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Sample records for antimalarial quinoline methanols

  1. Interference with hemozoin formation represents an important mechanism of schistosomicidal action of antimalarial quinoline methanols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana B R Corrêa Soares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the major causative agents of human schistosomiasis, which afflicts 200 million people worldwide. Praziquantel remains the main drug used for schistosomiasis treatment, and reliance on the single therapy has been prompting the search for new therapeutic compounds against this disease. Our group has demonstrated that heme crystallization into hemozoin (Hz within the S. mansoni gut is a major heme detoxification route with lipid droplets involved in this process and acting as a potential chemotherapeutical target. In the present work, we investigated the effects of three antimalarial compounds, quinine (QN, quinidine (QND and quinacrine (QCR in a murine schistosomiasis model by using a combination of biochemical, cell biology and molecular biology approaches. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment of S. mansoni-infected female Swiss mice with daily intraperitoneal injections of QN, and QND (75 mg/kg/day from the 11(th to 17(th day after infection caused significant decreases in worm burden (39%-61% and egg production (42%-98%. Hz formation was significantly inhibited (40%-65% in female worms recovered from QN- and QND-treated mice and correlated with reduction in the female worm burden. We also observed that QN treatment promoted remarkable ultrastructural changes in male and female worms, particularly in the gut epithelium and reduced the granulomatous reaction to parasite eggs trapped in the liver. Microarray gene expression analysis indicated that QN treatment increased the expression of transcripts related to musculature, protein synthesis and repair mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: The overall significant reduction in several disease burden parameters by the antimalarial quinoline methanols indicates that interference with Hz formation in S. mansoni represents an important mechanism of schistosomicidal action of these compounds and points out the heme crystallization process as a

  2. Quinoline-based antimalarial hybrid compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandekerckhove, Stéphanie; D'hooghe, Matthias

    2015-08-15

    Quinoline-containing compounds, such as quinine and chloroquine, have a long-standing history as potent antimalarial agents. However, the increasing resistance of the Plasmodium parasite against these drugs and the lack of licensed malaria vaccines have forced chemists to develop synthetic strategies toward novel biologically active molecules. A strategy that has attracted considerable attention in current medicinal chemistry is based on the conjugation of two biologically active molecules into one hybrid compound. Since quinolines are considered to be privileged antimalarial building blocks, the synthesis of quinoline-containing antimalarial hybrids has been elaborated extensively in recent years. This review provides a literature overview of antimalarial hybrid molecules containing a quinoline core, covering publications between 2009 and 2014. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quinoline-Based Hybrid Compounds with Antimalarial Activity

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    Xhamla Nqoro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of quinoline-based compounds for the treatment of malaria infections is hampered by drug resistance. Drug resistance has led to the combination of quinolines with other classes of antimalarials resulting in enhanced therapeutic outcomes. However, the combination of antimalarials is limited by drug-drug interactions. In order to overcome the aforementioned factors, several researchers have reported hybrid compounds prepared by reacting quinoline-based compounds with other compounds via selected functionalities. This review will focus on the currently reported quinoline-based hybrid compounds and their preclinical studies.

  4. Quinoline hybrids and their antiplasmodial and antimalarial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan-Qiang; Gao, Chuan; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Lei; Xu, Zhi; Feng, Lian-Shun; Wu, Xiang; Zhao, Feng

    2017-10-20

    Malaria, in particular infection with P. falciparum (the most lethal of the human malaria parasite species, responsible for nearly one million deaths every year), is one of the most devastating and common infectious disease throughout the world. Beginning with quinine, quinoline containing compounds have long been used in clinical treatment of malaria and remained the mainstays of chemotherapy against malaria. The emergence of P. falciparum strains resistant to almost all antimalarials prompted medicinal chemists and biologists to study their effective replacement with an alternative mechanism of action and new molecules. Combination with variety of quinolines and other active moieties may increase the antiplasmodial and antimalarial activities and reduce the side effects. Thus, hybridization is a very attractive strategy to develop novel antimalarials. This review aims to summarize the recent advances towards the discovery of antiplasmodial and antimalarial hybrids including quinoline skeleton to provide an insight for rational designs of more active and less toxic quinoline hybrids antimalarials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Design and Synthesis of Some New Quinoline Based 1,2,3-Triazoles as Antimicrobial and Antimalarial Agents

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    Parthasaradhi Y.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 6-bromo-2-chloro-3-(4-phenyl-[1,2,3]triazol-1-ylmethyl-quinoline and its derivatives (5a-j were synthesized in good yields from the intermediates (6-bromo-2-chloro-quinolin-3-yl-methanol (2, methanesulfonic acid (6-bromo-2-chloroquinolin-3-ylmethyl methanesulfonate (3 and 3-azidomethyl-6-bromo-2-chloro-quinoline (4. The synthetic route leading to the title compounds is commenced from commercially available 6-bromo-2-chloro-quinolin-3-carbaldehyde (1. The chemical structures of the newly synthesized compounds were elucidated by their IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectral data and elemental analysis. Further, all the target compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms and antimalarial activity towards P. falciparum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.692 

  6. Quinoline drug-heme interactions and implications for antimalarial cytostatic versus cytocidal activities.

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    Gorka, Alexander P; de Dios, Angel; Roepe, Paul D

    2013-07-11

    Historically, the most successful molecular target for antimalarial drugs has been heme biomineralization within the malarial parasite digestive vacuole. Heme released from catabolized host red blood cell hemoglobin is toxic, so malarial parasites crystallize heme to nontoxic hemozoin. For years it has been accepted that a number of effective quinoline antimalarial drugs (e.g., chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine) function by preventing hemozoin crystallization. However, recent studies over the past decade have revealed a surprising molecular diversity in quinoline-heme molecular interactions. This diversity shows that even closely related quinoline drugs may have quite different molecular pharmacology. This paper reviews the molecular diversity and highlights important implications for understanding quinoline antimalarial drug resistance and for future drug design.

  7. In vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol and Water Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the in vivo antimalarial effect of Eryngium thorifolium, an endemic plant in. Turkey. Methods: The methanol and water extracts were prepared and phytochemical analysis conducted on the extracts. Twenty four healthy Balb/c male mice, divided into 4 groups (n = 6), were infected intravenously with ...

  8. Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs: a novel class of autophagy inhibitors.

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    Golden, Encouse B; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Hofman, Florence M; Louie, Stan G; Schönthal, Axel H; Chen, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a quinoline-based drug widely used for the prevention and treatment of malaria. More recent studies have provided evidence that this drug may also harbor antitumor properties, whereby CQ possesses the ability to accumulate in lysosomes and blocks the cellular process of autophagy. Therefore, the authors of this study set out to investigate whether CQ analogs, in particular clinically established antimalaria drugs, would also be able to exert antitumor properties, with a specific focus on glioma cells. Toward this goal, the authors treated different glioma cell lines with quinine (QN), quinacrine (QNX), mefloquine (MFQ), and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and investigated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death, autophagy, and cell death. All agents blocked cellular autophagy and exerted cytotoxic effects on drug-sensitive and drug-resistant glioma cells with varying degrees of potency (QNX > MFQ > HCQ > CQ > QN). Furthermore, all quinoline-based drugs killed glioma cells that were highly resistant to temozolomide (TMZ), the current standard of care for patients with glioma. The cytotoxic mechanism involved the induction of apoptosis and ER stress, as indicated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and CHOP/GADD153. The induction of ER stress and resulting apoptosis could be confirmed in the in vivo setting, in which tumor tissues from animals treated with quinoline-based drugs showed increased expression of CHOP/GADD153, along with elevated TUNEL staining, a measure of apoptosis. Thus, the antimalarial compounds investigated in this study hold promise as a novel class of autophagy inhibitors for the treatment of newly diagnosed TMZ-sensitive and recurrent TMZ-resistant gliomas.

  9. In vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol and Water Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The possible active compounds responsible for the observed chemosupression may be flavonoids, terpeneoids and anthraquinones which are present in the extract. This is the first report on the in vivo antimalarial activity of E. thorifolium. Keywords: Antimalarial, Eryngium thorifolium, Plasmodium berghei, ...

  10. (E-N′-[1-(4-Hydroxyphenylethylidene]-2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetohydrazide methanol solvate

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    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C19H17N3O3·CH4O, the mean planes of the benzene ring and the quinoline rings make a dihedral angle of 75.5 (2°. The acetohydrazide molecules are connected via pairs of intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds into inversion dimers, and the methanol solvent molecule is linked to the acetohydrazide molecule via intermolecular N—H...O and bifurcated O—H...(N,O hydrogen bonds.

  11. Anti-malarial activity of a non-piperidine library of next-generation quinoline methanols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical utility for mefloquine has been eroded due to its association with adverse neurological effects. Better-tolerated alternatives are required. The objective of the present study was the identification of lead compounds that are as effective as mefloquine, but exhibit physiochemical properties likely to render them less susceptible to passage across the blood-brain barrier. Methods A library of drug-like non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. These compounds are diverse in structure and physiochemical properties. They were screened in appropriate in vitro assays and evaluated in terms of their potential as lead compounds. The correlation of specific structural attributes and physiochemical properties with activity was assessed. Results The most potent analogs were low molecular weight unconjugated secondary amines with no heteroatoms in their side-chains. However, these compounds were more metabolically labile and permeable than mefloquine. In terms of physiochemical properties, lower polar surface area, lower molecular weight, more freely rotatable bonds and fewer H-bond acceptors were associated with greater potency. There was no such relationship between activity and LogP, LogD or the number of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs). The addition of an H-bond donor to the side-chain yielded a series of active diamines, which were as metabolically stable as mefloquine but showed reduced permeability. Conclusions A drug-like library of non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. From amongst this library an active lead series of less permeable, but metabolically stable, diamines was identified. PMID:20149249

  12. Quinoline: A versatile heterocyclic

    OpenAIRE

    Marella, Akranth; Tanwar, Om Prakash; Saha, Rikta; Ali, Mohammad Rahmat; Srivastava, Sandeep; Akhter, Mymoona; Shaquiquzzaman, Mohammad; Alam, Mohammad Mumtaz

    2012-01-01

    Quinoline or 1-aza-naphthalene is a weak tertiary base. Quinoline ring has been found to possess antimalarial, anti-bacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic, cardiotonic, anticonvulsant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activity. Quinoline not only has a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities but there are several established protocols for the synthesis of this ring. The article aims at highlighting these very diversities of the ring.

  13. Central nervous system exposure of next generation quinoline methanols is reduced relative to mefloquine after intravenous dosing in mice

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    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical use of mefloquine (MQ) has declined due to dose-related neurological events. Next generation quinoline methanols (NGQMs) that do not accumulate in the central nervous system (CNS) to the same extent may have utility. In this study, CNS levels of NGQMs relative to MQ were measured and an early lead chemotype was identified for further optimization. Experimental design The plasma and brain levels of MQ and twenty five, 4-position modified NGQMs were determined using LCMS/MS at 5 min, 1, 6 and 24 h after IV administration (5 mg/kg) to male FVB mice. Fraction unbound in brain tissue homogenate was assessed in vitro using equilibrium dialysis and this was then used to calculate brain-unbound concentration from the measured brain total concentration. A five-fold reduction CNS levels relative to mefloquine was considered acceptable. Additional pharmacological properties such as permeability and potency were determined. Results The maximum brain (whole/free) concentrations of MQ were 1807/4.9 ng/g. Maximum whole brain concentrations of NGQMs were 23 - 21546 ng/g. Maximum free brain concentrations were 0.5 to 267 ng/g. Seven (28%) and two (8%) compounds exhibited acceptable whole and free brain concentrations, respectively. Optimization of maximum free brain levels, IC90s (as a measure or potency) and residual plasma concentrations at 24 h (as a surrogate for half-life) in the same molecule may be feasible since they were not correlated. Diamine quinoline methanols were the most promising lead compounds. Conclusion Reduction of CNS levels of NGQMs relative to mefloquine may be feasible. Optimization of this property together with potency and long half-life may be feasible amongst diamine quinoline methanols. PMID:21645370

  14. In vivo antimalarial activity and toxicological effects of methanolic extract of Cocos nucifera (Dwarf red variety) husk fibre.

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    Balogun, Elizabeth Abidemi; Malomo, Sylvia Orume; Adebayo, Joseph Oluwatope; Ishola, Ahmed Adebayo; Soladoye, Ayodele Olufemi; Olatunji, Lawrence Aderemi; Kolawole, Olatunji Matthew; Oguntoye, Stephen Olubunmi; Babatunde, Abiola Samuel; Akinola, Oluwole Busayo

    2014-11-01

    Phytochemical constituents as well as antimalarial and toxicity potentials of the methanolic extract of the husk fibre of Dwarf Red variety of Cocos nucifera were evaluated in this study. The dried powdered husk fibre was exhaustively extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol successively and the methanolic extract was screened for flavonoids, phenolics, tannins, alkaloids, steroids, triterpenes, phlobatannins, anthraquinones and glycosides. A 4-day suppressive antimalarial test was carried out using Plasmodium berghei NK65-infected mice, to which the extract was administered at doses of 31.25, 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight (BW). Toxicity of the extract was evaluated in rats using selected hematological parameters and organ function indices after orally administering doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg BW for 14 d. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phenolics, saponins, glycosides, steroids and anthraquinones in the extract. Moreover, the extract reduced parasitemia by 39.2% and 45.8% at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg BW respectively on day 8 post-inoculation. Various hematological parameters evaluated were not significantly altered (P>0.05) at all doses of the extract, except red blood cell count which was significantly elevated (P<0.05) at 100 mg/kg BW. The extract significantly increased (P<0.05) urea, creatinine, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and bilirubin concentrations in the serum as well as atherogenic index, while it reduced albumin concentration significantly (P<0.05) at higher doses compared to the controls. Alanine aminotransferase activity was reduced in the liver and heart significantly (P<0.05) but was increased in the serum significantly (P<0.05) at higher doses of the extract compared to the controls. The results suggest that methanolic extract of the Dwarf red variety has partial antimalarial activity at higher doses, but is capable of impairing normal kidney and liver function as well

  15. Effect of antimalarial drugs on stimulation and interleukin 2 production of human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Svenson, M; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    Effect of pyrimethamine, an antimalarial antifolate, and of mefloquine, chloroquine, and quinine, which belong to the quinoline group of antimalarials, on proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production of human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. Pyrimethamine at concentrations above therapeutic...

  16. Augmentation of the Differentiation Response to Antitumor Antimalarials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rahim, Rayhana

    2003-01-01

    .... We have shown that the quinoline antimalarials chloroquine (CO) and hydroxychioroquine (HCQ) inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in breast cancer cell lines without toxicity to normal MCF-10A cells...

  17. Tandem Reduction/Cyclization of O-Nitrophenyl Propargyl Alcohols-A Novel Synthesis of 2- & 2,4-Disubstituted Quinolines and Application to the Synthesis of Streptonigrin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandelier, Matthew J

    2008-01-01

    The quinoline ring system is a common structural component of a wide variety of natural products with highly desirable biological activity, including antimalarial agents such as quinine, chloroquine...

  18. Quinine conjugates and quinine analogues as potential antimalarial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel A; Panda, Siva S; Hall, C Dennis

    2015-06-05

    Malaria is a tropical disease, prevalent in Southeast Asia and Africa, resulting in over half a million deaths annually; efforts to develop new antimalarial agents are therefore particularly important. Quinine continues to play a role in the fight against malaria, but quinoline derivatives are more widely used. Drugs based on the quinoline scaffold include chloroquine and primaquine, which are able to act against the blood and liver stages of the parasite's life cycle. The purpose of this review is to discuss reported biologically active compounds based on either the quinine or quinoline scaffold that may have enhanced antimalarial activity. The review emphasises hybrid molecules, and covers advances made in the last five years. The review is divided into three sections: modifications to the quinine scaffold, modifications to aminoquinolines and finally metal-containing antimalarial compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo antimalarial and cytotoxic properties of Annona senegalensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo animal antimalarial and in vitro cytotoxic activities of the methanol extract of Annona senegalensis Pers. (Annonaceae) was investigated in this study. The in vivo antimalarial activity of the methanol extract against Plasmodium berghei was assessed using the 4-day suppressive test procedure. The extract of A.

  20. Quinoline: a promising antitubercular target.

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    Keri, Rangappa S; Patil, Siddappa A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global public health problem in recent years. TB originated mainly from various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a highly infectious and chronic disease with high infection rate since ancient times. Since the last 50 years, the same long-duration, multidrug treatment plan is being followed for the treatment of tuberculosis. Due to the development of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is a need for new therapeutic strategies to combat M. tuberculosis. Subsequently, there is an urgent need for the development of new drug molecules with newer targets and with an alternative mechanism of action. Among hetrocyclic compounds, quinoline compounds are important privileged structure in medicinal chemistry, are widely used as "parental" compounds to synthesize molecules with medical benefits, especially with anti-malarial and anti-microbial activities. Certain, quinoline-based compounds, also show effective anti-TB activity. This broad spectrum of biological and biochemical activities has been further facilitated by the synthetic versatility of quinoline, which allows the generation of a large number of structurally diverse derivatives. To pave the way for future research, there is a need to collect the latest information in this promising area. In the present review, we have collated published reports on this versatile core to provide an insight so that its full therapeutic potential can be utilized for the treatment tuberculosis. It is hoped that, this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic quinoline-based anti-TB drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. CNS adverse events associated with antimalarial agents. Fact or fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips-Howard, P. A.; ter Kuile, F. O.

    1995-01-01

    CNS adverse drug events are dramatic, and case reports have influenced clinical opinion on the use of antimalarials. Malaria also causes CNS symptoms, thus establishing causality is difficult. CNS events are associated with the quinoline and artemisinin derivatives. Chloroquine, once considered too

  2. Theoretical study on the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline in methanol and cyclohexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); State Key Lab of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhao, Jinfeng [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); State Key Lab of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Cui, Yanling; Wang, Qianyu [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Dai, Yumei [Normal College, Shenyang University, Shenyang 110044 (China); Song, Peng, E-mail: songpeng@lnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Xia, Lixin, E-mail: lixinxia@lnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-05-15

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 10-hydroxybenzoquinoline (HBQ) in different solvents, have been investigated based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in detail. Upon excitation, the intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and phenanthrene functionality is significantly strengthened in the S{sub 1} state, which can be used as a reasonable tendency for facilitating the ESIPT process. In addition, the calculated vertical excitation energies in the S{sub 0} state and S{sub 1} state reproduce the experimental UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra well. Through calculating the fluorescence spectra of the HBQ chromophore, two outcomes for this chromophore were found in the S{sub 1} state, which demonstrates that the ESIPT process occurs. The potential energy curves have been calculated to account for the mechanism of the proton-transfer process in the excited-state. As a result, the barrierless ESIPT process can occur in the S{sub 1} state with proton transfer from the O atom to the N atom. And maybe the ESIPT process is easier in methanol solvent due to the higher potential energy difference. - Highlights: • The hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and phenanthrene is strengthened. • The hydrogen bond facilitates the proton transfer from the hydroxyl group to the N atom. • The spontaneous excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reaction can be observed.

  3. Recent Advances in Metal-Free Quinoline Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramann, Ginelle A; Cowen, Bryan J

    2016-07-29

    The quinoline ring system is one of the most ubiquitous heterocycles in the fields of medicinal and industrial chemistry, forming the scaffold for compounds of great significance. These include anti-inflammatory and antitumor agents, the antimalarial drugs quinine and chloroquine, and organic light-emitting diodes. Quinolines were first synthesized in 1879, and since then a multitude of synthetic routes have been developed. Many of these methods, such as the Skraup, Doebner-Von Miller, and Friedlander quinoline syntheses, are well-known but suffer from inefficiency, harsh reaction conditions, and toxic reagents. This review focuses on recent transition metal-free processes toward these important heterocycles, including both novel routes and modifications to established methods. For example, variations on the Skraup method include microwave irradiation, ionic liquid media, and novel annulation partners, all of which have shown increased reaction efficiency and improved yield of the heteroring-unsubstituted quinoline products. Similarly, modifications to other synthetic routes have been implemented, with the quinoline products displaying a wide variety of substitution patterns.

  4. Potential role of meflquine (antimalarial drug and methanol extract of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Sesbania sesban in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Wahab El-Emam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To elucidate the efficacy of mefloquine and methanol extract of the plants Chenopodium ambrosioides (C. ambrosioides and Sesbania sesban (S. sesban as a combined therapy for the treatment of Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni infected mice, and study the parasitological, biochemical and histological parameters of treated mice. Methods: Two groups of male Swiss Albino mice were infected with S. mansoni cercariae. The first group untreated served as control. The second group was orally treated with a single dose (200 mg/kg of mefloquine 3 weeks post infection, then subsequently divided into 2 subgroups; the first orally retreated with the plant extracts 1 000 mg/kg of S. sesban followed by 1 250 mg/kg of C. ambrosioides with an 1 h interval, for 2 successive days. The second sub-group was re-treated with the same (dose and method plant extracts after 7 weeks post infection. Results: The results showed that S. mansoni infected mice treated with mefloquine and the plants’ extracts 3 weeks post infection significantly (P < 0.01 reduced the worm burden/ mouse by 95.5% and the few worms recovered from sacrificed mice in this treatment failed to lay ova. Moreover, no worms were recovered from infected mice treated with mefloquine (3 weeks post infection and re-treated by the plant’s extracts at 7 weeks post infection. Also, treatment of infected mice with mefloquine followed by the plants’ extracts either at 3 or 7 weeks post infection ameliorated the activities of the serum enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkline phosphatase and acid phosphatase as well as the hepatic granulomatous lesions compared to infected untreated group. Conclusions: It is concluded that successive treatment of S. mansoni infected mice with mefloquine and methanol extract of the plants C. ambrosioides and S. sesban could be a promising device in the strategy of schistosomiasis control.

  5. Effect of antimalarial drugs on stimulation and interleukin 2 production of human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Svenson, M; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    Effect of pyrimethamine, an antimalarial antifolate, and of mefloquine, chloroquine, and quinine, which belong to the quinoline group of antimalarials, on proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production of human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. Pyrimethamine at concentrations above therapeutic...... levels suppressed the lymphocytes' proliferation, but not their IL-2 production. All three quinolines suppressed the proliferation of lymphocytes, but not equally, with mefloquine having the strongest effect. Quinine suppressed the growth at therapeutic concentrations. The IL-2 production was suppressed...... at concentrations twice as high as those required to suppress lymphocyte proliferation. Addition of exogenous IL-2 only partially reversed the suppressive effect on lymphocyte proliferation. Delayed addition of the quinolines decreased their suppressive effect, but not completely. The mechanisms of action on human...

  6. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  7. On peroxide antimalarials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGOR OPSENICA

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Several dicyclohexylidene tetraoxanes were prepared in order to gain a further insight into structure–activity relationship of this kind of antimalarials. The tetraoxanes 2–5, obtained as a cis/trans mixture, showed pronounced antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine susceptible D6, chloroquine resistant W2 and multidrug-resistant TM91C235 (Thailand strains. They have better than or similar activity to the corresponding desmethyl dicyclohexylidene derivatives. Two chimeric endoperoxides with superior antimalarial activity to the natural product ascaridole were also synthesized.

  8. Hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiff, Jr., E. K.

    1977-06-01

    The hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline and of acridine was studied in a batch autoclave reactor between 342 and 353/sup 0/C and between 500 and 2000 psig. The several commercial hydrotreating catalysts examined decreased in activity in the following order for quinoline hydrodenitrogenation: Ni--Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Ni--W/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Ni--W/SiO/sub 2/--Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Co--Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The total nitrogen removal rate for quinoline was slightly greater than that for acridine and both followed pseudo first-order kinetics over a conversion range of 0 to 50%. Hydrogenation and cracking steps were both kinetically limiting. Nitrogen-containing reaction products for quinoline hydrodenitrogenation were 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinoline, decahydroquinoline and o-propylaniline. At 342/sup 0/C and 500 psig quinoline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline were in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the disappearance of the lumped group of quinoline plus 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline followed pseudo first-order kinetics. Sixteen nitrogen-containing reaction products were found for acridine hydrodenitrogenation, including 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine, 1,2,3,4,9,10,13,14-octahydroacridine, sym-octahydroacridine, perhydroacridine, and o-(methylenecyclohexane)aniline. The hydrogenolysis step for both quinoline and acridine appears to be through hydrogenated forms of these compounds. This is supported by bond strength arguments.

  9. Preliminary assessment of medicinal plants used as antimalarials in the southeastern Venezuelan Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caraballo Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen species of medicinal plants used in the treatment of malaria in Bolívar State, Venezuela were recorded and they belonged to Compositae, Meliaceae, Anacardiaceae, Bixaceae, Boraginaceae, Caricaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Leguminosae, Myrtaceae, Phytolaccaceae, Plantaginaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae and Verbenaceae families. Antimalarial plant activities have been linked to a range of compounds including anthroquinones, berberine, flavonoids, limonoids, naphthquinones, sesquiterpenes, quassinoids, indol and quinoline alkaloids.

  10. 40 CFR 721.9100 - Substituted quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted quinoline. 721.9100... Substances § 721.9100 Substituted quinoline. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted quinoline (PMN P-93-1183) is...

  11. Cajachalcone: An Antimalarial Compound from Cajanus cajan Leaf Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Ajaiyeoba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cajanus cajan L, a member of the family Fabaceae, was identified from the Nigerian antimalarial ethnobotany as possessing antimalarial properties. The bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude methanol extract of C. cajan leaves was done in vitro using the multiresistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1 in the parasite lactate dehydrogenase assay. Isolation of compound was achieved by a combination of chromatographic techniques, while the structure of the compound was elucidated by spectroscopy. This led to the identification of a cajachalcone, 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4-methoxy chalcone, as the biologically active constituent from the ethyl acetate fraction. Cajachalcone had an IC50 value of 2.0 μg/mL (7.4 μM and could be a lead for anti-malarial drug discovery.

  12. Cytostatic versus cytocidal profiling of quinoline drug combinations via modified fixed-ratio isobologram analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug combination therapy is the frontline of malaria treatment. There is an ever-accelerating need for new, efficacious combination therapies active against drug resistant malaria. Proven drugs already in the treatment pipeline, such as the quinolines, are important components of current combination therapy and also present an attractive test bank for rapid development of new concepts. Methods The efficacy of several drug combinations versus chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains was measured using both cytostatic and cytocidal potency assays. Conclusions These screens identify quinoline and non-quinoline pairs that exhibit synergy, additivity, or antagonism using the fixed-ratio isobologram method and find tafenoquine – methylene blue combination to be the most synergistic. Also, interestingly, for selected pairs, additivity, synergy, or antagonism defined by quantifying IC50 (cytostatic potency) does not necessarily predict similar behaviour when potency is defined by LD50 (cytocidal potency). These data further support an evolving new model for quinoline anti-malarials, wherein haem and haemozoin are the principle target for cytostatic activity, but may not be the only target relevant for cytocidal activity. PMID:24044530

  13. Bromodecarboxylation of quinoline salicylic acids: increasing the diversity of accessible substituted quinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Kristin; Kaila, Neelu

    2009-11-20

    Quinoline salicylic acids underwent bromodecarboxylation at room temperature upon treatment with N-bromosuccinimide. A wide variety of functional groups was tolerated. Several one-pot transformations were also carried out, allowing the preparation of diverse 4-substituted quinolines.

  14. Recent advances in research of natural and synthetic bioactive quinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Po-Yee; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Pun, Ho-Yuen; Chan, Dessy; Chan, Albert Sun-Chi; Chui, Chung-Hin; Tang, Johnny Cheuk-On; Lam, Kim-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Many natural products that consist of quinoline core are found to be bioactive and the versatility of quinoline and its derivatives have attracted great attention in the field of drug development. As a result, in recent years, many green and sustainable synthetic approaches for the synthesis of structurally diverse quinolines have been developed. This review covers four main aspects, namely bioactive quinoline alkaloids, the biological activity and mechanism of action of quinoline-based compounds as well as various quinoline syntheses.

  15. Glycoconjugates of Quinolines: Application in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Valentina; Vecchio, Graziella

    2016-09-02

    Compounds with the quinoline scaffold are widely investigated and offer a variety of therapeutical properties. A number of quinoline derivatives have been synthesized and among these there are glycoconjugated derivatives. Based on the interest for this family of compounds, we reviewed the different biological activities (molecular probes, antiinfective, antiproliferative, antiaggregant and antioxidant) and the potential applications in medicinal chemistry of quinoline glycoconjugates. This review wants to show an example of the glycoconjugation strategy which arose not only to modify the water solubility of the quinolines but also to influence their activity and targeting properties.

  16. New compounds hybrids 1h-1,2,3-triazole-quinoline against Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechat, Núbia; Ferreira, Maria de Lourdes G; Pinheiro, Luiz C S; Jesus, Antônio M L; Leite, Milene M M; Júnior, Carlos C S; Aguiar, Anna C C; de Andrade, Isabel M; Krettli, Antoniana U

    2014-09-01

    Malaria is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The global importance of this disease, current vector control limitations, and the absence of an effective vaccine make the use of therapeutic antimalarial drugs the main strategy to control malaria. Chloroquine is a cost-effective antimalarial drug with a relatively robust safety profile, or therapeutic index. However, chloroquine is no longer used alone to treat patients with Plasmodium falciparum due to the emergence and spread of chloroquine-resistant strains, which have also been reported for Plasmodium vivax. However, the activity of 1,2,3-triazole derivatives against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum has been reported in the literature. To enhance the anti-P. falciparum activity of quinoline derivatives, we synthesized 11 new quinoline-1H-1,2,3-triazole hybrids with different substituents in the 4-positions of the 1H-1,2,3-triazole ring, which were assayed against the W2-chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum clone. Six compounds exhibited activity against the P. falciparum W2 clone, chloroquine-resistant, with IC50 values ranging from 1.4 to 46 μm. None of these compounds was toxic to a normal monkey kidney cell line, thus exhibiting good selectivity indexes, as high 351 for one compound (11). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Antimalarial naphthoquinones from Nepenthes thorelii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhitwitayawuid, K; Kaewamatawong, R; Ruangrungsi, N; Krungkrai, J

    1998-04-01

    Roots of Nepenthes thorelii yielded plumbagin, 2-methylnaphthazarin, octadecyl caffeate, isoshinanolone, and droserone. In addition, seven derivatives were prepared from plumbagin. Each of these natural and semisynthetic compounds was evaluated for in vitro antimalarial potential.

  18. Methyl 3-(Quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumaissa Belguedj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel compound, methyl 3-(quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate (2 has been synthesized by cycloaddition reaction of 1-(quinolin-2-ylmethylpyridinium ylide (1 with methyl propiolate in presence of sodium hydride in THF. The structure of this compound was established by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and MS data

  19. Metallocene Antimalarials: The Continuing Quest

    OpenAIRE

    Blackie, Margaret A. L.; Chibale, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade, a significant body of research has been developed around the inclusion of a metallocene moiety into known antimalarial compounds. Ferroquine is the most successful of these compounds. Herein, we describe our contribution to metallocene antimalarials. Our approach has sought to introduce diversity sites in the side chain of ferroquine in order to develop a series of ferroquine derivatives. The replacement of the ferrocenyl moiety with ruthenocene has given rise to rutheno...

  20. Amazonian Plant Natural Products: Perspectives for Discovery of New Antimalarial Drug Leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio H. Freitas-Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria parasites are now resistant, or showing signs of resistance, to most drugs used in therapy. Novel chemical entities that exhibit new mechanisms of antiplasmodial action are needed. New antimalarials that block transmission of Plasmodium spp. from humans to Anopheles mosquito vectors are key to malaria eradication efforts. Although P. vivax causes a considerable number of malaria cases, its importance has for long been neglected. Vivax malaria can cause severe manifestations and death; hence there is a need for P. vivax-directed research. Plants used in traditional medicine, namely Artemisia annua and Cinchona spp. are the sources of the antimalarial natural products artemisinin and quinine, respectively. Based on these compounds, semi-synthetic artemisinin-derivatives and synthetic quinoline antimalarials have been developed and are the most important drugs in the current therapeutic arsenal for combating malaria. In the Amazon region, where P. vivax predominates, there is a local tradition of using plant-derived preparations to treat malaria. Here, we review the current P. falciparum and P. vivax drug-sensitivity assays, focusing on challenges and perspectives of drug discovery for P. vivax, including tests against hypnozoites. We also present the latest findings of our group and others on the antiplasmodial and antimalarial chemical components from Amazonian plants that may be potential drug leads against malaria.

  1. Antimalarial drug induced decrease in creatinine clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landewé, R. B.; Vergouwen, M. S.; Goeei The, S. G.; van Rijthoven, A. W.; Breedveld, F. C.; Dijkmans, B. A.

    1995-01-01

    To confirm the antimalarial drug induced increase of creatinine to determine the factors contributing to this effect. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 118) who have used or still use antimalarials (chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine). Serum creatinines prior to antimalarials and serum

  2. Difluoro[2-(quinolin-2-ylphenolato]borane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C15H10BF2NO, was synthesized by the reaction of 2-(quinolin-2-ylphenol and boron trifluoride etherate. The quinoline ring system and the benzene ring are twisted, making a dihedral angle of 8.3 (2°. In the crystal, π–π interactions between the aromatic rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.638 (9 Å] link the molecules into chains propagating in [100].

  3. Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 116; Issue 5. Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8-olato chelated ruthenium organometallics. Bikash Kumar Panda. Volume 116 ... Keywords. Ruthenium organometallics; quinolin-8-olato chelation; emission properties; trivalent ruthenium.

  4. 40 CFR 721.9080 - Nitro methyl quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitro methyl quinoline. 721.9080... Substances § 721.9080 Nitro methyl quinoline. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as nitro methyl quinoline (PMN P-96-1319) is...

  5. Modeling the transition state structure to probe a reaction mechanism on the oxidation of quinoline by quinoline 2-oxidoreductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bayle, Enyew A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quinoline 2-oxidoreductase (Qor) is a member of molybdenum hydroxylase which catalyzes the oxidation of quinoline (2, 3 benzopyridine) to 1-hydro-2-oxoquinoline. Qor has biological and medicinal significances. Qor is known to metabolize drugs produced from quinoline for the treatment of malaria, arthritis, and lupus for many years. However, the mechanistic action by which Qor oxidizes quinoline has not been investigated either experimentally or theoretically. Purpose of the study T...

  6. Metallocene Antimalarials: The Continuing Quest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackie, Margaret A. L.; Chibale, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, a significant body of research has been developed around the inclusion of a metallocene moiety into known antimalarial compounds. Ferroquine is the most successful of these compounds. Herein, we describe our contribution to metallocene antimalarials. Our approach has sought to introduce diversity sites in the side chain of ferroquine in order to develop a series of ferroquine derivatives. The replacement of the ferrocenyl moiety with ruthenocene has given rise to ruthenoquine and a modest series of analogues. The reaction of ferroquine and selected analogues with Au(PPh3)NO3, Au(C6F5)(tht), and [Rh(COD)Cl2] has resulted in a series of heterobimetallic derivatives. In all cases, compounds have been evaluated for in vitro antiplasmodial activity in both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Preliminary structure-activity relationships have been delineated. PMID:18274662

  7. Dissociative photoionization of quinoline and isoquinoline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, J.; Sztáray, B.; Oomens, J.; Hemberger, P.; Bodi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Two nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon isomers of C9H7N composition, quinoline, and isoquinoline have been studied by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy at the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source. High resolution threshold photoelectron spectra have been

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of quinoline functionalised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of quinoline based imidazolium salts were prepared and characterised as nucleophilic heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand precursors. The symmetrically saturated imidazolium salt prepared by ring closure of achiral tetradentate diquinolyl-diamine with triethyl orthoformate is a tridentate ligand and can function as ...

  9. Zeolites Promoting Quinoline Synthesis via Friedlander Reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Vitvarová, Dana; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, 19-20 (2010), s. 1430-1437 ISSN 1022-5528 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous catalysis * zeolites * quinolines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.359, year: 2010

  10. Solventless Synthesis of Quinoline Derivatives: Acceleration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    ABSTRACT. Different Keggin type heteropoly acids (HPAs) and supported ones on solids with different nature and textural properties were used in ... Friedländer reaction, quinoline derivatives, heteropoly compound, supported catalysts, solvent-free condition. 1. ... mechanical properties.7 Different procedures such as the.

  11. Antimalarial natural products: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz Mojab

    2012-03-01

    Results and Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the development of new treatments for malaria. Many countries have a vast precedence in the use of medicinal plants and the required knowledge spans many centuries. Although malaria is controlled in Iran, some researchers tend to study malaria and related subjects. In vitro biological tests for the detection of antimalarial activities in plant extracts are currently available. It is vital that the efficacy and safety of traditional medicines be validated and their active constituents be identified in order to establish reliable quality control measures.

  12. Accelerating Quinoline Biodegradation and Oxidation with Endogenous Electron Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qi; Yang, Lihui; Li, Rongjie; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Yongming; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-10-06

    Quinoline, a recalcitrant heterocyclic compound, is biodegraded by a series of reactions that begin with mono-oxygenations, which require an intracellular electron donor. Photolysis of quinoline can generate readily biodegradable products, such as oxalate, whose bio-oxidation can generate endogenous electron donors that ought to accelerate quinoline biodegradation and, ultimately, mineralization. To test this hypothesis, we compared three protocols for the biodegradation of quinoline: direct biodegradation (B), biodegradation after photolysis of 1 h (P1h+B) or 2 h (P2h+B), and biodegradation by adding oxalate commensurate to the amount generated from photolysis of 1 h (O1+B) or 2 h (O2+B). The experimental results show that P1h+B and P2h+B accelerated quinoline biodegradation by 19% and 50%, respectively, compared to B. Protocols O1+B and O2+B also gave 19% and 50% increases, respectively. During quinoline biodegradation, its first intermediate, 2-hydroxyquinoline, accumulated gradually in parallel to quinoline loss but declined once quinoline was depleted. Mono-oxygenation of 2-hydroxyquinoline competed with mono-oxygenation of quinoline, but the inhibition was relieved when extra electrons donors were added from oxalate, whether formed by UV photolysis or added exogenously. Rapid oxalate oxidation stimulated both mono-oxygenations, which accelerated the overall quinoline oxidation that provided the bulk of the electron donor.

  13. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  14. Antimalarial efficacy of nine medicinal plants traditionally used by the Karens of Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Punnam Chander

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the antimalarial activity of nine medicinal plants used by Karens of Andaman and Nicobar Islands, against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive MRC-2 isolate. The methanol extracts were obtained by cold percolation method and in vitro antimalarial activity was assessed using M-III method. The results indicated that out of nine plant species tested, four plants, viz., Z. spectabilis, S. wallichiana, C. pulcherrima and Amomum sp. demonstrated significant antimalarial activity (50% inhibitory concentration values were 5.5 ± 0.7, 12.0 ± 2.5, 14.6 ± 1.3 and 37.3 ± 2.5 μg/mL respectively with no toxicity effect on erythrocytes.

  15. trans-Dichloridobis(quinoline-κNplatinum(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Ha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, trans-[PtCl2(C9H7N2], the PtII ion is four-coordinated in an essentially square-planar coordination environment defined by two N atoms from two quinoline (qu ligands and two Cl− anions. The Pt atom is located on an inversion centre and thus the asymmetric unit contains one half of the complex; the PtN2Cl2 unit is exactly planar. The dihedral angle between the PtN2Cl2 unit and the quinoline ligand is 85.1 (1°. In the crystal, the complex molecules are stacked into columns along the b axis. In the columns, several intermolecular π–π interactions between the six-membered rings are present, the shortest ring centroid–centroid distance being 3.733 (5 Å between pyridine rings.

  16. γ-radiolysis of the quinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, E.M.

    1989-06-01

    The chemical and radiolytic stability of products by radiation from quinoline in isopropanol solution was studied. Doses were from 2 x 10 4 to 3 x 10 5 Gy and concentration in the samples was L:L by volume. It has observed significant effects for high radiation doses. Lower doses affected the solvent with the production of long polymeric hydrocarbons. Products formed were characterized by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (CG/MS). (author)

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of the antiplasmodial activity of novel indeno[2,1-c]quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barteselli, Anna; Parapini, Silvia; Basilico, Nicoletta; Mommo, Danilo; Sparatore, Anna

    2014-11-01

    With the aim to explore the potentiality of new chemical scaffolds for the design of new antimalarials, a set of new indeno[2,1-c]quinolines bearing different basic heads has been synthesized and tested in vitro against chloroquine sensitive (CQ-S) and chloroquine resistant (CQ-R) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited a moderate antiplasmodial activity, inhibiting the growth of both CQ-S and CQ-R strains of P. falciparum with IC50 ranging from 0.24 to 6.9 μM and with a very low resistance index. The most potent compounds (1.2-1.3-fold the CQ on the W-2 strain) can be considered as promising 'lead compounds' to be further optimized to improve efficacy and selectivity against Plasmodia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. (Quinoline-2-carboxylato-κO)(quinoline-2-carboxylic acid-κO)bis(quinoline-2-carboxylic acid-κ2N,O)potassium

    OpenAIRE

    Seik Weng Ng

    2010-01-01

    The K atom in the title complex, [K(C10H6NO2)(C10H7NO2)3], lies on a twofold rotation axis that relates one N,O-chelating quinoline-2-carboxylic acid to the other; their N and O atoms are cis to each other in the distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The K atom is also coordinated by another monodentate quinoline-2-carboxylic acid; the acid is disordered with respect to a monodentate quinoline-2-carboxylate anion; the acid and anion are linked by an O—H...O hydrogen bond. An O...

  19. Microbial degradation of quinoline by immobilized cells of Burkholderia pickettii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianlong, Wang; Xiangchun, Quan; Liping, Han; Yi, Qian; Hegemann, Werner

    2002-05-01

    A quinoline-biodegrading microorganism was isolated from activated sludge of coke-oven wastewater treatment plant using quinoline as sole carbon and nitrogen source. It is a gram negative, rod-shaped and aerobic strain, which was identified as Burkholderia pickettii. The biodegradation of quinoline was carried out with this isolated strain. Analysis by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrum (GC/MS) revealed that 2-hydroxyquinoline (2-OH-Q) was the first intermediate in the course of quinoline biodegradation. A novel immobilization carrier, that is, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-gauze hybrid carrier, was developed. The isolated strain was immobilized by two different immobilizing techniques and used for the quinolinerdegradation. It was found that biodegradation rate of quinoline by the microorganisms immobilized on PVA-gauze hybrid carrier was faster than that by the microorganisms immobilized in PVA gel beads. Kinetics of quinoline biodegradation by cells of Burkholderia pickettii immobilized on PVA-gauze hybrid carrier was investigated. The results demonstrate that quinoline degradation could be described by zero-order reaction rate equation when the initial quinoline concentration was in the range of 50-500 mg l(-1).

  20. A new quinoline alkaloid from the roots of Dictamnus angustifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Bo; Qu, Wei; Guan, Fu-Qin; Li, Lin-Zhen; Liang, Jing-Yu

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the quinoline alkaloids from the roots of Dictamnus angustifolius G.Don ex Sweet (Rutaceae). The quinoline alkaloids were isolated by various column chromatographic methods and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis. A new quinoline alkaloid, 5-methoxylrobustine (1), along with five known quinoline alkaloids were obtained, and their structures were identified as dictamnine (2), robustine (3), isopteleine (4), γ-fagarine (5), and skimmianine (6). Cytotoxicity testing of these alkaloids showed that all of them had weak cytotoxic activities against human breast cancer cells (MCF7). Compound 1 is a new quinoline alkaloid. Alkaloid 3 showed stronger anti-proliferation effect than the other alkaloids. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quinoline and quinolones: promising scaffolds for future antimycobacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Kaur, Gurpuneet; Mangla, Veenu; Gupta, Manish K

    2015-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major health concern worldwide. The increasing incidences of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) necessitate the development of new anti-TB drugs acting via novel mode of action. The search of newer drugs for TB led to the identification of several quinoline-based antimycobacterial agents against both the drug-sensitive and MDR-TB. These agents have been designed by substituting quinoline scaffold with diverse chemical functionalities as well as by modifying quinoline/quinolone-based antibacterial drugs. Several of quinoline/quinolone derivatives displayed excellent antimycobacterial activity and were found free of cytotoxicity. This review highlights the critical aspects of design and structure-activity relationship of quinoline- and quinolone-based antimycobacterial agents.

  2. Some Pharmacological Aspects of Antimalarial Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-15

    Jun 15, 1974 ... in the synthesis of folic acid. Both G-6-PD-deficient erythrocytes and the secondary tissue schizonts appear to have a similar enzyme defect involving the pentose-phosphate pathway, making them susceptible to oxidation damage by the quinoline-quinone metabolites of the. 8-aminoquinolines. (primaquin).

  3. Anti-breast cancer activity of some novel quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S

    2015-09-01

    To discover new bioactive lead compounds for medicinal purposes, 2-cyano-3-(4-substituted)-N-(quinolin-3-yl) acrylamide derivatives 2-24, chromenes 25, 26 and benzochromenes 27, 28 were synthesized. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopies. In addition, the structure of compound 1 was confirmed through X-ray crystallography. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. The corresponding 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-N-(quinolin-3-yl) acrylamide (15), 3-oxo-N-(quinolin-3-yl)-3H-benzol[f] chromene-2-carboxamide (27), 2-cyano-3-(4-fluorophenyl-N-(quinolin-3-yl) acrylamide (7), 2-cyano-5-(4-(dimethyl-amino) phenyl)-N-(quinolin-3-yl) penta-2,4-dienamide (19) exhibited higher activity compared to doxorubicin (with IC50 value of 47.9 μmol L-1) as a reference drug, with IC50 values of 29.8, 39.0, 40.0, 40.4 μmol L-1, resp. Also, quinoline acrylamides containing 2,3,4-trimethoxyphenyl 17, 2-chlorophenyl 10, benzo[d][1,3]dioxol 12, 2-methoxynaphthalen 22, 2,4-dichlorophenyl 18 and quinoline carrying a chromene-3-carboxamide moiety 25 were nearly as active as doxorubicin, while quinoline acrylamides incorporating unsubstituted phenyl 2, p-tolyl 3, 2,4-dienamide 8, 3-nitrophenyl 13, 4-nitrophenyl 14, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl 16 and chromene 26 exhibited a moderate activity. In addition, quinoline with acetamide 1, 4-hydroxyphenyl 4, 4-dimethylaminophenyl 9, 4-chlorophenyl 11, 3-bromophenyl 20, 4-bromophenyl 21 and 3-thienyl moiety 24 showed less activity than doxorubicin. On the other hand, quinoline having 2-methoxyphenyl 5, 4-methoxyphenyl 6, 4-metho xynaphthalene 23 and chromene-2-carboxamide 28 showed no activity.

  4. A density functional study of 15N chemical shielding tensors in quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Beheshtian, Javad; Hadipour, Nasser L.; van der Spoel, David

    2009-07-01

    DFT calculations were carried out to characterize the 15N shielding tensors in quinolines. This computational study is intended to shed light on the differences between two groups of quinolines: series A (7-chloro 4-aminoalkyls quinolines) and series B (quinolines, 3-, 5-, 6-, 8-amino quinolines and 4,8-dichloro quinoline). Unlike the quinolines in series B, the series A quinolines show considerable β-hematin inhibition activity which is essential for quinoline-based drugs. The results show that the substitution position significantly affects the σ11 and σ22 components of 15N shielding tensors of quinolines. The 15N shielding components are noticeably different for the two series and can be related to their ability to interact with hematin.

  5. New quinoline derivatives as nicotinic receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, Dina; Bellucci, Cristina; Dei, Silvia; Teodori, Elisabetta; Varani, Katia; Spirova, Ekaterina; Kudryavtsev, Denis; Shelukhina, Irina; Tsetlin, Victor; Romanelli, Maria Novella

    2016-03-03

    As a continuation of previous work on quinoline derivatives, which showed some preference (2-3 times) for the α7 with respect to α4β2 acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), we synthesized a series of novel azabicyclic or diazabicyclic compounds carrying a quinoline or isoquinoline ring, with the aim of searching for more selective α7 nAChR compounds. Radioligand binding studies on α7* and α4β2* nAChRs (rat brain homogenate) revealed one compound (7) with a 2-fold higher affinity for the α4β2*-subtype, and four compounds (11, 13, 14 and 16) with at least 3-fold higher affinity for α7* nAChR. The most promising was 11, showing Ki∼100 nM and over 10-fold selectivity for α7* nAChR. Compounds 7, 11, 13 and 16 at 50 μM suppressed ion currents induced in the rat α4β2 nAChR and the chimeric nAChR composed of the ligand-binding domain of the chick α7 and transmembrane domain of the α1 glycine receptor, expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Calcium imaging experiments on the human α7 nAChR expressed in the Neuro2a cells and potentiated by PNU-120596 confirmed the antagonistic activity for 7; on the contrary, 11, 13 and 16 were agonists with the EC50 values in the range of 1.0-1.6 μM. Thus, the introduced modifications allowed us to enhance the selectivity of quinolines towards α7 nAChR and to get novel compounds with agonistic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimalarial work in China: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, K

    1998-06-01

    Systematic scientific studies of malaria in China did not begin until the 1920s. The persistence of misconceptions about the disease and the absence of political stability, funds and trained personnel were obstacles to any large scale antimalarial campaigns. In the 1920s and 30s, antimalarial efforts involved epidemiologic studies, environmental alterations, and treatment of patients. During the Sino-Japanese War when the Chinese government relocated inland, China's antimalarial work focused on the control of the disease, especially in the western and southwestern provinces. After the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, nationwide antimalarial campaigns were initiated and enforced by the central government which also promoted intersectoral and interregional cooperation. Together with the building of a preventive and anti-epidemic infrastructure and health care system as well as the training of personnel, the government used techniques of mass mobilization to launch programs of vector control and mass therapy. Provinces were also organized into antimalarial regional alliances to facilitate malaria control and surveillance.

  7. The sensitivity and selectivity properties of a fluorescence sensor based on quinoline-Bodipy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuri Kursunlu, Ahmed, E-mail: ankursunlu@gmail.com; Guler, Ersin

    2014-01-15

    A novel florescence sensor (Q-BODIPY) based on quinoline-Bodipy (quinoline-boradiazaindacene) was prepared by ‘click chemistry’ in several stages. The sensing actions of Q-BODIPY were confirmed by UV–vis titration, emission and excitation spectroscopic studies in presence of Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, La{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions in methanol:H{sub 2}O (1:1) medium. Whereas some metal ions can only cause quenching effect on the fluorescence intensity of Q-BODIPY, some of them show an increase in fluorescence intensity. The stoichiometry of host–guest complexes formed was determined by Job′s plot method. The binding constants were calculated by Stern–Volmer method. As a fluorescence sensor, Q-BODIPY shows the best selectivity performance against Zn{sup 2+} ions in according to all spectroscopic data. -- Highlights: • Q-BODIPY prepared by several techniques shows a fluorescent behavior toward p, d and f block metal ions. • Q-BODIPY has both a more sensitivity and more effective ability for the detection of Zn(II) ion. • The synthesis strategies to produce Bodipy′s with metal coordinating offer a new approach for the design of novel fluorescence sensors.

  8. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of the Solvent Fractions of Fruit Rind and Root of Carica papaya Linn (Caricaceae) against Plasmodium berghei in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebebe, Dereje; Mulisa, Eshetu; Gashe, Fanta

    2017-01-01

    Background Currently, antimalarial drug resistance poses a serious challenge. This stresses the need for newer antimalarial compounds. Carica papaya is used traditionally and showed in vitro antimalarial activity. This study attempted to evaluate in vivo antimalarial activity of C. papaya in mice. Methods In vivo antimalarial activity of solvent fractions of the plant was carried out against early P. berghei infection in mice. Parasitemia, temperature, PCV, and body weight of mice were recorded. Windows SPSS version 16 (one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test) was used for data analysis. Results The pet ether and chloroform fractions of C. papaya fruit rind and root produced a significant (p papaya fruit rind in the highest dose (400 mg/kg/day). Only 400 mg/kg/day dose of chloroform fraction of C. papaya root exhibited a parasite suppression effect (48.11%). But, methanol fraction of the plant parts produced less chemosuppressive effect. Conclusion Pet ether fraction of C. papaya fruit rind had the highest antimalarial activity and could be a potential source of lead compound. Further study should be done to show the chemical and metabolomic profile of active ingredients. PMID:29391947

  9. THE TRAGEDY CAUSED BY FAKE ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ambroise-Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Counterfeit antimalarials (mainly artemisinin derivatives is a crucial health problem in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The illegal production, sale and distribution of fake drugs is a huge market evaluated to several billion of dollars and represents more than 50% of the pharmaceutical market in several African countries. Fake drugs have led to a very great number of deaths from untreated malaria or fatality provoked by toxic ingredients. These fake medicines increase the risk of artemisinin resistance developed by the use of sub therapeutic dosages of antimalarials. Tackling this criminal traffic is the objective of an international  programme created by WHO  and involves the international police and custom organizations like INTERPOL. Several very important and encouraging results have been obtained, but the problem will be completely solved if genuine antimalarials, free-of-charge, are handed-over to populations in sub Sahara African countries.

     

     

  10. THE TRAGEDY CAUSED BY FAKE ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ambroise-Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Counterfeit antimalarials (mainly artemisinin derivatives is a crucial health problem in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The illegal production, sale and distribution of fake drugs is a huge market evaluated to several billion of dollars and represents more than 50% of the pharmaceutical market in several African countries. Fake drugs have led to a very great number of deaths from untreated malaria or fatality provoked by toxic ingredients. These fake medicines increase the risk of artemisinin resistance developed by the use of sub therapeutic dosages of antimalarials. Tackling this criminal traffic is the objective of an international  programme created by WHO  and involves the international police and custom organizations like INTERPOL. Several very important and encouraging results have been obtained, but the problem will be completely solved if genuine antimalarials, free-of-charge, are handed-over to populations in sub Sahara African countries.

  11. The tragedy caused by fake antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroise-Thomas, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Counterfeit antimalarials (mainly artemisinin derivatives) is a crucial health problem in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The illegal production, sale and distribution of fake drugs is a huge market evaluated to several billion of dollars and represents more than 50% of the pharmaceutical market in several African countries. Fake drugs have led to a very great number of deaths from untreated malaria or fatality provoked by toxic ingredients. These fake medicines increase the risk of artemisinin resistance developed by the use of sub therapeutic dosages of antimalarials. Tackling this criminal traffic is the objective of an international program created by WHO and involves the international police and custom organizations like INTERPOL. Several very important and encouraging results have been obtained, but the problem will be completely solved if genuine antimalarials, free-of-charge, are handed-over to populations in sub Sahara African countries.

  12. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  13. Accessibility of Antimalarials in Secondary Health Care Facilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accessibility of Antimalarials in Secondary Health Care Facilities and Community Pharmacies in Lagos State – A Comparative Study. ... Private partnership pharmacies do not stock antimalarials as a matter of policy, since the drugs are supposed to be obtained free from the hospital. This first line antimalarial cost about six ...

  14. New pyrone and quinoline alkaloid from Almeidea rubra and their trypanocidal activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrozin, Alessandra R.P.; Mafezoli, Jair; Vieira, Paulo C.; Fernandes, Joao B.; Silva, M. Fatima das G.F. da [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: paulo@dq.ufscar.br; Ellena, Javier A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Albuquerque, Sergio de [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas, Bromatologicas

    2005-05-15

    The investigation of the ethyl acetate fraction of methanol extract from leaves of Almeidea rubra A. St.-Hil. (Rutaceae) afforded two new compounds 4-methoxy-6-[2-(methylamino)phenyl]-2Hpyran- 2-one and rel-(7R,8R)-8-[(E)-3-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-butenyl]-4,8-dimethoxy-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrofuro[2,3-b]quinoline-7-yl acetate, along with the known compounds arborinine, N-methyl- 1-hydroxy-3-methoxyacridone, skimmianine, kokusagine, isodutaduprine, isoskimmianine, and isokokusagine. Their structures were established based on their spectral data, and for the new compounds these data are described herein. Additionally, these compounds were assayed on the tripomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi showing moderate trypanocidal activity. (author)

  15. Antimalarial properties of South African medicinal plants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pillay, P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available of structure-activity derivatives around these simplified structures is currently under way. CONCLUSIONS The study identified a number of promising South African medicinal plants for further investigation as plant-based antimalarial agents. The overall... as potential sources of antimalarial lead compounds. REFERENCES Clarkson, C., Maharaj, V.J., Crouch, N.R., Grace, O.M., Pillay, P., Matsabisa, M.G., Bhagwandin, N., Smith, P.J., Folb, P.I., 2004. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of medicinal plants native...

  16. Synthetic Methods of Quinoline Derivatives as Potent Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Mehta, Dinesh Kumar; Das, Rina

    2017-01-01

    On account of significant biological activities, quinoline derivatives have drawn more attention to the synthesis and biological activities in the search for new therapeutic agents. Several new synthetic approaches have been implemented to derive new molecules from quinoline and all the synthesized molecules showed effective anticancer activity. Some molecules are synthesized using quinolones as precursor reactant, which is another effective product of quinoline, also showing significant activity against malignant tumors. The presence of nitrogen in it and its ability to bind with enzymes like gyrase, topoisomerase II and kinase have also proven it with antitumor activity. This review encapsulates the recent advances in the synthesis and anticancer activity of Quinoline derivatives. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. A review on anticancer potential of bioactive heterocycle quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Obaid; Kumar, Suresh; Haider, Md Rafi; Ali, Md Rahmat; Kumar, Rajiv; Jaggi, Manu; Bawa, Sandhya

    2015-06-05

    The advent of Camptothecin added a new dimension in the field anticancer drug development containing quinoline motif. Quinoline scaffold plays an important role in anticancer drug development as their derivatives have shown excellent results through different mechanism of action such as growth inhibitors by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, disruption of cell migration, and modulation of nuclear receptor responsiveness. The anti-cancer potential of several of these derivatives have been demonstrated on various cancer cell lines. In this review we have compiled and discussed specifically the anticancer potential of quinoline derivatives, which could provide a low-height flying bird's eye view of the quinoline derived compounds to a medicinal chemist for a comprehensive and target oriented information for development of clinically viable anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. SYNTHESIS AND IN-VITRO STUDIES OF SOME NEW QUINOLINE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mail: viswanath_fed@kluniversity.in. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. SYNTHESIS AND IN-VITRO STUDIES OF SOME NEW QUINOLINE 1,3,4-. THIADIAZOLO PYRIMIDIN DERIVATIVES.

  19. Thermodynamics of organic mixtures containing amines. VIII. Systems with quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Juan Antonio [G.E.T.E.F., Grupo Especializado en Termodinamica de Equilibrio entre Fases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: jagl@termo.uva.es; Domanska, Urszula; Zawadzki, Maciej [Physical Chemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-08-15

    (Solid + liquid) equilibrium temperatures for mixtures containing quinoline and 1-dodecanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octadecanol have been measured using a dynamic method. (Quinoline + benzene, +alkane, or +1-alkanol) systems were investigated using DISQUAC. The corresponding interaction parameters are reported. The model yields a good representation of molar excess Gibbs free energies, G{sup E}, molar excess enthalpies, H{sup E}, and of the (solid + liquid) equilibria, SLE. Interactional and structural effects were analysed comparing H{sup E} and the molar excess internal energy at constant volume, U{sub V}{sup E}. It was encountered that structural effects are very important in systems involving alkanes or 1-alkanols. Interactions between amine molecules are stronger in mixtures with quinoline than in those containing pyridine, which was ascribed to the higher polarizability of quinoline.

  20. Counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lon, C T; Tsuyuoka, R; Phanouvong, S; Nivanna, N; Socheat, D; Sokhan, C; Blum, N; Christophel, E M; Smine, A

    2006-11-01

    Counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs can cause death and contribute to the growing malaria drug resistance problem, particularly in Southeast Asia. Since 2003 in Cambodia the quality of antimalarial drugs both in the public and private health sector is regularly monitored in sentinel sites. We surveyed 34% of all 498 known facilities and drug outlets in four provinces. We collected 451 drug samples; 79% of these were not registered at the Cambodia Department of Drugs and Food (DDF). Twenty-seven percent of the samples failed the thin layer chromatography and disintegration tests; all of them were unregistered products. Immediate action against counterfeit drugs was taken by the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) and the DDF. They communicated with the Provincial Health Department about the presence of counterfeit antimalarial drugs through alert letters, a manual, annual malaria conferencing and other training occasions. Television campaigns to alert the population about counterfeit drugs were conducted. Moreover, the NMCP has been promoting the use of good quality antimalarial drugs of a blister co-packaged combination of artesunate and mefloquine in public and private sectors. Appropriate strategies need to be developed and implemented by relevant government agencies and stakeholders to strengthen drug quality assurance and control systems in the country.

  1. Antimalarial Drugs for Pediatrics - Prescribing and Dispensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess dispensing and prescribing practices with regard to antimalarial drugs for pediatrics in private pharmacies and public hospitals in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study that assessed the knowledge and practice of 200 drug dispensers in the private community ...

  2. Design, Synthesis and Testing of Novel Antimalarial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-05

    of P. falciparum Strains Tested ............................. 27 Figure 17 – Antimalarial Data of Chloroquine and Mefloquine ...vitro tests were performed by Dr. Lucia Gerena at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. 27 D6 W2 TM91-C235 Resistance Mefloquine ...Chloroquine Mefloquine Halofantrine Pyrimethamine Chloroquine Quinine Folate Antagonists Susceptibility Chloroquine Mefloquine

  3. Thiazole Containing Heterocycles With Antimalarial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Mukesh Kumar

    2017-07-25

    Heterocyclic compounds are the main class of medicinally important compounds. Many heterocyclic compounds bearing a five member ring in their structure have a good spectrum of biological activities. Thiazole is an important class of five membered heterocyclic compounds. Thiazole and its derivatives exhibited a broad range of biological activities due to the presence of various reaction posses. Thiazole, heterocyclic nucleus is present in several potent pharmacologically active molecules such as Sulfathiazole (antimicrobial drug), Ritonavir (antiretroviral drug), Tiazofurin (antineoplastic drug) and Abafungin (antifungal drug) etc. The search for some novel biologically active thiazoles is to be continued in the field of medicinal chemistry for investigators. An aim of this review is to identify and try making a SAR (Structure Activity Relationship) of substituted thiazole nucleus as possible new antimalarials. Author undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using standard tools. The characteristics of screened papers were described, and a deductive qualitative content analysis methodology was applied to analyse the interventions and findings of included studies using a conceptual framework. Fifteen papers were included in the review; the majority were described about many biological activity of thiazole nucleus. Seven papers were find that had impacted upon the thaizoles as antimalarials. Some papers focused on the design, synthesis and antimalarial activity evaluation of thiazole derivatives. This review identified and made a SAR (Structure Activity Relationship) of substituted thiazole nucleus as possible new antimalarials. This review describes ongoing research in the search for novel thiazoles as targets and new antimalarial drug molecules. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries

  4. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, David C; Craig, John C; Raheem, K Saki

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications.

  5. In Silico Mining for Antimalarial Structure-Activity Knowledge and Discovery of Novel Antimalarial Curcuminoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Viira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasitic tropical disease that kills around 600,000 patients every year. The emergence of resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs represents a significant public health threat, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to reverse ACT resistance and cure the disease. For this, extensive curation and homogenization of experimental anti-Plasmodium screening data from both in-house and ChEMBL sources were conducted. As a result, a coherent strategy was established that allowed compiling coherent training sets that associate compound structures to the respective antimalarial activity measurements. Seventeen of these training sets led to the successful generation of classification models discriminating whether a compound has a significant probability to be active under the specific conditions of the antimalarial test associated with each set. These models were used in consensus prediction of the most likely active from a series of curcuminoids available in-house. Positive predictions together with a few predicted as inactive were then submitted to experimental in vitro antimalarial testing. A large majority from predicted compounds showed antimalarial activity, but not those predicted as inactive, thus experimentally validating the in silico screening approach. The herein proposed consensus machine learning approach showed its potential to reduce the cost and duration of antimalarial drug discovery.

  6. Evaluation of antimalarial, free-radical-scavenging and insecticidal activities of Artemisia scoparia and A. Spicigera, Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba H. Afshar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia species (Asteraceae, widespread throughout the world, are a group of important medicinal plants. The extracts of two medicinal plants of this genus, Artemisia scoparia Waldst. & Kit. and A. spicigera C. Koch, were evaluated for potential antimalarial, free-radical-scavenging and insecticidal properties, using the heme biocrystallisation and inhibition assay, the DPPH assay and the contact toxicity bioassay using the pest Tribolium castaneum, respectively. The methanol extracts of both species showed strong free-radical-scavenging activity and the RC50 values were 0.0317 and 0.0458 mg/mL, respectively, for A. scoparia and A. spicigera. The dichloromethane extracts of both species displayed a moderate level of potential antimalarial activity providing IC50 at 0.778 and 0.999 mg/mL for A. scoparia and A. spicigera, respectively. Both species of Artemisia showed insecticidal properties. However, A. spicigera was more effective than A. scoparia.

  7. Andrographolide: A Novel Antimalarial Diterpene Lactone Compound from Andrographis paniculata and Its Interaction with Curcumin and Artesunate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (AND, the diterpene lactone compound, was purified by HPLC from the methanolic fraction of the plant Andrographis paniculata. The compound was found to have potent antiplasmodial activity when tested in isolation and in combination with curcumin and artesunate against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and Plasmodium berghei ANKA in vivo. IC50s for artesunate (AS, andrographolide (AND, and curcumin (CUR were found to be 0.05, 9.1 and 17.4 μM, respectively. The compound (AND was found synergistic with curcumin (CUR and addictively interactive with artesunate (AS. In vivo, andrographolide-curcumin exhibited better antimalarial activity, not only by reducing parasitemia (29%, compared to the control (81%, but also by extending the life span by 2-3 folds. Being nontoxic to the in vivo system this agent can be used as template molecule for designing new derivatives with improved antimalarial properties.

  8. [Historical overview of antimalarials used in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerpa de Artiles, N

    1993-06-01

    A historical review of antimalarials used in Venezuela is presented from the time when the bark of quina was used until the massive distribution of quinine and metoquine by the Dirección de Malariología y Saneamiento Ambiental. The utility of chloroquine and primaquine against sensible parasite isolates and of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine, currently used against P. falciparum resistant strains, is thoroughly discussed. The author suggests use of artemisimine and its derivatives as a very promising antimalarial drug. She also stresses the possibility of the application of new antimalaria vaccine against P. falciparum blood states, presently assayed in the country as an additional tool in malaria control programs.

  9. In vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of extracts, fractions and a substance isolated from the Amazonian plant Tachia grandiflora (Gentianaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Francisco Rocha e Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tachia sp. are used as antimalarials in the Amazon Region and in vivo antimalarial activity of a Tachia sp. has been previously reported. Tachia grandiflora Maguire and Weaver is an Amazonian antimalarial plant and herein its cytotoxicity and antimalarial activity were investigated. Spectral analysis of the tetraoxygenated xanthone decussatin and the iridoid aglyone amplexine isolated, respectively, from the chloroform fractions of root methanol and leaf ethanol extracts was performed. In vitro inhibition of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum Welch was evaluated using optical microscopy on blood smears. Crude extracts of leaves and roots were inactive in vitro. However, chloroform fractions of the root and leaf extracts [half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 10.5 and 35.8 µg/mL, respectively] and amplexine (IC50= 7.1 µg/mL were active in vitro. Extracts and fractions were not toxic to type MRC-5 human fibroblasts (IC50> 50 µg/mL. Water extracts of the roots of T. grandiflora administered by mouth were the most active extracts in the Peters 4-day suppression test in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. At 500 mg/kg/day, these extracts exhibited 45-59% inhibition five to seven days after infection. T. grandiflora infusions, fractions and isolated substance have potential as antimalarials.

  10. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much as half of antimalarials distributed in many developing countries. Use of antimalarials through the health services is often poor; drug shortages are common and overprescription and overuse of injections are significant problems. Anxiety over drug costs may prevent patients from getting the necessary treatment for malaria, especially because of the seasonal appearance of this disease when people's cash reserves are very low. The high costs may lead them to unofficial sources, which will sell a single tablet instead of a complete course of treatment, and subsequently to increased, often irrational demand for more drugs and more injections. Increasingly people are resorting to self-medication for malaria, which may cause delays in seeking proper treatment in cases of failure, especially in areas where chloroquine resistance has increased rapidly. Self-medication is now widespread, and measures to restrict the illicit sale of drugs have been unsuccessful. The "unofficial" channels thus represent an unacknowledged extension of the health services in many countries; suggestions are advanced to encourage better self-medication by increasing the knowledge base among the population at large (mothers, schoolchildren, market sellers, and shopkeepers), with an emphasis on correct dosing and on the importance of seeking further treatment without delay, if necessary. PMID:1893512

  11. The antimalarial ferroquine: from bench to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biot C.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ferroquine (FQ, SSR97193 is currently the most advanced organometallic drug candidate and about to complete phase II clinical trials as a treatment for uncomplicated malaria. This ferrocenecontaining compound is active against both chloroquine-susceptible and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax strains and/or isolates. This article focuses on the discovery of FQ, its antimalarial activity, the hypothesis of its mode of action, the current absence of resistance in vitro and recent clinical trials.

  12. Structure of Quinolinate Synthase from Pyrococcus horikoshii in the Presence of Its Product, Quinolinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga A; Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L; Saunders, Allison H; McLaughlin, Martin I; Yennawar, Neela H; Booker, Squire J

    2016-06-15

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is a common intermediate in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its derivatives in all organisms that synthesize the molecule de novo. In most prokaryotes, it is formed from the condensation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and aspartate-enamine by the action of quinolinate synthase (NadA). NadA contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster cofactor with a unique, non-cysteinyl-ligated, iron ion (Fea), which is proposed to bind the hydroxyl group of a postulated intermediate in the last step of the reaction to facilitate a dehydration. However, direct evidence for this role in catalysis has yet to be provided. Herein, we present the structure of NadA in the presence of the product of its reaction, QA. We find that N1 and the C7 carboxylate group of QA ligate to Fea in a bidentate fashion, which is confirmed by Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy. This binding mode would place the C5 hydroxyl group of the postulated final intermediate distal to Fea and virtually incapable of coordinating to it. The structure shows that three strictly conserved amino acids, Glu198, Tyr109, and Tyr23, are in close proximity to the bound product. Substitution of these amino acids with Gln, Phe, and Phe, respectively, leads to complete loss of activity.

  13. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    In proposed fuel-cell system, methanol converted to hydrogen in two places. External fuel processor converts only part of methanol. Remaining methanol converted in fuel cell itself, in reaction at anode. As result, size of fuel processor reduced, system efficiency increased, and cost lowered.

  15. A novel way to grow hemozoin-like crystals in vitro and its use to screen for hemozoin inhibiting antimalarial compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hemozoin crystals are normally formed in vivo by Plasmodium parasites to detoxify free heme released after hemoglobin digestion during its intraerythrocytic stage. Inhibition of hemozoin formation by various drugs results in free heme concentration toxic for the parasites. As a consequence, in vitro assays have been developed to screen and select candidate antimalarial drugs based on their capacity to inhibit hemozoin formation. In this report we describe new ways to form hemozoin-like crystals that were incidentally discovered during research in the field of prion inactivation. METHODS: We investigated the use of a new assay based on naturally occurring "self-replicating" particles and previously described as presenting resistance to decontamination comparable to prions. The nature of these particles was determined using electron microscopy, Maldi-Tof analysis and X-ray diffraction. They were compared to synthetic hemozoin and to hemozoin obtained from Plasmodium falciparum. We then used the assay to evaluate the capacity of various antimalarial and anti-prion compounds to inhibit "self-replication" (crystallisation of these particles. RESULTS: We identified these particles as being similar to ferriprotoporphyrin IX crystal and confirmed the ability of these particles to serve as nuclei for growth of new hemozoin-like crystals (HLC. HLC are morphologically similar to natural and synthetic hemozoin. Growth of HLC in a simple assay format confirmed inhibition by quinolines antimalarials at potencies described in the literature. Interestingly, artemisinins and tetracyclines also seemed to inhibit HLC growth. CONCLUSIONS: The described HLC assay is simple and easy to perform and may have the potential to be used as an additional tool to screen antimalarial drugs for their hemozoin inhibiting activity. As already described by others, drugs that inhibit hemozoin crystal formation have also the potential to inhibit misfolded proteins

  16. Effects of 5,8-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]quinoline-2-carboxylic acid on the antioxidative defense and lipid membranes in Plasmodium berghei-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa de Domínguez, N D; Charris, J; Domínguez, J; Monasterios, M; Angel, J; Rodrigues, J

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium parasites degrade hemoglobin producing reactive oxygen species as toxic byproducts which are detoxified by a series of antioxidant mechanisms. Quinoline compounds have demonstrated activity against hemoglobin degradation with 5,8-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]quinoline-2-carboxylic acid (TQCA) representing a recent compound inhibiting this process. Thus, this study was undertaken to determine the ability of TQCA to modify the oxidative status in Plasmodium berghei-infected erythrocytes. After hemolysis, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and dehydrogenase enzymes as well as lipid peroxidation were investigated by spectrophotometry. Saturated and unsaturated fatty acids were determined by gas-liquid chromatography and the in vivo effects of TQCA were confirmed by a malaria murine model (Rane test). The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) in infected cells was diminished by this compound compared to control infection in 75.1 ± 3.5% and 26.5 ± 0.3%, respectively, while that of GPx and GR was also lowered (p quinoline derivate in 49.2 ± 1.32% and 37 ± 0.06%, respectively, protecting the cells from hemolysis caused by the infection. The in vitro results were in concordance with the potential in vivo activity of this compound in an established malaria murine model in which TQCA showed significant decrease in the parasitemia levels and increased the mean survival days of infected mice. In conclusion, the antioxidant defense represents a biochemical target for TQCA actions as a potent antimalarial whose effects were also confirmed in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative structure-chromatographic retention correlations of quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, Nadezhda A; Kurbatova, Svetlana V

    2017-04-07

    The aim of our study was to investigate relationships between quinoline derivatives structure and their retention under reversed-phase liquid chromatography conditions. Retention factors of quinolines were experimentally measured and various geometrical and physicochemical parameters representing analytes molecular structure were calculated. Equations connecting chromatographic data with computed characteristics for the set of 17 investigated compounds were constructed. It was shown that the most precise dependencies include combination of physico-chemical and geometrical parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimalarial Anthrone and Chromone from the Leaf Latex of Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Ethiopian traditional medicine, the leaf latex of Aloe debranan Chrstian is used for the treatment of several diseases including malaria. In an ongoing search for effective, safe and cheap antimalarial agents from plants, the leaf latex of A. debrana was tested for its in vivo antimalarial activity, in a 4-day suppressive assay ...

  19. Antimalarial properties of imipramine and amitriptyline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Siegel, L.; Pinto, J.; Meshnick, S.

    1986-01-01

    This laboratory has previously demonstrated that imipramine (IM) and amitriptyline (AM), inhibit the conversion of riboflavin to its coenzymic derivatives. Several other laboratories have shown that dietary riboflavin deficiency is protective against malarial infection. In the present investigation, the authors determined whether IM and AM exert antimalarial effects similar to that of riboflavin deficiency, as they have hypothesized. In addition, they evaluated whether these drugs, like other antimalarial agents, increase the hemolytic response to ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FP). The growth of P. falciparum (FCR3) in the absence or presence of these drugs (80 μM) was measured by incubating parasitized erythrocytes for 48 h in RPMI 1640 medium. Parasitemia was determined by counting erythrocyte smears and monitoring ( 3 H)hypoxanthine uptake. With no drug, parasitemia was 20.3 +/- 5.3%, whereas in the presence of IM and AM, parasitemia was reduced to 7.3 +/- 0.8% and 13.6 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The uptake of ( 3 H)hypoxanthine was reduced to 47 +/- 3.6% and 54 +/- 2.9% of control by IM and AM, respectively. Assays of hemolysis were conducted by incubating 0.5% RBC suspension in NaCl-Tris buffer for 3 h at 37 0 C with variable concentrations of drugs and/or FP (1-7 μM). Both drugs at 10 to 100 μM significantly enhanced hemolysis induced by FP. No hemolysis by these drugs was detected in the absence of FP. It is concluded that the tricyclic antidepressants, IM and AM, possess substantial antimalarial properties, thereby supporting the hypothesis that drugs which interfere with riboflavin metabolism should also provide protection against malaria

  20. Antimalarial Activity of Ultra-Short Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yolanda Rios

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-short peptides 1-9 were designed and synthesized with phenylalanine, ornithine and proline amino acid residues and their effect on antimalarial activity was analyzed. On the basis of the IC50 data for these compounds, the effects of nature, polarity, and amino acid sequence on Plasmodium berghei schizont cultures were analyzed too. Tetrapeptides Phe-Orn-Phe-Orn (4 and Lys-Phe-Phe-Orn (5 showed a very important activity with IC50 values of 3.31 and 2.57 μM, respectively. These two tetrapeptides are candidates for subsequent in vivo assays and SARS investigations.

  1. QSAR modeling and chemical space analysis of antimalarial compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Pavel; Viira, Birgit; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Maran, Uko; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) has been used to visualize and analyze the chemical space of antimalarial compounds as well as to build predictive models linking structure of molecules with their antimalarial activity. For this, a database, including 3000 molecules tested in one or several of 17 anti- Plasmodium activity assessment protocols, has been compiled by assembling experimental data from in-house and ChEMBL databases. GTM classification models built on subsets corresponding to individual bioassays perform similarly to the earlier reported SVM models. Zones preferentially populated by active and inactive molecules, respectively, clearly emerge in the class landscapes supported by the GTM model. Their analysis resulted in identification of privileged structural motifs of potential antimalarial compounds. Projection of marketed antimalarial drugs on this map allowed us to delineate several areas in the chemical space corresponding to different mechanisms of antimalarial activity. This helped us to make a suggestion about the mode of action of the molecules populating these zones.

  2. Terahertz absorption spectra of commonly used antimalarial drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawuah, Prince; Zeitler, J. Axel; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2018-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectra from the pure forms [i.e. the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs)] of four commonly used antimalarial drugs are reported. The well-defined spectral fingerprints obtained for these APIs in the spectral range of 0.1 THz-3 THz show the sensitivity of the THz time-domain spectroscopic (THz-TDS) method for screening antimalarial drugs. For identification purpose, two commercially available antimalarial tablets were detected. Clear spectral fingerprints of the APIs in the antimalarial tablets were obtained even amidst the several types of excipients present in the tablets. This observation further proves the high sensitivity of the THz techniques in tracking the presence or absence of API in a pharmaceutical tablet. We envisage that the spectral data obtained for these drugs can contribute to a spectroscopic database in the far infrared spectral region and hence support the modelling of THz sensing to differentiate between genuine and counterfeit antimalarial tablets.

  3. QSAR modeling and chemical space analysis of antimalarial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Pavel; Viira, Birgit; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Maran, Uko; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) has been used to visualize and analyze the chemical space of antimalarial compounds as well as to build predictive models linking structure of molecules with their antimalarial activity. For this, a database, including ~3000 molecules tested in one or several of 17 anti-Plasmodium activity assessment protocols, has been compiled by assembling experimental data from in-house and ChEMBL databases. GTM classification models built on subsets corresponding to individual bioassays perform similarly to the earlier reported SVM models. Zones preferentially populated by active and inactive molecules, respectively, clearly emerge in the class landscapes supported by the GTM model. Their analysis resulted in identification of privileged structural motifs of potential antimalarial compounds. Projection of marketed antimalarial drugs on this map allowed us to delineate several areas in the chemical space corresponding to different mechanisms of antimalarial activity. This helped us to make a suggestion about the mode of action of the molecules populating these zones.

  4. Molecular modeling of the voltammetric oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode of the antimalarial drug primaquine and its prodrugs succinylprimaquine and maleylprimaquine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La-Scalea, Mauro A. [Lapen, Laboratorio de Planejamento e Sintese de Quimioterapicos Potencialmente Ativos Contra Endemias Tropicais, Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580 Bl. 13 sup., 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: scalea@usp.br; Menezes, Carla M.S. [Lapen, Laboratorio de Planejamento e Sintese de Quimioterapicos Potencialmente Ativos Contra Endemias Tropicais, Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580 Bl. 13 sup., 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: casmenezes@yahoo.com; Matsutami, Guilherme C. [Lapen, Laboratorio de Planejamento e Sintese de Quimioterapicos Potencialmente Ativos Contra Endemias Tropicais, Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580 Bl. 13 sup., 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Polli, Michelle C. [Lapen, Laboratorio de Planejamento e Sintese de Quimioterapicos Potencialmente Ativos Contra Endemias Tropicais, Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580 Bl. 13 sup., 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Serrano, Silvia H.P. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 748 Bl. 2 sup., 05508-90 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferreira, Elizabeth I. [Lapen, Laboratorio de Planejamento e Sintese de Quimioterapicos Potencialmente Ativos Contra Endemias Tropicais, Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580 Bl. 13 sup., 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-15

    The 8-aminoquinoline primaquine (PQ) is the only antimalarial drug used as tissue schizonticide and relapsing malaria. Antichagasic activity was also reported. Nevertheless, as it also shows serious side effects, prodrugs such as succinyl and maleyl derivatives have been proposed to decrease its toxicity. Although PQ mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated, the promotion of oxidative stress is an advanced hypothesis that could explain its activity in both plasmodia and trypanosome parasites. The oxidation of PQ and its prodrugs, maleylprimaquine (MPQ) and succinylprimaquine (SPQ), was studied by cyclic voltammetry using glassy carbon electrode. All compounds were oxidized in aqueous medium, with the charge transfer process being pH-dependent in acidic medium and pH-independent in a weak basic medium, being the neutral form more easily oxidized. This indicated that the protonation of the nitrogen atoms displays a determinant role in the voltammetric oxidation, being both prodrugs more easily oxidized than PQ protonated forms, in the order: SPQ < MPQ < PQ. For a better understanding of this behavior, a molecular modeling study was performed using the AM1 semi-empirical method from Spartan 04 for Linux (v.119, Wavefunction Inc.). The medium pH showed to be fundamental not only to the electronic density of the quinoline ring but also to the rearrangement of the nitrogen side chain. The electronic density of primaquine non-protonated quinoline ring is higher than that in its protonated and diprotonated species. Also, the use of prodrugs and the degree of saturation of the carriers (maleic or succinic acid) interfere with this feature. SPQ and MPQ have a slight increase in the quinoline electronic density in comparison to PQ. Nevertheless, the carrier in the side chain of SPQ is closer to the quinoline ring than it is in MPQ, which accounts for the higher electronic density in the former. The most significant effect occurs in the correspondent protonated

  5. Targetting the hemozoin synthesis pathway for antimalarial drug and detected by TEM (Transmission electron microscope)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Jamilah; Artanti, Nina; Sundowo, Andini; Dewijanti, Indah Dwiatmi; Hanafi, Muhammad; Lisa, Syafrudin, Din

    2017-11-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem mainly due to the development of resistance by the most lethal causative parasite species, the alarming spread of drug resistance and limited number of effective drug available now. Therefore it is important to discover new antimalarial drug. Malaria is caused by a singlecelled parasite from the genus Plasmodium. Plasmodium falciparum parasite infect red blood cells, ingesting and degradation hemoglobin in the acidic food vacuola trough a sequential metabolic process involving multiple proteases. During these process, hemoglobin is utilized as the predominant source of nutrition. Proteolysis of hemoglobin yields amino acid for protein synthesis as well as toxic heme. Massive degradation of hemoglobin generates large amount of toxic heme. Malaria parasite has evolved a distinct mechanism for detoxification of heme through conversion into insoluble crystalline pigment, known as hemozoin (β hematoin). Hemozoin synthesis is an indispensable process for the parasite and is the target for action of several known antimalarial drug. TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) technology for hemozoin formation in vitro assay was done in this research. Calophyllum aerophyllum Lauterb as medicinal plants was used as a source of antimalarial drug. Acetone extracts of C. lowii showed growth inhibition against parasite P. falciparum with IC50 = 5.2 µg/mL. Whereas from hexane, acetone and methanol fraction of C. aerophyllum showed growth inhibition with IC50 = 0.054, 0.055 and 0.0054 µg/mL respectively. New drug from Calophyllum might have potential compounds that have unique structures and mechanism of action which required to develop new drug for treatment of sensitive and drug resistant strain of malaria.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    chelated ruthenium organometallics. BIKASH KUMAR PANDA. Department of Inorganic ... Ruthenium organometallics; quinolin-8-olato chelation; emission properties; trivalent ruthenium. 1. Introduction. There is continuing ... chem.istry of orthometallated ruthenium compounds is of current interest in the context of synthesis ...

  7. (E-N′-(Furan-2-ylmethylene-4-(quinolin-8-yloxybutanohydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Xie

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecule, C18H17N3O3, the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the furan ring and the quinoline group is 77.4 (2°. In the crystal structure, intermolecular N—H...N hydrogen bonds link the molecules into centrosymmetric dimers.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8-olato chelated ruthenium organometallics. BIKASH KUMAR PANDA. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700 032,. India e-mail: b_panda@hotmail.com. MS received 2 June 2004; revised 21 July 2004.

  9. Enantioselective organocatalytic partial transfer hydrogenation of lactone-fused quinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aillerie, Alexandre; de Talancé, Vincent Lemau; Moncomble, Aurélien; Bousquet, Till; Pélinski, Lydie

    2014-06-06

    The first enantioselective synthesis of 4-aza-podophyllotoxin derivatives by partial transfer hydrogenation of lactone-fused quinolines was achieved using a chiral Brønsted acid catalyst. This reaction was extended to a large scope of substrates with good yields and enantioselectivities.

  10. Transformation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, D.; Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.

    1996-01-01

    kinetics. The kinetic parameters for indole were an apparent maximum specific transformation rate (V-Amax) of 263 mu mol mg total protein(-1) day(-1) and an apparent half-saturation constant (K-Am) of 139 mu M. The V-Amax for quinoline was 170 mu mol mg total protein(-1) day(-1) and K-Am was 92 mu M...

  11. Synthesis of new biphenyl-substituted quinoline derivatives ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corrosion inhibitors, preservatives and as solvents for resins and terpenes. Furthermore, these compounds find applications in transition metal catalysis for uniform polymerization and luminescence chemistry.8,9 Owing to this, the synthesis of substituted quinolines has been a subject of great focus in organic chemistry. ∗.

  12. A quinoline based pH sensitive ratiometric fluorescent sensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A new quinoline based hydrazone was synthesized via a condensation reaction and characterized by NMR, mass and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. It was investigated for suitability as a reversible ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor in acidic pH region. The sensor exhibits intramolecular charge transfer (ICT).

  13. A quinoline based pH sensitive ratiometric fluorescent sensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new quinoline based hydrazone was synthesized via a condensation reaction and characterized by NMR, mass and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. It was investigated for suitability as a reversible ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor in acidic pH region. The sensor exhibits intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) type ...

  14. Antimalarial and cytotoxic activities of roots and fruits fractions of Astrodaucus persicus extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Goodarzi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Astrodaucus persicus (Apiaceae is one of the two species of this genus which grows in different parts of Iran. Roots of this plant were rich in benzodioxoles and used as food additive or salad in Iran and near countries. The aim of present study was evaluation of antimalarial and cytotoxic effects of different fractions of A. persicus fruits and roots extracts. Materials and Methods: Ripe fruits and roots of A. persicuswere extracted and fractionated by hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol, separately. Antimalarial activities of fractions were performed based on Plasmodium berghei suppressive test in mice model and percentage of parasitemia and suppression were determined for each sample. Cytotoxicity of fruits and roots fractions were investigated against human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7, colorectal carcinoma (SW480 and normal (L929 cell lines by MTT assay and IC50 of them were measured. Results: Hexane fraction of roots extract (RHE and ethyl acetate fraction of fruits extract (FEA of A. persicus demonstrated highest parasite inhibition (73.3 and 72.3%, respectively at 500 mg/kg/day which were significantly different from negative control group (P

  15. Evaluation of the use of Cocos nucifera as antimalarial remedy in Malaysian folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Nor, Zurainee M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Amran, Adel A; Mahmud, Rohela

    2011-04-12

    White flesh extract of Cocos nucifera (coconut) was studied to ascertain the ethnopharmacological standing of its antimalarial usage in Malaysian folk medicine. The crude methanol extract was investigated for phytochemical constituents and acute oral toxicity. Antimalarial activity of different extract doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400mg/kg were investigated in vivo against Plasmodium berghei (NK65) infections in mice during early, established and residual infections. Chloroquine (20mg/kg) and pyrimethamine (1.2mg/kg) were used as reference drugs. The results revealed that the extract contained some phytochemical constituents and is toxicologically safe by oral administration. The extract significantly reduced the parasitaemia by the 200 and 400mg/kg doses in the all three in vivo assessment assays. However, the extract did not significantly increase the survival time of the infected mice. The observed pharmacological activities suggest that the Malaysian folkloric medicinal application of Cocos nucifera has a pharmacological basis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of quinoline on activity and microbial culture of partial nitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhimin; Zhao, Ji

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of quinoline on nitrification in an activated sludge system was evaluated in batch assays. Quinoline was evaluated to partial nitrification process or to partial nitrification-quinoline degrading process. In partial nitrification assays, 50-150mg/L quinoline presence promoted the ammonium oxidation efficiency (200-100%). Nonetheless, the consumption efficiencies for quinoline were less than 66.6%. On the other hand, in partial nitrification-quinoline degrading process, the promotion effect of quinoline (50-150mg/L) diminished significantly, ammonium oxidation were similarity to the control. However, the consumption efficiencies for quinoline were nearly 100%. DGGE results showed that the bacteria communities varied significantly. Acidovorax sp. JS42 and Acidovorax ebreus TPSY were responsible for ammonium oxidation in partial nitrification process, while Nitrosomonas in partial nitrification-quinoline degrading process. This information might be useful for treating wastewaters of ammonium/quinoline by partial nitrification technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenylpropanoids and furanocoumarins as antibacterial and antimalarial constituents of the Bhutanese medicinal plant Pleurospermum amabile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Pyne, Stephen G; Keller, Paul A; Taweechotipatr, Malai; Kamchonwongpaisane, Sumalee

    2014-07-01

    With the objective of determining safety and verifying the traditional uses of the Bhutanese medicinal plant, Pleurospermum amabile Craib & W. W. Smith, we investigated its crude extracts and the isolated phytochemicals for their biological activities. Four phenylpropanoids [(E)-isomyristicin (1), (E)-isoapiol (2), methyl eugenol (3) and (E)-isoelemicin (4)] and six furanocoumarins [psoralen (5), bergapten (6), isoimperatorin (7), isopimpinellin (8), oxypeucedanin hydrate (9) and oxypeucedanin methanolate (10)] were isolated from this plant. Among the test samples, compound 10 showed weak antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and best antimalarial activity against the Plasmodium falciparum strains, TM4/8.2 (chloroquine and antifolate sensitive) and K1CB1 (multidrug resistant). None of the test samples showed cytotoxicity. This study generated scientific data that support the traditional medical uses of the plant.

  18. Methanol Adsorption on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsebeth Schröder

    2013-01-01

    bonds like the covalent and hydrogen bonds. The adsorption of a single methanol molecule and small methanol clusters on graphene is studied at various coverages. Adsorption in clusters or at high coverages (less than a monolayer is found to be preferable, with the methanol C-O axis approximately parallel to the plane of graphene. The adsorption energies calculated with vdW-DF are compared with previous DFT-D and MP2-based calculations for single methanol adsorption on flakes of graphene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For the high coverage adsorption energies, we also find reasonably good agreement with previous desorption measurements.

  19. The Methanol Economy Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olah, George [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Prakash, G. K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  20. Biodegradation and interaction of quinoline and glucose in dual substrates system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong

    2015-03-01

    An indigenous mixed culture of microorganisms, isolated from a full-scale coal gasification wastewater treatment plant, was used in degrading quinoline in presence of glucose as an alternative carbon source. The results showed that biodegradation kinetics of both quinoline and glucose could be described by first-order reaction kinetics model. It was also found that the biodegradation rate of quinoline was accelerated by the presence of glucose, while glucose degradation was inhibited by the presence of quinoline. Both the biomass yield coefficient and specific growth rate were increased with the increasing of the glucose concentrations in the dual substrates system. A sum kinetics model was used to describe the relative effects of the two substrates on their individual uptakes. The interaction parameter values indicated that quinoline exhibits stronger inhibition on glucose degradation. But for glucose, its effect on quinoline utilization was stimulative. Furthermore, the stimulation was positively correlated with the concentration of glucose in the system.

  1. Sensitive and rapid determination of quinoline yellow in drinks using polyvinylpyrrolidone-modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenghui; Shi, Zhen; Wang, Jinshou

    2015-04-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-modified carbon paste electrode was developed for the sensitive and rapid determination of quinoline yellow. In 0.1M, pH 6.5 phosphate buffer, an irreversible oxidation wave at 0.97 V was observed for quinoline yellow. PVP exhibited strong accumulation ability to quinoline yellow, and consequently increased the oxidation peak current of quinoline yellow remarkably. The effects of pH value, amount of PVP, accumulation potential and time were studied on the oxidation signals of quinoline yellow. The linear range was from 5×10(-8) to 1×10(-6) M, and the limit of detection was evaluated to be 2.7×10(-8) M. It was used to detect quinoline yellow in different drink samples, and the results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimalarial activity of extract and norbergenin derivatives from the stem bark of Diospyros sanza-minika A. Chevalier (Ebenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangmouo, Jean Gustave; Ho, Raimana; Matheeussen, An; Lannang, Alain Meli; Komguem, Justin; Messi, Bernadette Biloa; Maes, Louis; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2010-11-01

    The methanol extract from the stem bark of Diospyros sanza-minika as well as five norbergenin derivatives isolated from this crude extract were evaluated for their in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum K1 and cytotoxicity on MRC-5 cells. 4-O-(3'-methylgalloyl)norbergenin was found to be the most potent compound (IC(50) 0.6 μg/mL; CC(50) 24.7 μg/mL), followed by 4-O-galloylnorbergenin (IC(50) 3.9 μg/mL; CC(50) > 64 μg/mL) and 11-O-p-hydroxy-benzoyl-norbergenin (IC(50) 4.9 μg/mL; CC(50) > 64 μg/mL). Norbergenin and 4-O-syringoylnorbergenin were inactive (IC(50) > 32 μg/mL; CC(50) > 64 μg/mL). The antimalarial activity of the pure constituents and of the methanol extract from the stem bark of Diospyros sanza-minika is reported for the first time. The results provide interesting baseline information for the potential use of the crude extract well as some of the isolated compounds in the search for novel antimalarial compounds. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongru Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  5. Methanol in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodson Greg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the origins of methanol in grape wine and the quantities typically found in it, as well as in other foods such as unpasteurised fruit juices. The toxicology of methanol and the associated regulatory limits established by competent authorities in various parts of the world are also considered. It is concluded that such limits are not driven by public health considerations and thus authorities are requested to consider the need for methanol analyses to be performed and reported on certificates of analysis as a condition of market entry for wine. Where methanol limits are still deemed to be necessary to achieve policy objectives, authorities are encouraged to establish them in the light of the levels of methanol typically found in grape wines produced by the full array of internationally permitted winemaking practices, and to consider harmonising their limits with those that have already been established by other governments or recommended by appropriate intergovernmental organisations.

  6. Internal loop photo-biodegradation reactor used for accelerated quinoline degradation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling; Zhang, Yongming; Gan, Lu; Xu, Hua; Yan, Ning; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-07-01

    Biofilm biodegradation was coupled with ultra-violet photolysis using the internal loop photobiodegradation reactor for degradation of quinoline. Three protocols-photolysis alone (P), biodegradation alone (B), and intimately coupled photolysis and biodegradation (P&B)-were used for degradation of quinoline in batch and continuous-flow experiments. For a 1,000 mg/L initial quinoline concentration, the volumetric removal rate for quinoline was 38 % higher with P&B than with B in batch experiments, and the P&B kinetics were the sum of kinetics from the P and B experiments. Continuous-flow experiments with an influent quinoline concentration of 1,000 mg/L also gave significantly greater quinoline removal in P&B, and the quinoline-removal kinetics for P&B were approximately equal to the sum of the removal kinetics for P and B. P&B similarly increased the rate and extent of quinoline mineralization, for which the kinetics for P&B were nearly equal to the sum of kinetics for P and B. These findings support that the rate-limiting step for mineralization was transformation of quinoline, which was accelerated by the simultaneous action of photolysis and biodegradation.

  7. Degradation of pyridine and quinoline in aqueous solution by gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Libing; Yu, Shaoqing; Wang, Jianlong

    2018-03-01

    In present work, the degradation of two N-heteroaromatic pollutants, i.e., pyridine and quinoline was investigated by gamma irradiation in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticle. The experimental results showed that quinoline has a higher degradation rate than pyridine. The removal efficiency of the pollutants, TOC and TN reached 93.0%, 11.9% and 12.0% for quinoline, 71.0%, 10.6% and 4.4% for pyridine, respectively at 7.0 kGy and initial concentration of 50 mg/L. Ammonium was detected for both pyridine and quinoline within the absorbed doses, suggesting that the organic nitrogen was transformed into ammonium. The degradation rate constant of pyridine and quinoline was increased by 1.1-1.5 times with addition of TiO2. TiO2 nanoparticles were especially effective to enhance the mineralization. The removal efficiency of TOC and TN was increased by 15-12% for pyridine and 23-25% for quinoline, respectively in the presence of 2.0 g/L TiO2. Following gamma irradiation, 2-hydroxypyridine, 3-hydroxypyridine, oxalic acid and formic acid were identified for pyridine and the hydroxyl quinoline and formic acid were detected for quinoline. Accordingly, the degradation mechanism of pyridine and quinoline by gamma irradiation was tentatively proposed.

  8. Quinoline-2-thiol Derivatives as Fluorescent Sensors for Metals, pH and HNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naphtali A. O’Connor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A tautomeric equilibrium exists for quinoline-2-thiol and quinoline-2(1H-thione. Quantum mechanical calculations predict the thione is the major tautomer and this is confirmed by the absorption spectra. The utility of quinolone-2-thiol/quinoline-2(1H-thione as a chromophore for developing fluorescent sensors is explored. No fluorescence is observed when excited at absorption maxima, however a fluorescence increase is observed when exposed to HNO, a molecule of import as a cardiovascular therapeutic. Alkylated quinoline-2-thiol derivatives are found to be fluorescent and show a reduction in fluorescence when exposed to metals and changes in pH.

  9. Unambiguous Synthesis and Prophylactic Antimalarial Activities of Imidazolidinedione Derivatives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Quan; Guan, Jian; Sacci, John; Ager, Arba; Ellis, William; Mihlhous, Wilbur; Kyle, Dennis; Lin, Ai J

    2005-01-01

    .... To search for compounds with good oral efficacy, a series of carbamate derivatives of the active components were prepared by the new procedure, many of which showed profound causal prophylactic antimalarial activity against Plasmodium yoelil in mouse by oral administration.

  10. Pharmacological screening of some traditionally-used antimalarial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacological screening of some traditionally-used antimalarial plants from the Democratic Republic of Congo compared to their ecological taxonomic equivalence in Madagascar. KN Ngbolua, H Rafatro, H Rakotoarimanana, US Ratsimamanga, V Mudogo, PT Mpiana, DST Tshibangu ...

  11. In Vivo Antimalarial Activities of Plants Used in Ethiopian Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Vivo Antimalarial Activities of Plants Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine, Delomenna, Southeast Ethiopia. Ashenafi Asefa, Kelbassa Urga, Mulugeta Guta, Waleleng Mekonene, Daniel Melaku, Kise Mudie, Tesgayae Kidanemariam ...

  12. Mutation in the Plasmodium falciparum CRT Protein Determines the Stereospecific Activity of Antimalarial Cinchona Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Carol E.; Hoke, Jonathan M.; Samarakoon, Upeka; Duan, Junhui; Mu, Jianbing; Ferdig, Michael T.; Warhurst, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The Cinchona alkaloids are quinoline aminoalcohols that occur as diastereomer pairs, typified by (−)-quinine and (+)-quinidine. The potency of (+)-isomers is greater than the (−)-isomers in vitro and in vivo against Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites. They may act by the inhibition of heme crystallization within the parasite digestive vacuole in a manner similar to chloroquine. Earlier studies showed that a K76I mutation in the digestive vacuole-associated protein, PfCRT (P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter), reversed the normal potency order of quinine and quinidine toward P. falciparum. To further explore PfCRT-alkaloid interactions in the malaria parasite, we measured the in vitro susceptibility of eight clonal lines of P. falciparum derived from the 106/1 strain, each containing a unique pfcrt allele, to four Cinchona stereoisomer pairs: quinine and quinidine; cinchonidine and cinchonine; hydroquinine and hydroquinidine; 9-epiquinine and 9-epiquinidine. Stereospecific potency of the Cinchona alkaloids was associated with changes in charge and hydrophobicity of mutable PfCRT amino acids. In isogenic chloroquine-resistant lines, the IC50 ratio of (−)/(+) CA pairs correlated with side chain hydrophobicity of the position 76 residue. Second-site PfCRT mutations negated the K76I stereospecific effects: charge-change mutations C72R or Q352K/R restored potency patterns similar to the parent K76 line, while V369F increased susceptibility to the alkaloids and nullified stereospecific differences between alkaloid pairs. Interactions between key residues of the PfCRT channel/transporter with (−) and (+) alkaloids are stereospecifically determined, suggesting that PfCRT binding plays an important role in the antimalarial activity of quinine and other Cinchona alkaloids. PMID:22869567

  13. 6-[4-(Diphenylaminophenyl]quinoline 1-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhi Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecule, C27H20N2O, a triphenylamine derivative of quinoline, the three benzene rings linked through an N atom form a propeller shape, with dihedral angles between the mean planes of pairs of rings of 75.57 (9, 55.68 (9 and 83.66 (9°. The quinoline ring is essentially planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of the fitted atoms of 0.0155 Å, and forms a dihedral angle of 33.52 (8° with the benzene ring to which it is bonded. Weak C—H...π interactions are also observed in the crystal structure.

  14. A novel quinoline derivative that inhibits mycobacterial FtsZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Bini; Ross, Larry; Reynolds, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotypic screening of large commercially available libraries through two NIH programs has produced thousands of potentially interesting hits for further development as antitubercular agents. Unfortunately, these screens do not supply target information, and further follow up target identification is required to allow optimal rational design and development of highly active and selective clinical candidates. Cheminformatic analysis of the quinoline and quinazoline hits from these HTS screens suggested a hypothesis that certain compounds in these two classes may target the mycobacterial tubulin homolog, FtsZ. In this brief communication, activity of a lead quinoline against the target FtsZ from M. tuberculosis (Mtb) is confirmed as well as good in vitro whole cell antibacterial activity against Mtb H37Rv. The identification of a putative target of this highly tractable pharmacophore should help medicinal chemists interested in targeting FtsZ and cell division develop a rational design program to optimize this activity towards a novel drug candidate. PMID:23647650

  15. Relationship between molecular structure and Raman spectra of quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    DFT calculations were applied to investigate the relationship between the molecular structure and the Raman spectra of quinolines. A variety of different quinolines with increasing complexity was investigated and an aminoquinoline nucleus was found that describes the Raman spectrum of protonated chloroquine. It was discovered that the biological important, rigid C7-chloro group and C4-side chain of chloroquine significantly disturb certain molecular vibrations. The protonation at the N1 position causes dramatic changes of the Raman bands in the wavenumber region between 1500 cm -1 and 1650 cm -1. These bands are putative marker bands of the aminoquinoline drugs for π-π interactions to the hematin targets in malaria infected cells. The calculation of the normal modes and the illustration of the associated atomic displacements are very valuable for a deeper understanding of the associated bands in the Raman spectra.

  16. Dietary methanol and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of Antimalarials at the Epicenter of Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Results from an Overt and Mystery Client Survey in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L. S.; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M.; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-01-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  18. Evaluation of In-vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5 in 11 groups) intraperitoneally. Animals in the ... the multiplication of the parasite within red blood cells of the host, causing symptoms that typically include fever and ... fractionation of plant extract. Leaves of G. brevis were air dried, reduced to.

  19. Evaluation of In-vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The serum concentrations of AST, ALT, and ALP in the infected control group were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those of the treated malaria-infected groups treated with the three fractions. Conclusion: Glyphaea brevis possesses significant antiplasmodial properties and could be a source of lead molecules for the ...

  20. Analytical sample preparation strategies for the determination of antimalarial drugs in human whole blood, plasma and urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Mònica Escolà; Hansen, Martin; Krogh, Kristine A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Antimalarial drugs commonly referred to as antimalarials , include a variety of compounds with different physicochemical properties. There is a lack of information on antimalarial distribution in the body over time after administration, eg the drug ...

  1. Dissociated methanol test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finegold, J.G.; McKinnon, J.T.

    1982-04-01

    The design and testing of an automotive fuel system that provides hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by catalytically cracking, or dissociating, methanol on board the vehicle is described. The vaporization and dissociation of methanol absorb heat from the engine exhaust and increase the lower heating value of the fuel by approximately 22%. In addition, raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air increase the engine thermal efficiency. Engine dynamometer test results with dissociated methanol demonstrated improvement in brake thermal efficiency compared to gasoline from 30% to 100% depending on engine speed and torque. Lower speeds and torques produce the largest improvements. Maps of exhaust temperature and exhaust heat content are presented. The exhaust temperature is almost always high enough for dissociation to occur, but at lower power outputs, there is only enough exhaust energy for partial dissociation of the methanol.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of quinoline in aqueous TiO{sub 2} suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Jieying [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Shanxi Province and Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi 030024 (China); Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Li, Wenying, E-mail: ying@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Shanxi Province and Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi 030024 (China); Boyd, Adina [Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Zhang, Yu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, Jilin 130012 (China); Colvin, Vicki L. [Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Yu, William W., E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Shanxi Province and Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi 030024 (China); Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Jilin University, Jilin 130012 (China)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized and employed as catalyst to degrade quinoline under UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The superoxide radical ({center_dot}O{sub 2}) played a dominant role in the photodegradation of quinoline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quinoline photodegradation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. - Abstract: Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with an average size of 16 nm were synthesized via a modified sol-gel method and were employed to degrade quinoline under UV irradiation ({lambda} = 365 nm). The influence of reaction parameters such as TiO{sub 2} dosage, initial quinoline concentration and pH was investigated. Under the optimized reaction condition, 91.5% photodegradation efficiency of quinoline was achieved. When the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were reused for four times, the photodegradation efficiency was still as high as 90.6%. The analysis of the organic intermediates suggested that superoxide radical ({center_dot}O{sub 2}) predominantly attacked the pyridine ring of quinoline leading to the formation of 2-aminobenzaldehyde, 2-quinolinone, 4-quinolinone; while the hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) contributed much less by attacking benzene rings resulting in the formation of 5-hydroxyquinoline. The photocatalytic performance of the as-synthesized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was comparable to the commercial P25. A tentative mechanism was postulated for the photodegradation of quinoline over TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  3. Integrated methanol synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, W.

    1982-01-01

    This invention concerns a plant for methanol manufacture from gasified coal, particularly using nuclear power. In order to reduce the cost of the hydrogen circuits, the methanol synthesis is integrated in the coal gasification plant. The coal used is gasified with hydration by means of hydrogen and the crude gas emerging, after cooling and separating the carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, is mixed with the synthetic gas leaving the methane cracking furnace. This mixture is taken to the methanol synthesis and more than 90% is converted into methanol in one pass. The gas mixture remaning after condensation and separation of methanol is decomposed into three fractions in low temperature gas decomposition with a high proportion of unconverted carbon monoxide. The flow of methane is taken to the cracking furnace with steam, the flow of hydrogen is taken to the hydrating coal gasifier, and the flow of carbon monoxide is taken to the methanol synthesis. The heat required for cracking the methane can either be provided by a nuclear reactor or by the coke left after hydrating gasification. (orig./RB) [de

  4. The Asian methanol market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-01-01

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future

  5. Reappraisal of Antimalarials in Interferonopathies: New Perspectives for Old Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscianz, Elisa; Cuzzoni, Eva; Sharma, Rajan; Tesser, Alessandra; Sapra, Pooja; Tommasini, Alberto

    2017-09-11

    The story of antimalarials as antinflammatory drugs dates back several centuries. Chinin, the extract of the Cinchona bark, has been exploited since the 18th century for its antimalarial and antifebrile properties. Later, during the Second World War, the broad use of antimalarials allowed arguing their antirheumatic effect on soldiers. Since then, these drugs have been broadly used to treat Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, but, only recently, have the molecular mechanisms of action been partly clarified. Inhibitory action on vacuole function and trafficking has been considered for decades the main mechanism of the action of antimalarials, affecting the activation of phagocytes and dendritic cells. In addition, chloroquine is also known as a potent inhibitor of autophagy, providing another possible explanation of its antinflammatory action. However, much attention has been recently devoted to the action of antimalarials on the so-called cGAS-STING pathway leading from the sensing of cytoplasmic nucleic acids to the production of type I interferons. This pathway is a fundamental mechanism of host defence, since it is able to detect microbial DNA and induce the type I interferon-mediated immune response. Of note, genetic defects in the degradation of nucleic acids lead to inappropriate cGAS-STING activation and inflammation. These disorders, called type I interferonopathies, represent a valuable model to study the antinflammatory potential of antimalarials. We will discuss possible development of antimalarials to improve the treatment of type I interferonopathies and likely multifactorial disorders characterised by interferon inflammation, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN IV: Clinical pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbotosho Grace O

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN database has the potential to improve the treatment of malaria, through informing current drug selection and use and providing a prompt warning of when treatment policies need changing. This manuscript outlines the contribution and structure of the clinical pharmacology component of this database. The determinants of treatment response are multi-factorial, but clearly providing adequate blood concentrations is pivotal to curing malaria. The ability of available antimalarial pharmacokinetic data to inform optimal dosing is constrained by the small number of patients studied, with even fewer (if any studies conducted in the most vulnerable populations. There are even less data relating blood concentration data to the therapeutic response (pharmacodynamics. By pooling all available pharmacokinetic data, while paying careful attention to the analytical methodologies used, the limitations of small (and thus underpowered individual studies may be overcome and factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetic parameters defined. Key variables for pharmacokinetic studies are defined in terms of patient (or study subject characteristics, the formulation and route of administration of the antimalarial studied, the sampling and assay methodology, and the approach taken to data analysis. Better defining these information needs and criteria of acceptability of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD studies should contribute to improving the quantity, relevance and quality of these studies. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of antimalarials and a more clear definition of what constitutes "therapeutic drug levels" would allow more precise use of the term "antimalarial resistance", as it would indicate when treatment failure is not caused by intrinsic parasite resistance but is instead the result of inadequate drug levels. The clinical pharmacology component

  7. Evaluation of French Guiana traditional antimalarial remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, S; Bourdy, G; Landau, I; Robinson, J C; Esterre, Ph; Deharo, E

    2005-04-08

    In order to evaluate the antimalarial potential of traditional remedies used in French Guiana, 35 remedies were prepared in their traditional form and screened for blood schizonticidal activity in vitro on Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine re4sistant strain (W2). Some of these extracts were screened in vivo against Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria. Ferriprotoporphyrin inhibition test was also performed. Four remedies, widely used among the population as preventives, were able to inhibit more than 50% of the parasite growth in vivo at around 100 mg/kg: Irlbachia alata (Gentiananceae), Picrolemma pseudocoffea (Simaroubaceae), Quassia amara (Simaroubaceae), Tinospora crispa (Menispermaceae) and Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae). Five remedies displayed an IC50 in vitro < 10 microg/ml: Picrolemma pseudocoffea, Pseudoxandra cuspidata (Annonaceae) and Quassia amara leaves and stem, together with a multi-ingredient recipe. Two remedies were more active than a Cinchona preparation on the ferriprotoporphyrin inhibition test: Picrolemma pseudocoffea and Quassia amara. We also showed that a traditional preventive remedy, made from Geissospermum argenteum bark macerated in rum, was able to impair the intrahepatic cycle of the parasite. For the first time, traditional remedies from French Guiana have been directly tested on malarial pharmacological assays and some have been shown to be active.

  8. Human serum albumin binding of certain antimalarials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Olivera S.; Cvijetić, Ilija N.; Zlatović, Mario V.; Opsenica, Igor M.; Konstantinović, Jelena M.; Terzić Jovanović, Nataša V.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.; Verbić, Tatjana Ž.

    2018-03-01

    Interactions between eight in-house synthesized aminoquinolines, along with well-known chloroquine, and human serum albumin (HSA) have been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The synthesized aminoquinolines, despite being structurally diverse, were found to be very potent antimalarials. Fluorescence measurements indicate that three compounds having additional thiophene or benzothiophene substructure bind more strongly to HSA than other studied compounds. Competitive binding experiments indicate that these three compounds bind significantly stronger to warfarin compared to diazepam binding site. Fluorescence quenching at three temperatures (20, 25, and 37 °C) was analyzed using classical Stern-Volmer equation, and a static quenching mechanism was proposed. The enthalpy and entropy changes upon sulphur-containing compound-HSA interactions were calculated using Van't Hoff equation. Positive values of enthalpy and entropy changes indicate that non-specific, hydrophobic interactions are the main contributors to HSA-compound interaction. Molecular docking and calculated lipophilicity descriptors indicate the same, pointing out that the increased lipophilicity of sulphur-containing compounds might be a reason for their better binding to HSA. Obtained results might contribute to design of novel derivatives with improved pharmacokinetic properties and drug efficacy.

  9. Synthesis in aqueous medium and organic praseodymium complexes with ligands derived from Schiff base quinolinic. Characterization and physicochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, A.

    2015-01-01

    It was investigated the coordination ability of the quinolinic Schiff base organic tetradentate quinolinic ligand (Q Schiff-(OH) 2 ) towards the trivalent praseodymium by UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration (St). By St, was studied the formed species between the Q Schiff-(OH) 2 ligand and the praseodymium nitrate salt in equimolar concentrations (5.86 x 10 -4 M: 5.22 x 10 -4 M) in methanol. The statistical analysis of the experimental results suggested three complexed species with 1Pr:3L, 1Pr:2L y 1Pr:1L stoichiometries. The predominant stoichiometries were the second and the latter. Based on these results and data from the scientific literature, the methodology for the syntheses of the complexes Q Schiff-(OH) 2 -Pr in aqueous-organic and organic media was established and a molar ratio M:L= 1:2 of praseodymium nitrate and the ligand was used. The new complexes were characterized by UV/Vis, Infrared, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XP S), Diffuse Reflectance (Dr) and Thermogravimetric Analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TGA/DSC). Elemental analysis of C, N, O and Pr by XP S suggested 1Pr:2L:1Na (PrC 32 H 20 N 4 O 4 Na) stoichiometry of the complex synthesized by the aqueous-organic medium while for the complex synthesized by the organic medium it was 1Pr:3L (PrC 48 H 33 N 6 O 6 ). In the first case, the praseodymium ion charge was neutralized by the anionic ligands whose remaining charge was compensated by the sodium ion. In the second case, the ion charge was neutralized by the ligands. The minimum formula was Pr(Q Schiff) 2 Na for the pure coordination compound from the aqueous-organic medium and the minimum formula Pr(Q Schiff) 3 for that from the organic medium. XP S also indicated that the oxidation state of praseodymium ion was maintained. Both complexes were stable in methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile at least for 5 days. The photophysical properties of the studied complexes were evaluated by emission and excitation luminescence (fluorescence and

  10. Methanol production by Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisman, L S; Ballou, C E

    1988-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis cells produce [3H]methanol when incubated with [methyl-3H]methionine. The methanol is derived from S-adenosylmethionine rather than methyltetrahydrofolate. M. smegmatis cells carboxymethylate several proteins, and some of the methanol probably results from their demethylation, but most of the methanol may come from an unidentified component with a high gel mobility. Although methanol in the medium reached 19 microM, it was not incorporated into the methylated mannose p...

  11. Quinoline biodegradation by filamentous fungus Cunninghamella elegans and adaptive modifications of the fungal membrane composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felczak, Aleksandra; Bernat, Przemysław; Różalska, Sylwia; Lisowska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    Quinoline, which belongs to N-heterocyclic compounds, occurs naturally in the environment and is used in numerous industrial processes. The structures of various chemicals, such as dyes and medicines, are based on this compound. Due to that fact, quinoline and its derivatives are widely distributed in environment and can exert toxic effects on organisms from different trophic levels. The ability of the filamentous fungus Cunninghamella elegans IM 1785/21Gp to degrade quinoline and modulate the membrane composition in response to the pollutant was studied. C. elegans IM 1785/21Gp removes quinoline with high efficiency and transforms the pollutant into two novel hydroxylated derivatives, 2-hydroxyquinoline and 3-hydroxyquinoline. Moreover, due to the disruption in the membrane stability by quinoline, C. elegans IM 1785/21Gp modulates the fatty acid composition and phospholipid profile.

  12. Effect of the complexation on the NLO electronic contribution in film based conjugated quinoline ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroudj, S.; Aamoum, A.; Messaadia, L.; Bouraiou, A.; Bouacida, S.; Bouchouit, K.; Sahraoui, B.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present the complexation, single crystal structure and the third harmonic generation response of the quinoline ligand and its mercury complex. Crystals structure of Bis(quinoline) Mercury (II) dichloride, (C18H14Cl2HgN2) is obtained from aqueous solution and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction at room temperature. This complex crystallizes in centrosymmetric space group. The structure is formed by chains along c axis. These chains are constituted by the quinoline ligand. The electronic contribution χTHG is measured using the third harmonic generation technique on thin films at 1064 nm for quinoline ligand and its mercury complex incorporated in PMMA matrices. The first hyperpolarizability (β), the polarizability (α) and the electric dipole moment (μ) were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the LANL2DZ basis set. The obtained results for the quinoline ligand and its Hg complex show non zero (β).

  13. [Biodegradation and adsorption of bio-zeolite on pyridine and quinoline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yao-Hui; Sun, Qing-Hua; Xing, Rui; Wen, Dong-Hui; Tang, Xiao-Yan

    2010-09-01

    The study was to explore the treatment of pyridine, quinoline and their transformation product, NH(4+) -N, by the biodegradation and adsorption of a natural and a modified bio-zeolites. The experiment results demonstrated that the mixed bacteria on the bio-zeolites, a pyridine-degrading bacterium and a quinoline-degrading bacterium, could degrade pyridine and quinoline simultaneously. The NH(4+) -N transformed from pyridine and quinoline could be adsorbed by the natural and modified zeolites. The adsorption capacity of the modified zeolite was lower than that of the natural zeolite. However, more microorganisms could attach on the surface of the modified zeolite, so the application of the modified bio-zeolite has a better prospect in actual treatment of pyridine and/ or quinoline pollution.

  14. Degradation of quinoline and isoquinoline by vacuum ultraviolet light and mechanism thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Dazhang; Ni Yaming; Sun Dongmei; Wang Shilong; Sun Xiaoyu; Yao Side

    2010-01-01

    Since the wavelength is shorter than 190 nm, vacuum ultraviolet light has high energy enough to break the H-O bonds of water to produce HO·, as well as the protection is very easy, degradation of organic contaminants in water by vacuum ultraviolet light has obviously excellent feature of no reagent adding to the wastewater among advanced oxidation technologies. In this paper, it was reported that quinoline and isoquinoline were degraded in water by the irradiation of low-pressure quartz mercury light with the electric power of 200 W which mainly emitted the light of 185 nm and 254 nm. The change regulation of the concentration of substrates, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) were investigated as well as the degradation processes of quinoline and isoquinoline were compared. It showed that both quinoline and isoquinoline could be degraded very fast under the given conditions. The concentration of the substrates decreased to nearly 0 in 10 minutes while the apparent first reaction rate constants were 0.41 ± 0.02 min -1 and 0.19 ± 0.01 min -1 , respectively. Meanwhile, the COD and TOC decreased to nearly 0 in 30 minutes. Quinoline has the faster degradation rate. In order to investigate mechanism thereof, pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis of quinoline and isoquinoline aqueous solution were performed, respectively. Pulse radiolysis indicated that the reaction rate constant of quinoline and HO· was faster than that of isoquinoline. In the meanwhile, laser flash photolysis indicated that both quinoline and isoquinoline could be ionized by the UV-C light while the photo-ionization efficiency of quinoline was higher than that of quinoline. These two reasons caused the faster degradation rate of quinoline. (authors)

  15. Antimalarial drug policy in India: Past, present & future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Arora, Usha; Sonal, G.S.; Mishra, Neelima; Shahi, Bharatendu; Savargaonkar, Deepali; Kumar, Navin; Shah, Naman K.; Valecha, Neena

    2014-01-01

    The use of antimalarial drugs in India has evolved since the introduction of quinine in the 17th century. Since the formal establishment of a malaria control programme in 1953, shortly after independence, treatments provided by the public sector ranged from chloroquine, the mainstay drug for many decades, to the newer, recently introduced artemisinin based combination therapy. The complexity of considerations in antimalarial treatment led to the formulation of a National Antimalarial Drug Policy to guide procurement as well as communicate best practices to both public and private healthcare providers. Challenges addressed in the policy include the use of presumptive treatment, the introduction of alternate treatments for drug-resistant malaria, the duration of primaquine therapy to prevent relapses of vivax malaria, the treatment of malaria in pregnancy, and the choice of drugs for chemoprophylaxis. While data on antimalarial drug resistance and both public and private sector treatment practices have been recently reviewed, the policy process of setting national standards has not. In this perspective on antimalarial drug policy, this review highlights its relevant history, analyzes the current policy, and examines future directions. PMID:24718394

  16. Plasmodium falciparum neutral aminopeptidases: new targets for anti-malarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Stack, Colin M; Trenholme, Katharine R; Brown, Chris L; Grembecka, Jolanta; Lowther, Jonathan; Mucha, Artur; Drag, Marcin; Kafarski, Pawel; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C; Gardiner, Donald L; Dalton, John P

    2010-01-01

    The neutral aminopeptidases M1 alanyl aminopeptidase (PfM1AAP) and M17 leucine aminopeptidase (PfM17LAP) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are targets for the development of novel anti-malarial drugs. Although the functions of these enzymes remain unknown, they are believed to act in the terminal stages of haemoglobin degradation, generating amino acids essential for parasite growth and development. Inhibitors of both enzymes are lethal to P. falciparum in culture and kill the murine malaria P. chabaudi in vivo. Recent biochemical, structural and functional studies provide the substrate specificity and mechanistic binding data needed to guide the development of more potent anti-malarial drugs. Together with biological studies, these data form the rationale for choosing PfM1AAP and PfM17LAP as targets for anti-malarial development. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quinine dimers are potent inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and are active against quinoline-resistant P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycyna, Christine A; Summers, Robert L; Lehane, Adele M; Pires, Marcos M; Namanja, Hilda; Bohn, Kelsey; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Ferdig, Michael; Henrich, Philipp P; Fidock, David A; Kirk, Kiaran; Chmielewski, Jean; Martin, Rowena E

    2014-03-21

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is primarily conferred by mutations in the "chloroquine resistance transporter" (PfCRT). The resistance-conferring form of PfCRT (PfCRT(CQR)) mediates CQ resistance by effluxing the drug from the parasite's digestive vacuole, the acidic compartment in which CQ exerts its antiplasmodial effect. PfCRT(CQR) can also decrease the parasite's susceptibility to other quinoline drugs, including the current antimalarials quinine and amodiaquine. Here we describe interactions between PfCRT(CQR) and a series of dimeric quinine molecules using a Xenopus laevis oocyte system for the heterologous expression of PfCRT and using an assay that detects the drug-associated efflux of H(+) ions from the digestive vacuole in parasites that harbor different forms of PfCRT. The antiplasmodial activities of dimers 1 and 6 were also examined in vitro (against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of P. falciparum) and in vivo (against drug-sensitive P. berghei). Our data reveal that the quinine dimers are the most potent inhibitors of PfCRT(CQR) reported to date. Furthermore, the lead compounds (1 and 6) were not effluxed by PfCRT(CQR) from the digestive vacuole but instead accumulated to very high levels within this organelle. Both 1 and 6 exhibited in vitro antiplasmodial activities that were inversely correlated with CQ. Moreover, the additional parasiticidal effect exerted by 1 and 6 in the drug-resistant parasites was attributable, at least in part, to their ability to inhibit PfCRT(CQR). This highlights the potential for devising new antimalarial therapies that exploit inherent weaknesses in a key resistance mechanism of P. falciparum.

  18. Quinine Dimers Are Potent Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter and Are Active against Quinoline-Resistant P. falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycyna, Christine A.; Summers, Robert L.; Lehane, Adele M.; Pires, Marcos M.; Namanja, Hilda; Bohn, Kelsey; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Ferdig, Michael; Henrich, Philipp P.; Fidock, David A.; Kirk, Kiaran; Chmielewski, Jean; Martin, Rowena E.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is primarily conferred by mutations in the “chloroquine resistance transporter” (PfCRT). The resistance-conferring form of PfCRT (PfCRTCQR) mediates CQ resistance by effluxing the drug from the parasite’s digestive vacuole, the acidic compartment in which CQ exerts its antiplasmodial effect. PfCRTCQR can also decrease the parasite’s susceptibility to other quinoline drugs, including the current antimalarials quinine and amodiaquine. Here we describe interactions between PfCRTCQR and a series of dimeric quinine molecules using a Xenopus laevis oocyte system for the heterologous expression of PfCRT and using an assay that detects the drug-associated efflux of H+ ions from the digestive vacuole in parasites that harbor different forms of PfCRT. The antiplasmodial activities of dimers 1 and 6 were also examined in vitro (against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of P. falciparum) and in vivo (against drug-sensitive P. berghei). Our data reveal that the quinine dimers are the most potent inhibitors of PfCRTCQR reported to date. Furthermore, the lead compounds (1 and 6) were not effluxed by PfCRTCQR from the digestive vacuole but instead accumulated to very high levels within this organelle. Both 1 and 6 exhibited in vitro antiplasmodial activities that were inversely correlated with CQ. Moreover, the additional parasiticidal effect exerted by 1 and 6 in the drug-resistant parasites was attributable, at least in part, to their ability to inhibit PfCRTCQR. This highlights the potential for devising new antimalarial therapies that exploit inherent weaknesses in a key resistance mechanism of P. falciparum. PMID:24369685

  19. The interaction of x-rays and antimalarials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geoghegan, D.S.; Skinner-Adams, T.; Davis, T.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The radiation sensitivity of malaria parasites has three potential clinical applications, namely i) to prevent the transmission of malaria by blood transfusion, ii) as adjunctive therapy when a radioactive isotope is complexed to a conventional antimalarial drug, and iii) to attenuate the pathogenicity of specific parasite stages as part of the development of a vaccine. In the first two applications, detailed information relating to parasite radiosensitivity and the interaction of ionising radiation with antimalarials is of vital importance because dosimetry must allow for the exposure of normal cells. Malaria parasite cultures (Plasmodium falciparum) were exposed to a logarithmic series of concentrations of antimalarial agents and irradiated using a Siemens Stabilipan orthovoltage radiotherapy unit. The irradiation was performed at room temperature and ambient oxygen concentration. Control samples were also irradiated. The DNA synthesis in each culture was measured 48 hours post irradiation by using a 3 H-hypoxanthine incorporation assay. The antimalarials studied are: artesunate, quinine, retinol and chloroquine. The radiosensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum is not dependent on the strain of parasite with the dose required to inhibit 50% of DNA synthesis (ID 50 ) equal to 24.7 ± 3.0 Gy. This applies equally for the drug resistant and drug sensitive strains studied. Because the measured radiosensitivity is dependent on the sera oxygen concentration, the reported value for the ID 50 may not apply in hypoxic situations. The interaction of ionising radiation with the antimalarials shows synergy with retinol and choloquine, additivity with quinine and slight antagonism with artesunate. Radionuclide therapy may emerge as a novel treatment for malaria. If this does occur, then, although all strains appear to be equally radiosensitive, care must be taken when combining ionising radiation with existing antimalarials for the treatment of malaria. Copyright

  20. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  1. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  2. In Vivo Antimalarial Effects of Iranian Flora Artemisia khorassanica against Plasmodium berghei and Pharmacochemistry of its Natural Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Amini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimalarial effects of Iranian flora Artemisia khorassanica against Plasmodium berghei in vivo and pharmacochemistry of its natural components."nMethods: The aerial parts of Iranian flora A. khorasanica were collected at flowering stage from Khorassan Province, northeastern Iran in 2008. They were air-dried at room temperature; powder was macerated in methanol and the extract defatted in refrigerator, filtered, diluted with water, then eluted with n-hexane and finally non-polar components were identified through Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS. Toxicity of herbal extracts was assessed on naïve NMRI mice, and its anti-malarial efficacy was investigated on infected Plasmodium berghei animals. This is the first ap­plication on A. khorssanica extract for treatment of murine malaria. The significance of differences was determined by Analysis of Variances (ANOVA and Student's t-test using Graph Pad Prism Software."nResults: The herbal extract was successfully tested in vivo for its anti-plasmodial activity through ar­temisin composition, which is widely used as a standard malaria treatment."nConclusion: Although, this study confirmed less anti-malarial effects of A. khorssanica against mur­ine malaria in vivo, how­ever there are some evidences on reducing pathophysiology by this medica­tion. In complementary assay, major components were detected by GC-MS analysis in herbal extract including chrysanthe­none (7.8%, palmitic acid (7.4% and cis-thujone (5.8%.  The most retention indices of the compo­nent are given as n-eicosane, palmitic acid and n-octadecane.

  3. The antimalarial drug artemisinin alkylates heme in infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Anne; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Claparols, Catherine; Meunier, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Heme alkylation by the antimalarial drug artemisinin is reported in vivo, within infected mice that have been treated at pharmacologically relevant doses. Adducts resulting from the alkylation of heme by the drug were characterized in the spleen of treated mice, and their glucuroconjugated derivatives were present in the urine. Because these heme-artemisinin adducts were not observed in noninfected mice, this report confirms that the alkylating activity of this antimalarial drug is related to the presence of the parasite in infected animals. The identification of heme-artemisinin adducts in mice should be considered as the signature of the alkylation capacity of artemisinin in vivo. PMID:16155128

  4. Febuxostat methanol solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Qi-Ying Jiang; Jing-Jing Qian; Jian-Ming Gu; Gu-Ping Tang; Xiu-Rong Hu

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: [2-(3-cyano-4-isobutyloxyphenyl)-4-methyl-1,3-thiazole-5-carboxylic acid (febuxostat) methanol monosolvate}, C16H16N2O3S·CH4O, the benzene and thiazole rings in the febuxostat molecule are twisted at 5.3 (1)°. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...O and O—H...N hydrogen bonds link the febuxostat and methanol molecules into helical chains along the 21 screw axis.

  5. Synthesis of samarium complexes with the derivative binder of Schiff Quinolinic base. Characterization and photophysical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas H, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we determined the metal: binder stoichiometry of the species formed during the UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration of the derivative binder of Schiff quinolinic base, L1 with the samarium nitrate pentahydrate in methanol. Statistical analysis of the data allowed proposing the metal: binder stoichiometry for the synthesis of the complexes which was one mole of samarium salt by 2.5 moles of binder and thus favor the formation of complexes with 1M: 1L and 1M: 2L stoichiometries. They were synthesized in aqueous-organic medium (water-ethanol), isolated and purified two complexes with stoichiometry 1 Sm: 1 L1, complex 1 and 1 Sm: 2 L1, complex 2. The overall yield of the reaction was 76%. The characterization of the formed complexes was performed by visible ultraviolet spectrometry (UV/Vis), nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), thermal gravimetric analysis with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC), and radial distribution function. These complexes were studied by fluorescence and emission phosphorescence at variable temperature. Spectroscopic techniques used in both solution and solid demonstrated the formation and stability of these complexes. In addition XP S indicated that in both complexes the samarium retains its oxidation state 3+. Luminescence studies indicated that there is intra-binding charge transfer which decreases the transfer of light energy from the binder to the samarium. Based on the experimental results, L1 binder molecules and complexes 1 and 2 were modeled that demonstrated the proposed Nc for each complex, as well as allowed to visualize the structural arrangement of the molecules, complexes and binder. (Author)

  6. Comparative theoretical and experimental study on novel tri-quinoline system and its anticancer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, Kasirajan; Radhika, Ramachandran; Shankar, Ramasamy; Malathi, Mahalingam; Savithiri, Krishnaswamy; Sparkes, Hazel A.; Howard, Judith A. K.; Mohan, Palathurai Subramaniam

    2017-04-01

    A novel compound 2-chloro-3,6-bis-(quinolin-8-yloxymethyl)-quinoline 3 bearing a tri-quinoline moiety has been synthesized from 2-chloro-3,6-dimethyl quinoline 1 and 8-hydroxy quinoline 2 using dry acetone and K2CO3 as a base. 3 has been characterized by using FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. We have also made a combined experimental and theoretical study on the molecular structure, vibrational spectra, NMR, FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectra of 2-chloro-3,6-bis-(quinolin-8-yloxymethyl)-quinoline. The theoretical studies of the title compound have been evaluated by using density functional theory calculations using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of theories. The calculated theoretical values were found to be in good agreement with the experimental findings. The single crystal structure 3 crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Pna21. The compound 3 exhibits higher cytotoxicity in human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa) than human breast cancer cell lines (MCF7).

  7. Synthesis and crystal structure of bis(1-{[(quinolin-8-ylimino]methyl}pyrene-κ2N,N′silver(I trifluoromethanesulfonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pinto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Ag(qPyr2]CF3SO3 where qPyr = 1-(quinoline-2-ylmethyleneaminopyrene, C26H16N2, was synthesized from a reaction of silver trifluoromethanesulfonate and qPyr in dichloromethane–methanol mixed media. In this design, the qPyr ligand was chosen for its characteristic excitation and emission profiles, which could enable the tracking of the silver complex within biological targets. The AgI atom resides in a distorted tetrahedral N4 coordination sphere. Analysis of the packing pattern revealed significant intra- and intermolecular π–π stacking interactions between the [Ag(qPyr2]+ cations. In addition, a weak C—H...O hydrogen bond consolidates the packing between cations and anions.

  8. Evaluation of the use of Ocimum suave Willd. (Lamiaceae), Plectranthus barbatus Andrews (Lamiaceae) and Zanthoxylum chalybeum Engl. (Rutaceae) as antimalarial remedies in Kenyan folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraithe, Micheni N; Nguta, Joseph M; Mbaria, James M; Kiama, Stephen G

    2016-02-03

    Crude extracts from the leaves of Ocimum suave Willd (Lamiaceae) and the root barks of Plectranthus barbatus Andrews (Lamiaceae) and Zanthoxylum chalybeum Engl. (Rutaceae) were studied to ascertain the ethnopharmacological standing of their antimalarial usage in Kenyan folk medicine. Aqueous and Chloroform: Methanol (1:1) extracts of the plants were used in this study. Toxicity of the extracts was investigated by using brine shrimp lethality test and acute oral toxicity in mice. The antimalarial activity at a dose of 100 mg/kg was screened in Swiss albino mice against chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium berghei (D6) using Peters 4-day suppressive test. Chloroquine, at a dosage rate of 20 mg/kg was used as a reference drug. The extracts showed some signs of acute toxicity in the brine shrimp lethality test. However, no signs of toxicity were observed in the mice at a dose of 2000 mg/kg of the crude extracts. The results revealed that all the tested crude extracts were safe. Z. chalybeum aqueous extract and P. barbatus organic extract showed chemosuppressive activities of 81.45% and 78.69%, respectively. This antimalarial activity was not significantly different from that of chloroquine (P<0.05). The findings suggest that the Kenyan folkloric medicinal application of these plants has a pharmacological basis. Bioactivity guided fractionation and isolation of bioactive molecules from the two species could lead to new hits against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Methanol from biomass and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    For Hawaii in the near term, the only liquid fuels indigenous sources will be those that can be made from biomass, and of these, methanol is the most promising. In addition, hydrogen produced by electrolysis can be used to markedly increase the yield of biomass methanol. This paper calculates cost of producing methanol by an integrated system including a geothermal electricity facility plus a plant producing methanol by gasifying biomass and adding hydrogen produced by electrolysis. Other studies cover methanol from biomass without added hydrogen and methanol from biomass by steam and carbon dioxide reforming. Methanol is made in a two-step process: the first is the gasification of biomass by partial oxidation with pure oxygen to produce carbon oxides and hydrogen, and the second is the reaction of gases to form methanol. Geothermal steam is used to generate the electricity used for the electrolysis to produce the added hydrogen

  10. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of quinoline and 3-methylquinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mingchao; Zhang, Wenbing; Fang, Jun; Liang, Qianqiong; Liu, Dongxuan

    2017-08-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has been used extensively to investigate the biodegradation of various organic pollutants. To date, little isotope fractionation information is available for the biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. In this study, we report on the carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during quinoline and 3-methylquinoline aerobic microbial degradation by a Comamonas sp. strain Q10. Degradation of quinoline and 3-methylquinoline was accompanied by isotope fractionation. Large hydrogen and small carbon isotope fractionation was observed for quinoline while minor carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation effects occurred for 3-methylquinoline. Bulk carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors (ε bulk ) for quinoline biodegradation were -1.2 ± 0.1 and -38 ± 1‰, respectively, while -0.7 ± 0.1 and -5 ± 1‰ for 3-methylquinoline, respectively. This reveals a potential advantage for employing quinoline as the model compound and hydrogen isotope analysis for assessing aerobic biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. The apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE C ) values of carbon were 1.008 ± 0.0005 for quinoline and 1.0048 ± 0.0005 for 3-methylquinoline while AKIE H values of hydrogen of 1.264 ± 0.011 for quinoline and 1.0356 ± 0.0103 for 3-methylquinoline were obtained. The combined evaluation of carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation yields Λ values (Λ = Δδ 2 H/Δδ 13 C ≈ εH bulk /εC bulk ) of 29 ± 2 for quinoline and 8 ± 2 for 3-methylquinoline. The results indicate that the substrate specificity may have a significant influence on the isotope fractionation for the biodegradation of quinolinic compounds. The substrate-specific isotope enrichment factors would be important for assessing the behavior and fate of quinolinic compounds in the environment.

  11. Methanol from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  12. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the

  13. Factors contributing to antimalarial drug resistance in Rachuonyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative and quantitative data were collected among 380 respondents including health care providers, people seeking malaria treatment and Community Own Resource (CORPs), from 47 registered health facilities. The study revealed that all health facilities were using general-purpose trucks to transport antimalarial ...

  14. Bioguided investigation of the antimalarial activities of Trema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acetone extract of T. orientalis leaves was investigated for its antimalarial activity in a mouse model of Plasmodium berghei using the 4 day suppressive test. Bioguided investigation was carried out by using column chromatographic fractions for in-vivo antiplasmodial screening. Preliminary spectroscopic profile of the most ...

  15. Safety and Tolerability Profile of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The WHO in 2001 advocated artemisinin- based antimalarial combination therapy (ACT), which was adopted by Nigeria in 2005. The objective of this study was to characterize the safety and tolerability profile of the ACTs in adult patients with uncomplicated malaria. A descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in the ...

  16. The antimalarial drug quinine interferes with serotonin biosynthesis and action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islahudin, Farida; Tindall, Sarah M.; Mellor, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    The major antimalarial drug quinine perturbs uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan, and patients with low plasma tryptophan are predisposed to adverse quinine reactions; symptoms of which are similar to indications of tryptophan depletion. As tryptophan is a precursor of the neurotransmit...

  17. Dried whole plant Artemisia annua as an antimalarial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A Elfawal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drugs are primary weapons for reducing malaria in human populations. However emergence of resistant parasites has repeatedly curtailed the lifespan of each drug that is developed and deployed. Currently the most effective anti-malarial is artemisinin, which is extracted from the leaves of Artemisia annua. Due to poor pharmacokinetic properties and prudent efforts to curtail resistance to monotherapies, artemisinin is prescribed only in combination with other anti-malarials composing an Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT. Low yield in the plant, and the added cost of secondary anti-malarials in the ACT, make artemisinin costly for the developing world. As an alternative, we compared the efficacy of oral delivery of the dried leaves of whole plant (WP A. annua to a comparable dose of pure artemisinin in a rodent malaria model (Plasmodium chabaudi. We found that a single dose of WP (containing 24 mg/kg artemisinin reduces parasitemia more effectively than a comparable dose of purified drug. This increased efficacy may result from a documented 40-fold increase in the bioavailability of artemisinin in the blood of mice fed the whole plant, in comparison to those administered synthetic drug. Synergistic benefits may derive from the presence of other anti-malarial compounds in A. annua. If shown to be clinically efficacious, well-tolerated, and compatible with the public health imperative of forestalling evolution of drug resistance, inexpensive, locally grown and processed A. annua might prove to be an effective addition to the global effort to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality.

  18. Antimalarial activity of selected Ethiopian medicinal plants in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshetu M. Bobasa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Parasites are the leading killers in subtropical areas of which malaria took the lion share from protozoan diseases. Measuring the impact of antimalarial drug resistance is difficult, and the impact may not be recognized until it is severe, especially in high transmission areas. Aims: To evaluate the in vivo antimalarial activities of hydroalcoholic extracts of the roots of Piper capense and Adhatoda schimperiana, against Plasmodium berghei in mice. Methods: Four-day suppressive and curative test animal models were used to explore the antimalarial activities of the plants. 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg of each plant extract was administered to check the activities versus vehicle administered mice. Mean survival time and level of parasitemia were the major variables employed to compare the efficacy vs. negative control. Results: In both models the 400 and 600 mg/kg doses of Adhatoda schimperiana and the 600 mg/kg dose Piper capense. showed significant parasitemia suppression and increased in mean survival time at p≤0.05. The middle dose of Piper capense had a border line inhibition where the extracts were considered active when parasitemia was reduced by ≥ 30%. Conclusions: The hydroalcoholic extracts of the roots of Adhatoda schimperiana and Piper capense possess moderate antimalarial activities, which prove its traditional claims. Thus, further studies should be done to isolate the active constituents for future use in the modern drug discovery.

  19. Antimalarial drug use among caregivers in Ghana | Abuaku | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Household surveys, using multi-stage sampling, were conducted in 2 sentinel districts, Wassa West and Kassena Nankana, established to monitor chloroquine resistance in the country. Five hundred caregivers were interviewed in each district to determine patterns of antimalarial drug use among caregivers of ...

  20. In Vivo anti-malarial activities of Clerodendrum myricoides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum is an acute disease which kills an estimated 863,000 people per year according to the WHO report of 2009. The fight against malaria is faced with the occurrence of widespread resistance of P. falciparum. The search for plant-derived antimalarial drugs ...

  1. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs Analysed in the National Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the period 2002–2005, the National Quality Control Laboratory analysed 229 samples of antimalarial drugs. In 2002, 42% of these products failed to comply with compendial specifications, with the sulfadoxine/ sulfamethoxypyrazine and pyrimethamine combination products forming 39% of the total failures.

  2. Comparative antimalarial and cytotoxic activities of two Vernonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antimalarial and cytotoxic activities of two Vernonia species: V. amygdalina from the Democratic Republic of Congo and V. cinerea subsp vialis endemic to Madagascar. KN Ngbolua, H Rakotoarimanana, H Rafatro, US Ratsimamanga, V Mudogo, PT Mpiana, DST Tshibangu ...

  3. Antimalarial prescribing patterns in state hospitals and selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    slowdown of progression to resistance could be achieved by improving prescribing practice, drug quality, and patient compliance. Objective: To determine the antimalarial prescribing pattern and to assess rational prescribing of chloroquine by prescribers in government hospitals and parastatals in Lagos State. Methods: ...

  4. Synthesis, and anti-malarial screening, of 1-diethylamino-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artemisinin and its derivatives have become antimalarial drugs of choice because they are effective against most stages in the life cycle of plasmodium and are safe for all, including pregnant women. World Health Organisation ... The target compound also had an LD50 of 330 mg/kg in mice by the oral route. A single dose ...

  5. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  6. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    OpenAIRE

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefor...

  7. Coordination chemistry and biological activity of 5'-OH modified quinoline-B12 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenka, Karel; Brandl, Helmut; Spingler, Bernhard; Zelder, Felix

    2011-10-14

    The consequences of structural modifications at the 5'-OH ribofuranotide moiety of quinoline modified B12 derivatives are discussed in regard of the coordination chemistry, the electrochemical properties and the biological behaviour of the compound.

  8. Nitro group substitution effects in selected β- and γ-quinoline derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslankiewicz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The quinolines nitration reaction have been investigated by means of 1 H NMR. The reaction products have been identified and influence of nitro group localization discussed on the base of chemical shifts and coupling constants observed in NMR spectra

  9. Quality of antimalarials at the epicenter of antimalarial drug resistance: results from an overt and mystery client survey in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L S; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-06-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Pharmacomodulation of the Antimalarial Plasmodione: Synthesis of Biaryl- and N-Arylalkylamine Analogues, Antimalarial Activities and Physicochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karène Urgin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of increasing the structural diversity on the early antimalarial drug plasmodione, an efficient and versatile procedure to prepare a series of biaryl- and N-arylalkylamines as plasmodione analogues is described. Using the naturally occurring and commercially available menadione as starting material, a 2-step sequence using a Kochi-Anderson reaction and subsequent Pd-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling was developed to prepare three representative biphenyl derivatives in good yields for antimalarial evaluation. In addition, synthetic methodologies to afford 3-benzylmenadione derivatives bearing a terminal -N(Me2 or -N(Et2 in different positions (ortho, meta and para on the aryl ring of the benzylic chain of plasmodione were investigated through reductive amination was used as the optimal route to prepare these protonable N-arylalkylamine privileged scaffolds. The antimalarial activities were evaluated and discussed in light of their physicochemical properties. Among the newly synthesized compounds, the para-position of the substituent remains the most favourable position on the benzyl chain and the carbamate -NHBoc was found active both in vitro (42 nM versus 29 nM for plasmodione and in vivo in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. The measured acido-basic features of these new molecules support the cytosol-food vacuole shuttling properties of non-protonable plasmodione derivatives essential for redox-cycling. These findings may be useful in antimalarial drug optimization.

  11. Assessment of Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Pregnant Women in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agomo, Chimere Obiora; Oyibo, Wellington Aghoghovwia; Sutherland, Colin; Hallet, Rachael; Oguike, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of antimalarial drugs for prevention and treatment is a major strategy in the prevention of malaria in pregnancy. Although sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is currently recommended for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Nigeria, previously used drugs for prophylaxis such as chloroquine (CQ) and pyrimethamine are accessible as they are purchased over the counter. This study describes the markers of absence or presence of resistance to quinoline (Pfcrt and Pfmdr 1) and type 1 antifolate antimalarial medicines (Pfdhfr). Methods Plasmodium falciparum-positive dried blood spots from pregnant women attending antenatal clinics for the first time during current pregnancy were investigated for the presence of mutations at codons 72–76 of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) gene by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using haplotype-specific probes. PCR followed by sequence analysis was used to identify mutations at codons 86, 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 of P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (Pfmdr1) gene; and codons 16, 50, 51, 59, 108, 140 and 164 of Pfdhfr gene. Results Two haplotypes of Pfcrt (n = 54) were observed: CVMNK 13(24.2%) and CVIET 41 (75.9%) of the samples. The SVMNT haplotype was absent in this population. The Pfmdr1 (n = 28) haplotypes were NYSND 15(53.6%), YYSND 5(17.9%), NFSND 6(21.4%) and YFSND 2(7.1%). The Pfdhfr (n = 15) were ACNCSVI 4(26.7%), and ACICNSVI 1(6.7%) and ACIRNVI 10 (66.7%). The rate of occurrence of Pfcrt 76T, Pfdhfr108N, Pfmdr186Yand184F were 75.9%, 73.3%, 25% and 28.1% respectively. The Pfmdr1 86Y was associated with low parasitaemia (median = 71 parasites/μl, P = 0.024) while Pfcrt 76T was associated with young maternal age (mean 24.1 ± 4.5 years; P = 0.006). The median parasitaemia were similar (P>0.05) in wild and mutant strains of Pfcrt 76, Pfmdr1 184 and Pfdhfr 108. There was no association between gravidity or gestational age of the women and

  12. Rare-earth quinolinates: Infrared-emitting molecular materials with a rich structural chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Van Deun, Rik; Fias, Pascal; Nockemann, Peter; Schepers, An; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2004-01-01

    Near-infrared-emitting rare-earth chelates based on 8-hydroxyquinoline have appeared frequently in recent literature, because they are promising candidates for active components in near-infrared-luminescent optical devices, such as optical amplifiers, organic light-emitting diodes, .... Unfortunately, the absence of a full structural investigation of these rare-earth quinolinates is hampering the further development of rare-earth quinolinate based materials, because the luminescence output ca...

  13. The potential of quinoline derivatives for the treatment of Toxoplasma gondii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Dema; Crater, Anna K; Lee, Hoyun; Solomon, V Raja; Ananvoranich, Sirinart

    2014-10-01

    Here we reported our investigation, as part of our drug repositioning effort, on anti-Toxoplasma properties of newly synthesized quinoline compounds. A collection of 4-aminoquinoline and 4-piperazinylquinoline analogs have recently been synthesized for use in cancer chemotherapy. Some analogs were able to outperform chloroquine, a quinoline derivative drug which is commonly used in the treatment of malaria and other parasitic infections. Herein 58 compounds containing one or two quinoline rings were examined for their effectiveness as potential anti-Toxoplasma compounds. Of these 58 compounds, 32 were efficient at inhibiting Toxoplasma growth (IC50Toxoplasma effect among quinoline derivatives was detected in B11, B12, B23, and B24, whose structures carry two quinoline rings, and their resultant cLogP values are ⩾7. Among these compounds, B23 was the most effective compound with IC50 value of 425±35 nM, and TI value of 4.9. It was also noted that compounds with at least one quinoline ring, displaying anti-Toxoplasma effects were capable of causing the disappearance of the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle. When treated with quinoline, 8-hydroxyquinoline or B23, 40-45% of the parasites lost their apicoplasts. Our findings recapitulate the properties of quinoline derivatives in diminishing apicoplast. This could aid further investigations of anti-parasitic treatments specific to Apicomplexan. More importantly, B12 and B23 which harbor superior anti-cancer properties than chloroquine, have effective anti-Toxoplasma activity. These compounds therefore have significant potential for future development of chemotherapeutic agents for patients suffering from breast cancers and parasitic infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methanol commercial aviation fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.O.

    1992-01-01

    Southern California's heavy reliance on petroleum-fueled transportation has resulted in significant air pollution problems within the south Coast Air Basin (Basin) which stem directly from this near total dependence on fossil fuels. To deal with this pressing issue, recently enacted state legislation has proposed mandatory introduction of clean alternative fuels into ground transportation fleets operating within this area. The commercial air transportation sector, however, also exerts a significant impact on regional air quality which may exceed emission gains achieved in the ground transportation sector. This paper addresses the potential, through the implementation of methanol as a commercial aviation fuel, to improve regional air quality within the Basin and the need to flight test and demonstrate methanol as an environmentally preferable fuel in aircraft turbine engines

  15. A single LC-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of 14 antimalarial drugs and their metabolites in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodel, E M; Zanolari, B; Mercier, T; Biollaz, J; Keiser, J; Olliaro, P; Genton, B; Decosterd, L A

    2009-04-01

    Among the various determinants of treatment response, the achievement of sufficient blood levels is essential for curing malaria. For helping us at improving our current understanding of antimalarial drugs pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity, we have developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-MS/MS) requiring 200mul of plasma for the simultaneous determination of 14 antimalarial drugs and their metabolites which are the components of the current first-line combination treatments for malaria (artemether, artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, amodiaquine, N-desethyl-amodiaquine, lumefantrine, desbutyl-lumefantrine, piperaquine, pyronaridine, mefloquine, chloroquine, quinine, pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine). Plasma is purified by a combination of protein precipitation, evaporation and reconstitution in methanol/ammonium formate 20mM (pH 4.0) 1:1. Reverse-phase chromatographic separation of antimalarial drugs is obtained using a gradient elution of 20mM ammonium formate and acetonitrile both containing 0.5% formic acid, followed by rinsing and re-equilibration to the initial solvent composition up to 21min. Analyte quantification, using matrix-matched calibration samples, is performed by electro-spray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry by selected reaction monitoring detection in the positive mode. The method was validated according to FDA recommendations, including assessment of extraction yield, matrix effect variability, overall process efficiency, standard addition experiments as well as antimalarials short- and long-term stability in plasma. The reactivity of endoperoxide-containing antimalarials in the presence of hemolysis was tested both in vitro and on malaria patients samples. With this method, signal intensity of artemisinin decreased by about 20% in the presence of 0.2% hemolysed red-blood cells in plasma, whereas its derivatives were essentially not affected. The method is precise (inter-day CV%: 3.1-12.6%) and sensitive

  16. Quinolines in clothing textiles--a source of human exposure and wastewater pollution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Giovanna; Thorsén, Gunnar; Ostman, Conny

    2014-05-01

    A production process in which the use of various types of chemicals seems to be ubiquitous makes the textile industry a growing problem regarding both public health as well as the environment. Among several substances used at each stage, the present study focuses on the quinolines, a class of compounds involved in the manufacture of dyes, some of which are skin irritants and/or classified as probable human carcinogens. A method was developed for the determination of quinoline derivatives in textile materials comprising ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction, solid phase extraction cleanup, and final analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Quinoline and ten quinoline derivatives were determined in 31 textile samples. The clothing samples, diverse in color, material, brand, country of manufacture, and price, and intended for a broad market, were purchased from different shops in Stockholm, Sweden. Quinoline, a possible human carcinogen, was found to be the most abundant compound present in almost all of the samples investigated, reaching a level of 1.9 mg in a single garment, and it was found that quinoline and its derivatives were mainly correlated to polyester material. This study points out the importance of screening textiles with nontarget analysis to investigate the presence of chemicals in an unbiased manner. Focus should be primarily on clothing worn close to the body.

  17. Synthesis, photochemistry, DNA cleavage/binding and cytotoxic properties of fluorescent quinoxaline and quinoline hydroperoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nilanjana; Gangopadhyay, Moumita; Karthik, S; Pradeep Singh, N D; Baidya, Mithu; Ghosh, S K

    2014-01-05

    Novel fluorescent quinoxaline and quinoline hydroperoxides were shown to perform dual role as both fluorophores for cell imaging and photoinduced DNA cleaving agents. Photophysical studies of newly synthesized quinoxaline and quinoline hydroperoxides showed that they all exhibited moderate to good fluorescence. Photolysis of quinoxaline and quinoline hydroperoxides in acetonitrile using UV light above 350nm resulted in the formation of corresponding ester compounds via γ-hydrogen abstraction by excited carbonyl chromophore. Single strand DNA cleavage was achieved on irradiation of newly synthesized hydroperoxides by UV light (⩾350nm). Both hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygen were identified as reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for the DNA cleavage. Further, we showed quinoline hydroperoxide binds to ct-DNA via intercalative mode. In vitro biological studies revealed that quinoline hydroperoxide has good biocompatibility, cellular uptake property and cell imaging ability. Finally, we showed that quinoline hydroperoxide can permeate into cells efficiently and may cause cytotoxicity upon irradiation by UV light. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CO{sub 2} binding in the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Jacob D.; Buytendyk, Allyson M.; Wang, Yi; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kim, Seong K. [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-21

    We have studied the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex by a combination of mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. The (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex has much in common with previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complexes both in terms of geometric structure and covalent bonding character. Unlike the previously studied N-heterocycles, however, quinoline has a positive electron affinity, and this provided a pathway for determining the binding energy of CO{sub 2} in the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex. From the theoretical calculations, we found CO{sub 2} to be bound within the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex by 0.6 eV. We also showed that the excess electron is delocalized over the entire molecular framework. It is likely that the CO{sub 2} binding energies and excess electron delocalization profiles of the previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complexes are quite similar to that of the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex. This class of complexes may have a role to play in CO{sub 2} activation and/or sequestration.

  19. Crystal structure and theoretical studies on quinoline phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Issa, T.; Ghalla, H.; Marzougui, S.; Benhamada, L.

    2017-12-01

    The crystal structure of (C9H7N) H3PO4 (QP) was determined from single crystals obtained by slow evaporation methods (space group Pī; a = 7.5508(3) Å, b = 7.9705(3) Å, c = 8.6849(3) Å; α = 77.3725(18)°, β = 82.6225(19)°, γ = 74.9829(19)°). The crystal structure of QP is built up from infinite hydrogen bonding inorganic chains of (H3PO4)n lay parallel to the an axis, which are also connected to the quinoline rings through hydrogen bonds in a 3D arrangement. The structure was examined through atoms in molecules (AIM) topological and Hirshfeld surface (HS) analyses and its molecular structure optimized by theoretical density functional (DFT) calculations. The QP observed IR absorptions between 4000 and 400 cm-1 were assigned on the basis of the calculated theoretical vibrational modes.

  20. UV action spectroscopy of protonated PAH derivatives. Methyl substituted quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klærke, Benedikte; Holm, Anne; Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the production of molecular photofragments upon UV excitation of PAH derivatives, relevant for the interstellar medium. Methods. The action absorption spectra of protonated gas-phase methyl-substituted quinolines (CH3−C9H7NH+) have been recorded in the 215–338 nm spectral range...... using the electrostatic storage ring ELISA, an electrospray ion source and 3 ns UV laser pulses. Results. It is shown that the absorption profile is both redshifted and broadened when moving the methyl group from the heterocycle containing nitrogen to the homoatomic ring. The absorption profiles...... the estimated IR relaxation time. Photophysical properties of both nitrogen containing and methyl-substituted PAHs are interesting in an astrophysical context in connection with identifying the aromatic component of the interstellar medium....

  1. Antitrypanosomal quinoline alkaloids from the roots of Waltheria indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretton, Sylvian; Breant, Lise; Pourrez, Lucie; Ambuehl, Chiara; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Hamburger, Matthias; Perozzo, Remo; Karimou, Soumana; Kaiser, Marcel; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2014-10-24

    Chemical investigation of the dichloromethane root extract of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of 10 quinoline alkaloids, namely, 8-deoxoantidesmone (1), waltheriones E-L (2-9), and antidesmone (10). Among these, compounds 2-9 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by comparison of experimental and TDDFT-calculated ECD spectra. In addition, the isolated constituents were evaluated for their in vitro antitrypanosomal activity. Compounds 4, 5, and 8 showed potent and selective growth inhibition toward Trypanosoma cruzi with IC50 values between 0.02 and 0.04 μM. Cytotoxicity for mouse skeletal L-6 cells was also determined for these compounds.

  2. Quinolinic Acid: An Endogenous Neurotoxin with Multiple Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Lugo-Huitrón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (QUIN, a neuroactive metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is normally presented in nanomolar concentrations in human brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and is often implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human neurological diseases. QUIN is an agonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, and it has a high in vivo potency as an excitotoxin. In fact, although QUIN has an uptake system, its neuronal degradation enzyme is rapidly saturated, and the rest of extracellular QUIN can continue stimulating the NMDA receptor. However, its toxicity cannot be fully explained by its activation of NMDA receptors it is likely that additional mechanisms may also be involved. In this review we describe some of the most relevant targets of QUIN neurotoxicity which involves presynaptic receptors, energetic dysfunction, oxidative stress, transcription factors, cytoskeletal disruption, behavior alterations, and cell death.

  3. Giant negative magnetoresistance in Ni(quinoline-8-selenoate)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nicholas; Daiki, Tonouchi; Matsushita, Michio M; Woollins, J Derek; Awaga, Kunio; Robertson, Neil

    2017-12-20

    The magnetic, structural, conductivity and magnetoresistance properties of [Ni(quinoline-8-selenoate) 2 ] ([Ni(qs) 2 ]) have been studied. Despite the insolubility of the material necessitating its study as a powdered sample, a remarkably high conductivity has been measured. The conductivity is an order of magnitude greater than the thin-film processable thiol analogue previously reported and has been interpreted through the same space-charge limited conduction mechanism with charges injected from the electrodes. The introduction of selenium, results in a material with conductivity approaching metallic due to the enhanced interaction between adjacent molecules. Additionally, under an applied magnetic field, the material displays a negative magnetoresistance effect above 35% at 2 K. The effect can still be observed at 200 K and is interpreted in terms of a double-exchange mechanism.

  4. Determination of aniline and quinoline compounds in textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Giovanna; Iadaresta, Francesco; Moccia, Emanuele; Östman, Conny; Crescenzi, Carlo

    2016-11-04

    A simple method for simultaneous determination of twenty-one analytes, belonging to two classes of compounds, aromatic amines and quinolines, is presented. Several of the analytes considered in this study frequently occur in textiles goods on the open market and have been related to allergic contact dermatitis and/or are proven or suspected carcinogens. The method includes an efficient clean-up step using graphitized carbon black (GCB) that simplifies and improves the robustness of the subsequent GC-MS analysis. Briefly, after solvent extraction of the textile sample, the extract is passed through a GCB SPE cartridge that selectively retain dyes and other interfering compounds present in the matrix, producing a clean extract, suitable for GC-MS analysis, is obtained. The method was evaluated by spiking blank textiles with the selected analytes. Method quantification limits (MQL) ranged from 5 to 720ng/g depending on the analyte. The linear range of the calibration curves ranged over two order magnitude with coefficients of determination (R 2 ) higher than 0.99. Recoveries ranged from 70 to 92% with RSDs 1.7-14%. The effectiveness of the method was tested on a variety of textile materials samples from different origin. In a pilot explorative survey, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline was detected in all the analysed clothing samples in concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 576μg/g. 2,4-dinitroaniline was detected in four of the seven samples with a highest concentration of 305μg/g. Quinoline was detected in all samples in concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 6.2μg/g. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Crystal Structures of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster-Dependent Quinolinate Synthase in Complex with Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate, Iminoaspartate Analogues, and Quinolinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenwick, Michael K. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Ealick, Steven E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    The quinolinate synthase of prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, NadA, contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster with unknown function. We report crystal structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii NadA in complex with dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), iminoaspartate analogues, and quinolinate. DHAP adopts a nearly planar conformation and chelates the [4Fe-4S] cluster via its keto and hydroxyl groups. The active site architecture suggests that the cluster acts as a Lewis acid in enediolate formation, like zinc in class II aldolases. The DHAP and putative iminoaspartate structures suggest a model for a condensed intermediate. The ensemble of structures suggests a two-state system, which may be exploited in early steps.

  6. Genotoxicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4, 5-f)quinoline (IQ) and related compounds in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Graf, Ulrich; Wild, Dieter; Würgler, Friedrich E.

    2017-01-01

    The potent food mutagen and carcinogen 2-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4, 5-f]quinoline (IQ) and the structurally related heterocyclic aromatic amines 2-aminoimidazo[4, 5-f]quinoline (demethyl-IQ) and 2-amino-l-methylinudazo(4, 5-f)quinoline (iso-IQ) were assayed for genotoxicity in the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) as well as in the sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, 3-methyl-2-nitroimidazo[4, 5-f]-quinoline (nitro-IQ), 2-nitroflu...

  7. Reactions between arylhydrazinium chlorides and 2-chloroquinoline-3-carbaldehydes: molecular and supramolecular structures of a hydrazone, a 4,9-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline and two 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, Tholappanavara H Suresha; Nagendrappa, Gopalpur; Chandrika, Nanjappa; Sowmya, Haliwana B V; Kaur, Manpreet; Jasinski, Jerry P; Glidewell, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Hydrazone derivatives exhibit a wide range of biological activities, while pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivatives, on the other hand, exhibit both antimicrobial and antiviral activity, so that all new derivatives in these chemical classes are potentially of value. Dry grinding of a mixture of 2-chloroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde and 4-methylphenylhydrazinium chloride gives (E)-1-[(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl)methylidene]-2-(4-methylphenyl)hydrazine, C17H14ClN3, (I), while the same regents in methanol in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride give 1-(4-methylphenyl)-4,9-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, C17H15N3, (II). The reactions between phenylhydrazinium chloride and either 2-chloroquinoline-3-carbaldehyde or 2-chloro-6-methylquinoline-3-carbaldehyde give, respectively, 1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, C16H11N3, (III), which crystallizes in the space group Pbcn as a nonmerohedral twin having Z' = 3, or 6-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, C17H13N3, (IV), which crystallizes in the space group R\\overline{3}. The molecules of compound (I) are linked into sheets by a combination of N-H...N and C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds, and the molecules of compound (II) are linked by a combination of N-H...N and C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds to form a chain of rings. In the structure of compound (III), one of the three independent molecules forms chains generated by C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds, with a second type of molecule linked to the chains by a second C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bond and the third type of molecule linked to the chain by multiple π-π stacking interactions. A single C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bond links the molecules of compound (IV) into cyclic centrosymmetric hexamers having \\overline{3} (S6) symmetry, which are themselves linked into a three-dimensional array by π-π stacking interactions.

  8. The (p, ρ, T) of (methanol + benzene) and (methanol + ethylbenzene)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naziev, Yashar M.; Shahverdiyev, Astan N.; Hasanov, Vaqif H.

    2005-01-01

    The (p, ρ, T) of methanol, ethylbenzene and (methanol + benzene) and (methanol + ethylbenzene) at temperatures between (290 and 500) K and pressures in the range (0.1 to 60) MPa have been measured with a magnetic suspension densimeter with an uncertainty of ±0.1%. Our measurements with methanol deviate from the literature values by less than 0.2%. The (p, ρ, T) measurements were fitted with experimental uncertainties by an empirical equation. The temperature and mole fraction dependence of the coefficients of the equation of state are presented

  9. Formaldehyde, methanol and hydrocarbon emissions from methanol-fueled cars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Lipari, F.; Potter, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Exhaust and evaporative emissions tests were conducted on several methanol- and gasoline-fueled vehicles. Separate samples for chromatographic analysis of formaldehyde, methanol, and individual hydrocarbons were collected in each of the three phases of the driving cycle and in each of the two portions of the evaporative emissions test. One vehicle, equipped with an experimental variable-fuel engine, was tested using methanol/gasoline fuel mixtures of 100, 85, 50, 15, and 0 percent methanol. Combustion-generated hydrocarbons were lowest using methanol fuel, and increased several-fold as the gasoline fraction was increased. Gasoline components in the exhaust increased from zero as the gasoline fraction of the fuel was increased. On the other hand, formaldehyde emissions were several times higher using methanol fuel than they were using gasoline. A dedicated methanol car and the variable-fuel car gave similar emissions patterns when they both were tested using methanol fuel. The organic-carbon composition of the exhaust was 85-90 percent methanol, 5-7 percent formaldehyde, and 3-9 percent hydrocarbons. Several cars that were tested using gasoline emitted similar distributions of hydrocarbons, even through the vehicles represented a broad range of current and developmental engine families and emissions control systems

  10. Synthesis, Characterization & Screening for Anti-Inflammatory & Analgesic Activity of Quinoline Derivatives Bearing Azetidinones Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sujeet Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are clinically used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic agents but they have the drawbacks such as gastric irritation and gastric ulceration. Recently, quinoline derivatives have shown significant anti-inflammatory and less ulcerogenic activity. The present study deals with the synthesis and pharmacological assessment of a series of novel quinoline derivatives bearing azetidinones scaffolds as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. A series of newer 3-chloro-1-(substituted)-4-(tetrazolo [1,5-a]quinolin-4- yl)azetidin-2-one derivatives (6a-l) was synthesized starting with acetanilide (1). Initially, acetanilide (1) was allowed to react with Vilsmeier-Haack reagent (DMF + POCl3) to form 2- chloro-3-formyl quinoline (2). The 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline (2) was further treated with p-toluenesulphonic acid and sodium azide which yielded Tetrazolo [1,5-1] quinoline-4- carbaldehyde (3). The reaction of formyl group with various substituted amines (4a-l) formed corresponding Schiff base intermediates (5a-l), which were further allowed to react with chloroacetyl chloride to produce 3-chloro-1-(substituted)-4-(tetrazolo [1,5-a]quinolin-4-yl) azetidin-2-one derivatives (6a-l). The structure of the final analogues (6a-l) has been confirmed on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities by using carrageenan induced rat paw model and Eddy's hot plate method respectively. All the values of elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra were found to be prominent. The anti-inflammatory activity test revealed that 3-chloro-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)- 4-(tetrazolo[1,5-a] quinolin-4-yl)azetidin-2-one (6b), 3-chloro-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)- 4-(tetrazolo[1,5-a]quinolin-4-yl)azetidin-2-one (6a) exhibited significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity as compared to control group. The results of the

  11. From crystal to compound: structure-based antimalarial drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Nyssa; McGowan, Sheena

    2014-08-01

    Despite a century of control and eradication campaigns, malaria remains one of the world's most devastating diseases. Our once-powerful therapeutic weapons are losing the war against the Plasmodium parasite, whose ability to rapidly develop and spread drug resistance hamper past and present malaria-control efforts. Finding new and effective treatments for malaria is now a top global health priority, fuelling an increase in funding and promoting open-source collaborations between researchers and pharmaceutical consortia around the world. The result of this is rapid advances in drug discovery approaches and technologies, with three major methods for antimalarial drug development emerging: (i) chemistry-based, (ii) target-based, and (iii) cell-based. Common to all three of these approaches is the unique ability of structural biology to inform and accelerate drug development. Where possible, SBDD (structure-based drug discovery) is a foundation for antimalarial drug development programmes, and has been invaluable to the development of a number of current pre-clinical and clinical candidates. However, as we expand our understanding of the malarial life cycle and mechanisms of resistance development, SBDD as a field must continue to evolve in order to develop compounds that adhere to the ideal characteristics for novel antimalarial therapeutics and to avoid high attrition rates pre- and post-clinic. In the present review, we aim to examine the contribution that SBDD has made to current antimalarial drug development efforts, covering hit discovery to lead optimization and prevention of parasite resistance. Finally, the potential for structural biology, particularly high-throughput structural genomics programmes, to identify future targets for drug discovery are discussed.

  12. Screening Mangrove Endophytic Fungi for Antimalarial Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Calcul, Laurent; Waterman, Carrie; Ma, Wai Sheung; Lebar, Matthew D.; Harter, Charles; Mutka, Tina; Morton, Lindsay; Maignan, Patrick; Van Olphen, Alberto; Kyle, Dennis E.; Vrijmoed, Lilian; Pang, Ka-Lai; Pearce, Cedric; Baker, Bill J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a screening campaign to investigate fungi as a source for new antimalarial compounds. A subset of our fungal collection comprising Chinese mangrove endophytes provided over 5000 lipophilic extracts. We developed an accelerated discovery program based on small-scale cultivation for crude extract screening and a high-throughput malaria assay. Criteria for hits were developed and high priority hits were subjected to scale-up cultivation. Extracts from large scale cultivation were fr...

  13. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  14. Ethnobotanical perspective of antimalarial plants: traditional knowledge based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayum, Abdul; Arya, Rakesh; Lynn, Andrew M

    2016-02-04

    Considering the demand of antimalarial plants it has become essential to find and locate them for their optimal extraction. The work aims to find plants with antimalarial activities which were used by the local people; to raise the value of traditional knowledge system (TKS) prevalent in the study region; to compile characteristics of local plants used in malaria treatment (referred as antimalarial plants) and to have its spatial distribution analysis to establish a concept of geographical health. Antimalarial plants are listed based on literature survey and field data collected during rainy season, from 85 respondents comprised of different ethnic groups. Ethno-medicinal utilities of plants was extracted; botanical name, family, local name, part used, folklore, geographical location and image of plants were recorded after cross validating with existing literatures. The interview was trifurcated in field, Vaidya/Hakims and house to house. Graphical analysis was done for major plants families, plant part used, response of people and patients and folklore. Mathematical analysis was done for interviewee's response, methods of plant identification and people's preferences of TKS through three plant indices. Fifty-one plants belonging to 27 families were reported with its geographical attributes. It is found plant root (31.75 %) is used mostly for malaria treatment and administration mode is decoction (41.2 %) mainly. The study area has dominance of plants of family Fabaceae (7), Asteraceae (4), Acanthaceae (4) and Amaranthaceae (4). Most popular plants found are Adhatoda vasica, Cassia fistula and Swertia chirata while  % usage of TKS is 82.0 % for malaria cure. The research findings can be used by both scientific community and common rural people for bio-discovery of these natural resources sustainably. The former can extract the tables to obtain a suitable plant towards finding a suitable lead molecule in a drug discovery project; while the latter can meet their

  15. Quinolone-3-diarylethers: a new class of antimalarial drug.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen Aaron; LaCrue Alexis N; White Karen L; Forquer Isaac P; Cross R Matthew; Marfurt Jutta; Mather Michael W; Delves Michael J; Shackleford David M; Saenz Fabian E; Morrisey Joanne M; Steuten Jessica; Mutka Tina; Li Yuexin; Wirjanata Grennady

    2013-01-01

    The goal for developing new antimalarial drugs is to find a molecule that can target multiple stages of the parasite's life cycle thus impacting prevention treatment and transmission of the disease. The 4(1H) quinolone 3 diarylethers are selective potent inhibitors of the parasite's mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex. These compounds are highly active against the human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. They target both the liver and blood stages of the parasite a...

  16. Preliminary studies on the antiplasmodial potential of aqueous and methanol extracts ofeucalyptus camadulensis leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabiru, Y. A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The rising problem of resistance to the classical drugs like chloroquine and the problem of recrudescence of malaria after treatment with artemisinin suggest the need for new antimalaria agents. This project was designed to explore the antiplasmodial potential of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaf extracts. Methods: The antiplasmodial potential of the methanol and aqueous extracts of Eucalyptus camadulensis (leaf were evaluated in a mouse model of malaria. Swiss albino mice were intraperitoneally infected with plasmodium berghei (NK65, a rodent malaria parasite. The level of parasitemia, life span, variation in weight and percentage packed cell volume (% PCV of infected and treated mice were used to assess the efficacy of extracts. Treatment with the extracts at dose levels of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg body weight commenced 72 hours post infection for the test groups, while a standard antimalarial drug, Artesunate, at a dose of 50mg/kg body weight was administered on the positive control group. The negative control group was left untreated. Results: Animals treated with the methanol extract showed a significant decrease in parasitaemia (p < 0.05, and survived for 29 days compared with those treated with the aqueous extract which survived for 19 days with a higher level of parasitemia. However, the control group treated with Artesunate showed a significantly lower parasitaemia (p < 0.05 and survived for 34 days when compared with the groups treated with methanol and aqueous extracts. The level of parasitemia, decrease in weight and %PCV in all the treated groups was significantly lower (P < 0.05 compared with the infected but untreated group (negative control which survived for only 7 days. Conclusions: The methanol extract of the leaves of E. camadulensis has an antimalarial potential that could be exploited for the benefit of mankind.

  17. POTENCY OF THE INDONESIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS AS ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subeki Subeki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Indonesian traditional herbal medicine has been practiced for many centuries in Indonesia to treat malaria diseases. Although modern medicine is becoming increasingly important, herbal medicine is still very popular. In order to select raw material for preparation of safety herbal medicines, forty five medicinal plants have been tested for acute toxicity in mouse at a dose 715 mg/kg body weight. The extracts of Asclepias curassavica leave, Alstonia scholaris leave, Decospermum fruticosum leave, Elaocarpus petiolatus bark, Elaocarpus parvifolius bark, Eurycoma longifolia root, Garcinia rigida bark, Nephelium lappaceum bark, Pentaspodan motleyi leave, Picrasma javanica leave, Phyllanthus niruri whole, Quassia indica leave, Syzygium pycnanthum bark, Tetrasera scandens leave, Cratoxylum glaucum bark, Sandoricum emarginatum bark, Mallotus paniculatus leave, Microcos ovatolanceolata bark, Poikilospermum suaveolens leave, Fibraurea chloroleuea leave, Tetrasera scandens root, and Timonius billitonensis bark showed toxicity with mortality level of 20-100%. The remaining 32 plant extracts were not toxic at dose tested. The toxic plant species should be considered in the preparation of herbal medicines. Of the safety extracts were tested for their antimalarial activity against Plasmodium berghei in vivo at a dose 715 mg/kg body weight. Extract of Carica papaya leave was most active than other plant extracts with parasitemia 1.13%, while control showed 17.21%. More research is needed to scientifically prove efficacy and to identity antimalarial constituents in the plant extracts. Key words: Indonesian medicinal plant, jamu, toxicity, antimalarial activity, Plasmodium berghei.

  18. Quality Testing of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Drugs in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Suqin; Kyaw, Myat Phone; He, Lishan; Min, Myo; Ning, Xiangxue; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Baomin; Cui, Liwang

    2017-10-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies are the frontline treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The circulation of falsified and substandard artemisinin-based antimalarials in Southeast Asia has been a major predicament for the malaria elimination campaign. To provide an update of this situation, we purchased 153 artemisinin-containing antimalarials, as convenience samples, in private drug stores from different regions of Myanmar. The quality of these drugs in terms of their artemisinin derivative content was tested using specific dipsticks for these artemisinin derivatives, as point-of-care devices. A subset of these samples was further tested by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This survey identified that > 35% of the collected drugs were oral artesunate and artemether monotherapies. When tested with the dipsticks, all but one sample passed the assays, indicating that the detected artemisinin derivative content corresponded approximately to the labeled contents. However, one artesunate injection sample was found to contain no active ingredient at all by the dipstick assay and subsequent HPLC analysis. The continued circulation of oral monotherapies and the description, for the first time, of falsified parenteral artesunate provides a worrisome picture of the antimalarial drug quality in Myanmar during the malaria elimination phase, a situation that deserves more oversight from regulatory authorities.

  19. Antimalarial Activity of Cocos nucifera Husk Fibre: Further Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, J. O.; Balogun, E. A.; Malomo, S. O.; Soladoye, A. O.; Olatunji, L. A.; Kolawole, O. M.; Oguntoye, O. S.; Babatunde, A. S.; Akinola, O. B.; Aguiar, A. C. C.; Andrade, I. M.; Souza, N. B.; Krettli, A. U.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the antimalarial and toxicity potentials of husk fibre extracts of five Nigerian varieties of Cocos nucifera were evaluated in vitro. The only active extract fraction, West African Tall (WAT) ethyl acetate extract fraction, was then evaluated for its phytochemical constituents, antimalarial and toxicity potentials at varying doses (31.25–500 mg/kg body weight) using various organ function indices. The results revealed that WAT ethyl acetate extract fraction (WATEAEF) contained alkaloids, tannins, and flavonoids and was active against Plasmodium falciparum W2 strain maintained in continuous culture, with a selectivity index of 30.3. The same extract fraction was active in vivo against Plasmodium berghei NK65, causing more than 50% reduction in parasitaemia on days 4 and 6 after inoculation at various doses administered. WATEAEF did not significantly alter (P > 0.05) function indices of the liver and cardiovascular system at all doses administered but significantly increased (P < 0.05) plasma creatinine concentration at 250 and 500 mg/Kg body weight compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that WATEAEF possesses antimalarial activity and may not adversely affect normal liver function nor predispose subjects to cardiovascular diseases but may impair normal kidney function at higher doses. Further studies are underway to isolate the active principles. PMID:23983800

  20. In Vitro Susceptibility of Plasmodium vivax to Antimalarials in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Diana; Segura, César; Arboleda, Margarita; Garavito, Giovanny; Blair, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 30 isolates of Plasmodium vivax to a number of antimalarials (chloroquine [CQ], mefloquine, amodiaquine, quinine, and artesunate [AS]) were evaluated. The isolates came from the region of Urabá in Colombia, in which malaria is endemic, and were evaluated by the schizont maturation test. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.6 nM (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 1.0 nM) for artesunate, 8.5 nM (95% CI, 5.6 to 13.0 nM) for amodiaquine, 23.3 nM (95% CI, 12.4 to 44.1 nM) for chloroquine, 55.6 nM (95% CI, 36.8 to 84.1 nM) for mefloquine, and 115.3 nM (95% CI, 57.7 to 230.5 nM) for quinine. The isolates were classified according to whether the initial parasites were mature or immature trophozoites (Tfz). It was found that the IC50s for chloroquine and artesunate were significantly different in the two aforementioned groups (P Colombia, P. vivax continues to be susceptible to antimalarials. This is the first report, to our knowledge, showing in vitro susceptibilities of P. vivax isolates to antimalarials in Colombia. PMID:25114141

  1. Synthesis of 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhadi, S. A.

    2004-09-01

    Quinolin derivatives are a group of compounds known to possess a wide range of biological activities. The chemistry of quinolines together with their corresponding aldehydes were dealt with in chapter one of this study. Special emphasis was given to the chemistry of benzaldehyde. Twenty five 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives together with their corresponding intermediates were prepared in this work. Basically, the synthetic design of these compounds arise from the appropriate disconnections of the target 2-phenyl and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acids. The retro synthesis analysis of these compounds reveals pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde or phenyl pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde as possible logical precursors for 2-phenyl-and 2,3-diphenyl- quinoline-4-carboxylic acids respectively. The purity and identities of the synthesized compounds were elucidated through chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The compounds were heavily subjected to spectroscopic analysis (UV, IR, GC/MS, 1 H-and 13 C- NMR). The appropriate disconnections and the mechanisms of the corresponding reactions were given and discussed in chapter three. The spectral data were interpreted and correlated with the target structures. The prepared 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives were screened for their antibacterial activity. The compounds were tested against the standard bacterial organisms B. subtilis, S. aureus, E. coli and P. vulgaris. Some of these compounds were devoid of antibacterial activity against S. aureus and P. vulgaris, while others showed moderate activity. All of the tested compounds showed an activity against B. subtilis and E. coli. 2,3-diphenyl -6-sulphanilamide-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid showed the highest activity against the four standard tested organisms.(Author)

  2. Novel Basic Mesoporous Catalysts for Friedländer Reaction from 2-Aminoaryl Ketones: Quinolin-2(1H)-ones vs. Quinolines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Domínguez-Fernández, F.; López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Bek, David; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2009), s. 241-243 ISSN 1867-3880 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : quinolines * heterogeneous catalysis * basicity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. 40 CFR 180.426 - 2-[4,5-Dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-quinoline carboxylic acid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2- -3-quinoline carboxylic acid... Tolerances § 180.426 2- -3-quinoline carboxylic acid; tolerance for residues. A tolerance is established for residues of the herbicide 2- -3-quinoline carboxylic acid, in or on the raw agricultural commodity soybean...

  4. Development of methanol evaporation plate to reduce methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiming

    This research focuses on methanol crossover reduction in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) through separating the methanol vapor from its liquid phase and feeding the vapor passively at low temperature range. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated by using commercial available membrane with different thickness at different anode catalyst loading levels, and tested under the operating conditions below 100°C in cell temperature and cathode exit open to ambient pressure. Liquid methanol transport from the anode through the membrane into cathode ("methanol crossover") is identified as one of the major efficiency losses in a DMFC. It is known that the methanol crossover rate in the vapor phase is much lower than in liquid phase. Vapor feed can be achieved by heating the liquid methanol to elevated temperatures (>100°C), but other issues limit the performance of the cell when operating above 100°C. High temperature membranes and much more active cathode catalyst structures are required, and a complex temperature control system must be employed. However, methanol vapor feed can also occur at a lower temperature range (evaporation through a porous body. The methanol crossover with this vapor feed mode is lower compared with the direct liquid methanol feed. A new method of using a methanol evaporation plate (MEP) to separate the vapor from its liquid phase to reduce the liquid methanol crossover at low temperature range is developed. A MEP plays the roles of liquid/vapor methanol phase separation and evaporation in a DMFC. The goal of this study is to develop a MEP with the proper properties to achieve high methanol phase separation efficiency and fast methanol evaporation rate over a wide range of temperature, i.e., from room temperature up to near boiling temperature (100°C). MEP materials were selected and characterized. MEPs made from three different types were tested extensively with different MEA and porous back layer configurations. The benefits of

  5. An overview of quinoline as a privileged scaffold in cancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiol, Robert

    2017-06-01

    The concept of privileged structures is well known and is often used in the process of drug design and development. Although its assumptions are not clear, its overall usefulness remains high. Various substructures have been identified as privileged and quinoline is a prime example of such a structure. Areas covered: Quinoline drugs that are currently approved or under clinical investigation were reviewed based on a literature search. Their modes of action and outcomes during clinical research are discussed. Expert opinion: Undoubtedly, quinoline-based compounds have a significant impact on anticancer drugs. Although topoisomerase and kinase inhibitors are the only two different classes of agents that are currently approved for anticancer therapy, more than twenty different drug candidates are being tested on humans. The quinoline moiety offers an easily accessible, well-understood scaffold for designing new drugs. It is also a very druggable molecule with the potency for structure optimization through established synthetic pathways. For these reasons, quinoline-based anticancer drugs have a strong position in modern medicinal chemistry.

  6. An unusual chemoselective hydrogenation of quinoline compounds using supported gold catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dong; He, Lin; Yu, Lei; Ding, Ran-Sheng; Liu, Yong-Mei; Cao, Yong; He, He-Yong; Fan, Kang-Nian

    2012-10-24

    The pursuit of modern sustainable chemistry has stimulated the development of innovative catalytic processes that enable chemical transformations to be performed under mild and clean conditions with high efficiency. Herein, we report that gold nanoparticles supported on TiO(2) catalyze the chemoselective hydrogenation of functionalized quinolines with H(2) under mild reaction conditions. Our results point toward an unexpected role for quinolines in gold-mediated hydrogenation reactions, namely that of promoter; this is in stark contrast to what prevails in the traditional noble metal Pd-, Pt-, and Ru-based catalyst systems, in which quinolines and their derivatives typically act as poisons. As a result of the remarkable promotional effect of quinoline molecules to H(2) activation over supported gold, the transformation can proceed smoothly under very mild conditions (even at temperatures as low as 25 °C). Of practical significance is that various synthetically useful functional groups including halogens, ketone, and olefin remain intact during the hydrogenation of quinolines. Moreover, the protocol also shows promise for the regiospecific hydrogenation of the heterocyclic ring of a variety of other biologically important heteroaromatic nitrogen compounds, such as isoquinoline, acridine, and 7,8-benzoquinoline, in a facile manner. Apart from its importance in catalytic hydrogenation, we believe that this intriguing self-promoted effect by reactant molecules may have fundamental implications for the broad field of gold catalysis and form the basis for development of new catalytic procedures for other key transformations.

  7. Uptake and fate of phenol, aniline and quinoline in terrestrial plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Bean, R.M.; Fellows, R.J.

    1987-06-01

    The bioavailability and chemical fate of xenobiotics in terrestrial plants can influence the impact of fossil fuel development on the human food chain. To determine the relative behavior of organic residues representing a range of chemical classes, we compared the rates of root absorption, tissue distribution and chemical fate of phenol, aniline and quinoline in soybean plants. Root absorption rates for these compounds were 180, 13 and 30 μg/g (fresh weight) root/day, respectively. Following uptake, aniline was concentrated in the root, while phenol and quinoline were evenly distributed in roots and leaves. After accumulation, phenol was readily decomposed, and its carbon was respired. While aniline was susceptible to oxidative decomposition, it persisted in leaves and roots; 25% of the soluble activity represented aniline, and a significant fraction was bound or conjugated to cell constitutents. Quinoline persisted both in the parent form and as metabolic products. However, in leaves, additional compounds were found that were chemically similar to quinoline; these were not found in unexposed plants. A substantial fraction of the quinoline accumulated by leaves was emitted to the atmosphere by volatilization. 12 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Methanol synthesis beyond chemical equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bennekom, J. G.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Wilbers, E.; Assink, D.; Lemmens, K. P. J.; Heeres, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    In commercial methanol production from syngas, the conversion is thermodynamically limited to 0.3-0.7 leading to large recycles of non-converted syngas. This problem can be overcome to a significant extent by in situ condensation of methanol during its synthesis which is possible nowadays due to the

  9. Methanol as an energy carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, P.; Grube, T.; Hoehlein, B. (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    For the future, a strongly growing energy demand is expected in the transport sector worldwide. Economically efficient oil production will run through a maximum in the next decade. Higher fuel prices and an environmentally desirable reduction of emissions will increase the pressure for reducing fuel consumption and emissions in road traffic. These criteria show the urgent necessity of structural changes in the fuel market. Due to its advantages concerning industrial-scale production, storage and global availability, methanol has the short- to medium-term potential for gaining increased significance as a substitution product in the energy market. Methanol can be produced both from fossil energy sources and from biomass or waste materials through the process steps of synthesis gas generation with subsequent methanol synthesis. Methanol has the potential to be used in an environmentally friendly manner in gasoline/methanol mixtures for flexible fuel vehicles with internal combustion engines and in diesel engines with pure methanol. Furthermore, it can be used in fuel cell vehicles with on-board hydrogen production in direct methanol fuel cell drives, and in stationary systems for electricity and heat generation as well as for hydrogen production. Finally, in portable applications it serves as an energy carrier for electric power generation. In this book, the processes for the production and use of methanol are presented and evaluated, markets and future options are discussed and issues of safety and environmental impacts are addressed by a team of well-known authors. (orig.)

  10. Accidental methanol ingestion: case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Epker (Jelle); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The incidence of methanol (CH3OH) intoxication differs enormously from country to country. Methanol intoxication is extremely rare in the Dutch population. Even a low dose can already be potentially lethal. Patients are conventionally treated with hemodialysis. Therefore we'd

  11. Quinoline Derivative MC1626, a Putative GCN5 Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Inhibitor, Exhibits HAT-Independent Activity against Toxoplasma gondii▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron T.; Livingston, Meredith R.; Mai, Antonello; Filetici, Patrizia; Queener, Sherry F.; Sullivan, William J.

    2007-01-01

    We report that quinoline derivative MC1626, first described as an inhibitor of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) GCN5, is active against the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii in vitro. However, MC1626 does not inhibit Toxoplasma GCN5 HATs or reduce HAT-mediated activity; rather, this quinoline may target the plastid organelle called the apicoplast. PMID:17178801

  12. Electrochemical oxidation of quinoline aqueous solution on β-PbO2anode and the evolution of phytotoxicity on duckweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiangjuan; Bian, Lixia; Ding, Jingfeng; Wu, Yaping; Xia, Huilong; Li, Jionghui

    2017-04-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of quinoline on a β-PbO 2 electrode modified with fluoride resin and the comprehensive toxicity of intermediates formed during oxidation on duckweed were investigated in detail. The results showed that quinoline was initially hydroxylated at the C-2 and C-8 positions by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) electro-generated on a β-PbO 2 anode, yielding 2(1H)-quinolinone and 8-hydroxyquinoline, then undergoing ring cleavage to form pyridine, nicotinic acid, pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde and acetophenone, which were ultimately converted to biodegradable organic acids. NO 3 - was the final form of quinoline-N. The growth of duckweed exposed to the oxidized quinoline solution was gradually inhibited with the decrease in pH and the formation of intermediates. However, the growth inhibition of duckweed could be eliminated beyond 120 min of oxidation, indicating the comprehensive toxicity of the quinoline solution reduced when the amount of quinoline removed was above 80%. Additionally, the adjustment of the pH to 7.5 and the addition of nutrients to the treated quinoline solution before culturing duckweed could obviously alleviate the inhibition on duckweed. Thus, partial electrochemical degradation of quinoline offers a cost-effective and clean alternative for pretreatment of wastewater containing nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds before biological treatment. The duckweed test presents a simple method for assessing the comprehensive toxicity of intermediates.

  13. Synthesis of 2-Alkenylquinoline by Reductive Olefination of Quinoline N-Oxide under Metal-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hong; Liu, Yuanhong; Zhao, Peng; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Jun

    2016-04-15

    Synthesis of 2-alkenylquinoline by reductive olefination of quinoline N-oxide under metal-free conditions is disclosed. Practically, the reaction could be performed with quinoline as starting material via a one-pot, two-step process. A possible mechanism is proposed that involves a sequential 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and acid-assisted ring opening followed by a dehydration process.

  14. Methanol poisoning: characteristic MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nirdesh; Himanshu, Dandu; Verma, Shailendra Prasad; Parihar, Anit

    2013-01-01

    Acute methanol intoxication is not an unusual poisoning. It can have serious neurological sequelae. We emphasize how neuroimaging can help in distinguishing methanol poisoning from other causes of acute unconsciousness in alcoholic patients such as hypoglycemic brain damage and carbon monoxide poisoning or head injury, which are frequently observed in alcoholic patients and are also responsible for altered sensorium. The most important findings in MR brain imaging in methanol poisoning have been bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis. Other less common findings are subcortical and deep white matter lesions, cerebral and cerebellar cortical lesions, and midbrain lesions, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and even enhancement of necrotic lesions, we found almost the entire spectrum of MRI findings in this patient with methanol poisoning. Neurological sequelae can entail the course and prognosis in methanol poisoning. The patient died because of ventilator-associated pneumonia that developed in the course of prolonged hospitalization.

  15. Methylnaltrexone bromide methanol monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbo Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound [systematic name: (4R,4aS,7aR,12bS-3-cyclopropylmethyl-4a,9-hydroxy-7-oxo-2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,7a-octahydro-1H-4,12-methanobenzofuro[3,2-e]isoquinolin-3-ium bromide methanol monosolvate], C21H26NO4+·Br−·CH3OH, two of the three six-membered rings adopt chair conformations while the third, which contains a C=C double bond, adopts an approximate half-boat conformation. The 2,3-dihydrofuran ring adopts an envelope conformation. In the crystal, the components are linked by O—H...O and O—H...Br hydrogen bonds. The absolute stereochemistry was inferred from one of the starting materials.

  16. Regioselective demethylation of quinoline derivatives. A DFT rationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belferdi, Fatiha; Merabet, Naima; Belkhiri, Lotfi; Douara, Bachir

    2016-08-01

    Demethylation of compound 2,7-dimethoxyquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 1, is carried out using BBr3. However, all attempts led, either to the starting material or to the regioselective demethylation at position 2 affording the product 4a. The nature (donor or acceptor) and the position of the R (CHO or CN) group is likely to play a role in the preventing the demethylation at position 7. To address this phenomena, the demethylation of 2-chloro-7-methoxyquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 2 and 2,7-dimethoxyquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 3 has been carried out. To support the results obtained, theoretical computations at DFT level (vide infra) have been carried out upon compound 1. The exploration of how the gas-phase demethylation process on Quinoline can be affected at a position 7 center by stepwise substation effects using different electro-donor and attractor groups, show that demethylation process seems to be more favorable when substituent is an electro-donor. This is sustained by bond energy and thermodynamic analyses (vide infra).

  17. Excellent storage stability and sensitive detection of neurotoxin quinolinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjana; Kashyap, Sunayana; Kumar, Suveen; Abraham, Shiju; Gupta, Tejendra K; Kayastha, Arvind M; Malhotra, Bansi D; Saxena, Preeti Suman; Srivastava, Anchal; Singh, Ranjan K

    2017-04-15

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is a metabolite of tryptophan degradation obtained through kynurenine pathway, produced naturally in the mammalian brain as well as in the human cerebrospinal fluid. The presence of QA ~10-40µM is a clear indicator of many neurological disorders as well as deficiency of vitamin B 6 in human being. In the present work; rapid, sensitive and cost-effective bio-electrodes were prepared to detect the trace amount of endogenous neurotoxin (QA). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies were carried out to measure the electrochemical response of the fabricated bio-electrodes as a function of QA concentrations. These devices were found to exhibit desirable sensitivity of ~7.86mAμM -1 cm -2 in wide concentration range (6.5μM-65mM). The lower detection limit of this device is as low as 6.5μM and it has excellent storage stability of ~30 days. The capability of the proposed electrochemical bio-sensor was also checked to detect QA in the real samples (human serum). These results reveal that the use of this electrochemical bio-sensor may provide a potential platform for the detection of QA in the real samples for the prior detection of many diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Synthesis of a Novel Quinoline Skeleton Introduced Cationic Polyfluorene Derivative for Multimodal Antimicrobial Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Yin, Bohan; Ma, Hongli; Yuan, Huanxiang; Fu, Bin; Liu, Libing

    2015-11-18

    A new functional polyfluorene derivative containing quinoline skeleton and quarternary ammonium group (QAG) modified side chains (PFPQ) was synthesized and characterized. The multimodal antimicrobial effect toward Gram-negative E. coli was achieved by the dark toxicity resulting from the quinoline skeleton, QAG, and light toxicity resulting from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the main backbone of PFPQ under white light. The mechanism of interaction between PFPQ and bacteria was also demonstrated. PFPQ bound to E. coli mainly through electrostatic interactions causing nearly 50% bacterial death in the absence of light irradiation, and the huge capability of PFPQ to generate ROS under white light opened another bactericidal mode. The killing efficiency was more than 99% upon relatively mild irradiation under white light (400-800 nm) with a light dose of 18 J·cm(-2). PFPQ with the incorporation of quinoline into the backbones will provide a new versatile strategy to achieve the multimodal antimicrobial effect to fight against resistant bacteria.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of antioxidant activity of new quinoline-2-carbaldehyde hydrazone derivatives: bioisosteric melatonin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskullu, M Orhan; Shirinzadeh, Hanif; Nenni, Merve; Gurer-Orhan, Hande; Suzen, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species results in oxidative stress that can cause fatal damage to vital cell structures. It is known that the use of antioxidants could be beneficial in the prevention or delay of numerous diseases associated with oxidative stress. Melatonin (MLT) is known as a powerful free-radical scavenger and antioxidant. It was found that indole ring of MLT can be employed by bioisosteric replacement by other aromatic rings. Quinoline derivatives constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. Owing to quinoline and hydrazones appealing physiological properties and are mostly found in numerous biologically active compounds a series of quinoline-2-carbaldehyde hydrazone derivatives were synthesized as bioisosteric analogues of MLT, characterized and in vitro antioxidant activity was investigated by evaluating their reducing effect against oxidation of a redox-sensitive fluorescent probe. Cytotoxicity potential of all compounds was investigated both by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay and by MTT assay.

  20. A New One-Pot Synthesis of Quinoline-2-carboxylates under Heterogeneous Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Serena; Giardinieri, Alessandra; Sampaolesi, Susanna; Ballini, Roberto; Palmieri, Alessandro

    2016-06-15

    Quinoline-2-carboxylates are an important subclass of quinoline derivatives largely present in a variety of biologically active molecules, as well as useful ligands in metal-catalyzed reactions. Herein, we present a new one-pot protocol for synthesizing this class of derivatives starting from β-nitroacrylates and 2-aminobenzaldehydes. In order to optimize the protocol, we investigated several reaction conditions, obtaining the best results using the 2-tert-Butylimino-2-diethylamino-1,3-dimethylperhydro-1,3,2-diazaphosphorine (BEMP) as solid base, in acetonitrile. Finally, we demonstrated the generality of our approach over several substrates which led to synthesize a plethora of functionalized quinolines-2-carboxylate derivatives in good overall yields.

  1. Dynamics of excited state proton transfer in nitro substituted 10-hydroxybenzo[h] quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marciniak, H.; Hristova, S.; Deneva, V.

    2017-01-01

    The ground state tautomerism and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) and its nitro derivatives, 7-nitrobenzo[h]quinolin-10-ol (2) and 7,9-dinitrobenzo[h]quinolin-10-ol (3), have been studied in acetonitrile using steady state as well as time...... occurs with a time constant of 0.89 ps and 0.68 ps, respectively. In both cases a mixture of the enol and proton transfer forms is optically excited. The enol form exhibits then the ESIPT and subsequently both fractions take the same relaxation path. We propose that in 2 and 3 the ESIPT path exhibits...... a potential energy barrier resulting in an incoherent rate governed process while in HBQ the ESIPT proceeds as a ballistic wavepacket motion along a path without significant barriers. The theoretical calculations (M06-2X/TZVP) confirm the existence of a barrier in the ground and excited states as result...

  2. Novel quinolines carrying pyridine, thienopyridine, isoquinoline, thiazolidine, thiazole and thiophene moieties as potential anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorab Mostafa M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of ongoing studies in developing new anticancer agents, novel 1,2-dihydropyridine 4, thienopyridine 5, isoquinolines 6–20, acrylamide 21, thiazolidine 22, thiazoles 23–29 and thiophenes 33–35 bearing a biologically active quinoline nucleus were synthesized. The structure of newly synthesized compounds was confirmed on the basis of elemental analyses and spectral data. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. 2,3-Dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamides 27, 25, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (34, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (7, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (35, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (6, 2-cyano-3-(dimethylamino-N-(quinolin-3-ylacrylamide (21, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitriles (11 and (8 exhibited higher activity (IC50 values of 27–45 μmol L–1 compared to doxorubicin (IC50 47.9 μmol L–1. LQ quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (12, 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (28 and quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (15 show activity comparable to doxorubicin, while (quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (9, 2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (24, thieno [3,4-c] pyridine-4(5H-one (5, cyclopenta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (33 and (quinolin-3-yl-6-stryl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (10 exhibited moderate activity, lower than doxorubicin.

  3. Elucidating antimalarial drug targets/mode-of-action by application of system biology technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Becker, J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available . Eradication efforts are hampered by two major drawbacks-the absence of an effective vaccine coupled with the widespread occurrence of drug-resistant strains to frontline antimalarials and, of late, the emergence of resistance to current antimalarials of choice...

  4. Estimated Under-Five Deaths Associated with Poor-Quality Antimalarials in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, John P.; Walters, Kelsey M.; Newton, Paul N.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-01-01

    Many antimalarials sold in sub-Saharan Africa are poor-quality (falsified, substandard, or degraded), and the burden of disease caused by this problem is inadequately quantified. In this article, we estimate the number of under-five deaths caused by ineffective treatment of malaria associated with consumption of poor-quality antimalarials in 39 sub-Saharan countries. Using Latin hypercube sampling our estimates were calculated as the product of the number of private sector antimalarials consumed by malaria-positive children in 2013; the proportion of private sector antimalarials consumed that were of poor-quality; and the case fatality rate (CFR) of under-five malaria-positive children who did not receive appropriate treatment. An estimated 122,350 (interquartile range [IQR]: 91,577–154,736) under-five malaria deaths were associated with consumption of poor-quality antimalarials, representing 3.75% (IQR: 2.81–4.75%) of all under-five deaths in our sample of 39 countries. There is considerable uncertainty surrounding our results because of gaps in data on case fatality rates and prevalence of poor-quality antimalarials. Our analysis highlights the need for further investigation into the distribution of poor-quality antimalarials and the need for stronger surveillance and regulatory efforts to prevent the sale of poor-quality antimalarials. PMID:25897068

  5. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Solvent Fractions of the Leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to almost all the available antimalarial drugs urges a search for newer antimalarial drugs. Justicia schimperiana Hochst. Ex Nees is traditionally used for the treatment of malaria and a study conducted previously on the crude leaf extract confirmed that the plant is endowed ...

  6. Novel in vivo active anti-malarials based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, Claire-Lise; Siegrist, Romain; Aissaoui, Hamed; Marx, Léo; Racine, Sophie; Meyer, Solange; Binkert, Christoph; de Kanter, Ruben; Fischli, Christoph; Wittlin, Sergio; Boss, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    A novel series of anti-malarials, based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold, initially identified as peptidomimetic protease inhibitors is described. Combination of the hydroxy-ethyl-amine anti-malarial phramacophore with the known Mannich base pharmacophore of amodiaquine (57) resulted in promising in vivo active novel derivatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanochemical Synthesis, In vivo Anti-malarial and Safety Evaluation of Amodiaquine-zinc Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arise Rotimi Olusanya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available So far, some prospective metal-based anti-malarial drugs have been developed. The mechanochemical synthesis and characterization of Zn (II complex with amodiaquine and its anti-malarial efficacy on Plasmodium berghei-infected mice and safety evaluation were described in this study.

  8. malaria and anti-malarial drugs utilisation among adults in a rural

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vihar

    Magreth Komanya (Bsc Nursing). AMREF. ABSTRACT. Objective: To study malaria and examine determinants of anti-malarial drugs utilization among ..... anti-malarials for prophylaxis and chemotherapy or may be provided with prescription forms to buy drugs. Moreover the general understanding that pregnant women are ...

  9. Antimalarial activity of Malaysian Plectranthus amboinicus against Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Norazsida; Ahamed, Pakeer Oothuman Syed; Elhady, Hassan Mohamed; Taher, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus of Plasmodium. The protozoans have developed resistance against many of current drugs. It is urgent to find an alternative source of new antimalarial agent. In the effort to discover new antimalarial agents, this research has been conducted on Plectranthus amboinicus. This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and antiplasmodial properties of P. amboinicus. Acute oral toxicity dose at 5000 mg/kg was conducted to evaluate the safety of this extract. Twenty mice were divided into control and experimental group. All the mice were observed for signs of toxicity, mortality, weight changes and histopathological changes. Antimalarial activity of different extract doses of 50, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infections in mice (five mice for each group) during early, established and residual infections. The acute oral toxicity test revealed that no mortality or evidence of adverse effects was seen in the treated mice. The extract significantly reduced the parasitemia by the 50 (P = 0.000), 200 (P = 0.000) and 400 mg/kg doses (P = 0.000) in the in vivo prophylactic assay. The percentage chemo-suppression was calculated as 83.33% for 50 mg/kg dose, 75.62% for 200 mg/kg dose and 90.74% for 400 mg/kg dose. Body weight of all treated groups; T1, T2, T3 and T4 also showed enhancement after 7 days posttreatment. Statistically no reduction of parasitemia calculated for curative and suppressive test. Thus, this extract may give a promising agent to be used as a prophylactic agent of P. berghei infection.

  10. Antimalarial interaction of quinine and quinidine with clarithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Swaroop Kumar; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Singh, Sarika; Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Tripathi, Renu

    2013-03-01

    Quinine (QN) and quinidine (QND) have been commonly used as effective and affordable antimalarials for over many years. Quinine primarily is used for severe malaria treatment. However, plasmodia resistance to these drugs and poor patient compliance limits their administration to the patients. The declining sensitivity of the parasite to the drugs can thus be dealt with by combining with a suitable partner drug. In the present study QN/QND was assessed in combination with clarithromycin (CLTR), an antibiotic of the macrolide family. In vitro interactions of these drugs with CLTR against Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) have shown a synergistic response with mean sum fractional inhibitory concentrations (ΣFICs) of ≤1 (0.85 ± 0.11 for QN + CLTR and 0.64 ± 0.09 for QND + CLTR) for all the tested combination ratios. Analysis of this combination of QN/QND with CLTR in mouse model against Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis multi-drug resistant (P. yoelii nigeriensis MDR) showed that a dose of 200 mg/kg/day for 4 days of QN or QND produces 100% curative effect with 200 mg/kg/day for 7 days and 150 mg/kg/day for 7 days CLTR respectively, while the same dose of individual drugs could produce only up to a maximum 20% cure. It is postulated that CLTR, a CYP3A4 inhibitor, might have caused reduced CYP3A4 activity leading to increased plasma level of the QN/QND to produce enhanced antimalarial activity. Further, parasite apicoplast disruption by CLTR synergies the antimalarial action of QN and QND.

  11. Antimalarial drug use in general populations of tropical Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardella Florence

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of Plasmodium falciparum malaria has worsened because of the emergence of chloroquine resistance. Antimalarial drug use and drug pressure are critical factors contributing to the selection and spread of resistance. The present study explores the geographical, socio-economic and behavioural factors associated with the use of antimalarial drugs in Africa. Methods The presence of chloroquine (CQ, pyrimethamine (PYR and other antimalarial drugs has been evaluated by immuno-capture and high-performance liquid chromatography in the urine samples of 3,052 children (2–9 y, randomly drawn in 2003 from the general populations at 30 sites in Senegal (10, Burkina-Faso (10 and Cameroon (10. Questionnaires have been administered to the parents of sampled children and to a random sample of households in each site. The presence of CQ in urine was analysed as dependent variable according to individual and site characteristics using a random – effect logistic regression model to take into account the interdependency of observations made within the same site. Results According to the sites, the prevalence rates of CQ and PYR ranged from 9% to 91% and from 0% to 21%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of CQ in urine was significantly associated with a history of fever during the three days preceding urine sampling (OR = 1.22, p = 0.043, socio-economic level of the population of the sites (OR = 2.74, p = 0.029, age (2–5 y = reference level; 6–9 y OR = 0.76, p = 0.002, prevalence of anti-circumsporozoite protein (CSP antibodies (low prevalence: reference level; intermediate level OR = 2.47, p = 0.023, proportion of inhabitants who lived in another site one year before (OR = 2.53, p = 0.003, and duration to reach the nearest tarmacked road (duration less than one hour = reference level, duration equal to or more than one hour OR = 0.49, p = 0.019. Conclusion Antimalarial drug pressure varied considerably from

  12. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  13. Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90: Towards Reversing Antimalarial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dea Shahinas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria continues to exact a great human toll in tropical settings. Antimalarial resistance is rife and the parasite inexorably develops mechanisms to outwit our best drugs, including the now first-line choice, artesunate. Novel strategies to circumvent resistance are needed. Here we detail drug development focusing on heat shock protein 90 and its central role as a chaperone. A growing body of evidence supports the role for Hsp90 inhibitors as adjunctive drugs able to restore susceptibility to traditionally efficacious compounds like chloroquine.

  14. Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with Malarone antimalarial prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberger, Michael; Lechner, Arno Michael; Zelger, Bernhard

    2003-07-01

    To the best of our knowledge, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) has not been reported previously as an adverse reaction to Malarone, which is a combination of atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride used for antimalarial prophylaxis and therapy. We describe a 65-year-old patient who had SJS with typical clinical and histopathological findings associated with the use of Malarone prophylaxis for malaria. This report should alert physicians to this severe cutaneous reaction, and Malarone should be added to the list of drugs that can potentially cause SJS.

  15. Mono- and bis-thiazolium salts have potent antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzé, Abdallah; Rubi, Eric; Arnal, Pascal; Boisbrun, Michel; Carcel, Carole; Salom-Roig, Xavier; Maynadier, Marjorie; Wein, Sharon; Vial, Henri; Calas, Michèle

    2005-05-19

    Three new series comprising 24 novel cationic choline analogues and consisting of mono- or bis (N or C-5-duplicated) thiazolium salts have been synthesized. Bis-thiazolium salts showed potent antimalarial activity (much superior to monothiazoliums). Among them, bis-thiazolium salts 12 and 13 exhibited IC(50) values of 2.25 nM and 0.65 nM, respectively, against P. falciparum in vitro. These compounds also demonstrated good in vivo activity (ED(50)

  16. Metabolic pathways of quinoline, indole and their methylated analogs by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, S.S.; Licht, D.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    detection, thin-layer chromatography, combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and proton NMR spectroscopy. All degraded compounds were initially hydroxylated at position 2 by D. indolicum. A new degradation product of quinoline was observed in the second transformation step, where 3,4-dihydro-2......The transformation of quinoline, isoquinoline and 3-, 4-, 6- and 8-methylquinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was compared with that of the N-containing analogues indole and 1-, 2-, 3- and 7-methylindole. The metabolites were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV...

  17. 4,4′-Methylenebis{N-[(E-quinolin-2-ylmethylidene]aniline}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoud Djamel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C33H24N4, was prepared by the reaction of a bifunctional aromatic diamine (4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane and an aldehyde (quinoline-2-carboxaldhyde. The molecule consists of two nearly planar (or r.m.s. deviation = 0.017 Å 4-methyl-N-[(E-quinolin-2-ylmethylidene]aniline moieties, which are linked by the methylene group. The angle between the mean planes of the two benzene rings connected to the methylene group is 77.86 (11°.

  18. Modulating effects of plasma containing anti-malarial antibodies on in vitro anti-malarial drug susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udomsangpetch Rachanee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of anti-malarial drugs is determined by the level of parasite susceptibility, anti-malarial drug bioavailability and pharmacokinetics, and host factors including immunity. Host immunity improves the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of anti-malarial drugs, but the mechanism and magnitude of this effect has not been characterized. This study characterized the effects of 'immune' plasma to Plasmodium falciparumon the in vitro susceptibility of P. falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. Methods Titres of antibodies against blood stage antigens (mainly the ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen [RESA] were measured in plasma samples obtained from Thai patients with acute falciparum malaria. 'Immune' plasma was selected and its effects on in vitro parasite growth and multiplication of the Thai P. falciparum laboratory strain TM267 were assessed by light microscopy. The in vitro susceptibility to quinine and artesunate was then determined in the presence and absence of 'immune' plasma using the 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method. Drug susceptibility was expressed as the concentrations causing 50% and 90% inhibition (IC50 and IC90, of 3H-hypoxanthine uptake. Results Incubation with 'immune' plasma reduced parasite maturation and decreased parasite multiplication in a dose dependent manner. 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation after incubation with 'immune' plasma was decreased significantly compared to controls (median [range]; 181.5 [0 to 3,269] cpm versus 1,222.5 [388 to 5,932] cpm (p= 0.001. As a result 'immune' plasma reduced apparent susceptibility to quinine substantially; median (range IC50 6.4 (0.5 to 23.8 ng/ml versus 221.5 (174.4 to 250.4 ng/ml (p = 0.02, and also had a borderline effect on artesunate susceptibility; IC50 0.2 (0.02 to 0.3 ng/ml versus 0.8 (0.2 to 2.3 ng/ml (p = 0.08. Effects were greatest at low concentrations, changing the shape of the concentration-effect relationship. IC90 values were not

  19. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  20. SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL INDOLO[3,2-c]QUINOLINES; ETHYL 3-CHLORO-9,11-DIMETHOXY INDOLO[3,2-c]QUINOLINE-6-CARBOXYLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Dwi Wahyuningsih

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available -Carboline and its derivatives are significant due to their pharmacological importance. The synthesis of indolo[3,2-c]quinolines as a benzo analog of -carboline has been carried out via an oxime ether intermediate. Reaction of 2'-glyoxylic ester with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in the presence of sodium acetate afforded the oxime acetate in 82%. It was then treated with natrium and fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in ethanol to give an orange solid of oxime ether acetate which is in subsequent treatment with a base yielded a pale yellow solid of indolo[3,2-c]carboline in 43%. Keywords: -carboline, oxime, indolo[3,2-c]quinoline.

  1. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-02-13

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting.

  2. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: A drug target for the development of antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anju; Maqbool, Mudasir; Mobashir, Mohammad; Hoda, Nasimul

    2017-01-05

    Malaria is a critical human disease with extensive exploration yet unestablished due to occurrence of frequent drug resistance. This aspect of malaria pharmacology calls for the introduction of new antimalarial. The drugs reported till date targeted different stages of the parasites in order to stop their growth and proliferation. Beside this, various drugs that could inhibit the imperative enzymes of the parasite have also been reported. Amid them, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has a key worth. DHODH is involved in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis of the malarial parasite which acts as a primary source of energy for its survival. Since life of the parasite utterly depends on pyrimidine biosynthesis, so it can be used as an apt drug target for malaria eradication. In addition to this, DHODH is also present in human and their active sites have significant structural dissimilarities, so the development of selective inhibitors may prove to be a milestone in search of new antimalarials. Inhibitors of human DHODH have been used to treat autoimmune diseases such as, rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis and have been investigated in the treatment of cancer, viral diseases, as well as in plant pathology. Here, we have reviewed the important role of DHODH as a viable drug target against malaria, its importance for the survival of the parasite, and DHODH inhibitors reported so far. The rate of success of the reported DHODH inhibitors and further required improvements have also been accounted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards histone deacetylase inhibitors as new antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Katherine T; Tran, Thanh N; Fairlie, David P

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important enzymes that effect post-translational modifications of proteins by altering the acetylation state of lysine residues. HDACs control epigenetic changes that trigger cell transformation and proliferation of transformed cells associated with many diseases. These enzymes are validated drug targets for some types of cancer and are promising therapeutic targets for a range of other diseases, including malaria. Annually, there are ~500 million clinical cases of malaria and ~0.8-1.2 million deaths. There is no licensed vaccine for preventing malaria, and parasites that cause malaria are becoming resistant to current drugs, necessitating the search for new therapies. HDAC inhibitors are emerging as a promising new class of antimalarial drugs with potent and selective action against Plasmodium parasites in vitro. Recent studies on the effects of HDAC inhibitors on the growth and development of P. falciparum have provided important new information on transcriptional regulation in malaria parasites and have validated the potential of this class of inhibitors for malaria therapy. To realise effective HDAC inhibitors for clinical trials, next generation inhibitors must not inhibit other human HDACs or proteins required for normal human physiology, be highly selective in killing parasites in vivo without killing normal host cells, and have improved bioavailability and pharmacokinetic profiles. This review summarizes current knowledge about malaria parasite HDACs and HDAC inhibitors with antimalarial properties, and provides insights for their development into new drugs for treatment of malaria.

  4. Synthesis and structure of interaction products of quinoline-2(1H)-thione with molecular iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov'yants, Margarita S; Starikova, Zoya A; Kolesnikova, Tatiana S; Karginova, Anastasia O; Lyanguzov, Nikolay V

    2015-03-15

    The behavior of quinoline-2(1H)-thione, which is a potential antithyroid drug toward molecular iodine, was investigated. The ability of quinoline-2(1H)-thione to form the outer-sphere charge-transfer complex C9H7NS·I2 with iodine molecular in dilute chloroform solution has been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy (lgβ=3.85). The crystal structure of the new salt 2-(quinoline-2-yldisulfanyl)quinolinium triiodide - product of irreversible oxidation of quinoline-2(1H)-thione was determined by X-ray diffraction. The 2-(quinoline-2-yldisulfanyl)quinolinium cations form dimers through π-π-stacking interaction between quinoline rings. Strong intramolecular interactions are observed between iodine - sulfur atoms and iodine - hydrogen atoms with shortened contacts (less of sum of van der Waals contacts). It is noteworthy that two perfectly centrosymmetrical anions I3(-) form a very short contact I(3)⋯I(3') 3.7550(5) so we can state the formation of the dianion I(6)(2-). Therefore the formation and topology of polyiodide species depend on the characteristics, such as shape, size and charge, etc., of the counter cation, 2-(quinoline-2-yldisulfanyl)quinolinium, which is considered as templating agent. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Accidental methanol ingestion: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Jan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of methanol (CH3OH intoxication differs enormously from country to country. Methanol intoxication is extremely rare in the Dutch population. Even a low dose can already be potentially lethal. Patients are conventionally treated with hemodialysis. Therefore we'd like to present a report of a foreign sailor in Rotterdam who accidentally caused himself severe methanol intoxication, with a maximum measured concentration of 4.4 g/L. Case presentation The patient presented with hemodynamic instability and severe metabolic acidosis with pH 6.69. The anion gap was 39 mmol/L and the osmol gap 73 mosmol/kg. Treatment with ethanol and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVH-DF was initiated. Despite the hemodynamic instability it is was possible to achieve rapid correction of pH and methanol concentration with CVVH-DF while maintaining a stable and therapeutic ethanol serum concentration. Despite hemodynamic and acid-base improvement, our patient developed massive cerebral edema leading to brain death. Permission for organ donation was unfortunately not ascertained. Conclusions We conclude that in a hemodynamic instable situation high methanol concentrations and methanol-induced derangements of homeostasis are safely and effectively treated with CVVH-DF and that severe cerebral edema is another possible cause of death rather than the classical bleeding in the putamen area.

  6. Novel quinoline-3-carboxamides (Part 2): Design, optimization and synthesis of quinoline based scaffold as EGFR inhibitors with potent anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Rasha M; Serya, Rabah A T; El-Motwally, Amira M; Esmat, Ahmed; Abbas, Safinaz; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2017-12-01

    EGFR has a key role in cell growth. Its mutation and overexpression share in epithelial malignancies and tumor growth. Quinazoline and quinoline derivatives are common anticancer intracellular inhibitors of EGFR kinase, and their optimization is an important issue for development of potent targeted anticancer agents. Based on these facts, different strategies were used for optimizing our reported quinoline-3-carboxamide compound III (EGFR IC 50  = 5.283 µM and MCF-7 IC 50  = 3.46 µM) through different molecular modeling techniques. The optimized compounds were synthesized and subjected to EGFR binding assay and accordingly some more potent inhibitors were obtained. The most potent quinoline-3-carboxamides were the furan derivative 5o; thiophene derivative 6b; and benzyloxy derivative 10 showing EGFR IC 50 values 2.61, 0.49 and 1.73 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the anticancer activity of compounds eliciting potent EGFR inhibition (5o, 5p, 6b, 8a, 8b, and 10) was evaluated against MCF-7 cell line where they exhibited IC 50 values 3.355, 3.647, 5.069, 3.617, 0.839 and 10.85 μM, respectively. Compound 6b was selected as lead structure for further optimization hoping to produce more potent EGFR inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis, reactions, and biological activities of some new thieno[3,2-c]quinoline and pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wadood, Fatma K; Abdel-Monem, Maisa I; Fahmy, Atiat M; Geies, Ahmed A

    2014-02-01

    2-Bromo-4-fluoroaniline (1) was condensed with ethyl 2-cyano-3-ethoxyacrylate (2) in ethanol to afford 3, which upon refluxing in paraffin oil at 250°C gave 8-bromo-3-cyano-6-fluoroquinoline-4(1H)-one (4). Then, compound 4 was taken as a versatile building block that allows the synthesis of thieno[3,2-c]quinoline, pyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline, and N-methylpyrrolo[3,2-c]quinoline systems. The newly synthesized compounds and their derivatives were characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopy (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and mass). Furthermore, some of these synthesized compounds were screened for their biological activities against various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. Our results demonstrate that most of the synthesized compounds possess a significant broad antibacterial activity against all strains of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In addition, compound 5 showed remarkable antifungal activity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingul, Murat; Tan, Owen; Gardner, Christopher R; Sutton, Selina K; Arndt, Greg M; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B; Kumar, Naresh; Black, David StC

    2016-07-14

    Identification of the novel (E)-N'-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-yl)methylene)-3-(phenylthio)propanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19-26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G₁ cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27(kip1) cell cycle regulating protein.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bingul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the novel (E-N′-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-ylmethylene-3-(phenylthiopropanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19–26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G1 cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27kip1 cell cycle regulating protein.

  10. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    127, No. 2, February 2015, pp. 215–223. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0781-6. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate. PRITHIVIRAJ KHAKHLARY and JUBARAJ B BARUAH∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039, India.

  11. Chlorine- and Sulphur-substituted Pyrrolo[3, 4-b]quinolines and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outcome from aminolysis of 3, 3, 9-trichlorothieno[3, 4-b]quinolinone with an alkylamine is dependent on the reaction conditions and extraneous reagents employed. A variety of hitherto unreported products can be obtained and include 4-chloro-2- alkylthiocarbamoyl-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid alkylamides, ...

  12. Inhibitory activity of benzo[h]quinoline and benzo[h]chromene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Benzo[h]quinoline and benzo[h]chromene were synthesized by treating 6-methoxy-1- tetralone with benzylidenemalononitrile under microwave irradiation. The structures of compounds 2 and 3 were confirmed by elemental, spectral, and x-ray crystallographic analyses. The cytotoxic activity of compounds 2 and 3 ...

  13. Quinoline Fluorescent Probes for Zinc - from Diagnostic to Therapeutic Molecules in Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplinska, Barbara; Spaczynska, Ewelina; Musiol, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent compounds had gained strong attention due to their wide and appealing applications. Microscopic techniques and visualization are good examples among others. Introduction of fluorescent dyes into microbiology opens the possibility to observe tissues, organisms or organelle with exceptional sensitivity and resolution. Probes for detection of biologically relevant metals as zinc, iron or copper seems to be particularly important for drug design and pharmaceutical sciences. Quinoline derivatives are well known for their good metal affinity and wide spectrum of biological activity. In this regard, molecular sensors built on this scaffold may be useful not only as analytical but also as therapeutic agents. In the present review, application of quinoline moiety in designing of novel fluorescent probes for zinc is presented and discussed. Zinc cations are relevant for vast majority of processes and recently attract a great deal of attention for their role in neurodegenerative diseases. Compounds interacting with Zn2+ may be used for early diagnosis of such disorders, for example the Alzheimer disease. Quinoline-based zinc probes may exert some beneficial role in organism acting as theranostic agents. First preliminary drugs for Alzheimer therapy that are based on quinoline moiety are good example of this trend. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. A fluorescent sensor based on binaphthol-quinoline Schiff base for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    moiety to quinoline fluorophore and the isomerization process of C=N bond.12 Upon addition of 4.0 equiv. of. Zn2+, a dramatic fluorescence enhancement at 512nm was observed, which could be attributed to the Zn2+ - binding induced suppression of PET and C=N isome rization. The Zn2+ induced green fluorescence ...

  15. 4,8-Dimethoxyfuro[2,3-b]quinoline (γ-fagarine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The title molecule, C13H11NO3, a natural compound extracted from Phellodendron chinense, exhibits a near planar framework: the mean deviations from the furo[2,3-b]quinoline ring system and from the whole molecule (not including the H atoms are 0.006 and 0.062 Å, respectively.

  16. Chlorine- and Sulphur-substituted Pyrrolo[3,4-b]quinolines and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outcome from aminolysis of 3,3,9-trichlorothieno[3,4-b]quinolinone with an alkylamine is dependent on the reaction condi- tions and extraneous reagents employed. A variety of hitherto unreported products can be obtained and include. 4-chloro-2-alkylthiocarbamoyl-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid alkylamides, ...

  17. Optimized quinoline amino alcohols as disruptors and dispersal agents of Vibrio cholerae biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Brian; Jake Haeckl, F. P.; Linington, Roger G.

    2015-01-01

    The biofilm state is an integral part of the lifecycle of many bacterial pathogens. Identifying inhibitors as molecular probes against bacterial biofilms has numerous potential biomedical applications. Here we report quinoline amino alcohol 20 as a highly potent disruptor of V. cholerae biofilms. Additionally, 20 was able to disperse preformed biofilms, an activity exhibited by few compounds with biofilm inhibiting activity. PMID:26156292

  18. Emitting oligomer containing quinoline group: Synthesis and photophysical properties of conjugated oligomer obtained by Wittig reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpagam, S., E-mail: skarpagam80@yahoo.com [Organic Chemistry Division, School of Advanced Science, VIT University, Vellore 14, Tamil Nadu (India); Guhanathan, S. [Department of Chemistry, Muthurangam Government Arts College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-01-15

    Dichloro quinoline substituted phenylene vinylene oligomer (QUI-OPV) was synthesized via Wittig route. Formation of the oligomer was characterized by spectral (FTIR, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR), elemental and gel permeation chromatography analysis. The oligomer possesses excellent thermal stability (decomposition temperature 470 °C), solubility in common organic solvents and high glass transition temperature (61 °C). The morphology of the oligomer film of one dimensional (1D) and three dimensional (3D) architectures was observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In CHCl{sub 3} solution, the oligomer showed the absorption maxima at 382 nm and also observed excellent photoluminescence (PL) with bluish green emission maxima at shorter wavelengths of 477 nm. The introduction of quinoline to the main chain resulted in a slight decrease of effective conjugation length and exhibited the blue shift in both the absorption and emission spectra. -- Highlights: • Simple synthesis of quinoline functionalized phenylene vinylene oligomer by Wittig route. • The materials had good organosolubility and intrinsic viscosity. • High thermal stability and good surface roughness morphology were observed. • Performance of luminescence improved via introducing quinoline into PPV. • Electrochemical and optical band gap of the oligomer were consistent with each other.

  19. Mono- and multimeric ferrocene congeners of quinoline-based polyamines as potential antiparasitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of mono- and multimeric polyamine-containing ferrocenyl complexes bearing a quinoline motif were prepared. The complexes were characterised by standard techniques. The molecular structure of the monomeric salicylaldimine derivative was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction and w...

  20. Comparison of bacterial community characteristics between complete and shortcut denitrification systems for quinoline degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Hua, Xiufu; Yue, Xiuping

    2017-02-01

    For quinoline-denitrifying degradation, very few researches focused on shortcut denitrification process and its bacterial community characteristics. In this study, complete and shortcut denitrification systems were constructed simultaneously for quinoline degradation. By calculation, specific quinoline removal rates were 0.905 and 1.123 g/(gVSS d), respectively, in the complete and shortcut systems, and the latter was 1.24 times of the former. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), high-throughput sequencing, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques based on 16S rRNA were jointly applied to compare microbial community structures of two systems. Many denitrifying bacteria phyla, classes, and genera were detected in the two systems. Phylum Proteobacteria, Class Gammaproteobacteria, and Genus Alicycliphilus denitrificans were the dominant contributors for quinoline-denitrifying degradation. In the shortcut denitrification system, main and specific strains playing crucial roles were more; the species richness and the total abundance of functional genes (narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ) were higher compared with the complete denitrification system. It could be supposed that inorganic-nitrogen reductase activity of bacterial community was stronger in the shortcut denitrification system, which was the intrinsic reason to result in higher denitrification rate.

  1. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    of succinic acid is suggested to be a result of a coupling reaction of the acetic acid radical A reaction mechanism is suggested for the degradation of quinoline: it involves hydroxyl radicals and the possible interaction with autoclave walls is discussed. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. An experimental screen for quinoline/fumaric acid salts and co-crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beko, S. L.; Schmidt, M. U.; Bond, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental screen has been carried out for salts and co-crystals of quinoline (C9H7N) and fumaric acid (C4H4O4), including solution-based co-crystallisation from a variety of solvents, solvent-assisted and solvent-free co-grinding, and direct co-crystallisation of the starting materials...

  3. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  4. Asymmetric hydrogenation of quinolines catalyzed by iridium complexes of monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrsic, Natasa; Lefort, Laurent; Boogers, Jeroen A. F.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; de Vries, Johannes G.; Mršić, Nataša

    The monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidite PipPhos is used as ligand for the iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of 2- and 2,6-substituted quinolines. If tri-ortho-tolylphosphine and/or chloride salts are used as additives enantioselectivities are strongly enhanced up to 89%. NMR indicates

  5. Syntheses and characterization of non-bisphosphonate quinoline derivatives as new FPPS inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinggong; Liu, Weilin; Ge, Hu; Gao, Jinbo; He, Qingqing; Su, Lijuan; Xu, Jun; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-shu; Li, Ding

    2014-03-01

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS) is a key regulatory enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and in the post-translational modification of signaling proteins. It has been reported that non-bisphosphonate FPPS inhibitors targeting its allosteric binding pocket are potentially important for the development of promising anti-cancer drugs. The following methods were used: organic syntheses of non-bisphosphonate quinoline derivatives, enzyme inhibition studies, fluorescence titration assays, synergistic effect studies of quinoline derivatives with zoledronate, ITC studies for the binding of FPPS with quinoline derivatives, NMR-based HAP binding assays, molecular modeling studies, fluorescence imaging assay and MTT assays. We report our syntheses of a series of quinoline derivatives as new FPPS inhibitors possibly targeting the allosteric site of the enzyme. Compound 6b showed potent inhibition to FPPS without significant hydroxyapatite binding affinity. The compound showed synergistic inhibitory effect with active-site inhibitor zoledronate. ITC experiment confirmed the good binding effect of compound 6b to FPPS, and further indicated the binding ratio of 1:1. Molecular modeling studies showed that 6b could possibly bind to the allosteric binding pocket of the enzyme. The fluorescence microscopy indicated that these compounds could get into cancer cells. Our results showed that quinoline derivative 6b could become a new lead compound for further optimization for cancer treatment. The traditional FPPS active-site inhibitors bisphosphonates show poor membrane permeability to tumor cells, due to their strong polarity. The development of new non-bisphosphonate FPPS inhibitors with good cell membrane permeability is potentially important. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The washout effect during laundry on benzothiazole, benzotriazole, quinoline, and their derivatives in clothing textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Giovanna; Avagyan, Rozanna; Hongyu, Ren; Östman, Conny

    2016-02-01

    In two previous papers, the authors have shown that benzothiazole, benzotriazole, quinoline, and several of their derivatives are widespread in clothing textile articles. A number of these compounds exhibit allergenic and irritating properties and, due to their octanol-water partition coefficient, are prone to be absorbed by the skin. Moreover, they are slightly soluble in water, which could make washing of clothes a route of emission into the environment. In the present study, the washout effect of benzothiazole, benzotriazole, quinoline, and some of their derivatives has been investigated. Twenty-seven textile samples were analyzed before, as well as after five and ten times of washing. The most abundant analyte was found to be benzothiazole, which was detected in 85 % of the samples with an average concentration of 0.53 μg/g (median 0.44 μg/g), followed by quinoline, detected in 81 % of the samples with an average concentration of 2.42 μg/g (median 0.21 μg/g). The average decrease in concentration for benzothiazoles was 50 % after ten times washing, while it was around 20 % for quinolines. The average emission to household wastewater of benzothiazoles and quinolines during one washing (5 kg of clothes made from polyester materials) was calculated to 0.5 and 0.24 g, respectively. These results strongly indicate that laundering of clothing textiles can be an important source of release of these compounds to household wastewater and in the end to aquatic environments. It also demonstrates a potential source of human exposure to these chemicals since considerable amounts of the compounds remain in the clothes even after ten times of washing.

  7. Antimalarial activity of selected Sudanese medicinal plants with emphasis to Maytenus senegalensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, Ahmed El Tahir Mohamed

    1998-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify and characterize the antimalrial agents from traitional Sudanese medicinal plants. 49 plants parts representing 26 species from 15 families were extracted and screened for their in vitro antimalrial activity using P. falciparum strain 3D7 which is chloroquine sensitive and Dd2 strain which is chloroquine resistant and pyrimethamine sensitive.The plant species investigated exhibited diverse botanical families. They includes Annonaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Asteraceae, Balantiaceae, Caesalpiniceae, Celasteraceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, Graminae, Meliaceae, Myrtaceae, Polygonaceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae, and simaroubaceae. The evaluation of these plants for their antimalarial activity and their effect on lymphocyte proliferation was carried out. 57 extracts were tested on the chloroquine sensitive strain (3D7). Where 34 extracts (59%) exhibited significant activity against 3D7 with IC 50 values ≤ 50 μ g/ml. While 21 extracts (57%) showed antimalrial activities with IC 50 values ≤ 50 μ g/ml on Dd2. 13 extracts (22%) and ten extracts (18%) only showed an activity with IC 50 values ≤ 5 μ g/ml on 3 D7 and Dd2, respectively. The activities of some plant extracts, which affected 3D7 strain, were measured using the radiolabelled ( 3 H) hypoxanthine method and microscopical count. 15 plant extracts (48%) from 32 showed IC 50 values ≤ 50 μ g/ml against 3D7 strain using the radiolabelled hypoxanthine methods and only 5 extracts (16%) showed IC 50 values ≤ 5 μ g/ml against 3D7. Most of the extracts screened had a low effect on lymphocyte proliferation (IC 50 values >100 μ g/ml), where as Sonochous cornatus, Balanites aegyptiaca, Tamarindus indica, Acacia nilotica, Annona squamosa, Eucalyptus globulus and Cassia tora enhanced lymphocyte proliferation. liquid-liquid partition of methanolic preparation of Acacia nilotica seeds and husk showed that the ethylacetate phase possessed the highest activity against both 3D7 and Dd2

  8. Differential speciation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX in the presence of free base and diprotic 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildenhuys, Johandie; Müller, Ronel; le Roex, Tanya; de Villiers, Katherine A.

    2017-03-01

    The crystal structures of the μ-propionato dimer and π-π dimer of ferriprotoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)PPIX) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCD). Both species were obtained in the presence of the synthetic 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial drug, amodiaquine (AQ). The solution that afforded the μ-propionato dimer contained AQ as a free base (i.e. with both quinoline and terminal amine nitrogen atoms neutral). On the other hand, when the diprotic salt of AQ was included in the crystallization medium, the Fe(III)PPIX π-π dimer was obtained. The structure of the μ-propionato dimer, which is the discrete structural unit that constitutes haemozoin (malaria pigment), is identical to that obtained previously in presence of chloroquine free base. We suspect that the drug, via its two available basic sites, facilitates dissociation of one of the two Fe(III)PPIX propionic acid groups to yield a propionate group that is required for reciprocal coordination of the metal centre to form the centrosymmetric dimer. On the other hand, this proton transfer is not possible when the drug is present as a diprotic salt. In this case, the π-π dimer of Fe(III)PPIX is obtained. In the current study, the π-π dimer of haemin (chloro-Fe(III)PPIX) was obtained as a DMF solvate from non-aqueous aprotic solution (dimethyl formamide and chloroform), however the π-π dimer is also known to exist in aqueous solution (as aqua- or hydroxo-Fe(III)PPIX), where it is purportedly involved in the nucleation of haemozoin. We have been able to unambiguously determine the positions of all non-hydrogen atoms, as well as locate or assign all hydrogen atoms in the structure of the π-π dimer, which was not possible in the SCD structure of haemin reported by Koenig in 1965 owing to disorder in the vinyl and methyl substituents. Interestingly, no disorder in the methyl and vinyl groups is observed in the current structure. Both the π-π and μ-propionato dimers of Fe(III)PPIX are

  9. Antimalarial polyoxygenated cyclohexene derivatives from the roots of Uvaria cherrevensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekphrom, Ratsami; Kanokmedhakul, Kwanjai; Schevenels, Florian; Kanokmedhakul, Somdej

    2018-02-01

    Three new polyoxygenated cyclohexene derivatives named cherrevenisyls A and B (1 and 2), and ellipeiopsol E (3), along with fifteen known compounds, were isolated from the roots of Uvaria cherrevensis. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR techniques and mass spectrometry. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were assigned. Compounds 1, 2 and 5 showed antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum with IC 50 ranging from 3.34-7.34μg/mL. Compounds 5-18 exhibited cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines (KB, MCF-7 and NCI-H187) with IC 50 values in ranging from 1.26-49.03μg/mL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of counterfeit artesunate antimalarial tablets from southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Krystyn Alter; Newton, Paul N; Green, Michael D; De Veij, Marleen; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pizzanelli, David; Mayxay, Mayfong; Dondorp, Arjen; Fernandez, Facundo M

    2006-11-01

    In southeast Asia, the widespread high prevalence of counterfeits tablets of the vital antimalarial artesunate is of great public health concern. To assess the seriousness of this problem, we quantified the amount of active ingredient present in artesunate tablets by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. This method, in conjunction with analysis of the packaging, classified tablets as genuine, substandard, or fake and validated results of the colorimetric Fast Red TR test. Eight (35%) of 23 fake artesunate samples contained the wrong active ingredients, which were identified as different erythromycins and paracetamol. Raman spectroscopy identified calcium carbonate as an excipient in 9 (39%) of 23 fake samples. Multivariate unsupervised pattern recognition results indicated two major clusters of artesunate counterfeits, those with counterfeit foil stickers and containing calcium carbonate, erythromycin, and paracetamol, and those with counterfeit holograms and containing starch but without evidence of erythromycin or paracetamol.

  11. Triterpenes from Minquartia guianensis (Olacaceae) and in vitro antimalarial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cursino, Lorena Mayara de Carvalho; Nunez, Cecilia Veronica [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Lab. de Bioprospeccao e Biotecnologia; Paula, Renata Cristina de; Nascimento, Maria Fernanda Alves do [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia. Dept. de Produtos Farmaceuticos; Santos, Pierre Alexandre dos, E-mail: cecilia@inpa.gov.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    2012-07-01

    Minquartia guianensis, popularly known as acariquara, was phytochemically investigated. The following triterpenes were isolated from the dichloromethane extract of leaves: lupen-3-one (1), taraxer-3-one (2) and oleanolic acid (3). The dichloromethane extract of branches yielded the triterpene 3{beta}-methoxy-lup-20(29)-ene (4). The chemical structures were characterized by NMR data. Plant extracts, substance 3, squalene (5) and taraxerol (6), (5 and 6 previously isolated), were evaluated by in vitro assay against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The dichloromethane extract of leaves and the three triterpenes assayed have shown partial activity. Thus, these results demonstrated that new potential antimalarial natural products can be found even in partially active extracts. (author)

  12. Selection of a trioxaquine as an antimalarial drug candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslédan, Frédéric; Fraisse, Laurent; Pellet, Alain; Guillou, François; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Kremsner, Peter G.; Moreno, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique; Maffrand, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Trioxaquines are antimalarial agents based on hybrid structures with a dual mode of action. One of these molecules, PA1103/SAR116242, is highly active in vitro on several sensitive and resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum at nanomolar concentrations (e.g., IC50 value = 10 nM with FcM29, a chloroquine-resistant strain) and also on multidrug-resistant strains obtained from fresh patient isolates in Gabon. This molecule is very efficient by oral route with a complete cure of mice infected with chloroquine-sensitive or chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodia at 26–32 mg/kg. This compound is also highly effective in humanized mice infected with P. falciparum. Combined with a good drug profile (preliminary absorption, metabolism, and safety parameters), these data were favorable for the selection of this particular trioxaquine for development as drug candidate among 120 other active hybrid molecules. PMID:18987321

  13. Screening Mangrove Endophytic Fungi for Antimalarial Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcul, Laurent; Waterman, Carrie; Ma, Wai Sheung; Lebar, Matthew D.; Harter, Charles; Mutka, Tina; Morton, Lindsay; Maignan, Patrick; Van Olphen, Alberto; Kyle, Dennis E.; Vrijmoed, Lilian; Pang, Ka-Lai; Pearce, Cedric; Baker, Bill J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a screening campaign to investigate fungi as a source for new antimalarial compounds. A subset of our fungal collection comprising Chinese mangrove endophytes provided over 5000 lipophilic extracts. We developed an accelerated discovery program based on small-scale cultivation for crude extract screening and a high-throughput malaria assay. Criteria for hits were developed and high priority hits were subjected to scale-up cultivation. Extracts from large scale cultivation were fractionated and these fractions subjected to both in vitro malaria and cytotoxicity screening. Criteria for advancing fractions to purification were developed, including the introduction of a selectivity index and by dereplication of known metabolites. From the Chinese mangrove endophytes, four new compounds (14–16, 18) were isolated including a new dimeric tetrahydroxanthone, dicerandrol D (14), which was found to display the most favorable bioactivity profile. PMID:24351903

  14. Screening Mangrove Endophytic Fungi for Antimalarial Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Calcul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a screening campaign to investigate fungi as a source for new antimalarial compounds. A subset of our fungal collection comprising Chinese mangrove endophytes provided over 5000 lipophilic extracts. We developed an accelerated discovery program based on small-scale cultivation for crude extract screening and a high-throughput malaria assay. Criteria for hits were developed and high priority hits were subjected to scale-up cultivation. Extracts from large scale cultivation were fractionated and these fractions subjected to both in vitro malaria and cytotoxicity screening. Criteria for advancing fractions to purification were developed, including the introduction of a selectivity index and by dereplication of known metabolites. From the Chinese mangrove endophytes, four new compounds (14–16, 18 were isolated including a new dimeric tetrahydroxanthone, dicerandrol D (14, which was found to display the most favorable bioactivity profile.

  15. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of new haemanthamine-type derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrón, Juan C; Gutiérrez, David; Flores, Ninoska; Ravelo, Ángel G; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2012-09-15

    Thirty one derivatives were prepared from the natural alkaloids haemanthamine (1), haemanthidine (2) and 11-hydroxyvittatine (3). They were evaluated for their in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-sensitive strains of Plasmodium falciparum and some structure-activity relationships were outlined. For haemanthamine derivatives having a methoxy group at C-3, the presence of a free hydroxyl group at C-11 is important for the activity. The double bond at C-1-C-2 plays also an important role to achieve good inhibitory activity. Compound 35 with two nicotinate groups at C-3 and at C-11 was the most active compound with a IC(50) = 0.8 ± 0.06 μM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plants of the American continent with antimalarial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid R. Mariath

    Full Text Available Malaria is a human parasitic disease caused by protozoa species of the Plasmodium genus. This disease has affected populations of the tropical and subtropical regions. About 500 million new cases occur annually on the world and therefore it is considered an emerging disease of important public health problem. In this context, the natural products as vegetables species have their bioactive molecules as targets for pharmacological, toxicological and phytochemical studies towards the development of more effective medicines for the treatment of many diseases. So this work intends to aid the researchers in the study of natural products to the treatment of malaria. In this review, 476 plants of the American continent were related for the antimalarial activity and of these vegetables species 198 were active and 278 inactive for some type of Plasmodium when they were evaluated through of in vitro or in vivo bioassays models.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Antimalarial Evaluations of Myrtle Extract, a Plant Traditionally Used for Treatment of Parasitic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Naghibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the collected ethnobotanical data from the Traditional Medicine and Materia Medica Research Center (TMRC, Iran, Myrtus communis L. (myrtle was selected for the assessment of in vitro and in vivo antimalarial and cytotoxic activities. Methanolic extract of myrtle was prepared from the aerial parts and assessed for antiplasmodial activity, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay against chloroquine-resistant (K1 and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The 4-day suppressive test was employed to determine the parasitemia suppression of the myrtle extract against P. berghei  in vivo. The IC50 values of myrtle extract were 35.44 µg/ml against K1 and 0.87 µg/ml against 3D7. Myrtle extract showed a significant suppression of parasitaemia (84.8 ± 1.1% at 10 mg/kg/day in mice infected with P. berghei after 4 days of treatment. Cytotoxic activity was carried out against mammalian cell lines using methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT assay. No cytotoxic effect on mammalian cell lines up to 100 µg/mL was shown. The results support the traditional use of myrtle in malaria. Phytochemical investigation and understanding the mechanism of action would be in our upcoming project.

  18. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  19. Synthesis and initial evaluation of quinoline-based inhibitors of the SH2-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase (SHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher M; Adhikari, Arijit A; Wallach, Daniel R; Fernandes, Sandra; Balch, Amanda N; Kerr, William G; Chisholm, John D

    2015-11-15

    Recently, inhibition of the SH2-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) has become an attractive strategy for facilitating engraftment of MHC-I mismatched bone marrow grafts, increasing the number of adult stem cells in vivo, and inducing mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Utilizing high-throughput screening, two quinoline small molecules (NSC13480 and NSC305787) that inhibit SHIP1 enzymatic activity were discovered. New syntheses of these inhibitors have been developed which verified the relative stereochemistry of these structures. Utilizing this synthetic route, some analogs of these quinolines have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit SHIP. These structure activity studies determined that an amine tethered to the quinoline core is required for SHIP inhibition. SHIP inhibition may explain the antitumor effects of similar quinoline amino alcohols and provides an impetus for further synthetic studies in this class of compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenyl-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydrothieno[3,2-b]quinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Balamurugan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C23H15Cl2NS, the quinoline system is almost planar [r.m.s. deviation = 0.013 (2 Å]. The phenyl group is disordered over two positions with site occupancies of 0.55 and 0.45, and is oriented in a nearly perpendicular configuration to the quinoline ring [the dihedral angles between the quinoline ring and the major and minor disordered components of the phenyl ring are 81.8 (2 and 71.6 (2°, respectively]. The dihydrothiene ring adopts an envelope conformation. The dihedral angle between the chlorophenyl ring and the quinoline system is 79.32 (1°. In the crystal weak C—H...π interactions occur.

  1. Antimalarial efficacy of hydroxyethylapoquinine (SN-119) and its derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Natalie G; Meyers, David J; Sullivan, David J

    2014-01-01

    Quinine and other cinchona-derived alkaloids, although recently supplanted by the artemisinins (ARTs), continue to be important for treatment of severe malaria. Quinine and quinidine have narrow therapeutic indices, and a safer quinine analog is desirable, particularly with the continued threat of antimalarial drug resistance. Hydroxyethylapoquinine (HEAQ), used at 8 g a day for dosing in humans in the 1930s and halving mortality from bacterial pneumonias, was shown to cure bird malaria in the 1940s and was also reported as treatment for human malaria cases. Here we describe synthesis of HEAQ and its novel stereoisomer hydroxyethylapoquinidine (HEAQD) along with two intermediates, hydroxyethylquinine (HEQ) and hydroxyethylquinidine (HEQD), and demonstrate comparable but elevated antimalarial 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 100 to 200 nM against Plasmodium falciparum quinine-sensitive strain 3D7 (IC50, 56 nM). Only HEAQD demonstrated activity against quinine-tolerant P. falciparum strains Dd2 and INDO with IC50s of 300 to 700 nM. HEQD had activity only against Dd2 with an IC50 of 313 nM. In the lethal mouse malaria model Plasmodium berghei ANKA, only HEQD had activity at 20 mg/kg of body weight comparable to that of the parent quinine or quinidine drugs measured by parasite inhibition and 30-day survival. In addition, HEQ, HEQD, and HEAQ (IC50 ≥ 90 μM) have little to no human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel inhibition expressed in CHO cells compared to HEAQD, quinine, and quinidine (hERG IC50s of 27, 42, and 4 μM, respectively). HEQD more closely resembled quinine in vitro and in vivo for Plasmodium inhibition and demonstrated little hERG channel inhibition, suggesting that further optimization and preclinical studies are warranted for this molecule.

  2. Antimalarial activity of nepodin isolated from Rumex crispus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keyong Ho; Rhee, Ki-Hyeong

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the antimalarial activity of Rumex crispus. To identify an active compound that is isolated from R. crispus, bioassay-based chromatographic fractionation and purification is carried out from 70 % ethanol extract of R. crispus; then, an active compound, nepodin, is identified by spectroscopic analysis. Anitmalarial activity is measured by PfNDH2 assay, cytotoxicity, and animal test. From NADH:quinone oxidoreductase enzyme (PfNDAH2) assay, nepodin exhibited significant IC50 values that were 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.79 ± 0.06 μg/ml against P. falciparum chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant (S20), respectively. Nepodin showed a potential selective inhibition (SI index: ratio of 50 % cytotoxic concentration to 50 % effective anti-plasmodial concentration) of 161.6 and 151.4 against P. falciparum 3D7 and P. falciparum S20. In the animal test, all groups of nepodin treatment of 10, 50, and 250 mg/kg were active with a parasitemia suppression of 97.1 ± 3.3, 99.1 ± 3.7, and 99.1 ± 2.6 %, respectively. The survival time with nepodin treatment was increased by 14.6 ± 2.5, 16.2 ± 1.5, and 19.8 ± 1.7 days at each dose, respectively. This study newly identified the plant R. crispus containing nepodin, which is a potential antimalarial compound. It exhibited the inhibitory activity of PfNDH2 and prolonged the survival time on the group of nepodin treatment; moreover, it inhibited the parasitemia in the animal test.

  3. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  4. Hydrogen-bis[2-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-quinoline-1-oxide]dichlorocuprate (I) from X-ray study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekimova, T. A., E-mail: dery@psu.karelia.ru [Petrozavodsk State University (Russian Federation); Tafeenko, V. A. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Aleshina, L. A.; Basalaev, R. S.; Andreev, V. P.; Nizhnik, Ya. P. [Petrozavodsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    X-ray diffraction data on powder and single-crystal samples were used to determine the crystal structure of hydrogen-bis[2-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-quinoline-1-oxide]dichlorocuprate (I): monoclinic system, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/n, and Z = 2. Two molecules of N oxide of 2-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)quinoline are bound through a hydrogen atom located at the center of symmetry, thus forming a complex cation.

  5. Design, synthesis and evaluation of 3-quinoline carboxylic acids as new inhibitors of protein kinase CK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syniugin, Anatolii R; Ostrynska, Olga V; Chekanov, Maksym O; Volynets, Galyna P; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the derivatives of 3-quinoline carboxylic acid were studied as inhibitors of protein kinase CK2. Forty-three new compounds were synthesized. Among them 22 compounds inhibiting CK2 with IC 50 in the range from 0.65 to 18.2 μM were identified. The most active inhibitors were found among tetrazolo-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives.

  6. Methanol and ethylene glycol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, James A

    2012-10-01

    Accidental or intentional ingestion of substances containing methanol and ethylene glycol can result in death, and some survivors are left with blindness, renal dysfunction, and chronic brain injury. However, even in large ingestions, a favorable outcome is possible if the patient arrives at the hospital early enough and the poisoning is identified and appropriately treated in a timely manner. This review covers the common circumstances of exposure, the involved toxic mechanisms, and the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and treatment of methanol and ethylene glycol intoxication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J.J.; Velden, M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Russel, F.G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly

  8. The mechanisms of parasite clearance after antimalarial treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chotivanich, K.; Udomsangpetch, R.; Dondorp, A.; Williams, T.; Angus, B.; Simpson, J. A.; Pukrittayakamee, S.; Looareesuwan, S.; Newbold, C. I.; White, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine how malaria parasites are cleared from the blood after antimalarial treatment. Neither artesunate nor quinine decreased parasitized red cell deformability or increased antibody binding. In acute falciparum malaria, ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA)

  9. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results...... women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp) during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform...... a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods: All drug shops selling...

  10. Removal of pyridine and quinoline by bio-zeolite composed of mixed degrading bacteria and modified zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yaohui; Sun Qinghua; Xing Rui; Wen Donghui; Tang Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    In the process of the biodegradation of pyridine and quinoline, ammonium is often generated because of the transformation of N from pyridine and quinoline. Zeolite has been proven to be an effective sorbent for the removal of the ammonium. The natural zeolite can be modified to be the macroporous carrier in the biological wastewater treatment process. In this study, a specific bio-zeolite composed of mixed bacteria (a pyridine-degrading bacterium and a quinoline-degrading bacterium) and modified zeolite was used for biodegradation and adsorption in two types of wastewater: sterile synthetic and coking wastewater. The experimental results indicated that pyridine and quinoline could be degraded simultaneously by the mixed bacteria. Furthermore, NH 4 + -N transformed from pyridine and quinoline could be removed by the modified zeolite. In addition, the bacterial community structures of the coking wastewater and the bio-zeolite were monitored by the amplicon length heterogeneity polymerase-chain reaction (LH-PCR) technique. Both LH-PCR results and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that the microorganisms, including BW001 and BW003, could be easily attached on the surface of the modified zeolite and that the bio-zeolite could be used in the treatment of wastewater containing pyridine and/or quinoline.

  11. Fake antimalarials in Southeast Asia are a major impediment to malaria control: multinational cross-sectional survey on the prevalence of fake antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondorp, A M; Newton, P N; Mayxay, M; Van Damme, W; Smithuis, F M; Yeung, S; Petit, A; Lynam, A J; Johnson, A; Hien, T T; McGready, R; Farrar, J J; Looareesuwan, S; Day, N P J; Green, M D; White, N J

    2004-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of counterfeit antimalarial drugs in Southeast (SE) Asia. Cross-sectional survey. Pharmacies and shops selling antimalarial drugs in Myanmar (Burma), Lao PDR, Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand. Proportion of artemisinin derivatives or mefloquine containing drugs of substandard quality. Of the 188 tablet packs purchased which were labelled as 'artesunate' 53% did not contain any artesunate. All counterfeit artesunate tablets were labelled as manufactured by 'Guilin Pharma', and refinements of the fake blisterpacks made them often hard to distinguish from their genuine counterparts. No other artemisinin derivatives were found to be counterfeited. Of the 44 mefloquine samples, 9% contained active ingredient. An alarmingly high proportion of antimalarial drugs bought in pharmacies and shops in mainland SE Asia are counterfeit, and the problem has increased significantly compared with our previous survey in 1999-2000. This is a serious threat to public health in the region.

  12. Self-Medication with Antibiotics and Antimalarials in the Community of Silte Zone, South Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Tajure Wabe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Self-medication with antibiotics and antimalarials occurs among the population in Ethiopian. We studied to estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics and antimalarials in Ethiopia and evaluate factors associated with self-medications. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 405 households, selected from Silte Zone in South Ethiopia, using a random sampling technique by employing a pretested questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS for windows version 16.0. Chi-square test was used to observe the association of variables. RESULT: The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics/ antimalarials in this study was 14.5%. Twenty seven (6.7% participants were self medicated with antibiotics, 2.7% used antimalarials drugs while 21 (5.2% used both. Level of monthly income and educational status significantly influence pattern of antibiotics and antimalarials self medication (P<0.05.The top three diseases that led to self medication in this study were headache (38.5%, fever (35.9%, and cough (14.1%. Among self-medicated antibiotics, Amoxicillin (13.5% followed by Ciprofloxacin (8.5% were the most commonly used class of drug. From antimalarials chloroquine (10.1% were highly abused. The main source of antibiotics /antimalarials was pharmacies (59.0% followed by shops (Kiosks (17.9%. The majority (20.5% of the respondents practiced self medication to avoid waiting time at health facilities. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of self-medication with anti-biotic/ antimalarials in the study community was low. Self medication tended to be higher in people with a higher education and those on higher monthly incomes. The major reason for self-medication is found to be to avoid waiting time at health facility. Community pharmacies are the major source drugs. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(5.000: 529-536

  13. Post-marketing surveillance of anti-malarial medicines used in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Chikowe, Ibrahim; Osei-Safo, Dorcas; Harrison, Jerry JEK; Konadu, Daniel Y; Addae-Mensah, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing concern over the extent of anti-malarial medicine resistance in sub-Saharan Africa, driven largely by administration of sub-therapeutic doses derived from falsified and substandard medicines necessitates regular monitoring of the quality of these medicines to avert any potential public health disaster. This study aimed at determining the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content of anti-malarial medicines available in Malawi with respect to the manufacturers? label...

  14. The in vitro antimalarial interaction of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone and α-mangostin with mefloquine/artesunate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug resistance Plasmodium falciparum is the major health problem in Thailand. Discovery and development of new antimalarial drugs with novel modes of action is urgently required. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimalarial interaction of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone and α-mangostin with the standard antimalarial drugs mefloquine and artesunate in chloroquine sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine resistant (K1) P. falciparum clones in vitro. Median (range) IC50 (drug concentration which produces 50% parasite growth inhibition) values of the 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone, α-mangostin, artesunate and mefloquine for 3D7 vs K1 clones were 1.5 (0.9-2.1) vs 1.2 (1.1-1.6) μM, 17.9 (15.7.0-20.0) vs 9.7 (6.0-14.0) μM, 1.0 (0.4-3.0) vs 1.7 (1.0-2.5) nM, and 13.3 (11.1-13.3) vs 7.1 (6.7-12.2) nM, respectively. Analysis of isobologram and combination index (CI) of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone with artesunate or mefloquine showed synergistic and indifference antimalarial interaction, respectively. α-mangostin-artesunate combination exhibited a slight antagonistic effect of antimalarial interaction, whereas α-mangostin and mefloquine combination showed indifference interaction in both clones. The combination of 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone with α-mangostin showed the synergistic antimalarial interaction in both clones.

  15. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. A qualitative assessment of the challenges of WHO prequalification for anti-malarial drugs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangmu; Pan, Ke; Peng, Danlu; Stergachis, Andy

    2018-04-03

    While China is a major manufacturer of artemisinin and its derivatives, it lags as a global leader in terms of the total export value of anti-malarial drugs as finished pharmaceutical products ready for marketing and use by patients. This may be due to the limited number of World Health Organization (WHO) prequalified anti-malarial drugs from China. Understanding the reasons for the slow progress of WHO prequalification (PQ) in China can help improve the current situation and may lead to greater efforts in malaria eradication by Chinese manufacturers. In-depth interviews were conducted in China between November 2014 and December 2016. A total of 26 key informants from central government agencies, pharmaceutical companies, universities, and research institutes were interviewed, all of which had current or previous experience overseeing or implementing anti-malarial research and development in China. Chinese anti-malarial drugs that lack WHO PQ are mainly exported for use in the African private market. High upfront costs with unpredictable benefits, as well as limited information and limited technical support on WHO PQ, were reported as the main barriers to obtain WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs by respondents from Chinese pharmaceutical companies. Potential incentives identified by respondents included tax relief, human resource training and consultation, as well as other incentives related to drug approval, such as China's Fast Track Channel. Government support, as well as innovative incentives and collaboration mechanisms are needed for further adoption of WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs in China.

  17. Comparison of antimalarial activity of Artemisia turanica extract with current drugs in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Mahboubeh; Rustaiyan, Abdolhossein; Nahrevanian, Hossein; Naeimi, Sabah; Taherkhani, Tofigh

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare antimalarial activity of Artemisia turanica Krasch as Iranian flora with current antimalarial drugs against Plasmodium berghei in vivo in mice. Air-dried aerial parts of Iranian flora A. turanica were collected from Khorasan, northeastern Iran, extracted with Et2O/MeOH/Petrol and defatted. Toxicity of herbal extracts was assessed on male NMRI mice, and their antimalarial efficacy was compared with antimalarial drugs [artemether, chloroquine and sulfadoxinepyrimethamine (Fansidar)] on infected P. berghei animals. All the groups were investigated for parasitaemia, body weight, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and anemia. The significance of differences was determined by Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) and Student's t-test using Graph Pad Prism software. The inhibitory effects of A. turanica extract on early decline of P. berghei parasitaemia highlights its antimalarial activity, however, this effect no longer can be observed in the late infection. This may be due to the metabolic process of A. turanica crude extract by mice and reduction of its concentration in the body. Crude extract of A. turanica represented its antisymptomatic effects by stabilization of body, liver and spleen weights. This study confirmed antimalarial effects of A. turanica extracts against murine malaria in vivo during early infection, however, there are more benefits on pathophysiological symptoms by this medication.

  18. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  19. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  20. A general three-step one-pot synthesis of novel (E)-6-chloro-2-(aryl/hetarylvinyl)quinoline-3-carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Yang; Zou, Hongtao

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a facile and general three-step one-pot synthesis of structurally new (E)-6-chloro-2-(aryl/hetarylvinyl)quinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives has been achieved from easily available ethyl 6-chloro-2-(chloromethyl) quinoline-3-carboxylate and aromatic or heteroaromatic aldehydes. This strategy features simple one-pot operation, tolerance of a wide range of substituents, and good yields. Moreover, these newly synthesized compounds belong to a new class of quinoline derivatives and could be good candidates for the development of more complex quinoline compounds for use in medicinal chemistry.

  1. Geometric, electronic and intrinsic chemical reactivity properties of mono- and bi-substituted quinoline derivatives for the ground state in gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira Bueno, O. L.; Hincapié H, L.; García Madrid, C.

    2016-02-01

    The study of geometric, electronic properties and intrinsic chemical reactivity is presented for the case of Quinoline and three-derived molecules (4-Amino-Quinoline, 3- Phenyl-Quinoline, 4-Amino-3-phenylquinoline). The study was carried for the ground state in gas phase in the context of the functional theory density using B3LYP/6 31+G (d) model. The purpose of the study is aimed for identifying a compound derived from quinoline, on based to mono- or bi-substitution, using the amino fragment and the phenyl group.

  2. The fate of methanol in anaerobic bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florencio, L.

    1994-01-01

    Methanol is an important component of certain industrial wastewaters. In anaerobic environments, methanol can be utilized by methanogens and acetogens. In wastewater treatment plants, the conversion of methanol into methane is preferred because this conversion is responsible for chemical

  3. Sorption of methanol in alkali exchange zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M.; Rep, M.; Corma, Avelino; Palomares, A.E.; Palomares gimeno, A.E.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Lercher, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Metal cation methanol sorption complexes in MFI (ZSM5), MOR and X have been studied by in situ i.r. spectroscopy in order to understand the nature of interactions of methanol in the molecular sieve pores. The results show that (a) a freely vibrating hydroxy and methyl group of methanol exist on

  4. Syntheses and anti-microbial evaluation of new quinoline scaffold derived pyrimidine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha S. Dave

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of diversely substituted chalcones derived from a quinoline scaffold, e.g. (E-3-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl prop-2-en-1-one and its pyrimidine analogues e.g. 2-[2-amino-6-(2-chloroquinolin-3-yl-5,6-dihydropyrimidin-4-yl]phenols have been prepared by condensation of 2-chloro-3-formyl quinoline with differently substituted 2-hydroxy acetophenones and further treatment with guanidine carbonate. All the newly synthesized compounds have been evaluated for their in vitro growth inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus typhi, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Pseudomonas chrysogenum.

  5. 7-Chloro-4-[(E-N′-(4-fluorobenzylidenehydrazinyl]quinoline monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. N. de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecule of the title hydrate, C16H11ClFN3·H2O, is slightly twisted, as indicated by the dihedral angle of 9.55 (10° formed between the quinoline ring system and the benzene ring. The conformation about the C=N double bond is E, and the amine-H atom is oriented towards the quinoline residue. In the crystal structure, the water molecule accepts an N—H...O and makes two O—H...Nquinoline hydrogen bonds, generating a two-dimensional array in the ab plane, which is further stabilized by C—H...O interactions. The most significant contacts between layers are of the type C—H...F.

  6. 7-Chloro-4-[(E-2-(4-methoxybenzylidenehydrazin-1-yl]quinoline monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. T. Tiekink

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic molecule in the title hydrate, C17H14ClN3O·H2O, has a small but significant twist from planarity, as seen in the dihedral angle of 12.10 (17° between the quinoline and benzene rings. The conformation about the C=N bond is E. Chains along the b axis are formed in the crystal structure aided by water–quinoline O—H...N (× 2 and hydrazone–water N—H...O hydrogen bonds. Layers of these chains stack along the a axis via C—H...π and π–π interactions [ring centroid–ring centroid distance = 3.674 (2 Å]. C—H...O interactions are also present.

  7. Tetrakis(quinolin-8-olato-κ2N,Ohafnium(IV toluene disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryke Steyn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Hf(C9H6NO4]·2C7H8, the hafnium metal centre is coordinated by four N,O-donating bidentate quinolin-8-olate ligands arranged to give a square-antiprismatic coordination polyhedron with a slightly distorted dodecahedral geometry. The average Hf—O and Hf—N distances are 2.096 (3 and 2.398 (3 Å, respectively, and the average O—Hf—N bite angle is 70.99 (11°. The crystal packing is controlled by π–π interactions between quinoline ligands of neighbouring molecules and hydrogen-bonding interactions. The interplanar distances vary between 3.138 (1 and 3.208 (2 Å, while the centroid–centroid distances range from 3.576 (1 to 4.074 (1 Å.

  8. Antiviral Activity of Novel Quinoline Derivatives against Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de la Guardia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes dengue fever, a debilitating disease with an increasing incidence in many tropical and subtropical territories. So far, there are no effective antivirals licensed to treat this virus. Here we describe the synthesis and antiviral activity evaluation of two compounds based on the quinoline scaffold, which has shown potential for the development of molecules with various biological activities. Two of the tested compounds showed dose-dependent inhibition of dengue virus serotype 2 in the low and sub micromolar range. The compounds 1 and 2 were also able to impair the accumulation of the viral envelope glycoprotein in infected cells, while showing no sign of direct virucidal activity and acting possibly through a mechanism involving the early stages of the infection. The results are congruent with previously reported data showing the potential of quinoline derivatives as a promising scaffold for the development of new antivirals against this important virus.

  9. Molecular characterization of Plasmodium falciparum uracil-DNA glycosylase and its potential as a new anti-malarial drug target

    OpenAIRE

    Suksangpleng, Thidarat; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Moonsom, Saengduen; Siribal, Saranya; Boonyuen, Usa; Wright, George E; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on resistance of currently used anti-malarials, a new anti-malarial drug target against Plasmodium falciparum is urgently needed. Damaged DNA cannot be transcribed without prior DNA repair; therefore, uracil-DNA glycosylase, playing an important role in base excision repair, may act as a candidate for a new anti-malarial drug target. Methods Initially, the native PfUDG from parasite crude extract was partially purified using two columns, and the glycosylase activity was monit...

  10. Organoselenium group is critical for antioxidant activity of 7-chloro-4-phenylselenyl-quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Ane G; Voss, Guilherme T; de Oliveira, Renata L; Paltian, Jaini J; Duarte, Luis F B; Alves, Diego; Jesse, Cristiano R; Roman, Silvane S; Roehrs, Juliano A; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2018-02-25

    The quinolone compounds have been reported for many biological properties, especially as potent antioxidants. This study investigated the antioxidant effect of 7-chloro-4-phenylselenyl-quinoline (PSQ), a quinolone derivative with organoselenium group, against oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in brains of mice. A second objective was to verify the importance of phenylselenyl group presents at position 4 of the quinoline structure to antioxidant effect of compound. So, it was compared the antioxidant effect of PSQ with a quinoline without organoseleniun group (7-chloroquinoline [QN]). Swiss mice were used and received SNP (0.335 μmol/site, intracerebroventricular) 30 min after treatment with PSQ or QN, at the doses of 50 mg/kg (intragastrically). After 1 h, animals were sacrificed and the brains were removed to biochemistry analysis. Thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), protein carbonyl (PC) and non-protein thiol (NPSH) levels, as well as catalase (CAT), glutathione S transferase (GST) and δ -aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA-D) activities were determined. SNP increased TBARS and PC levels, and reduced the enzymatic (CAT and GST activity) and non-enzymatic (NPSH levels) antioxidant defenses and inhibited the δ-ALA-D activity. PSQ avoided the increase in the lipid peroxidation and PC levels, as well as the decrease in the NPSH levels, CAT, GST and δ-ALA-D activities QN partially avoided the increase in lipid peroxidation, but it not protected against alterations induced by SNP. In conclusion, phenylselenyl group present in quinoline structure is critical for antioxidant activity of PSQ. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ionic liquid catalyzed convenient synthesis of imidazo[1,2-a]quinoline under sonic condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Devji S.; Avalani, Jemin R.; Raval, Dipak K., E-mail: dipanalka@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Sardar Patel University Gujarat (India)

    2012-10-15

    An efficient protocol for the synthesis of imidazo[1,2-a]quinoline from aldehydes, enaminones, and malononitrile using 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]-undec-7-en-8-ium acetate ([DBU][Ac]) as a catalyst under ultrasound irradiation is described. Compared with other methods, this new method has the advantages of easier work-up, milder reaction conditions, high yields and environmentally benign procedure. (author)

  12. Quinoline-3-carboxamide Derivatives as Potential Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Kang Shen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel quinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives 1017 and 2327 were designed and synthesized as cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitors. All of them exhibited activity against CETP. Particularly, compounds 24 and 26 displayed the best activity against CETP with the same inhibitory rate of 80.1%.

  13. From Sensors to Silencers: Quinoline- and Benzimidazole-Sulfonamides as Inhibitors for Zinc Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Derived from the extensive work in the area of small molecule zinc(II) ion sensors, chelating fragment libraries of quinoline- and benzimidazole-sulfonamides have been prepared and screened against several different zinc(II)-dependent matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The fragments show impressive inhibition of these metalloenzymes and preferences for different MMPs based on the nature of the chelating group. The findings show that focused chelator libraries are a powerful strategy for the discovery of lead fragments for metalloprotein inhibition. PMID:20507095

  14. 8-[(3-Phenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-ylmethoxy]quinoline monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yuan Bai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C18H13N3O2·H2O, the oxadiazole ring forms dihedral angles 7.21 (10 and 21.25 (11° with the quinoline and benzene rings, respectively. The crystal structure features O—H...N hydrogen bonds and is further consolidated by C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the water molecule of hydration.

  15. Diiodido[methyl 2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetate-κN]mercury(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hong Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title mononuclear complex, [HgI2(C12H11NO3], the HgII ion has a distorted trigonal–planar coordination sphere defined by two I− anions and the N atom of a methyl 2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetate ligand. In the crystal, face-to-face π–π stacking interactions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.563 (9 Å, are observed.

  16. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  17. Experimental study on methanol recovery through flashing vaporation in continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cunwen; Chen Wen; Wang Weiguo; Wu Yuanxin; Chi Ruan; Tang Zhengjiao

    2011-01-01

    To improve the oil conversion, high methanol/oil molar ratio is required in the continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol transesterification in tubular reactor. And thus the subsequent excess methanol recovery needs high energy consumption. Based on the feature of high temperature and high pressure in supercritical methanol transesterification, excess methanol recovery in reaction system by flashing vaporation is conducted and the effect of reaction temperature, reaction pressure and flashing pressure on methanol recovery and methanol concentration in gas phase is discussed in detail in this article. Results show that at the reaction pressure of 9-15 MPa and the reaction temperature of 240-300 o C, flashing pressure has significant influence on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase, which can be effectively improved by reducing flashing pressure. At the same time, reaction temperature and reaction pressure also have an important effect on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase. At volume flow of biodiesel and methanol 1:2, tubular reactor pressure 15 MPa, tubular reactor temperature 300 o C and the flashing pressure 0.4 MPa, methanol recovery is more than 85% and methanol concentration of gas phase (mass fraction) is close to 99% after adiabatic braising; therefore, the condensate liquid of gas phase can be injected directly into methanol feedstock tank to be recycled. Research abstracts: Biodiesel is an important alternative energy, and supercritical methanol transesterification is a new and green technology to prepare biodiesel with some obvious advantages. But it also exists some problems: high reaction temperature, high reaction pressure and large molar ratio of methanol/oil will cause large energy consumption which restricts supercritical methanol for the industrial application of biodiesel. So a set of tubular reactor-coupled flashing apparatus is established for continuous preparing biodiesel in supercritical

  18. Selective Intercalation of Graphite Oxide by Methanol in Water/Methanol Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    You, Shujie; Yu, Junchun; Sundqvist, Bertil; Belyaeva, L. A.; Avramenko, Natalya V.; Korobov, Mikhail V.; Talyzin, Alexandr V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphite oxide is selectively intercalated by methanol when exposed to liquid water/methanol mixtures with methanol fraction in the range 20-100%. Insertion of water into the GO structure occurs only when the content of water in the mixture with methanol is increased up to 90%. This conclusion is confirmed by both ambient temperature XRD data and specific temperature variations of the GO structure due to insertion/deinsertion of an additional methanol monolayer observed upon cooling/heating. ...

  19. Systemic optimization and structural evaluation of quinoline derivatives as transthyretin amyloidogenesis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boyoung; Park, Hwanggue; Lee, Seul Ki; Park, Sung Jean; Koo, Tae-Sung; Kang, Nam Sook; Hong, Ki Bum; Choi, Sungwook

    2016-11-10

    Wild type transthyretin (TTR) and mutant TTR misfold and misassemble into a variety of extracellular insoluble amyloid fibril and/or amorphous aggregate, which are associated with a variety of human amyloid diseases. To develop potent TTR amyloidogenesis inhibitors, we have designed and synthesized a focused library of quinoline derivatives by Pd-catalyzed coupling reaction and by the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction. The resulting 2-alkynylquinoline derivatives, (E)-2-alkenylquinoline derivatives, and (E)-3-alkenylquinoline derivatives were evaluated to inhibit TTR amyloidogenesis by utilizing the acid-mediated TTR fibril formation. Among these quinoline derivatives, compound 14c exhibited the most potent anti-TTR fibril formation activity in the screening studies, with IC50 values of 1.49 μM against WT-TTR and 1.63 μM against more amyloidogenic V30 M TTR mutant. That is comparable to that of approved therapeutic drug, tafamidis, to ameliorate transthyretin-related amyloidosis. Furthermore, rationalization of the increased efficacy of compound 14c bearing a hydrophobic substituent, such as chloride, was carried out by utilizing in silico docking study that could focus on the region of the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) binding sites. Additionally, the most potent compound 14c exhibited good pharmacokinetics properties. Taken together, the novel quinoline derivatives could potentially be explored as potential drug candidates to treat the human TTR amyloidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo photoacoustic tumor tomography using a quinoline-annulated porphyrin as NIR molecular contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Michael; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhou, Feifei; Zhu, Hua; Bornhütter, Tobias; Röder, Beate; Zhu, Quing; Brückner, Christian

    2017-01-25

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of a tetra-PEG-modified and freely water-soluble quinoline-annulated porphyrin are described. We previously demonstrated the ability of quinoline-annulated porphyrins to act as an in vitro NIR photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contrast agent. The solubility of the quinoline-annulated porphyrin derivative in serum now allowed the assessment of the efficacy of the PEGylated derivative as an in vivo NIR contrast agent for the PAI of an implanted tumor in a mouse model. A multi-fold contrast enhancement when compared to the benchmark dye ICG could be shown, a finding that could be traced to its photophysical properties (short triplet lifetimes, low fluorescence and singlet oxygen sensitization quantum yields). A NIR excitation wavelength of 790 nm could be used, fully taking advantage of the optical window of tissue. Rapid renal clearance of the dye was observed. Its straight-forward synthesis, optical properties with the possibility for further optical fine-tuning, nontoxicity, favorable elimination rates, and contrast enhancement make this a promising PAI contrast agent. The ability to conjugate the PAI chromophore with a fluorescent tag using a facile and general conjugation strategy was also demonstrated.

  1. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Triketone-Quinoline Hybrids as Novel 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Yan; Cao, Run-Jie; Chen, Tao; Wu, Feng-Xu; Hao, Ge-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-06-17

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.27, HPPD) is one of the most important targets for herbicide discovery. In the search for new HPPD inhibitors with novel scaffolds, triketone-quinoline hybrids were designed and subsequently optimized on the basis of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed potent inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD (AtHPPD), and some of them exhibited broad-spectrum and promising herbicidal activity at the rate of 150 g ai/ha by postemergence application. Most promisingly, compound III-l, 3-hydroxy-2-(2-methoxy-7-(methylthio)quinoline-3-carbonyl)cyclohex-2-enone (Ki = 0.009 μM, AtHPPD), had broader spectrum of weed control than mesotrione. Furthermore, compound III-l was much safer to maize at the rate of 150 g ai/ha than mesotrione, demonstrating its great potential as herbicide for weed control in maize fields. Therefore, triketone-quinoline hybrids may serve as new lead structures for novel herbicide discovery.

  2. Repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays for quinoline in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Fuyumi; Tanaka, Jin; Ueda, Maya; Nagai, Miho; Fukumuro, Masahito; Natsume, Masakatsu; Oba, Michiyo; Akahori, Ayaka; Masumori, Shoji; Takami, Shigeaki; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kougo, Yuriko; Ohyama, Wakako; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Okada, Emiko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Repeated-dose liver, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays that use young adult rats were evaluated in a collaborative study that was organized by the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group. A genotoxic hepatocarcinogen quinoline was orally administered to independent groups of five Crl:CD (SD) male rats at doses of 30, 60 and 120mg/kg for 14 days and at doses of 15, 30 and 60mg/kg for 28 days. After treatment, the livers were harvested and hepatocytes were isolated by collagenase treatment. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated dose studies. However, the frequency of micronucleated cells did not increase in the bone marrow, stomach or colon cells, which were not quinoline-induced carcinogenic target organs in the rats. These results indicate that a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats is capable of detecting the genotoxicity of quinoline at the target organ of carcinogenicity. The protocol may also permit the integration of the genotoxic endpoint into general repeated-dose toxicity studies. Furthermore, we elucidated that conducting the micronucleus assay in multiple organs could potentially assess organ specificity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rare-earth quinolinates: infrared-emitting molecular materials with a rich structural chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deun, Rik; Fias, Pascal; Nockemann, Peter; Schepers, An; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2004-12-27

    Near-infrared-emitting rare-earth chelates based on 8-hydroxyquinoline have appeared frequently in recent literature, because they are promising candidates for active components in near-infrared-luminescent optical devices, such as optical amplifiers, organic light-emitting diodes, .... Unfortunately, the absence of a full structural investigation of these rare-earth quinolinates is hampering the further development of rare-earth quinolinate based materials, because the luminescence output cannot be related to the structural properties. After an elaborate structural elucidation of the rare-earth quinolinate chemistry we can conclude that basically three types of structures can be formed, depending on the reaction conditions: tris complexes, corresponding to a 1:3 metal-to-ligand ratio, tetrakis complexes, corresponding to a 1:4 metal-to-ligand ratio, and trimeric complexes, with a 3:8 metal-to-ligand ratio. The intensity of the emitted near-infrared luminescence of the erbium(III) complexes is highest for the tetrakis complexes of the dihalogenated 8-hydroxyquinolinates.

  4. Molecules of the quinoline family block tau self-aggregation: implications toward a therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Leonardo P; Guzmán, Leonardo; San Martín, Aurelio; Astudillo-Saavedra, Luis; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2012-01-01

    The neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) generated by self-aggregation of anomalous forms of tau represent a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These lesions begin to form long before the clinical manifestation of AD, and its severity is correlated with cognitive impairment in patients. We focused on the search for molecules that interact with aggregated tau of the Alzheimer's type and that may block its aggregation before the formation of NFTs. We show that molecules from a family of quinolines interact specifically with oligomeric forms of tau, inhibiting their assembly into AD filaments. The quinolines 2-(4-methylphenyl)-6-methyl quinoline (THQ-4S) and 2-(4-aminophenyl)-6-methylquinoline (THQ-55) inhibited in vitro aggregation of heparin-induced polymers of purified brain tau and aggregates of human recombinant tau. They also interact with paired helical filaments (PHFs) purified from AD postmortem brains. In vitro studies indicated a significantly lower inhibitory effect of amyloid-β42 on the aggregation, suggesting that tau aggregates are specific targets for quinoline interactions. These compounds showed highly lipophilic properties as corroborated with the analysis of total polar surface areas, and evaluation of their molecular properties. Moreover, these quinolines exhibit physical chemical properties similar to drugs able to penetrate the human brain blood barrier. Docking studies based on tau modeling, as a structural approach to the analysis of the interaction of tau-binding ligands, indicated that a C-terminal tau moiety, involved in the formation of PHFs, seems to be a site for binding of quinolines. Studies suggest the potential clinical use of these quinolines and of their derivatives to inhibit tau aggregation and possible therapeutic routes for AD.

  5. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) inspired azole-quinoline based fluorophores: Synthesis and photophysical properties study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalkar, Vikas S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan, E-mail: n.sekar@ictmumbai.edu.in

    2014-11-15

    7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was obtained by the condensation reaction of p-amino salicylic acid and 4-nitrophenylmalonadialdehyde which was obtained from phenylacetonitrile through nitration, hydrolysis and Vilsmeier reaction. 7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl) quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was condensed with different o-aminophenols or o-aminothiophenol in ethanol in the presence of phosphorustrichloride. Synthesized quinoline contained benzimidazole and benzothiazole moieties. Photophysical behaviors of these compounds in solvents of different polarities were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds showed single absorption in all the studied solvents. The dual emissions (normal emission and ESIPT emission) as well as large Stokes' shift emission pattern were observed for the synthesized fluorophores. The photophysical study shows that the emission properties of the compounds depend on the solvent polarity. The photophysical properties of the compounds were compared with structurally analogous ESIPT quinoline. Thermal stability of the compounds was studied using thermogravimetric analysis and results show that compounds are thermally stable up to 300 °C. The synthesized quinoline derivatives were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR and {sup 1}H –NMR, {sup 13}C –NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. - Highlights: • First and unique study of quinoline derivatives contain ESIPT azole unit at 6-position and hydroxyl group at 7-position. • Compounds are fluorescent with considerable quantum yields. • All compounds showed absorption in ultraviolet region and emission in visible region with large Stokes' shift. • The photophysical properties of new compounds were compared with reported ESIPT quinoline analogous.

  6. The current status of antimalarial drug research with special reference to application of QSAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Probir Kumar; Roy, Kunal

    2015-01-01

    Malaria, the most virulent parasitic disease, has become a devastating health problem in tropical and subtropical regions, especially in Africa, due to favorable temperature and rainfall conditions for the development of the causative vector. Due to the spread of multidrug resistance to the marketed antimalarial drugs including the "magic bullet" artemisinin, discovery and development of new antimalarial drugs is one of the utmost challenges. Different government and non-government chemical regulatory authorities have recommended the application of non-animal, alternative techniques and in particular, in silico, methods in order to provide information about the basic physicochemical properties as well as the ecological and human health effects of chemicals before they reach into the market for public use. In this aspect, application of chemometric methods along with structure-based approaches may be useful for the design and discovery of new antimalarial compounds. The quantitative structureactivity relationship (QSAR) along with molecular docking and pharmacophore modeling techniques play a crucial role in the field of drug design. QSAR focuses on the chemical attributes influencing the activity and thereby allows synthesis of selective potential candidate molecules. In this communication, we have reviewed the QSAR reports along with some pharmacophore modeling and docking studies of antimalarial agents published during the year 2011 to 2014 and attempted to focus on the importance of physicochemical properties and structural features required for antimalarial activity of different chemical classes of compounds. Note that this is not an exhaustive review and all the given examples should be considered as the representative ones. The reader will gain an insight of the current status of QSAR and related in silico models developed for different classes of antimalarial compounds. This review suggests that combination of both ligand and structure-based drug designing

  7. ANTIMALARIAL COMPOUNDS FROM ENDOPHYTIC FUNGI OF BROTOWALI (Tinaspora crispa L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfita Elfita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The term endophytic refers to a bacteria or a fungi microorganism that colonizes interior organs of plants, but does not have pathogenic effects on its host. In their symbiotic association, the host plant protects and feeds the endophytic, which ";in return"; produces bioactive metabolites to enhance the growth and compotitiveness of the host and to protect it from herbivores and plant pathogens. Plants with ethnobotanical history, for example brotowali (Tinaspora crispa L, are likely candidates to find bioactive compounds. Two alkaloids have been isolated from endophytic fungi of brotowali. The molecular structures of the isolated compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, including UV, IR, NMR 1D and 2D spectrum. The compounds were determined as: 7- hydroxy-3,4,5-trimethyl-6-on-2,3,4,6-tetrahydroisoquinoline-8-carboxylic acid (1 and 2,5-dihydroxy-1-(hydroxymethylpyridin-4-on (2. The compound has antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, with IC50 values 0,129 µM and 0,127 µM.

  8. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, Rosi; Barking, Susanne; Alzoubi, Kousi; Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine has previously been shown to stimulate apoptosis of nucleated cells. Similar to apoptosis, erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i), and ceramide. Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3- fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from specific antibody binding. A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with mefloquine significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥5 μg/ml), significantly decreased forward scatter (≥5 μg/ml), significantly increased ROS abundance (5 μg/ml), significantly increased [Ca2+]i (7.5 μg/ml) and significantly increased ceramide abundance (10 μg/ml). The up-regulation of annexin- V-binding following mefloquine treatment was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, mefloquine significantly increased annexin-V-binding. Mefloquine treatment leads to erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling, effects at least partially due to induction of oxidative stress, increase of [Ca2+]i and up-regulation of ceramide abundance. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  11. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavet, R; Nauss, K M

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.

  12. Methanol from biomass: A technoeconomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Biomass-derived methanol offers significant potential as an alternative transportation fuel. Methanol is cleaner burning and has a lower flame temperature than gasoline. These characteristics can result in lower carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide emissions when methanol is used as a fuel. Methanol produced from biomass offers potential advantages over that from other sources. When produced from biomass which is subsequently regrown, methanol does not contribute net emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to the atmosphere. The introduction of alternative fuels will likely be driven by a number of political and economic decisions. The ability of biomass to compete with other resources will be determined in part by the economics of the production systems. In this paper, recent technoeconomic analyses of biomass-methanol systems are presented. The results are compared with methanol production from coal and natural gas

  13. Methanol production method and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1984-01-01

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  14. The methanol industry's missed opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Throughout its history the methanol industry has been backward in research and development and in industry cooperation on public image and regulatory matters. It has been extremely reticent as to the virtue of its product for new uses, especially for motor fuel. While this is perhaps understandable looking back, it is inexcusable looking forward. The industry needs to cooperate on a worldwide basis in research and market development, on the one hand, and in image-building and political influence, on the other, staying, of course, within the US and European and other regional antitrust regulations. Unless the industry develops the motor fuel market, and especially the exciting new approach through fuel cell operated EVs, to siphon off incremental capacity and keep plants running at 90% or more of capacity, it will continue to live in a price roller-coaster climate. A few low-cost producers will do reasonably well and the rest will just get along or drop out here and there along the way, as in the past. Having come so far from such a humble beginning, it is a shame not to realize the full potential that is clearly there: a potential to nearly double sales dollars without new plants and to produce from a plentiful resource, at least for the next half-century, all the methanol that can be imagined to be needed. Beyond that the industry can turn to renewable energy--the sun--via biomass growth, to make their product. In so doing, it can perhaps apply methanol as a plant growth stimulant, in effect making the product fully self-sustainable. The world needs to know what methanol can do to provide--economically and reliably--the things upon which a better life rests

  15. Antimalarial activity of medicinal plants from the Democratic Republic of Congo: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memvanga, Patrick B; Tona, Gaston L; Mesia, Gauthier K; Lusakibanza, Mariano M; Cimanga, Richard K

    2015-07-01

    Malaria is the most prevalent parasitic disease and the foremost cause of morbidity and mortality in the Democratic Republic of Congo. For the management of this disease, a large Congolese population recourses to traditional medicinal plants. To date the efficacy and safety of many of these plants have been validated scientifically in rodent malaria models. In order to generate scientific evidence of traditional remedies used in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the management of malaria, and show the potential of Congolese plants as a major source of antimalarial drugs, this review highlights the antiplasmodial and toxicological properties of the Congolese antimalarial plants investigated during the period of 1999-2014. In doing so, a useful resource for further complementary investigations is presented. Furthermore, this review may pave the way for the research and development of several available and affordable antimalarial phytomedicines. In order to get information on the different studies, a Google Scholar and PubMed literature search was performed using keywords (malaria, Congolese, medicinal plants, antiplasmodial/antimalarial activity, and toxicity). Data from non-indexed journals, Master and Doctoral dissertations were also collected. Approximately 120 extracts and fractions obtained from Congolese medicinal plants showed pronounced or good antiplasmodial activity. A number of compounds with interesting antiplasmodial properties were also isolated and identified. Some of these compounds constituted new scaffolds for the synthesis of promising antimalarial drugs. Interestingly, most of these extracts and compounds possessed high selective activity against Plasmodium parasites compared to mammalian cells. The efficacy and safety of several plant-derived products was confirmed in mice, and a good correlation was observed between in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity. The formulation of several plant-derived products also led to some clinical trials

  16. A Novel ZnONPs/PVA-Functionalized Biomaterials for Bacterial Cells Immobilization and its Strengthening Effects on Quinoline Biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinjin; Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Yu; Hou, Siyu

    2018-03-01

    A novel bacterial cells immobilized carrier (ZnONPs/PVA), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites decorated with ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs), was prepared and used for immobilization of the strain Ochrobactrum sp. LC-1, and subsequently for quinoline degrading in water. Characterization of ZnONPs/PVA by using X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that ZnO NPs were coated on the surface of PVA cubes evenly and the bacterium grew well on the ZnONPs/PVA. Quinoline biodegradation results showed that the degradation effect of quinoline by ZnONPs/PVA immobilized cells was superior to the free cells significantly. The structure and physical properties of ZnNPs/PVA were maintained steady after the reuse of ZnNPs/PVA for cells immobilization several times. Reusability of the ZnONPs/PVA immobilized cells revealed that the quinoline removal ratio was above 97% within 8 h under the conditions of pH neutral, 37 °C when the initial quinoline concentration was 300 mg/L.

  17. Quinoline-degrading strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 isolated from coking activated sludge is capable of the simultaneous removal of phenol in a dual substrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Panhong; Jia, Rong; Zhang, Yuxiu; Shi, Peili; Chai, Tuanyao

    2016-11-09

    Quinoline is a refractory organic compound in the treatment of coking wastewater. The isolation of high efficiency quinoline-degrading bacteria from activated sludge and the evaluation of their degradation characteristics in the presence of phenol or in the actual coking wastewater are important for the improvement of effluent quality. The novel bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 was isolated from a quinoline enrichment culture obtained from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The optimum temperature and initial pH for quinoline degradation were 33-38°C and 8-9, respectively. KDQ4 completely degraded 400 mg/L of quinoline within 24 h and 800 mg/L of phenol within 30 h. In the dual-substrate system, the removal efficiencies of quinoline and phenol at the same initial concentration (200 mg/L) by KDQ4 were 89% and 100% within 24 h, respectively, indicating that KDQ4 could simultaneously and quickly degrade quinoline and phenol in a coexistence system. Moreover, KDQ4 was able to adapt to actual coking wastewater containing high quinoline and phenol concentrations and rapidly remove them. KDQ4 also exhibited heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification potential under aerobic conditions. These results suggested a potential bioaugmentation role for KDQ4 in the removal of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds and phenolics from coking wastewater.

  18. An expeditious I sub(2)-catalyzed entry into 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline system of cryptotackieine

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvatkar, P.T.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Tilve, S.G.

    A synthesis of a series of novel 6H-indolo[2,3-b]- quinolines with different substituents on the quinoline ring is described. The method involves reaction of indole-3-carboxyaldehyde with aryl amines in the presence of a catalytic amount of iodine...

  19. Compliance with antimalarial chemoprophylaxis in German soldiers: a 6-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickmann, H; Schwarz, N G; Holtherm, H-U; Maassen, W; Vorderwülbecke, F; Erkens, K; Fischer, M; Morwinsky, T; Hagen, R M

    2013-04-01

    Since 1992, German soldiers have been deployed in areas where malaria is endemic. Antimalarial chemoprophylaxis (CP) is directed according to the assessed risk and is provided free of charge. Compliance is crucial if its effect is to be reliable. This study analysed compliance with directed CP in German soldiers as well as its determinants. Between 2003 and 2009, standardized questionnaire-based interviews were performed with 2,149 out of approximately 100,000 German soldiers who were deployed during this period in areas where malaria is endemic. The questionnaires dealt with information that the soldiers had received about malaria prior to their missions, with their adherence to mosquito-protective and antimalarial chemoprophylactic procedures, and their estimations of their individual level of exposure. About 1,308 out of 2,149 interviewed soldiers had been ordered to take CP, allowing for an assessment of the outcome parameter "CP-compliance". About 76.9 % out of 1,308 soldiers to whom regular CP was directed took it regularly. The exposure variables "age", "satisfaction with malaria counselling", "perceived threat due to insects or mosquitoes" and "use of insect repellents" were positively associated with compliance with directed antimalarial CP. The study confirms the findings of the French and US armies that even free-of-charge access to antimalarial medication will not lead to 100 % acceptance. The compliance problem is aggravated by the generally low age of deployed soldiers. Adequate counselling is crucial to increase adherence to antimalarial CP.

  20. ANTIMALARIALS PRESCRIPTION TO PATIENTS IN JOSINA MACHEL CENTRAL HOSPITAL. JANUARY-JULY 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Sebastião João Fernandes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria represents the main public health problem in Angola, being the leading cause of disease and death. The misuse of antimalarials can lead to an increase of drug resistance and undesired adverse reactions, among other issues, with a negative impact in patients and the National Health System. An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study, of the Drug Use Study type, was conducted in patients with a confirmed diagnosis of malaria admitted at Josina Machel Central Hospital, to evaluate the quality of prescription of antimalarials. This prescription-indication study was conducted from January to July of 2014, in a sample of 151 patients admitted in the Medicine and Therapy Services. The adequacy of the prescription was assessed taking into account patients characteristics and the prescribed therapeutic regimen (drug, dose, posology and duration of treatment, using the therapeutic guidelines of the National Malaria Control Programme in Angola as reference. There was a high prevalence of inadequate prescriptions of antimalarials, which was observed in 70 out of 151 patients (46.4%. The inadequate prescription of antimalarials was more frequently observed in cases of complicated malaria and between patients admitted in the Medicine Services. The more frequent causes of antimalarials misuse were “unnecessary or inappropriate drug combinations” and “inadequate treatment”. The drugs more commonly misused were Quinine IV and Artemether IM.

  1. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Endogenous methanol regulates mammalian gene activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V; Petrunia, Igor V; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Silachev, Denis N; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Kiryanov, Gleb I; Dorokhov, Yuri L

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis.

  3. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  4. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  5. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  6. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberico, E.; Nielsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous...... catalytic systems have been reported which are able to promote either one or the other of the two reactions under mild conditions. Here, we review and discuss these developments....

  7. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberico, E; Nielsen, M

    2015-04-21

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous catalytic systems have been reported which are able to promote either one or the other of the two reactions under mild conditions. Here, we review and discuss these developments.

  8. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-01-01

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation,...

  9. Screening for antimalarial and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of some Iranian seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannadi, A; Plubrukarn, A; Zandi, K; Sartavi, K; Yegdaneh, A

    2013-04-01

    Alcoholic extracts of 8 different types of seaweeds from Iran's Persian Gulf were tested for their antimalarial and acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) inhibitory activities for the first time. A modified Ellman and Ingkaninan method was used for measuring AChE inhibitory activity in which galanthamine was used as the reference. The antimalarial assay was performed using microculture radioisotope technique. Mefloquine and dihydroartemisinin were uased as the standards. The extract of Sargassum boveanum (Sargasseae family) showed the highest AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 equals to 1 mg ml(-1)) while Cystoseira indica (Cystoseiraceae family) exhibited the least activity (IC50 of 11 mg ml(-1)). The species from Rhodophyta (Gracilaria corticata and Gracilaria salicornia) also showed moderate activities (IC509.5, 8.7 mg ml(-1), respectively). All extracts were inactive in antimalarial assay.

  10. QUANTITATIVE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE - ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP OF ANTIMALARIAL COMPOUND OF ARTEMISININ DERIVATIVES USING PRINCIPAL COMPONENT REGRESSION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Robert Martin Werfette

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of quantitative structure - activity relationship (QSAR for a series of antimalarial compound artemisinin derivatives has been done using principal component regression. The descriptors for QSAR study were representation of electronic structure i.e. atomic net charges of the artemisinin skeleton calculated by AM1 semi-empirical method. The antimalarial activity of the compound was expressed in log 1/IC50 which is an experimental data. The main purpose of the principal component analysis approach is to transform a large data set of atomic net charges to simplify into a data set which known as latent variables. The best QSAR equation to analyze of log 1/IC50 can be obtained from the regression method as a linear function of several latent variables i.e. x1, x2, x3, x4 and x5. The best QSAR model is expressed in the following equation,  (;;   Keywords: QSAR, antimalarial, artemisinin, principal component regression

  11. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata Kunt (Rutaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuca-Suarez, Luis Enrique; Barrera, Ericsson David Coy; Alvarez Caballero, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, G-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data ( 1 H, 13 C, 1 D, 2 D, IR, MS) and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia. (author)

  12. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata Kunt (Rutaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuca-Suarez, Luis Enrique; Barrera, Ericsson David Coy [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Quimica; Alvarez Caballero, Juan Manuel [Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta DTCH (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias Basicas

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, G-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 1}D, {sup 2}D, IR, MS) and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia. (author)

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of quinoline derivatives as potential anti-prostate cancer agents and Pim-1 kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Li, Ying; Zhou, Di; Fan, Yinbo; Guo, Hongye; Ma, Tianyi; Wen, Jiachen; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Linxiang

    2016-04-15

    In this work, a series of quinoline derivatives were designed and synthesized as antitumor agents. Most quinolines showed potent anti-proliferative activity against human prostatic cancer PC-3 cell line. Among which, 9d, 9f and 9g were the most effective compounds with GI50 values of 2.60, 2.81 and 1.29 μM, respectively. Structure-activity relationship analysis indicated that the secondary amine linked quinoline and pyridine ring played an important role in the anti-proliferative effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 9g was a potential Pim-1 kinase inhibitor with abilities of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. Considering of the increased activity of Pim-1 in prostate cancer, such compounds have potential to be developed as anti-prostate cancer agents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. GAS PHASE SYNTHESIS OF (ISO)QUINOLINE AND ITS ROLE IN THE FORMATION OF NUCLEOBASES IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Dorian S. N.; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mebel, Alexander M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-04-20

    Nitrogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) have been proposed to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the formation mechanisms of even their simplest prototypes—quinoline and isoquinoline—remain elusive. Here, we reveal a novel concept that under high temperature conditions representing circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars, (iso)quinoline can be synthesized via the reaction of pyridyl radicals with two acetylene molecules. The facile gas phase formation of (iso)quinoline in circumstellar envelopes defines a hitherto elusive reaction class synthesizing aromatic structures with embedded nitrogen atoms that are essential building blocks in contemporary biological-structural motifs. Once ejected from circumstellar shells and incorporated into icy interstellar grains in cold molecular clouds, these NPAHs can be functionalized by photo processing forming nucleobase-type structures as sampled in the Murchison meteorite.

  15. Polyamine quinoline rhodium complexes: synthesis and pharmacological evaluation as antiparasitic agents against Plasmodium falciparum and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Tameryn; Taylor, Dale; Guzgay, Hajira; Shokar, Ajit; Au, Aaron; Smith, Peter J; Hendricks, Denver T; Land, Kirkwood M; Egan, Timothy J; Smith, Gregory S

    2015-09-07

    A series of mono- and bis-salicylaldimine ligands and their corresponding Rh(i) complexes were prepared. The compounds were characterised using standard spectroscopic techniques including NMR, IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The salicylaldimine ligands and complexes were screened for antiparasitic activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum i.e. the NF54 CQ-sensitive and K1 CQ-resistant strain as well as against the G3 isolate of Trichomonas vaginalis. The monomeric salicylaldimine quinolines exhibited good activity against the NF54 strain and the dimeric salicylaldimine quinolines exhibited no cross resistance across the two strains. The binuclear 5-chloro Rh(i) complex displayed the best activity against the Trichomonas vaginalis parasite, possibly a consequence of its enhanced lipophilicity. The compounds were also screened for cytotoxicity in vitro against WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells. The monomeric salicylaldimine quinolines exhibited high selectivity towards malaria parasites compared to cancer cells, while the dimeric compounds were less selective.

  16. 2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinoline analogs show improved anti-Zika virus activity, compared to mefloquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Lima, Giselle; Moraes, Adriana M; Araújo, Adriele da S; da Silva, Emerson T; de Freitas, Caroline S; Vieira, Yasmine R; Marttorelli, Andressa; Neto, José Cerbino; Bozza, Patrícia T; de Souza, Marcus V N; Souza, Thiago Moreno L

    2017-02-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV), an arthropod-born Flavivirus, has been associated with a wide range of neurological diseases in adults, foetuses and neonates. Since no vaccine is available, repurposing of antiviral drugs currently in medical use is necessary. Mefloquine has confirmed anti-ZIKV activity. We used medicinal chemistry-driven approaches to synthesize and evaluate the ability of a series of new 2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinoline derivatives to inhibit ZIKV replication in vitro, in order to improve the potency of mefloquine. We found that quinoline derivatives 3a and 4 were the most potent compounds within this series, both with mean EC 50 values of 0.8 μM, which represents a potency 5 times that of mefloquine. These results indicate that new 2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinoline chemical structures may be promising for the development of novel anti-ZIKV drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystal structure of bis(azido-κNbis(quinolin-8-amine-κ2N,N′iron(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Setifi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for new molecular materials with interesting magnetic properties using the pseudohalide azide ion and quinolin-8-amine (aqin, C9H8N2 as a chelating ligand, led to the synthesis and structure determination of the title complex, [Fe(N32(C9H8N22]. The complex shows an octahedral geometry, with the FeII atom surrounded by six N atoms; the two N3− anions coordinate in a cis configuration, while the remaining N atoms originate from the two quinolin-8-amine ligands with the quinoline N atoms lying on opposite sides of the Fe atom. The crystal packing is dominated by layers of hydrophilic and aromatic regions parallel to the ac plane, stabilized by a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network and π–π stacking.

  18. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata kunt (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Enrique Cuca-Suarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, Γ-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data (¹H, 13C, 1D, 2D, IR, MS and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia.

  19. Analysis of denitrifier community in a bioaugmented sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yaohui; Xing, Rui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Sun, Qinghua [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

    2011-05-15

    The denitrifier community and associated nitrate and nitrite reduction in the bioaugmented and general sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) during the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline were investigated. The efficiency and stability of nitrate and nitrite reduction in SBR was considerably improved after inoculation with four pyridine- or quinoline-degrading bacterial strains (including three denitrifying strains). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the nosZ gene revealed that the structures of the denitrifier communities in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented reactors were distinct and varied during the course of the experiment. Bioaugmentation protected indigenous denitrifiers from disruptions caused by pyridine and quinoline. Clone library analysis showed that one of the added denitrifiers comprised approximately 6% of the denitrifier population in the bioaugmented sludge. (orig.)

  20. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  1. Monitoring antimalarial safety and tolerability in clinical trials: A case study from Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpimbaza Arthur

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New antimalarial regimens, including artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs, have been adopted widely as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Although these drugs appear to be safe and well-tolerated, experience with their use in Africa is limited and continued assessment of safety is a priority. However, no standardized guidelines for evaluating drug safety and tolerability in malaria studies exist. A system for monitoring adverse events in antimalarial trials conducted in Uganda was developed. Here the reporting system is described, and difficulties faced in analysing and interpreting the safety results are illustrated, using data from the trials. Case description Between 2002 and 2007, eleven randomized, controlled clinical trials were conducted to compare the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of different antimalarial regimens for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. The approach to adverse event monitoring was similar in all studies. A total of 5,614 treatments were evaluated in 4,876 patients. Differences in baseline characteristics and patterns of adverse event reporting were noted between the sites, which limited the ability to pool and analyse data. Clinical failure following antimalarial treatment confounded associations between treatment and adverse events that were also common symptoms of malaria, particularly in areas of lower transmission intensity. Discussion and evaluation Despite prospectively evaluating for adverse events, limitations in the monitoring system were identified. New standardized guidelines for monitoring safety and tolerability in antimalarial trials are needed, which should address how to detect events of greatest importance, including serious events, those with a causal relationship to the treatment, those which impact on adherence, and events not previously reported. Conclusion Although the World Health Organization has supported the development of

  2. Antimalarial plants used by indigenous people of the Upper Rio Negro in Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kffuri, Carolina Weber; Lopes, Moisés Ahkʉtó; Ming, Lin Chau; Odonne, Guillaume; Kinupp, Valdely Ferreira

    2016-02-03

    This is the first intercultural report of antimalarial plants in this region. The aim of this study was to document the medicinal plants used against malaria by indigenous people in the Upper Rio Negro region and to review the literature on antimalarial activity and traditional use of the cited species. Participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and ethnobotanical walks were conducted with 89 informants in five indigenous communities between April 2010 and November 2013 to obtain information on the use of medicinal plants against malaria. We reviewed academic databases for papers published in scientific journals up to January 2014 in order to find works on ethnopharmacology, ethnobotany, and antimalarial activity of the species cited. Forty-six plant species belonging to 24 families are mentioned. Fabaceae (17.4%), Arecaceae (13.0%) and Euphorbiaceae (6.5%) account together for 36.9% of these species. Only seven plant species showed a relatively high consensus. Among the plant parts, barks (34.0%) and roots (28.0%) were the most widely used. Of the 46 species cited, 18 (39.1%) have already been studied for their antimalarial properties according to the literature, and 26 species (56.5%) have no laboratory essays on antimalarial activity. Local traditional knowledge of the use of antimalarials is still widespread in indigenous communities of the Upper Rio Negro, where 46 plants species used against malaria were recorded. Our studies highlight promising new plants for future studies: Glycidendron amazonicum, Heteropsis tenuispadix, Monopteryx uaucu, Phenakospermum guianensis, Pouteria ucuqui, Sagotia brachysepala and notably Aspidosperma schultesii, Ampelozizyphus amazonicus, Euterpe catinga, E. precatoria, Physalis angulata, Cocos nucifera and Swartzia argentea with high-use consensus. Experimental validation of these remedies may help in developing new drugs for malaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design configurations of the methanol synthesis loop

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhn, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the chemical industry has undergone considerable changes due to increased environmental regulations and energy costs. This master thesis has evaluated three different design considerations of the methanol synthesis loop using Honeywell's general purpose process simulator UniSim Design (R380 Build 14027) combined with MathWorks programming language MATLAB. The three configurations are Lurgis methanol reactor loop as built on Tjeldbergodden, the use of interstage methanol remova...

  4. New catalysts for miniaturized methanol fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Chorkendorff, Ib; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    The methanol fuel cell is an interesting energy technology, capable of converting the chemical energy of methanol directly into electricity. The technology is specifically attractive for small mobile applications such as laptops, smartphones, tablets etc. since it offers almost instantaneously recharging by simply replacing the methanol liquid. The technology is currently being developed for hearing instruments in order to ease the handling of the device for users complaining about difficulti...

  5. Catalytic conversion of methanol to light olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.S.; Stead, G.E.

    1987-05-12

    A process is described for converting a methanol-containing feed to an olefin-containing hydrocarbon product having a propylene-methylene weight ratio of at least 35.1:6.4. The process comprises contacting the methanol-containing feed in a reaction zone under methanol conversion conditions with a ZSM-12 zeolite catalyst modified by incorporation of a minor amount of a modifier selected from magnesium oxide, manganese oxide and a combination of both magnesium oxide and manganese oxide.

  6. Diversity-oriented synthesis-facilitated medicinal chemistry: toward the development of novel antimalarial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Eamon; Beaudoin, Jennifer A; Kato, Nobutaka; Fitzgerald, Mark E; Heidebrecht, Richard W; Lee, Maurice duPont; Masi, Daniela; Mercier, Marion; Mulrooney, Carol; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Rowley, Ann; Crespo-Llado, Keila; Serrano, Adelfa E; Lukens, Amanda K; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F; Palmer, Michelle A; Foley, Michael A; Munoz, Benito; Scherer, Christina A; Duvall, Jeremy R; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2014-10-23

    Here, we describe medicinal chemistry that was accelerated by a diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) pathway, and in vivo studies of our previously reported macrocyclic antimalarial agent that derived from the synthetic pathway. Structure-activity relationships that focused on both appendage and skeletal features yielded a nanomolar inhibitor of P. falciparum asexual blood-stage growth with improved solubility and microsomal stability and reduced hERG binding. The build/couple/pair (B/C/P) synthetic strategy, used in the preparation of the original screening library, facilitated medicinal chemistry optimization of the antimalarial lead.

  7. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dismas Baza

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO, a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9% compared to public (4.2% and NGO (0% outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu. Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu, private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu. Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors

  8. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewchuk, Tanya; O'Connell, Kathryn A; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Chapman, Steven; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012.ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate findings widely for decision

  9. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  10. Biotransformation and biocatalysis: roles and applications in the discovery of antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigorimbo-Murefu, Nyaradzo T L; Njoroge, Mathew; Nzila, Alexis; Louw, Stefan; Masimirembwa, Collen; Chibale, Kelly

    2012-12-01

    Several strategies to discover new antimalarials have been proposed to augment and complement the conventional drug-discovery paradigm. One approach, which has not yet been fully exploited, is the use of drug biotransformation to identify new active molecules. This concept rests on the use of the biotransformation of drugs to their pharmacologically active metabolites. This approach has been used successfully in human chemotherapy, with the discovery and development of several metabolite-based drugs. This review looks at the contribution that biotransformations can play in antimalarial drug discovery.

  11. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of new chloroquine analogues carrying a multifunctional linear side chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniuk, Daniel P.; Whetmore, Eric D.; Rosa, Nicholas; Ekoue-Kovi, Kekeli; Alumasa, John; de Dios, Angel C.; Roepe, Paul D.; Wolf, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We report the synthesis and in vitro antimalarial activity of several new 4-amino-and 4-alkoxy-7-chloroquinolines carrying a linear dibasic side chain. Many of these chloroquine analogues have submicromolar antimalarial activity versus HB3 (chloroquine sensitive) and Dd2 (chloroquine resistant strain of P. falciparum) and low resistance indices were obtained in most cases. Importantly, compounds 11–15 and 24 proved to be more potent against Dd2 than chloroquine. Branching of the side chain structure proved detrimental to the activity against the CQR strain. PMID:19703776

  12. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate

  13. Developments in the European methanol market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speed, J.

    1995-01-01

    In the late eighties/early nineties the World Methanol Market was basically divided into three regional markets--America, Asia Pacific and Europe. These markets were interrelated but each had its own specific characteristics and traditional suppliers. Now the situation has changed; in the mid nineties there is a Global Methanol Market with global players and effective global pricing and the European market is governed by events world-wide. Europe is however a specific market with specific characteristics which are different from those of other markets although it is also part of the Global Market. Hence before the author focuses on Europe he looks at the World Market. The paper discusses world methanol production and consumption by region, world methanol consumption by end use, world methanol supply demand balance, the west European market, western European methanol production, methanol imports to W. Europe, the Former Soviet Union supplies, W. European methanol consumption by end use, MTBE in Europe, duties on methanol imports into W. Europe, investment in Europe, the effect of the 1994/95 price spike, and key issues for the future of the industry

  14. Generation of gaseous methanol reference standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geib, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Methanol has been proposed as an automotive fuel component. Reliable, accurate methanol standards are essential to support widespread monitoring programs. The monitoring programs may include quantification of methanol from tailpipe emissions, evaporative emissions, plus ambient air methanol measurements. This paper will present approaches and results in the author's investigation to develop high accuracy methanol standards. The variables upon which the authors will report results are as follows: (1) stability of methanol gas standards, the studies will focus on preparation requirements and stability results from 10 to 1,000 ppmv; (2) cylinder to instrument delivery system components and purge technique, these studies have dealt with materials in contact with the sample stream plus static versus flow injection; (3) optimization of gas chromatographic analytical system will be discussed; (4) gas chromatography and process analyzer results and utility for methanol analysis will be presented; (5) the accuracy of the methanol standards will be qualified using data from multiple studies including: (a) gravimetric preparation; (b) linearity studies; (c) independent standards sources such as low pressure containers and diffusion tubes. The accuracy will be provided as a propagation of error from multiple sources. The methanol target concentrations will be 10 to 500 ppmv

  15. Soil and groundwater remediation guidelines for methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    Methanol is used by oil and gas operators to inhibit hydrate formation in the recovery of heavy oils, in natural gas production and transport, as well as in various other production applications. Emissions from methanol primary occur from miscellaneous solvent usage, methanol production, end-product manufacturing, and storage and handling losses. This document provided soil and groundwater remediation guidelines for methanol releases into the environment. The guidelines were consistent with the Alberta Environment tier 1 soil and groundwater framework. The chemical and physical properties of methanol were reviewed. The environmental fate and behavior of methanol releases was discussed, and the behaviour and effects of methanol in terrestrial and aquatic biota were evaluated. The toxicity of methanol and its effects in humans and mammalian species were reviewed. Soil quality and ground water quality guidelines were presented. Surface water and soil guideline calculation methods were provided, and ecological exposure and ground water pathways were discussed. Management limits for methanol concentrations were also provided. 162 refs., 18 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. Methanol in the L1551 Circumbinary Torus

    OpenAIRE

    White, Glenn J.; Fridlund, C. W. M.; Bergman, P.; Beardsmore, A.; Liseau, Rene; Phillips, R. R.

    2006-01-01

    We report observations of gaseous methanol in an edge-on torus surrounding the young stellar object L1551 IRS5. The peaks in the torus are separated by ~ 10,000 AU from L1551 IRS5, and contain ~ 0.03 earth masses of cold methanol. We infer that the methanol abundance increases in the outer part of the torus, probably as a result of methanol evaporation from dust grain surfaces heated by the shock luminosity associated with the shocks associated with the jets of an externally located x-ray sou...

  17. Thermo-optical properties of 1H[3,4-b] quinoline films used in electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglarz, Janusz; Kępińska, Mirosława; Sanetra, Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Electroluminescence cells with H[3,4-b] quinoline layers are promising devices for a blue light emitting EL diode. This work measured the optical reflectance as a function of temperature in copolymers PAQ layers deposited on Si crystalline substrate. Using the extended Cauchy dispersion model of the film refractive index we determined the thermo-optical coefficients for quinoline layers in the temperature range of 76-333 K from combined ellipsometric and spectrofotometric studies. The obtained values of thermo-optical coefficients of thin PAQ film, were negative and ranged in 5-10 × 10-4 [1/K].

  18. Infrared Spectra of Protonated Quinoline (1-C_9H_7NH^{+}) in Solid Para-Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chih-Yu; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-06-01

    Large protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (H^{+}PAH) and polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (H^{+}PANH) have been proposed as possible carriers of unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands from galactic objects. The nitrogen atom in H^{+}PANH is expected to induce a blue shift of the C=C stretching band near 6.2 μm so that their emission bands might agree with the UIR band better than those of H^{+}PAH. In this work, we report the IR spectrum of protonated quinoline and its neutral species measured upon electron bombardment during deposition of a mixture of quinoline and para-hydrogen at 3.2 K. New features were assigned to 1-C_9H_7NH^{+} and 1-C_9H_7NH, indicating that the protonation and hydrogenation occur at the N-atom site. The intensities of features of 1-C_9H_7NH^{+} diminished when the matrix was maintained in darkness for 10 h, whereas those of 1-C_9H_7NH increased. Spectral assignments were made according to comparison of experimental results with anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers and IR intensities calculated with the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. Although agreement between the observed spectrum of 1-C_9H_7NH^{+} and the UIR emission bands is unsatisfactory, presumably because of the small size of quinoline, we did observe C=C stretching bands at 1641.4, 1598.4, 1562.0 \\wn, blue-shifted from those at 1618.7, 1580.8, 1510.0 \\wn of the corresponding protonated PAH (C_{10}H_{9}^{+}), pointing to the direction of the UIR bands.

  19. Grafting polyethylenimine with quinoline derivatives for targeted imaging of intracellular Zn2+ and logic gate operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yi; Shi, Yupeng; Chen, Junying; Wong, Chap-Mo; Zhang, Heng; Li, Mei-Jin; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yi, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent Zn 2+ probe which exhibited excellent biocompatibility, water solubility, and cell-membrane permeability, was facilely synthesized in a single step by grafting polyethyleneimine (PEI) with quinoline derivatives. The primary amino groups in the branched PEI can increase water solubility and cell permeability of the probe PEIQ, while quinoline derivatives can specifically recognize Zn 2+ and reduce the potential cytotoxicity of PEI. Basing on fluorescence off-on mechanism, PEIQ demonstrated excellent sensing capability towards Zn 2+ in absolute aqueous solution, where a high sensitivity with a detection limit as low as 38.1 nM, and a high selectivity over competing metal ions and potential interfering amino acids, were achieved. Inspired by these results, elementary logic operations (YES, NOT and INHIBIT) have been constructed by employing PEIQ as the gate while Zn 2+ and EDTA as chemical inputs. Together with the low cytotoxicity and good cell-permeability, the practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging was satisfactorily demonstrated, emphasizing its wide application in fundamental biology research. - Graphical abstract: The fluorescent Zn 2+ probe, PEIQ, is facilely synthesized by grafting PEI with 8-CAAQ, and demonstrated for the pratical applications in Zn 2+ imaging and implementation of molecular logic operations within biological cells. - Highlights: • PEIQ, fluorescent Zn 2+ probe, is synthesized by grafting PEI with quinoline derivatives. • PEIQ exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity in absolute aqueous solution. • PEIQ is biocompatible, water soluble, and cell-membrane permeable. • Elementary logic operations have been demonstrated for PEIQ/Zn 2+ /EDTA system. • The practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging is demonstrated.

  20. Improvement of biodiesel methanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Datta Bharadwaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to improve the performance of biodiesel–methanol blends in a VCR engine by using optimized engine parameters. For optimization of the engine, operational parameters such as compression ratio, fuel blend, and load are taken as factors, whereas performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency (Bth and brake specific fuel consumption (Bsfc and emission parameters such as carbon monoxide (CO, unburnt hydrocarbons (HC, Nitric oxides (NOx and smoke are taken as responses. Experimentation is carried out as per the design of experiments of the response surface methodology. Optimization of engine operational parameters is carried out using Derringers Desirability approach. From the results obtained it is inferred that the VCR engine has maximum performance and minimum emissions at 18 compression ratio, 5% fuel blend and at 9.03 kg of load. At this optimized operating conditions of the engine the responses such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption, carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbons, nitric oxide, and smoke are found to be 31.95%, 0.37 kg/kW h, 0.036%, 5 ppm, 531.23 ppm and 15.35% respectively. It is finally observed from the mathematical models and experimental data that biodiesel methanol blends have maximum efficiency and minimum emissions at optimized engine parameters.

  1. Metabolic pathways of quinoline, indole and their methylated analogs by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, S.S.; Licht, D.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The transformation of quinoline, isoquinoline and 3-, 4-, 6- and 8-methylquinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was compared with that of the N-containing analogues indole and 1-, 2-, 3- and 7-methylindole. The metabolites were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV dete...... inhibited. An incomplete transformation of some methylated compounds was observed, e.g. for 3- and 6-methylquinoline and 3- and 7-methylindole, with residual concentrations of 0.5-4 mg/l in relation to initial concentrations of 10-15 mg/l....

  2. (Methoxo-κOoxidobis(quinolin-8-olato-κ2N,Ovanadium(V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Guo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [V(C9H6NO2(CH3OO], the central VV atom is coordinated by the O atoms from the oxido and methoxo ligands and the N and O atoms of two bis-chelating quinolin-8-olate ligands, forming a distorted octahedral environment. In the crystal structure, weak intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds connect molecules into centrosymmetric dimers which are, in turn, linked by weak C—H...π interactions into chains along the b axis.

  3. Quinoline-8-sulfonamidePart CXXXII in the series of Azinyl Sulfides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marciniec

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C9H8N2O2S, the sulfamoyl NH2 group is involved in intramolecular N—H...N and intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonding. In the crystal, molecules are linked via pairs of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers, which are further associated through π–π stacking interactions between the quinoline benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.649 (1 Å] into a one-dimensional polymeric structure extending along the a axis.

  4. Quinoline derivatives bearing pyrazole moiety: Synthesis and biological evaluation as possible antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shehry, Mohamed F; Ghorab, Mostafa M; Abbas, Samir Y; Fayed, Eman A; Shedid, Said A; Ammar, Yousry A

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt for development of new antimicrobial agents, three series of quinoline derivatives bearing pyrazole moiety have been synthesized. The first series was synthesized through the synthesis of 4-(quinolin-2-yloxy)benzaldehyde and 4-(quinolin-2-yloxy)acetophenone and then treatment with ketone or aldehyde derivatives to afford the corresponding chalcones. Cyclization of the latter chalcones with hydrazine derivatives led to the formation of new pyrazoline derivatives. The second series was synthesized via the synthesis of 2-hydrazinylquinoline and then treatment with formylpyrazoles to afford the corresponding hydrazonyl pyrazole derivatives. The third series was synthesized through the treatment of 2-hydrazinylquinoline with ethoxyethylidene, dithioacetal and arylidene derivatives to afford the corresponding pyrazole derivatives. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their expected antibacterial and antifungal activities; where, the majority of these compounds showed potent antibacterial and antifungal activities against the tested strains of bacteria and fungi. Pyrazole derivative 13b showed better results when compared with the reference drugs as revealed from their MIC values (0.12-0.98 μg/mL). The pyrazole derivative 13b showed fourfold potency of gentamycin in inhibiting the growth of S. flexneri (MIC 0.12 μg/mL). Also, compound 13b showed fourfold potency of amphotericin B in inhibiting the growth of A. clavatus (MIC 0.49 μg/mL) and C. albicans (MIC 0.12 μg/mL), respectively. The same compound showed twofold potency of gentamycin in inhibiting the growth of P. vulgaris (MIC 0.98 μg/mL), equipotent to the ampicillin and amphotericin B in inhibiting the growth of S. epidermidis (MIC 0.49 μg/mL), A. fumigatus (MIC 0.98 μg/mL), respectively. Thus, these studies suggest that quinoline derivatives bearing pyrazole moiety are interesting scaffolds for the development of novel antibacterial and antifungal agents. Copyright © 2017

  5. Increasing the Aromatic Selectivity of Quinoline Hydrogenolysis Using Pd/MOx–Al2O3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach, Mark; Morlanes-Sanchez, Natalia; Canlas, Christian P.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2014-09-11

    Catalysts consisting of Pd nanoparticles supported on highly dispersed TiOx–Al2O3, TaOx–Al2O3, and MoOx–Al2O3 are studied for catalytic quinoline hydrogenation and selective C–N bond cleavage at 275 °C and 20 bar H2. The Pd/MOx–Al2O3 materials exhibit significantly greater aromatic product selectivity and thus 10–15 % less required H2 for a given level of denitrogenation relative to an unmodified Pd/Al2O3 catalyst.

  6. Ring-substituted 4-Hydroxy-1H-quinolin-2-ones: Preparation and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Dohnal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study, a series of twelve ring-substituted 4-hydroxy-1H-quinolin-2-one derivatives were prepared. The procedures for synthesis of the compounds are presented. The compounds were analyzed using RP-HPLC to determine lipophilicity and tested for their photosynthesis-inhibiting activity using spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. All the synthesized compounds were also evaluated for antifungal activity using in vitro screening with eight fungal strains. For all the compounds, the relationships between the lipophilicity and the chemical structure of the studied compounds are discussed, as well as their structure-activity relationships (SAR.

  7. Crystal structure of bis(3-bromomesityl(quinolin-1-ium-8-ylboron(III tribromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Son

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C27H26.82BBr2.18N+·Br3−, is a cationic triarylborane isolated as its tribromide salt. The aryl substituents include a protonated 8-quinolyl group and two 3-bromomesityl groups. The molecule was prepared on combination of 3:1 Br2 and dimesityl(quinolin-8-ylborane in hexanes. The refinement of the structure indicated a degree of `over-bromination' (beyond two bromine atoms for the cation. There are two tribromide ions in the asymmetric unit, both completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry.

  8. Synthesis of (iso)quinoline, (iso)coumarin and (iso)chromene derivatives from acetylene compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabukhin, D. S.; Vasilyev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Published data on the methods of synthesis of quinoline, isoquinoline, coumarin, isocoumarin, chromene and isochromene derivatives from acetylene compounds are summarized. The reactions catalyzed by metal complexes (Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh, Au, Ag, Ni, Cu, etc.) and transformations induced by various electrophilic reagents (Brynsted and Lewis acids) are considered. Moieties of the mentioned heterocyclic systems are present in many biologically active natural products and pharmaceutical agents. Besides, derivatives of these heterocycles are used in the manufacture of catalysts, dyes, perfumery and cosmetic products, corrosion inhibitors and so on. The bibliography includes 211 references.

  9. Femtosecond to microsecond observation of the photochemical reaction of 1,2-di(quinolin-2-yl)disulfide with methyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Daisuke; Donaldson, Paul M; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2017-05-24

    The mechanism of the thiol-ene reaction induced by 330 nm ultraviolet excitation of 1,2-di(quinolin-2-yl)disulfide (QSSQ) in the presence of methyl methacrylate (MMA) is investigated by sub-picosecond to microsecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements, spanning more than seven orders of magnitude of time, directly reveal multiple radical reaction steps. The ground state quinoliene-2-thiyl radical (QS) is formed with a time constant of ∼200 fs by photolysis of QSSQ, followed by (64 ± 1)% decay of the initially formed QS radical because of solvent cage induced geminate recombination and QS dimer formation with a rate coefficient of (3.4 ± 0.2) × 10 10 M -1 s -1 in methanol solution. In MMA solution, the carbon centered radical QS-MMA forms with a bimolecular reaction rate coefficient of (2.8 ± 0.2) × 10 7 M -1 s -1 . The distinct infrared band at 1653 cm -1 assigned to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretch mode of the QS-MMA radical decays rapidly in aerated solution, in contrast to observations in a solution purged of O 2 by N 2 bubbling. This decay is attributed to reaction of the QS-MMA radicals with molecular oxygen, producing peroxy radicals. Kinetic analysis of the intensity of the band at 1653 cm -1 reveals a bimolecular reaction rate coefficient of (3.3 ± 0.3) × 10 9 M -1 s -1 for the reaction of the QS-MMA radicals with molecular oxygen, and indicates that this reaction step is reversible.

  10. Application of Porous Nickel-Coated TiO2 for the Photocatalytic Degradation of Aqueous Quinoline in an Internal Airlift Loop Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suiyi; Yang, Xia; Yang, Wu; Zhang, Leilei; Wang, Jian; Huo, Mingxin

    2012-01-01

    P25 film, prepared by a facile dip-coating method without any binder, was further developed in a recirculating reactor for quinoline removal from synthetic wastewater. Macroporous foam Ni, which has an open three-dimensional network structure, was utilized as a substrate to make good use of UV rays. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the coated/calcinated P25 films consisted of two crystal phases, and had a number of uniform microcracks on the surface. The effects of initial quinoline concentration, light intensity, reaction temperature, aeration, and initial pH were studied. Increased reaction time, light intensity, environmental temperature, and gas aeration were found to significantly improve the quinoline removal efficiency. The aeration effect of oxygen dependency on the quinoline degradation had the trend pure oxygen > air > no gas > pure nitrogen with free O2. The solution pH crucially affected quinoline photodegradation; the high electrostatic adsorption of quinoline molecules on the TiO2 surface was strongly pH dependent. 2-Pyridine-carboxaldehyde, 3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, and 2(1H)-quinolinone were identified as the major intermediates of quinoline degradation. Based on these intermediates, a primary degradation mechanism was proposed. This reusable P25 film benefits the photodegradation of water contaminants and has potential in other various applications. PMID:22470309

  11. Biodegradation characterization and immobilized strains' potential for quinoline degradation by Brevundimonas sp. K4 isolated from activated sludge of coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunrong; Zhang, Mengru; Cheng, Fanglin; Geng, Qi

    2015-01-01

    A novel quinoline-degrading strain, named K4, was isolated from activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant and identified as Brevundimonas sp. on the basis of its 16s rDNA gene sequence analysis. Its optimum temperature and pH for quinoline degradation were 30 °C and pH 9.0, respectively, and during the biodegradation process, at 100 mg/L initial quinoline concentration, an inoculation amount of 8% (OD600 of 0.23) was the optimal strain concentration. In addition, the kinetics of free K4 strains for quinoline degradation showed that it followed a zero-order equation. Furthermore, compared with free K4 strains, immobilized K4 strains' potential for quinoline degradation was investigated by adding both of them into SBR reactors for actual coking wastewater treatment on operation over 15 days. The results showed that bioaugmentation by both free and immobilized K4 strains enhanced quinoline removal efficiency, and especially, the latter could reach its stable removal after a shorter accommodation period, with 94.8% of mean quinoline removal efficiency.

  12. One-pot Sequential Reactions Featuring a Copper-catalyzed Amination Leading to Pyrido[2',1':2,3]imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines and Dihydropyrido[2',1':2,3]imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xue-Sen; Zhang, Ju; Li, Bin; Zhang, Xin-Ying

    2015-06-01

    Tetracyclic skeletons combining an imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine moiety with a quinoline framework such as pyrido[2',1':2,3]imidazo[4,5-b]quinoline are stimulating increasing interests since they are close isosteres of a series of powerful antiproliferative compounds. In this paper, we report a novel methodology for the synthesis of pyrido[2',1':2,3]imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines through one-pot sequential reactions of commercially available or readily obtainable 2-aminopyridines, 2-bromophenacyl bromides, aqueous ammonia, and aldehydes. Moreover, dihydropyrido[2',1':2,3]imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines could also be obtained in a similar manner by using various ketones as the substrates in place of aldehydes. Notably, the whole procedure combines condensation/amination/cyclization reactions in one pot to give complex compounds in a simple and practical manner. Compared with literature methods, the synthetic strategy reported herein has the advantages of readily available starting materials, structural diversity of products, good functional group tolerance, and obviation of step-by-step operations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. ( Asteraceae ) methanol extracts against Helicobacter pylori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol vehicle did not affect H. pylori growth. Conclusion: The observed antibacterial effect of G. glutinosum extracts may be of benefit as an adjuvant treatment of diseases caused by H. pylori. Key words: Gymnosperma glutinosum, Helicobacter pylori, methanol extract, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC).

  14. Methanol synthesis mechanism over zirconium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekerdt, J.G.; Silver, R.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1986-01-01

    The source and role of oxygen in the formation of carbonates, formate, methoxide, and methanol were studied over zirconia via infrared spectroscopy and /sup 18/O-labeled reactants. The studies are consistent with a formate-to-methoxide mechanism for methanol synthesis and suggest the nature of the active sites involved

  15. Methanol as fuel: evaluation of atmosphere contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.D.; Romano, J.; Guardani, M.L.G.

    1991-01-01

    With the beginning of methanol use as automotive fuel in Sao Paulo city, 1990, were realized special measurements of methanol, formaldehyde, ethanol and acetaldehyde in atmosphere. Other indicators of air quality as carbon and ozone monoxide were also observed in this study. (C.M.)

  16. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide for methanol production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; van den Berg, Henderikus; Benneker, A.; Simmelink, G.; Timmer, J.; van Weerden, S.

    2012-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol with a capacity of 10 kt/y methanol is designed in a systematic way. The challenge will be to obtain a process with a high net CO2 conversion. From initially four conceptual designs the most feasible is selected and designed in more detail. The

  17. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology of Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methanol is a high production volume chemical used as a feedstock for chemical syntheses and as a solvent and fuel additive. Methanol is acutely toxic to humans, causing acidosis, blindness in death at high dosages, but its developmental and reproductive toxicity in humans is poo...

  18. Phytochemical Studies And Antimicrobial Properties Of Methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical studies were carried out on aqueous and methanolic extracts of Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass). Agar well diffusion method was employed to assess the antimicrobial potency of the extracts against selected microbial pathogens. The mean zone of inhibition (mm) produced by methanolic extract at four ...

  19. Antimalarial activity of lactucin and lactucopicrin: sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Cichorium intybus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Theodore A; Kelley, Charles J; Karchesy, Yvette; Laurantos, Maria; Nguyen-Dinh, Phuc; Arefi, Abdul Ghafoor

    2004-12-01

    Folklore reports from Afghanistan prior to the wars described the use of aqueous root extracts of Cichorium intybus (L.) as a light-sensitive plant remedy for malaria. Preparative isolation and bioassay against HB3 clone of strain Honduras-1 of Plasmodium falciparum identified the previously known light-sensitive sesquiterpene lactones Lactucin and Lactucopicrin to be antimalarial compounds.

  20. Poor-quality antimalarial drugs in southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Gaurvika M L; Breman, Joel G; Newton, Paul N; Herrington, James

    2012-06-01

    Poor-quality antimalarial drugs lead to drug resistance and inadequate treatment, which pose an urgent threat to vulnerable populations and jeopardise progress and investments in combating malaria. Emergence of artemisinin resistance or tolerance in Plasmodium falciparum on the Thailand-Cambodia border makes protection of the effectiveness of the drug supply imperative. We reviewed published and unpublished studies reporting chemical analyses and assessments of packaging of antimalarial drugs. Of 1437 samples of drugs in five classes from seven countries in southeast Asia, 497 (35%) failed chemical analysis, 423 (46%) of 919 failed packaging analysis, and 450 (36%) of 1260 were classified as falsified. In 21 surveys of drugs from six classes from 21 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, 796 (35%) of 2297 failed chemical analysis, 28 (36%) of 77 failed packaging analysis, and 79 (20%) of 389 were classified as falsified. Data were insufficient to identify the frequency of substandard (products resulting from poor manufacturing) antimalarial drugs, and packaging analysis data were scarce. Concurrent interventions and a multifaceted approach are needed to define and eliminate criminal production, distribution, and poor manufacturing of antimalarial drugs. Empowering of national medicine regulatory authorities to protect the global drug supply is more important than ever. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strengthening of national capacity in implementation of antimalarial drug quality assurance in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykadga, Saowanit; Cholpol, Sawat; Sitthimongkol, Saipin; Pawaphutanan, Anusorn; Pinyoratanachot, Arunya; Rojanawatsirivet, Chaiporn; Kovithvattanapong, Rojana; Thimasarn, Krongthong

    2006-01-01

    Substandard and counterfeit pharmaceutical products, including antimalarial drugs, appear to be widespread internationally and affect both the developing and developed countries. The aim of the study was to investigate the quality of antimalarial drugs, ie, artesunate (ART), chloroquine (CHL), mefloquine (MEF), quinine (QUI), sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (S/P) and tetracycline (TT) obtained from the government sector and private pharmacies in 4 Thai provinces: Mae Hong Son, Kanchanaburi, Ranong, and Chanthaburi. Three hundred sixty-nine samples of 6 antimalarial drugs from 27 government hospitals, 27 malaria clinics, and 53 drugstores, were collected. Drug quality was assessed by simple disintegration test and semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography in each province; 10% passed, 100% failed and doubtful samples were sent to be verified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at the Thai National Drug Analysis Laboratory, (NL). Fifteen point four percent of ART, 11.1% of CHL and 29.4% of QUI were substandard. Based on the finding, drug regulatory authorities in the country took appropriate action against violators to ensure that antimalarial drugs consumed by malaria patients are of good quality.

  2. In Vitro Chemosensitization of Plasmodium falciparum to Antimalarials by Verapamil and Probenecid▿

    OpenAIRE

    Masseno, Victor; Muriithi, Steven; Nzila, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    We tested the effect of probenecid and verapamil in chemosensitizing Plasmodium falciparum to 14 antimalarials using the multidrug-resistant strain V1S and the drug-sensitive 3D7. Verapamil chemosensitizes V1S to quinine and chloroquine. Interestingly, probenecid profoundly chemosensitizes V1S to piperaquine. Thus, probenecid could be used to increase piperaquine efficacy in vivo.

  3. In vitro chemosensitization of Plasmodium falciparum to antimalarials by verapamil and probenecid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseno, Victor; Muriithi, Steven; Nzila, Alexis

    2009-07-01

    We tested the effect of probenecid and verapamil in chemosensitizing Plasmodium falciparum to 14 antimalarials using the multidrug-resistant strain V1S and the drug-sensitive 3D7. Verapamil chemosensitizes V1S to quinine and chloroquine. Interestingly, probenecid profoundly chemosensitizes V1S to piperaquine. Thus, probenecid could be used to increase piperaquine efficacy in vivo.

  4. Mass anti-malarial administration in western Cambodia: a qualitative study of factors affecting coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pell, Christopher; Tripura, Rupam; Nguon, Chea; Cheah, Phaikyeong; Davoeung, Chan; Heng, Chhouen; Dara, Lim; Sareth, Ma; Dondorp, Arjen; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Peto, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Mass anti-malarial administration has been proposed as a key component of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategy in the Greater Mekong sub-Region. Its effectiveness depends on high levels of coverage in the target population. This article explores the factors that influenced mass

  5. A SAR and QSAR Study of New Artemisinin Compounds with Antimalarial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleydson Breno R. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Hartree-Fock method and the 6-31G** basis set were employed to calculate the molecular properties of artemisinin and 20 derivatives with antimalarial activity. Maps of molecular electrostatic potential (MEPs and molecular docking were used to investigate the interaction between ligands and the receptor (heme. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were employed to select the most important descriptors related to activity. The correlation between biological activity and molecular properties was obtained using the partial least squares and principal component regression methods. The regression PLS and PCR models built in this study were also used to predict the antimalarial activity of 30 new artemisinin compounds with unknown activity. The models obtained showed not only statistical significance but also predictive ability. The significant molecular descriptors related to the compounds with antimalarial activity were the hydration energy (HE, the charge on the O11 oxygen atom (QO11, the torsion angle O1-O2-Fe-N2 (D2 and the maximum rate of R/Sanderson Electronegativity (RTe+. These variables led to a physical and structural explanation of the molecular properties that should be selected for when designing new ligands to be used as antimalarial agents.

  6. Tritium labelling and characterization of the antimalarial drug (+/-)-chloroquine by several methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.A.Judith A.; Laseter, Anne G.; Filer, C.N.Crist N.

    2002-01-01

    To study its mechanism of antimalarial action, a tritium labelled analogue of (+/-)-chloroquine was required at high specific activity. Two synthetic methods were successfully employed. [3- 3 H] (+/-)-Chloroquine 2 was prepared by the catalytic tritium dehalogenation of an iodo precursor and [N-ethyl- 3 H] (+/-)-chloroquine 4 was synthesized by the alkylation of (+/-)-desethylchloroquine with [ 3 H] ethyl iodide

  7. Tritium labelling and characterization of the antimalarial drug (+/-)-chloroquine by several methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, J.A.Judith A.; Laseter, Anne G.; Filer, C.N.Crist N. E-mail: crist.filer@perkinelmer.com

    2002-09-01

    To study its mechanism of antimalarial action, a tritium labelled analogue of (+/-)-chloroquine was required at high specific activity. Two synthetic methods were successfully employed. [3-{sup 3}H] (+/-)-Chloroquine 2 was prepared by the catalytic tritium dehalogenation of an iodo precursor and [N-ethyl-{sup 3}H] (+/-)-chloroquine 4 was synthesized by the alkylation of (+/-)-desethylchloroquine with [{sup 3}H] ethyl iodide.

  8. Influence of smoking on disease severity and antimalarial therapy in cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, A; Sigges, J; Biazar, C

    2014-01-01

    . Smoking behaviour was assessed by the EUSCLE Core Set Questionnaire in 838 patients and statistically analysed using an SPSS database. The results were correlated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) and the efficacy of antimalarial treatment. RESULTS: A high...

  9. The Discovery of Novel Antimalarial Compounds Enabled by QSAR-based Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Fourches, Denis; Sedykh, Alexander; Zhu, Hao; Golbraikh, Alexander; Ekins, Sean; Clark, Julie; Connelly, Michele C.; Sigal, Martina; Hodges, Dena; Guiguemde, Armand; Guy, R. Kiplin; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models have been developed for a dataset of 3133 compounds defined as either active or inactive against P. falciparum. Since the dataset was strongly biased towards inactive compounds, different sampling approaches were employed to balance the ratio of actives vs. inactives, and models were rigorously validated using both internal and external validation approaches. The balanced accuracy for assessing the antimalarial activities of 70 external compounds was between 87% and 100% depending on the approach used to balance the dataset. Virtual screening of the ChemBridge database using QSAR models identified 176 putative antimalarial compounds that were submitted for experimental validation, along with 42 putative inactives as negative controls. Twenty five (14.2%) computational hits were found to have antimalarial activities with minimal cytotoxicity to mammalian cells, while all 42 putative inactives were confirmed experimentally. Structural inspection of confirmed active hits revealed novel chemical scaffolds, which could be employed as starting points to discover novel antimalarial agents. PMID:23252936

  10. Melidianolic acid A and B, new antimalarial acyclic diterpenes from Aphanamixis grandifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astulla, Adil; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Rahman, Abdul; Kusumawati, Idha; Ekasari, Wiwied; Widyawaruyanti, Aty; Zaini, Noor Cholies; Morita, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Two new acyclic diterpenes, melidianolic acids A (1) and B (2), have been isolated from the bark of Aphanamixis grandifolia. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical methods. Melidianolic acids A (1) and B (2) showed antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 with IC50 of 6.1 and 7.3 microg/mL, respectively.

  11. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin: The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerapan Krungkrai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu (Chinese name and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Artemisinin was discovered in 1971 by a Chinese medical scientist Youyou Tu, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2015 on her discovering the antimalarial properties of qinghaosu from the traditional Chinese qinghao plant. Nevertheless, artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients has first emerged on the Thai-Cambodian border in 2009, which is now prevalent across mainland Southeast Asia from Vietnam to Myanmar. Here, we reviewed malaria disease severity, history of artemisinin discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of drug action, artemisinin-based combination therapies, emergence and spread of drug resistance, including the recent findings on mechanism of resistance in the falciparum malaria parasite. This poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for the urgent development of new antimalarial drugs.

  12. Assessing anti-malarial drug effects ex vivo using the haemozoin detection assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebelo, Maria; Tempera, Carolina; Fernandes, José F.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Hänscheid, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In vitro sensitivity assays are crucial to detect and monitor drug resistance. Plasmodium falciparum has developed resistance to almost all anti-malarial drugs. Although different in vitro drug assays are available, some of their inherent characteristics limit their application, especially in the

  13. Recycling of greenhouse gases via methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Eliasson, B.; Kogelschatz, U. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere can be mitigated by using direct control technologies (capture, disposal or chemical recycling). We report on carbon dioxide and methane recycling with other chemicals, especially with hydrogen and oxygen, to methanol. Methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} is investigated on various catalysts at moderate pressures ({<=}30 bar) and temperatures ({<=}300{sup o}C). The catalysts show good methanol activities and selectivities. The conversion of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} to methanol is also studied in a silent electrical discharge at pressures of 1 to 4 bar and temperatures close to room temperature. Methanol yields are given for mixtures of CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} and also for CH{sub 4} and air mixtures. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  14. New catalysts for miniaturized methanol fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov

    . The kinetics can however be improved by using a superior catalyst. Therefore, the aim of this thesis is to identify new catalyst material for methanol fuel cells. By analysing the performance of the standard catalysts (PtRu and Pt) currently being applied in methanol fuel cells as anode and cathode......The methanol fuel cell is an interesting energy technology, capable of converting the chemical energy of methanol directly into electricity. The technology is specifically attractive for small mobile applications such as laptops, smartphones, tablets etc. since it offers almost instantaneously...... demonstrated by the Danish Technological Institute; however, for the technology to become more widely adapted, the power density of the fuel cell must be increased. It is well known that a considerable part of the energy from the methanol is lost in the fuel cell during the conversion due to poor kinetics...

  15. Self-medication with antibiotics and antimalarials in the community of Khartoum State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Abdelmoneim; Eltayeb, Idris; Matowe, Lloyd; Thalib, Lukman

    2005-08-12

    To estimate the prevalence of self medication with antibiotics and antimalarials in Khartoum State, Sudan and evaluate factors associated with self medication. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of 600 households, (1750 adult persons), selected from three cities in Khartoum State, Sudan, using a multistage stratified clustered sampling. One thousand two hundred and ninety three (73.9%) of the study population had used antibiotics or antimalarials without a prescription within one month prior to the study. Eight hundred and forty one (48.1%) of the respondents agreed that they have used antibiotics, 43.4% used antimalarials, while 17.5% used both. Self medication with either antibiotics/ antimalarials was found to be significantly associated with age, income, gender and level of education. Overall, self medication with any antibiotics or antimalarials was least common among the > or = 60 years compared to youngest age group (OR: 0.07; 0.04 -0.11) and most common among the female gender (OR: 1.8; 1.4 -2.4), the middle income group (OR: 3.7; 2.6-5.3) and the university graduates. Self medication with antibiotic was found to be significantly higher among females (OR: 1.5; 1.16-1.87), middle aged respondents aged 40-59 (OR: 2.1; 1.5-3.0) compared to younger respondents. Lower income and higher level of education was also found to be significantly associated with the increase risk of self medicating with antibiotic. Increase risk for self medication with antimalarials were, however, found to be significantly associated with male gender and younger age group of self-medication was financial constraints. The main source of medicines was the private pharmacies, which were regarded as a cheaper alternative to other primary healthcare sources. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics/antimalarials in Khartoum State, Sudan is alarmingly high. Self medication behaviour varies significantly with a number of socio-economic characteristics

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies on IR, Raman, and UV-Vis spectra of quinoline-7-carboxaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, M; Küçük, V; Kocademir, M; Alfanda, H M; Altun, A; Sarı, L

    2015-01-05

    Spectroscopic properties of quinoline-7-carboxaldehyde (Q7C) have been studied in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The FT-IR (4000-50 cm(-1)), FT-Raman (4000-50 cm(-1)), dispersive-Raman (3500-50 cm(-1)), and UV-Vis (200-400 nm) spectra of Q7C were recorded at room temperature (25 °C). Geometry parameters, potential energy surface about CCH(O) bond, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis spectrum, and thermodynamic characteristics (at 298.15K) of Q7C were computed at Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional B3LYP levels employing the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Frontier molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, and Mulliken charge analyses of Q7C have also been performed. Q7C has two stable conformers that are energetically very close to each other with slight preference to the conformer that has oxygen atom of the aldehyde away from the nitrogen atom of the quinoline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Substituent influence on the spectra of some benzo[f]quinoline derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oanca, Gabriel; Stare, Jernej; Todirascu, Antonina Gritco; Creanga, Dorina; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relations between the properties of some organic compounds that are cycloaddition derivatives of benzo[f]quinoline, namely benzo[f]pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinolines (BQCDs) and the structure of variable substituent in the addition cycle. The work was focused on the differences in the molecular parameters like frontier orbitals and dipole moment as well as electronic absorption spectra of substituted BQCDs. The optimized molecular structures of BQCDs were calculated using Gaussian 09, with DFT method, the frontier orbitals and electronic absorption spectra being modeled with restricted Hartree Fock method also implemented in Gaussian 09. Influence of substituted radical on the dipole moments and frontier orbital energies of the BQCDs was evidenced from calculated values. Substituent effect on the BQCDs recorded electronic absorption spectra in diluted solution and protonated diluted solution was also emphasized: different types of the transitions underlying absorption bands in the visible range were presumed based on the quantum chemical and experimental investigation.

  18. 4-Phenyl quinoline derivatives as potential serotonin receptor ligands with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pranaya V; Sayed, Alim A; RaviKumar, Ameeta; Puranik, Vedavati G; Zinjarde, Smita S

    2017-08-18

    Antagonists of signaling receptors are often effective non-toxic therapeutic agents. Over the years, there have been evidences describing the role of serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in development of cancer. Although there are reports on the antiproliferative effects of some serotonin receptor antagonists, there are very few investigations related to understanding their structure-activity relationships. In this study, we report the screening of a library of 4-phenyl quinoline derivatives for their antiproliferative activities. Preliminary docking studies indicated that these ligands had the ability to bind to two of the serotonin receptors, 5-HT 1B and 5-HT 2B . The results of the in silico experiments were validated by performing in vitro studies on MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. The ethylpiperazine derivatives showed maximum toxicity against this cancer cell line. The compounds inhibited Calcium ion efflux (induced by serotonin) and ERK activation. One of the most active 4-phenyl quinoline derivatives (H3a) also induced apoptosis, thereby, suggesting the use of this scaffold as a potential anticancer drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A computational study on corrosion inhibition performances of novel quinoline derivatives against the corrosion of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Şaban; Safi, Zaki S.; Kaya, Savaş; Işın, Dilara Özbakır; Guo, Lei; Kaya, Cemal

    2017-04-01

    In this computational study, the adsorption and corrosion inhibition properties of some novel quinoline derivatives namely, 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q1), 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-(p-tolyl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q2), 2-amino-7-hydroxy-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile) (Q3) and 2-amino-4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-7-hydroxy-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitrile (Q4) on the corrosion of iron were investigated using quantum chemical and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Quantum chemical calculations section of the study provides enough calculation and discussion on the relationship between corrosion inhibition and global reactivity descriptors such as EHOMO, ELUMO, HOMO-LUMO energy gap (ΔE), chemical hardness (η), softness (σ), electronegativity (χ), chemical potential (μ), electrophilicity (ω), nucleophilicity (ɛ), electrons transferred from inhibitors to metal surface (ΔN), initial molecule-metal interaction energy (Δψ), total electronic energy (E), the energy change during electronic back-donation process (ΔEb-d). The adsorption behaviors of studied compounds on Fe (110) surface were investigated with the help of molecular dynamics simulation approach. The binding energies calculated on Fe (110) surface of mentioned quinoline derivatives followed the order: Q4 > Q3 > Q2 > Q1. It should be noted that the results obtained in the study are in good agreement with experimental inhibition efficiency results earlier reported.

  20. Dipodal quinoline-tethered fluorescent probe synthesis and investigation of spectroscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obalı, Aslıhan Yılmaz; Yilmaz, Menzeher Serkan; Uçan, Halil İsmet

    2017-10-01

    Novel quinoline-tethered fluorescent probe was designed and synthesized as multidentate ligand. Their sensing actions were confirmed by UV-Vis absorbance and emission spectroscopic studies in presence of perchlorate salts of Co2+, Li+, Fe2+, K+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Hg2+, Ag+ cations in acetonitrile (1 × 10-5 M for absorption studies, 1 × 10-7 M for fluorescence studies). It was found that the dipodal compounds can selectively bind to Cu2+ and Ag+ metal ions with a significant quenching in their emissions. The capture of Cu2+ and Ag+ by the probe resulted in deprotonation of the secondary amine conjugated to the quinoline-tethered probe, so that the electron-donation ability of the 'N' atom would be greatly enhanced and the probe (2) showed blue-shift in emission and exhibited an on-off fluorescent response. The binding study was explored by using fluorescence spectroscopy with Job plot method.

  1. Synthetically simple, click-generated quinoline-based Fe3+ sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyun; Wang, Hua; Meng, Ting; Hao, Erhong; Jiao, Lijuan

    2017-06-01

    Simple quinoline-based fluorescent probes for Fe3+ have been efficiently synthesized through ‘click’ reaction. Both probes gave intense fluorescence compared to 8-hydroquinoline in various organic solvents due to the inhibition of the excited state intramolecular photon transfer process, while showing dramatically quenched and red-shifted fluorescence in an aqueous solution, which can be attributed to the hydrogen bond-induced intermolecular excited state proton transfer process. In the presence of Fe3+ or in an acidic condition (pH less than 4.0), both probes showed similar quenching of the emission and over 100 nm red-shifts of their emission maxima. The binding mode between the probes and Fe3+ has been found to be 1:1 based on Job’s plot. A highly sensitive and selective response in their absorption and emission towards Fe3+ over many other metal ions, including Cr3+ and Cu2+, was observed and may be the result of the ground state metal to ligand charge transfer effect from Fe3+ to quinoline ligands.

  2. Synthesis, molecular docking, antimicrobial, antioxidant and toxicity assessment of quinoline peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraj, Muthu; Gengan, Robert Moonsamy; Ranjan, Bibhuti; Muthusamy, Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    A series of quinoline based peptides were synthesized by a one-pot reaction through Ugi-four component condensation of lipoic acid, cyclohexyl isocyanide, aniline derivatives and 2-methoxy quinoline-3-carbaldehyde derivatives under microwave irradiation. The products were obtained in excellent yields and high purity. Solvent optimization and the effect of microwave irradiation with various powers were also observed. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by FTIR, NMR spectral data and elemental analysis. A total of eight peptides were subjected to antimicrobial, antioxidant and toxicity evaluation. Among them, four peptides showed potential towards antibacterial screening with Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans, Candida utilis and three peptides showed antioxidant test positive (DPPH). Besides, toxicity of all the peptides were evaluated by using brine shrimp and it was observed that four peptides showed mortality rate less than 50% up to 48h. Molecular docking studies revealed that the higher binding affinity of the two peptides toward DNA gyrase than ciprofloxacin based on Libdock score. The described chemistry represents a facile tool to synthesize complex heterocycles of pharmaceutical relevance in a highly efficient and one-pot fashion. The advantages of this method are its green approach, inexpensive solvent, shorter reaction times and excellent yields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Drug repurposing of novel quinoline acetohydrazide derivatives as potent COX-2 inhibitors and anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Chelli Sai; Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Siva Kumar, B.; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara

    2018-02-01

    Novel QuinolineAcetohydrazide (QAh) derivatives (9a-n) were firstly evaluated in silico to determine their anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer efficacy via the mechanisms of COX1 and COX2 inhibition, and NF-ĸB, HDAC and Human Topoisomerase I pathways respectively. In the studied set, the trifluoro substituted QAh derivatives: (E)-N'-(4-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazid and (E)-N'-(3-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazide are determined to be potential leads, indicated from their best docked scores, relative ligand efficiency, and significant structural attributes evaluated by ab initio simulations. The only setback being their partition co-efficient that retrieved a red flag in the evaluation of their Lipinski parameters. The experimental in vitro studies confirmed the significant enhancement as COX-2 inhibitors and appreciable enhancement in MTT assay of breast and skin cancer cell lines. Significantly, trifluoro substituent in the quinoline scaffold can be reasoned to note the excellent binding affinity to all the evaluated drug targets.

  4. New inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on SBA-15 molecular sieves involved in the quinolines synthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    López-Sanz, J.; Pérez-Mayoral, E.; Soriano, E.; Sturm, M.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 1 (2012), s. 97-103 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : mesoporous molecular sieves * heterogeneous catalysis * quinolines Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  5. B(HSO43: An efficient and recyclable catalyst for the preparation of substituted Friedländer quinoline synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghanezhad Seyyed Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substituted quinolines have been synthesized in the presence of catalytic amounts of boron sulfonic acid (BSA in solvent-free conditions. This methodology offers some advantages including high yield, short reaction time, low cost of the catalyst, green conditions by avoiding toxic solvents and recoverable catalyst.

  6. Ruthenium-catalysed synthesis of 2- and 3-substituted quinolines from anilines and 1,3-diols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Madsen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward synthesis of substituted quinolines is described by cyclocondensation of anilines with 1,3-diols. The reaction proceeds in mesitylene solution with catalytic amounts of RuCl3·xH 2O, PBu3 and MgBr2·OEt2. The transformation does not require any stoichiometric additives and only...

  7. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Mora, Víctor; Bagnarello, Vanessa; Martínez, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonieta; Vanegas, Juan Carlos; Apestegui, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biol6gica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB), were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae); Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae); Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae); Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae); Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae); Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae); Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae); Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae); Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae); Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae); Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae); Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae); Prunus annularis (Rosaceae); Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae); Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae); Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae); Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae) and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae). We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9 microg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  8. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  9. Mass anti-malarial administration in western Cambodia: a qualitative study of factors affecting coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Christopher; Tripura, Rupam; Nguon, Chea; Cheah, Phaikyeong; Davoeung, Chan; Heng, Chhouen; Dara, Lim; Sareth, Ma; Dondorp, Arjen; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Peto, Thomas J

    2017-05-19

    Mass anti-malarial administration has been proposed as a key component of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategy in the Greater Mekong sub-Region. Its effectiveness depends on high levels of coverage in the target population. This article explores the factors that influenced mass anti-malarial administration coverage within a clinical trial in Battambang Province, western Cambodia. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with villagers, in-depth interviews with study staff, trial drop-outs and refusers, and observations in the communities. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and translated from Khmer to English for qualitative content analysis using QSR NVivo. Malaria was an important health concern and villagers reported a demand for malaria treatment. This was in spite of a fall in incidence over the previous decade and a lack of familiarity with asymptomatic malaria. Participants generally understood the overall study aim and were familiar with study activities. Comprehension of the study rationale was however limited. After the first mass anti-malarial administration, seasonal health complaints that participants attributed to the anti-malarial as "side effects" contributed to a decrease of coverage in round two. Staff therefore adapted the community engagement approach, bringing to prominence local leaders in village meetings. This contributed to a subsequent increase in coverage. Future mass anti-malarial administration must consider seasonal disease patterns and the importance of local leaders taking prominent roles in community engagement. Further research is needed to investigate coverage in scenarios that more closely resemble implementation i.e. without participation incentives, blood sampling and free healthcare.

  10. Ameliorative antimalarial effects of the combination of rutin and swertiamarin on malarial parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Shitlani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To ameliorate the antimalarial activity via the combination of rutin (flavonoid and swertiamarin (glycoside. Methods: The antimalarial effects were assessed by in vitro and in vivo methodology. In vitro antiplasmodial activity was assessed by using Plasmodium falciparum cultured media and determined the IC 50 value of individual drugs and their combinations. In in vivo methodology, antimalarial effects of rutin, swertiamarin (200–280 mg/kg/day, p.o. and their combination in 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 ratios were investigated early and established malaria infections using Swiss albino mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Chloroquine phosphate (5 mg/kg/day, p.o. was used as the standard drug. Results: IC 50 values of the rutin and swertiamarin via in vitro study revealed (9.50 ± 0.29 µg/ mL and (8.17 ± 0.17 µg/mL respectively. Whereas, the combination in 1:1 ratio [IC50 of (5.51 ± 0.18 µg/mL] showed better antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum. In vivo results showed that rutin and swertiamarin had chemosuppressant effects in a dose-dependent manner, whereas, combination in 1:1 ratio possessed potential antimalarial activity similar to chloroquine phosphate. The drug interaction between rutin and swertiamarin revealed the synergistic effect on 1:1 ratio and additive effect on 1:2 and 2:1 ratios. Conclusions: The results of the in vitro and in vivo study clearly indicate that the combination (1:1 of rutin and swertiamarin showed potential antimalarial activity rather than an individual of each and their combinations 1:2 and 2:1.

  11. Anti-malarial treatment outcomes in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreyohannes, Eyob Alemayehu; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Seid, Mohammed Assen; Tegegn, Henok Getachew

    2017-07-03

    Ethiopia is among countries with a high malaria burden. There are several studies that assessed the efficacy of anti-malarial agents in the country and this systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to obtain stronger evidence on treatment outcomes of malaria from the existing literature in Ethiopia. A systematic literature search using the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement was conducted on studies from Pubmed, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect databases to identify published and unpublished literature. Comprehensive meta-analysis software was used to perform all meta-analyses. The Cochrane Q and the I 2 were used to evaluate heterogeneity of studies. Random effects model was used to combine studies showing heterogeneity of Cochrane Q p  50. Twenty-one studies were included in the final analysis with a total number of 3123 study participants. Treatment outcomes were assessed clinically and parasitologically using World Health Organization guidelines. Adequate clinical and parasitological response was used to assess treatment success at the 28th day. Overall, a significant high treatment success of 92.9% (95% CI 89.1-96.6), p Ethiopia, but associated with high rates of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, these ADRs were not serious enough to discontinue anti-malarial treatment. The results of this study suggest that the current anti-malarial medications are effective and safe; however, greater priority should be placed on the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs to achieve successful outcomes as resistance seems inevitable since cases of anti-malarial drug resistance have been reported from other areas of the world.

  12. Bioactive compounds fractionated from endophyte Streptomyces SUK 08 with promising ex-vivo antimalarial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraziah Mohamad Zin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine ex vivo antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of endophytic Streptomyces SUK 08 as well as the main core structure fractionated from its crude extract. Methods: The activities of SUK 08 crude extract were evaluated by using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase assay and synchronization test against rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei, instead of human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The cytotoxicity of the crude extract was determined by MTT assay. The crude extract was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrophotometry. Results: The ethyl acetate crude extract showed very promising antimalarial activity with IC50 of 1.25 mg/mL. The synchronization tests showed that ethyl acetate extraction could inhibit all stages of the Plasmodium life cycle, but it was most effective at the Plasmodium ring stage. On the basis of a MTT assay on Chang Liver cells, ethyl acetate and ethanol demonstrated IC50 values of >1.0 mg/mL. The IC50 of parasitemia at 5% and 30% for this extract was lower than chloroquine. Thin-layer chromatography, with 1: 9 ratio of ethyl acetate: hexane, was used to isolate several distinct compounds. Based on gas chromatography–mass spectrophotometry analysis, three core structures were identified as cyclohexane, butyl propyl ester, and 2,3-heptanedione. Structurally, these compounds were similar to currently available antimalarial drugs. Conclusions: The results suggest that compounds isolated from Streptomyces SUK 08 are viable antimalarial drug candidates that require further investigations. Keywords: Butyl–propyl–ester, Cyclohexane, 2,3-Heptanedione, Endophyte, Streptomyces, Antimalarial

  13. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misael Chinchilla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biológica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB, were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P. berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae; Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae; Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae; Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae; Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae; Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae; Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae; Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae; Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae; Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae; Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae; Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae; Prunus annularis (Rosaceae; Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae; Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanácea (Solanaceae; Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae; Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae. We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9μg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  14. Attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptotic process by verapamil and diltiazem against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like alterations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-04

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disease with complex pathophysiology. Recently, role of neuroinflammation and interplay between various other cellular cascades have been suggested to be involved in pathophysiology of Huntington disease. Involvement of calcium overload mediated oxidative damage and excitotoxicity have been suggested to play a central role in quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms. The present study has been carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effect of calcium channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) against quinolinic acid induced dysfunction in motor, biochemical and neuroinflammatory signaling in rats. Intrastriatal quinolinic acid administration leads to significant motor [locomotor (72% reduction), rotarod (55% reduction), balance beam walk performance] dysfunction coupled with the marked oxidative damage and increased neuroinflammatory markers [TNF-α (140%), IL-6 (115%), caspase-3(75%)] levels in striatum as compared to the sham treatment. Verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) drug treatment for 21days resulted in a significant improvement in the motor function (improvement in locomotor activity, rotarod and balance beam walk performance). Further, verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated oxidative damage, level of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α IL-6 and caspase-3) in quinolinic acid treated animals. Results of the present study demonstrate that protective effect of these calcium channel blockers (verapamil, diltiazem) might be due to their inhibitory action on different neuroinflammatory pathways against quinolinic acid induced Huntington disease like symptoms in rats. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Methanol-based pulping of Eucalyptus globulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilarranz, M.A.; Oliet, M.; Rodriguez, F.; Tijero, J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1999-06-01

    The dissolution of wood components using organosolv pulping was discussed. Solvents such as ethanol and methanol can provide more efficient utilization of the lignocellulosic feedstock, ease of bleachability, and lower capital production costs compared to the kraft process. In this study, the autocatalyzed pulping of Eucalyptus globulus wood in a methanol-water media was examined. The influence of pulping temperature, pulping time and methanol concentration on pulp properties were determined by a surface response method. One of the advantages of using methanol pulping of hardwoods compared to ethanol pulping is the low boiling point of methanol which makes its recovery easy from pulping black liquor by distillation. The price of methanol is also very low compared to other solvents. The optimum pulping conditions were found to be a cooking temperature of 185 degrees C, a cooking time of 110 minutes and a methanol concentration of 50 per cent. These conditions yielded a pulp with a low kappa number and a viscosity value of 110 mL/g. When ethanol pulping was used under the same conditions, the resulting pulp had a higher kappa number and a lower viscosity. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational Blindness from Chronic Methanol Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanicha Chuenkongkaew, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe three patients with occupational blindness from chronic methanol intoxication. Case presentation: Three patients who worked in the same industry of methylated spirit manufacture for more than 1 year developed bilateral visual loss from inhaled methanol intoxication. Ophthalmological, neurological examinations and blood methanol levels were undertaken. Two male and one female patients developed a sudden onset of bilateral blindness. Blood and urine methanol levels obtained from the male patients at 48 and 72 hours after their cessation to methanol exposure were negative. Those from the female patient at 9 hours after their cessation to methanol exposure were 73.78 mg/dl. Their final visual acuity was not improved after the treatment. Conclusion: Chronic methanol intoxication from inhalation is likely to produce ocular problems with mild systemic toxicity with severe ocular problems which eventually result in permanent blindness. The risk assessment of occupational health and safety should be seriously taken into account to avoid harmful effect of hazards in the workplace.

  18. Sorption phenomena of methanol on heat treated coal; Netsushori wo hodokoshita sekitan no methanol kyuchaku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, H.; Kaiho, M.; Yamada, O.; Soneda, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Makino, M. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Experiments were carried out to learn methanol sorption characteristics of heat-treated coal. When Taiheiyo coal is heat-treated at 125{degree}C, performed with a first methanol adsorption at 25{degree}C, and then desorption at 25{degree}C, a site with strong interaction with methanol and a site with relatively weak interaction are generated in test samples. A small amount of methanol remains in both sites. Then, when the methanol is desorbed at as low temperature as 70{degree}C, the methanol in the site with strong interaction remains as it has existed therein, but the methanol in the site with relatively weak interaction desorbs partially, hence the adsorption amount in a second adsorption at 25{degree}C increases. However, when desorption is performed at as high temperature as 125{degree}C, the methanol in the site with strong interaction also desorbs, resulting in increased adsorption heat in the second adsorption. The adsorption velocity drops, however. Existence of methanol in a site with strong interaction affects the adsorption velocity, but no effect is given by methanol in a site with weak interaction. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Radiation-chemical hydroxypropylation of methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silaev, M.M.; AFanus'ev, A.N.; Bugaenko, L.T.; Kalyazin, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    A new method has been developed for the synthesis of 1.4-butanediol based on the possibility discovered by the authors for radiationchemical hydroxypropylation of methanol in the alpha position by means of 2-propen-l-ol, i.e., addition of a CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 OH fragment to methanol. Cylindrical molybdenum-glass ampuls containing 0.8 cm 3 of a solution of 2-propen-l-ol in cp methanol were evacuated and then irradiated by 60 CO gamma-rays. The results show that 2-propen-l-ol can be used as a potentially new telogen for radiation telomerization

  20. Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

  1. SENYAWA AKTIF ANTIKANKER PAYUDARA DAN ANTIMALARIA DARI TUMBUHAN DADAP AYAM (ERHYTHRINA VALERIEGATA SECARA IN VITRO (Anti Breast-cancer and anti-malarial Active Compounds of Erithrina Variegata by in Vitro Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Herlina

    2012-03-01

    E. variegata used as medicinal folk of anti-cancer and anti-malarial, however haven’t reported yet of bioactive compounds. The purpose of this research was assayed an anti-cancer and anti-malarial compounds toward breast cancer cell-lines T47D and toward Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (chloroquine sensitive and K1 (chloroquine resistance in vitro from E. variegata. The research was extraction of methanol and fractionation from the leaves and stem bark of E. variegata by using guide-assay in vitro Sulphorhodamine B (SRB method and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Furthermore, by using the anti-cancer and anti-malarial activity to follow separation, the active fraction was separated by combination of column chromatography to yield three active compounds (1-3. The chemical structure of active compounds (1-3 were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidences and comparison with those previously reported and identified as terpenoid pentacyclic glycoside (1, flavonoid, erystagallin A (2 and steroid, (22E-5α,8α-epidioxyergosta-6,22-diene-3β-ol (3. The compound (1 showed anti-malarial activity in vitro against P. falciparum strain 3D7 and K1 with IC50 1.8 and  3.3  µg/mL, respectively.  The compounds (2-3 showed anti-cancer activity against of breast cancer cell-lines T47D with IC50 of 3.03and 3.2 µg/ml, respectively. This results strongly suggested that E. variegata is a promising sources of anti-cancer and anti-malarial agents.

  2. Approaches for introducing high molecular diversity in scaffolds: fast parallel synthesis of highly substituted 1H-quinolin-4-one libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Gorohovsky, Sofia; Levy, Amalia; Meir, Simcha; Shkoulev, Vladimir; Menashe, Naim; Greenwald, Moshe; Aizikovich, Alexander; Ofer, Dror; Byk, Gerardo; Gellerman, Garry

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a two steps strategy for the parallel synthesis of highly diversified quinolin-ones. In the first step we have combined and improved different synthetic methods for generating quinolin-4-ones bearing four different substitutions at specific positions using round bottomed flasks. The synthesis was assessed for a large number of substituted quinolin-4-ones. In the second step, the improved method was adapted to a parallel array synthesis using a 12 positions carrousel as demonstrated for the synthesis of 42-variable quinolin-4-ones. The first combinatorial library set 14(a-x) was obtained with a chemical purity of more than 95% without purification, the second library set 15(a-r), which included two synthetic steps, needed combinatorial purification using an innovative parallel purifier. The proposed approach contributes to a more extensive diversification of molecular scaffolds in general and provides access to highly substituted quinolinones in particular.

  3. Preparation, characterization and in vitro release kinetics of polyaspartamide-based conjugates containing antimalarial and anticancer agents for combination therapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderibigbe, BA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is treated by combination of two drugs in order to overcome drug resistance. Antimalarials have been found to be more effective by combining them with low doses of anticancer drugs. Polymer-drug conjugates containing aminoquinoline...

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of antimalarial activity of curcumin derivatives; Sintese e avaliacao da atividade antimalarica de compostos derivados da curcumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Patricia Ramos; Miguel, Fabio Balbino; Almeida, Mauro Vieira de; Couri, Mara Rubia Costa [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Quimica; Oliveira, Michael Eder de; Ferreira, Vanessa Viana; Guimaraes, Daniel Silqueira Martins; Lima, Aline Brito de; Barbosa, Camila de Souza; Oliveira, Mariana Amorim de; Almeida, Mauro Vieira de; Viana, Gustavo Henrique Ribeiro; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla, E-mail: varotti@ufsj.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; and others

    2014-05-15

    ne of the main challenges in the development of new antimalarial drugs is to achieve a viable lead candidate with good pharmacokinetic properties. Curcumin has a broad range of biological activities, including antimalarial activity. Herein, we report the antimalarial activity of six curcumin derivatives (6-12) and an initial analysis of their pharmacokinetic properties. Five compounds have demonstrated potent activity against the P. falciparum in vitro (IC{sub 50} values ranging from 1.7 to 15.2 μg mL{sup -1}), with moderate or low cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line. The substitution of the carbonyl group in 6 by a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone group (to afford 11) increases the Selective Index. These preliminary results indicate curcumin derivatives as potential antimalarial compounds. (author)

  5. Self-medication practices with antibiotics and antimalarials among Sudanese undergraduate university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Abdelmoneim I; Eltayeb, Idris B

    2007-07-01

    In many developing countries, up to 60-80% of health problems are self-medicated. To estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics and/or antimalarials and identify factors promoting such use among university students in Sudan. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed, using a pretested questionnaire on a sample of 1300 students selected from 5 universities in Khartoum State, Sudan. Eight hundred ninety-one (79.5%; 95% CI 77.0 to 81.8) students from the study population had used antibiotics or antimalarials without a prescription within 1-2 months prior to the study. Four hundred ninety (55%; 95% CI 51.7 to 58.3) of the respondents stated that they had used antibiotics, 39 (4.4%; 95% CI 3.2 to 6.0) had used antimalarials, and 362 (40.6%; 95% CI 37.4 to 43.9) had used both. Overall, self-medication with antibiotics or antimalarials was significantly more common among students 21 years of age or older compared with those 20 years of age or younger (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.09; p = 0.004) and among students attending private universities compared with those attending public universities (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.95; p = 0.028). Self-medication with antibiotics followed a similar pattern, which was significantly more common among students 21 years of age or older (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.81; p = 0.03) and private university respondents (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.02; p = 0.003). Self-medication with antimalarials was found to be significantly less common among females (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.97; p = 0.028) and higher among the 21 years or older age group (OR 1.84; 95% CI 1.42 to 2.40; p self-medication was the respondents' previous experiences with similar ailments. The main source of drugs was community pharmacies. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics/antimalarials among undergraduate university students in Khartoum State is high. Our findings highlight the need for planning interventions to promote the judicious use of

  6. The impact of mass transport and methanol crossover on the direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.; Taama, W. M.; Argyropoulos, P.; Sundmacher, K.

    The performance of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell based on a Nafion® solid polymer electrolyte membrane is reported. The cell utilises a porous Pt-Ru-carbon supported catalyst anode. The effect of cell temperature, air cathode pressure, methanol fuel flow rate and methanol concentration on the power performance of a small-scale (9 cm 2 area) cell is described. Data reported is analysed in terms of semi-empirical models for the effect of methanol crossover by diffusion on cathode potential and thus cell voltage. Mass transfer characteristics of the anode reaction are interpreted in terms of the influence of carbon dioxide gas evolution and methanol diffusion in the carbon cloth diffusion layer. Preliminary evaluation of reaction orders and anode polarisation agree with a previous suggested mechanism for methanol oxidation involving a rate limiting step of surface reaction between adsorbed CO and OH species.

  7. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrell, Megan; Gatakaa, Hellen; Phok, Sochea; Allen, Henrietta; Yeung, Shunmay; Chuor, Char Meng; Dysoley, Lek; Socheat, Duong; Spiers, Angus; White, Chris; Shewchuk, Tanya; Chavasse, Desmond; O'Connell, Kathryn A

    2011-10-31

    Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT). The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Most public outlets (85%) and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%), drug stores (14%), mobile providers (4%) and grocery stores (2%). Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61%) and private (42%) sectors. While data on the anti-malarial market shows favourable progress towards replacing

  8. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti-malarial

  9. Simplified Reversed Chloroquines To Overcome Malaria Resistance to Quinoline-Based Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsaru, Bornface; Burgess, Steven J; Morrill, Westin; Kelly, Jane X; Shomloo, Shawheen; Smilkstein, Martin J; Liebman, Katherine; Peyton, David H

    2017-05-01

    Building on our earlier work of attaching a chemosensitizer (reversal agent) to a known drug pharmacophore, we have now expanded the structure-activity relationship study to include simplified versions of the chemosensitizer. The change from two aromatic rings in this head group to a single ring does not appear to detrimentally affect the antimalarial activity of the compounds. Data from in vitro heme binding and β -hematin inhibition assays suggest that the single aromatic RCQ compounds retain activities against Plasmodium falciparum similar to those of CQ, although other mechanisms of action may be relevant to their activities. Copyright © 2017 Gunsaru et al.

  10. Iodine-Mediated Intramolecular Dehydrogenative Coupling: Synthesis of N-Alkylindolo[3,2-c]- and -[2,3-c]quinoline Iodides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvoikar, Prajesh S; Tilve, Santosh G

    2016-03-04

    An I2/TBHP-mediated intramolecular dehydrogenative coupling reaction is developed for the synthesis of a library of medicinally important 5,11-dialkylindolo[3,2-c]quinoline salts and 5,7-dimethylindolo[2,3-c]quinoline salts. The annulation reaction is followed by aromatization to yield tetracycles in good yield. This protocol is also demonstrated for the synthesis of the naturally occurring isocryptolepine in salt form.

  11. Implementation of a reference standard and proficiency testing programme by the World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Karen I

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN is a global collaboration to support the objective that anyone affected by malaria receives effective and safe drug treatment. The Pharmacology module aims to inform optimal anti-malarial drug selection. There is an urgent need to define the drug exposure - effect relationship for most anti-malarial drugs. Few anti-malarials have had their therapeutic blood concentration levels defined. One of the main challenges in assessing safety and efficacy data in relation to drug concentrations is the comparability of data generated from different laboratories. To explain differences in anti-malarial pharmacokinetics in studies with different measurement laboratories it is necessary to confirm the accuracy of the assay methods. This requires the establishment of an external quality assurance process to assure results that can be compared. This paper describes this process. Methods The pharmacology module of WWARN has established a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC programme consisting of two separate components: 1. A proficiency testing programme where blank human plasma spiked with certified reference material (CRM in different concentrations is sent out to participating bioanalytical laboratories. 2. A certified reference standard programme where accurately weighed amounts of certified anti-malarial reference standards, metabolites, and internal standards are sent to participating bioanalytical and in vitro laboratories. Conclusion The proficiency testing programme is designed as a cooperative effort to help participating laboratories assess their ability to carry out drug analysis, resolve any potential problem areas and to improve their results - and, in so doing, to improve the quality of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic data published and shared with WWARN. By utilizing the same source of standards for all laboratories, it is possible to minimize bias arising from poor

  12. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard Alan E; Dorsey Grant; Gupta Vinay; Rosenthal Philip J; Greenhouse Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary elec...

  13. Direct dimethyl ether synthesis from synthesis gas: The influence of methanol dehydration on methanol synthesis reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Dadgar, Farbod; Myrstad, Rune; Pfeifer, Peter; Holmen, Anders; Venvik, Hilde Johnsen

    2016-01-01

    Direct dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis from synthesis gas is studied with regard to potential effects of methanol dehydration on methanol formation and copper-based catalyst performance. For this, the influence of the operating conditions (space velocity, temperature, pressure, time-on-stream and syngas composition) on activity, selectivity and stability of the catalyst was studied and compared for methanol synthesis and direct DME synthesis. The advantage of the direct over the two-step DME s...

  14. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; LaConti, A.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power application in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton-exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt-catalyzed fuel and air/O 2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 °C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm 2 current density and an operating temperature of 90 °C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  15. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T. B.; Lerner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the large-scale production and use of methanol as a substitute for the diminishing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Describes the manufacturing process and advantages of the versatile fuel. (JR)

  16. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  17. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  18. World scale fuel methanol facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapor, M.C.; Hederman, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the Administration announced a clean alternative fuels initiative, industry and government agencies' analyses of the economics of methanol as an alternative motor vehicle fuel have accelerated. In the short run, methanol appears attractive because excess production capacity currently has depressed methanol prices and marginal costs of production are lower than other fuels (current excess capacity). In the long run, however, full costs are the more relevant. To lower average production costs, U.S. policy interest has focused on production from a world-scale, 10,000 tons per day (tpd) methanol plant facility on a foreign site. This paper reviews several important site and financial considerations in a framework to evaluate large scale plant development. These considerations include: risks associated with a large process plant; supply economics of foreign sites; and investment climates and financial incentives for foreign investment at foreign sites

  19. Phytochemical screening and antiproliferative effects of methanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary Phytochemical screening. Thin layer chromatographic profile (TLC) of methanol crude extract and antiproliferative studies were carried out in this research. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of carbohydrate, glycoside, anthraquinone, steroid, triterpenes, saponin, tannins, flavonoids and alkaloid.

  20. Methanol gasoline blend from petroleum coke sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzer, David [Consulting Chemical Engineer (United States); Wallsgrove, Chris [Process Engineering Manager (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In Alberta, a large amount of petroleum coke is produced as a byproduct from processes relating to bitumen upgrading and refining. Unfortunately, there is little to no market for this product in the province. This presentation addresses concerns relating to the concept of converting the otherwise wasted petcoke into methanol and using it as a blending component in gasoline. The presentation tackles issues relating to environmental impact, economics, renewability, toxicity, safety, and vehicle design by analyzing and comparing the proposed methanol/gasoline (M-10) to that of an ethanol/gasoline (E-10). The presentation covers analysis of the CO2 emissions, an analysis of the finances, and a number of scenarios involving the improper use or accidental spillage of M-10. Through the comparison of methanol/gasoline and ethanol/gasoline, the presentation demonstrated that converting the petcoke byproduct into methanol for use as a gasoline blend is a viable option.

  1. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar, E-mail: gude@cee.msstate.edu

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  2. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions

  3. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  4. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

    2008-05-12

    In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  5. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-04-24

    In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  6. Integrated anode structure for passive direct methanol fuel cells with neat methanol operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Peng; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Ting; Zheng, Junwei; Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    A microporous titanium plate based integrated anode structure (Ti-IAS) suitable for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) fueled with neat methanol is reported. This anode structure incorporates a porous titanium plate as a methanol mass transfer barrier and current collector, pervaporation film for passively vaporizing methanol, vaporous methanol cavity for evenly distributing fuel, and channels for carbon dioxide venting. With the effective control of methanol delivery rate, the Ti-IAS based DMFC allows the direct use of neat methanol as the fuel source. In the meantime, the required water for methanol-oxidation reaction at the anode can also be fully recovered from the cathode with the help of the highly hydrophobic microporous layer in the cathode. DMFCs incorporating this new anode structure exhibit a power density as high as 40 mW cm-2 and a high volumetric energy density of 489 Wh L-1 operating with neat methanol and at 25 °C. Importantly, no obvious performance degradation of the passive DMFC system is observed after more than 90 h of continuous operation. The experimental results reveal that the compact DMFC based on the Ti-IAS exhibits a substantial potential as power sources for portable applications.

  7. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other usef...

  8. METHANOL PRODUCTION BY BI-REFORMING

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno A.V. Santos; José M. Loureiro; Ana M. Ribeiro; Alírio E. Rodrigues; Adelino F. Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Population growth and emerging economies have as consequence increasing energy demands associated with fossil fuel depletion and environmental impacts. A new philosophy emerges: the concept of green chemistry. Carbon dioxide, a well-known greenhouse gas, is a source for the production of fine chemicals and fuels such as methanol. It appears in abundance due to anthropogenic human activities. Nowadays, methanol is typically produced from synthesis-gas which requires conventional fossil fuels; ...

  9. Urine methanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackus, M; Van de Loo, A J A E; Korte-Bouws, G A H; Van Neer, R H P; Wang, X; Nguyen, T T; Brookhuis, K A; Garssen, J; Verster, J C

    2017-03-01

    Congeners are substances, other than ethanol, that are produced during fermentation. Previous research found that the consumption of congener-rich drinks contributes to the severity of alcohol hangover. Methanol is such a congener that has been related to alcohol hangover. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urine methanol concentration and alcohol hangover severity. N = 36 healthy social drinkers (22 females, 14 males), aged 18-30 years old, participated in a naturalistic study, comprising a hangover day and a control day (no alcohol consumed the previous day). N = 18 of them had regular hangovers (the hangover group), while the other N = 18 claimed to be hangover-immune (hangover-immune group). Overall hangover severity was assessed, and that of 23 individual hangover symptoms. Urine methanol concentrations on the hangover and control days were compared, and correlated to hangover (symptom) severity. Urine methanol concentration was significantly higher on hangover days compared to control days (p = 0.0001). No significant differences in urine methanol concentration were found between the hangover group and hangover-immune group. However, urine methanol concentration did not significantly correlate with overall hangover severity (r = -0.011, p = 0.948), nor with any of the individual hangover symptoms. These findings were observed also when analyzing the data separately for the hangover-immune group. In the hangover group, a significant correlation with urine methanol concentration was found only with vomiting (r = 0.489, p = 0.037). No significant correlation was observed between urine methanol concentration and hangover severity, nor with individual core hangover symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. California Methanol Assessment; Volume II, Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    O'Toole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    A joint effort by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering has brought together sponsors from both the public and private sectors for an analysis of the prospects for methanol use as a fuel in California, primarily for the transportation and stationary application sectors. Increasing optimism in 1982 for a slower rise in oil prices and a more realistic understanding of the costs of methanol production have had a ne...

  11. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Battery Replacement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    electrode assembly” Journal of Power Sources, 177, (2), pp 386-392 (2008) 5. Smotkin, E. S., “Proton spillover promoted non- Faradaic reactions at...Eugene S. Smotkin, “The effect of sorbed methanol, current and temperature on multi-component transport in Nafion based direct methanol fuel cells” J...diffusion layer. In the process of hot-pressing the pressure at which the catalyzed diffusion layer is subjected is not very high or it would

  12. Identification of a novel class of quinoline-oxadiazole hybrids as anti-tuberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Puneet P; Degani, Mariam S; Raju, Archana; Anantram, Aarti; Seervi, Madhav; Sathaye, Sadhana; Ray, Muktikanta; Rajan, M G R

    2016-01-15

    A series of novel quinoline-oxadiazole hybrid compounds was designed based on stepwise rational modification of the lead molecules reported previously, in order to enhance bioactivity and improve druglikeness. The hybrid compounds synthesized were screened for biological activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and for cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell line. Several of the hits exhibited good to excellent anti-tuberculosis activity and selectivity, especially compounds 12m, 12o and 12p, showed minimum inhibitory concentration values500. The results of this study open up a promising avenue that may lead to the discovery of a new class of anti-tuberculosis agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The discovery of quinoline based single-ligand human H1and H3receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopiou, Panayiotis A; Ancliff, Rachael A; Gore, Paul M; Hancock, Ashley P; Hodgson, Simon T; Holmes, Duncan S; Keeling, Steven P; Looker, Brian E; Parr, Nigel A; Rowedder, James E; Slack, Robert J

    2016-12-15

    A novel series of potent quinoline-based human H 1 and H 3 bivalent histamine receptor antagonists, suitable for intranasal administration for the potential treatment of allergic rhinitis associated nasal congestion, were identified. Compound 18b had slightly lower H 1 potency (pA 2 8.8 vs 9.7 for the clinical goldstandard azelastine), and H 3 potency (pK i 9.1vs 6.8 for azelastine), better selectivity over α 1A , α 1B and hERG, similar duration of action, making 18b a good back-up compound to our previous candidate, but with a more desirable profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A fluorescence turn-on chemosensor for hydrogen sulfate anion based on quinoline and naphthalimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zaoli; Yin, Kai; Yu, Zhu; Chen, Mengxue; Li, Yan; Ren, Jun

    2016-12-01

    A new fluorescence turn-on chemosensor 1 based on quinoline and naphthalimide was prepared and its anion sensing toward various anions behavior was explored in this paper. Sensor 1 exhibited a highly selective fluorescent response toward HSO4- with an 8-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement in the presence of 10 equiv. of HSO4- in DMSO-H2O (1/1, v/v) solution. The sensor also displayed high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfate and the detection limit was calculated to be 7.79 × 10- 7 M. The sensing mechanism has been suggested to proceed via a hydrolysis process of the Schiff base group. The hydrolysis product has been isolated and further identified by 1H NMR and MS.

  15. Methyl(phenylbis(quinoline-2-carboxylato-κ2N,Otin(IV monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Vafaee

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The SnIV atom in each of the two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Sn(CH3(C6H5(C10H6NO22]·H2O, is N,O-chelated by two quinoline-2-carboxylate ions; the dative Sn—N bonds are significantly longer than the covalent Sn—O bonds. The two O and two N atoms comprise a trapezoid, and the diorganotin skeleton is bent over the longer N—N edge [C—Sn—C = 144.2 (1 and 144.5 (1° in the two independent molecules]. The uncoordinated water molecules serve to connect the skew-trapezoidal bipyramidal tin-bearing molecules, generating a linear chain motif running along the ac diagonal. The crystal studied was a non-merohedral twin having a minor component of 33.2 (1%.

  16. Photophysical Model of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline: Internal Conversion and Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junghwa; Joo, Taiha [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Photophysics of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) has been in controversy, in particular, on the nature of the electronic states before and after the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), even though the dynamics and mechanism of the ESIPT have been well established. We report highly time resolved fluorescence spectra over the full emission frequency regions of the enol and keto isomers and the anisotropy in time domain to determine the accurate rates of the population decay, spectral relaxation and anisotropy decay of the keto isomer. We have shown that the ∼300 fs component observed frequently in ESIPT dynamics arises from the S{sub 2}→S{sub 1} internal conversion in the reaction product keto isomer and that the ESIPT occurs from the enol isomer in S{sub 1} state to the keto isomer in S{sub 2} state.

  17. Quinoline-substituted Zinc(II) phthalocyanine for the dual detection of ferric and zinc ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ankush [Lyallpur Khalsa College of Engineering, Jalandhar (India); Kim, A Rong [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Sub; Na, Kun [The Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Myung Seok [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong S. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Here we present the synthesis and properties of quinoline-substituted zinc(II) phthalocyanine, Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ]. Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ] can function as a highly selective chemosensor against Fe{sup 3+} and Zn{sup 2+} ions, exhibiting efficient fluorescence quenching and enhancement, respectively. Various characterization techniques were employed to investigate the intermolecular interactions of Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ] with metal ions. A double-electron exchange and a forbidden photoinduced electron transfer behavior in Zn[Pc(O-QN){sub 4} ] were attributed to such opposite responses. Furthermore, by taking advantage of selectivity, we successfully employed Zn[Pc(O-QN)-4 ] to stain and record confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Chang liver cells in the presence of metal ions.

  18. Quinoline containing acetyl hydrazone: An easily accessible switch-on optical chemosensor for Zn2 +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Na; Mao, Pan-Dong; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Xiao-Lei; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    A simple chemosensor, namely, N-((quinolin-8-yl)methylene)acetohydrazide (1) was synthesized and used as an off-on fluorescence sensor, which exhibits high selectivity toward Zn2 + in aqueous media. The probe has large Stokes shift of > 200 nm, and its detection limit for Zn2 + is 89.3 nM. The binding process was confirmed through UV-vis absorption analysis, fluorescence measurements, mass spectroscopy study, 1H NMR spectra and density functional theory calculation. The crystal structures of Zn2 +, Ni2 +, and Cu2 + complexes based on 1 were determined through X-ray crystallographic analysis. The fluorescent probe was then applied to monitor intracellular Zn2 + in HeLa cells.

  19. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowska-Janusik, M. [Solid State Department, Institute of Physics, WSP Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, Czestochowa PL42201 (Poland); Gondek, E. [Institute of Physics, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Podchorazych 1, 30-084 (Poland); Kityk, I.V. [Department of Biology and Biophysics, Technical University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 36, Czestochowa PL-42210 (Poland)]. E-mail: i.kityk@wsp.czest.pl; WisIa, J. [Departament of Chemistry, Hugon Kollataj Agricultural University, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Sanetra, J. [Institute of Physics, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Podchorazych 1, 30-084 (Poland); Danel, A. [Department of Chemistry, Hugon Kollataj Agricultural University, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2004-11-15

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 {mu}m varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities.

  20. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowska-Janusik, M.; Gondek, E.; Kityk, I.V.; WisIa, J.; Sanetra, J.; Danel, A.

    2004-01-01

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 μm varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities