( = 0.0991) C. coli populations were close to linkage equilibrium, indicative of a freely recombining population. Identical STs were detected between the pigs and their environment both at farm and slaughter. A minimum spanning tree revealed the close clustering of C. coli STs that originated from swine and carcass with those from the environment. In conclusion, our study reveals a genotypic diverse C. coli population that shares a common ancestry in the conventional and ABF swine production systems. This could potentially explain the high prevalence of antimicrobial resistant C. coli in the ABF system in the absence of antimicrobial selection pressure. PMID:22984540

  16. 76 FR 20542 - Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host bacteria... specific to Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Specific...

  17. Multidrug-Resistant and Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Dutch Surface Water and Wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, Hetty; Lynch, Gretta; Italiaander, Ronald; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Schets, Franciska M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/139498281

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the current study was to gain insight into the prevalence and concentrations of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Escherichia coli in Dutch surface water, and to explore the role of wastewater as AMR contamination source. METHODS: The prevalence of AMR E. coli was determined in

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  19. Common phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance patterns found in a case study of multiresistant E. coli from cohabitant pets, humans, and household surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Liliana Raquel Leite; Pina, Susana Maria Rocha; Simões, Romeo Luís Rocha; de Matos, Augusto José Ferreira; Rodrigues, Pedro; da Costa, Paulo Martins Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles among E. coli strains isolated from cohabitant pets and humans, evaluating the concurrent colonization of pets, owners, and home surfaces by bacteria carrying the same antimicrobial-resistant genes. The authors also intended to assess whether household surfaces and objects could contribute to the within-household antimicrobial-resistant gene diffusion between human and animal cohabitants. A total of 124 E. coli strains were isolated displaying 24 different phenotypic patterns with a remarkable percentage of multiresistant ones. The same resistance patterns were isolated from the dog's urine, mouth, the laundry floor, the refrigerator door, and the dog's food bowl. Some other multiresistant phenotypes, as long as resistant genes, were found repeatedly in different inhabitants and surfaces of the house. Direct, close contact between all the cohabitants and the touch of contaminated household surfaces and objects could be an explanation for these observations.

  20. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kilic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. Most strains of E. coli are harmless for human. E. coli O157:H7 is the most common member of a group of pathogenic E. coli strains known variously as enterohaemorrhagic, verocytotoxin-producing, or Shiga-toxin-producing organisms. EHEC bacterium is the major cause of haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The reservoir of this pathogen appears to be mainly cattle and other ruminants such as camels. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 387-388

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  3. Thioredoxin from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, A.; Ohlsson, I.; Grankvist, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    A competition radioimmunoassay for Escherichia coli thioredoxin using 125 I-labeled thioredoxin-S 2 and a double antibody technique was developed. The method permits determination of picomole amounts of thioredoxin in crude cell extracts and was used to study the localization of thioredoxin cell fractions. E. coli B was calculated to have approximately 10,000 copies of thioredoxin per cell mainly located in the soluble fraction after separation of the membrane and soluble fractions by gentle lysis and centrifugation. E. coli B tsnC mutants which are defective in the replication of phage T7 DNA in vivo and in vitro were examined for their content of thioredoxin. E. coli B tsnC 7004 contained no detectable level of thioredoxin in cell-free extracts examined under a variety of conditions. The results strongly suggest that tsnC 7004 is a nonsense or deletion mutant. Two other E. coli tsnC mutants, 7007 and 7008, contained detectable levels of thioredoxin in crude extracts as measured by thioredoxin reductase and gave similar immunoprecipitation reactions as the parent strain B/1. By radioimmunoassay incompletely cross-reacting material was present in both strains. These results show that tsnC 7007 and 7008 belong to a type of thioredoxin mutants with missence mutations in the thioredoxin gene affecting the function of thioredoxin as subunit in phage T7 DNA polymerase

  4. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P resistant bacteria and antimicrobial resistance genes exist in cattle, human, and swine waste streams, but a higher diversity of antimicrobial resistance genes are present

  5. Antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health challenge, which has accelerated by the overuse of antibiotics worldwide. Increased antimicrobial resistance is the cause of severe infections, complications, longer hospital stays and increased mortality. Overprescribing of antibiotics......-the-counter sale of antibiotics, the use of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, the active participation of clinicians in audits, the utilization of valid rapid point-of-care tests, the promotion of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies, the enhancement of communication skills with patients with the aid...... is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects, more frequent re-attendance and increased medicalization of self-limiting conditions. Antibiotic overprescribing is a particular problem in primary care, where viruses cause most infections. About 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions are issued by general...

  6. Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni in Ecuadorian broilers at slaughter age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinueza-Burgos, Christian; Wautier, Magali; Martiny, Delphine; Cisneros, Marco; Van Damme, Inge; De Zutter, Lieven

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. are a major cause of foodborne gastrointestinal infections worldwide. The linkage of human campylobacteriosis and poultry has been widely described. In this study we aimed to investigate the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of C. coli and C. jejuni in broilers from Ecuador. Caecal content from 379 randomly selected broiler batches originating from 115 farms were collected from 6 slaughterhouses located in the province of Pichincha during 1 year. Microbiological isolation was performed by direct plating on mCCDA agar. Identification of Campylobacter species was done by PCR. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, streptomycin, and erythromycin were obtained. Genetic variation was assessed by RFLP-flaA typing and Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of selected isolates. Prevalence at batch level was 64.1%. Of the positive batches 68.7% were positive for C. coli, 18.9% for C. jejuni, and 12.4% for C. coli and C. jejuni. Resistance rates above 67% were shown for tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and nalidixic acid. The resistance pattern tetracycline, ciprofloxin, and nalidixic acid was the dominant one in both Campylobacter species. RFLP-flaA typing analysis showed that C. coli and C. jejuni strains belonged to 38 and 26 profiles respectively. On the other hand MLST typing revealed that C. coli except one strain belonged to CC-828, while C. jejuni except 2 strains belonged to 12 assigned clonal complexes (CCs). Furthermore 4 new sequence types (STs) for both species were described, whereby 2 new STs for C. coli were based on new allele sequences. Further research is necessary to estimate the impact of the slaughter of Campylobacter positive broiler batches on the contamination level of carcasses in slaughterhouses and at retail in Ecuador. PMID:28339716

  7. CLINICAL ISOLATES OF MECA, METHICILLIN, VANCOMYCIN RESISTANCE S. AUREUS; ESBLs PRODUCING K.PNEUMONIA, E.COLI, P. AUREGENOSA FROM VARIOUS CLINICAL SOURCE AND ITS ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mahmud Ali, Amirthalingam R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Antimicrobial resistance has turned into a key medical and public health crisis globally since the injudicious use of magic bullets (drugs. Aim of this study is focused on the clinical isolate and their percentages of resistant to antibiotics in gram positive bacteria such as MRSA, VRSA, and MSSA are common causes of nosocomical, skin structure infections, bacteremia and infection of other systems; ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, Klebsiella spp. is common agent of urinary tract, bloodstream, pulmonary and intra-abdominal infections and carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa with its complete antimicrobial patterns which are currently practiced in this population. Methods: There are one hundred and fourteen (114 various clinical isolates, isolated from various clinical samples like throat swab, urine, pus, sputum, and blood culture, identified as specific isolate with resistance patterns were analyzed by BD phoenix-100 the auto analyzer. Results: Off 114 clinical isolate, 6 mecA-mediated resistance (cefoxitin>8mgc/ml, 11 methicillin resistance, 18 β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor, 12 methicillin sensitive and 3 vancomycin (>16µg/ml resistance S. aureus have been isolated from overall 50 isolate of S.aureus. In addition, there are 27 P.aeruginosa, 15 ESBLs from overall of 25 K. pneumoniae and 7 ESBLs out of 12 Escherichia coli species have been isolated. The resistance and susceptibility pattern percentages have been graphically represented for each isolates. Conclusion: Current study revealed that the drug classes of β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor having high resistance rate with S.aureus, P.aureginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolate. Also, some of other drug classes such as cepham and tetracycline having higher resistance rate with P.aureginosa and K.pneumoniae. In addition, the vancomycin resistances S. aureus have been isolated and reported as first time in this population.

  8. Perfil de sensibilidade antimicrobiana e detecção do gene ISS pela reação em cadeia da polimerase na tipificação de Escherichia coli patogênica em codornas de corte sob inspeção sanitária Profile of antimicrobial resistance and detection of iss gene by the polymerase chain reaction in the typification of pathogenic Escherichia coli in meat type quails under sanitary inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Lima da Costa Abreu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A patogenicidade das cepas de Escherichia coli está relacionada à expressão de fatores de virulência encontrados em elementos genéticos denominados plasmídios. O patotipo APEC, responsável por diferentes tipos de doenças em aves, pode apresentar o gene iss que aumenta a resistência das cepas de E. coli aos efeitos líticos do soro, além da resistência a diversos antimicrobianos. Este estudo foi conduzido para detectar E. coli em traquéias de codornas destinadas ao abate e avaliar, pela presença do gene iss e o perfil de susceptibilidade antimicrobiana, o potencial patogênico para aves e humanos dos isolados obtidos. Foram coletadas 180 traquéias de codornas para detecção de E. coli, determinação do perfil de resistência a agentes antimicrobianos e posterior detecção, por reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR, do gene iss. Das traquéias analisadas, 8,9 % (16/180 foram positivas para E. coli, sendo obtidos 20 isolados deste agente. A maioria dos isolados foi resistente à Tetraciclina (16/20, seguida pela Ceftazidima (13/20 e Ácido Nalidíxico (12/20, sendo apenas um resistente à Amoxicilina. A detecção do gene iss ocorreu em 55% (11/20 dos isolados. A presença do gene iss e a resistência a múltiplos antimicrobianos dos isolados obtidos neste estudo pode indicar um possível potencial patogênico das cepas de E. coli tanto para codornas quanto para outros tipos de aves e animais e mesmo para o ser humano que fique em contato com as mesmas.The pathogenicity of Escherichia coli strains is partially related to the expression of virulence factors genes, present in genetic elements called plasmids. APEC strains responsible for diseases in birds may present the iss gene which increases the resistance of E. coli strains to the lityc effect of the host's serum, besides resistance to several antimicrobials. This study was conduced in order to detect E. coli in tracheae of meat-type quails and to evaluate, by the presence of

  9. Cephem Potentiation by Inactivation of Nonessential Genes Involved in Cell Wall Biogenesis of beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Kristin R.; Sigurdardottir, Helga Høeg; Jana, Bimal

    2017-01-01

    Reversal of antimicrobial resistance is an appealing and largely unexplored strategy in drug discovery. The objective of this study was to identify potential targets for “helper” drugs reversing cephem resistance in Escherichia coli strains producing β-lactamases. A CMY-2-encoding plasmid was tra...

  10. Sources of Variation in the Ampicillin-Resistant Escherichia coli Concentration in the Feces of Organic Broiler Chickens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pleydell, E. J.; Brown, P. E.; Woodward, M. J.; Davies, R. H.; French, N. P.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, there are limited published data for the population dynamics of antimicrobial-resistant commensal bacteria. This study was designed to evaluate both the proportions of the Escherichia coli populations that are resistant to ampicillin at the level of the individual chicken on commercial broiler farms and the feasibility of obtaining repeated measures of fecal E. coli concentrations. Short-term temporal variation in the concentration of fecal E. coli was investigated, and a prelimina...

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation of Antimicrobial ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of Antimicrobials Page Last Updated: ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  15. Molecular Characterization, Antimicrobial Resistance and Caco-2 Cell Invasion Potential of Campylobacter jejuni/coli from Young Children with Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haijian; Ge, Yanling; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Jianmin; Kuang, Dai; Yang, Xiaowei; Su, Xudong; Huang, Zheng; Shi, Xianming; Xu, Xuebin; Meng, Jianghong

    2016-03-01

    Campylobacter is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Young children represent a particular age group affected by Campylobacter infection because of their limited diets and weak immune systems. In this study, a total of 110 Campylobacter (80 Campylobacter jejuni and 30 Campylobacter coli) isolated from children younger than 5 years of age with diarrhea in Shanghai, China in 2011 were examined for their genetic relationship and antimicrobial susceptibility. The presence of virulence genes and its association with invasion potential in Caco-2 cell were also determined. Multilocus sequence typing revealed 62 sequence types (STs) under 14 clonal complexes from C. jejuni and 15 STs under 2 clonal complexes from C. coli. High resistance rates among the 110 isolates were observed to nalidixic acid (88.2%), ciprofloxacin (87.3%) and tetracycline (87.3%), followed by ampicillin (30.9%), gentamicin (28.2%), clindamycin (21.8%), erythromycin (21.8%) and chloramphenicol (8.2%). Compared with that of C. jejuni (32.5%), a larger proportion of C. coli (83.3%) were resistant to multiple antimicrobials, including 16 isolates of ST-828 complex resistant to 6 antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Furthermore, 57 Campylobacter isolates were selected based on their distinct STs and the presence of virulence genes to determine their abilities to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. The level of invasion varied widely among isolates and had relatively weak correlation with the genotype data. Our findings provided baseline data on Campylobacter among young children. Active surveillance of Campylobacter is needed to better understand the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance trends of this significant pathogen to help control and protect young children from such infections.

  16. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  17. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated Report Data Meetings and Publications Resources Judicious Use of ...

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

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    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  19. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chicken in farms and at time of slaughter in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, S; Franciosini, M P; Comitini, F; Ciani, M; De Luca, S; Bellucci, S; Menchetti, L; Casagrande Proietti, P

    2017-05-01

    Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni were investigated along the broiler chicken production chain in central Italy. Campylobacter sp. isolated from cloacal swabs in farms (n = 116) and from the neck skin of chilled and eviscerated carcasses at slaughter (n = 24) were identified as C. coli (n = 99) and C. jejuni (n = 41) by multiplex PCR. Characterization by single amplified fragment length polymorphism (s-AFLP) revealed a specific genotype of Campylobacter for each farm. Minimal inhibitory concentration showed high prevalence of fluoroquinolones (70%), tetracycline (70%) and erythromycin (30%) resistance among C. coli isolates. Campylobacter jejuni isolates showed lower prevalence of fluoroquinolone (39%) and tetracycline (10%) resistance, and all isolates were susceptible to erythromycin. The S-AFLP types of the C. coli and C. jejuni isolates were associated with their antimicrobial resistance profiles (P Campylobacter isolates suggested that a specific genotype was harboured in each farm. A considerable number of C. coli isolates were resistant to erythromycin. Campylobacter coli was detected more frequently than C. jejuni in contrast to common findings for poultry. The high prevalence of 30% resistance to erythromycin in C. coli strains isolated from poultry is worrisome, as this is the first antibiotic of choice to treat human campylobacteriosis. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Anti-microbial resistance of E. Coli isolates from feeds and poultry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Between September 2002 and February 2003, 614 samples collected from four large-scale and five small-scale farms, one turkey breeder farm and two hatcheries as well as five commercial feed brands and various feed ingredients in Imo state, Nigeria were analyzed for the presence of E. coli. Thereafter, isolates were ...

  1. Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation...

  2. Identification of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains from Avian Organic Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Puño-Sarmiento

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%, three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%, 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%, but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  3. Antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L; Long, M; Huang, Y; Wu, G; Deng, W; Yang, X; Li, B; Meng, Y; Cheng, L; Fan, L; Zhang, H; Zou, L

    2015-07-01

    The study aims to demonstrate the antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Antimicrobial testing was performed according to the standard disk diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of disinfectants were determined using the agar dilution method. All isolates were screened for the presence of antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance genes and further analysed for genetic relatedness by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results showed that 46·6% of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. Escherichia coli isolates showed resistance to fewer antimicrobials as panda age increased. Among antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates, the antimicrobial resistance genes blaCTX-M (88·2%) and sul1 (92·3%) were most prevalent. The disinfectant resistance genes emrE, ydgE/ydgF, mdfA and sugE(c) were commonly present (68·2-98·9%), whereas qac and sugE(p) were relatively less prevalent (0-21·3%). The frequencies of resistance genes tended to be higher in E. coli isolated in December than in July, and PFGE profiles were also more diverse in isolates in December. The qacEΔ1 and sugE(p) genes were higher in adolescent pandas than in any other age groups. PFGE revealed that antimicrobial resistance correlated well with sampling time and habitat. This study demonstrated that antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance was common in giant panda-derived E. coli, and the antimicrobial resistance was associated with sampling time and habitat. Escherichia coli could serve as a critical vector in spreading disinfectant and antimicrobial resistance. This is the first study that demonstrated the phenotypic and genetic characterizations of antimicrobial and disinfectant resistance in E. coli isolates from more than 60 giant pandas. Frequent transfer of pandas to other cages may lead to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The

  4. Heavy metal susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from urine samples from Sweden, Germany, and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Suetterlin, S; Tellez-Castillo, CJ; Anselem, L; Yin, H; Bray, JE; Maiden, MCJ

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a major health care problem, with the intensive use of heavy metals and biocides recently being identified as potential contributing factors to the aggravation of this situation. This study investigated heavy metal susceptibility and genetic resistance determinants in Escherichia coli isolated from clinical urine samples from Sweden, Germany and Spain. A total of 186 isolates were tested for minimal inhibition concentration to sodium arsenite, silver nitrate and co...

  5. Prevalence, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in white stork Ciconia ciconia in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepańska, Bernadeta; Kamiński, Piotr; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Śpica, Dorota; Kartanas, Edmund; Ulrich, Werner; Jerzak, Leszek; Kasprzak, Mariusz; Bocheński, Marcin; Klawe, Jacek J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of white stork Ciconia ciconia as a potential reservoir of Campylobacter spp. Antimicrobial resistance and the presence of putative virulence genes of the isolates were also examined. A total of 398 white stork chicks sampled in Western Poland in habitats with high density of breeding were examined. Rectal swabs were collected during breeding season 2009-2012 from storks developing in a relatively pure environment (Odra meadows), in polluted areas (a copper mining-smelting complex), and in suburbs. Of the anal swabs collected, 7.6% were positive for Campylobacter among chicks (5.3% samples positive for C. jejuni and 2.3% samples positive for C. coli). Samples from polluted areas had the highest prevalence of Campylobacter (12.2%). The prevalence of resistance among C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from young storks was as follows: to ciprofloxacin (52.4%, 44.4%), and to tetracycline (19%, 77.8%). All of the analyzed isolates were susceptible to macrolides. The resistance to both classes of antibiotics was found in the 23.3% of Campylobacter spp. All Campylobacter spp. isolates had cadF gene and flaA gene responsible for adherence and motility. CdtB gene associated with toxin production was present in 88.9% of C. coli isolates and 57.1% of C. jejuni isolates. The iam marker was found more often in C. coli strains (55.6%) compared to C. jejuni isolates (42.9%). Our results confirm the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in the white stork in natural conditions and, because it lives in open farmlands with access to marshy wetlands, the environmental sources such as water reservoirs and soil-water can be contaminated from white stork feces and the pathogens can be widely disseminated. We can thus conclude that Campylobacter spp. may easily be transmitted to waterfowl, other birds, and humans via its environmental sources and/or by immediate contact.

  6. Development of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli adapted to biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The potential for adaptive resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli after step-wise exposure to increasing sub-inhibitory concentrations of five biocides as triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate and trisodium phosphate, was investigated, to identify the mechanisms underlying resistance. The biocide resistance and cross-resistance to the antimicrobials erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, and to sodium dodecyl sulphate, were examined according to the broth microdilution method. The presence of active efflux was studied on the basis of restored sensitivity in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitors phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine, cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone, verapamil and reserpine. Changes in the outer membrane protein profiles and morphological changes in adapted strains were studied, as compared with the parent strains. Repeated exposure of C. jejuni and C. coli to biocides resulted in partial increases in tolerance to biocides itself, to other biocides and antimicrobial compounds. The developed resistance was stable for up to 10 passages in biocide-free medium. More than one type of active efflux was identified in adapted strains. These adapted strains showed different alterations to their outer membrane protein profiles, along with morphological changes. The data presented here suggest that different mechanisms are involved in adaptation to biocides and that this adaptation is unique to each strain of Campylobacter and does not result from a single species-specific mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Annual Surveillance Summary: Escherichia coli (E. coli) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    7 Section B – Antimicrobial Resistance and Use...coli in the MHS: Annual Summary 2016 Prepared June 2017 EpiData Center Department NMCPHC-EDC-TR-407-2017 Section B – Antimicrobial Resistance ... resistance to three or more tested antimicrobial agents. 13 The current assessment found regions with the highest total IRs and analyses defining

  8. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili; Christensen, Jens P; Olsen, John E; Nolan, Lisa; Olsen, Rikke H

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded by the chromosome may also be important for disease manifestation and antimicrobial resistance. For the E. coli strain APEC_O2 the plasmids have been sequenced and analyzed in several studies, and E. coli APEC_O2 may therefore serve as a reference strain in future studies. Here we describe the chromosomal features of E. coli APEC_O2. E. coli APEC_O2 is a sequence type ST135, has a chromosome of 4,908,820 bp (plasmid removed), comprising 4672 protein-coding genes, 110 RNA genes, and 156 pseudogenes, with an average G + C content of 50.69%. We identified 82 insertion sequences as well as 4672 protein coding sequences, 12 predicated genomic islands, three prophage-related sequences, and two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats regions on the chromosome, suggesting the possible occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in this strain. The wildtype strain of E. coli APEC_O2 is resistant towards multiple antimicrobials, however, no (complete) antibiotic resistance genes were present on the chromosome, but a number of genes associated with extra-intestinal disease were identified. Together, the information provided here on E. coli APEC_O2 will assist in future studies of avian pathogenic E. coli strains, in particular regarding strain of E. coli APEC_O2, and aid in the general understanding of the pathogenesis of avian pathogenic E. coli .

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. ... concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All ...

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  12. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  13. Escherichia coli as a probiotic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Wildeboer-Veloo, ACM; van der Waaij, D; Degener, JE

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oral treatment with a suspension of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli cells (commercially available as: Symbioflor II(R)) on the morphological composition of the gut microflora and on the systemic humoral immune response (the IgG-, IgA- and IgM-isotype) against the bacterial cells in

  14. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The bio-effects of the ethanol extracts from the leaf and stem of Momordica charantia were studied with the view to ascertain the medical usefulness ascribed to the plant by the locals. The plant parts, stem and leaf, revealed remarkable activity against Escherichia coli and Staphlococcus aureus. The leaves ...

  15. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 8. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli. Joshua Lederberg. Classics Volume 13 Issue 8 August 2008 pp 793-794. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/08/0793-0794 ...

  16. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 8. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli. Joshua Lederberg. Classics Volume 13 Issue 8 August 2008 pp 793-794. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/08/0793-0794 ...

  17. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  18. Refugees and antimicrobial resistance: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Smalen, Allard Willem; Ghorab, Hatem; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A

    There is a large increase in the numbers of refugees and asylum seekers worldwide and a lack of data on the carriage of antimicrobial resistance in refugee/asylum seeking groups. This article aims to identify the impact of refugees and asylum seekers on the acquisition and transmission of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) through a literature search. The databases Embase, Medline, Pubmed, and Web of Science Core Collection were utilised and covered all articles before the 1st of October 2016. In total, 577 articles were identified, and studies were eligible if they met the selection criteria, including observational study design, English language, and AMR strains reported in absolute numbers. In total, 17 articles met the criteria, the majority were from the European region. Articles fitting the selection criteria exclusively reported AMR in bacterial species including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, K. oxytoca, Shigella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and Acinetobacter baumannii. The analyses indicated that a high percentage of AMR strains, have been circulating among refugees and asylum seekers. The displacement of refugees and asylum seekers seem to play a key role in the transmission of AMR. Therefore, improved AMR control measures are essential. A knowledge gap was identified; further research is strongly recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterisation of Commensal Escherichia coli Isolated from Apparently Healthy Cattle and Their Attendants in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtambo, Madundo M. A.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Lupindu, Athumani M.; Olsen, John E.

    2016-01-01

    While pathogenic types of Escherichia coli are well characterized, relatively little is known about the commensal E. coli flora. In the current study, antimicrobial resistance in commensal E. coli and distribution of ERIC-PCR genotypes among isolates of such bacteria from cattle and cattle attendants on cattle farms in Tanzania were investigated. Seventeen E. coli genomes representing different ERIC-PCR types of commensal E. coli were sequenced in order to determine their possible importance as a reservoir for both antimicrobial resistance genes and virulence factors. Both human and cattle isolates were highly resistant to tetracycline (40.8% and 33.1%), sulphamethazole-trimethoprim (49.0% and 8.8%) and ampicillin (44.9% and 21.3%). However, higher proportion of resistant E. coli and higher frequency of resistance to more than two antimicrobials was found in isolates from cattle attendants than isolates from cattle. Sixteen out of 66 ERIC-PCR genotypes were shared between the two hosts, and among these ones, seven types contained isolates from cattle and cattle attendants from the same farm, suggesting transfer of strains between hosts. Genome-wide analysis showed that the majority of the sequenced cattle isolates were assigned to phylogroups B1, while human isolates represented phylogroups A, C, D and E. In general, in silico resistome and virulence factor identification did not reveal differences between hosts or phylogroups, except for lpfA and iss found to be cattle and B1 phylogroup specific. The most frequent plasmids replicon genes found in strains from both hosts were of IncF type, which are commonly associated with carriage of antimicrobial and virulence genes. Commensal E. coli from cattle and attendants were found to share same genotypes and to carry antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes associated with both intra and extraintestinal E. coli pathotypes. PMID:27977751

  20. Association Between Tetracycline Consumption and Tetracycline Resistance in Escherichia coli from Healthy Danish Slaughter Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Houe, Hans; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2009-01-01

    the intestinal tract of healthy pigs and patterns of tetracycline Consumption in the herds of origin, together with other risk factors. Data oil antimicrobial resistance, antimicrobial consumption, and pig herd demographics were obtained from different Danish surveillance programs. Descriptive statistics were......It has been recognized that exposure to antimicrobial agents can exert a selective pressure for the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate an association between the probability of isolating a tetracycline-resistant Escherichia coli isolate from...... Susceptibility status were number of produced animals in the year and year of sampling. Other antimicrobial consumption risk factors, Such as number of prescriptions and amount prescribed, although not included in the final model, presented indirect impact in the tetracycline resistance probability. From...

  1. Virulence Genes in Expanded-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant and -Susceptible Escherichia coli Isolates from Treated and Untreated Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, S; Delannoy, S; Bougeard, S; Larvor, E; Jouy, E; Balan, O; Fach, P; Kempf, I

    2015-12-14

    This study investigated antimicrobial resistance, screened for the presence of virulence genes involved in intestinal infections, and determined phylogenetic groups of Escherichia coli isolates from untreated poultry and poultry treated with ceftiofur, an expanded-spectrum cephalosporin. Results show that none of the 76 isolates appeared to be Shiga toxin-producing E. coli or enteropathogenic E. coli. All isolates were negative for the major virulence factors/toxins tested (ehxA, cdt, heat-stable enterotoxin [ST], and heat-labile enterotoxin [LT]). The few virulence genes harbored in isolates generally did not correlate with isolate antimicrobial resistance or treatment status. However, some of the virulence genes were significantly associated with certain phylogenetic groups. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Space-time clustering of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli isolated from Danish pigs at slaughter between 1997 and 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abatih, E. N.; Ersbøll, A. K.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo

    2009-01-01

    In Denmark, antimicrobial resistance in bacteria in animals, animal products and humans, is routinely monitored. This study aimed at determining whether the observed variations in the prevalence of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli isolated from healthy pigs at slaughter were random....... The clusters of ampicillin resistant E coli appeared at the same time as the national consumption of ampicillin in pigs increased, however antimicrobial consumption at the herd level did not appear to have any effects on space-time clustering in this study. The results could serve as a platform to highlight...... or clustered in space and time. Data on E coli isolates between 1997 and 2005 were obtained from the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP) whereas data on the quantity of ampicillin consumed was obtained from the Danish Register of Veterinary Medicines (Vet...

  3. Cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from farm-workers and pigs in northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Son T T; Bortolaia, Valeria; Thi, Nhat T

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria may be transmitted between farm workers and livestock. This study aimed to determine and compare the prevalence and the genetic determinants of cefotaxime-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in faecal isolates from workers and pigs at 100 farms....... RESULTS Antimicrobial usage was widespread and included classes regarded of critical or high importance in human medicine. Dosages were 0.5-2 times higher than recommended and antimicrobials were often administered right until slaughter. Prevalence of CTX-resistant E. coli was 86% in farm workers and 89......% in pigs. In 76% of farms, CTX-resistant E. coli were shared by pigs and farm workers. ESBL-producing E. coli were detected from pigs and workers at 66 and 69 farms, respectively. The ESBL phenotype was mainly mediated by CTX-M and to a lesser extent by TEM. Occurrence of blaCTX-M was similar in E. coli...

  4. Using data on resistance prevalence per sample in the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Shuyu, Wu; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2008-01-01

    quantitative data on antimicrobial resistance (resistance prevalence per sample). Methods: In this study, a total of 98 faecal samples from slaughter pigs were tested for tetracycline and sulphonamide resistance in Escherichia coli using the single colony method, and these results were compared......Objectives: In most existing antimicrobial resistance monitoring programmes, one single bacterial colony from each collected sample is susceptibility tested against a panel of antimicrobials. Detecting the proportion of colonies resistant to different antimicrobials in each sample can provide...... and occurrence of resistance, there is a need to move towards a more quantitative approach when dealing with antimicrobial resistance in a population, and the resistance prevalence per sample method can provide some of this additional information....

  5. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was concluded from the study that healthy food animals form a reservoir of multiple resistant E. coli which may be transmitted to humans through the food chain. Thus, continued surveillance of E. coli obtained from food production continuum is merited to identify emerging antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes. The Kenya ...

  6. Evolutionary History of the Global Emergence of the Escherichia coli Epidemic Clone ST131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Stoesser

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131 has emerged globally as the most predominant extraintestinal pathogenic lineage within this clinically important species, and its association with fluoroquinolone and extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance impacts significantly on treatment. The evolutionary histories of this lineage, and of important antimicrobial resistance elements within it, remain unclearly defined. This study of the largest worldwide collection (n = 215 of sequenced ST131 E. coli isolates to date demonstrates that the clonal expansion of two previously recognized antimicrobial-resistant clades, C1/H30R and C2/H30Rx, started around 25 years ago, consistent with the widespread introduction of fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins in clinical medicine. These two clades appear to have emerged in the United States, with the expansion of the C2/H30Rx clade driven by the acquisition of a blaCTX-M-15-containing IncFII-like plasmid that has subsequently undergone extensive rearrangement. Several other evolutionary processes influencing the trajectory of this drug-resistant lineage are described, including sporadic acquisitions of CTX-M resistance plasmids and chromosomal integration of blaCTX-M within subclusters followed by vertical evolution. These processes are also occurring for another family of CTX-M gene variants more recently observed among ST131, the blaCTX-M-14/14-like group. The complexity of the evolutionary history of ST131 has important implications for antimicrobial resistance surveillance, epidemiological analysis, and control of emerging clinical lineages of E. coli. These data also highlight the global imperative to reduce specific antibiotic selection pressures and demonstrate the important and varied roles played by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements in the perpetuation of antimicrobial resistance within lineages.

  7. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Contributes to Escherichia coli Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Hsien Wang; Kwang Sik Kim

    2013-01-01

    E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacteria causing neonatal meningitis, and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Recent reports of E. coli meningitis caused by antimicrobial resistant strains are a particular concern. These findings indicate that a novel strategy is needed to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. Cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) is a bacterial virulence factor associ...

  8. Drug-resistant Escherichia coli, Rural Idaho

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, Elizabeth L.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Johnson, James R.; Haddadin, Bassam; Williamson, Jacquelyn; Samore, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    Stool carriage of drug-resistant Escherichia coli in home-living residents of a rural community was examined. Carriage of nalidixic acid–resistant E. coli was associated with recent use of antimicrobial agents in the household. Household clustering of drug-resistant E. coli was observed. Most carriers of drug-resistant E. coli lacked conventional risk factors.

  9. Novel sequence types of extended-spectrum and acquired AmpC beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and Escherichia clade V isolated from wild mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carla Andrea; Alcalá, Leticia; Simón, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    The closer contact with wildlife due to the growing human population and the destruction of natural habitats emphasizes the need of gaining insight into the role of animals as source of antimicrobial resistance. Here, we aim at characterizing the antimicrobial resistance genes and phylogenetic distribution of commensal Escherichia coli from 62 wild mammals. Isolates exhibiting resistance to ≥1 antibiotic were detected in 25.8% of the animals and 6.4% carried an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing E. coli. Genetic mechanisms involved in third-generation cephalosporin resistance were as follows: (i) hyperproduction of chromosomal AmpC (hedgehog), (ii) production of acquired CMY-2 β-lactamase (hedgehog), (iii) production of SHV-12 and CTX-M-14 ESBLs (n = 2, mink and roe-deer). ESBL genes were transferable by conjugation, and blaCMY-2 was mobilized by a 95kb IncI1 plasmid. The distribution of the phylogenetic groups in the E. coli collection studied was B1 (44.6%), B2 (24.6%), E (15.4%), A (4.6%) and F (3.1%). Five isolates (7.7%) were cryptic Escherichia clades (clade IV, 4 mice; clade V, 1 mink). ESBL/AmpC-E. coli isolates showed different sequence types (STs): ST1128/B1, ST4564/B1 (new), ST4996/B1 (new) and a non-registered ST. This study contributes to better understand the E. coli population and antimicrobial resistance flow in wildlife and reports new AmpC-E. coli STs and a first described ESBL-producing Escherichia clade V isolate. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelzel, Christina S., E-mail: Christina.Hoelzel@wzw.tum.de [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mueller, Christa [Institute for Agroecology, Organic Farming and Soil Protection, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 12, 85354 Freising (Germany); Harms, Katrin S. [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany); Mikolajewski, Sabine [Department for Quality Assurance and Analytics, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture (LfL), Lange Point 4, 85354 Freising (Germany); Schaefer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann [Chair of Animal Hygiene, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephaner Berg 3, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08-5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1-32.0 mg chrome, 22.4-3387.6 mg copper, <2.0-26.7 mg lead, <0.01-0.11 mg mercury, 3.1-97.3 mg nickel and 93.0-8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against {beta}-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against {beta}-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  11. Heavy metals in liquid pig manure in light of bacterial antimicrobial resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hölzel, Christina S.; Müller, Christa; Harms, Katrin S.; Mikolajewski, Sabine; Schäfer, Stefanie; Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals are regularly found in liquid pig manure, and might interact with bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Concentrations of heavy metals were determined by atomic spectroscopic methods in 305 pig manure samples and were connected to the phenotypic resistance of Escherichia coli (n=613) against 29 antimicrobial drugs. Concentrations of heavy metals (/kg dry matter) were 0.08–5.30 mg cadmium, 1.1–32.0 mg chrome, 22.4–3387.6 mg copper, <2.0–26.7 mg lead, <0.01–0.11 mg mercury, 3.1–97.3 mg nickel and 93.0–8239.0 mg zinc. Associated with the detection of copper and zinc, resistance rates against β-lactams were significantly elevated. By contrast, the presence of mercury was significantly associated with low antimicrobial resistance rates of Escherichia coli against β-lactams, aminoglycosides and other antibiotics. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of mercury on bacterial resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and doxycycline were also demonstrated in a laboratory trial. Antimicrobial resistance in the porcine microflora might be increased by copper and zinc. By contrast, the occurrence of mercury in the environment might, due to co-toxicity, act counter-selective against antimicrobial resistant strains.

  12. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in Daycare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Stensvold, Christen R.; Struve, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been associated with persistent diarrhea, reduced growth acceleration, and failure to thrive in children living in developing countries and with childhood diarrhea in general in industrialized countries. The clinical implications of an EAEC carrier...... and answered a questionnaire regarding gastrointestinal symptoms and exposures. Exposures included foreign travel, consumption of antibiotics, and contact with a diseased animal. In the capital area of Denmark, a total of 179 children aged 0-6 years were followed in a cohort study, in the period between 2009...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ol Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  14. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet ...

  15. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... topics menu Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System ... If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  16. Original Paper Prevalence of Arcobacter, Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-12

    Apr 12, 2011 ... Prevalence of Arcobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and ... species by selective cultural procedures and for Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Staphylococcus aureus enriched ... Point System monitoring of critical contamination points used in meat production to ensure food safety in.

  17. PATHOGENIC POTENTIALS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrolyte and haematological parameters in rabbits infected with pathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli from rural water supplies in Rivers State, Nigeria, where monitored. Rabbits were orally infected with suspension containing 3x107 cfu /ml of Escherichia coli to induce diarrhoea, and the electrolyte (sodium, potassium ...

  18. A retrospective analysis of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens in an equine hospital (2012-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spijk, J N; Schmitt, S; Fürst, A E; Schoster, A

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has become an important concern in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study was to describe the rate of antimicrobial resistance in common equine pathogens and to determine the occurrence of multidrug-resistant isolates. A retrospective analysis of all susceptibility testing results from bacterial pathogens cultured from horses at the University of Zurich Equine Hospital (2012-2015) was performed. Strains exhibiting resistance to 3 or more antimicrobial categories were defined as multidrug-resistant. Susceptibility results from 303 bacterial pathogens were analyzed, most commonly Escherichia coli (60/303, 20%) and Staphylococcus aureus (40/303, 13%). High rates of acquired resistance against commonly used antimicrobials were found in most of the frequently isolated equine pathogens. The highest rate of multidrug resistance was found in isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (23/24, 96%), followed by Enterobacter cloacae complex (24/28, 86%) and Escherichia coli (48/60, 80%). Overall, 60% of Escherichia coli isolates were phenotypically ESBL-producing and 68% of Staphylococcus spp. were phenotypically methicillin-resistant. High rates of acquired antimicrobial resistance towards commonly used antibiotics are concerning and underline the importance of individual bacteriological and antimicrobial susceptibility testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Minimizing and optimizing antimicrobial therapy in horses is needed.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial strains isolated from avian cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian cellulitis is an inflammatory process in the subcutaneous tissue, mainly located in the abdomen and thighs. This problem is commonly observed in poultry at slaughter and it is considered one of the major causes of condemnation of carcasses in Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform the microbial isolation of lesions of avian cellulitis from a processing plant located in the State of Goiás in order to analyze antimicrobial resistance by antibiogram test and to detect resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. A total of 25 samples of avian cellulitis lesions were analyzed, from which 30 bacterial strains were isolated. There were eleven (44% strains of Escherichia coli, nine (36% strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, seven (28% strains of Proteus mirabilis and three (12% strains of Manheimiahaemolytica. The antibiogram test showed that all strains were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. The gene of antimicrobial resistance tetB was detected in E. coli, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis strains, and was the most frequently observed gene. The gene of antimicrobial resistance Sul1 was detected in all bacterial species, while tetA was found in E. coli and S. epidermidis strains, SHV in E. coli strains, S. epidermidis and P. mirabilis,and cat1 in one P. mirabilis strain. The results suggest a potential public health hazard due to the ability of these microorganisms to transmit antimicrobial resistancegenes to other microorganisms present in the intestinal tract of humans and animals, which may affect clinical-medical usage of these drugs.

  20. Bacteriophages with the Ability to Degrade Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amee Manges

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. UTIs are usually managed with antibiotic therapy, but over the years, antibiotic-resistant strains of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC have emerged. The formation of biofilms further complicates the treatment of these infections by making them resistant to killing by the host immune system as well as by antibiotics. This has encouraged research into therapy using bacteriophages (phages as a supplement or substitute for antibiotics. In this study we characterized 253 UPEC in terms of their biofilm-forming capabilities, serotype, and antimicrobial resistance. Three phages were then isolated (vB_EcoP_ACG-C91, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 which were able to lyse 80.5% of a subset (42 of the UPEC strains able to form biofilms. Correlation was established between phage sensitivity and specific serotypes of the UPEC strains. The phages’ genome sequences were determined and resulted in classification of vB_EcoP_ACG-C91 as a SP6likevirus, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 as a T4likevirus and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 as T1likevirus. We assessed the ability of the three phages to eradicate the established biofilm of one of the UPEC strains used in the study. All phages significantly reduced the biofilm within 2–12 h of incubation.

  1. mcr-1 identified in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Lima Barbieri

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance associated with colistin has emerged as a significant concern worldwide threatening the use of one of the most important antimicrobials for treating human disease. Here, we examined a collection (n = 980 of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC isolated from poultry with colibacillosis from the US and internationally for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2, genes known to encode colistin resistance. Included in the analysis was an additional set of avian fecal E. coli (AFEC (n = 220 isolates from healthy birds for comparative analysis. The mcr-1 gene was detected in a total of 12 isolates recovered from diseased production birds from China and Egypt. No mcr genes were detected in the healthy fecal isolates. The full mcr-1 gene from positive isolates was sequenced using specifically designed primers and were compared with sequences currently described in NCBI. mcr-1 positive isolates were also assessed for phenotypic colistin resistance and extended spectrum beta lactam phenotypes and genotypes. This study has identified mcr-1 in APEC isolates dating back to at least 2010 and suggests that animal husbandry practices could result in a potential source of resistance to the human food chain in countries where application of colistin in animal health is practiced.

  2. mcr-1 identified in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Barbieri, Nicolle; Nielsen, Daniel W; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Cavender, Tia; Hussein, Ashraf; Yan, Shi-Gan; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance associated with colistin has emerged as a significant concern worldwide threatening the use of one of the most important antimicrobials for treating human disease. Here, we examined a collection (n = 980) of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) isolated from poultry with colibacillosis from the US and internationally for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2, genes known to encode colistin resistance. Included in the analysis was an additional set of avian fecal E. coli (AFEC) (n = 220) isolates from healthy birds for comparative analysis. The mcr-1 gene was detected in a total of 12 isolates recovered from diseased production birds from China and Egypt. No mcr genes were detected in the healthy fecal isolates. The full mcr-1 gene from positive isolates was sequenced using specifically designed primers and were compared with sequences currently described in NCBI. mcr-1 positive isolates were also assessed for phenotypic colistin resistance and extended spectrum beta lactam phenotypes and genotypes. This study has identified mcr-1 in APEC isolates dating back to at least 2010 and suggests that animal husbandry practices could result in a potential source of resistance to the human food chain in countries where application of colistin in animal health is practiced.

  3. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from children and environmental sources in urban and suburban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanska, Bernadeta; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Spica, Dorota; Klawe, Jacek J

    2017-04-04

    Campylobacteriosis is a dominant bacterial cause of foodborne infection and is considered the main public health problem in Europe and many other countries worldwide. In the study lasting from 2011 to 2013 we compared the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from children, domestic animals, poultry meat and surface water in Northern Poland. During a 3-years study 1973 samples were analysed. The results proved the presence of Campylobacter spp. in 306 (15.5%) samples. The percentage of Campylobacter-positive samples differed among the sample types, from 0% (freshwater beaches) to 38.6% (poultry meat in 2011). Prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in children isolates was 9.6%. It decreased from 13.2% in 2011 to 8.0% in 2013. It should be highlighted with a particular concern that Campylobacter jejuni was detected in 20.0% of fountains. All children and poultry meat isolates were susceptible to azithromycin. Two C. coli (3.7%) and four C. jejuni (3.3%) isolated from poultry meat were resistant to erythromycin. The highest percentage of C. jejuni isolates with resistance to ciprofloxacin were found in samples from 80% dogs and 85% ponds. Among isolates resistant to two antimicrobials 74.7% C. jejuni and 59.2% C. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin as well as to tetracycline. Only one cat C. coli isolate was resistant to both azithromycin and erythromycin. One C. jejuni isolate from a fountain was resistant to four antimicrobial agents (erythromycin, azithromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin). The study proved that surface water, poultry meat and pets constituted potential sources of Campylobacter to children. Fountains can be a direct source of children campylobacteriosis but can also pollute other environments with multidrug-resistant Campylobacter. The high resistance to some antimicrobials among the isolates may lead to increasing numbers of difficult-to-treat campylobacteriosis cases among children.

  4. EMERGING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITAL A THREAT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vichal Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance(AMR threatens the health of many throughout the world, since both old and new infectious diseases remain a formidable public health threat. When pathogenic microorganisms can multiply beyond some critical mass in the face of invading antimicrobials, treatment outcome is compromised. This phenomenon is referred as antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the overall antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates from tertiary care hospitals as majority of patients here receive empirical antibiotics therapy. Method: This retrospective study was carried out in teaching hospital, Greater Noida to determine prevalence of multidrug resistance in patients in relation to empirical antibiotic therapy in hospital. Various samples (pus,urine,blood were collected for bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: Total 500 bacterial strains isolated from ICU, surgery, obstetrics & gynaecology and orthopaedics and their sensitivity pattern was compared in this study. The highest number of resistant bacterias were of pseudomonas sp. i.e. 21(33.87% followed by 16(25.80% of staphylococcus aureus, 12(19.35% of Escherichia coli, Klebseilla sp & Proteus vulgaris were 05(8.06% each & Citrobacter sp. 03(4.83%. Total 62(12.4% bacterial isolates were found to be resistant to multiple drugs. The 31 (50% of these resistant bacteria were prevalent in ICU, 12(19.35% in Surgery, 11(17.74% in Gynaecology, 08(12.90% in Orthopaedics.. All the bacterial strains were resistant to common antibiotics like Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline & Cotrimoxazole and some were even resistant to Imipenem. Conclusion: Therefore we have outlined the nature of the antimicrobial resistance problem as an important health issue for national and international community. It is advised to avoid use of empirical antibiotics therapy.

  5. [Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistant Esherichia coli by Rectal Swab Method--Annual Change of Prevalence of Quinolone-resistant and ESBL Producing Strains from 2009 to 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Yoshitsugu; Sako, Shinichi; Yano, Tomofumi; Kosaka, Noriko

    2015-09-01

    Although most of commonly used antimicrobial agents had been susceptible to Esherichia coli, recently there are a lot of reports concerning about community-acquired infection caused by resistant E. coli. The aim of this study is to define the prevalence of resistant E. coli in normal flora colonization by the rectal swab method. From June 2009 to December 2013, 251 male patients (50-85 year-old, median 68) planned to transrectal prostate biopsy participated in this study. Stools stuck on the glove at the digital examination were provided for culture specimen. Identification of E. coli and determination of MIC was performed by MicroScan WalkAway40plus (Siemens). Isolated E. coli were deemed quinolone-resistant strains when their MIC of levofloxacine was 4 μg/mL or above according to the breakpoint MIC by the CLSI criteria. ESBL producing ability was determined by the double disk method used by CVA contained ESBL definition disc (Eikenkagaku). Of the 251 study patients, 224 patients had positive cultures of E. coli. Twenty-four patients had quinolone-resistant strains and 9 patients had ESBL producing strains. The prevalence of quinolone-resistant strains in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 5.9% (2 out of 34 strains), 13.5% (5 out of 37 strains), 12.5% (4 out of 32 strains), 9.0% (6 out of 67) and 13.0% (7 out of 54 strains), respectively. The prevalence of ESBL producing strains in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 were 0% (0 out of 34 strains), 5.4% (2 out of 37 strains), 3.1% (1 out of 32 strains), 3.0% (2 out of 67 strains) and 7.4% (4 out of 54 strains), respectively. In 2013, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistant E. coli, both quinolone-resistant and ESBL producing strains, were increasing. We have to pay a close attention to the increase of resistant E. coli.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characterization of Escherichia coli recovered from frozen game meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus-Vargas, Rafael H; Atanassova, Viktoria; Reich, Felix; Klein, Günter

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae both in veterinary and human medicine, the dissemination of these bacteria in several environments and their possible repercussions on human health is causing concern. Game meat is usually seen as free of antimicrobial resistant bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current antimicrobial susceptibility status in generic Escherichia coli isolated from packed frozen game meat from a game handling establishment in Germany. A total of 229 E. coli isolates were obtained from cuts of red deer, roe deer and wild boar. The susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents was evaluated by a broth microdilution method according to ISO 20776-1:2006. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values were compared to breakpoints and cut-off values published by the EUCAST. Isolates showing MICs above the reference values were further studied for associated resistance determinants and phylogrouping by PCR. Overall, 16 E. coli isolates (7.0%) showed resistance (microbiological or clinical) to at least one antimicrobial agent tested. Clinical resistance was recorded to ampicillin (5/229) and chloramphenicol (4/229), whereas the MIC of 9 isolates exceeded the epidemiological cut-off value for doxycycline. One of the ampicillin-resistant isolates showed resistance to the β-lactam antibiotic derivatives tested, cephalosporines and aztreonam. Three of 9 non-wild-type isolates for doxycycline were positive for tet (B) genes. The ß-lactam-resistant isolate was found to harbour bla CTX-M-1 gene. These data show a low prevalence of resistant E. coli in packed game meat compared to studies on conventional meat. Although isolates obtained in this study may also be originating from the processing environment and not necessarily from animals, based on our results, it is important to monitor the development of antimicrobial resistance in game animals and products in order to identify future threats for the

  7. Proteomic comparison of three clinical diarrhoeagenic drug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates grown on CHROMagar™STEC media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalule, John Bosco; Fortuin, Suereta; Calder, Bridget; Robberts, Lourens; Keddy, Karen H; Nel, Andrew J M; Garnett, Shaun; Nicol, Mark; Warner, Digby F; Soares, Nelson C; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2017-09-05

    Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are key diarrhoea-causing foodborne pathogens. We used proteomics to characterize the virulence and antimicrobial resistance protein profiles of three clinical pathogenic E. coli isolates (two EPEC [one resistant to ciprofloxacin] and one STEC) cultured on CHROMagar™STEC solid media after minimal laboratory passage. We identified 4767 unique peptides from 1630 protein group across all three clinical E. coli strains. Label-free proteomic analysis allowed the identification of virulence and drug resistance proteins that were unique to each of the clinical isolates compared in this study. The B subunit of Shiga toxin, ToxB, was uniquely detected in the STEC strain while several other virulence factors including SheA, OmpF, OmpC and OmpX were significantly more abundant in the STEC strain. The ciprofloxacin resistant EPEC isolate possessed reduced levels of key virulence proteins compared to the ciprofloxacin susceptible EPEC and STEC strains. Parallel reaction monitoring assays validated the presence of biologically relevant proteins across biologically-replicated cultures. Propagation of clinical isolates on a relevant solid medium followed by mass spectrometry analysis represents a convenient means to quantify virulence factors and drug resistance determinants that might otherwise be lost through extensive in vitro passage in enteropathogenic bacteria. Through the use of quantitative proteomics, we have characterized the virulence and antimicrobial resistance attributes of three clinically isolated, pathogenic E. coli strains cultured on solid media. Our results provide new, quantitative data on the expressed proteomes of these tellurite-resistant, diarrhoeagenic E. coli strains and reveal a subset of antimicrobial resistance and virulence proteins that are differentially abundant between these clinical strains. Our quantitative proteomics-based approach should thus have

  8. Multidrug resistant commensal Escherichia coli in animals and its impact for public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmolka, Ama; Nagy, Béla

    2013-01-01

    After the era of plentiful antibiotics we are alarmed by the increasing number of antibiotic resistant strains. The genetic flexibility and adaptability of Escherichia coli to constantly changing environments allows to acquire a great number of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. Commensal strains of E. coli as versatile residents of the lower intestine are also repeatedly challenged by antimicrobial pressures during the lifetime of their host. As a consequence, commensal strains acquire the respective resistance genes, and/or develop resistant mutants in order to survive and maintain microbial homeostasis in the lower intestinal tract. Thus, commensal E. coli strains are regarded as indicators of antimicrobial load on their hosts. This chapter provides a short historic background of the appearance and presumed origin and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal intestinal E. coli of animals with comparative information on their pathogenic counterparts. The dynamics, development, and ways of evolution of resistance in the E. coli populations differ according to hosts, resistance mechanisms, and antimicrobial classes used. The most frequent tools of E. coli against a variety of antimicrobials are the efflux pumps and mobile resistance mechanisms carried by plasmids and/or other transferable elements. The emergence of hybrid plasmids (both resistance and virulence) among E. coli is of further concern. Co-existence and co-transfer of these “bad genes” in this huge and most versatile in vivo compartment may represent an increased public health risk in the future. Significance of multidrug resistant (MDR) commensal E. coli seem to be highest in the food animal industry, acting as reservoir for intra- and interspecific exchange and a source for spread of MDR determinants through contaminated food to humans. Thus, public health potential of MDR commensal E. coli of food animals can be a concern and needs monitoring and more molecular analysis in the

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to veterinarians, livestock producers, lawmakers, consumer ... FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to ... audiences. We hope this animation will make the concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issue of antimicrobial resistance is that the subject material appears abstract and is complex. This video was ... can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material may be copied, reproduced, and distributed as long ...

  14. Antibiotic resistant Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To characterise and investigate antimicrobial resistance of Esherichia coli and salmonella strains isolated from indigenous Gallus gallus in a leading slaughterhouse/market outlet in Nairobi-Kenya. Design: A repeated cross sectional study and based on random sampling was used. Setting: The study was carried ...

  15. PmrD is Required for Modifications to Escherichia Coli Endotoxin that Promote Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-20

    a silica gel TLC plate (10,000 cpm per lane) (29). Lipids were separated using a chloroform, pyridine, 88% formic acid , and water solvent system (50...activating signal for PhoQ that is commonly used in the laboratory. PmrB senses CAMPs, mildly acidic pH, and high Fe3 concentrations (10–12). These two...and hexa-acylated (3). Select glucosamine carbons are numbered in red. (Right) Lipid A can be modified by numerous enzymes and under various conditions

  16. A survey of the antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from Sable Island horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonin, M E; Poissant, J; McLoughlin, P D; Hedlin, C E; Rubin, J E

    2017-03-01

    The feral horses of Sable Island are a geographically isolated population located ∼160 km off the east coast of Nova Scotia, Canada. Because these horses have no contact with domestic animals, have minimal contact with people, and have never received antimicrobials, they offer a unique opportunity to study the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in unmanaged populations. As part of an ongoing multidisciplinary and individual-based monitoring program, we collected feces from 508 geolocalized horses (92% of the total population) between July and September 2014. We selectively cultured Escherichia coli on MacConkey and CHROMagar ESBL media. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined, and organisms resistant to β-lactam antimicrobials were screened for β-lactamase genes by PCR. Escherichia coli was recovered from 146 (28.7%) individuals, and the majority of isolates (97%) were susceptible to all drugs tested. Resistance to tetracycline was most common, including organisms isolated from 4 (2.7%) of the colonized horses. A single isolate resistant to ampicillin, ceftriaxone, and ceftiofur was identified, which possessed the CTX-M-1 gene. Our findings demonstrate that although antimicrobial resistance is not common in this remote population, clinically relevant resistance genes are present.

  17. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  18. Antimicrobial resistance in Swiss laying hens, prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harisberger, M; Gobeli, S; Hoop, R; Dewulf, J; Perreten, V; Regula, G

    2011-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging concern to public health, and food-producing animals are known to be a potential source for transmission of resistant bacteria to humans. As legislation of the European Union requires to ban conventional cages for the housing of laying hens on the one hand, and a high food safety standard for eggs on the other hand, further investigations about the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in alternative housing types are required. In this study, we determined antimicrobial resistance in indicator bacteria from 396 cloacal swabs from 99 Swiss laying hen farms among four alternative housing types during a cross-sectional study. On each farm, four hens were sampled and exposure to potential risk factors was identified with a questionnaire. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined using broth microdilution in Escherichia coli (n=371) for 18 antimicrobials and in Enterococcus faecalis (n=138) and Enterococcus faecium (n=153) for 16 antimicrobials. All antimicrobial classes recommended by the European Food Safety Authority for E. coli and enterococci were included in the resistance profile. Sixty per cent of the E. coli isolates were susceptible to all of the considered antimicrobials and 30% were resistant to at least two antimicrobials. In E. faecalis, 33% of the strains were susceptible to all tested antimicrobials and 40% were resistant to two or more antimicrobials, whereas in E. faecium these figures were 14% and 39% respectively. Risk factor analyses were carried out for bacteria species and antimicrobials with a prevalence of resistance between 15% and 85%. In these analyses, none of the considered housing and management factors showed a consistent association with the prevalence of resistance for more than two combinations of bacteria and antimicrobial. Therefore we conclude that the impact of the considered housing and management practices on the egg producing farms on resistance in laying hens is low. © 2010

  19. Mathematical Model of Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Ceftiofur in Commensal Enteric Escherichia coli of Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V.; Lanzas, Cristina; Lu, Zhao; Gröhn, Yrjö Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in food animals may contribute to antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animals and humans. Commensal bacteria of animal intestine may serve as a reservoir of resistance-genes. To understand the dynamics of plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporin ceftiofur in enteric commensals of cattle, we developed a deterministic mathematical model of the dynamics of ceftiofur-sensitive and resistant commensal enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the absence of and during parenteral therapy with ceftiofur. The most common treatment scenarios including those using a sustained-release drug formulation were simulated; the model outputs were in agreement with the available experimental data. The model indicated that a low but stable fraction of resistant enteric E. coli could persist in the absence of immediate ceftiofur pressure, being sustained by horizontal and vertical transfers of plasmids carrying resistance-genes, and ingestion of resistant E. coli. During parenteral therapy with ceftiofur, resistant enteric E. coli expanded in absolute number and relative frequency. This expansion was most influenced by parameters of antimicrobial action of ceftiofur against E. coli. After treatment (>5 weeks from start of therapy) the fraction of ceftiofur-resistant cells among enteric E. coli, similar to that in the absence of treatment, was most influenced by the parameters of ecology of enteric E. coli, such as the frequency of transfer of plasmids carrying resistance-genes, the rate of replacement of enteric E. coli by ingested E. coli, and the frequency of ceftiofur resistance in the latter. PMID:22615803

  20. [Virulence mechanisms of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán-García, Ana Elvira; Ariza-Rojas, Sandra Catherine; Vargas-Cárdenas, Fabiola Andrea; Vargas-Remolina, Lizeth Viviana

    2016-08-01

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) is a global public health problem, especially in developing countries and is one of the causes of mortality in children under five. ADD etiologic agents include viruses, bacteria and parasites in that order. Escherichia coli bacteria it is classified as a major diarrheagenic agent and transmitted by consuming contaminated water or undercooked foods. This review compiled updates on information virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms involved in adhesion and colonization of seven pathotypes of E. coli called enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), shigatoxigenic E. coli (STEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and diffusely-adherent E. coli (DAEC). A final pathotype, adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) associated with Crohn's disease was also reviewed. The diarrheagenic pathotypes of E. coli affect different population groups and knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction with the human is important to guide research towards the development of vaccines and new tools for diagnosis and control.

  1. Emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase genes in extensively drug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from a patient in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveenkittiporn, Wantana; Kerdsin, Anusak; Chokngam, Sukanya; Bunthi, Charatdao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Gregory, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    We reported a case of Escherichia coli with colistin resistance and an extensively drug-resistant phenotype. Molecular analysis revealed that the isolate carried mcr-1 and multiple β-lactamase genes includingbla NDM1 , bla CTX-M-15 , bla TEM1 , and bla CMY-2 . This is the first report of a clinical mcr-1 isolate in Thailand highlighting the urgent need for a comprehensive antimicrobial resistance containment strategy to prevent further spread. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Market-Ready Chickens in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chishimba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequent administering of antibiotics in the treatment of poultry diseases may contribute to emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL- producing Escherichia coli in poultry in Zambia. A total of 384 poultry samples were collected and analyzed for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The cultured E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests and the polymerase chain reaction for detection of blaCTX-M, blaSHV, and blaTEM genes. Overall 20.1%, 77/384, (95% CI; 43.2–65.5% of total samples analyzed contained ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The antimicrobial sensitivity test revealed that 85.7% (66/77; CI: 75.7–92 of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates conferred resistance to beta-lactam and other antimicrobial agents. These results indicate that poultry is a potential reservoir for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The presence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in poultry destined for human consumption requires strengthening of the antibiotic administering policy. This is important as antibiotic administration in food animals is gaining momentum for improved animal productivity in developing countries such as Zambia.

  3. Detection of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Market-Ready Chickens in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishimba, K; Hang'ombe, B M; Muzandu, K; Mshana, S E; Matee, M I; Nakajima, C; Suzuki, Y

    2016-01-01

    The frequent administering of antibiotics in the treatment of poultry diseases may contribute to emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing Escherichia coli in poultry in Zambia. A total of 384 poultry samples were collected and analyzed for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The cultured E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests and the polymerase chain reaction for detection of bla CTX-M, bla SHV, and bla TEM genes. Overall 20.1%, 77/384, (95% CI; 43.2-65.5%) of total samples analyzed contained ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The antimicrobial sensitivity test revealed that 85.7% (66/77; CI: 75.7-92) of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates conferred resistance to beta-lactam and other antimicrobial agents. These results indicate that poultry is a potential reservoir for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The presence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in poultry destined for human consumption requires strengthening of the antibiotic administering policy. This is important as antibiotic administration in food animals is gaining momentum for improved animal productivity in developing countries such as Zambia.

  4. Effect of heifer-raising practices on E. coli antimicrobial resistance and Salmonella prevalence in heifer raisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R V; Siler, J D; Cummings, K J; Davis, M A; Warnick, L D

    2015-11-01

    Although cattle movement and commingling play an important role in the inter-herd transmission of pathogens, little is known about the effect of commingling of heifers at raising operations. The objective of this study was to compare the resistance of E. coli and prevalence of Salmonella from pooled faecal pats of heifers raised off-farm at multi-source raisers (MULTI) that raised heifers from at least two farms compared with on-farm raisers (HOME), with heifers from only that farm. MULTI faecal pat samples were collected from pens with animals that had arrived at the farm within the previous 2 months (AP) and from animals that would be departing the heifer raiser in 2-3 months (DP). Corresponding age sampling was conducted at HOME raisers. Odds of ampicillin resistance were 3·0 times greater in E. coli collected from MULTI compared to HOME raisers. E. coli from AP pens had significantly (P streptomycin, and tetracycline compared to DP pens. Salmonella recovery was not significantly different between heifer-raising systems (P = 0·3). Heifer-raising system did not have a major overall impact on selection of resistant E. coli, which was strongly affected by the age of the animals sampled.

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli Phylogenetic Groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Drug resistance, Escherichia coli, Extraintestinal infections, Polymerase chain reaction,. Phylogenetic group, Virulence. Access this .... performed by two methods: A carbapenem–EDTA combined disk method and MBL E-test ..... Enterobacteriaceae: Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus and other genera. In: Collee JG ...

  6. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  7. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  8. Escherichia Coli Removal from Water Using Electrophotocatalytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this experimental applied study is to evaluate the removal of Escherichia Coli, as the microbial contamination indicator of water, from drinking water using electrophotocatalytic method. The contaminated water in an electrophotocatalytic reactor were prepared by adding 102-103 cell of E. coli bacteria to drinking ...

  9. Fimbrial adhesins from extraintestinal Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) represent an important subclass of E. coli that cause a wide spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. Fimbriae are key virulence factors of ExPEC strains. These long surface located rod-shaped organelles mediate receptor-specific attachment...

  10. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  11. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  12. Characterization of Escherichia coli Phylogenetic Groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli strains mainly fall into four phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) and that virulent extra‑intestinal strains mainly belong to groups B2 and D. Aim: The aim was to determine the association between phylogenetic groups of E. coli causing extraintestinal infections (ExPEC) regarding the site of ...

  13. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdissa, Rosa; Haile, Woynshet; Fite, Akafete Teklu; Beyi, Ashenafi Feyisa; Agga, Getahun E.; Edao, Bedaso Mammo; Tadesse, Fanos; Korsa, Mesula Geloye; Beyene, Takele; Beyene, Tariku Jibat; Zutter, De Lieven; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of information regarding the epidemiology of Escherichia coli O157: H7 in developing countries. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of E. coli O157: H7 associated with beef cattle at processing plants and at retail shops in Ethiopia. Methods: Various samples

  14. ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    ANGGREINI, RAHAYU

    2015-01-01

    2015 RAHAYU ANGGREINI coli Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan identifikasi cemaran bakteri E. coli O157:H7 pada daging sapi di kota Makassar. Sampel pada penelitian ini sebanyak 72 sampel Kata Kunci : Daging sapi, pasar tradisional, E. coli, E. coli O157:H7, kontaminasi bakteri, identifikasi E. coli O157:H7.

  15. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from cultured...

  16. Escherichia coli with virulence factors and multidrug resistance in the Plankenburg River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corne Lamprecht

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a natural inhabitant of the gut and E. coli levels in water are considered internationally to be an indication of faecal contamination. Although not usually pathogenic, E. coli has been linked to numerous foodborne disease outbreaks, especially those associated with fresh produce. One of the most common ways through which E. coli can be transferred onto fresh produce is if contaminated water is used for irrigation. In this study, a total of 81 confirmed E. coli strains were isolated from the Plankenburg River as part of three separate studies over 3 years. During sampling, E. coli levels in the river were above the accepted levels set by the World Health Organization and the South African Department of Water Affairs and Forestry for safe irrigation of fresh produce, which indicates that transfer of E. coli during irrigation is highly probable. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction screening for pathogenic gene sequences revealed one enteroaggregative positive strain and four enteropathogenic positive strains. The four enteropathogenic strains were also found to be resistant to three or more critically and highly important antibiotics and were therefore classified as multidrug resistant strains. These results show that E. coli with enteropathogenic potential and multiple antimicrobial resistance properties has persisted over time in the Plankenburg River.

  17. ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius

    in E.coli is increasing and especially isolates producing Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) have been reported worldwide. Treatment of UTI is usually initiated by the general practitioners and a significant proportion of clinical isolates are now resistant to first line antibiotics. The global...... dissemination of resistant E.coli has in particular been driven by the spread of a few specific E.coli-lineages and it seems that there is a difference between the sequence types found among resistant E.coli, ESBL-producing E.coli and antibiotic susceptible E.coli. The overall objectives of this thesis were...... to investigate (i) antibiotics involved in selection of ESBL-producing E.coli, in an experimental mouse model in vivo, (ii) risk factors for UTI with ESBL-producing E.coli and (iii) to describe the phylogenetic composition of E.coli populations with different resistance patterns. We found that different...

  18. Isolation, histopathology and antibiogram of Escherichia coli from pigeons (Columba livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Dutta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To know the prevalence of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli among dead and/or diarrhoic pigeons in and around greater Guwahati. Materials and Methods: Samples were cultured from dead and/or diarrhoic pigeons and identification was done by standard methods. The sensitivity of the isolated E.coli strains to 15 antibiotics of human and veterinary use was also determined. Organs from those dead birds from which E.coli were recovered were processed according to the routine procedure for histopathological studies. Results: Out of 150 pigeons subjected to microbiological investigation, 91(60.67 % samples were found positive for E. coli.The most frequently occurring serotypes were O157 (9.89%, followed by O68, O121 (7.69%, O9, O75, O131 (5.49%, O2, O13, O22 (3.30%. Antibiogram investigation of the isolates revealed that 91isolates (100% exhibited resistance against Ampicillin followed by Nitro-furantoin (73.62%, Tetracycline (65.93 %, Oxytetracycline (62.63 % and Streptomycin (61.54. Gross changes of some birds showed fibrinous pericarditis and perihepatitis and coligranuloma in different organs like liver and serosal surface of intestine. Microscopically, severe congestion and haemorrhages in different organs such as liver, kidney, lung and intestine. In some cases thick layer of fibrinous exudates with large number of heterophills over the surface of liver and heart with early degenerative changes as well as focal necrosis. Conclusion: The result of this study suggests that antimicrobial-resistant pathogenic E.coli is present in pigeons in and around greater Guwahati. Surveillance programs may be introduced to monitor antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic E.coli in pigeons in and around greater guwahati. [Vet World 2013; 6(2.000: 91-94

  19. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Campylobacterjejuni and Campylobacter coli from Adult Hospitalized Patients with Diarrhea in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngan Thi Kim; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Trinh, Quang Duy; Khamrin, Pattara; Komine-Aizawa, Shihoko; Okitsu, Shoko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Hayakawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are recognized as the major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. A total of 310 fecal samples collected from Thai adult patients with diarrhea in 2008 were screened for the presence of Campylobacter by PCR. Resistance to fluoroquinolone and macrolides of the detected Campylobacter strains were analyzed by studying the mutations in the gyrA and 23S rRNA genes, respectively. Campylobacter species were detected in 4/310 (1.3%) of diarrheal patients, and C. jejuni was found in 3 of the 4 cases (75%). Fluoroquinolone resistance was noted in 2 cases (50%); however, no resistance to macrolides was observed. Campylobacter was detected in a low prevalence in adult Thai patients hospitalized with diarrhea, and the resistance to fluoroquinolones is still a matter of concern in case antibiotic therapy is required.

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit ... non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material ...

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  2. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection.

  3. EXPRESSION OF BACTERIOOPSIN GENES IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    OpenAIRE

    TSUJIUCHI, Yutaka; IWASA, Tatsuo; TOKUNAGA, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    An inducible expression vector pUBO was constructed with native codons in order to express the gene of Bacteriorhodopsin (BOP) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Vector pUBO contains lac-promoter followed by the partial structural gene of lacZ and the structural gene of BOP. The expression of this fusion protein was detected by ELISA with anti-BOP antiserum. The fusion protein obtained from E. coli trnsformed with pUBO formed approximately 0.1% of the total protein of the E. coli membrane fraction.

  4. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF LETTUCE SALADS AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS SPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães César, Josi; Madruga Peres, Andriele; Pereira das Neves, Caroline; Tupiniquim Freitas de Abreu, Érica; Fagundes de Mello, Jozi; Nunes Moreira, Ângela; Lameiro Rodrigues, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    self-service restaurants in which food is served ready to be consumed are liable to have some products contaminated by pathogenic microorganisms causing food-transmitted diseases. evaluates the microbiological quality of lettuce salads in restaurants in Pelotas RS Brazil by counts of thermo-tolerant coliforms, E. coli, Staphylococcus spp. and detection of Salmonella spp. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus spp. isolates are also assessed. thirty-six samples of lettuce salads were collected from nine restaurants and thermotolerant coliforms, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp. were quantified, coupled to a research on Salmonella spp., following methodology by the Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Staphylococcus spp. isolates underwent antimicrobial resistance test by the disc-diffusion method. results showed that 61.1% of the salad samples contained more thermotolerant coliforms than allowed by Brazilian legislation and E. coli was confirmed in 5.6% of the samples. Positive and negative coagulase Staphylococcus occurred respectively in 5.6% and 77.8% of isolates, but no sample had Salmonella spp. Further, 56.7% of the thirty isolates of Staphylococcus spp. tested were resistant to penicillin; 46.7% to oxacillin; 26.7% to erythromycin and 23.3% were multi- resistant. inadequate quality of the salad was due to pathogenic microorganisms, while Staphylococcus spp. isolates had a high percentage of antimicrobial resistance. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral Fosfomycin for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G. Zhanel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis in outpatients is commonly treated with oral fluoroquinolones; however, the worldwide dissemination of multidrug-resistant (MDR Escherichia coli has resulted in therapeutic failures with fluoroquinolones. We reviewed the literature regarding the use of oral fosfomycin in the treatment of acute and chronic prostatitis caused by MDR E. coli. All English-language references on PubMed from 1986 to June 2017, inclusive, were reviewed from the search “fosfomycin prostatitis.” Fosfomycin demonstrates potent in vitro activity against a variety of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli genotypes/phenotypes including ciprofloxacin-resistant, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL- producing, and MDR isolates. Fosfomycin attains therapeutic concentrations (≥4 μg/g in uninflamed prostatic tissue and maintains a high prostate/plasma ratio up to 17 hours after oral administration. Oral fosfomycin’s clinical cure rates in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis caused by antimicrobial-resistant E. coli ranged from 50 to 77% with microbiological eradication rates of >50%. An oral regimen of fosfomycin tromethamine of 3 g·q 24 h for one week followed by 3 g·q 48 h for a total treatment duration of 6–12 weeks appeared to be effective. Oral fosfomycin may represent an efficacious and safe treatment for acute and chronic prostatitis caused by MDR E. coli.

  6. Escherichia coli como causa de diarrea infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Fernández Ferrán

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza una revisión de la literatura médica reciente sobre Escherichia coli productora de diarrea. Se presentan los diferentes grupos de E. coli y se plantean los mecanismos patogénicos, así como el cuadro clínico asociado y su incidencia en la diarrea infantil, según estudios realizados en diferentes partes del mundo. Se señalan los elementos relacionados con el diagnóstico y se plantean las orientaciones terapéuticas recomendadas.A medical literature review was made about Escherichia coli as a cause of diarrhea. The different groups of E.coli are presented, also the pathogenic mechanisms, the clinical picture associated and its incidence on the infantile diarrhea are stated, according to studies performed in different parts of the world. The elements related to the diagnosis and the recommended therapeutical orientations are pointed out in this paper.

  7. Tackling Drug Resistant Infection Outbreaks of Global Pandemic Escherichia coli ST131 Using Evolutionary and Epidemiological Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Tim

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput molecular screening is required to investigate the origin and diffusion of antimicrobial resistance in pathogen outbreaks. The most frequent cause of human infection is Escherichia coli, which is dominated by sequence type 131 (ST131)—a set of rapidly radiating pandemic clones. The highly infectious clades of ST131 originated firstly by a mutation enhancing conjugation and adhesion. Secondly, single-nucleotide polymorphisms occurred enabling fluoroquinolone-resistance, which is near-fixed in all ST131. Thirdly, broader resistance through beta-lactamases has been gained and lost frequently, symptomatic of conflicting environmental selective effects. This flexible approach to gene exchange is worrying and supports the proposition that ST131 will develop an even wider range of plasmid and chromosomal elements promoting antimicrobial resistance. To stop ST131, deep genome sequencing is required to understand the origin, evolution and spread of antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic methods that decipher past events can predict future patterns of virulence and transmission based on genetic signatures of adaptation and gene exchange. Both the effect of partial antimicrobial exposure and cell dormancy caused by variation in gene expression may accelerate the development of resistance. High-throughput sequencing can decode measurable evolution of cell populations within patients associated with systems-wide changes in gene expression during treatments. A multi-faceted approach can enhance assessment of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli ST131 by examining transmission dynamics between hosts to achieve a goal of pre-empting resistance before it emerges by optimising antimicrobial treatment protocols. PMID:27682088

  8. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Librado Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made i...

  9. Frequency-dependent Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-01-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillate in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-...

  10. Comparison of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli obtained from drinking water sources in northern Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyimo, Beatus; Buza, Joram; Subbiah, Murugan; Smith, Woutrina; Call, Douglas R

    2016-11-03

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing and significant threat to public health on a global scale. Escherichia coli comprises Gram-negative, fecal-borne pathogenic and commensal bacteria that are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance. AMR E. coli can be ingested via food, water and direct contact with fecal contamination. We estimated the prevalence of AMR Escherichia coli from select drinking water sources in northern Tanzania. Water samples (n = 155) were collected and plated onto Hi-Crome E. coli and MacConkey agar. Presumptive E. coli were confirmed by using a uidA PCR assay. Antibiotic susceptibility breakpoint assays were used to determine the resistance patterns of each isolate for 10 antibiotics. Isolates were also characterized by select PCR genotyping and macro-restriction digest assays. E. coli was isolated from 71 % of the water samples, and of the 1819 E. coli tested, 46.9 % were resistant to one or more antibiotics. Resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim was significantly higher (15-30 %) compared to other tested antibiotics (0-6 %; P E. coli isolates obtained from these water sources were genetically diverse with few matching macro-restriction digest patterns. Water supplies in northern Tanzania may be a source of AMR E. coli for people and animals. Further studies are needed to identify the source of these contaminants and devise effective intervention strategies.

  11. High rates of multidrug resistance among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in children and analyses of ESBL producers from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections (UTI among pediatric patients is an increasing problem worldwide. However, very little is known about pediatric urinary tract infections and antimicrobial resistance trend from Nepal. This study was conducted to assess the current antibiotic resistance rate and ESBL production among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in pediatric patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal. Methods A total of 5,484 urinary tract specimens from children suspected with UTI attending a teaching hospital of Nepal over a period of one year were processed for the isolation of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Escherichia coli (n = 739, the predominant isolate in pediatric UTI, was further selected for the detection of ESBL-production by phenotypic combination disk diffusion test. Results Incidence of urinary tract infection among pediatric patients was found to be 19.68% and E coli (68.4% was leading pathogen involved. Out of 739 E coli isolates, 64.9% were multidrug resistant (MDR and 5% were extensively drug resistant (XDR. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL was detected in 288 (38.9% of the E coli isolates. Conclusion Alarming rate of drug resistance among pediatric uropathogens and high rate of ESBL-producing E. coli was observed. It is extremely necessary to routinely investigate the drug resistance among all isolates and formulate strict antibiotics prescription policy in our country.

  12. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenicEscherichia coliandSalmonellaspp. in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu state, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okorie-Kanu, O Josephine; Ezenduka, E Vivienne; Okorie-Kanu, C Onwuchokwe; Ugwu, L Chinweokwu; Nnamani, U John

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella species in retail raw table eggs sold for human consumption in Enugu State and to determine the resistance of these pathogens to antimicrobials commonly used in human and veterinary practices in Nigeria. A total of 340 raw table eggs comprising 68 composite samples (5 eggs per composite sample) were collected from five selected farms (13 composite samples from the farms) and 10 retail outlets (55 composite samples from the retail outlets) in the study area over a period of 4-month (March-June, 2014). The eggs were screened for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species following standard procedures within 24 h of sample collection. Isolates obtained were subjected to in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility test with 15 commonly used antimicrobials using the disk diffusion method. About 37 (54.4%) and 7 (10.3%) of the 68 composite samples were positive for pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species, respectively. The shells showed significantly higher (pE. coli than eggs from the retail outlets while the reverse was the case for Salmonella species even though they were not significant (p>0.05). The organisms obtained showed a multiple drug resistance. They were completely resistant to nitrofurantoin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, penicillin G and oxacillin. In addition to these, Salmonella spp. also showed 100% resistance to tetracycline. The pathogenic E. coli isolates obtained were 100% susceptible to gentamicin, neomycin, ciprofloxacin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid while Salmonella spp. showed 100% susceptibility to erythromycin, neomycin, and rifampicin. Both organisms showed varying degrees of resistance to streptomycin, amoxicillin, vancomycin, and doxycycline. From the results of the study, it can be concluded that the raw table eggs marketed for human consumption in Enugu State, Nigeria is contaminated with pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella species that

  13. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). This new date..., that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26, O45, O103, O111, O121...

  14. Detection of qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA genes in Escherichia coli isolated from cooked meat products in Henan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaobing; Yu, Tao; Wu, Nan; Meng, Hecheng; Shi, Lei

    2014-09-18

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli has increased in recent years in China. Antimicrobial resistant isolates and resistance genes of E. coli can be transferred to humans through the food chain and this presents a public health risk. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance-encoding genes in E. coli isolated from food samples in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of quinolone resistance genes (QRGs) and extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in E. coli isolated from cooked meat products in Henan, China. A total of 75 E. coli isolates (12.1%) were detected from 620 samples. High rates of resistance to the following drugs were observed: tetracycline (56.0%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (41.3%), streptomycin (29.3%), ampicillin (26.7%) and nalidixic acid (14.7%). Of the 75 isolates, QRGs were present in 10 isolates (13.3%), with qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr detected alone or in combination in five (6.7%) and eight isolates (10.7%). The qnr genes detected in this study included qnrS (n=3) and qnrA (n=2). The qepA gene was absent among these isolates. Three types of β-lactamase genes were identified in the five ESBL-producing E. coli isolates: blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-9, and blaTEM-1. The qnrS gene was found to be co-transferred with blaCTX-M-1 and blaTEM-1 in one isolate. Our data suggest that cooked meat products may act as reservoirs for multi-resistant bacteria and facilitate the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in wild game in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križman, M.; Kirbiš, A.; Jamnikar-Ciglenečki, U.

    2017-09-01

    Wildlife is usually not exposed to clinically-used antimicrobial agents but can acquire antimicrobial resistance throughout contact with humans, domesticated animals and environments. Samples of faeces from intestines (80 in total) were collected from roe deer (52), wild boars (11), chamois (10) red deer (6) and moufflon (1). After culture on ChromID extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plates to select for growth of ESBL-producing bacteria, 25 samples produced bacterial colonies for further study. Six species of bacteria were identified from the 25 samples: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Serratia fonticola, Stenotrophomonas nitritireducens, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. Two ESBL enzymes were amplified from group TEM and three from group CTX-M-1. Undercooked game meat and salami can be a source of resistant bacteria when animals are not eviscerated properly.

  16. Characterization and horizontal transfer of class 1 integrons in Escherichia coli isolates from cooked meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Jiayang; Jiang, Xiaobing; Wu, Junmei; Dai, Zhigang; Wu, Zhenbin; Liang, Yu; Wang, Xuannian

    2016-01-31

    Escherichia coli is a commensal bacterium in humans, animals, and the environment that is one of the microorganisms commonly resistant to antimicrobials. Cooked meat products, which are popular in China, are easily contaminated by E. coli during processing and storage. In this study, a total of 75 E. coli isolates from cooked meat products in Henan province, China, were assayed for the presence of and horizontal transfer of class 1 integrons. Class 1 integrons were detected in 11 (14.7%) of these isolates, and contained four groups of resistance gene cassettes, including dfrA17-aadA5, dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, and an uncommon array of aacA4-catB8-aadA1. The transfer frequency of selected integron-positve donors ranged from 10(-6) to 10(-4) transconjugants per recipient cell, and the integron-containing DNA from the donors could be transferred to E. coli J53Azr with the transformation frequency of 10(-7) to 10(-5). Class 1 integrons could be transferred to recipient E. coli J53 by conjugation and natural transformation. These findings suggest the role of commensal E. coli isolates from cooked meats as an important reservoir for integrons and the possible transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes to humans via the food chain.

  17. Occurrence of verotoxigenic E.coli in cow feces and antimicrobial resistance of the isolates in cattle farms in Shahrekord area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Bonyadian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Escherichia coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal microflora of warm-blooded animals. They are routinely shed into the environment through feces and can contaminate water and soil, and, consequently fruits and vegetables .Enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains are recently emerged group of food-borne pathogens that are a significant public health threat. This group causes bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, and the disease is prevalent in developed countries. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify the E.coli O157: H7 and other verotoxigenic ones and major virulence genes (rfbE, eaeA, stx1, stx2 in fecal swab samples by PCR in Shahrekord area. Materials and methods: In Spring and Summer 2015, 400 cow fecal swab samples were collected from farms in Shahrekord area. Bacteriological and biochemical examinations were done for detection of E.coli. PCR assay was done for identification of O157:H7 serotype and other verotoxigenic E. coli using rfbE, eae, stx1 and stx2 genes. Results: E. coli O157:H7 was not detected in any strains tested. But PCR showed that out of 384 E.coli strain, 104(27/08% isolates carried stx1 gene, 36(9/37% carried stx2 gene and 16 (4.16% carried both stx1 and stx2 genes. Intimin (eaeA gene was detected in 280(72/91% of the isolates. Among verotoxigenic strain antibiotic resistance to Tetracycline 87/1%, Ampiciline 51/62%, Cefotaxime 48/38%, Gentamycin 25/81%,, Ciprofeloxacin 3/22% and Sulfamethoxazol 3/22% were observed. Discussion and conclusion: According to the results, although the serotype O157: H7 did not isolate from the feces of cattle but other verotoxigenic strains that showed high resistance  to antibiotic were isolated so it is a risk for human health.

  18. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad......-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra...

  19. Comparison of 61 Sequenced Escherichia coli Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Wassenaar, T. M.; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important component of the biosphere and is an ideal model for studies of processes involved in bacterial genome evolution. Sixty-one publically available E. coli and Shigella spp. sequenced genomes are compared, using basic methods to produce phylogenetic and proteomics......% of the pan-genome and about 80% of a typical genome; some of these variable genes tend to be co-localized on genomic islands. The diversity within the species E. coli, and the overlap in gene content between this and related species, suggests a continuum rather than sharp species borders in this group...

  20. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  1. Antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial resistance genes in marine bacteria from salmon aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Q A; Cabello, Felipe C; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Tomova, Alexandra; Godfrey, Henry P; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Sørum, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) detected by disc diffusion and antimicrobial resistance genes detected by DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction with amplicon sequencing were studied in 124 marine bacterial isolates from a Chilean salmon aquaculture site and 76 from a site without aquaculture 8 km distant. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was present in 81% of the isolates regardless of site. Resistance to tetracycline was most commonly encoded by tetA and tetG; to trimethoprim, by dfrA1, dfrA5 and dfrA12; to sulfamethizole, by sul1 and sul2; to amoxicillin, by blaTEM ; and to streptomycin, by strA-strB. Integron integrase intl1 was detected in 14 sul1-positive isolates, associated with aad9 gene cassettes in two from the aquaculture site. intl2 Integrase was only detected in three dfrA1-positive isolates from the aquaculture site and was not associated with gene cassettes in any. Of nine isolates tested for conjugation, two from the aquaculture site transferred AR determinants to Escherichia coli. High levels of AR in marine sediments from aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites suggest that dispersion of the large amounts of antimicrobials used in Chilean salmon aquaculture has created selective pressure in areas of the marine environment far removed from the initial site of use of these agents. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Escherichia coli clonal group A among uropathogenic infections in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez-Hernandez, Angel; Molina-López, José; Gavilanes-Parra, Sandra; Hernandez-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli clonal group A (CGA) causes urinary tract and other extra-intestinal infections in humans. CGA is an important cause of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT) resistance in extra-intestinal pathogens. We examined the extent to which resistance in this area is related to CGA dissemination of E. coli from urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Mexico City. The virulence backgrounds of the isolates were also characterized. In this study, the frequency of resistance to SXT used for UTI treatment was high (56-65 %), and CGA isolates accounted for 9 of the 78 SXT-resistant isolates (11.5 %). Although all CGA isolates were found to be multidrug resistant (MDR), none of them were extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing organisms. The prevalence of CGA among the 45 MDR isolates that we identified was 20 %, indicating that this clonal group moderately contributes to the antibiotic resistance of uropathogenic E. coli isolates in this region. Most of the nine CGA isolates carried transferable, large-size plasmids of approximately 80 to 100 kb, which were able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to E. coli J53 in mating assays. CGA isolates mainly belonged to phylogenetic groups F and D. We found no association between antimicrobial resistance and virulence-associated genes: the median virulence scores of CGA isolates were slightly higher (4.6) than those of non-CGA isolates, whether they were susceptible (3.7) or resistant (3.5) to SXT. Our results indicate that CGA is not a major contributor to the high level of resistance to SXT in this region but, instead, seems to be an important constituent of MDR isolates from UTIs.

  3. Coliforms and Escherichia coli in waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallari, E.; Stefanelli, Gian Piero; Lorenzini, T.

    2005-01-01

    The study shows the evaluation of a defined substrate method, Colilert 18/Quanty Tray, for the simultaneous detection of Coliforms bacteria and Escherichia coli in water. The results obtained indicate that this method represents a valid alternative to the traditional methods considering sensitivity, specificity, repeatability but also rapidity and simplicity of use [it

  4. Leaner and meaner genomes in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David

    2006-01-01

    A 'better' Escherichia coli K-12 genome has recently been engineered in which about 15% of the genome has been removed by planned deletions. Comparison with related bacterial genomes that have undergone a natural reduction in size suggests that there is plenty of scope for yet more deletions....

  5. Inhibition of Escherichia Coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus. aureus are of great concern to the food industry, especially in foods stored under refrigerated conditions where, unlike most food-borne pathogens are able to multiply. This investigation was conducted to study the inhibitory effect of some spice ...

  6. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse...

  7. (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging antibiotic resistance due to extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production limited the use of β-lactam antibiotics against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. This observational study was conducted at the Microbiology department of the Children's Hospital, Lahore Pakistan, from June, 2009 to ...

  8. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Micha; Nielsen, Marc Trunjer Kusk; Möller, Sören

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes diarrhoeal disease, bloody diarrhoea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of STEC and the clinical features of STEC patients from a well-defined Danish population in which all fecal...

  9. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha...

  10. Emergence of Quinolone Resistance amongst Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and seventy three isolates of Escherichia coli obtained from 7 hospitals in Lagos were screened for Fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR). Rate of resistance was 22.3% showing an increase in quinolone resistance when compared with resistant rates between 1994 and 1999 which ranged from 0 – 2% then.

  11. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  12. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, B.A.; Sharif, Firdaus

    1986-01-01

    The authors report a study of the misincorporation step in excision proficient umuC Escherichia coli as revealed by delayed photoreversal and show that it parallels the loss of photoreversibility of mutations induced in isogenic umu + bacteria; in both cases the end-point was mutation to streptomycin resistance. (author)

  13. Multiplex Genome Editing in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2018-01-01

    Lambda Red recombineering is an easy and efficient method for generating genetic modifications in Escherichia coli. For gene deletions, lambda Red recombineering is combined with the use of selectable markers, which are removed through the action of, e.g., flippase (Flp) recombinase. This PCR...

  14. Antibiotic resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains isolated from pregnant women with history of recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) and healthy pregnant women. Methods: A total of 485 high vaginal swab specimens were collected from pregnant women with ...

  15. Antibiotic resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus, ..... and Argentina [28]. CONCLUSION. As far as we know, the present study is the first prevalence report on antibiotic resistance pattern of UPEC strains in ... serogroups profiles of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated ...

  16. (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... carbapenems (Patricia, 2001; Bush, 2001). The β-lactamases produced by bacteria are ... among clinical isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae. (Sanders and Sanders, 1992). ESBLs have ..... lactamases among multidrug resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species causing urinary tract infections in ...

  17. Optimization of plasmid electrotransformation into Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve electroporation, optical density of bacteria, recovery time and electrical parameter (field strength and capacitance) were optimized using the Taguchi statistical method. ANOVA of obtained data indicated that the optimal conditions of electrotransformation of pET-28a (+) plasmid into Escherichia coli ...

  18. Prevalence of Arcobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, varying level of resistance of Escherichia coli 66(84.6%), Salmonella 6(100%) and Arcobacter 57(100%) to amoxicillin was observed. The susceptibility pattern indicates that the bacterial isolates exhibited a varying level of resistance to two or more antimicrobial agents with maximum resistance to amoxicillin.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of E. coli from clinical sources in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli is the leading cause of urinary tract, ear, wound and other infections in humans. Increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli is a growing concern worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli from clinical ...

  20. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n = 56) exhibiting...... the strongest effects was most often linked to conjugative transmission of natural plasmids carried by the E. coli isolates (70%). Thus, the capacity of an isolate to promote the biofilm through cocultivation was (i) transferable to the K-12 strain, (ii) was linked with the acquisition of conjugation genes...

  1. Whole Genome Epidemiological Typing of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is of huge importance in global health both as a commensal organism living within its host or as a pathogen causing millions of infections each year. Infections occur both sporadic and as outbreaks with sometimes up to thousands of infected people. To limit the number...... of infections it is important to monitor pathogenic E. coli in order to detect outbreaks as quickly as possible and find the source of the outbreak. The effectiveness of monitoring and tracking of pathogens is very dependent on the typing methods that are employed. Classical typing methods employed for E. coli......D thesis attempts to take the first steps toward such a method. In Kaas I all publicly available E. coli genomes sequenced (186) are analyzed. 1,702 core genes were found in all genomes. 3,051 genes were found in 95% of the genomes. The pan genome was found to consist of 16,373 genes. The overall phylogeny...

  2. [Study of phenotypical and antimicrobial susceptibility markers in enteric Escherichia coli strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Adalberto; Bernedo, Robert; Llop, Alina; Ramírez, Margarita; Bravo, Laura; Fernández, Anabel; Ledo, Yudith

    2007-01-01

    Forty strains of Escherichia coli isolated from children under 5 years of age with acute diarreas, coming from different provinces of the country , were analyzed. Four important phenotypical determinants were tested: sorbosa, sorbitol, enterohemolysin and 0157:H7 serology, in order to select those strains from enterohemorrhagic or Shiga toxin-producing category. Likewise, they were characterized by biotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility methods. The use of phenotypical tests showed six strains with presumptive characteristics, four of which were most likely to be Shiga toxin-producing strains. In antimicrobial susceptibility test, the strains showed high resistance mainly to ampicillin and trimethrophin-sulfamethoxasole. Another interesting finding were intermediate resistance and susceptibility values to augmentin, aztreonan and ceftriaxone. There were 12 antimicrobial resistance patterns of which 10 were multi-resistant.

  3. Genotype variation and genetic relationship among Escherichia coli from nursery pigs located in different pens in the same farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Ahmed, Shahana; Hansen, Monica Hegstad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: So far, little is known about the genetic diversity and relatedness among Escherichia coli (E. coli) populations in the gut of swine. Information on this is required to improve modeling studies on antimicrobial resistance aiming to fight its occurrence and development. This work...... evaluated the genotype variation of E. coli isolated from swine fecal samples at the single pig and pen level, as well as between pens using repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR fingerprinting and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The genetic diversity of strains collected from media...... the isolates (N = 720). Two profiles (REP_2 and REP_5) dominated, accounting for 23.7 and 23.3% of all isolates, respectively. At the pig and at the pen level, the number of different strains ranged from two to eight, and from 27 to 31, respectively, and multiple isolates from a single pen were found...

  4. Molecular characterization of Escherichia coli recovered from traditional milk products in Kashan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Sharafati Chaleshtori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC strains as emerging groups of foodborne pathogens are responsible for most foodborne illnesses. The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern in STEC isolated from traditional milk products and their molecular characterization. Materials and Methods: A total of 116 samples were randomly purchased from local markets in Kashan, Iran, and evaluated for the occurrence of STEC by culturing and molecular methods. The antibiotic resistance of obtained isolates was determined by Kirby Bauer method. Furthermore, isolates were assayed for the presence of Shiga toxins (stx1 and stx2 and intimin gene (eae. Results: The incidence of E. coli in 60 ice cream, 30 yoghurt, and 26 cheese samples was 8.33%, 10%, and 11.54%, respectively. The findings showed that 11 out of 11 (100% E. coli had both stx1 and stx2 while eae gene was not found in E. coli isolated of traditional milk products. For E. coli strains carrying stx1 and stx2, highest antibiotic sensitive levels were related to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed relationship between the presence of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance. These results can be used for further studies on STEC as an emerging foodborne pathogen.

  5. Pathogenomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subset of faecal E. coli that can enter, colonize urinary tract and cause infection are known as uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. UPEC strains act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens taking advantage of host susceptibility using a diverse array of virulence factors. Presence of specific virulence associated genes on genomic/pathogenicity islands and involvement of horizontal gene transfer appears to account for evolution and diversity of UPEC. Recent success in large-scale genome sequencing and comparative genomics has helped in unravelling UPEC pathogenomics. Here we review recent findings regarding virulence characteristics of UPEC and mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of urinary tract infection.

  6. Marine echinoderms as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Marinho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderms are benthic animals that play an important ecological role in marine communities occupying diverse trophic levels in the marine food chains. The majority of echinoderms feed on small particles of edible matter, although they can eat many kinds of food (Clark, 1968. Although, some echinoderms species has been facing an emerging demand for human consumption, particularly in Asian and Mediterranean cuisine, where these animals can be eaten raw (Kelly, 2005; Micael et al., 2009. Echinoderms own an innate immune mechanism that allows them to defend themselves from high concentrations of bacteria, viruses and fungus they are often exposed, on marine sediment (Janeway and Medzhitov, 1998, Cooper, 2003. The most frequent genera of gut bacteria in echinoderms are Vibrio, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, and Aeromonas; nevertheless Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli are also present (Harris, 1993; Marinho et al., 2013. Moreover, fecal resistant bacteria found in the aquatic environment might represent an index of marine pollution (Foti et al., 2009, Kummerer, 2009. Several studies had been lead in order to identify environmental reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant bacteria in populations of fish, echinoderms and marine mammals, and they all support the thesis that these animals may serve as reservoirs since they had acquired resistant microbial species (Johnson et al., 1998, Marinho et al., 2013, Miranda and Zemelman, 2001. However, to our knowledge, there are only available in bibliography one study of antimicrobial resistant bacteria isolated from marine echinoderms (Marinho et al., 2013, which stats that their provenience in this environment is still unclear. Antimicrobial resistance outcomes from the intensive use of antimicrobial drugs in human activities associated with various mechanisms for bacteria genetic transfer (Barbosa and Levy, 2000, Coque et al., 2008. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria enter into water environments where they are

  7. Serotypes, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of vaginal and fecal isolates of Escherichia coli from giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Yan, Qigui; Xia, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yanming; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Although Escherichia coli typically colonizes the intestinal tract and vagina of giant pandas, it has caused enteric and systemic disease in giant pandas and greatly impacts the health and survival of this endangered species. In order to understand the distribution and characteristics of E. coli from giant pandas, 67 fecal and 30 vaginal E. coli isolates from 21 giant pandas were characterized for O serogroups, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. In addition, these isolates were tested for the presence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) by multiplex PCR detection of specific virulence genes. The most prevalent serogroups for all E. coli isolates were O88, O18, O167, O4, and O158. ExPEC isolates were detected mostly in vaginal samples, and DEC isolates were detected only in fecal samples. Phylogenetic group B1 predominated in fecal isolates, while groups B2 and D were frequently detected in vaginal isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was most frequently observed, followed by resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. All except five isolates were typeable by using XbaI and were categorized into 74 PFGE patterns. Our findings indicate that panda E. coli isolates exhibited antimicrobial resistance, and potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates were present in giant pandas. In addition, these E. coli isolates were genetically diverse. This study may provide helpful information for developing strategies in the future to control E. coli infections of giant pandas.

  8. Infektionen mit darmpathogenen Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Alexander; Stein, Jürgen; Dignass, Axel

    2001-01-01

    E. coli ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil der physiologischen Darmflora des Menschen. Die üblicherweise im Darm vorkommenden Kolibakterien sind apathogen und für den Menschen eher nützlich (Sonnenborn u. Greinwald 1990). Allerdings kennen wir bei dieser Bakterienspezies auch ein breites Spektrum von

  9. Spatial Clustering of Escherichia coli with Reduced Susceptibility to Cefotaxime and Ciprofloxacin among Dairy Cattle Farms Relative to European Starling Night Roosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhanie, G A; Pearl, D L; McEwen, S A; Guerin, M T; Jardine, C M; Schrock, J; LeJeune, J T

    2017-05-01

    European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) have been implicated in the dispersal of zoonotic enteric pathogens. However, their role in disseminating antimicrobial-resistant organisms through their home range has not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to determine whether starling night roosts served as foci for spreading organisms with reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials among dairy cattle farms. Bovine faecal pats were collected from 150 dairy farms in Ohio. Each farm was visited twice (in summer and fall) between 2007 and 2009. A total of 1490 samples (10 samples/farm over two visits) were tested for Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin. Using a spatial scan statistic, focal scans were conducted to determine whether clusters of farms with a high prevalence of organisms with reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin surrounded starling night roosts. Faecal pats 13.42% and 13.56% of samples carried Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Statistically significant (P Escherichia coli showing reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin were identified around these night roosts. This finding suggests that the risk of carriage of organisms with reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials in cattle closer to starling night roosts was higher compared to cattle located on farms further from these sites. Starlings might have an important role in spreading antimicrobial-resistant E. coli to livestock environments, thus posing a threat to animal and public health. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Presence of antimicrobial resistance in coliform bacteria from hatching broiler eggs with emphasis on ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezhoud, H; Chantziaras, I; Iguer-Ouada, M; Moula, N; Garmyn, A; Martel, A; Touati, A; Smet, A; Haesebrouck, F; Boyen, F

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the most important global health challenges. Broilers are an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistant bacteria in general and, more particularly, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Since contamination of 1-day-old chicks is a potential risk factor for the introduction of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the broiler production chain, the presence of antimicrobial resistant coliform bacteria in broiler hatching eggs was explored in the present study. Samples from 186 hatching eggs, collected from 11 broiler breeder farms, were inoculated on MacConkey agar with or without ceftiofur and investigated for the presence of antimicrobial resistant lactose-positive Enterobacteriaceae, particularly, ESBL/AmpC-producers. Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae were obtained from the eggshells in 10 out of 11 (10/11) sampled farms. The majority of the isolates were recovered from crushed eggshells after external decontamination suggesting that these bacteria are concealed from the disinfectants in the egg shell pores. Antimicrobial resistance testing revealed that approximately 30% of the isolates showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulphonamides, while the majority of isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides, florfenicol, neomycin and apramycin. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins was detected in eight Enterobacteriaceae isolates from five different broiler breeder farms. The ESBL phenotype was confirmed by the double disk synergy test and blaSHV-12, blaTEM-52 and blaACT-39 resistance genes were detected by PCR. This report is the first to present broiler hatching eggs as carriers and a potential source of ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae for broiler chicks.

  11. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were analyzed in total...... the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding result is described in Paper III...

  12. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad......-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra......-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are able to colonize tissue outside the gastrointestinal tract and contain a variety of virulence factors that may enable the pathogens to invade and induce infections in the cardiac endothelia. In these cases echocardiography as the imaging technology is of paramount importance...

  13. FTIR nanobiosensors for Escherichia coli detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Mura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (Escherichia coli have a low incidence but can have severe and sometimes fatal health consequences, and thus represent some of the most serious diseases due to the contamination of water and food. New, fast and simple devices that monitor these pathogens are necessary to improve the safety of our food supply chain. In this work we report on mesoporous titania thin-film substrates as sensors to detect E. coli O157:H7. Titania films treated with APTES ((3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and GA (glutaraldehyde were functionalized with specific antibodies and the absorption properties monitored. The film-based biosensors showed a detection limit for E. coli of 1 × 102 CFU/mL, constituting a simple and selective method for the effective screening of water samples.

  14. Impact of medicated feed along with clay mineral supplementation on Escherichia coli resistance to antimicrobial agents in pigs after weaning in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Kabore, Kiswendsida Paul; Fravalo, Philippe; Letellier, Ann; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) phenotype and virulence and AMR gene profiles in Escherichia coli from pigs receiving in-feed antimicrobial medication following weaning and the effect of feed supplementation with a clay mineral, clinoptilolite, on this dynamic. Eighty E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of pigs receiving a diet containing chlortetracycline and penicillin, with or without 2% clinoptilolite, were examined for antimicrobial resistance to 15 antimicrobial agents. Overall, an increased resistance to 10 antimicrobials was observed with time. Supplementation with clinoptilolite was associated with an early increase but later decrease in blaCMY-2, in isolates, as shown by DNA probe. Concurrently, a later increase in the frequency of blaCMY-2 and the virulence genes iucD and tsh was observed in the control pig isolates, being significantly greater than in the supplemented pigs at day 28. Our results suggest that, in the long term, supplementation with clinoptilolite could decrease the prevalence of E. coli carrying certain antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling dynamics of plasmid-gene mediated antimicrobial resistance in enteric bacteria using stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V; Lu, Zhao; Lanzas, Cristina; Scott, H Morgan; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous commensal bacteria harbour genes of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), often on conjugative plasmids. Antimicrobial use in food animals subjects their enteric commensals to antimicrobial pressure. A fraction of enteric Escherichia coli in cattle exhibit plasmid-gene mediated AMR to a third-generation cephalosporin ceftiofur. We adapted stochastic differential equations with diffusion approximation (a compartmental stochastic mathematical model) to research the sources and roles of stochasticity in the resistance dynamics, both during parenteral antimicrobial therapy and in its absence. The results demonstrated that demographic stochasticity among enteric E. coli in the occurrence of relevant events was important for the AMR dynamics only when bacterial numbers were depressed during therapy. However, stochasticity in the parameters of enteric E. coli ecology, whether externally or intrinsically driven, contributed to a wider distribution of the resistant E. coli fraction, both during therapy and in its absence, with stochasticities in individual parameters interacting in their contribution.

  16. Diversity of fecal coliforms and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in wastewater treatment model plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczkiewicz, A; Fudala-Ksiazek, S; Jankowska, K; Quant, B; Olańczuk-Neyman, K

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of resistance patterns among wastewater fecal coliforms was determined in the study. Susceptibility of the isolates was tested against 19 antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, aztreonam, carbapenems, cephalosporines, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors, penicillines, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and fluoroquinolones. Additionally the removal of resistant isolates was evaluated in the laboratory-scale wastewater treatment model plant (M-WWTP), continuously supplied with the wastewater obtained from the full-scale WWTP. Number of fecal coliforms in raw (after mechanical treatment) and treated wastewater, as well as in aerobic chamber effluent was determined using selective medium. The selected strains were identified and examined for antibiotic resistance using Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Biosciences, USA). The strains were identified as Escherichia coli (n=222), Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae (n=9), and Pantoea agglomerans (n=1). The isolate of P. agglomerans as well as 48% of E. coli isolates were sensitive to all antimicrobials tested. The most frequent resistance patterns were found for ampicillin: 100% of K. pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae and 41% of E. coli isolates. Among E. coli isolates 12% was regarded as multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR). In the studied M-WWTP, the applied activated sludge processes reduced considerably the number of fecal coliforms, but increased the ratio of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates to sensitive ones, especially among strains with MAR patterns.

  17. Escherichia coli Field Contamination of Pecan Nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Karen A.; Amling, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    More pecan samples collected from grazed orchards were contaminated with Escherichia coli than were samples from nongrazed orchards. No differences in frequency of contamination between mechanically and manually harvested nuts occurred. Nutmeats from whole uncracked pecans that were soaked for 24 h in a lactose broth solution containing E. coli did not become contaminated. Twentyfour percent of the whole pecans soaked in water for 48 h to simulate standing in a rain puddle developed openings along shell suture lines which did not completely close when the nuts were redried. PMID:4584575

  18. Vaginal Lactobacillus isolates inhibit uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Atassi , Fabrice; Brassart , Dominique; Grob , Philipp; Graf , Federico; Servin , Alain ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activities of Lactobacillus jensenii KS119.1 and KS121.1, and Lactobacillus gasserii KS120.1 and KS124.3 strains isolated from the vaginal microflora of healthy women, against uropathogenic, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains IH11128 and 7372 involved in recurrent cystitis. We observed that some of the Lactobacillus isolates inhibited the growth and decreased the viability of E. coli IH11128 and 7372....

  19. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  20. Prevalence of class 1 and 2 integrons in multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from aquaculture water in Chaharmahal Va Bakhtiari province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Elahe; Khamesipour, Faham; Ranjbar, Reza; Ugwu, Ifeoma Chinyere

    2015-07-31

    Integrons play important role in the spread and maintenance of antimicrobial resistance among strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other species of Enterobacteriaceae. This study investigated the prevalence of class 1 and 2 integrons among E. coli strains isolated from aquaculture water of fish fields in Iran. One hundred and fifty water samples from different geographical regions in Chaharmahal Va Bakhtiari province were examined over a 2 months period. Isolation was through culture and biochemical tests. Integrons were identified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using oligonucleotide primers specific for class 1 and 2 integrons. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using disc diffusion methods. Eighteen percent of the water samples were positive for E. coli. All the strains were multi-drug resistant; 100% to ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, gentamycin, ampicillin and tetracycline and least resistant to imipenem (7.2%). Ten (50%) of the most resistant strains were positive for class 1 (40%) and class 2 (10%). Escherichia coli in aquaculture in Iran carried integrons class 1 and 2 which could be of public health concern since they could play a role in the spread and maintenance of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial population in the region and should be constantly monitored.

  1. Identification and Prevalence of Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuta Mihaela Rotar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the incidence of Escherichia coli in animal and non-animal foods, and mainly the incidence of the serotype O157: H7 producing verotoxin. The presence of common Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in various foods (of animal and non animal origin was performed in Transylvania area. We analyzed a total of one hundred forty-one samples of minced meat, one hundred twenty-six samples of meat , twenty six samples of meat products, five samples of alcoholic beverages, three samples of seafood, one hundred samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, seventeen samples of butter, four samples of vegetables and one sample of milk powder, using the standard cultural method and Vidas Eco method for E. coli O157: H7 strains. E. coli was identified in 50 samples of minced meat, 55 samples of meat prepared, 4 samples of meat products, 2 samples of alcoholic beverages, 25 samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, 6 samples of butter and 1 sample of vegetables. In this study were not been identified any foods contaminated with the E. coli O157: H7 serotype. The results of this reasearch have demostrated that E. coli wich represents a hygienic indicator of recent food contamination, can be destroyed with heat treatment and hygienic handling of foods. Our country over the years has been among the few countries where the incidence of the E. coli O157: H7 serotype has been minimal.

  2. Zoonotic potential of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from healthy poultry carcasses in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Lima-Filho

    Full Text Available The zoonotic potential to cause human and/or animal infections among multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from avian origin was investigated. Twenty-seven extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates containing the increased survival gene (iss were obtained from the livers of healthy and diseased poultry carcasses at two slaughterhouses in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. The antimicrobial resistance-susceptibility profiles were conducted with antibiotics of avian and/or human use by the standardized disc-diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistance was higher for levofloxacin (51.8%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (70.4%, ampicillin (81.5%, cefalotin (88.8%, tetracycline (100% and streptomycin (100%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations above the resistance breakpoints of doxycycline, neomycin, oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin reached, respectively, 88.0%, 100%, 75% and 91.7% of the isolates. Strains with high and low antimicrobial resistance were i.p. administered to Swiss mice, and histopathological examination was carried out seven days after infection. Resistance to goat and human serum complement was also evaluated. The results show that Swiss mice challenged with strain 2B (resistant to 11 antimicrobials provoked a severe degeneration of hepatocytes besides lymphocytic infiltration in the liver, whereas the spleen showed areas of degeneration of the white and red pulp. Conversely, the spleen and liver of mice challenged with strain 4A (resistant to two antimicrobials were morphologically preserved. In addition, complement resistance to goat and human serum was high for strain 2B and low for strain 4A. Our data show that multidrug resistance and pathogenesis can be correlated in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains obtained from apparently healthy poultry carcasses, increasing the risk for human public healthy.

  3. Zoonotic potential of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from healthy poultry carcasses in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Lima-Filho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The zoonotic potential to cause human and/or animal infections among multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from avian origin was investigated. Twenty-seven extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates containing the increased survival gene (iss were obtained from the livers of healthy and diseased poultry carcasses at two slaughterhouses in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. The antimicrobial resistance-susceptibility profiles were conducted with antibiotics of avian and/or human use by the standardized disc-diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistance was higher for levofloxacin (51.8%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (70.4%, ampicillin (81.5%, cefalotin (88.8%, tetracycline (100% and streptomycin (100%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations above the resistance breakpoints of doxycycline, neomycin, oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin reached, respectively, 88.0%, 100%, 75% and 91.7% of the isolates. Strains with high and low antimicrobial resistance were i.p. administered to Swiss mice, and histopathological examination was carried out seven days after infection. Resistance to goat and human serum complement was also evaluated. The results show that Swiss mice challenged with strain 2B (resistant to 11 antimicrobials provoked a severe degeneration of hepatocytes besides lymphocytic infiltration in the liver, whereas the spleen showed areas of degeneration of the white and red pulp. Conversely, the spleen and liver of mice challenged with strain 4A (resistant to two antimicrobials were morphologically preserved. In addition, complement resistance to goat and human serum was high for strain 2B and low for strain 4A. Our data show that multidrug resistance and pathogenesis can be correlated in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains obtained from apparently healthy poultry carcasses, increasing the risk for human public healthy.

  4. Energetics of sodium efflux from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbolla, M.G.; Rosen, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    When energy-starved cells of Escherichia coli were passively loaded with 22 Na+, efflux of sodium could be initiated by addition of a source of metabolic energy. Conditions were established where the source of energy was phosphate bond energy, an electrochemical proton gradient, or both. Only an electrochemical proton gradient was required for efflux from intact cells. These results are consistent with secondary exchange of Na+ for H+ catalyzed by a sodium/proton antiporter

  5. Escherichia Coli: From Genome Sequences to Consequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pallen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article summarizes a presentation given by Professor Mark Pallen of the School of Medicine at the University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom for the Fourth Stanier Lecture held in Regina, Saskatchewan, on November 9, 2004. Professor Pallen's lecture, entitled 'Escherichia coli: From genome sequences to consequences', provides a summary of the important discoveries of his team of research scientists in the area of genetic sequencing and variations in phenotypic expression.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of avian Escherichia coli isolates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... this study is to test the antibiotic sensitivity of Escherichia coli strains which were isolated in Tabriz. A total of 100 E. coli ... and K1 capsule, presence of type 1 and P fimbriae, and temperature-sensitive ... Drug resistance patterns of 100 Escherichia coli strains isolated from colibacillosis. S/N Antibiotic type.

  7. Gene encoding virulence markers among Escherichia coli isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    River water sources and diarrhoeic stools of residents in the Venda Region, Limpopo Province of South Africa were analysed for the prevalence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the presence of virulence genes among the isolates. A control group of 100 nondiarrhoeic stool samples was included. Escherichia coli was ...

  8. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Chinen, Isabel; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  9. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n = 134, their owners (n = 134, and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n = 44, control, searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3% fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1% control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5% isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity of Escherichia coli isolated from pasteurized milk in State of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Oltramari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Food contamination caused by enteric pathogens is a major cause of diarrheal disease worldwide, resulting in high morbidity and mortality and significant economic losses. Bacteria are important agents of foodborne diseases, particularly diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. The present study assessed the genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of E. coli isolates from pasteurized milk processed in 21 dairies in northwestern State of Parana, Brazil. The 95 E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and assessed genotypically by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-Polymerase Chain Reaction (ERIC-PCR. The highest rate of resistance was observed for cephalothin (55.78%. ERIC-PCR revealed high genetic diversity, clustering the 95 bacterial isolates into 90 different genotypic patterns. These results showed a heterogeneous population of E. coli in milk samples produced in the northwestern region of Paraná and the need for good manufacturing practices throughout the processing of pasteurized milk to reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance and occurrence of indicator and pathogenic bacteria in organic and conventional chicken meat: comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ernlund Freitas de Macedo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the occurrence of pathogenic and indicator bacteria, and the antimicrobial resistance of Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from organic and conventional chicken carcasses. Fifty frozen chickens were assessed from five different commercial brands purchased at retail stores in the South and Southeast regions of Brazil. Of these chickens, 25 were conventionally farmed and 25 were organically farmed. Mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts were made, as well as counts for total coliform, Escherichia coli, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus and the assessment of Salmonella sp. Antimicrobial resistance was evaluated using the disk diffusion method. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, and Tukey´s test was used to compare means between brands within the organic and conventional groups. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare bacterial counts between organic and conventional group. Differences of antimicrobial resistance between groups were calculated using the Chi square test (P<0.05. The organic chicken carcasses showed higher microbiological contamination (P<0.05 compared to conventional carcasses; however, Enterobacteriaceae from the organic chicken showed lower antimicrobial resistance. The highest frequency of resistance in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from both organic and conventional chicken was tetracycline. The restricted use or absence of antibiotics in organic farming practices can lower the risk of dissemination of antibiotic resistant bacteria when chicken is consumed.

  12. Siderophore production by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagrali Manjula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most frequently encountered problems in ambulatory medicine. The present study was designed to determine siderophore production as the urovirulence factor of Escherichia coli isolated from the patients of UTI. A total of 160 strains of E. coli isolated from urine of patients with clinically diagnosed UTI were included in the study and 50 fecal isolates of E. coli, siderophore production was seen in 156 (97.5%. In 50 fecal isolates, siderophore production was seen in 2 (4%. Siderophore production has been shown to be more frequent in E. coli from patients with UTI, than in fecal isolates. The results suggest that siderophore production positive strains can be considered as UPEC. Thus, although a great deal has been learned regarding E. coli virulence mechanisms in UTI, much remains to be learned and the practical application of our growing understanding of E. coli virulence factors to the prevention and treatment of UTI has to be continued.

  13. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass.

  14. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Danevčič

    Full Text Available Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria.

  15. Action of sodium deoxycholate on Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Mello, A.; Yotis, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sodium deoxycholate is used in a number of bacteriological media for the isolation and classification of gram-negative bacteria from food and the environment. Initial experiments to study the effect of deoxycholate on the growth parameters of Escherichia coli showed an increase in the lag time constant and generation time and a decrease in the growth rate constant total cell yield of this microorganisms. Cell fractionation studies indicated that sodium deoxycholate at levels used in bacteriological media interferes with the incorporation of [U- 14 C]glucose into the cold-trichloroacetic acid-soluble, ethanol-soluble, and trypsin-soluble cellular fractions of E. coli. Finally, sodium deoxycholate interfered with the flagellation and motility of Proteus mirabilis and E. coli. It would appear then that further improvement of the deoxycholate medium may be in order

  16. Molecular mechanisms of Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxen, Matthew A; Finlay, B Brett

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a remarkable and diverse organism. This normally harmless commensal needs only to acquire a combination of mobile genetic elements to become a highly adapted pathogen capable of causing a range of diseases, from gastroenteritis to extraintestinal infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream and central nervous system. The worldwide burden of these diseases is staggering, with hundreds of millions of people affected annually. Eight E. coli pathovars have been well characterized, and each uses a large arsenal of virulence factors to subvert host cellular functions to potentiate its virulence. In this Review, we focus on the recent advances in our understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms that are used by various E. coli pathovars and how they cause disease in humans.

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance in Invasive Bacterial Infections in Hospitalized Children, Cambodia, 2007-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Lewis, Andrew; Takata, Junko; Miliya, Thyl; Lubell, Yoel; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Rith, Kolthida; McKellar, Gregor; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; McGonagle, Erin; Stoesser, Nicole; Moore, Catrin E; Parry, Christopher M; Turner, Claudia; Day, Nicholas P J; Cooper, Ben S; Turner, Paul

    2018-05-01

    To determine trends, mortality rates, and costs of antimicrobial resistance in invasive bacterial infections in hospitalized children, we analyzed data from Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, for 2007-2016. A total of 39,050 cultures yielded 1,341 target pathogens. Resistance rates were high; 82% each of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were multidrug resistant. Hospital-acquired isolates were more often resistant than community-acquired isolates; resistance trends over time were heterogeneous. K. pneumoniae isolates from neonates were more likely than those from nonneonates to be resistant to ampicillin-gentamicin and third-generation cephalosporins. In patients with community-acquired gram-negative bacteremia, third-generation cephalosporin resistance was associated with increased mortality rates, increased intensive care unit admissions, and 2.26-fold increased healthcare costs among survivors. High antimicrobial resistance in this setting is a threat to human life and the economy. In similar low-resource settings, our methods could be reproduced as a robust surveillance model for antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Correlation between apramycin and gentamicin use in pigs and an increasing reservoir of gentamicin-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær; Jakobsen, Lotte; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2006-01-01

    ), diagnostic submissions from pigs (clinical isolates) and pork were obtained from the national surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and from routine diagnostic laboratories. Antimicrobial consumption data were obtained from the Danish Medicines Agency (1997-2000) and from the VetStat database (2001...... and gentamicin resistance in Escherichia coli strains from pork, healthy pigs and diagnostic submissions from pigs and to investigate potential relationships to the use of apramycin and gentamicin at farm and national levels. Methods: Data on Danish E. coli isolates from healthy pigs (indicator bacteria......-2004). The genetic background for gentamicin resistance was investigated by PCR. Relationships between antimicrobial usage and resistance were analysed by chi(2) test and logistic regression. Results: At the farm level, the occurrence of apramycin/gentamicin cross-resistance was correlated to the use of apramycin (P...

  19. Substrate specificity of the OqxAB multidrug resistance pump in Escherichia coli and selected enteric bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Sørensen, Heidi Iskou

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: A plasmid-encoded multidrug eff lux pump, OqxAB, identified in Escherichia coli of porcine origin, was tested for substrate specificity against selected antibiotics, detergents and disinfectants. The ability of horizontal transfer to food-borne pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae family......, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera sp. and Enterobacter aerogrenes was investigated. The effect of the presence of the OqxAB pump on susceptibility for selected compounds was investigated using broth dilution assays. Results: The OqxAB pump conferred antimicrobial resistance or reduced susceptibility towards...... a variety of substrates in E. coli. These included animal growth promoters, antimicrobials, disinfectants and detergents. pOLA52 could readily be transferred to enterobacterial pathogens. Transconjugants showed reduced susceptibility towards chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin and olaquindox. Conclusions...

  20. Relative performance of antimicrobial susceptibility assays on clinical Escherichia coli isolates from animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Skye; Abraham, Sam; Saputra, Sugiyono; Trott, Darren J; Turnidge, John; Mitchell, Tahlia; Caraguel, Charles G B; Jordan, David

    2018-02-01

    The assessment of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria derived from animals is often performed using the disc diffusion assay. However broth-microdilution is the preferred assay for national antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of disc diffusion relative to broth-microdilution across a panel of 12 antimicrobials using data from a collection of 994 clinical Escherichia coli isolates from animals. Disc diffusion performance was evaluated by diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio pairs and receive-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Data was dichotomised using CLSI susceptible and resistant clinical breakpoints. In addition, disc diffusion breakpoints produced using diffusion Breakpoint Estimation Testing Software (dBETS) were evaluated. Analysis revealed considerable variability in performance estimates for disc diffusion susceptible and resistant breakpoints (AUC ranges: 0.78-0.99 and 0.92-1.0, respectively) across the panel of antimicrobials. Ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and ampicillin estimates were robust across both breakpoints, whereas estimates for several antimicrobials including amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin and gentamicin were less favourable using susceptible breakpoints. Overall performance estimates were moderately improved when dBETS susceptible breakpoints were applied. For most antimicrobials, disc diffusion was accurate at predicting resistance of clinical E. coli from animals that could otherwise be determined by broth-microdilution. While disc diffusion is suboptimal for assessing the proportion of fully susceptible isolates for some drugs, sensitivity and specificity estimates provided here allow for the use of standard formula to correct this. For this reason, disc diffusion has applicability in national surveillance provided the performance of the assay is taken into account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli in husbandry animals: the African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C A; Zarazaga, M; Ben Sallem, R; Jouini, A; Ben Slama, K; Torres, C

    2017-05-01

    In the last few years, different surveillances have been published in Africa, especially in northern countries, regarding antimicrobial resistance among husbandry animals. Information is still scarce, but the available data show a worrying picture. Although the highest resistance rates have been described against tetracycline, penicillins and sulphonamides, prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) are being increasingly reported. Among ESBLs, the CTX-M-1 group was dominant in most African surveys. Within this group, CTX-M-15 was the main variant both in animals and humans, except in Tunisia where CTX-M-1 was more frequently detected among Escherichia coli from poultry. Certain bla CTX -M-15 -harbouring clones (ST131/B2 or ST405/D) are mainly identified in humans, but they have also been reported in livestock species from Tanzania, Nigeria or Tunisia. Moreover, several reports suggest an inter-host circulation of specific plasmids (e.g. bla CTX -M-1 -carrying IncI1/ST3 in Tunisia, IncY- and Inc-untypeable replicons co-harbouring qnrS1 and bla CTX -M-15 in Tanzania and the worldwide distributed bla CTX -M-15 -carrying IncF-type plasmids). International trade of poultry meat seems to have contributed to the spread of other ESBL variants, such as CTX-M-14, and clones. Furthermore, first descriptions of OXA-48- and OXA-181-producing E. coli have been recently documented in cattle from Egypt, and the emergent plasmid-mediated colistin resistance mcr-1 gene has been also identified in chickens from Algeria, Tunisia and South Africa. These data reflect the urgent need of a larger regulation in the use of veterinary drugs and the implementation of surveillance programmes in order to decelerate the advance of antimicrobial resistance in this continent. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Escherichia coli in broiler chickens with airsacculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro S. Machado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Machado L.S., do Nascimento E.R., Pereira V.L.A., Abreu D.L.C., Gouvea R. & Santos L.M.M. 2014. [Escherichia coli in broiler chickens with airsacculitis.] Escherichia coli em frangos de corte com aerossaculite. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(3:261-265, 2014. Departamento de Medicina Veterinária Preventiva e Saúde Pública, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Dr. Vital Brazil Filho 64, Vital Brazil, Niterói, RJ 24230-340, Brazil. E-mail: leandromachadovet@yahoo.com.br The Brazilian poultry industry grows each year and becomes increasingly representative in the production and export of products. The health care with poultry have accompanied and favored this evolution, however, respiratory agents that affect the weight and carcass quality, continue to cause great damage to the poultry industry. Airsacculitis is considered the main cause of total and partial condemnation of carcasses of broilers, and has been attributed to Mycoplasmosis mostly caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS and Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to relate the positivity of MG / MS and E. coli detected by PCR as a risk factor for airsacculitis in condemnation of broilers in Health Inspection Service. We studied 30 broiler poultry slaughtered in a slaughterhouse under Federal Sanitary Inspection, located in the State of Rio de Janeiro. 30 chickens were randomly collected from different lots and tracheas obtained in each PCR. DNA was extracted by phenol-chloroform method and amplified using pairs of “primer”specific for MG, MS and E. coli. Of the 30 chickens analyzed by PCR, 30% (9/30 had lesions in air sacs. None of the birds showed infection with MG and/or MS PCR, however 33.3% (3/9 birds were positive for airsacculitis iss gene from E.coli. E.coli found in broiler chickens that were negative for mycoplasma airsacculitis, implying the presence of such bacteria may be sufficient

  3. Characterization of Multidrug Resistant Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli among Uropathogens of Pediatrics in North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Rezai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli remains as one of the most important bacteria causing infections in pediatrics and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs making them resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. In this study we aimed to genotype ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from pediatric patients for ESBL genes and determine their association with antimicrobial resistance. One hundred of the E. coli isolates were initially considered ESBL producing based on their MIC results. These isolates were then tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the presence or absence of CTX, TEM, SHV, GES, and VEB beta-lactamase genes. About 30.5% of isolated E. coli was ESBL-producing strain. The TEM gene was the most prevalent (49% followed by SHV (44%, CTX (28%, VEB (8%, and GES (0% genes. The ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were susceptible to carbapenems (66% and amikacin (58% and showed high resistance to cefixime (99%, colistin (82%, and ciprofloxacin (76%. In conclusion, carbapenems were the most effective antibiotics against ESBl-producing E. coli in urinary tract infection in North of Iran. The most prevalent gene is the TEM-type, but the other resistant genes and their antimicrobial resistance are on the rise.

  4. Petrol and diesel exhaust particles accelerate the horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Gu, April Z; Cen, Tianyu; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Dan; Chen, Jianmin

    2018-03-07

    Particles exhausted from petrol and diesel consumptions are major components of urban air pollution that can be exposed to human via direct inhalation or other routes due to atmospheric deposition into water and soil. Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious threats to modern health care. However, how the petrol and diesel exhaust particles affect the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in various environments remain largely unknown. This study investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of four representative petrol and diesel exhaust particles, namely 97 octane petrol, 93 octane petrol, light diesel oil, and marine heavy diesel oil, on the horizontal transfer of ARGs between two opportunistic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, E. coli S17-1 (donor) and E. coli K12 (recipient). The results demonstrated that these four representative types of nano-scale particles induced concentration-dependent increases in conjugative transfer rates compared with the controls. The underlying mechanisms involved in the accelerated transfer of ARGs were also identified, including the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the consequent induction of oxidative stress, SOS response, changes in cell morphology, and the altered mRNA expression of membrane protein genes and those involved in the promotion of conjugative transfer. The findings provide new evidences and mechanistic insights into the antimicrobial resistance risks posed by petrol and diesel exhaust particles, and highlight the implications and need for stringent strategies on alternative fuels to mitigate air pollution and health risks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from commercial swine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR) for the analysis of genetic diversity among Escherichia coli strains isolated from commercial swine farms in Sichuan province of China. Thirty four strains of E. coli were selected by selective medium and conventional biochemical test from ...

  6. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    PMQR) genes and the prevalence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) types in Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Methods: Sixty-one ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates were studied. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed ...

  7. lactamases genes among0 Escherichia coli from patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -lactamases (ESBLs) that mediate resistance to b-lactam drugs among Escherichia coli and other uropathogens have been reported worldwide. However, there is little information on the detection of ESBLs genes in E. coli from patients with ...

  8. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  10. Photoinactivation of mcr-1 positive Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, C. S. A.; Leal, C. R. B.; Rodrigues, A. C. S.; Lima, A. R.; Silva, C. M.; Ramos, C. A. N.; Chang, M. R.; Arruda, E. J.; Oliveira, S. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Caires, A. R. L.

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, mostly in Escherichia coli due to the mcr-1 gene, has revealed the need to develop alternative approaches in treating mcr-1 positive bacterial infections. This is because colistin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and one of the ‘last-resort’ antibiotics for multidrug resistant bacteria. The present study evaluated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the efficacy of photoinactivation processes to kill a known mcr-1 positive E. coli strain. Eosin methylene-blue (EMB) was investigated as a photoantimicrobial agent for inhibiting the growth of a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain obtained from a patient with a diabetic foot infection. The photoantimicrobial activity of EMB was also tested in a non-multidrug resistant E. coli strain. The photoinactivation process was tested using light doses in the 30-45 J cm-2 range provided by a LED device emitting at 625 nm. Our findings demonstrate that a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain is susceptible to photoinactivation. The results show that the EMB was successfully photoactivated, regardless of the bacterial multidrug resistance; inactivating the bacterial growth by oxidizing the cells in accordance with the generation of the oxygen reactive species. Our results suggest that bacterial photoinactivation is an alternative and effective approach to kill mcr-1 positive bacteria.

  11. [Transformation of phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mengrong; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Shuangping; Shi, Guiyang

    2014-10-01

    We constructed several recombinant Escherichia coli strains to transform phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS system) and compared the characteristics of growth and metabolism of the mutants. We knocked-out the key genes ptsI and ptsG in PTS system by using Red homologous recombination in E. coli and meanwhile we also knocked-in the glucose facilitator gene glf from Zymomonas mobilis in the E. coli chromosome. Recombinant E. coli strains were constructed and the effects of cell growth, glucose consumption and acetic acid accumulation were also evaluated in all recombinant strains. The deletion of gene ptsG and ptsI inactivated some PTS system functions and inhibited the growth ability of the cell. Expressing the gene glf can help recombinant E. coli strains re-absorb the glucose through Glf-Glk (glucose facilitator-glucokinase) pathway as it can use ATP to phosphorylate glucose and transport into cell. This pathway can improve the availability of glucose and also reduce the accumulation of acetic acid; it can also broaden the carbon flux in the metabolism pathway.

  12. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers.

  13. Strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Rajesh R; Kohli, Gurdeep Singh; Katekhaye, Vijay M; Swami, Onkar C

    2014-07-01

    The global burden of antimicrobial resistance is rising and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in clinical and community setting. Spread of antibiotic resistance to different environmental niches and development of superbugs have further complicated the effective control strategies. International, national and local approaches have been advised for control and prevention of antimicrobial resistance. Rational use of antimicrobials, regulation on over-the-counter availability of antibiotics, improving hand hygiene and improving infection prevention and control are the major recommended approaches. Thorough understanding of resistance mechanism and innovation in new drugs and vaccines is the need. A multidisciplinary, collaborative, regulatory approach is demanded for combating antimicrobial resistance.

  14. Using whole-genome sequencing to determine appropriate streptomycin epidemiological cutoffs for Salmonella and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Gregory H; Li, Cong; Ayers, Sherry; McDermott, Patrick F; Zhao, Shaohua

    2016-02-01

    For Enterobacteriaceae such as Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli, no unified interpretive resistance criteria exist for streptomycin, an epidemiologically important antibiotic. As part of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System, we had previously used a minimum inhibitory concentration of ≥ 64 μg mL(-1) as an epidemiological cutoff value (ECV) to define non-wild-type isolates. To identify whether this ECV correlated with genetic determinants of resistance, we performed whole-genome sequencing of 463 Salmonella and E. coli isolates to identify streptomycin resistance genotypes. From this analysis, we found that using a streptomycin resistance breakpoint of ≥ 64 μg mL(-1) classified over 20% of strains possessing aadA or strA/strB resistance genes as wild-type. Therefore, to improve the concordance between genotypic and phenotypic data, we propose reducing the phenotypic cutoff values to ≥ 32 μg mL(-1) for both Salmonella and E. coli, to be used widely as ECVs to categorize non-wild-type isolates. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Characterization of Vaginal Escherichia coli Isolated from Pregnant Women in Two Different African Sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Sáez-López

    Full Text Available The relevance of vaginal colonization of pregnant women by Escherichia coli is poorly understood, despite these strains sharing a similar virulence profile with other extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli producing severe obstetric and neonatal infections. We characterized the epidemiology, antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence profiles of 84 vaginal E. coli isolates from pregnant women from Rabat (Morocco and Manhiça (Mozambique, two very distinct epidemiological settings. Low levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed to all drugs tested, except for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in Manhiça, where this drug is extensively used as prophylaxis for opportunistic HIV infections. The most prevalent virulence factors were related to iron acquisition systems. Phylogroup A was the most common in Rabat, while phylogroups E and non-typeable were the most frequent in Manhiça. Regardless of the apparently "low virulence" of these isolates, the frequency of infections is higher and the outcomes more devastating in constrained-resources conditions, especially among pregnant women and newborns.

  16. Escherichia coli and urinary tract infections: the role of poultry-meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manges, A R

    2016-02-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common cause of community-acquired and hospital-acquired extraintestinal infections. The hypothesis that human ExPEC may have a food animal reservoir has been a topic of investigation by multiple groups around the world. Experimental studies showing the shared pathogenic potential of human ExPEC and avian pathogenic E. coli suggest that these extraintestinal E. coli may be derived from the same bacterial lineages or share common evolutionary roots. The consistent observation of specific human ExPEC lineages in poultry or poultry products, and rarely in other meat commodities, supports the hypothesis that there may be a poultry reservoir for human ExPEC. The time lag between human ExPEC acquisition (in the intestine) and infection is the fundamental challenge facing studies attempting to attribute ExPEC transmission to poultry or other environmental sources. Even whole genome sequencing efforts to address attribution will struggle with defining meaningful genetic relationships outside of a discrete food-borne outbreak setting. However, if even a fraction of all human ExPEC infections, especially antimicrobial-resistant ExPEC infections, is attributable to the introduction of multidrug-resistant ExPEC lineages through contaminated food product(s), the relevance to public health, food animal production and food safety will be significant. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  18. Translational coupling in Escherichia coli of a heterologous Bacillus subtilis-Escherichia coli gene fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaghloul, T I; Doi, R H

    1986-01-01

    The efficient expression in Escherichia coli of the Tn9-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.28) gene fused distal to the promoter and N terminus of the Bacillus subtilis aprA gene was dependent on the initiation of translation from the ribosome-binding site in the aprA gene.

  19. Genetic relationship of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes among the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O serogroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Y Bando

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic relationship among the Escherichia coli pathotypes was investigated. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD data for constructing a dendrogram of 73 strains of diarrheagenic E. coli. A phylogenetic tree encompassing 15 serotypes from different pathotypes was constructed using multilocus sequence typing data. Phylogram clusters were used for validating RAPD data on the clonality of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC O serogroup strains. Both analyses showed very similar topologies, characterized by the presence of two major groups: group A includes EPEC H6 and H34 strains and group B contains the other EPEC strains plus all serotypes belonging to atypical EPEC, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC. These results confirm the existence of two evolutionary divergent groups in EPEC: one is genetically and serologically very homogeneous whereas the other harbors EPEC and non-EPEC serotypes. The same situation was found for EAEC and EHEC.

  20. Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme: purification and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snapka, R.M.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Researchers have purified large quantities of Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme to apparent homogeneity and have studied its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 36,800 and a S/sub 20,w/ 0 of 3.72 S. Amino acid analysis revealed an apparent absence of tryptophan, a low content of aromatic residues, and the presence of no unusual amino acids. The N terminus is arginine. The purified enzyme contained up to 13% carbohydrate by weight. The carbohydrate was composed of mannose, galactose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine. The enzyme is also associated with RNA containing uracil, adenine, guanine, and cytosine with no unusual bases detected

  1. Molecular mechanisms of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, James M; Hardwidge, Philip R; Munson, George P; Rasko, David A; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Steinsland, Hans

    2010-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrheal illness in developing countries, and perennially the most common cause of traveller's diarrhea. ETEC constitute a diverse pathotype that elaborate heat-labile and/or heat-stable enterotoxins. Recent molecular pathogenesis studies reveal sophisticated pathogen-host interactions that might be exploited in efforts to prevent these important infections. While vaccine development for these important pathogens remains a formidable challenge, extensive efforts that attempt to exploit new genomic and proteomic technology platforms in discovery of novel targets are presently ongoing. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...... the transition to biofilm growth, and these included genes expressed under oxygen-limiting conditions, genes encoding (putative) transport proteins, putative oxidoreductases and genes associated with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Of particular interest was the observation that many of the genes altered...

  3. Expression of maize prolamins in Escherichia Coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Szu-zhen; Esen, Asim

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a cDNA expression library of developing corn (Zea manys L.) endosperm using plasmid pUC8 as vector and Escherichia coli strain DH1 as host. The expression library was screened with non-radioactive immunological probes to detect the expression of gamma-zein and alpha-zein. When anti-gamma-zein antibody was used as the probe, 23 colonies gave positive reactions. The lengths of cDNA inserts of the 23 colonies were found to be 250-900 base pairs. When anti-alpha zein antibody was used, however, fewer colonies gave positive reactions. The library was also screened by colony-hybridization with 32 P-labeled DNA probes. Based on immunological and hybridization screening of the library and other evidence, we conclude that alpha-zein was either toxic to E. coli cells or rapidly degraded whereas gamma-zein and its fragments were readily expressed. (author)

  4. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  5. Causative Organisms and Associated Antimicrobial Resistance in Healthcare-Associated, Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections From Oncology Settings, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Isaac; Freifeld, Alison G; Magill, Shelley S

    2016-05-15

    Recent antimicrobial resistance data are lacking from inpatient oncology settings to guide infection prophylaxis and treatment recommendations. We describe central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) pathogens and antimicrobial resistance patterns reported from oncology locations to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). CLABSI data reported to NHSN from 2009 to 2012 from adult inpatient oncology locations were compared to data from nononcology adult locations within the same hospitals. Pathogen profile, antimicrobial resistance rates, and CLABSI incidence rates per 1000 central line-days were calculated. CLABSI incidence rates were compared using Poisson regression. During 2009-2012, 4654 CLABSIs were reported to NHSN from 299 adult oncology units. The most common organisms causing CLABSI in oncology locations were coagulase-negative staphylococci (16.9%), Escherichia coli (11.8%), and Enterococcus faecium (11.4%). Fluoroquinolone resistance was more common among E. coli CLABSI in oncology than nononcology locations (56.5% vs 41.5% of isolates tested; P oncology compared to nononcology locations for fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (rate ratio, 7.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.20-8.76) and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (rate ratio, 2.27, 95% CI, 2.03-2.53). However, resistance rates for some organisms, such as Klebsiella species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were lower in oncology than in nononcology locations. Antimicrobial-resistant E. coli and E. faecium have become significant pathogens in oncology. Practices for antimicrobial prophylaxis and empiric antimicrobial therapy should be regularly assessed in conjunction with contemporary antimicrobial resistance data. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying New Small Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOrsdel, Caitlin E; Kelly, John P; Burke, Brittany N; Lein, Christina D; Oufiero, Christopher E; Sanchez, Joseph F; Wimmers, Larry E; Hearn, David J; Abuikhdair, Fatimeh J; Barnhart, Kathryn R; Duley, Michelle L; Ernst, Sarah E G; Kenerson, Briana A; Serafin, Aubrey J; Hemm, Matthew R

    2018-04-12

    The number of small proteins (SPs) encoded in the Escherichia coli genome is unknown, as current bioinformatics and biochemical techniques make short gene and small protein identification challenging. One method of small protein identification involves adding an epitope tag to the 3' end of a short open reading frame (sORF) on the chromosome, with synthesis confirmed by immunoblot assays. In this study, this strategy was used to identify new E. coli small proteins, tagging 80 sORFs in the E. coli genome, and assayed for protein synthesis. The selected sORFs represent diverse sequence characteristics, including degrees of sORF conservation, predicted transmembrane domains, sORF direction with respect to flanking genes, ribosome binding site (RBS) prediction, and ribosome profiling results. Of 80 sORFs, 36 resulted in encoded synthesized proteins-a 45% success rate. Modeling of detected versus non-detected small proteins analysis showed predictions based on RBS prediction, transcription data, and ribosome profiling had statistically-significant correlation with protein synthesis; however, there was no correlation between current sORF annotation and protein synthesis. These results suggest substantial numbers of small proteins remain undiscovered in E. coli, and existing bioinformatics techniques must continue to improve to facilitate identification. © 2018 The Authors. Proteomics Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Towson University.

  8. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  10. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Natural DNA uptake by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Sinha

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli has homologues of the competence genes other species use for DNA uptake and processing, but natural competence and transformation have never been detected. Although we previously showed that these genes are induced by the competence regulator Sxy as in other gamma-proteobacteria, no conditions are known that naturally induce sxy expression. We have now tested whether the competence gene homologues encode a functional DNA uptake machinery and whether DNA uptake leads to recombination, by investigating the effects of plasmid-borne sxy expression on natural competence in a wide variety of E. coli strains. High- and low-level sxy expression alone did not induce transformation in any of the strains tested, despite varying the transforming DNA, its concentration, and the incubation conditions used. Direct measurements of uptake of radiolabelled DNA were below the limit of detection, however transformants were readily detected when recombination functions were provided by the lambda Red recombinase. This is the first demonstration that E. coli sxy expression can induce natural DNA uptake and that E. coli's competence genes do encode a functional uptake machinery. However, the amount of transformation cells undergo is limited both by low levels of DNA uptake and by inefficient DNA processing/recombination.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance among pathogenic bacteria from mink (Neovison vison) in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaisen, Nanett Kvist; Lassen, Desireé Corvera Kløve; Chriél, Mariann; Larsen, Gitte; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær; Pedersen, Karl

    2017-09-13

    For proper treat