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Sample records for antimalarial quinoline methanols

  1. Design and Synthesis of Some New Quinoline Based 1,2,3-Triazoles as Antimicrobial and Antimalarial Agents

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    Parthasaradhi Y.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 6-bromo-2-chloro-3-(4-phenyl-[1,2,3]triazol-1-ylmethyl-quinoline and its derivatives (5a-j were synthesized in good yields from the intermediates (6-bromo-2-chloro-quinolin-3-yl-methanol (2, methanesulfonic acid (6-bromo-2-chloroquinolin-3-ylmethyl methanesulfonate (3 and 3-azidomethyl-6-bromo-2-chloro-quinoline (4. The synthetic route leading to the title compounds is commenced from commercially available 6-bromo-2-chloro-quinolin-3-carbaldehyde (1. The chemical structures of the newly synthesized compounds were elucidated by their IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectral data and elemental analysis. Further, all the target compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms and antimalarial activity towards P. falciparum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.692 

  2. Differences in anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline enantiomers and investigation of the presumed underlying mechanism of action

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    Mullié Catherine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better anti-malarial efficiency and lower neurotoxicity have been reported for mefloquine (MQ (+- enantiomer. However, the importance of stereoselectivity remains poorly understood as the anti-malarial activity of pure enantiomer MQ analogues has never been described. Building on these observations, a series of enantiopure 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives has previously been synthesized to optimize the efficiency and reduce possible adverse effects. Their in vitro activity on Plasmodium falciparum W2 and 3D7 strains is reported here along with their inhibition of β-haematin formation and peroxidative degradation of haemin, two possible mechanisms of action of anti-malarial drugs. Results The (S-enantiomers of this series of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives were found to be at least as effective as both chloroquine (CQ and MQ. The derivative with a 5-carbon side-chain length was the more efficient on both P. falciparum strains. (R -enantiomers displayed an activity decreased by 2 to 15-fold as compared to their (S counterparts. The inhibition of β-haematin formation was significantly stronger with all tested compounds than with MQ, irrespective of the stereochemistry. Similarly, the inhibition of haemin peroxidation was significantly higher for both (S and (R-enantiomers of derivatives with a side-chain length of five or six carbons than for MQ and CQ. Conclusions The prominence of stereochemistry in the anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives is confirmed. The inhibition of β-haematin formation and haemin peroxidation can be put forward as presumed mechanisms of action but do not account for the stereoselectivity of action witnessed in vitro.

  3. New quinoline derivatives demonstrate a promising antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and Plasmodium berghei in vivo.

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    Soares, Roberta Reis; da Silva, José Marcio Fernandes; Carlos, Bianca Cecheto; da Fonseca, Camila Campos; de Souza, Laila Salomé Araújo; Lopes, Fernanda Valério; de Paula Dias, Rafael Mafra; Moreira, Paulo Otávio Lourenço; Abramo, Clarice; Viana, Gustavo Henrique Ribeiro; de Pila Varotti, Fernando; da Silva, Adilson David; Scopel, Kézia Katiani Gorza

    2015-06-01

    Malaria continues to be an important public health problem in the world. Nowadays, the widespread parasite resistance to many drugs used in antimalarial therapy has made the effective treatment of cases and control of the disease a constant challenge. Therefore, the discovery of new molecules with good antimalarial activity and tolerance to human use can be really important in the further treatment of the disease. In this study we have investigated the antiplasmodial activity of 10 synthetic compounds derived from quinoline, five of them combined to sulfonamide and five to the hydrazine or hydrazide group. The compounds were evaluated according to their cytotoxicity against HepG2 and HeLa cell lines, their antimalarial activity against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains and, finally, their schizonticide blood action in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65. The compounds exhibited no cytotoxic action in HepG2 and HeLa cell lines when tested up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. In addition, the hydrazine or hydrazide derivative compounds were less cytotoxic against cell lines and more active against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains, showing high SI (>1000 when SI was calculated using the CC50 from the 3D7 strain as reference). When tested in vivo, the hydrazine derivative 1f compound showed activity against the development of blood parasites similar to that observed with CQ, the reference drug. Interestingly, the 1f compound demonstrated the best LipE value (4.84) among all those tested in vivo. Considering the in vitro and in vivo activities of the compounds studied here and the LipE values, we believe the 1f compound to be the most promising molecule for further studies in antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:25920564

  4. Bromido(quinolin-8-ol-κ2N,O(quinolin-8-olato-κ2N,Ozinc(II methanol monosolvate

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    Seik Weng Ng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [ZnBr(C9H6NO(C9H7NO]·CH3OH, has its metal atom N,O-chelated by a neutral and a deprotonated 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand. The hydroxy unit of the neutral ligand is a hydrogen-bond donor to the methanol O atom and the alkoxy O atom of the monoanionic ligand is a hydrogen-bond acceptor to the methanol O atom. In the crystal, adjacent molecules are linked by these two hydrogen bonds, generating a chain running along the a axis.

  5. Chlorido(8-hydroxyquinoline-κ2N,O(quinolin-8-olato-κ2N,Ozinc methanol monosolvate

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    Ezzatollah Najafi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Zn(C9H6NOCl(C9H7NO]·CH3OH, the ZnII ion is N,O-chelated by both a neutral and a deprotonated quinolin-8-ol ligand, with a chloride ligand in the apical site completing the square-pyramidal coordination geometry. The ZnII ion is displaced by 0.586 Å in the direction of the chloride ligand from the atoms forming the square plane. In the crystal, the components are linked by intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating chains along the b axis.

  6. Bis(μ-quinoline-2-carboxylato-κ3N,O:O;κ3O:N,O-bis[(acetato-κ2O,O′(methanol-κOlead(II

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    Gholamhossein Mohammadnezhad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The dinuclear title compound, [Pb2(C10H6NO22(CH3COO2(CH3OH2], lies across an inversion center. The methanol-coordinated PbII atom is chelated by the acetate anion as well as by the quinoline-2-carboxylate anion. One O atom of the quinoline-2-carboxylate anion bridges two symmetry-related PbII atoms, forming the dinuclear compound. Aside from the six atoms connected to the PbII atom by regular coordination bonds, the structure features a long Pb...O interaction [3.145 (3 Å] that gives rise to a distorted Ψ-square-antiprismatic geometry at the metal center. The H atom of the methanol is hydrogen bonded to an O atom of the acetate.

  7. Effect of antimalarial drugs on stimulation and interleukin 2 production of human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Svenson, M; Theander, T G;

    1987-01-01

    Effect of pyrimethamine, an antimalarial antifolate, and of mefloquine, chloroquine, and quinine, which belong to the quinoline group of antimalarials, on proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production of human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. Pyrimethamine at concentrations above therapeutic...... action on human mononuclear cells of the various antimalarial drugs and the potential adverse effects of antimalarial chemotherapy are discussed....... at concentrations twice as high as those required to suppress lymphocyte proliferation. Addition of exogenous IL-2 only partially reversed the suppressive effect on lymphocyte proliferation. Delayed addition of the quinolines decreased their suppressive effect, but not completely. The mechanisms of...

  8. Quinoline: a promising antitubercular target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keri, Rangappa S; Patil, Siddappa A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global public health problem in recent years. TB originated mainly from various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a highly infectious and chronic disease with high infection rate since ancient times. Since the last 50 years, the same long-duration, multidrug treatment plan is being followed for the treatment of tuberculosis. Due to the development of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is a need for new therapeutic strategies to combat M. tuberculosis. Subsequently, there is an urgent need for the development of new drug molecules with newer targets and with an alternative mechanism of action. Among hetrocyclic compounds, quinoline compounds are important privileged structure in medicinal chemistry, are widely used as "parental" compounds to synthesize molecules with medical benefits, especially with anti-malarial and anti-microbial activities. Certain, quinoline-based compounds, also show effective anti-TB activity. This broad spectrum of biological and biochemical activities has been further facilitated by the synthetic versatility of quinoline, which allows the generation of a large number of structurally diverse derivatives. To pave the way for future research, there is a need to collect the latest information in this promising area. In the present review, we have collated published reports on this versatile core to provide an insight so that its full therapeutic potential can be utilized for the treatment tuberculosis. It is hoped that, this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic quinoline-based anti-TB drugs. PMID:25458785

  9. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  10. Antimalarial activity of extracts of Malaysian medicinal plants.

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    Najib Nik A Rahman, N; Furuta, T; Kojima, S; Takane, K; Ali Mohd, M

    1999-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that Malaysian medicinal plants, Piper sarmentosum, Andrographis paniculata and Tinospora crispa produced considerable antimalarial effects. Chloroform extract in vitro did show better effect than the methanol extract. The chloroform extract showed complete parasite growth inhibition as low as 0.05 mg/ml drug dose within 24 h incubation period (Andrographis paniculata) as compared to methanol extract of drug dose of 2.5 mg/ml but under incubation time of 48 h of the same plant spesies. In vivo activity of Andrographis paniculata also demonstrated higher antimalarial effect than other two plant species. PMID:10363840

  11. On peroxide antimalarials

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    IGOR OPSENICA

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Several dicyclohexylidene tetraoxanes were prepared in order to gain a further insight into structure–activity relationship of this kind of antimalarials. The tetraoxanes 2–5, obtained as a cis/trans mixture, showed pronounced antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine susceptible D6, chloroquine resistant W2 and multidrug-resistant TM91C235 (Thailand strains. They have better than or similar activity to the corresponding desmethyl dicyclohexylidene derivatives. Two chimeric endoperoxides with superior antimalarial activity to the natural product ascaridole were also synthesized.

  12. Preliminary assessment of medicinal plants used as antimalarials in the southeastern Venezuelan Amazon

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    Caraballo Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen species of medicinal plants used in the treatment of malaria in Bolívar State, Venezuela were recorded and they belonged to Compositae, Meliaceae, Anacardiaceae, Bixaceae, Boraginaceae, Caricaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Leguminosae, Myrtaceae, Phytolaccaceae, Plantaginaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae and Verbenaceae families. Antimalarial plant activities have been linked to a range of compounds including anthroquinones, berberine, flavonoids, limonoids, naphthquinones, sesquiterpenes, quassinoids, indol and quinoline alkaloids.

  13. Cajachalcone: An Antimalarial Compound from Cajanus cajan Leaf Extract

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    E. O. Ajaiyeoba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cajanus cajan L, a member of the family Fabaceae, was identified from the Nigerian antimalarial ethnobotany as possessing antimalarial properties. The bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude methanol extract of C. cajan leaves was done in vitro using the multiresistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1 in the parasite lactate dehydrogenase assay. Isolation of compound was achieved by a combination of chromatographic techniques, while the structure of the compound was elucidated by spectroscopy. This led to the identification of a cajachalcone, 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4-methoxy chalcone, as the biologically active constituent from the ethyl acetate fraction. Cajachalcone had an IC50 value of 2.0 μg/mL (7.4 μM and could be a lead for anti-malarial drug discovery.

  14. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, a...

  15. Methyl 3-(Quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate

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    Roumaissa Belguedj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel compound, methyl 3-(quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate (2 has been synthesized by cycloaddition reaction of 1-(quinolin-2-ylmethylpyridinium ylide (1 with methyl propiolate in presence of sodium hydride in THF. The structure of this compound was established by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and MS data

  16. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  17. Antimalarial Activity of Azadipeptide Nitriles

    OpenAIRE

    Löser, Reik; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Frizler, Maxim; Gütschow, Michael; Andrews, Katherine T.

    2009-01-01

    Azadipeptide nitriles – novel cysteine protease inhibitors – display structure-dependent antimalarial activity against both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant lines of cultured Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites. Inhibition of parasite’s haemoglobin-degrading cysteine proteases was also investigated, revealing the azadipeptide nitriles as potent inhibitors of falcipain-2 and -3. A correlation between the cysteine protease-inhibiting activity and the antimalarial potential of...

  18. Amazonian Plant Natural Products: Perspectives for Discovery of New Antimalarial Drug Leads

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    Lucio H. Freitas-Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria parasites are now resistant, or showing signs of resistance, to most drugs used in therapy. Novel chemical entities that exhibit new mechanisms of antiplasmodial action are needed. New antimalarials that block transmission of Plasmodium spp. from humans to Anopheles mosquito vectors are key to malaria eradication efforts. Although P. vivax causes a considerable number of malaria cases, its importance has for long been neglected. Vivax malaria can cause severe manifestations and death; hence there is a need for P. vivax-directed research. Plants used in traditional medicine, namely Artemisia annua and Cinchona spp. are the sources of the antimalarial natural products artemisinin and quinine, respectively. Based on these compounds, semi-synthetic artemisinin-derivatives and synthetic quinoline antimalarials have been developed and are the most important drugs in the current therapeutic arsenal for combating malaria. In the Amazon region, where P. vivax predominates, there is a local tradition of using plant-derived preparations to treat malaria. Here, we review the current P. falciparum and P. vivax drug-sensitivity assays, focusing on challenges and perspectives of drug discovery for P. vivax, including tests against hypnozoites. We also present the latest findings of our group and others on the antiplasmodial and antimalarial chemical components from Amazonian plants that may be potential drug leads against malaria.

  19. Complex polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein 2 gene and its contribution to antimalarial response.

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    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Osório, Nuno S; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Franzén, Oscar; Dahlstrom, Sabina; Lum, J Koji; Nosten, Francois; Gil, José Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has the capacity to escape the actions of essentially all antimalarial drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins are known to cause multidrug resistance in a large range of organisms, including the Apicomplexa parasites. P. falciparum genome analysis has revealed two genes coding for the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) type of ABC transporters: Pfmrp1, previously associated with decreased parasite drug susceptibility, and the poorly studied Pfmrp2. The role of Pfmrp2 polymorphisms in modulating sensitivity to antimalarial drugs has not been established. We herein report a comprehensive account of the Pfmrp2 genetic variability in 46 isolates from Thailand. A notably high frequency of 2.8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/kb was identified for this gene, including some novel SNPs. Additionally, we found that Pfmrp2 harbors a significant number of microindels, some previously not reported. We also investigated the potential association of the identified Pfmrp2 polymorphisms with altered in vitro susceptibility to several antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapy and with parasite clearance time. Association analysis suggested Pfmrp2 polymorphisms modulate the parasite's in vitro response to quinoline antimalarials, including chloroquine, piperaquine, and mefloquine, and association with in vivo parasite clearance. In conclusion, our study reveals that the Pfmrp2 gene is the most diverse ABC transporter known in P. falciparum with a potential role in antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:25267670

  20. Antimalarial activity of extracts and alkaloids isolated from six plants used in traditional medicine in Mali and Sao Tome.

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    Ancolio, C; Azas, N; Mahiou, V; Ollivier, E; Di Giorgio, C; Keita, A; Timon-David, P; Balansard, G

    2002-11-01

    Methanol and chloroform extracts were prepared from various parts of four plants collected in Mali: Guiera senegalensis (Gmel.) Combretaceae, Feretia apodanthera (Del.) Rubiaceae, Combretum micranthum (Don.) Combretaceae, Securidaca longepedunculata (Fres.) Polygalaceae and two plants -collected in Sao Tome: Pycnanthus angolensis (Welw.) Myristicaceae and Morinda citrifolia (Benth.) Rubiaceae were assessed for their in vitro antimalarial activity and their cytotoxic effects on human monocytes (THP1 cells) by flow cytometry. The methanol extract of leaves of Feretia apodanthera and the chloroform extract of roots of Guiera senegalensis exhibited a pronounced antimalarial activity. Two alkaloids isolated from the active extract of Guiera senegalensis, harman and tetrahydroharman, showed antimalarial activity (IC(50) lower than 4 microg/mL) and displayed low toxicity against THP1. Moreover, the decrease of THP1 cells in S phase of the cell cycle, after treatment with harman and tetrahydroharman, was probably due to an inhibition of total protein synthesis. PMID:12410545

  1. Discovery of Novel Liver-Stage Antimalarials through Quantum Similarity.

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    David J Sullivan

    Full Text Available Without quantum theory any understanding of molecular interactions is incomplete. In principal, chemistry, and even biology, can be fully derived from non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In practice, conventional quantum chemical calculations are computationally too intensive and time consuming to be useful for drug discovery on more than a limited basis. A previously described, original, quantum-based computational process for drug discovery and design bridges this gap between theory and practice, and allows the application of quantum methods to large-scale in silico identification of active compounds. Here, we show the results of this quantum-similarity approach applied to the discovery of novel liver-stage antimalarials. Testing of only five of the model-predicted compounds in vitro and in vivo hepatic stage drug inhibition assays with P. berghei identified four novel chemical structures representing three separate quantum classes of liver-stage antimalarials. All four compounds inhibited liver-stage Plasmodium as a single oral dose in the quantitative PCR mouse liver-stage sporozoites-challenge model. One of the newly identified compounds, cethromycin [ABT-773], a macrolide-quinoline hybrid, is a drug with an extensive (over 5,000 people safety profile warranting its exploitation as a new weapon for the current effort of malaria eradication. The results of our molecular modeling exceed current state-of-the-art computational methods. Drug discovery through quantum similarity is data-driven, agnostic to any particular target or disease process that can evaluate multiple phenotypic, target-specific, or co-crystal structural data. This allows the incorporation of additional pharmacological requirements, as well as rapid exploration of novel chemical spaces for therapeutic applications.

  2. Antimicrobial and antimalarial properties of medicinal plants used by the indigenous tribes of Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India.

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    Chander, M Punnam; Pillai, C R; Sunish, I P; Vijayachari, P

    2016-07-01

    In this study, methanol extracts of six medicinal plants (Alstonia macrophylla, Claoxylon indicum, Dillenia andamanica, Jasminum syringifolium, Miliusia andamanica and Pedilanthus tithymaloides) traditionally used by Nicobarese tribes of Andaman and Nicobar Islands were studied for antimicrobial and antimalarial activities as well as preliminary photochemical analysis. Plants were collected from Car Nicobar of Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the ethnobotanical data were gathered from traditional healers who inhabit the study area. The methanol extracts were obtained by cold percolation method and the antimicrobial activity was found using agar well diffusion method. Among the plants tested, J. syringifolium, D. andamanica, C. indicum were most active. The antimalarial activity was evaluated against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive MRC-2 isolate. The crude extract of M. andamanica showed excellent antimalarial activity followed by extracts of P. tithymaloides, J. syringifolium and D. andamanica. The chemical injury to erythrocytes was also carried out and it showed that, there were no morphological changes in erythrocytes by the methanol crude extracts. The in vitro antimicrobial and antimalarial activity might be due to the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, sterols, tannins and saponins in the methanol extracts of tested plants. PMID:27174207

  3. Cannizzaro reaction of 2-chloro-3-formylquinolines and its synthetic utility for 2-acetylfuro[2,3-]quinolines: The alkaloid analogues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devadoss Karthik Kumar; Rajakandhan Shankar; Subramaniam Parameswaran Rajendran

    2012-09-01

    Cannizzaro reaction of 2-chloro-3-formylquinolines was investigated under two different conditions. Under both conditions, redox and methoxylation proceeded simultaneously and gave 2-methoxy- 3-formylquinolines, 2-methoxyquinolin-3-yl-methanols and 2-methoxyquinoline-3-carboxylic acids. The synthesized 2-methoxy-3-formylquinolines were then condensed with acetone in the presence of sulphuric acid to give 4-(2-methoxy-quinolin-3-yl)-but-3-en-2-ones which in turn were bromocyclized and dehydrobrominated to get 2-acetylfuro[2,3-]quinolines.

  4. EVALUATION OF NEPETA LEAVIGATA, NEPETA KURRAMENSIS AND RHYNCHOSIA RENIFORMIS ON ANTIMALARIAL AND ANTILEISHMANIAL ACTIVITIES

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    Memoona A, Amir MK, Sultan A, Razia P, Sumera P, Lal M, Nisar Ahmed*

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological investigation of methanolic extracts and different fractions of the Nepeta leavigata, Nepeta kurramensis and Rhynchosia reniformis were designed to assess the antimalarial and antileishmanial screening of medicinal plants for development of drugs. Materials and Methods: The shade-dried whole plant material of Nepeta leavigata was soaked in methanol for 10 days. The powdered drug was extracted with 80 % methanol three times and filtered at room temperature. The filtrate was evaporated in rotary to get a dark-greenish residue (extract, which was further suspended in water and partitioned successively with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain n-hexane-soluble, chloroform-soluble, ethyl acetate-soluble, n-butanol-soluble and aqueous fractions, respectively (Khan, et al., 2010a. Same extraction and fractionation procedure was adopted for Nepeta kurramensis and Rhynchosia reniformis. The antimalarial / antileishmanial activity of crude extracts/fractions was determined through standard protocol (Kerharo & Adam, 1974/. Results: The crude extract, chloroform fraction of Nepeta leavigata and fractions chloroform and ethyl acetate of Nepeta kurramensis showed promising antileishmanial and antimalarial activity against parasites of leishmania and malaria (promistogetes and schizonts by observing 1 or 0 number of parasites on slide field where ≤ 1 level is significant, while all fractions of Rhynchosia reniformis did not showed any action against promistigotes and schizonts. Conclusions: The bioassays guided isolation and phytochemical screening of active fractions against these activities will further enhance research in the field of pharmacology.

  5. Dissociative photoionization of quinoline and isoquinoline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bouwman; B. Sztáray; J. Oomens; P. Hemberger; A. Bodi

    2015-01-01

    Two nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon isomers of C9H7N composition, quinoline, and isoquinoline have been studied by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy at the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source. High resolution threshold photoelectron spectra have been reco

  6. 2-Isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyl quinoline-2-carboxylate

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    E. Fazal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C20H25NO2, the cyclohexyl ring adopts a slightly disordered chair conformation. The dihedral angle between the mean planes of the quinoline ring and the carboxylate group is 22.2 (6°. In the crystal, weak C—H...N interactions make chains along [010].

  7. Antimalarial natural products: a review

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    Faraz Mojab

    2012-03-01

    Results and Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the development of new treatments for malaria. Many countries have a vast precedence in the use of medicinal plants and the required knowledge spans many centuries. Although malaria is controlled in Iran, some researchers tend to study malaria and related subjects. In vitro biological tests for the detection of antimalarial activities in plant extracts are currently available. It is vital that the efficacy and safety of traditional medicines be validated and their active constituents be identified in order to establish reliable quality control measures.

  8. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

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    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  9. trans-Dichloridobis(quinoline-κNplatinum(II

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    Kwang Ha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, trans-[PtCl2(C9H7N2], the PtII ion is four-coordinated in an essentially square-planar coordination environment defined by two N atoms from two quinoline (qu ligands and two Cl− anions. The Pt atom is located on an inversion centre and thus the asymmetric unit contains one half of the complex; the PtN2Cl2 unit is exactly planar. The dihedral angle between the PtN2Cl2 unit and the quinoline ligand is 85.1 (1°. In the crystal, the complex molecules are stacked into columns along the b axis. In the columns, several intermolecular π–π interactions between the six-membered rings are present, the shortest ring centroid–centroid distance being 3.733 (5 Å between pyridine rings.

  10. γ-radiolysis of the quinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical and radiolytic stability of products by radiation from quinoline in isopropanol solution was studied. Doses were from 2 x 104 to 3 x 105 Gy and concentration in the samples was L:L by volume. It has observed significant effects for high radiation doses. Lower doses affected the solvent with the production of long polymeric hydrocarbons. Products formed were characterized by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (CG/MS). (author)

  11. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much a...

  12. Transformation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, D.; Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.; Ahring, B.K.

    1996-01-01

    Degradation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was studied in batch cultures. The first step in the degradation pathway of indole and quinoline was a hydroxylation at the 2 position to oxindole and 2-hydroxyquinoline respectively. These hydroxylation reactions followed saturati...

  13. Antimalarial and cytotoxic properties of Chukrasia tabularis A. Juss and Turraea vogelii Hook F. Ex. Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbole, Omonike O; Saka, Yusuf A; Fasinu, Pius S; Fadare, Adenike A; Ajaiyeoba, Edith O

    2016-04-01

    Malaria, caused by plasmodium parasite, is at the moment the highest cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropics. Recently, there is increasing efforts to develop more potent antimalarials from plant sources that will have little or no adverse effects. This study is aimed at investigating the in vivo mice antimalarial and in vitro antiplasmodial effects of two Meliaceae plants commonly used in Nigerian ethnomedicine as part of recipe for treating malaria infection: Chukrasia tabularis and Turraea vogelii. Hot water decoction and methanol extract of both plants were evaluated for their antimalarial activity in vivo using the mice model assay and in vitro using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The extracts were also assessed for toxicity with brine shrimp lethality assay and in mammalian cell lines using the neural red assay. The in vivo mice model antimalarial study showed that the methanol extract of the stem bark of C. tabularis exhibited the highest % chemosuppression (83.65 ± 0.66) at the highest dosage administered (800 mg/kg) when compared with chloroquine diphosphate, the standard reference drug which had a % suppression of 90.36 ± 0.04 (p < 0.05). The in vitro antiplasmodial study indicated that the aqueous extract of the stem bark of C. tabularis displayed good activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strain (IC50 of 10.739 μg/mL) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strain. Chloroquine and artemisinin had <0.163 and <0.0264, respectively. PMID:26911147

  14. The sensitivity and selectivity properties of a fluorescence sensor based on quinoline-Bodipy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuri Kursunlu, Ahmed, E-mail: ankursunlu@gmail.com; Guler, Ersin

    2014-01-15

    A novel florescence sensor (Q-BODIPY) based on quinoline-Bodipy (quinoline-boradiazaindacene) was prepared by ‘click chemistry’ in several stages. The sensing actions of Q-BODIPY were confirmed by UV–vis titration, emission and excitation spectroscopic studies in presence of Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, La{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions in methanol:H{sub 2}O (1:1) medium. Whereas some metal ions can only cause quenching effect on the fluorescence intensity of Q-BODIPY, some of them show an increase in fluorescence intensity. The stoichiometry of host–guest complexes formed was determined by Job′s plot method. The binding constants were calculated by Stern–Volmer method. As a fluorescence sensor, Q-BODIPY shows the best selectivity performance against Zn{sup 2+} ions in according to all spectroscopic data. -- Highlights: • Q-BODIPY prepared by several techniques shows a fluorescent behavior toward p, d and f block metal ions. • Q-BODIPY has both a more sensitivity and more effective ability for the detection of Zn(II) ion. • The synthesis strategies to produce Bodipy′s with metal coordinating offer a new approach for the design of novel fluorescence sensors.

  15. Method for making methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  16. Recent developments in naturally derived antimalarials: cryptolepine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Colin W

    2007-06-01

    Increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to commonly used antimalarial drugs has made the need for new agents increasingly urgent. In this paper, the potential of cryptolepine, an alkaloid from the West African shrub Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, as a lead towards new antimalarial agents is discussed. Several cryptolepine analogues have been synthesized that have promising in-vitro and in-vivo antimalarial activity. Studies on the antimalarial modes of action of these analogues indicate that they may have different or additional modes of action to the parent compound. Elucidation of the mode of action may facilitate the development of more potent antimalarial cryptolepine analogues. PMID:17637183

  17. Thermodynamics of organic mixtures containing amines. VIII. Systems with quinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (Solid + liquid) equilibrium temperatures for mixtures containing quinoline and 1-dodecanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octadecanol have been measured using a dynamic method. (Quinoline + benzene, +alkane, or +1-alkanol) systems were investigated using DISQUAC. The corresponding interaction parameters are reported. The model yields a good representation of molar excess Gibbs free energies, GE, molar excess enthalpies, HE, and of the (solid + liquid) equilibria, SLE. Interactional and structural effects were analysed comparing HE and the molar excess internal energy at constant volume, UVE. It was encountered that structural effects are very important in systems involving alkanes or 1-alkanols. Interactions between amine molecules are stronger in mixtures with quinoline than in those containing pyridine, which was ascribed to the higher polarizability of quinoline

  18. Thermodynamics of organic mixtures containing amines. VIII. Systems with quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Juan Antonio [G.E.T.E.F., Grupo Especializado en Termodinamica de Equilibrio entre Fases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: jagl@termo.uva.es; Domanska, Urszula; Zawadzki, Maciej [Physical Chemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-08-15

    (Solid + liquid) equilibrium temperatures for mixtures containing quinoline and 1-dodecanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octadecanol have been measured using a dynamic method. (Quinoline + benzene, +alkane, or +1-alkanol) systems were investigated using DISQUAC. The corresponding interaction parameters are reported. The model yields a good representation of molar excess Gibbs free energies, G{sup E}, molar excess enthalpies, H{sup E}, and of the (solid + liquid) equilibria, SLE. Interactional and structural effects were analysed comparing H{sup E} and the molar excess internal energy at constant volume, U{sub V}{sup E}. It was encountered that structural effects are very important in systems involving alkanes or 1-alkanols. Interactions between amine molecules are stronger in mixtures with quinoline than in those containing pyridine, which was ascribed to the higher polarizability of quinoline.

  19. 1995 world methanol conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 20 papers contained in this volume deal with the global markets for methanol, the production of MTBE, integrating methanol production into a coal-to-SNG complex, production of methanol from natural gas, catalysts for methanol production from various synthesis gases, combined cycle power plants using methanol as fuel, and economics of the methanol industry. All papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base

  20. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swain Bijay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20 and resistant (MRC-pf-303 strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AP (7.2 μg/ml was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml. Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs.

  1. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, David C; Craig, John C; Raheem, K Saki

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  2. Expanding the Antimalarial Drug Arsenal—Now, But How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev K. Mehlotra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of available and effective antimalarial drugs is quickly dwindling. This is mainly because a number of drug resistance-associated mutations in malaria parasite genes, such as crt, mdr1, dhfr/dhps, and others, have led to widespread resistance to all known classes of antimalarial compounds. Unfortunately, malaria parasites have started to exhibit some level of resistance in Southeast Asia even to the most recently introduced class of drugs, artemisinins. While there is much need, the antimalarial drug development pipeline remains woefully thin, with little chemical diversity, and there is currently no alternative to the precious artemisinins. It is difficult to predict where the next generation of antimalarial drugs will come from; however, there are six major approaches: (i re-optimizing the use of existing antimalarials by either replacement/rotation or combination approach; (ii repurposing drugs that are currently used to treat other infections or diseases; (iii chemically modifying existing antimalarial compounds; (iv exploring natural sources; (v large-scale screening of diverse chemical libraries; and (vi through parasite genome-based (“targeted” discoveries. When any newly discovered effective antimalarial treatment is used by the populus, we must maintain constant vigilance for both parasite-specific and human-related factors that are likely to hamper its success. This article is neither comprehensive nor conclusive. Our purpose is to provide an overview of antimalarial drug resistance, associated parasite genetic factors (1. Introduction; 2. Emergence of artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum, and the antimalarial drug development pipeline (3. Overview of the global pipeline of antimalarial drugs, and highlight some examples of the aforementioned approaches to future antimalarial treatment. These approaches can be categorized into “short term” (4. Feasible options for now and “long term” (5. Next generation of

  3. Identification of β-hematin inhibitors in a high-throughput screening effort reveals scaffolds with in vitro antimalarial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca D. Sandlin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant strains of Plasmodium spp. creates a critical need for the development of novel antimalarials. Formation of hemozoin, a crystalline heme detoxification process vital to parasite survival serves as an important drug target. The quinoline antimalarials including chloroquine and amodiaquine owe their antimalarial activity to inhibition of hemozoin formation. Though in vivo formation of hemozoin occurs within the presence of neutral lipids, the lipophilic detergent NP-40 was previously shown to serve as a surrogate in the β-hematin (synthetic hemozoin formation process. Consequently, an NP-40 mediated β-hematin formation assay was developed for use in high-throughput screening. Here, the assay was utilized to screen 144,330 compounds for the identification of inhibitors of crystallization, resulting in 530 hits. To establish the effectiveness of these target-based β-hematin inhibitors against Plasmodium falciparum, each hit was further tested in cultures of parasitized red blood cells. This effort revealed that 171 of the β-hematin inhibitors are also active against the parasite. Dose–response data identified 73 of these β-hematin inhibitors have IC50 values ⩽5 μM, including 25 compounds with nanomolar activity against P. falciparum. A scaffold-based analysis of this data identified 14 primary scaffolds that represent 46% of the 530 total hits. Representative compounds from each of the classes were further assessed for hemozoin inhibitory activity in P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. Each of the hit compounds tested were found to be positive inhibitors, while a negative control did not perturb this biological pathway in culture.

  4. Andrographolide: A Novel Antimalarial Diterpene Lactone Compound from Andrographis paniculata and Its Interaction with Curcumin and Artesunate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (AND, the diterpene lactone compound, was purified by HPLC from the methanolic fraction of the plant Andrographis paniculata. The compound was found to have potent antiplasmodial activity when tested in isolation and in combination with curcumin and artesunate against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and Plasmodium berghei ANKA in vivo. IC50s for artesunate (AS, andrographolide (AND, and curcumin (CUR were found to be 0.05, 9.1 and 17.4 μM, respectively. The compound (AND was found synergistic with curcumin (CUR and addictively interactive with artesunate (AS. In vivo, andrographolide-curcumin exhibited better antimalarial activity, not only by reducing parasitemia (29%, compared to the control (81%, but also by extending the life span by 2-3 folds. Being nontoxic to the in vivo system this agent can be used as template molecule for designing new derivatives with improved antimalarial properties.

  5. In Silico Mining for Antimalarial Structure-Activity Knowledge and Discovery of Novel Antimalarial Curcuminoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Viira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasitic tropical disease that kills around 600,000 patients every year. The emergence of resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs represents a significant public health threat, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to reverse ACT resistance and cure the disease. For this, extensive curation and homogenization of experimental anti-Plasmodium screening data from both in-house and ChEMBL sources were conducted. As a result, a coherent strategy was established that allowed compiling coherent training sets that associate compound structures to the respective antimalarial activity measurements. Seventeen of these training sets led to the successful generation of classification models discriminating whether a compound has a significant probability to be active under the specific conditions of the antimalarial test associated with each set. These models were used in consensus prediction of the most likely active from a series of curcuminoids available in-house. Positive predictions together with a few predicted as inactive were then submitted to experimental in vitro antimalarial testing. A large majority from predicted compounds showed antimalarial activity, but not those predicted as inactive, thus experimentally validating the in silico screening approach. The herein proposed consensus machine learning approach showed its potential to reduce the cost and duration of antimalarial drug discovery.

  6. Quinolinic Acid: Neurotoxin or Oxidative Stress Modulator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Kubicova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, QUIN is a well-known neurotoxin. Consequently, QUIN could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS are generated in reactions catalyzed by transition metals, especially iron (Fe. QUIN can form coordination complexes with iron. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, deoxyribose degradation and Fe(II autoxidation assays was used for explorating ROS formation in redox reactions that are catalyzed by iron in QUIN-Fe complexes. Differential pulse voltammetry showed an anodic shift of the iron redox potential if iron was liganded by QUIN. In the H2O2/FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant of the deoxyribose degradation assay, the dose-response curve was U-shaped. In the FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant, QUIN unambiguously showed antioxidant effects. In the Fe(II autoxidation assay, QUIN decreased the rate of ROS production caused by Fe(II oxidation. Our study confirms that QUIN toxicity may be caused by ROS generation via the Fenton reaction. This, however, applies only for unnaturally high concentrations that were used in attempts to provide support for the neurotoxic effect. In lower concentrations, we show that by liganding iron, QUIN affects the Fe(II/Fe(III ratios that are beneficial to homeostasis. Our results support the notion that redox chemistry can contribute to explaining the hormetic dose-response effects.

  7. [Historical overview of antimalarials used in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerpa de Artiles, N

    1993-06-01

    A historical review of antimalarials used in Venezuela is presented from the time when the bark of quina was used until the massive distribution of quinine and metoquine by the Dirección de Malariología y Saneamiento Ambiental. The utility of chloroquine and primaquine against sensible parasite isolates and of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine, currently used against P. falciparum resistant strains, is thoroughly discussed. The author suggests use of artemisimine and its derivatives as a very promising antimalarial drug. She also stresses the possibility of the application of new antimalaria vaccine against P. falciparum blood states, presently assayed in the country as an additional tool in malaria control programs. PMID:11640680

  8. The antimalarial ferroquine: from bench to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biot C.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ferroquine (FQ, SSR97193 is currently the most advanced organometallic drug candidate and about to complete phase II clinical trials as a treatment for uncomplicated malaria. This ferrocenecontaining compound is active against both chloroquine-susceptible and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax strains and/or isolates. This article focuses on the discovery of FQ, its antimalarial activity, the hypothesis of its mode of action, the current absence of resistance in vitro and recent clinical trials.

  9. Potential antimalarial activity of indole alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Frederich, Michel; Tits, Monique; Angenot, Luc

    2008-01-01

    New antimalarial treatments are now urgently required, following the emergence of resistance to the most used drugs. Natural products contribute greatly to the therapeutic arsenal in this area, including artemisinin and quinine (and atovaquone, semi-synthetic). Among the natural products, indole alkaloids represent an interesting class of compounds. Screening carried out to date has revealed several substances active in vitro under the micromolar range and with a good selectivity index. This ...

  10. Antimalarial drug resistance and combination chemotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    White, N.

    1999-01-01

    Antimarial drug resistance develops when spontaneously occurring parasite mutants with reduced susceptibility are selected, and are then transmitted. Drugs for which a single point mutation confers a marked reduction in susceptibility are particularly vulnerable. Low clearance and a shallow concentration-effect relationship increase the chance of selection. Use of combinations of antimalarials that do not share the same resistance mechanisms will reduce the chance of selection because the cha...

  11. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S D

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much as half of antimalarials distributed in many developing countries. Use of antimalarials through the health services is often poor; drug shortages are common and overprescription and overuse of injections are significant problems. Anxiety over drug costs may prevent patients from getting the necessary treatment for malaria, especially because of the seasonal appearance of this disease when people's cash reserves are very low. The high costs may lead them to unofficial sources, which will sell a single tablet instead of a complete course of treatment, and subsequently to increased, often irrational demand for more drugs and more injections. Increasingly people are resorting to self-medication for malaria, which may cause delays in seeking proper treatment in cases of failure, especially in areas where chloroquine resistance has increased rapidly. Self-medication is now widespread, and measures to restrict the illicit sale of drugs have been unsuccessful. The "unofficial" channels thus represent an unacknowledged extension of the health services in many countries; suggestions are advanced to encourage better self-medication by increasing the knowledge base among the population at large (mothers, schoolchildren, market sellers, and shopkeepers), with an emphasis on correct dosing and on the importance of seeking further treatment without delay, if necessary. PMID:1893512

  12. Antimalarial activity of some Colombian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Garavito, G. (G.); Rincon, J.; Arteaga, L.; Hata, Y; Bourdy, Geneviève; Gimenez, A.; Pinzon, R.; Deharo, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Antimalarial activity of 10 vegetal extracts (9 ethanolic extracts and 1 crude alkaloid extract), obtained from eight species traditionally used in Colombia to treat malaria symptoms, was evaluated in culture using Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant (FcB2) strain and in vivo on rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei. The activity on ferriprotoporphyrin biomineralization inhibition test (FBIT) was also assessed. Against Plasmodium falciparum, eight extracts displayed good activity Abuta gr...

  13. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Swain Bijay K; Dash Aditya P; Mishra Kirti; Dey Nrisingha

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP) and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC) are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20) and resistant (MRC-pf-303) strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using diff...

  14. Kinetic interaction in hydrogenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid fossil fuels contain numerous nitrogen compounds. During hydrodenitrogenation processes, these compounds for the active catalytic sites, with each compound affecting the kinetics of the other compounds. An understanding of the kinetic interaction is essential in using the results of model compound kinetics to predict the behavior of complex mixtures. In this work, the authors study the hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine in n-hexadecane over a commercial nickel-molybdenum catalyst in a batch autoclave reactor at 8.3 MPa (1200 psig) and 357-3900C. The reaction networks and kinetics of individual compounds were developed. These results confirm the existing knowledge of reaction networks for quinoline and acridine. Furthermore, their experiments show that formation for o-ethylaniline, o-toluidine and aniline are also important steps in quinoline denitrogenation. For total nitrogen removal, a dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood type model considering separate sites for adsorption of hydrogen and nitrogen compounds give the best fit

  15. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The high temperature, high pressure wet oxidation reaction of quinoline has been studied as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature. At neutral to acidic pH, it is effective in the oxidation of quinoline at 240 degrees C and above, whereas under alkaline conditions the reaction is...... markedly slowed down. The results indicate that the reaction is an auto-catalysed, free radical chain reaction transforming 99% of quinoline to other substances. Of the quinoline. 30-50% was oxidised to CO2 and H2O depending on the initial concentration. Wet oxidation of deuterium-labelled quinoline was...

  16. The thermodynamic properties of quinoline and isoquinoline: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W.V.; Archer, D.G.; Chirico, R.D.; Collier, W.B.; Gammon, B.E.; Hossenloop, I.A.; Nguyen, A.; Smith, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    Measurements leading to the calculation of the ideal-gas thermodynamic properties for quinoline and isoquinoline are reported. Thermodynamic and thermophysical properties were determined by adiabatic heat-capacity calorimetry, comparative ebulliometry, densimetry, and combustion calorimetry. Vibrational spectra of quinoline and isoquinoline were assigned. Entropies and enthalpies for the ideal-gas state from the claorimetric measurements and from the vibrational assignments were derived and compared. Entropies, enthalpies, and Gibbs energies of formation were derived at selected temperatues between T..-->..0 and 1000 K. new density measurements for benzene are reported. 55 refs., 11 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. A novel way to grow hemozoin-like crystals in vitro and its use to screen for hemozoin inhibiting antimalarial compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Thomas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hemozoin crystals are normally formed in vivo by Plasmodium parasites to detoxify free heme released after hemoglobin digestion during its intraerythrocytic stage. Inhibition of hemozoin formation by various drugs results in free heme concentration toxic for the parasites. As a consequence, in vitro assays have been developed to screen and select candidate antimalarial drugs based on their capacity to inhibit hemozoin formation. In this report we describe new ways to form hemozoin-like crystals that were incidentally discovered during research in the field of prion inactivation. METHODS: We investigated the use of a new assay based on naturally occurring "self-replicating" particles and previously described as presenting resistance to decontamination comparable to prions. The nature of these particles was determined using electron microscopy, Maldi-Tof analysis and X-ray diffraction. They were compared to synthetic hemozoin and to hemozoin obtained from Plasmodium falciparum. We then used the assay to evaluate the capacity of various antimalarial and anti-prion compounds to inhibit "self-replication" (crystallisation of these particles. RESULTS: We identified these particles as being similar to ferriprotoporphyrin IX crystal and confirmed the ability of these particles to serve as nuclei for growth of new hemozoin-like crystals (HLC. HLC are morphologically similar to natural and synthetic hemozoin. Growth of HLC in a simple assay format confirmed inhibition by quinolines antimalarials at potencies described in the literature. Interestingly, artemisinins and tetracyclines also seemed to inhibit HLC growth. CONCLUSIONS: The described HLC assay is simple and easy to perform and may have the potential to be used as an additional tool to screen antimalarial drugs for their hemozoin inhibiting activity. As already described by others, drugs that inhibit hemozoin crystal formation have also the potential to inhibit misfolded proteins

  18. Supramolecular aggregation of regioregular poly(4-alkyl-2,6-quinoline)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S H; Zhu, Yan; Jenekhe, Samson A; Su, A C; Chen, S A

    2007-11-01

    Phase behavior and morphological features of regioregular, n-type semiconducting poly(4-alkyl-2,6-quinoline)s were examined in detail via a combination of thermal, microscopic, and diffraction methods. Two members (P4OQ and P4DQ, with n-octyl and n-decyl substitutions, respectively) in this series were selected as representatives. Results indicate the dominance of lamellar mesophase throughout the experimentally accessed temperature range (from ambient to above 300 degrees C), with lamellar spacing well-correlated with side-chain length and temperature. Optical textures observed via polarized light microscopy reveal clear domain-wall features in P4OQ but more solid-like characteristics for P4DQ; improved lamellar order was also observed for P4DQ as compared to P4OQ. These signify stronger tendency toward supramolecular self-assembly with increasing side-chain length. A model of molecular arrangement in the lamellar mesophase in which the free volume is identified as the gap between tips of extended (and interdigitated) side chains and the backbone of the neighboring chain is proposed to account for the observed variation of layer spacing with side-chain length and temperature. The presence of nanodomains (similar to those previously reported for p-type conjugated polymers) is also identified in the present n-type series, implying general existence of this inherent morphological heterogeneity in semiconducting hairy-rod polymers. This means that molecular aggregation is determined solely by ground-state intermolecular forces; differences in carrier transport characteristics are irrelevant during morphological development. Origins of these nanodomains are discussed in terms of backbone folding (via inherent chemical defects or elastic bending) as well as fringed-micelle aggregates. PMID:17929859

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: New class of antimalarials on the horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-08-01

    Development of the antimalarial drug resistant strains has currently become a major public health challenge. There is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are receiving increasing attention as anticancer therapy. It has revolutionarised the management of CML to say the least. TKIs are also increasingly being implicated in complicated but vital life cycle of malaria parasite. Hence we tested two commonly used but different classes of TKIs (imatinib and sorafenib) in-vitro for their antimalarial activity and possible synergistic activity with existing antimalarial drug. Antimalarial activity was tested with the help of modified WHO microtest technique in-vitro for five different Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains (3D7, Dd2, 7G8, MRC2, PKL9). Imatinib and sorafenib showed a promising antimalarial activity with all the strains. These compounds caused dose dependent inhibition of parasite maturation. The isobologram analysis of the interactions of these TKIs with standard antimalarial drug, artesunate revealed distinct patterns of synergism, additivity and antagonism at different ratios. Imatinib showed worthwhile synergism with artesunate indicating imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may have significant antimalarial activity and can be used in combination therapy. PMID:26142327

  20. Ligand-based virtual screening and in silico design of new antimalarial compounds using nonstochastic and stochastic total and atom-type quadratic maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Iyarreta-Veitía, Maité; Montero-Torres, Alina; Romero-Zaldivar, Carlos; Brandt, Carlos A; Avila, Priscilla E; Kirchgatter, Karin; Machado, Yanetsy

    2005-01-01

    and stochastic atom-based quadratic fingerprints were 93.93% and 92.77%, respectively. The quadratic maps-based TOMOCOMD-CARDD approach implemented in this work was successfully compared with four of the most useful models for antimalarials selection reported to date. The developed models were then used in a simulation of a virtual search for Ras FTase (FTase = farnesyltransferase) inhibitors with antimalarial activity; 70% and 100% of the 10 inhibitors used in this virtual search were correctly classified, showing the ability of the models to identify new lead antimalarials. Finally, these two QSAR models were used in the identification of previously unknown antimalarials. In this sense, three synthetic intermediaries of quinolinic compounds were evaluated as active/inactive ones using the developed models. The synthesis and biological evaluation of these chemicals against two malaria strains, using chloroquine as a reference, was performed. An accuracy of 100% with the theoretical predictions was observed. Compound 3 showed antimalarial activity, being the first report of an arylaminomethylenemalonate having such behavior. This result opens a door to a virtual study considering a higher variability of the structural core already evaluated, as well as of other chemicals not included in this study. We conclude that the approach described here seems to be a promising QSAR tool for the molecular discovery of novel classes of antimalarial drugs, which may meet the dual challenges posed by drug-resistant parasites and the rapid progression of malaria illnesses. PMID:16045304

  1. An efficient synthesis of quinolines under solvent-free conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mihir K Chaudhuri; Sahid Hussain

    2006-03-01

    An efficient synthesis of substituted quinolines has been achieved in a one-pot reaction from -nitrobenzaldehyde and enolizable ketones using SnCl2.2H2O as the reductant under microwave irradiation without any solvent or catalyst.

  2. Anticancer properties of distinct antimalarial drug classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Hooft van Huijsduijnen

    Full Text Available We have tested five distinct classes of established and experimental antimalarial drugs for their anticancer potential, using a panel of 91 human cancer lines. Three classes of drugs: artemisinins, synthetic peroxides and DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors effected potent inhibition of proliferation with IC50s in the nM- low µM range, whereas a DHODH (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and a putative kinase inhibitor displayed no activity. Furthermore, significant synergies were identified with erlotinib, imatinib, cisplatin, dasatinib and vincristine. Cluster analysis of the antimalarials based on their differential inhibition of the various cancer lines clearly segregated the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439 from the artemisinin cluster that included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone, and from the DHFR inhibitors pyrimethamine and P218 (a parasite DHFR inhibitor, emphasizing their shared mode of action. In order to further understand the basis of the selectivity of these compounds against different cancers, microarray-based gene expression data for 85 of the used cell lines were generated. For each compound, distinct sets of genes were identified whose expression significantly correlated with compound sensitivity. Several of the antimalarials tested in this study have well-established and excellent safety profiles with a plasma exposure, when conservatively used in malaria, that is well above the IC50s that we identified in this study. Given their unique mode of action and potential for unique synergies with established anticancer drugs, our results provide a strong basis to further explore the potential application of these compounds in cancer in pre-clinical or and clinical settings.

  3. Antimalarial Activity of Ultra-Short Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yolanda Rios

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-short peptides 1-9 were designed and synthesized with phenylalanine, ornithine and proline amino acid residues and their effect on antimalarial activity was analyzed. On the basis of the IC50 data for these compounds, the effects of nature, polarity, and amino acid sequence on Plasmodium berghei schizont cultures were analyzed too. Tetrapeptides Phe-Orn-Phe-Orn (4 and Lys-Phe-Phe-Orn (5 showed a very important activity with IC50 values of 3.31 and 2.57 μM, respectively. These two tetrapeptides are candidates for subsequent in vivo assays and SARS investigations.

  4. Molecular modeling of the voltammetric oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode of the antimalarial drug primaquine and its prodrugs succinylprimaquine and maleylprimaquine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 8-aminoquinoline primaquine (PQ) is the only antimalarial drug used as tissue schizonticide and relapsing malaria. Antichagasic activity was also reported. Nevertheless, as it also shows serious side effects, prodrugs such as succinyl and maleyl derivatives have been proposed to decrease its toxicity. Although PQ mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated, the promotion of oxidative stress is an advanced hypothesis that could explain its activity in both plasmodia and trypanosome parasites. The oxidation of PQ and its prodrugs, maleylprimaquine (MPQ) and succinylprimaquine (SPQ), was studied by cyclic voltammetry using glassy carbon electrode. All compounds were oxidized in aqueous medium, with the charge transfer process being pH-dependent in acidic medium and pH-independent in a weak basic medium, being the neutral form more easily oxidized. This indicated that the protonation of the nitrogen atoms displays a determinant role in the voltammetric oxidation, being both prodrugs more easily oxidized than PQ protonated forms, in the order: SPQ < MPQ < PQ. For a better understanding of this behavior, a molecular modeling study was performed using the AM1 semi-empirical method from Spartan 04 for Linux (v.119, Wavefunction Inc.). The medium pH showed to be fundamental not only to the electronic density of the quinoline ring but also to the rearrangement of the nitrogen side chain. The electronic density of primaquine non-protonated quinoline ring is higher than that in its protonated and diprotonated species. Also, the use of prodrugs and the degree of saturation of the carriers (maleic or succinic acid) interfere with this feature. SPQ and MPQ have a slight increase in the quinoline electronic density in comparison to PQ. Nevertheless, the carrier in the side chain of SPQ is closer to the quinoline ring than it is in MPQ, which accounts for the higher electronic density in the former. The most significant effect occurs in the correspondent protonated

  5. BACTERIAL DNA GYRASE IS NOT THE TARGET OF QUINOLINE-BASED ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Few quinoline-based synthetic compounds (2, 8 Dicyclopentyl-4-methyl quinoline and 2, 8 Dicyclohexyl-4-methyl quinoline, the synthesis of which have been already shown by our medicinal chemistry group, were found to be potent inhibitor of mycobacterial growth. Based on the results of cell culture-based cell killing assays using DNA gyrase positive E. coli strains, we presumed that bacterial DNA gyrase might be a probable target of quinolines. The resemblance of the basic skeletal structural moiety of quinolone and quinoline inspired us to hypothesize that these quinolines might inhibit DNA gyrase. While the non-gyrase inhibitors like ethambutol and isoniazid did not inhibit the growth of these strains. The genesis of the notion of using E. coli DNA gyrase as an alternative to DNA gyrase from the pathogenic Mycobacterium, stems from the fact that E. coli DNA gyrase is found to be about eighty times more sensitive to the action of quinolones than the Mycobacterium DNA gyrase. Therefore, we had used E. coli DNA gyrase as a model enzyme for studying the action of some synthetic quinoline compounds synthesized by us. In the present work, we have used cell killing assay, gel electrophoresis assay (for DNA supercoiling and UV spectroscopy-based coupled assay (for ATP hydrolysis for characterizing the activity of DNA gyrase. Quinolones exhibited low IC50 values as compared to the studied quinolines on DNA gyrase positive E. coli strains We found that although quinolones are the potent inhibitors of supercoiling activity of E. coli DNA gyrase, quinolines are not. We further found that ATPase activity of E. coli DNA gyrase (Non-specific inhibitor was inhibited to a very minor extent in the presence of very high concentration of these synthetic quinolines. DNA gyrase is not the primary target of these synthetic quinolines (2, 8 Dicyclopentyl-4-methyl quinoline and 2, 8 Dicyclohexyl-4-methyl quinoline.

  6. Chitosan-based nanocarriers for antimalarials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreve, Simina; Kacso, Iren; Popa, Adriana; Raita, Oana; Bende, A.; Borodi, Gh.; Bratu, I.

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this research was to synthesize and characterize chitosan-based liquid and solid materials with unique absorptive and mechanical properties as carriers for quinine - one of the most used antimalarial drug. The use of chitosan (CTS) as base in polyelectrolyte complex systems, to prepare solid release systems as sponges is presented. The preparation by double emulsification of CTS hydrogels carrying quinine as anti-malarial drug is reported. The concentration of quinine in the CTS hydrogel was 0.08 mmol. Chitosan - drug loaded hydrogel was used to generate solid sponges by freeze-drying at -610°C and 0.09 atm. Structural investigations of the solid formulations were done by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS), spectrofluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. The results indicated that the drug molecule is forming temporary chelates in CTS hydrogels and sponges. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) demonstrates the presence of free radicals in a wide range and the antioxidant activity for chitosan - drug supramolecular cross-linked assemblies.

  7. The Methanol Economy Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olah, George [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Prakash, G. K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  8. Methanol Asinger's vision today

    CERN Document Server

    Bertau, Martin; Plass, Ludolf; Schmidt, Friedrich; Wernicke, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Methanol - The Chemical and Energy Feedstock of the Future offers a visionary yet unbiased view of methanol technology. Based on the groundbreaking 1986 publication ""Methanol"" by Friedrich Asinger, this book includes contributions by more than 40 experts from industry and academia. The authors and editors provide a comprehensive exposition of methanol chemistry and technology which is useful for a wide variety of scientists working in chemistry and energy related industries as well as academic researchers and even decision-makers and organisations concerned with the future of chemical and e

  9. Phase- and shape-controlled synthesis of cadmium hydroxyl chloride microstructures via an ammonia-assisted conversion of 1D CdQCl (Q=quinoline) complex microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Ni, Yonghong; Hong, Jianming

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we reported a NH3·H2O-assisted solvothermal route for successful synthesis of cadmium hydroxyl chlorides (Cdx(OH)yClz) microstructures with different phases and shapes, employing 1D CdQCl (Q=quinoline) complex microwires as the precursor. Experiments contained two processes: firstly, CdQCl complex microwires with 500-600 nm in diameter and several hundreds of micrometers in length were prepared by the complexation between CdCl2·2.5H2O and quinoline at room temperature; then, CdQCl microwires were solvothermally treated at 150 °C for 10 h in the presences of different amounts of NH3·H2O to produce Cdx(OH)yClz microstructures with various phases and shapes. The as-obtained precursor and Cdx(OH)yClz microstructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Infrared spectrometry and X-ray powder diffraction. Experiments showed that hexagonal Cd(OH)Cl was obtained from water-methanol system, while rhombohedral Cd4(OH)5Cl3 from methanol system. Also, it was found that the shapes of Cdx(OH)yClz could be tuned by the amounts of NH3·H2O. Furthermore, the UV diffuse reflection and photoluminescence spectra of the precursor and Cdx(OH)yClz were also investigated.

  10. A combination of the leaves and tuber ofIcacina senegalensis A. Juss (Icacinaceae) improves the antimalarial activity of the plant in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esien David-Oku; Juliet Ifeoma Obiajunwa-Otteh

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the possibility of increased antimalarial activity ofIcacina senegalensis A. Juss (Icacinaceae) upon a combination of its leaves and tubers against Plasmodium berghei malaria in mice. Methods: Chloroquine sensitiveANKA clones ofPlasmodium berghei were used to develop experimental models based on intraperitoneal injection of 107 parasitized erythrocytes in phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.2) and subsequent development of parasitemia. The models were employed to investigate prophylactic and curative anti-malarial activities of tuber and tuber-leaf methanol extracts of the plant at selected dosages (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight). Chloroquine with a curative dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight was used as positive control in both studies. Results:Tuber and tuber-leaf extracts produced a dose-dependent chemosuppression of the parasites, with higher activity and mean survival time exhibited by the combined extract. Conclusions:Anti-plasmodia activity has been discovered in methanol extract ofIcacina senegalensis tuber extract. The observed optimization of the antimalarial actions of the plant upon a combination of its leaf and tuber opens a new area of medicinal plant research.

  11. DETECTION OF PUTATIVE ANTIMALARIAL-RESISTANT PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN ANOPHELES VECTORS AT THAILAND-CAMBODIA AND THAILAND-MYANMAR BORDERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattaprasert, Pongruj; Chaksangchaichot, Panee; Wihokhoen, Benchawan; Suparach, Nutjaree; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of multidrug-resistant (MDR)falciparum and vivax malaria has recently been included in the Global Plan for Artemisinin Resistance Containment (GPARC) of the Greater Mekong Sub-region, particularly at the Thailand-Cambodia and Thailand-Myanmar borders. In parallel to GPARC, monitoring MDR malaria parasites in anopheline vectors is an ideal augment to entomological surveillance. Employing Plasmodium- and species-specific nested PCR techniques, only P. vivax was detected in 3/109 salivary gland DNA extracts of anopheline vectors collected during a rainy season between 24-26 August 2009 and 22-24 September 2009 and a dry season between 29-31 December 2009 and 16-18 January 2010. Indoor and out- door resting mosquitoes were collected in Thong Pha Phum District, Kanchanaburi Province (border of Thailand-Myanmar) and Bo Rai District, Trat Province (border of Thailand-Cambodia): one sample from Anopheles dirus at the Thailand-Cambodia border and two samples from An. aconitus from Thailand-Myanmar border isolate. Nucleotide sequencing of dihydrofolate reductase gene revealed the presence in all three samples of four mutations known to cause high resistance to antifolate pyrimethamine, but no mutations were found in multidrug resistance transporter 1 gene that are associated with (falciparum) resistance to quinoline antimalarials. Such findings indicate the potential usefulness of this approach in monitoring the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites in geographically regions prone to the development of drug resistance and where screening of human population at risk poses logistical and ethical problems. Keywords: Anopheles spp, Plasmodium vivax, antimalarial resistance, Greater Mekong Sub-region, nested PCR, vector surveillance PMID:27244954

  12. Mineralization of Quinoline by BDD Anodes: Variable Effects and Its Effluent Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C.R.; Wang, J.; Ma, X. G.; Li, H.; Zhang, S.Z.

    2015-01-01

    BDD anodes were selected for quinoline mineralization and influence of operating parameters, such as current density, initial quinoline concentration, supporting electrolyte, and initial pH was investigated. Based on the consideration of quinoline removal efficiency and average current efficiency, at initial quinoline concentration of 50 mg L−1 and pH of 7, the optimal condition was confirmed as current density of 75 mA cm−2, electrolysis time of 1.5 h, and Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 mol L−...

  13. Quinoline-2-thiol Derivatives as Fluorescent Sensors for Metals, pH and HNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naphtali A. O’Connor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A tautomeric equilibrium exists for quinoline-2-thiol and quinoline-2(1H-thione. Quantum mechanical calculations predict the thione is the major tautomer and this is confirmed by the absorption spectra. The utility of quinolone-2-thiol/quinoline-2(1H-thione as a chromophore for developing fluorescent sensors is explored. No fluorescence is observed when excited at absorption maxima, however a fluorescence increase is observed when exposed to HNO, a molecule of import as a cardiovascular therapeutic. Alkylated quinoline-2-thiol derivatives are found to be fluorescent and show a reduction in fluorescence when exposed to metals and changes in pH.

  14. Pyrolysis mechanisms of quinoline and isoquinoline with density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, L.X.; Zhang, R.G.; Wang, B.J.; Xie, K.C. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2009-10-15

    The pyrolysis mechanisms of quinoline and isoquinoline were investigated using the density functional theory of quantum chemistry, including eight reaction paths and a common tautomeric intermediate 1-indene imine. It is concluded that the conformational tautomerism of the intermediate decides the pyrolysis products (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, HC C-C N, C6H{sub 5}C N and HC CH) to be the same, and also decides the total disappearance rates of the reactants to be the same, for both original reactants quinoline and isoquinoline during the pyrolysis reaction. The results indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen migration is an important reaction step, which often appears in the paths of the pyrolysis mechanism. The activation energies of the rate determining steps are obtained. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-03-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the "whole nation" system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  16. Self-Deprotonation in Oxidation Mechanism of Quinoline Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokolová, Romana; Fiedler, Jan; Ramešová, Šárka; Nycz, J. E.; Degano, I.; Szala, M.; Kolivoška, Viliam; Gál, M.

    Sofia: Es Print, 2015 - (Vladikova, D.; Raikova, G.). s. 143-143 ISBN 978-954-92483-4-0. [Regional Symposium on Electrochemistry . South East Europe /5./. 07.06.2015-11.06.2015, Pravets] Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR M200401201 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : self-deprotonation * quinoline compounds * proton transfer Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  17. Activities of new quinoline derivatives against genital pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    AZNAR;, J.; Caballero, M C; Lozano, M C; Miguel, C. de; Palomares, J C; Perea, E J

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of four quinoline carboxylic acids against 48 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 10 of Chlamydia trachomatis, and 32 of Ureaplasma urealyticum were compared. Ciprofloxacin was the most active against N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis but had poor bactericidal activity against U. urealyticum, whereas ofloxacin showed the most bactericidal activity against U. urealyticum but was less active than ciprofloxacin against the two former pathogens. Norfloxacin and enoxacin were...

  18. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of antimalarial activity of curcumin derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ne of the main challenges in the development of new antimalarial drugs is to achieve a viable lead candidate with good pharmacokinetic properties. Curcumin has a broad range of biological activities, including antimalarial activity. Herein, we report the antimalarial activity of six curcumin derivatives (6-12) and an initial analysis of their pharmacokinetic properties. Five compounds have demonstrated potent activity against the P. falciparum in vitro (IC50 values ranging from 1.7 to 15.2 μg mL-1), with moderate or low cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line. The substitution of the carbonyl group in 6 by a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone group (to afford 11) increases the Selective Index. These preliminary results indicate curcumin derivatives as potential antimalarial compounds. (author)

  20. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  1. Antimalarial activity of plumbagin in vitro and in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Sumsakul, Wiriyaporn; Plengsuriyakarn, Tullayakorn; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Viyanant, Vithoon; Karbwang, Juntra; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2014-01-01

    Background Plumbagin is the major active constituent in several plants including Plumbago indica Linn. (root). This compound has been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity of plumbagin including its acute and subacute toxicity in mice. Methods In vitro antimalarial activity of plumbagin against K1 and 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum clones were assessed using SYBR Green I base...

  2. Antimalarial Synergy of Cysteine and Aspartic Protease Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Semenov, Andrey; Olson, Jed E.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain and aspartic proteases plasmepsin I and plasmepsin II act cooperatively to hydrolyze hemoglobin as a source of amino acids for erythrocytic parasites. Inhibitors of each of these proteases have potent antimalarial effects. We have now evaluated the antimalarial effects of combinations of cysteine and aspartic protease inhibitors. When incubated with cultured P. falciparum parasites, cysteine and aspartic protease ...

  3. Towards optimal design of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic studies.

    OpenAIRE

    White Nicholas J; Price Ric N; Jamsen Kris M; Simpson Julie A; Lindegardh Niklas; Tarning Joel; Duffull Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Characterization of anti-malarial drug concentration profiles is necessary to optimize dosing, and thereby optimize cure rates and reduce both toxicity and the emergence of resistance. Population pharmacokinetic studies determine the drug concentration time profiles in the target patient populations, including children who have limited sampling options. Currently, population pharmacokinetic studies of anti-malarial drugs are designed based on logistical, financial and ethi...

  4. The role of anti-malarial drugs in eliminating malaria.

    OpenAIRE

    White, NJ

    2008-01-01

    Effective anti-malarial drug treatment reduces malaria transmission. This alone can reduce the incidence and prevalence of malaria, although the effects are greater in areas of low transmission where a greater proportion of the infectious reservoir is symptomatic and receives anti-malarial treatment. Effective treatment has greater effects on the transmission of falciparum malaria, where gametocytogenesis is delayed, compared with the other human malarias in which peak gametocytaemia and tran...

  5. The role of anti-malarial drugs in eliminating malaria

    OpenAIRE

    White Nicholas J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Effective anti-malarial drug treatment reduces malaria transmission. This alone can reduce the incidence and prevalence of malaria, although the effects are greater in areas of low transmission where a greater proportion of the infectious reservoir is symptomatic and receives anti-malarial treatment. Effective treatment has greater effects on the transmission of falciparum malaria, where gametocytogenesis is delayed, compared with the other human malarias in which peak gametocytaemia...

  6. Antimalarial activity of Malaysian Plectranthus amboinicus against Plasmodium berghei

    OpenAIRE

    Ramli, Norazsida; Ahamed, Pakeer Oothuman Syed; Elhady, Hassan Mohamed; Taher, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Context: Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus of Plasmodium. The protozoans have developed resistance against many of current drugs. It is urgent to find an alternative source of new antimalarial agent. In the effort to discover new antimalarial agents, this research has been conducted on Plectranthus amboinicus. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and antiplasmodial properties of P. amboinicus. Materials and Methods: Acute oral t...

  7. Expanding the Antimalarial Drug Arsenal—Now, But How?

    OpenAIRE

    MEHLOTRA, RAJEEV K.; Grimberg, Brian T

    2011-01-01

    The number of available and effective antimalarial drugs is quickly dwindling. This is mainly because a number of drug resistance-associated mutations in malaria parasite genes, such as crt, mdr1, dhfr/dhps, and others, have led to widespread resistance to all known classes of antimalarial compounds. Unfortunately, malaria parasites have started to exhibit some level of resistance in Southeast Asia even to the most recently introduced class of drugs, artemisinins. While there is much need, th...

  8. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Novel Semisynthetic Nocathiacin I Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Indu; Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in...

  9. Quality of antimalarials at the epicenter of antimalarial drug resistance: results from an overt and mystery client survey in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L S; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-06-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  10. Synthesis, Crystal and Molecular Structure Studies and DFT Calculations of Phenyl Quinoline-2-Carboxylate and 2-Methoxyphenyl Quinoline-2-Carboxylate; Two New Quinoline-2 Carboxylic Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edakot Fazal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The crystal and molecular structures of the title compounds, phenyl quinoline-2-carboxylate and 2-methoxyphenyl quinoline-2-carboxylate, two new derivatives of quinolone-2-carboxylic acid, are reported and confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic data. Compound (I, C16H11NO2, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with 8 molecules in the unit cell. The unit cell parameters are a = 14.7910(3 Å; b = 5.76446(12 Å; c = 28.4012(6 Å; β = 99.043(2°; V = 2391.45(9 Å3. Compound (II, C17H13NO5, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n with 4 molecules in the unit cell. The unit cell parameters are a = 9.6095(3 Å; b = 10.8040(3 Å; c = 13.2427(4 Å; β = 102.012(3°; V = 1344.76(7 Å3. Density functional theory (DFT geometry optimized molecular orbital calculations were performed and frontier molecular orbitals of each compound are displayed. Correlation between the calculated molecular orbital energies (eV for the surfaces of the frontier molecular orbitals to the electronic excitation transitions from the absorption spectra of each compound has been proposed. Additionally, similar correlations observed among six closely related compounds examining small structural differences to their frontier molecular orbital surfaces and from their DFT molecular orbital energies, provide further support for the suggested assignments of the title compounds.

  11. Antimalarial activity of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) arene complexes with mono- and bidentate chloroquine analogue ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekengard, Erik; Glans, Lotta; Cassells, Irwin; Fogeron, Thibault; Govender, Preshendren; Stringer, Tameryn; Chellan, Prinessa; Lisensky, George C; Hersh, William H; Doverbratt, Isa; Lidin, Sven; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Smith, Gregory S; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-11-28

    Eight new ruthenium and five new osmium p-cymene half-sandwich complexes have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for antimalarial activity. All complexes contain ligands that are based on a 4-chloroquinoline framework related to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Ligands HL(1-8) are salicylaldimine derivatives, where HL(1) = N-(2-((2-hydroxyphenyl)methylimino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, and HL(2-8) contain non-hydrogen substituents in the 3-position of the salicylaldimine ring, viz. F, Cl, Br, I, NO2, OMe and (t)Bu for HL(2-8), respectively. Ligand HL(9) is also a salicylaldimine-containing ligand with substitutions in both 3- and 5-positions of the salicylaldimine moiety, i.e. N-(2-((2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)methyl-imino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, while HL(10) is N-(2-((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylamino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine) The half sandwich metal complexes that have been investigated are [Ru(η(6)-cym)(L(1-8))Cl] (Ru-1-Ru-8, cym = p-cymene), [Os(η(6)-cym)(L(1-3,5,7))Cl] (Os-1-Os-3, Os-5, and Os-7), [M(η(6)-cym)(HL(9))Cl2] (M = Ru, Ru-HL(9); M = Os, Os-HL(9)) and [M(η(6)-cym)(L(10))Cl]Cl (M = Ru, Ru-10; M = Os, Os-10). In complexes Ru-1-Ru-8 and Ru-10, Os-1-Os-3, Os-5 and Os-7 and Os-10, the ligands were found to coordinate as bidentate N,O- and N,N-chelates, while in complexes Ru-HL(9) and Os-HL(9), monodentate coordination of the ligands through the quinoline nitrogen was established. The antimalarial activity of the new ligands and complexes was evaluated against chloroquine sensitive (NF54 and D10) and chloroquine resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite strains. Coordination of ruthenium and osmium arene moieties to the ligands resulted in lower antiplasmodial activities relative to the free ligands, but the resistance index is better for the ruthenium complexes compared to chloroquine. Overall, osmium complexes appeared to be less active than the corresponding ruthenium complexes. PMID:26491831

  12. Assessment of Antimalarial Activity against Plasmodium falciparum and Phytochemical Screening of Some Yemeni Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Alshawsh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing countries, where malaria is one of the most prevalent diseases, still rely on traditional medicine as a source for the treatment of this disease. In the present study, six selected plants (Acalypha fruticosa, Azadirachta indica, Cissus rotundifolia, Echium rauwalfii, Dendrosicyos socotrana and Boswellia elongata commonly used in Yemen by traditional healers for the treatment of malaria as well as other diseases, were collected from different localities of Yemen, dried and extracted with methanol and water successfully. The antiplasmodial activity of the extracts was evaluated against fresh clinical isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. The selectivity parameters to evaluate the efficacy of these medicinal plants were measured by in vitro micro test (Mark III according to World Health Organization (WHO 1996 & WHO 2001 protocols of antimalarial drug tests. Among the investigated 12 extracts, three were found to have significant antiplasmodial activity with IC50 values less than 4 µg/ml, namely the water extracts of A. fruticosa, A. indica and D. socotrana. Six extracts showed moderate activity with IC50 values ranging from 10 to 30 µg/ml and three appeared to be inactive with IC50 values more than 30 µg/ml. In addition, preliminary phytochemical screening of the methanolic and aqueous extracts indicated the presence of saponins, tannins, flavonoids, terpenoids, polysaccharides and peptides.

  13. Degradation pathway of quinolines in a biofilm system under denitrifying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.; Mosbaek, H. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering; Hansen, A.B. [National Environmental Research Inst., Roskilde (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry

    1997-09-01

    This article reports for the first time the degradation pathways of quinoline, isoquinoline, and methylquinolines by a mixed culture in a biofilm under nitrate-reducing conditions. A simple reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method using ultraviolet detection at 223 nm for determination of seven quinoline analogues and 15 metabolites was developed, and gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analyses were used for identification. The inhibition of nitrification by the parent compounds and their degradation products was assessed by a nitrification toxicity test called MINNTOX. Quinoline and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 8-methylquinoline were all transformed by hydroxylation into their 2-hydroxyquinoline analogues (2-quinolinones), and isoquinoline was transformed into 1-hydroxyisoquinoline. 2-Methylquinoline was not transformed by this microcosm, likely due to the blockage at position 2 by the methyl group. The hydroxylated metabolites of isoquinoline and quinolines methylated at the heterocyclic ring were not transformed further, whereas metabolites of quinoline and quinolines methylated at the homocyclic ring were hydrogenated at position 3 and 4, and the resulting 3,4-dihydro-2-quinolinone analogues accumulated. Of these metabolites, only 3,4-dihydro-2-quinolinone from the degradation of quinoline was further transformed into unidentified products. All quinolines and their metabolites had inhibiting effects on the nitrifying bacteria at the same level (ppm) in the applied bioassay, indicating that the inhibition of the compounds was not influenced by the initial transformation reactions.

  14. Nꞌ-{[2-(Piperidin-1-yl)quinolin-3-yl]methylene}pyridine-4-carbohydrazide

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv K. Tonk; Suresh Kumar; Sandhya Bawa; Obaid Afzal

    2012-01-01

    Nꞌ-{[2-(piperidin-1-yl)quinolin-3-yl]methylene}pyridine-4-carbohydrazide 2 has been synthesized through condensation of 2-(piperidin-1-yl)quinoline-3-carbaldehyde 1 with isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in absolute ethanol. The structure of the title compound 2 was established on the basis of IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and mass spectral data.

  15. Synthesis in aqueous medium and organic praseodymium complexes with ligands derived from Schiff base quinolinic. Characterization and physicochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was investigated the coordination ability of the quinolinic Schiff base organic tetradentate quinolinic ligand (Q Schiff-(OH)2) towards the trivalent praseodymium by UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration (St). By St, was studied the formed species between the Q Schiff-(OH)2 ligand and the praseodymium nitrate salt in equimolar concentrations (5.86 x 10-4 M: 5.22 x 10-4 M) in methanol. The statistical analysis of the experimental results suggested three complexed species with 1Pr:3L, 1Pr:2L y 1Pr:1L stoichiometries. The predominant stoichiometries were the second and the latter. Based on these results and data from the scientific literature, the methodology for the syntheses of the complexes Q Schiff-(OH)2-Pr in aqueous-organic and organic media was established and a molar ratio M:L= 1:2 of praseodymium nitrate and the ligand was used. The new complexes were characterized by UV/Vis, Infrared, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XP S), Diffuse Reflectance (Dr) and Thermogravimetric Analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TGA/DSC). Elemental analysis of C, N, O and Pr by XP S suggested 1Pr:2L:1Na (PrC32H20N4O4Na) stoichiometry of the complex synthesized by the aqueous-organic medium while for the complex synthesized by the organic medium it was 1Pr:3L (PrC48H33N6O6). In the first case, the praseodymium ion charge was neutralized by the anionic ligands whose remaining charge was compensated by the sodium ion. In the second case, the ion charge was neutralized by the ligands. The minimum formula was Pr(Q Schiff)2Na for the pure coordination compound from the aqueous-organic medium and the minimum formula Pr(Q Schiff)3 for that from the organic medium. XP S also indicated that the oxidation state of praseodymium ion was maintained. Both complexes were stable in methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile at least for 5 days. The photophysical properties of the studied complexes were evaluated by emission and excitation luminescence (fluorescence and phosphorescence) at ambient

  16. Integrated methanol synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns a plant for methanol manufacture from gasified coal, particularly using nuclear power. In order to reduce the cost of the hydrogen circuits, the methanol synthesis is integrated in the coal gasification plant. The coal used is gasified with hydration by means of hydrogen and the crude gas emerging, after cooling and separating the carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, is mixed with the synthetic gas leaving the methane cracking furnace. This mixture is taken to the methanol synthesis and more than 90% is converted into methanol in one pass. The gas mixture remaning after condensation and separation of methanol is decomposed into three fractions in low temperature gas decomposition with a high proportion of unconverted carbon monoxide. The flow of methane is taken to the cracking furnace with steam, the flow of hydrogen is taken to the hydrating coal gasifier, and the flow of carbon monoxide is taken to the methanol synthesis. The heat required for cracking the methane can either be provided by a nuclear reactor or by the coke left after hydrating gasification. (orig./RB)

  17. The Asian methanol market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future

  18. A database of antimalarial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringwald Pascal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A large investment is required to develop, license and deploy a new antimalarial drug. Too often, that investment has been rapidly devalued by the selection of parasite populations resistant to the drug action. To understand the mechanisms of selection, detailed information on the patterns of drug use in a variety of environments, and the geographic and temporal patterns of resistance is needed. Currently, there is no publically-accessible central database that contains information on the levels of resistance to antimalaria drugs. This paper outlines the resources that are available and the steps that might be taken to create a dynamic, open access database that would include current and historical data on clinical efficacy, in vitro responses and molecular markers related to drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The goal is to include historical and current data on resistance to commonly used drugs, like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and on the many combinations that are now being tested in different settings. The database will be accessible to all on the Web. The information in such a database will inform optimal utilization of current drugs and sustain the longest possible therapeutic life of newly introduced drugs and combinations. The database will protect the valuable investment represented by the development and deployment of novel therapies for malaria.

  19. Antimalarial activity of some Colombian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavito, G; Rincón, J; Arteaga, L; Hata, Y; Bourdy, G; Gimenez, A; Pinzón, R; Deharo, E

    2006-10-11

    Antimalarial activity of 10 vegetal extracts (9 ethanolic extracts and 1 crude alkaloid extract), obtained from eight species traditionally used in Colombia to treat malaria symptoms, was evaluated in culture using Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant (FcB2) strain and in vivo on rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei. The activity on ferriprotoporphyrin biomineralization inhibition test (FBIT) was also assessed. Against Plasmodium falciparum, eight extracts displayed good activity Abuta grandifolia (Mart.) Sandwith (Menispermaceae) leaves, Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd. (Mimosaceae) leaves, Acnistus arborescens (L.) Schltdl. (Solanaceae) aerial part, Croton leptostachyus Kunth (Euphorbiaceae) aerial part, Piper cumanense Kunth (Piperaceae) fruits and leaves, Piper holtonii C. DC. (Piperaceae) aerial part and Xylopia aromatica (Lam.) Mart. (Annonaceae) bark with IC(50) values ranging from <1 to 2.1 microg/ml, while in the in vivo model only Abuta grandifolia alkaloid crude extract exhibits activity, inhibiting 66% of the parasite growth at 250 mg/kg/day. In the FBIT model, five extracts were active (Abuta grandifolia, Croton leptostachyus, Piper cumanense fruit and leaves and Xylopia aromatica). PMID:16713157

  20. Use and quality of antimalarial drugs in the private sector in Viet Nam.

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, L D; Yen, P. T.; Nhu, T. V.; Binh, L N

    1998-01-01

    This study examines the use and quality of antimalarial drugs in the growing private sector of Viet Nam. The practices of drug vendors (called alternative treatment providers (ATPs)) as well as their stocks and the quality of drugs sold by them, and the local production and distribution of antimalarials were investigated. Antimalarials were sold by the vast majority of ATPs, almost all the common antimalarials being available for sale. The practices and indications for sale, however, varied. ...

  1. From hybrid compounds to targeted drug delivery in antimalarial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rudi; Miranda, Daniela; Magalhães, Joana; Capela, Rita; Perry, Maria J; O'Neill, Paul M; Moreira, Rui; Lopes, Francisca

    2015-08-15

    The discovery of new drugs to treat malaria is a continuous effort for medicinal chemists due to the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to nearly all used antimalarials. The rapid adaptation of the malaria parasite remains a major limitation to disease control. Development of hybrid antimalarial agents has been actively pursued as a promising strategy to overcome the emergence of resistant parasite strains. This review presents the journey that started with simple combinations of two active moieties into one chemical entity and progressed into a delivery/targeted system based on major antimalarial classes of drugs. The rationale for providing different mechanisms of action against a single or additional targets involved in the multiple stages of the parasite's life-cycle is highlighted. Finally, a perspective for this polypharmacologic approach is presented. PMID:25913864

  2. Use of the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag-CO2 for the evaluation of in vitro Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to standard anti-malarial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travers Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the cultivation system in which the proper atmospheric conditions for growing Plasmodium falciparum parasites were maintained in a sealed bag. The Genbag® system associated with the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® was used for in vitro susceptibility test of nine standard anti-malarial drugs and compared to standard incubator conditions. Methods The susceptibility of 36 pre-identified parasite strains from a wide panel of countries was assessed for nine standard anti-malarial drugs (chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone and pyrimethamine by the standard 42-hour 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method using the Genbag CO2® system and compared to controlled incubator conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2. Results The counts per minute values in the control wells in incubator atmospheric conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2 were significantly higher than those of Genbag® conditions (2738 cpm vs 2282 cpm, p 50 estimated under the incubator atmospheric conditions was significantly lower for atovaquone (1.2 vs 2.1 nM, p = 0.0011 and higher for the quinolines: chloroquine (127 vs 94 nM, p 50 between the 2 conditions for dihydroartemisinin, doxycycline and pyrimethamine. To reduce this difference in term of anti-malarial susceptibility, a specific cut-off was estimated for each drug under Genbag® conditions by regression. The cut-off was estimated at 77 nM for chloroquine (vs 100 nM in 10% O2, 611 nM for quinine (vs 800 nM, 30 nM for mefloquine (vs 30 nM, 61 nM for monodesethylamodiaquine (vs 80 nM and 1729 nM for pyrimethamine (vs 2000 nM. Conclusions The atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® is an appropriate technology that can be transferred to the field for epidemiological surveys of drug-resistant malaria. The present data suggest the importance of the gas mixture on in vitro

  3. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  4. The interaction of x-rays and antimalarials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The radiation sensitivity of malaria parasites has three potential clinical applications, namely i) to prevent the transmission of malaria by blood transfusion, ii) as adjunctive therapy when a radioactive isotope is complexed to a conventional antimalarial drug, and iii) to attenuate the pathogenicity of specific parasite stages as part of the development of a vaccine. In the first two applications, detailed information relating to parasite radiosensitivity and the interaction of ionising radiation with antimalarials is of vital importance because dosimetry must allow for the exposure of normal cells. Malaria parasite cultures (Plasmodium falciparum) were exposed to a logarithmic series of concentrations of antimalarial agents and irradiated using a Siemens Stabilipan orthovoltage radiotherapy unit. The irradiation was performed at room temperature and ambient oxygen concentration. Control samples were also irradiated. The DNA synthesis in each culture was measured 48 hours post irradiation by using a 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation assay. The antimalarials studied are: artesunate, quinine, retinol and chloroquine. The radiosensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum is not dependent on the strain of parasite with the dose required to inhibit 50% of DNA synthesis (ID50) equal to 24.7 ± 3.0 Gy. This applies equally for the drug resistant and drug sensitive strains studied. Because the measured radiosensitivity is dependent on the sera oxygen concentration, the reported value for the ID50 may not apply in hypoxic situations. The interaction of ionising radiation with the antimalarials shows synergy with retinol and choloquine, additivity with quinine and slight antagonism with artesunate. Radionuclide therapy may emerge as a novel treatment for malaria. If this does occur, then, although all strains appear to be equally radiosensitive, care must be taken when combining ionising radiation with existing antimalarials for the treatment of malaria. Copyright (2001

  5. In Vivo Antimalarial Effects of Iranian Flora Artemisia khorassanica against Plasmodium berghei and Pharmacochemistry of its Natural Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Amini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimalarial effects of Iranian flora Artemisia khorassanica against Plasmodium berghei in vivo and pharmacochemistry of its natural components."nMethods: The aerial parts of Iranian flora A. khorasanica were collected at flowering stage from Khorassan Province, northeastern Iran in 2008. They were air-dried at room temperature; powder was macerated in methanol and the extract defatted in refrigerator, filtered, diluted with water, then eluted with n-hexane and finally non-polar components were identified through Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS. Toxicity of herbal extracts was assessed on naïve NMRI mice, and its anti-malarial efficacy was investigated on infected Plasmodium berghei animals. This is the first ap­plication on A. khorssanica extract for treatment of murine malaria. The significance of differences was determined by Analysis of Variances (ANOVA and Student's t-test using Graph Pad Prism Software."nResults: The herbal extract was successfully tested in vivo for its anti-plasmodial activity through ar­temisin composition, which is widely used as a standard malaria treatment."nConclusion: Although, this study confirmed less anti-malarial effects of A. khorssanica against mur­ine malaria in vivo, how­ever there are some evidences on reducing pathophysiology by this medica­tion. In complementary assay, major components were detected by GC-MS analysis in herbal extract including chrysanthe­none (7.8%, palmitic acid (7.4% and cis-thujone (5.8%.  The most retention indices of the compo­nent are given as n-eicosane, palmitic acid and n-octadecane.

  6. Stevioside methanol tetrasolvate

    OpenAIRE

    Avery, Mitchell A.; McChesney, James D.; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Douglas L. Rodenburg; Yunshan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Stevioside is a naturally occurring diterpenoid glycoside in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni. The title compound, C38H60O18·4CH3OH, crystallized as its methanol tetrasolvate. Stevioside consists of an aglycone steviol (a tetracyclic diterpene in which the four-fused-ring system consists of three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring) and a sugar part (three glucose units). A weak intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond occurs. In the crystal, the methanol molecules participate in a ...

  7. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  8. Fighting fire with fire: mass antimalarial drug administrations in an era of antimalarial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antimalarial resistance has been a major liability for malaria control. The spread of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains had catastrophic consequences for people in malaria-endemic regions, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The recent emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum strains is of highest concern. Current efforts to contain artemisinin resistance have yet to show success. In the absence of more promising plans, it has been suggested to eliminate falciparum malaria from foci of artemisinin resistance using a multipronged approach, including mass drug administrations. The use of mass drug administrations is controversial as it increases drug pressure. Based on current knowledge it is difficult to conceptualize how targeted malaria elimination could contribute to artemisinin resistance, provided a full treatment course is ensured. PMID:25831482

  9. In vitro Potentiation of Antimalarial Activities by Daphnetin Derivatives Against Plasmodium falciparum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG HUANG; LIN-HUA TANG; LIN-QIAN YU; YI-CHANG NI; QIN-MEI WANG; FA-JUN NAN

    2006-01-01

    Objective To screen the antimalarial compounds of daphnetin derivatives against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. Method Plasmodium faciparum (FCC1) was cultured in vitro by a modified method of Trager and Jensen. Antimalarial compounds were screened by microscopy-based assay and microfluorimetric method. Results DA79 and DA78 showed potent antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum cultured in vitro. Conclusion Though the relationship between the structures of daphnetin derivatives and their antimalarial activities has not been clarified yet, this study may provide a new direction for discovery of more potential antimalarial compounds.

  10. Synthesis and biological activity of pyrimido [1, 2-a] quinoline moiety and its 2-substituted derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, A. G.; Halikar, N. K.

    2013-04-01

    2-Amino-3-cyano quinoline (1) and bis (methylthio) methylene malononitrile (2) were refluxed in N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) in presence of catalytic amount of anhydrous potassium carbonate to afforded 3, 11-dicyano-4-imino-2-methylthio -4H-pyrimido [1, 2-a] quinoline (3). The latter were further reacted with different substituted aniline, phenol, hetryl amine and compound containing active methyl group. Afforded to 3, 11-dicyano-4-imino -4H-pyrimido [1, 2-a] quinoline and their 2-substuited derivatives (4a-7c). All these newly synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis and spectral data, and screened for their antimicrobial activities.

  11. Protein from methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, M.; Ushio, S.

    1974-01-07

    The biosynthesis of proteins from methanol produced from natural gas can provide an attractive alternative to the already commercially proven technique of protein synthesis from gas oil and n-paraffin feedstocks if current pilot-plant tests in England and Japan prove successful. The methanol route also provides other advantages as a protein feedstock: it is water soluble, contains no polycyclic aromatic compounds, and requires less oxygen than methane. Its lower boiling point helps ease the separation of feedstock from the product stream. Finally, it will require lower investment costs. Both ICI and Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co. are large methanol producers. ICI already has a 1000 ton/yr plant operating at Teeside, England, and expects to decide on a 100,000 m ton/yr plant later this year. Mitsubishi is constructing a large-scale pilot plant scheduled to come onstream this year. ICI will use a Pseudomona bacterium at 98.6/sup 0/F (37/sup 0/C) in the fermenter. Mitsubishi has not yet decided on a yeast or a bacteria, and is searching for a strain capable of withstanding up to 115/sup 0/F (46/sup 0/C). In the more advanced ICI process, methanol will be mixed with phosphoric acid, potassium sulfate, sodium chloride, and traces of iron, copper, zinc, and molybdenum; diluted with water; passed through a sterilization tank; and fermented at pH 7 in a pressure cycle fermenter. The product stream, containing a 3 percent suspension of cellular dry matter, is taken near the top of the fermenter riser, then passed through a flotation vessel and a centrifuge to pack the cell concentration to 20 percent. Water is recycled. Whatever methanol remains in the fermenter product stream is either used up by the microorganisms in subsequent processing or vaporized in the dryer. (auth)

  12. Detecting Counterfeit Antimalarial Tablets by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counterfeit antimalarial drugs are found in many developing countries, but it is challenging to differentiate between genuine and fakes due to their increasing sophistication. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical forensics, and we tested this technique for discrim...

  13. In vitro antimalarial activity of novel semisynthetic nocathiacin I antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Indu; Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in vitro growth inhibition assay was done using three laboratory strains of P. falciparum displaying various levels of chloroquine (CQ) susceptibility. Our results indicate that BMS461996 has potent antimalarial activity and inhibits parasite growth with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 51.55 nM for P. falciparum 3D7 (CQ susceptible), 85.67 nM for P. falciparum Dd2 (accelerated resistance to multiple drugs [ARMD]), and 99.44 nM for P. falciparum K1 (resistant to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine). Similar results at approximately 7-fold higher IC50s were obtained with BMS411886 than with BMS461996. We also tested the effect of BMS491996 on gametocytes; our results show that at a 20-fold excess of the mean IC50, gametocytes were deformed with a pyknotic nucleus and growth of stage I to IV gametocytes was arrested. This preliminary study shows a significant potential for nocathiacin analogues to be developed as antimalarial drug candidates and to warrant further investigation. PMID:25779576

  14. The antimalarial drug quinine interferes with serotonin biosynthesis and action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islahudin, Farida; Tindall, Sarah M.; Mellor, Ian R.;

    2014-01-01

    The major antimalarial drug quinine perturbs uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan, and patients with low plasma tryptophan are predisposed to adverse quinine reactions; symptoms of which are similar to indications of tryptophan depletion. As tryptophan is a precursor of the neurotransmit...

  15. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the m

  16. Quinoline analog labeled with 123I in melanoma detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Greene melanoma in the hamster (Syrian Golden), the radiopharmaceutical, 123I-4(3-dimethylaminopropylamino)- 7-Iodoquinoline, was tested for its ability to localize melanoma. This quinoline analog has been described for use in the detection of melanoma, but this is the first report, to our knowledge, of its being used with an 123I label. Hamsters with either skin or eye melanomas were studied. Both melanomas could be seen with a gamma camera at three hours after injection. In vitro analysis confirmed the tumor specificity. Thus, it appears that this preclinical trial of a new radiopharmaceutical justifies clinical testing to determine its value in the localization of melanomas of the eyes and skin of humans

  17. A quinoline based pH sensitive ratiometric fluorescent sensor: Structure and spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soma Mukherjee; Amit Kumar Paul; Helen Stoeckli-Evans

    2015-09-01

    A new quinoline based hydrazone was synthesized via a condensation reaction and characterized by NMR, mass and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. It was investigated for suitability as a reversible ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor in acidic pH region. The sensor exhibits intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) type photophysical changes upon protonation of the quinoline ring. No significant interference on emission behavior was observed in the presence of various metal ions.

  18. Activated carbon fibers prepared from quinoline and isoquinoline pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochida, I.; An, K.; Korai, Y. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study; Kojima, T.; Komatsu, M. [Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Nitrogen enriched activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared from isotropic quinoline and isoquinoline pitches produced by the catalytic action of HF/BF3 through spinning, stabilization, carbonization, and oxidative activation. The pitches exhibited excellent spinnability, and the resultant fibers had mechanical properties comparable to those of commercial fibers. The surface areas and nitrogen contents of the ACFs, obtained hereby were 740-860 m{sup 2}/g and 4-5.6%, respectively, at around 50 wt% of burn-off. FT-IR and XPS analyses identified the surface oxygen and nitrogen functional groups on the stabilized and activated fibers. The ACFs from isoquinoline pitch (IQP-ACF) exhibited higher basicity (l.3 meq/g) than commercial ACFs of similar surface areas (0.68 and 0.25 meq/g for PAN (FE-300) and coal tar pitch (OG-8A) based ACFs, respectively) due to a higher basic nitrogen content on the surface. The activation appears to expose basic nitrogen atoms, which were located under the surface. The basicity of ACF from quinoline pitch (QP-ACF) was much lower than that of IQP-ACF, however, QP-ACF adsorbed 74 mg/g of SO2, which was 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than that over FE-300 and OG-8A. In contrast, IQP-ACFs showed less adsorption of SO2 than that of QP-ACF and FE-300, but more than that of OG-8A. Oxidation activity of ACF surface may participate in the adsorption of SO2 in the form of SO3 or H2SO4. The oxygen functional groups under the influence of neighboring nitrogen atoms may be the active sites for the oxidative adsorption. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Temporal variations in rainwater methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J. D.; Jones, S. B.; Avery, G. B.; Willey, J. D.; Mead, R. N.; Kieber, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    This work reports the first comprehensive analysis of methanol concentrations in rainwater. Methanol concentrations measured in 49 rain events collected between 28 August 2007 and 10 July 2008 in Wilmington, NC, USA, ranged from below the detection limit of 6 nM to 9.3 μM with a volume-weighted average concentration of 1 ± 0.2 μM. Methanol concentrations in rainwater were up to ~200 times greater than concentrations reported previously in marine waters, indicating wet deposition as a potentially significant source of methanol to marine waters. Assuming that these methanol concentrations are an appropriate proxy for global methanol rainwater concentrations, the global methanol wet deposition sink is estimated as 20 Tg yr-1, which implies that previous methanol budgets underestimate removal by precipitation. Methanol concentrations in rainwater did not correlate significantly with H+, NO3-, and NSS, which suggests that the dominant source of the alcohol to rainwater is not anthropogenic. However, methanol concentrations were strongly correlated with acetaldehyde, which has a primarily biogenic input. The methanol volume-weighted concentration during the summer (2.7 ± 0.9 μM) was ~3 times that of the winter (0.9 ± 0.2 μM), further promoting biogenic emissions as the primary cause of temporal variations of methanol concentrations. Methanol concentrations peaked in rainwater collected during the time period 12 p.m.-6 p.m. Peaking during this period of optimal sunlight implies a possible relationship with photochemical methanol production, but there are also increases in biogenic activity during this time period. Rain events with terrestrial origin had greater concentrations than those of marine origin, demonstrating the significance of the continental source of methanol in rainwater.

  20. CO{sub 2} binding in the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Jacob D.; Buytendyk, Allyson M.; Wang, Yi; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kim, Seong K. [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-21

    We have studied the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex by a combination of mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. The (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex has much in common with previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complexes both in terms of geometric structure and covalent bonding character. Unlike the previously studied N-heterocycles, however, quinoline has a positive electron affinity, and this provided a pathway for determining the binding energy of CO{sub 2} in the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex. From the theoretical calculations, we found CO{sub 2} to be bound within the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex by 0.6 eV. We also showed that the excess electron is delocalized over the entire molecular framework. It is likely that the CO{sub 2} binding energies and excess electron delocalization profiles of the previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complexes are quite similar to that of the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex. This class of complexes may have a role to play in CO{sub 2} activation and/or sequestration.

  1. Quinolines in clothing textiles--a source of human exposure and wastewater pollution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Giovanna; Thorsén, Gunnar; Ostman, Conny

    2014-05-01

    A production process in which the use of various types of chemicals seems to be ubiquitous makes the textile industry a growing problem regarding both public health as well as the environment. Among several substances used at each stage, the present study focuses on the quinolines, a class of compounds involved in the manufacture of dyes, some of which are skin irritants and/or classified as probable human carcinogens. A method was developed for the determination of quinoline derivatives in textile materials comprising ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction, solid phase extraction cleanup, and final analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Quinoline and ten quinoline derivatives were determined in 31 textile samples. The clothing samples, diverse in color, material, brand, country of manufacture, and price, and intended for a broad market, were purchased from different shops in Stockholm, Sweden. Quinoline, a possible human carcinogen, was found to be the most abundant compound present in almost all of the samples investigated, reaching a level of 1.9 mg in a single garment, and it was found that quinoline and its derivatives were mainly correlated to polyester material. This study points out the importance of screening textiles with nontarget analysis to investigate the presence of chemicals in an unbiased manner. Focus should be primarily on clothing worn close to the body. PMID:24604325

  2. CO2 binding in the (quinoline-CO2)− anionic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the (quinoline-CO2)− anionic complex by a combination of mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. The (quinoline-CO2)− anionic complex has much in common with previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO2)− anionic complexes both in terms of geometric structure and covalent bonding character. Unlike the previously studied N-heterocycles, however, quinoline has a positive electron affinity, and this provided a pathway for determining the binding energy of CO2 in the (quinoline-CO2)− anionic complex. From the theoretical calculations, we found CO2 to be bound within the (quinoline-CO2)− anionic complex by 0.6 eV. We also showed that the excess electron is delocalized over the entire molecular framework. It is likely that the CO2 binding energies and excess electron delocalization profiles of the previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO2)− anionic complexes are quite similar to that of the (quinoline-CO2)− anionic complex. This class of complexes may have a role to play in CO2 activation and/or sequestration

  3. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    OpenAIRE

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefor...

  4. Methanol commercial aviation fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southern California's heavy reliance on petroleum-fueled transportation has resulted in significant air pollution problems within the south Coast Air Basin (Basin) which stem directly from this near total dependence on fossil fuels. To deal with this pressing issue, recently enacted state legislation has proposed mandatory introduction of clean alternative fuels into ground transportation fleets operating within this area. The commercial air transportation sector, however, also exerts a significant impact on regional air quality which may exceed emission gains achieved in the ground transportation sector. This paper addresses the potential, through the implementation of methanol as a commercial aviation fuel, to improve regional air quality within the Basin and the need to flight test and demonstrate methanol as an environmentally preferable fuel in aircraft turbine engines

  5. Stevioside methanol tetrasolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell A. Avery

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stevioside is a naturally occurring diterpenoid glycoside in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni. The title compound, C38H60O18·4CH3OH, crystallized as its methanol tetrasolvate. Stevioside consists of an aglycone steviol (a tetracyclic diterpene in which the four-fused-ring system consists of three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring and a sugar part (three glucose units. A weak intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond occurs. In the crystal, the methanol molecules participate in a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network parallel to b axis with the sugars and together they form a hydrophilic tunnel which encloses the lipophilic part of the molecule.

  6. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, S. J.; Custer, T.; G. Schade; Soares Dias, A. P.; J. Burrows

    2005-01-01

    A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w) of the...

  7. Discovery and optimisation studies of antimalarial phenotypic hits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Alka; Murugesan, Dinakaran; Kaiser, Marcel; Yeates, Clive; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of new antimalarial compounds. As a result of a phenotypic screen, several compounds with potent activity against the parasite Plasmodium falciparum were identified. Characterization of these compounds is discussed, along with approaches to optimise the physicochemical properties. The in vitro antimalarial activity of these compounds against P. falciparum K1 had EC50 values in the range of 0.09–29 μM, and generally good selectivity (typically >100-fold) compared to a mammalian cell line (L6). One example showed no significant activity against a rodent model of malaria, and more work is needed to optimise these compounds. PMID:26408453

  8. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Solomon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w of the catalyst in quartz sand. Optimal methanol to formaldehyde conversion (>95% efficiency occurred at a catalyst housing temperature of 345°C and an estimated sample-air/catalyst contact time of <0.2 s. Potential interferences arising from conversion of methane and a number of common volatile organic compounds (VOC to formaldehyde were found to be negligible under most atmospheric conditions and catalyst housing temperatures. Using the new technique, atmospheric measurements of methanol were made at the University of Bremen campus from 1 to 15 July 2004. Methanol mixing ratios ranged from 1 to 5 ppb with distinct maxima at night. Formaldehyde mixing ratios, obtained in conjunction with methanol by periodically bypassing the catalytic converter, ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 ppb with maxima during midday. These results suggest that selective, catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion, coupled with existing formaldehyde measurement instrumentation, is an inexpensive and effective means for monitoring atmospheric methanol.

  9. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Solomon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w of the catalyst in quartz sand. Optimal methanol to formaldehyde conversion (>95% efficiency occurred at a catalyst housing temperature of 345°C and an estimated sample-air/catalyst contact time of <0.2 seconds. Potential interferences arising from conversion of methane and a number of common volatile organic compounds (VOC to formaldehyde were found to be negligible under most atmospheric conditions and catalyst housing temperatures. Using the new technique, atmospheric measurements of methanol were made at the University of Bremen campus from 1 to 15 July 2004. Methanol mixing ratios ranged from 1 to 5 ppb with distinct maxima at night. Formaldehyde mixing ratios, obtained in conjunction with methanol by periodically bypassing the catalytic converter, ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 ppb with maxima during midday. These results suggest that selective, catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion, coupled with existing formaldehyde measurement instrumentation, is an inexpensive and effective means for monitoring atmospheric methanol.

  10. Synthesis of 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinolin derivatives are a group of compounds known to possess a wide range of biological activities. The chemistry of quinolines together with their corresponding aldehydes were dealt with in chapter one of this study. Special emphasis was given to the chemistry of benzaldehyde. Twenty five 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid derivatives together with their corresponding intermediates were prepared in this work. Basically, the synthetic design of these compounds arise from the appropriate disconnections of the target 2-phenyl and 2,3-diphenyl-quinolin-4-carboxylic acids. The retro synthesis analysis of these compounds reveals pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde or phenyl pyruvic acid, aromatic amine and benzaldehyde as possible logical precursors for 2-phenyl-and 2,3-diphenyl- quinoline-4-carboxylic acids respectively. The purity and identities of the synthesized compounds were elucidated through chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The compounds were heavily subjected to spectroscopic analysis (UV, IR, GC/MS, 1H-and 13C- NMR). The appropriate disconnections and the mechanisms of the corresponding reactions were given and discussed in chapter three. The spectral data were interpreted and correlated with the target structures. The prepared 2-phenyl- and 2,3-diphenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives were screened for their antibacterial activity. The compounds were tested against the standard bacterial organisms B. subtilis, S. aureus, E. coli and P. vulgaris. Some of these compounds were devoid of antibacterial activity against S. aureus and P. vulgaris, while others showed moderate activity. All of the tested compounds showed an activity against B. subtilis and E. coli. 2,3-diphenyl -6-sulphanilamide-quinolin-4-carboxylic acid showed the highest activity against the four standard tested organisms.(Author)

  11. Potential antimalarials from African natural products: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Lawal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnopharmacological relevance: Malaria remains an overwhelming infectious disease with significant health challenges in African and other endemic countries globally. Resistance to antimalarial drugs has become one of the most momentous challenges to human health and thus has necessitated the hunt for new and effective drugs. Consequently, few decades have witnessed a surfeit of research geared to validate the effectiveness of commonly used traditionally medicines against malaria fever. The present review work focuses on documenting natural products from African whose activity has been reported in-vivo or invi-tro against malaria parasite. Methods: Literature was collected using electronic search of published articles (Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Sciencedirect, Science domain that report on antiplasmodial activity of natural products from differernts Africa region. Results: A Total of 652 plant taxa from 146 families, 134 isolated antimalarial compounds from 39 plants species, 2 herbal formulations and 4 insect/products were found to be reported in literature from 1996 to 2015. Plants species from family Asteraceae (11.04%, Fababceae (8.128%, Euphorbiaceae (5.52%, Rubiaceas (5.52% and Apocyanaceae (5.214%, have received more scientific validation than others. Conclusion: African natural products possess remarkable healing properties as revealed in the various citations as promising antimalarial agents. Some of these natural products from Africa demonstrate high, promising or low activities against plasmodium parasite. This study also shows that natural products from Africa have a huge amount of novel antimalarial compounds that could serve as a leads for the development of new and effective antiplasmodial drugs. However, in a view of bridging the gap in knowledge, clinical validation of these natural products is of paramount importance. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(4.000: 318-343

  12. Drug resistance genomics of the antimalarial drug artemisinin

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A Winzeler; Manary, Micah J

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, over 200 million annual malaria infections result in up to 660,000 deaths, 77% of which occur in children under the age of five years. Although prevention is important, malaria deaths are typically prevented by using antimalarial drugs that eliminate symptoms and clear parasites from the blood. Artemisinins are one of the few remaining compound classes that can be used to cure multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum infections. Unfortunately, clinical trials from Southeast...

  13. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  14. Antimalarial drug resistance in Africa: key lessons for the future

    OpenAIRE

    Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Laufer, Miriam K

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant parasites repeatedly arise as a result of widespread use of antimalarial drugs and have contributed significantly to the failure to control and eradicate malaria throughout the world. In this review, we describe the spread of resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine, two old drugs that are no longer used owing to high rates of resistance, and examine the effect of the removal of drug pressure on the survival of resistant parasites. Artemisinin-resistant malaria i...

  15. Intermittent Preventive Antimalarial Treatment for Children with Anaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Athuman, Mwaka; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Rohwer, Anke C

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a global public health problem. Children under five years of age living in developing countries (mostly Africa and South-East Asia) are highly affected. Although the causes for anaemia are multifactorial, malaria has been linked to anaemia in children living in malaria-endemic areas. Administering intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment (IPT) to children might reduce anaemia, since it could protect children from new Plasmodium parasite infection (the parasites tha...

  16. Cell wall perturbation sensitizes fungi to the antimalarial drug chloroquine

    OpenAIRE

    Islahudin, Farida; Khozoie, Combiz; Bates, Steven; Ting, Kang-Nee; Pleass, Richard J.; Avery, Simon V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been a mainstay of antimalarial drug treatment for several decades. Additional therapeutic actions of CQ have been described, including some reports of fungal inhibition. Here we investigated the action of CQ in fungi, including the yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genomewide yeast deletion strain collection was screened against CQ, revealing that bck1Δ and slt2Δ mutants of the cell wall integrity pathway are CQ hypersensitive. This phenotype was rescued with sorbi...

  17. Antimalarial effect of agmatine on Plasmodium berghei K173 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SURui-Bin; WEIXiao-Li; LIUYin; LIJin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the antimalarial effect of agmatine (Agm) on chloroquine-susceptible Plasmodium berghei K173strain (S strain) and the P berghei K173 resistant strain (R strain). METHODS: The antimalarial effects of Agm onP berghei K173 S strain and R strain were evaluated by Peters 4-d suppression test in mice. RESULTS: Agm(12.5-200 mg/kg,ig,daily) decreased the parasitemia for both P berghei K173 S strain (IC50=139 mg/kg) and Rstrain (IC50=126mg/kg) in mice. Subcutaneous injection (sc) of Agm (5-40mg/kg,tid) showed relatively strongerantimalarial effect than intragastric gavage (IC50=30 mg/kg) in P berghei K 173 S strain. Spermidine antagonized theantimalarial effect of Agm for P berghei K173 S strain and R strain. Agm did not reverse the chloroquine resistanceof P berghei K173 S strain, dl-α-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO, sc) decreased the parasitemia of P BergheiK173 S strain and this effect was antagonized by spermidine. CONCLUSION: Agm has an antimalarial effect andthe mechanism is related to its inhibition of polyamine synthesis.

  18. Antimalarials and the fight against malaria in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz MA Carmargo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Luiz MA Carmargo1, Saulo de Oliveira2, Sergio Basano3, Célia RS Garcia21ICBV-USP, Monte Negro, Rondônia, Brasil; 2Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3CEMETRON, Porto Velho, Guaporé, BrazilAbstract: Malaria, known as the “fevers,” has been treated for over three thousand years in China with extracts of plants of the genus Artemisia (including Artemisia annua, A. opiacea, and A. lancea from which the active compound is artemisin, a sesquiterpene that is highly effective in the treatment of the disease, especially against young forms of the parasite. South American Indians in the seventeenth century already used an extract of the bark of chinchona tree, commonly named “Jesuits’ powder.” Its active compound was isolated in 1820 and its use spread all over the world being used as a prophylactic drug during the construction of the Madeira–Mamoré railroad in the beginning of the twentieth century. During the 1920s to the 1940s, new antimalarial drugs were synthesized to increase the arsenal against this parasite. However, the parasite has presented systematic resistence to conventional antimalarial drugs, driving researchers to find new strategies to treat the disease. In the present review we discuss how Brazil treats Plasmodium-infected patients.Keywords: Plasmodium falciparum, malaria, antimalarials, calcium

  19. Review of pyronaridine anti-malarial properties and product characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croft Simon L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pyronaridine was synthesized in 1970 at the Institute of Chinese Parasitic Disease and has been used in China for over 30 years for the treatment of malaria. Pyronaridine has high potency against Plasmodium falciparum, including chloroquine-resistant strains. Studies in various animal models have shown pyronaridine to be effective against strains resistant to other anti-malarials, including chloroquine. Resistance to pyronaridine appears to emerge slowly and is further retarded when pyronaridine is used in combination with other anti-malarials, in particular, artesunate. Pyronaridine toxicity is generally less than that of chloroquine, though evidence of embryotoxicity in rodents suggests use with caution in pregnancy. Clinical pharmacokinetic data for pyronaridine indicates an elimination T1/2 of 13.2 and 9.6 days, respectively, in adults and children with acute uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in artemisinin-combination therapy. Clinical data for mono or combined pyronaridine therapy show excellent anti-malarial effects against P. falciparum and studies of combination therapy also show promise against Plasmodium vivax. Pyronaridine has been developed as a fixed dose combination therapy, in a 3:1 ratio, with artesunate for the treatment of acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria and blood stage P. vivax malaria with the name of Pyramax® and has received Positive Opinion by European Medicines Agency under the Article 58 procedure.

  20. Anti-Malarial Plants of Jonai, India: an Ethnobotanical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonlong WANGPAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available North-East India represents a unique ecosystem with treasured medicinal plant wealth closely related with Folk medicines. A large number of plants having medicinal properties and their folk uses have remained confined to the natives of this region. The tribal community of Jonai, Assam was explored to expose the indigenous herbal remedy for malaria. Sixteen antimalarial plants belonging to 13 families were reported. The analysis revealed highest fidelity level (FL value for Ajuga integrifolia (100% followed by Ricinus communis (94%, Alstonia scholaris (88%, Oroxylum indicum (86% and Achyranthes aspera (82%. The percentage of respondent’s knowledge (PRK about anti-malarial plants showed Alstonia scholaris as the most commonly known antimalarial species (53% within this region. Preference ranking (PR unveiled eight species to be very effective against malarial parasite, which includes Allium sativum, Artemisia indica, Azadirachta indica, Carica papaya, Clerodendrum glandulosum, Ocimum tenuiflorum, Oroxylum indicum, Piper longum and Piper nigrum. All medicine preparations are made using water as the medium and are orally administered in the form of crude extract, powder, juice and decoction. Overall analysis suggested Ajuga integrifolia, Achyranthes aspera, Alstonia scholaris, Artemisia indica, Oroxylum indicum and Ricinus communis to be used for the development of novel, economical, effective and ecofriendly herbal formulations for healthcare management.

  1. CO2 hydrogenation to methanol

    OpenAIRE

    Frilund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The literature survey discusses the recent developments in heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Special focus was given to new coated catalysts and reactors. Methanol is an important chemical that is currently produced from synthesis gas. Methanol can also be produced from CO2, but the reaction is less thermodynamically favoured. The main reaction is the exothermic CO2 hydrogenation, and there is a competing fast reaction, the reverse water-gas shift, which converts CO2 t...

  2. Cytotoxicity and cell cycle effects of novel indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeniuk, Rita; Kaczmarek, Lukasz; Peczyńska-Czoch, Wanda; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Cellular effects of novel indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives were studied. These compounds are synthetic analogs of plant alkaloid neocryptolepine (5-methyl-5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline) present in extracts from Cryptolepis sanguinolenta. They are traditionally used in natural medicine in Central and West Africa. Previous molecular and computational studies indicated that these compounds were DNA intercalators and inhibitors of topoisomerase II. We have extended our studies on their mode of action to the cellular level. Past experiments have shown that these compounds were active in vitro against cell lines derived from solid tumors, so for the present studies we selected leukemic cell lines. Jurkat acute T cell, CCRF-CEM T lymphoblastoid, THP-1 acute monocytic, HL-60 acute promyelocytic leukemias, and HL-60/MX2 subline with reduced expression of topoisomerase II were used. We evaluated the cytotoxicity and cell cycle effects of the indolo[2,3-b]quinoline compounds. We also tested if these compounds were able to induce apoptosis in the cells. Our studies revealed that novel indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives were more cytotoxic to all cell lines than etoposide (used as a reference topoisomerase II inhibitor), and that their cytotoxicity depended on the substituents introduced to the indolo[2,3-b]quinoline core. Surprisingly, our studies have shown that HL-60/MX2 cell line and also THP-1 cell line, resistant to etoposide, were susceptible to methyl- and methoxy-substituted indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives. In parallel to the evaluation of cytotoxicity we studied cell cycle effects of these compounds. Treatment of HL-60 cells with etoposide in subcytotoxic concentrations resulted in a massive accumulation of the cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. When we used subcytotoxic concentrations of our novel indolo[2,3-b]quinoline derivatives the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells was not affected. Moreover, the cell cycle of HL-60/MX2 cells was not influenced by

  3. Antimalarial activity and toxicity of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ratchanu; Bunyong; Wanna; Chaijaroenkul; Tullayakorn; Plengsuriyakarn; Kesara; Na-Bangchang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antimalarial activity and toxicity of the crude ethanolic extract of its pericarp both in vitro and in vim.Methods:The antimalarial activity of Gareinja mangostana(G.mangostana)Linn.extract against 3D7 and Kl Plasmodium falciparum(P.falciparum)clone were assessed using SYBR green I-based assay.A 4-day suppressive test of Plasmodium berghei{P.berghei)infected mouse was performed to investigate in vivo antimalarial activity.Results:The in vitro antimalarial activity was seleclive(SI>5?and classified as weak and good lo moderate activity against both 3D7 and K1 P.falciparum,clones with median IC50(range)values of 11.12(10.94-11.29)and 7.54(6.80-7.68)μg/mL,respectively.The extract was considered nontoxic to mice.The maximum tolerated doses for acute and subacute toxicity in mice were 5 000and 2 000 mg/kg,respectively.Median(range)parasite density on day 4 of the negative control group(25%Tween-80),mice treated with 250,500,1000,and 2 000 mg/kg body weight of the extract,and 10 mg/kg body weight of chloroquine for 14 d were 12.8(12.2-13.7),11.4(9.49-13.8),11.6(9.9-12.5),11.7(10.6-12.8),10.9(9.4-11.6)and 0(0-0)%respectively.Parasite density on day 4in the control group treated with Tween-80 was higher than the groups treated with chloroquine and all dose levels of the extract.Conclusions:G.mangostana linn,showed weak antimalarial activity of the extract both in vitro and in vivo could be due to limitation of absorption of the active compounds.

  4. 40 CFR 180.426 - 2-[4,5-Dihydro-4-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-5-oxo-1H-imidazol-2-yl]-3-quinoline carboxylic acid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2- -3-quinoline carboxylic acid... Tolerances § 180.426 2- -3-quinoline carboxylic acid; tolerance for residues. A tolerance is established for residues of the herbicide 2- -3-quinoline carboxylic acid, in or on the raw agricultural commodity...

  5. Mineralization of Quinoline by BDD Anodes: Variable Effects and Its Effluent Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BDD anodes were selected for quinoline mineralization and influence of operating parameters, such as current density, initial quinoline concentration, supporting electrolyte, and initial pH was investigated. Based on the consideration of quinoline removal efficiency and average current efficiency, at initial quinoline concentration of 50 mg L−1 and pH of 7, the optimal condition was confirmed as current density of 75 mA cm−2, electrolysis time of 1.5 h, and Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 mol L−1 by orthogonal test. At different electrolysis time, its effluent characteristics were focused on. The biodegradability (the ratio between BOD5 and COD was enhanced from initial 0.02 to 0.57 at 90 min. The specific oxygen uptake rate was used to assess effluent toxicity, and the value gradually reduced with decreasing effluent organic concentration with mean value of 5.51, 4.19, and 2.20 mgO2 g−1MLSS at electrolysis time of 15, 30, and 45 min, respectively. Compared with control sample (prepared with glucose, the effluent of quinoline mineralization showed obvious inhibition effect on microorganisms at electrolysis time of 15 min, and then it was significantly faded at 30 min and 45 min.

  6. Regioselective demethylation of quinoline derivatives. A DFT rationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belferdi, Fatiha; Merabet, Naima; Belkhiri, Lotfi; Douara, Bachir

    2016-08-01

    Demethylation of compound 2,7-dimethoxyquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 1, is carried out using BBr3. However, all attempts led, either to the starting material or to the regioselective demethylation at position 2 affording the product 4a. The nature (donor or acceptor) and the position of the R (CHO or CN) group is likely to play a role in the preventing the demethylation at position 7. To address this phenomena, the demethylation of 2-chloro-7-methoxyquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 2 and 2,7-dimethoxyquinoline-3-carbaldehyde 3 has been carried out. To support the results obtained, theoretical computations at DFT level (vide infra) have been carried out upon compound 1. The exploration of how the gas-phase demethylation process on Quinoline can be affected at a position 7 center by stepwise substation effects using different electro-donor and attractor groups, show that demethylation process seems to be more favorable when substituent is an electro-donor. This is sustained by bond energy and thermodynamic analyses (vide infra).

  7. Zero Kinetic Energy Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Benzo[h]quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2015-12-17

    We report zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy of benzo[h]quinoline (BhQ) via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) through the first electronically excited state S1. From the simulated REMPI spectra with and without Herzberg-Teller coupling, we conclude that vibronic coupling plays a minor but observable role in the electronic excitation to the S1 state. We further compare the S1 state of BhQ with the first two electronically excited states of phenanthrene, noticing a similarity of the S1 state of BhQ with the second electronically excited state S2 of phenanthrene. In the ZEKE spectra of BhQ, the vibrational frequencies of the cationic state D0 are consistently higher than those of the intermediate neutral state, indicating enhanced bonding upon ionization. The sparse ZEKE spectra, compared with the spectrum of phenanthrene containing rich vibronic activities, further imply that the nitrogen atom has attenuated the structural change between S1 and D0 states. We speculate that the nitrogen atom can withdraw an electron in the S1 state and donate an electron in the D0 state, thereby minimizing the structural change during ionization. The origin of the first electronically excited state is determined to be 29,410 ± 5 cm(-1), and the adiabatic ionization potential is determined to be 65,064 ± 7 cm(-1). PMID:26039927

  8. Synthesis of quinoline-3-carboxylates by a Rh(II)-catalyzed cyclopropanation-ring expansion reaction of indoles with halodiazoacetates

    OpenAIRE

    Magnus Mortén; Martin Hennum; Tore Bonge-Hansen

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we report a novel synthesis of ethyl quinoline-3-carboxylates from reactions between a series of indoles and halodiazoacetates. The formation of the quinoline structure is probably the result of a cyclopropanation at the 2- and 3-positions of the indole followed by ring-opening of the cyclopropane and elimination of H–X.

  9. 8-Hydroxy-2-methylquinolinium tetrachlorido(quinolin-2-olato-κ2N,Ostannate(IV methanol disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzatollah Najafi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline and stannic chloride, the 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline is protonated, yielding the disolvated title salt, (C10H10NO[SnCl4(C9H6NO]·2CH3OH. The SnIV atom in the anion is N,O-chelated by the hydroxyquinolinate in a cis-SnNOCl4 octahedral geometry. In the crystal, the cation, anion and solvent molecules are linked by N—H...O, O—H...O and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, generating a three-dimensional network.

  10. Methanol as an energy carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, P.; Grube, T.; Hoehlein, B. (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    For the future, a strongly growing energy demand is expected in the transport sector worldwide. Economically efficient oil production will run through a maximum in the next decade. Higher fuel prices and an environmentally desirable reduction of emissions will increase the pressure for reducing fuel consumption and emissions in road traffic. These criteria show the urgent necessity of structural changes in the fuel market. Due to its advantages concerning industrial-scale production, storage and global availability, methanol has the short- to medium-term potential for gaining increased significance as a substitution product in the energy market. Methanol can be produced both from fossil energy sources and from biomass or waste materials through the process steps of synthesis gas generation with subsequent methanol synthesis. Methanol has the potential to be used in an environmentally friendly manner in gasoline/methanol mixtures for flexible fuel vehicles with internal combustion engines and in diesel engines with pure methanol. Furthermore, it can be used in fuel cell vehicles with on-board hydrogen production in direct methanol fuel cell drives, and in stationary systems for electricity and heat generation as well as for hydrogen production. Finally, in portable applications it serves as an energy carrier for electric power generation. In this book, the processes for the production and use of methanol are presented and evaluated, markets and future options are discussed and issues of safety and environmental impacts are addressed by a team of well-known authors. (orig.)

  11. Methanol synthesis beyond chemical equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bennekom, J. G.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Wilbers, E.; Assink, D.; Lemmens, K. P. J.; Heeres, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    In commercial methanol production from syngas, the conversion is thermodynamically limited to 0.3-0.7 leading to large recycles of non-converted syngas. This problem can be overcome to a significant extent by in situ condensation of methanol during its synthesis which is possible nowadays due to the

  12. Methylnaltrexone bromide methanol monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbo Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound [systematic name: (4R,4aS,7aR,12bS-3-cyclopropylmethyl-4a,9-hydroxy-7-oxo-2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,7a-octahydro-1H-4,12-methanobenzofuro[3,2-e]isoquinolin-3-ium bromide methanol monosolvate], C21H26NO4+·Br−·CH3OH, two of the three six-membered rings adopt chair conformations while the third, which contains a C=C double bond, adopts an approximate half-boat conformation. The 2,3-dihydrofuran ring adopts an envelope conformation. In the crystal, the components are linked by O—H...O and O—H...Br hydrogen bonds. The absolute stereochemistry was inferred from one of the starting materials.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. sapiens quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase has been expressed, purified and crystallized. A diffraction data set has been collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRTase) is a key NAD-biosynthetic enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of quinolinic acid to 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, yielding nicotinic acid mononucleotide. Homo sapiens QPRTase (Hs-QPRTase) appeared as a hexamer during purification and the protein was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected and processed at 2.8 Å resolution. Native Hs-QPRTase crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.2, b = 137.1, c = 92.7 Å, β = 103.8°. Assuming the presence of six molecules in the asymmetric unit, the calculated Matthews coefficient is 2.46 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of 49.9%

  14. Chemical consequences of pyrazole orientation in Ru(II) complexes of unsymmetric quinoline-pyrazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg Wallenstein, Joachim; Fredin, Lisa A; Jarenmark, Martin; Abrahamsson, Maria; Persson, Petter

    2016-08-01

    A series of homoleptic Ru(II) complexes including the tris-bidentate complexes of a new bidentate ligand 8-(1-pyrazol)-quinoline (Q1Pz) and bidentate 8-(3-pyrazol)-quinoline (Q3PzH), as well as the bis-tridentate complex of bis(quinolinyl)-1,3-pyrazole (DQPz) was studied. Together these complexes explore the orientation of the pyrazole relative to the quinoline. By examining the complexes structurally, photophysically, photochemically, electrochemically, and computationally by DFT and TD-DFT, it is shown that the pyrazole orientation has a significant influence on key properties. In particular, its orientation has noticeable effects on oxidation and reduction potentials, photostability and proton sensitivity, indicating that [Ru(Q3PzH)3](2+) is a particularly good local environment acidity-probe candidate. PMID:27240703

  15. Solid-phase synthesis of europium and terbium complexes of quinolinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regularities of mechanochemical synthesis and spectral-luminescent properties of europium and terbium compounds with dicarboxylic quinoline acid were studied. The compounds Ln2(XH)3D · 2H2O, Ln = Eu3+, Tb3+, XH - quinoline acid anion, D - 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-dipyridyl, diphenyl guanidine, benzotriazole were prepared. The synthesis of the europium and terbium complexes aqueous solutions was also conducted for comparison by the reaction of the rare earth chlorides(nitrates) with alcohol solution of the acid and neutral ligand. The data of element analysis and X-ray diffraction are given. IR-spectra and luminescence spectra of europium and quinoline acid synthesized as mechanochemically, so traditional method, are identical to each other

  16. Anion- interactions in layered structures of salts of 5-(hydroxyimino) quinolin-8-one and related salts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prithiviraj Khakhlary; Jubaraj B Baruah

    2015-01-01

    Relevance of anion- interactions in chloride, bromide, nitrate and perchlorate salts of 5-(hydroxyimino)quinolin-8-one are discussed. Structures of nitrate salt of 5-aminoquinoline as well as nitrate salt of 4-hydroxyquinazoline are compared with the structure of nitrate salt of 5-(hydroxyimino)quinolin-8-one. From such a comparison, two different arrangements of nitrate ions with respect to the respective cations are discerned. Nitrate ions are sandwiched between aromatic planes of cations in nitrate salts of 5-(hydroxyimino)quinolin-8-one or 4-hydroxyquinazoline; whereas, nitrate ions are in oblique positions with respect to aromatic planes of counter cations in nitrate salt of 5-aminoquinoline. Binding constants of different nitrate salts in solution are determined by UV-visible spectroscopic titrations. Solution study shows formation of ion-pairs of these salts in solution.

  17. Novel quinolines carrying pyridine, thienopyridine, isoquinoline, thiazolidine, thiazole and thiophene moieties as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Ragab, Fatma A; Al-Mishari, Abdullah A; Almoqbil, Abdulaziz N

    2016-06-01

    As a part of ongoing studies in developing new anticancer agents, novel 1,2-dihydropyridine 4, thienopyridine 5, isoquinolines 6-20, acrylamide 21, thiazolidine 22, thiazoles 23-29 and thiophenes 33-35 bearing a biologically active quinoline nucleus were synthesized. The structure of newly synthesized compounds was confirmed on the basis of elemental analyses and spectral data. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. 2,3-Dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamides 27, 25, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (34), 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (7), 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (35), 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (6), 2-cyano-3-(dimethylamino)-N-(quinolin-3-yl)acrylamide (21), 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitriles (11) and (8) exhibited higher activity (IC50 values of 27-45 μmol L-1) compared to doxorubicin (IC50 47.9 μmol L-1). LQ quinolin-3-yl)-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (12), 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (28) and quinolin-3-yl)-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (15) show activity comparable to doxorubicin, while (quinolin-3-yl)-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (9), 2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (24), thieno [3,4-c] pyridine-4(5H)-one (5), cyclopenta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (33) and (quinolin-3-yl)-6-stryl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (10) exhibited moderate activity, lower than doxorubicin. PMID:27279061

  18. Novel quinolines carrying pyridine, thienopyridine, isoquinoline, thiazolidine, thiazole and thiophene moieties as potential anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorab Mostafa M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of ongoing studies in developing new anticancer agents, novel 1,2-dihydropyridine 4, thienopyridine 5, isoquinolines 6–20, acrylamide 21, thiazolidine 22, thiazoles 23–29 and thiophenes 33–35 bearing a biologically active quinoline nucleus were synthesized. The structure of newly synthesized compounds was confirmed on the basis of elemental analyses and spectral data. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. 2,3-Dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamides 27, 25, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (34, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (7, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (35, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (6, 2-cyano-3-(dimethylamino-N-(quinolin-3-ylacrylamide (21, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitriles (11 and (8 exhibited higher activity (IC50 values of 27–45 μmol L–1 compared to doxorubicin (IC50 47.9 μmol L–1. LQ quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (12, 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (28 and quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (15 show activity comparable to doxorubicin, while (quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (9, 2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (24, thieno [3,4-c] pyridine-4(5H-one (5, cyclopenta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (33 and (quinolin-3-yl-6-stryl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (10 exhibited moderate activity, lower than doxorubicin.

  19. In vivo antimalarial activity of extracts of Tanzanian medicinal plants used for the treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondo, Ramadhani S O; Erasto, Paul; Moshi, Mainen J; Zacharia, Abdallah; Masimba, Pax J; Kidukuli, Abdul W

    2016-01-01

    Plants used in traditional medicine have been the source of a number of currently used antimalarial medicines and continue to be a promising resource for the discovery of new classes of antimalarial compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo antimalarial activity of four plants; Erythrina schliebenii Harms, Holarrhena pubescens Buch-Ham, Phyllanthus nummulariifolius Poir, and Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Flem used for treatment of malaria in Tanzania. In vivo antimalarial activity was assessed using the 4-day suppressive antimalarial assay. Mice were infected by injection via tail vein with 2 × 10(7) erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Extracts were administered orally, once daily, for a total of four daily doses from the day of infection. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg/day) and solvent (5 mL/kg/day) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The extracts of C. bonducella, E. schliebenii, H. pubescens, and P. nummulariifolius exhibited dose-dependent suppression of parasite growth in vivo in mice, with the highest suppression being by C. bonducella extract. While each of the plant extracts has potential to yield useful antimalarial compounds, the dichloromethane root extract of C. bonducella seems to be the most promising for isolation of active antimalarial compound(s). In vivo antimalarial activity presented in this study supports traditional uses of C. bonducella roots, E. schliebenii stem barks, H. pubescens roots, and P. nummulariifolius for treatment of malaria. PMID:27144154

  20. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant activity of quinolin-5-ylamine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mallesha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Imines of six new quinolin-5-ylamine derivatives 3(a-c and 5(a-c were synthesized by the reaction of quinolin-5-ylamine (1 with different aldehydes 2(a-c and ketones 4(a-c. The chemical structures of the compounds were confirmed by UV-visible, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectral study. New compounds were screened for the antioxidant activity by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method. Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT was used as standard. All the compounds showed DPPH radical scavenging activity, where compound 3c was the best radical scavenger.

  1. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant activity of quinolin-5-ylamine derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mallesha, L.; B. K. Kendagannaswamy; K. N. Mohana

    2013-01-01

    Imines of six new quinolin-5-ylamine derivatives 3(a-c) and 5(a-c) were synthesized by the reaction of quinolin-5-ylamine (1) with different aldehydes 2(a-c) and ketones 4(a-c). The chemical structures of the compounds were confirmed by UV-visible, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectral study. New compounds were screened for the antioxidant activity by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method. Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT) was used as standard. All the compounds showed DPPH radical scavenging activity...

  2. Lanthanide perchlorate complexes of quinoline-1-oxide and isoquinoline-2-oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyanasundaram, R; Navaneetham, NS; Soundararajan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Complexes of lanthanide perchlorates with quinoline-1-oxide and isoquinoline-2-oxide have been isolated for the first time characterised by analysis, conductance and IR, NMR and electronic spectoral studies. The complexes of quinoline-1-oxide have the composition $Ln(QNO)_8$$(ClO_4)_3$ where Ln = La, Pr or Nd and $Ln(QNO)_7$ where Ln = Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb. The isoquinoline-2-oxide complexes analyse for the formula $Ln(IsoQNO)_7(ClO_4)_3$ where Ln = La-Yb.

  3. Lowest energy vibrational modes of some naphthalene derivatives: Azulene, quinoline, isoquinoline - Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Pirali, O.; Loquais, Y.; Falvo, C.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2013-02-01

    Far infrared (FIR) gas phase absorption spectra of azulene, quinoline and isoquinoline have been recorded using a Fourier transform Bruker IFS125 interferometer at medium resolution (0.5 cm-1). Assignments of these weak vibrational bands were performed using density-functional theory calculations carried out at the harmonic and anharmonic levels. Agreement between observed and calculated band positions is better than 5% for azulene and 1% for quinoline and isoquinoline. The relative band intensities are also correctly predicted. Molecular structure dependence of the FIR spectra is discussed based on the comparative study of three selected FIR modes.

  4. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Bryan T; Eastman, Richard T; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Thomas, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  5. Antimalarial activity of Malaysian Plectranthus amboinicus against Plasmodium berghei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazsida Ramli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus of Plasmodium. The protozoans have developed resistance against many of current drugs. It is urgent to find an alternative source of new antimalarial agent. In the effort to discover new antimalarial agents, this research has been conducted on Plectranthus amboinicus. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and antiplasmodial properties of P. amboinicus. Materials and Methods: Acute oral toxicity dose at 5000 mg/kg was conducted to evaluate the safety of this extract. Twenty mice were divided into control and experimental group. All the mice were observed for signs of toxicity, mortality, weight changes and histopathological changes. Antimalarial activity of different extract doses of 50, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infections in mice (five mice for each group during early, established and residual infections. Results: The acute oral toxicity test revealed that no mortality or evidence of adverse effects was seen in the treated mice. The extract significantly reduced the parasitemia by the 50 (P = 0.000, 200 (P = 0.000 and 400 mg/kg doses (P = 0.000 in the in vivo prophylactic assay. The percentage chemo-suppression was calculated as 83.33% for 50 mg/kg dose, 75.62% for 200 mg/kg dose and 90.74% for 400 mg/kg dose. Body weight of all treated groups; T1, T2, T3 and T4 also showed enhancement after 7 days posttreatment. Statistically no reduction of parasitemia calculated for curative and suppressive test. Conclusion: Thus, this extract may give a promising agent to be used as a prophylactic agent of P. berghei infection.

  6. Proteomics analysis of antimalarial targets of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    OpenAIRE

    Wanna Chaijaroenkul; Artitiya Thiengsusuk; Kanchana Rungsihirunrat; Stephen Andrew Ward; Kesara Na-Bangchang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate possible protein targets for antimalarial activity of Garcinia mangostana Linn. (G. mangostana) (pericarp) in 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum clone using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Methods: 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum was exposed to the crude ethanolic extract of G. mangostana Linn. (pericarp) at the concentrations of 12μg/mL (IC50 level: concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50%) and 30 μg/mL (IC90 level...

  7. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  8. Home treatment of febrile children with antimalarial drugs in Togo.

    OpenAIRE

    Deming, M. S.; Gayibor, A.; Murphy, K; Jones, T. S.; Karsa, T.

    1989-01-01

    In Togo, the principal strategy for preventing death from malaria in children is prompt treatment of fever with antimalarial drugs. A household survey was conducted in a rural area of south-central Togo in which information was collected from mothers on the treatment received by 507 children under 5 years of age who, according to their mothers, had recently had fever. Altogether, 20% of the children (95% confidence interval (Cl): 15-25%) were seen at a health centre during their illness, whil...

  9. Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90: Towards Reversing Antimalarial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dea Shahinas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria continues to exact a great human toll in tropical settings. Antimalarial resistance is rife and the parasite inexorably develops mechanisms to outwit our best drugs, including the now first-line choice, artesunate. Novel strategies to circumvent resistance are needed. Here we detail drug development focusing on heat shock protein 90 and its central role as a chaperone. A growing body of evidence supports the role for Hsp90 inhibitors as adjunctive drugs able to restore susceptibility to traditionally efficacious compounds like chloroquine.

  10. Mono- and bis-thiazolium salts have potent antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzé, Abdallah; Rubi, Eric; Arnal, Pascal; Boisbrun, Michel; Carcel, Carole; Salom-Roig, Xavier; Maynadier, Marjorie; Wein, Sharon; Vial, Henri; Calas, Michèle

    2005-05-19

    Three new series comprising 24 novel cationic choline analogues and consisting of mono- or bis (N or C-5-duplicated) thiazolium salts have been synthesized. Bis-thiazolium salts showed potent antimalarial activity (much superior to monothiazoliums). Among them, bis-thiazolium salts 12 and 13 exhibited IC(50) values of 2.25 nM and 0.65 nM, respectively, against P. falciparum in vitro. These compounds also demonstrated good in vivo activity (ED(50)

  11. Cloroquine – miscellaneous properties of the antimalarial drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jarzyna

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine is a drug with over 60 years of safe clinical use in the treatment of malaria. The multiple mechanisms of chloroquine action have appeared to be useful in the therapy of many miscellaneous disorders well beyond its original antimalarial purposes. This paper is focused on the application of chloroquine for the treatment of malaria, porphyria cutanea tarda, rheumatoid arthritis, palindromic rheumatism and lupus. The possibility of the use of chloroquine in the therapy of other disorders such as diabetes mellitus, AIDS, hyperlipidemia, sarcoidosis, hypercalcemia, and melanoma is reviewed. Mechanisms of action of the drug as well as side effects on metabolism are discussed in view of recent discoveries.

  12. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure. PMID:27119198

  13. Proteomics analysis of antimalarial targets of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanna Chaijaroenkul; Artitiya Thiengsusuk; Kanchana Rungsihirunrat; Stephen Andrew Ward; Kesara Na-Bangchang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate possible protein targets for antimalarial activity of Garcinia mangostana Linn. (G. mangostana) (pericarp) in 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum clone using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Methods: 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum was exposed to the crude ethanolic extract of G.mangostana Linn. (pericarp) at the concentrations of 12µg/mL (IC50 level: concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50%) and 30 µg/mL (IC90 level: concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 90%) for 12 h. Parasite proteins were separated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by LC/MS/MS.Results:At the IC50 concentration, about 82% of the expressed parasite proteins were matched with the control (non-exposed), while at the IC90 concentration, only 15% matched proteins were found. The selected protein spots from parasite exposed to the plant extract at the concentration of 12 µg/mL were identified as enzymes that play role in glycolysis pathway, i.e., phosphoglycerate mutase putative, L-lactate dehydrogenase/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphoglycerate kinase. The proteosome was found in parasite exposed to 30 µg/mL of the extract.Conclusions:Results suggest that proteins involved in the glycolysis pathway may be the targets for antimalarial activity of G. mangostana Linn. (pericarp).

  14. Proteomics analysis of antimalarial targets of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanna; Chaijaroenkul; Artitiya; Thiengsusuk; Kanchana; Rungsihirunrat; Stephen; Andrew; Ward; Kesara; Na-Bangchang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate possible protein targets for antimalarial activity of Garcina mangostana Linn.(G.mangostana)(pericarp)in 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum clone using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry(LC/MS/MS).Methods:3D7 Plasmodium falciparum was exposed to the crude ethanolic extract of G.mangostana Linn.(pericarp)at the concentrations of 12μg/mL(1C50level:concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50%)and 30μg/mL(1C90level:concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 90%)for 12 h.Parasite proteins were separated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by LC/MS/MS.Results:At the IC50concentration,about 82%of the expressed parasite proteins were matched with the control(non-exposed),while at the IC90concentration,only 15%matched proteins were found.The selected protein spots from parasite exposed to the plant extract at the concentration of 12μg/mL were identified as eneymes that play role in glycolysis pathway,i.e.,phosphoglyeerate mutase putative,L-lactate dehydrogenase/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase,and fruetose-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphoglyeerate kinase.The proteosome was found in parasite exposed to 30μg/mL of the extract.Conclusions:Results suggest that proteins involved in the glycolysis pathway may be the targets for antimalarial activity of G.mangostana Linn.(pericarp).

  15. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (<8 %) were found in just two of the countries, whilst substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting. PMID:26873700

  16. Antimalarials and the fight against malaria in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmargo, Luiz Ma; de Oliveira, Saulo; Basano, Sergio; Garcia, Célia Rs

    2009-08-01

    Malaria, known as the "fevers," has been treated for over three thousand years in China with extracts of plants of the genus Artemisia (including Artemisia annua, A. opiacea, and A. lancea) from which the active compound is artemisin, a sesquiterpene that is highly effective in the treatment of the disease, especially against young forms of the parasite. South American Indians in the seventeenth century already used an extract of the bark of chinchona tree, commonly named "Jesuits' powder." Its active compound was isolated in 1820 and its use spread all over the world being used as a prophylactic drug during the construction of the Madeira-Mamoré railroad in the beginning of the twentieth century. During the 1920s to the 1940s, new antimalarial drugs were synthesized to increase the arsenal against this parasite. However, the parasite has presented systematic resistence to conventional antimalarial drugs, driving researchers to find new strategies to treat the disease. In the present review we discuss how Brazil treats Plasmodium-infected patients. PMID:19753125

  17. Metabolic pathways of quinoline, indole and their methylated analogs by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, S.S.; Licht, D.; Arvin, E.; Mosbæk, H.

    1997-01-01

    The transformation of quinoline, isoquinoline and 3-, 4-, 6- and 8-methylquinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was compared with that of the N-containing analogues indole and 1-, 2-, 3- and 7-methylindole. The metabolites were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV dete...

  18. Phosphotungstic Acid: An Efficient, Cost-effective and Recyclable Catalyst for the Synthesis of Polysubstituted Quinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahareh Bashiribod

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40 was used as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the synthesis of polysubstituted quinolines through the Friedländer condensation of 2-aminoarylketone with carbonyl compounds, which was achieved by conventional heating under solvent-free conditions.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingul, Murat; Tan, Owen; Gardner, Christopher R; Sutton, Selina K; Arndt, Greg M; Marshall, Glenn M; Cheung, Belamy B; Kumar, Naresh; Black, David StC

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the novel (E)-N'-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-yl)methylene)-3-(phenylthio)propanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19-26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G₁ cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27(kip1) cell cycle regulating protein. PMID:27428941

  20. Synthesis, Characterization and Anti-Cancer Activity of Hydrazide Derivatives Incorporating a Quinoline Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bingul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the novel (E-N′-((2-chloro-7-methoxyquinolin-3-ylmethylene-3-(phenylthiopropanehydrazide scaffold 18 has led to the development of a new series of biologically active hydrazide compounds. The parent compound 18 and new quinoline derivatives 19–26 were prepared from the corresponding quinoline hydrazones and substituted carboxylic acids using EDC-mediated peptide coupling reactions. Further modification of the parent compound 18 was achieved by replacement of the quinoline moiety with other aromatic systems. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against the SH-SY5Y and Kelly neuroblastoma cell lines, as well as the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cell lines. Analogues 19 and 22 significantly reduced the cell viability of neuroblastoma cancer cells with micromolar potency and significant selectivity over normal cells. The quinoline hydrazide 22 also induced G1 cell cycle arrest, as well as upregulation of the p27kip1 cell cycle regulating protein.

  1. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimido [5,4-c] quinoline derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Zhang; Xin Zhai; Li Juan Chen; Jian Guo Qi; Bo Cui; Yu Cheng Gu; Ping Gong

    2011-01-01

    A series of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimido[5,4-c]quinoline derivatives were synthesized and their cytotoxic activity against H460, HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines was evaluated in vitro. It was found that most of the tested compounds especially compound 17, shown stronger activity to the selected three cell lines than ZM447439.

  2. Palladium-Catalyzed Intermolecular Aerobic Annulation of o-Alkenylanilines and Alkynes for Quinoline Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia; Li, Zun; Huang, Liangbin; Wu, Wanqing; Li, Jianxiao; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-08-01

    A new approach to construct 2,3-disubstituted quinolines is described via Pd-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of o-vinylanilines and alkynes with molecular oxygen. This transformation is supposed to undergo intermolecular amination of alkyne, insertion of the olefin, and oxidative cleavage of C-C bond sequence. PMID:27418021

  3. Multicomponent reaction access to complex quinolines via oxidation of the Povarov adducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Vicente-García

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The tetrahydroquinolines obtained through the Povarov multicomponent reaction have been oxidized to the corresponding quinoline, giving access to a single product through a two-step sequence. Several oxidizing agents were studied and manganese dioxide proved to be the reagent of choice, affording higher yields, cleaner reactions and practical protocols.

  4. Multicomponent reaction access to complex quinolines via oxidation of the Povarov adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Vicente-García; Rosario Ramón; Sara Preciado; Rodolfo Lavilla

    2011-01-01

    The tetrahydroquinolines obtained through the Povarov multicomponent reaction have been oxidized to the corresponding quinoline, giving access to a single product through a two-step sequence. Several oxidizing agents were studied and manganese dioxide proved to be the reagent of choice, affording higher yields, cleaner reactions and practical protocols.

  5. Self-Assembly of a Library of Polyborate Chiral Anions for Asymmetric Catalytic Quinoline Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Aman A.; Guan, Yong; Odom, Aaron L.; Majumder, Supriyo; Wulff, William D.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘template’ polyborate BOROX catalysts are shown to mediate the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 2-quinolines. The rapid and simple generation of a large family of BOROX catalysts with significantly altered asymmetric pockets is described. A transition state model that explains the enantioselectivity is proposed. PMID:26034335

  6. Isolation, characterization and a study of the solvolytic reactions in non-aqueous media of some dioxomolybdenum (VI) chelates and the solvolytic studies in methanol of a few other dioxomdybdenum (VI) complexes with monoligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two dioxomolybdenum(VI) chelates having the compositions MoO2(en)Cl2 and MoO2(Sal2en.H2)Cl2 [Sal2enH2 = N, N'-disalicyl ethylenediimine] are isolated by reacting MoO2Cl2H2O with the appropriate ligands in suitable solvents and they have been characterised by IR, TGA and magnetic susceptibility studies. The former undergoes 'base solvolysis' and the latter 'acid solvolysis' in methanol as followed by their conductance measurement in the said solvent. Such conductance study reveals that the complexes MoO2Cl2L2 (L = pyridine, 4-nitropyridine and quinoline N-oxides; triphenyl phosphine oxide; hexamethyl phosphoramide and dimethyl sulphoxide) also undergo 'base solvolysis' in methanol but at a very high dilution (approximately 10-4M) the triphenyl phosphine oxide, quinoline N-oxide and dimethyl sulphoxide complexes probably undergo further decomposition ( a maxima in √ Csub(M)vs.Λsub(M) plots) when the organic ligand molecules leave the inner sphere of coordination and the solvated organic ligands associate with the protons to a marked extent. This observation suggests that the standard free energy change accompanying the transfer of H+[ΔGsub(t)sup(o)(H+)] from methanol to the methanolated ligand species in these three cases are negative. A probable qualitative theoretical model in the case of the DMSO complexes has also been incorporated. (author)

  7. 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenyl)-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydrothieno[3,2-b]quinoline

    OpenAIRE

    K. Balamurugan; D. Narmadha; Suresh, J.; Perumal, S.; P. L. Nilantha Lakshman

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C23H15Cl2NS, the quinoline system is almost planar [r.m.s. deviation = 0.013 (2) Å]. The phenyl group is disordered over two positions with site occupancies of 0.55 and 0.45, and is oriented in a nearly perpendicular configuration to the quinoline ring [the dihedral angles between the quinoline ring and the major and minor disordered components of the phenyl ring are 81.8 (2) and 71.6 (2)°, respectively]. The dih...

  8. Acute methanol toxicity in minipigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, D.C.; Dye, J.A.; Nassise, M.P.; Ekuta, J.; Bolon, B.

    1993-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a potential animal model for methanol-induced neuro-ocular toxicosis in humans because of its low liver tetrahydrofolate levels and slower rate of formate metabolism compared to those of humans. To examine the validity of this animal model, 12 4-month-old female minipigs (minipig YU) were given a single oral dose of water or methanol at 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 g/kg body wt by gavage (n = 3 pigs/dose). Dose-dependent signs of acute methanol intoxication, which included mild CNS depression, tremors, ataxia, and recumbency, developed within 0.5 to 2.0 hr, and resolved by 52 hr. Methanol- and formate-dosed pigs did not develop optic nerve lesions, toxicologically significant formate accumulation, or metabolic acidosis. Based on results following a single dose, female minipigs do not appear to be overtly sensitive to methanol and thus may not be a suitable animal model for acute methanol-induced neuroocular toxicosis.

  9. ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF PHENYL QUINOLINE ON WATER FLEA DAPHNIA MAGNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildebrando Ayala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic ecotoxicological determination of phytonematicide products using the zooplanktonic cladoceran Daphnia magna is important for environmental risk assessment. Evaluations were made of the acute median lethal concentration (LC50 of phenyl quinoline on D. magna, that was 4.12 ug i.a. L-1 at 48 h of exposure. The chronic effects of phenyl quinoline in the mortality rate of the cladoceran D. magna at 17 d of exposure, with 0.18 ug ai L-1 of LOEC (Lowest Observed Effect Concentration and 0.072 ug ai L-1 of NOEC (No Observed Effect Concentration were determined. Evaluations of the chronic effect of phenyl quinoline on three parameters of growth of D. magna (total length, antenna length and caudal length to 17 d of exposure, only showed significant differences in length of the antenna between the control and 0.072 ug ai L-1 been this the value of LOEC and thus the lower concentration 0.0288 ug ai L-1, the NOEC value for phenyl quinoline. The ratio between acute and chronic toxicity (RAC for the relationship showed acute 48 h exposure on mortality NOEC 17 d a value of 57.22, and for the ratio of acute NOEC on of the length of the antenna to 17 d was a value of 143. The environmental risk assessment (ERA shows that the PEC (Probable Effect Concentration / PNEC (Predicted No-Effect Concentration for acute assay was 582 524 and for the PEC / PNEC for chronic test was 83 333 333. These results demonstrate that phenyl quinoline has a high impact on aquatic biota represented by the trophic level that belongs to D. magna, and therefore shows that the substance is a candidate for a comprehensive ecotoxicological assessment.

  10. The washout effect during laundry on benzothiazole, benzotriazole, quinoline, and their derivatives in clothing textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Giovanna; Avagyan, Rozanna; Hongyu, Ren; Östman, Conny

    2016-02-01

    In two previous papers, the authors have shown that benzothiazole, benzotriazole, quinoline, and several of their derivatives are widespread in clothing textile articles. A number of these compounds exhibit allergenic and irritating properties and, due to their octanol-water partition coefficient, are prone to be absorbed by the skin. Moreover, they are slightly soluble in water, which could make washing of clothes a route of emission into the environment. In the present study, the washout effect of benzothiazole, benzotriazole, quinoline, and some of their derivatives has been investigated. Twenty-seven textile samples were analyzed before, as well as after five and ten times of washing. The most abundant analyte was found to be benzothiazole, which was detected in 85 % of the samples with an average concentration of 0.53 μg/g (median 0.44 μg/g), followed by quinoline, detected in 81 % of the samples with an average concentration of 2.42 μg/g (median 0.21 μg/g). The average decrease in concentration for benzothiazoles was 50 % after ten times washing, while it was around 20 % for quinolines. The average emission to household wastewater of benzothiazoles and quinolines during one washing (5 kg of clothes made from polyester materials) was calculated to 0.5 and 0.24 g, respectively. These results strongly indicate that laundering of clothing textiles can be an important source of release of these compounds to household wastewater and in the end to aquatic environments. It also demonstrates a potential source of human exposure to these chemicals since considerable amounts of the compounds remain in the clothes even after ten times of washing. PMID:26429136

  11. Antimalarial activity of selected Sudanese medicinal plants with emphasis to Maytenus senegalensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to identify and characterize the antimalrial agents from traitional Sudanese medicinal plants. 49 plants parts representing 26 species from 15 families were extracted and screened for their in vitro antimalrial activity using P. falciparum strain 3D7 which is chloroquine sensitive and Dd2 strain which is chloroquine resistant and pyrimethamine sensitive.The plant species investigated exhibited diverse botanical families. They includes Annonaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Asteraceae, Balantiaceae, Caesalpiniceae, Celasteraceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, Graminae, Meliaceae, Myrtaceae, Polygonaceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae, and simaroubaceae. The evaluation of these plants for their antimalarial activity and their effect on lymphocyte proliferation was carried out. 57 extracts were tested on the chloroquine sensitive strain (3D7). Where 34 extracts (59%) exhibited significant activity against 3D7 with IC50 values ≤ 50 μ g/ml. While 21 extracts (57%) showed antimalrial activities with IC50 values ≤ 50 μ g/ml on Dd2. 13 extracts (22%) and ten extracts (18%) only showed an activity with IC50 values ≤ 5 μ g/ml on 3 D7 and Dd2, respectively. The activities of some plant extracts, which affected 3D7 strain, were measured using the radiolabelled (3H) hypoxanthine method and microscopical count. 15 plant extracts (48%) from 32 showed IC50 values ≤ 50 μ g/ml against 3D7 strain using the radiolabelled hypoxanthine methods and only 5 extracts (16%) showed IC50 values ≤ 5 μ g/ml against 3D7. Most of the extracts screened had a low effect on lymphocyte proliferation (IC50 values >100 μ g/ml), where as Sonochous cornatus, Balanites aegyptiaca, Tamarindus indica, Acacia nilotica, Annona squamosa, Eucalyptus globulus and Cassia tora enhanced lymphocyte proliferation. liquid-liquid partition of methanolic preparation of Acacia nilotica seeds and husk showed that the ethylacetate phase possessed the highest activity against both 3D7 and Dd2 strains

  12. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  13. 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenyl-9-phenyl-2,3-dihydrothieno[3,2-b]quinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Balamurugan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C23H15Cl2NS, the quinoline system is almost planar [r.m.s. deviation = 0.013 (2 Å]. The phenyl group is disordered over two positions with site occupancies of 0.55 and 0.45, and is oriented in a nearly perpendicular configuration to the quinoline ring [the dihedral angles between the quinoline ring and the major and minor disordered components of the phenyl ring are 81.8 (2 and 71.6 (2°, respectively]. The dihydrothiene ring adopts an envelope conformation. The dihedral angle between the chlorophenyl ring and the quinoline system is 79.32 (1°. In the crystal weak C—H...π interactions occur.

  14. Multicomponent Dipolar Cycloaddition Strategy: Combinatorial Synthesis of Novel Spiro-Tethered Pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline Hybrid Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumesh, Remani Vasudevan; Muthu, Muthumani; Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Suresh Kumar, Raju; Arumugam, Natarajan; Athimoolam, S; Jeya Yasmi Prabha, E Arockia; Kumar, Raju Ranjith

    2016-05-01

    The stereoselective syntheses of a library of novel spiro-tethered pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline-pyrrolidine/pyrrolothiazole/indolizine-oxindole/acenaphthene hybrid heterocycles have been achieved through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azomethine ylides generated in situ from α-amino acids and 1,2-diketones to dipolarophiles derived from pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivatives. PMID:27027478

  15. Trisubstituted Pyrimidines as Efficacious and Fast-Acting Antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Neil R; Baragaña, Beatriz; Wilson, Caroline; Hallyburton, Irene; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Norval, Suzanne; Riley, Jennifer; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick R C; Porzelle, Achim; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Meister, Stephan; Sanz, Laura; Jiménez-Díaz, Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Frearson, Julie A; Gray, David W; Fairlamb, Alan H; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Waterson, David; Campbell, Simon F; Willis, Paul; Read, Kevin D; Gilbert, Ian H

    2016-07-14

    In this paper we describe the optimization of a phenotypic hit against Plasmodium falciparum, based on a trisubstituted pyrimidine scaffold. This led to compounds with good pharmacokinetics and oral activity in a P. berghei mouse model of malaria. The most promising compound (13) showed a reduction in parasitemia of 96% when dosed at 30 mg/kg orally once a day for 4 days in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria. It also demonstrated a rapid rate of clearance of the erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum in the SCID mouse model with an ED90 of 11.7 mg/kg when dosed orally. Unfortunately, the compound is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes, probably due to a 4-pyridyl substituent. Nevertheless, this is a lead molecule with a potentially useful antimalarial profile, which could either be further optimized or be used for target hunting. PMID:27314305

  16. Drug resistance genomics of the antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Manary, Micah J

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, over 200 million annual malaria infections result in up to 660,000 deaths, 77% of which occur in children under the age of five years. Although prevention is important, malaria deaths are typically prevented by using antimalarial drugs that eliminate symptoms and clear parasites from the blood. Artemisinins are one of the few remaining compound classes that can be used to cure multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum infections. Unfortunately, clinical trials from Southeast Asia are showing that artemisinin-based treatments are beginning to lose their effectiveness, adding renewed urgency to the search for the genetic determinants of parasite resistance to this important drug class. We review the genetic and genomic approaches that have led to an improved understanding of artemisinin resistance, including the identification of resistance-conferring mutations in the P. falciparum kelch13 gene. PMID:25470531

  17. New 1-Aryl-3-Substituted Propanol Derivatives as Antimalarial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Monge

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro antimalarial activity against a P. falciparum 3D7 strain of some new 1-aryl-3-substituted propanol derivatives. Twelve of the tested compounds showed an IC50 lower than 1 μM. These compounds were also tested for cytotoxicity in murine J774 macrophages. The most active compounds were evaluated for in vivo activity against P. berghei in a 4-day suppressive test. Compound 12 inhibited more than 50% of parasite growth at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day. In addition, an FBIT test was performed to measure the ability to inhibit ferriprotoporphyrin biocrystallization. This data indicates that 1-aryl-3-substituted propanol derivatives hold promise as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of malaria.

  18. Screening Mangrove Endophytic Fungi for Antimalarial Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Calcul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a screening campaign to investigate fungi as a source for new antimalarial compounds. A subset of our fungal collection comprising Chinese mangrove endophytes provided over 5000 lipophilic extracts. We developed an accelerated discovery program based on small-scale cultivation for crude extract screening and a high-throughput malaria assay. Criteria for hits were developed and high priority hits were subjected to scale-up cultivation. Extracts from large scale cultivation were fractionated and these fractions subjected to both in vitro malaria and cytotoxicity screening. Criteria for advancing fractions to purification were developed, including the introduction of a selectivity index and by dereplication of known metabolites. From the Chinese mangrove endophytes, four new compounds (14–16, 18 were isolated including a new dimeric tetrahydroxanthone, dicerandrol D (14, which was found to display the most favorable bioactivity profile.

  19. Triterpenes from Minquartia guianensis (Olacaceae) and in vitro antimalarial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cursino, Lorena Mayara de Carvalho; Nunez, Cecilia Veronica [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Lab. de Bioprospeccao e Biotecnologia; Paula, Renata Cristina de; Nascimento, Maria Fernanda Alves do [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia. Dept. de Produtos Farmaceuticos; Santos, Pierre Alexandre dos, E-mail: cecilia@inpa.gov.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas

    2012-07-01

    Minquartia guianensis, popularly known as acariquara, was phytochemically investigated. The following triterpenes were isolated from the dichloromethane extract of leaves: lupen-3-one (1), taraxer-3-one (2) and oleanolic acid (3). The dichloromethane extract of branches yielded the triterpene 3{beta}-methoxy-lup-20(29)-ene (4). The chemical structures were characterized by NMR data. Plant extracts, substance 3, squalene (5) and taraxerol (6), (5 and 6 previously isolated), were evaluated by in vitro assay against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The dichloromethane extract of leaves and the three triterpenes assayed have shown partial activity. Thus, these results demonstrated that new potential antimalarial natural products can be found even in partially active extracts. (author)

  20. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  1. Distillation Time as Tool for Improved Antimalarial Activity and Differential Oil Composition of Cumin Seed Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A steam distillation extraction kinetics experiment was conducted to estimate essential oil yield, composition, antimalarial, and antioxidant capacity of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seed (fruits). Furthermore, regression models were developed to predict essential oil yield and composition for a given...

  2. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of 2-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine- and quinoline-substituted 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchis-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Zentella, Alejandro; Martínez-Urbina, Miguel Angel; Guzmán, Angel; Vargas, Omar; Ramírez Apan, María Teresa; Ventura Gallegos, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    A series of 2-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine- and quinoline-substituted 2-aminopyrimidines derivatives were synthesized using a convenient synthetic route. We evaluate the isosteric replacement of methyl groups in 4-(2-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl)-N-p-tolylpyrimidin-2-amine (compound 1) by trifluoromethyl groups and the isosteric substitution of the 2-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl scaffold by quinolin-4-yl or quinolin-3-yl moieties. The replacement of hydrogen by fluorine does not affect notably the cytotoxic activity and CDK inhibitor activity in this series. Quinolin-4-yl-substituted compound, 8, presents cytotoxic activity and is most effective and selective against CDK1/CycA than against CDK2/CycB. Compound 11, which has a quinolin-3-yl moiety is CDK inhibitor but presents null cytotoxic activity. Quinolin-4-yl-substituted compounds constitute a new lead of cytotoxic and CDK inhibitor compounds from which more compelling and selective inhibitors can be designed. PMID:19879023

  3. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin: The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Jerapan Krungkrai; Sudaratana Rochanakij Krungkrai

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu (Chinese name) and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Art...

  4. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority.

    OpenAIRE

    Newton Paul N; Green Michael D; Mildenhall Dallas C; Plançon Aline; Nettey Henry; Nyadong Leonard; Hostetler Dana M; Swamidoss Isabel; Harris Glenn A; Powell Kristen; Timmermans Ans E; Amin Abdinasir A; Opuni Stephen K; Barbereau Serge; Faurant Claude

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT) at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African coun...

  5. Post-marketing surveillance of anti-malarial medicines used in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Chikowe, Ibrahim; Osei-Safo, Dorcas; Harrison, Jerry JEK; Konadu, Daniel Y; Addae-Mensah, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing concern over the extent of anti-malarial medicine resistance in sub-Saharan Africa, driven largely by administration of sub-therapeutic doses derived from falsified and substandard medicines necessitates regular monitoring of the quality of these medicines to avert any potential public health disaster. This study aimed at determining the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content of anti-malarial medicines available in Malawi with respect to the manufacturers’ label...

  6. Self-Medication with Antibiotics and Antimalarials in the Community of Silte Zone, South Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir Tajure Wabe; Dargicho Ahmed; Mulugeta Tarekegn Angamo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Self-medication with antibiotics and antimalarials occurs among the population in Ethiopian. We studied to estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics and antimalarials in Ethiopia and evaluate factors associated with self-medications. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 405 households, selected from Silte Zone in South Ethiopia, using a random sampling technique by employing a pretested questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS for windows version 16.0. ...

  7. Public Awareness and Identification of Counterfeit Drugs in Tanzania: A View on Antimalarial Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mhando, Linus; Jande, Mary B.; Liwa, Anthony; Mwita, Stanley; Marwa, Karol J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The illicit trade in counterfeit antimalarial drugs is a major setback to the fight against malaria. Information on public awareness and ability to identify counterfeit drugs is scanty. Aim. Therefore, the present study aimed at assessing public awareness and the ability to identify counterfeit antimalarial drugs based on simple observations such as appearance of the drugs, packaging, labelling, and leaflets. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted using interviewer adm...

  8. In vitro antimalarial activity of different extracts of Eremostachys macrophylla Montbr. & Auch.

    OpenAIRE

    Solmaz Asnaashari; Fariba Heshmati Afshar; Atefeh Ebrahimi; Sedigheh Bamdad Moghaddam; Abbas Delazar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of drug resistance and the use of medicinal plants in malaria prevention and treatment have led to the search for new antimalarial compounds with natural origin. Methods: In the current study, six extracts with different polarity from aerial parts and rhizomes of Eremostachys macrophylla Montbr. & Auch., were screened for their antimalarial properties by cell-free beta-hematin formation assay. Results: Dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of both parts of plant showed s...

  9. Evaluation of plants used for antimalarial treatment by the Maasai of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A; Tamez, P; Pezzuto, J; Soejarto, D

    2005-10-01

    Semi-structured interviews with three Maasai herbalists led to the identification and collection of 21 species of plants used to treat malaria. Extracts were evaluated using in vitro antimalarial and cytotoxicity assays. Of the species tested, over half were antiplasmodial (IC5020 microg/ml) against cultured KB cells. The results of this preliminary investigation support the traditional knowledge of Maasai herbalists and justify ethnomedical inquiry as a promising method, specifically, in antimalarial therapy, to yield leads for drug discovery. PMID:15878245

  10. PEG-SO3H as a catalyst in aqueous media: A simple, proficient and green approach for the synthesis of quinoline derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Nasseri; S A Alavi; B Zakerinasab

    2013-01-01

    A convenient and efficient method was developed for the synthesis of quinolines, an important class of potentially bioactive compounds. The quinoline derivatives were prepared in water, an excellent solvent in terms of environmental impact and with reduced waste production. PEG-SO3H effectively catalysed the one-pot synthesis of quinolines by the condensation of -aminoaryl ketones and carbonyl compound with high yields (75-95%). The compounds were isolated by simple filtration in a high purity form.

  11. Study of the antimalarial properties of hydroxyethylamine derivatives using green fluorescent protein transformed Plasmodium berghei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Conceição Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A rapid decrease in parasitaemia remains the major goal for new antimalarial drugs and thus, in vivo models must provide precise results concerning parasitaemia modulation. Hydroxyethylamine comprise an important group of alkanolamine compounds that exhibit pharmacological properties as proteases inhibitors that has already been proposed as a new class of antimalarial drugs. Herein, it was tested the antimalarial property of new nine different hydroxyethylamine derivatives using the green fluorescent protein (GFP-expressing Plasmodium berghei strain. By comparing flow cytometry and microscopic analysis to evaluate parasitaemia recrudescence, it was observed that flow cytometry was a more sensitive methodology. The nine hydroxyethylamine derivatives were obtained by inserting one of the following radical in the para position: H, 4Cl, 4-Br, 4-F, 4-CH3, 4-OCH3, 4-NO2, 4-NH2 and 3-Br. The antimalarial test showed that the compound that received the methyl group (4-CH3 inhibited 70% of parasite growth. Our results suggest that GFP-transfected P. berghei is a useful tool to study the recrudescence of novel antimalarial drugs through parasitaemia examination by flow cytometry. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the insertion of a methyl group at the para position of the sulfonamide ring appears to be critical for the antimalarial activity of this class of compounds.

  12. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  13. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure, optical and electrochemical properties of 9,10-dihydroxybenzo[ℎ]quinoline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kew-Yu Chen; Hsing-Yang Tsai; Wei-Chi Lin; Hou-Hsein Chu; Yu-Ching Weng; Chih-Chieh Chan

    2014-07-01

    9,10-Dihydroxybenzo[ℎ]quinoline (1), a 10-hydroxybenzo[ℎ]quinoline (2) derivative, was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 possesses an intramolecular six-membered-ring hydrogen bond, from which excitedstate intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) takes place from the phenolic proton to the pyridinic nitrogen, resulting in a proton-transfer tautomer emission of 650 nm in dichloromethane. Its molecular geometry in the ground state has also been calculated using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G∗∗ level and compared with its crystal structure. Results show that the optimized geometry can well reproduce the crystal structure. Furthermore, both absorption and emission spectra of 1 and 2 were calculated using time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations, and were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. 7-Chloro-4-[(E-N′-(4-fluorobenzylidenehydrazinyl]quinoline monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. N. de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecule of the title hydrate, C16H11ClFN3·H2O, is slightly twisted, as indicated by the dihedral angle of 9.55 (10° formed between the quinoline ring system and the benzene ring. The conformation about the C=N double bond is E, and the amine-H atom is oriented towards the quinoline residue. In the crystal structure, the water molecule accepts an N—H...O and makes two O—H...Nquinoline hydrogen bonds, generating a two-dimensional array in the ab plane, which is further stabilized by C—H...O interactions. The most significant contacts between layers are of the type C—H...F.

  16. 7-Chloro-4-[(E-2-(4-methoxybenzylidenehydrazin-1-yl]quinoline monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. T. Tiekink

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic molecule in the title hydrate, C17H14ClN3O·H2O, has a small but significant twist from planarity, as seen in the dihedral angle of 12.10 (17° between the quinoline and benzene rings. The conformation about the C=N bond is E. Chains along the b axis are formed in the crystal structure aided by water–quinoline O—H...N (× 2 and hydrazone–water N—H...O hydrogen bonds. Layers of these chains stack along the a axis via C—H...π and π–π interactions [ring centroid–ring centroid distance = 3.674 (2 Å]. C—H...O interactions are also present.

  17. Diiodido[methyl 2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetate-κN]mercury(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hong Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title mononuclear complex, [HgI2(C12H11NO3], the HgII ion has a distorted trigonal–planar coordination sphere defined by two I− anions and the N atom of a methyl 2-(quinolin-8-yloxyacetate ligand. In the crystal, face-to-face π–π stacking interactions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.563 (9 Å, are observed.

  18. Neonatal brain infusion of quinolinic acid induces schizophrenia-like behaviour in adult rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tejkalová, H.; Skuba, I.; Klaschka, Jan; Šťastný, František

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl. 1 (2005), s. 97-97. ISSN 0955-8810. [Biennial Meeting of the European Behavioural Pharmacology Society /11./. 09.09.2005-12.09.2005, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MZd NF7626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : schizophrenia * rats * behaviour * quinolinic acid Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  19. Ring-closure Reaction to Novel Quinoline Derivatives and Their Structural Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U),Yin-Xiang(吕银祥); LAN,Bi-Jian(蓝碧健); ZHOU,Hui(周辉); XU,Wei(徐伟); WANG,Jing-Mei(王静梅); HUANG,Yong-Ming(黄永明)

    2004-01-01

    In the condensation of arylaldehydes with arylethylidenemalononitriles, it was found that, besides the normal product dienes a, the ring-closure product quinoline derivatives b can be also obtained in 26%-50% yields. The substituent effects were also examined and a possible reaction mechanism was proposed for the formation of b. The X-ray crystal structure of 1b confirms the structure of the ring-closure product.

  20. 8-[(3-Phenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-ylmethoxy]quinoline monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yuan Bai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C18H13N3O2·H2O, the oxadiazole ring forms dihedral angles 7.21 (10 and 21.25 (11° with the quinoline and benzene rings, respectively. The crystal structure features O—H...N hydrogen bonds and is further consolidated by C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the water molecule of hydration.

  1. Nerve growth factor protects cholinergic neurons against quinolinic acid-induced excitotoxicity in wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljević Ivana D.; Jovanović Marina D.; Čolić Miodrag J.; Mićić D.; Ninković Milica; Maličević Živorad

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) is still unknown. There could be a complex interplay between altered energy metabolism, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Excitotoxic striatal lesions induced by quinolinic acid (QA), were used to test for the neuroprotective actions of nerve growth factor (NGF) on striatal cholinergic and GABAergic neurons. QA is an endogenous excitotoxin acting on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) rec...

  2. Anthracene derivatives of benzo(f)quinoline. Synthesis, spectra, and luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koslov, N.S.; Shmanai, G.S.; Gladchenko, L.F.

    1986-05-01

    By condensation of 9-(N-(2-naphthyl)formimidoyl)anthracene with methyl ketones under conditions of acid catalysis, 1-R-3-(-anthryl)benzo(f)quinolines have been obtained. The byproducts of the reaction have been identified: 1-R-3-(9-anthyl)-2-propen-1-ones and N-(1-(p-aminophenyl)-3-(9-anthryl)-2-propen-1-ylidene)-2-naph-thylamines. The spectral and luminescence properties of these compounds have been examined critically.

  3. 4,5-Bis(dimethylamino)quinolines: proton sponge versus azine behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyablo, Olga V; Shmoilova, Elena A; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Burov, Oleg N; Starikova, Zoya A

    2012-08-17

    Two first representatives, 5 and 6, of the still unknown 4,5-bis(dimethylamino)quinoline have been synthesized and studied. While the former, being protonated either at the peri-NMe(2) groups or at the ring nitrogen, has been shown to display properties of both a proton sponge and azine, its counterpart 6 behaves exclusively as azine giving only a quinolinium salt. PMID:22860688

  4. Ionic liquid catalyzed convenient synthesis of imidazo[1,2-a]quinoline under sonic condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Devji S.; Avalani, Jemin R.; Raval, Dipak K., E-mail: dipanalka@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Sardar Patel University Gujarat (India)

    2012-10-15

    An efficient protocol for the synthesis of imidazo[1,2-a]quinoline from aldehydes, enaminones, and malononitrile using 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]-undec-7-en-8-ium acetate ([DBU][Ac]) as a catalyst under ultrasound irradiation is described. Compared with other methods, this new method has the advantages of easier work-up, milder reaction conditions, high yields and environmentally benign procedure. (author)

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Thioredoxin Reductase (PfTrxR) and Its Role as a Target for New Antimalarial Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sara E. McCarty; Amanda Schellenberger; Douglas C. Goodwin; Ngolui Rene Fuanta; Tekwani, Babu L.; Calderón, Angela I.

    2015-01-01

    The growing resistance to current antimalarial drugs is a major concern for global public health. The pressing need for new antimalarials has led to an increase in research focused on the Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), an enzyme needed to maintain redox equilibrium in Plasmodium species, is a promising target for new antimalarials. This review paper provides an overview of the structure and function of TrxR, discusses similarities and differences...

  6. Active-site models for complexes of quinolinate synthase with substrates and intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Erika V.; Zhang, Yang; Colabroy, Keri L.; Sanders, Jennie M.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Structural studies of quinolinate synthase suggest a model for the enzyme–substrate complex and an enzyme–intermediate complex with a [4Fe–4S] cluster. Quinolinate synthase (QS) catalyzes the condensation of iminoaspartate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form quinolinate, the universal precursor for the de novo biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QS has been difficult to characterize owing either to instability or lack of activity when it is overexpressed and purified. Here, the structure of QS from Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure is a homodimer consisting of three domains per protomer. Each domain shows the same topology with a four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by four α-helices, suggesting that the domains are the result of gene triplication. Biochemical studies of QS indicate that the enzyme requires a [4Fe–4S] cluster, which is lacking in this crystal structure, for full activity. The organization of domains in the protomer is distinctly different from that of a monomeric structure of QS from P. horikoshii [Sakuraba et al. (2005 ▶), J. Biol. Chem.280, 26645–26648]. The domain arrangement in P. furiosus QS may be related to protection of cysteine side chains, which are required to chelate the [4Fe–4S] cluster, prior to cluster assembly.

  7. A tetranuclear cadmium(II) complex based on the 2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Liang; Ye, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    The hydrothermal reaction of 2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile and Cd(ClO(4))(2) yielded the noncentrosymmetric coordination complex tetrakis[μ-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetato]tetrakis[μ-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile]tetracadmium tetrakis(perchlorate) dihydrate, [Cd(4)(C(11)H(8)NO(3))(4)(C(11)H(8)N(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(4)·2H(2)O. The local coordination environment around the Cd(II) cation can be best described as a capped octahedron defined by two N atoms and five O atoms from three ligands. The Cd(II) cations are linked by the ligands with Cd-O-Cd and Cd-O-C-C-O-Cd bridges, forming tetranuclear units, there being two independent tertranuclear units in the structure. The fourfold rotoinversion centre sits at the centre of each Cd(4) core. The two perchlorate anions in the asymmetric unit are linked by the water molecule through O-H...O hydrogen bonds. PMID:23282905

  8. Proton reduction by a nickel complex with an internal quinoline moiety for proton relay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majee, Karunamay; Patel, Jully; Rai, Surabhi; Das, Babulal; Panda, Binata; Padhi, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-08-21

    The complex Ni(DQPD) (where DQPD = deprotonated N(2),N(6)-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide (DQPDH2)) behaves as a visible light driven active catalyst to reduce protons from water when employed with the photosensitizer fluorescein (Fl) and triethylamine (TEA) as the sacrificial electron donor. The photocatalytic system shows very high activity, attaining 2160 turnovers and an initial turnover rate of 0.032 s(-1) with respect to the catalyst. The proposed electrocatalytic mechanism is of the CECE type (C is a chemical step protonation and E is the electrochemical step reduction), where the Ni(DQPD) catalyst undergoes rapid protonation at the non-coordinating nitrogen atom of the quinoline before undergoing reduction. The location of the pendant base is a key factor such that the N-H resulting from the protonation of the non-coordinating nitrogen atom of the quinoline is properly located to interact with the Ni-H hydride leading to heterocoupling between protons and hydrides. Theoretical calculations for the catalytic system were carried out using the density functional level of theory (DFT) and are consistent with a mechanism for catalysis in a polypyridine nickel system. This is the first report of a polypyridine based nickel catalyst where the pendant base is responsible for the internal proton relay towards the metal center through the heterocoupling between protons and hydrides to generate hydrogen. PMID:27432223

  9. An unusual presentation of methanol poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    TURMEN, Suha; ERYİĞİT, Umut; SAHİN, Aynur; MENTESE, Seda; Gunduz, Abdulkadir

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is a substance possessing high toxicity even in small quantities. It may lead to intracerebral hemorrhage, blindness and death. Methanol poisoning generally takes place as result of oral ingestion, but may rarely occur through inhalation or transdermally. Persons may be exposed to methanol because of illegal alcohol beverage producers or alternative medicine providers. A 55-year-old male with methanol poisoning as a result of rubbing a self-prepared mixture of methylated spirit and a...

  10. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) inspired azole-quinoline based fluorophores: Synthesis and photophysical properties study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was obtained by the condensation reaction of p-amino salicylic acid and 4-nitrophenylmalonadialdehyde which was obtained from phenylacetonitrile through nitration, hydrolysis and Vilsmeier reaction. 7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl) quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was condensed with different o-aminophenols or o-aminothiophenol in ethanol in the presence of phosphorustrichloride. Synthesized quinoline contained benzimidazole and benzothiazole moieties. Photophysical behaviors of these compounds in solvents of different polarities were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds showed single absorption in all the studied solvents. The dual emissions (normal emission and ESIPT emission) as well as large Stokes' shift emission pattern were observed for the synthesized fluorophores. The photophysical study shows that the emission properties of the compounds depend on the solvent polarity. The photophysical properties of the compounds were compared with structurally analogous ESIPT quinoline. Thermal stability of the compounds was studied using thermogravimetric analysis and results show that compounds are thermally stable up to 300 °C. The synthesized quinoline derivatives were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR and 1H –NMR, 13C –NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. - Highlights: • First and unique study of quinoline derivatives contain ESIPT azole unit at 6-position and hydroxyl group at 7-position. • Compounds are fluorescent with considerable quantum yields. • All compounds showed absorption in ultraviolet region and emission in visible region with large Stokes' shift. • The photophysical properties of new compounds were compared with reported ESIPT quinoline analogous

  11. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) inspired azole-quinoline based fluorophores: Synthesis and photophysical properties study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padalkar, Vikas S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan, E-mail: n.sekar@ictmumbai.edu.in

    2014-11-15

    7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was obtained by the condensation reaction of p-amino salicylic acid and 4-nitrophenylmalonadialdehyde which was obtained from phenylacetonitrile through nitration, hydrolysis and Vilsmeier reaction. 7-Hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl) quinoline-6-carboxylic acid was condensed with different o-aminophenols or o-aminothiophenol in ethanol in the presence of phosphorustrichloride. Synthesized quinoline contained benzimidazole and benzothiazole moieties. Photophysical behaviors of these compounds in solvents of different polarities were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The compounds showed single absorption in all the studied solvents. The dual emissions (normal emission and ESIPT emission) as well as large Stokes' shift emission pattern were observed for the synthesized fluorophores. The photophysical study shows that the emission properties of the compounds depend on the solvent polarity. The photophysical properties of the compounds were compared with structurally analogous ESIPT quinoline. Thermal stability of the compounds was studied using thermogravimetric analysis and results show that compounds are thermally stable up to 300 °C. The synthesized quinoline derivatives were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR and {sup 1}H –NMR, {sup 13}C –NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral analysis. - Highlights: • First and unique study of quinoline derivatives contain ESIPT azole unit at 6-position and hydroxyl group at 7-position. • Compounds are fluorescent with considerable quantum yields. • All compounds showed absorption in ultraviolet region and emission in visible region with large Stokes' shift. • The photophysical properties of new compounds were compared with reported ESIPT quinoline analogous.

  12. Production of methanol/DME from biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Münster-Swendsen, Janus;

    In this project the production of DME/methanol from biomass has been investigated. Production of DME/methanol from biomass requires the use of a gasifier to transform the solid fuel to a synthesis gas (syngas) - this syngas can then be catalytically converted to DME/methanol. Two different gasifi...

  13. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  14. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem-ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic. PMID:26170661

  15. Experimental study on methanol recovery through flashing vaporation in continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the oil conversion, high methanol/oil molar ratio is required in the continuous production of biodiesel via supercritical methanol transesterification in tubular reactor. And thus the subsequent excess methanol recovery needs high energy consumption. Based on the feature of high temperature and high pressure in supercritical methanol transesterification, excess methanol recovery in reaction system by flashing vaporation is conducted and the effect of reaction temperature, reaction pressure and flashing pressure on methanol recovery and methanol concentration in gas phase is discussed in detail in this article. Results show that at the reaction pressure of 9-15 MPa and the reaction temperature of 240-300 oC, flashing pressure has significant influence on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase, which can be effectively improved by reducing flashing pressure. At the same time, reaction temperature and reaction pressure also have an important effect on methanol recovery and methanol content in gas phase. At volume flow of biodiesel and methanol 1:2, tubular reactor pressure 15 MPa, tubular reactor temperature 300 oC and the flashing pressure 0.4 MPa, methanol recovery is more than 85% and methanol concentration of gas phase (mass fraction) is close to 99% after adiabatic braising; therefore, the condensate liquid of gas phase can be injected directly into methanol feedstock tank to be recycled. Research abstracts: Biodiesel is an important alternative energy, and supercritical methanol transesterification is a new and green technology to prepare biodiesel with some obvious advantages. But it also exists some problems: high reaction temperature, high reaction pressure and large molar ratio of methanol/oil will cause large energy consumption which restricts supercritical methanol for the industrial application of biodiesel. So a set of tubular reactor-coupled flashing apparatus is established for continuous preparing biodiesel in supercritical

  16. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  17. Methanol production method and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1984-01-01

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  18. The direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  19. The methanol industry's missed opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout its history the methanol industry has been backward in research and development and in industry cooperation on public image and regulatory matters. It has been extremely reticent as to the virtue of its product for new uses, especially for motor fuel. While this is perhaps understandable looking back, it is inexcusable looking forward. The industry needs to cooperate on a worldwide basis in research and market development, on the one hand, and in image-building and political influence, on the other, staying, of course, within the US and European and other regional antitrust regulations. Unless the industry develops the motor fuel market, and especially the exciting new approach through fuel cell operated EVs, to siphon off incremental capacity and keep plants running at 90% or more of capacity, it will continue to live in a price roller-coaster climate. A few low-cost producers will do reasonably well and the rest will just get along or drop out here and there along the way, as in the past. Having come so far from such a humble beginning, it is a shame not to realize the full potential that is clearly there: a potential to nearly double sales dollars without new plants and to produce from a plentiful resource, at least for the next half-century, all the methanol that can be imagined to be needed. Beyond that the industry can turn to renewable energy--the sun--via biomass growth, to make their product. In so doing, it can perhaps apply methanol as a plant growth stimulant, in effect making the product fully self-sustainable. The world needs to know what methanol can do to provide--economically and reliably--the things upon which a better life rests

  20. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  1. Public Awareness and Identification of Counterfeit Drugs in Tanzania: A View on Antimalarial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Mhando

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The illicit trade in counterfeit antimalarial drugs is a major setback to the fight against malaria. Information on public awareness and ability to identify counterfeit drugs is scanty. Aim. Therefore, the present study aimed at assessing public awareness and the ability to identify counterfeit antimalarial drugs based on simple observations such as appearance of the drugs, packaging, labelling, and leaflets. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted using interviewer administered structured questionnaire and a checklist. Respondents were required to spot the difference between genuine and counterfeit antimalarial drugs given to them. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Results. The majority of respondents, 163 (55.6%, were able to distinguish between genuine and counterfeit antimalarial drugs. Respondents with knowledge on health effects of counterfeit drugs were more likely to identify genuine and counterfeit drugs than their counterparts (P=0.003; OR = 2.95; 95% CI: 1.47–5.65. The majority of respondents, 190 (64.8%, perceived the presence of counterfeit drugs to be a big problem to the community. Conclusions. A substantial proportion of respondents were able to distinguish between genuine and counterfeit antimalarial drugs. Public empowerment in identifying counterfeit drugs by simple observations is a major step towards discouraging the market of counterfeit drugs.

  2. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  3. An expeditious I sub(2)-catalyzed entry into 6H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline system of cryptotackieine

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvatkar, P.T.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Tilve, S.G.

    A synthesis of a series of novel 6H-indolo[2,3-b]- quinolines with different substituents on the quinoline ring is described. The method involves reaction of indole-3-carboxyaldehyde with aryl amines in the presence of a catalytic amount of iodine...

  4. Temporal and spatial variations in rainwater methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J. D.; Jones, S. B.; Avery, G. B.; Willey, J. D.; Mead, R. N.; Kieber, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the first detailed analysis of methanol concentrations in rainwater. Methanol concentrations measured in 49 rain events collected between 28 August 2007 to 10 July 2008 in Wilmington, NC, USA, ranged from below the detection limit of 6 nM to 9.3 μM with a volume weighted average concentration of 1.2 ± 0.2 μM. Methanol concentrations in rainwater were up to ~200× greater than concentrations observed in marine waters indicating wet deposition as a potential significant source to marine waters. Assuming these methanol concentrations are an appropriate proxy for global methanol rainwater concentrations the global methanol wet deposition sink is estimated as 20 Tg yr-1 which implies previous methanol budgets underestimate removal by precipitation. Methanol concentrations did not correlate with H+, NO3-, and NSS, which suggest that the dominant source of the alcohol to rainwater is not anthropogenic. However, methanol concentrations were strongly correlated with acetaldehyde which has a primarily biogenic input. Methanol volume weighted concentration during the growing season (1.5 + 0.3 μM) was more than double that of the non-growing season (0.7 + 0.1 μM), further promoting biogenic emissions as the primary cause of fluctuating methanol concentrations. Methanol concentrations peaked in rainwater collected between the time period 12:00-06:00 p.m. Peaking during this period of optimal sunlight implies a direct relationship to photochemical methanol production but there are also increases in biogenic activity during this time period. Rain events with terrestrial origins had higher concentrations than those of marine origin demonstrating the significance of the continental source of methanol in rainwater.

  5. Monitoring the efficacy of antimalarial medicines in India via sentinel sites: Outcomes and risk factors for treatment failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelima Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: Till 2012, India′s national antimalarial drug resistance monitoring system proved highly efficacious and safe towards first-line antimalarials used in the country, except in Northeastern region where a decline in efficacy of AS+SP has been observed. This led to change in first-line treatment for P. falciparum to artemether-lumefantrine in Northeastern region.

  6. Analysis of denitrifier community in a bioaugmented sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yaohui; Xing, Rui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Sun, Qinghua [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

    2011-05-15

    The denitrifier community and associated nitrate and nitrite reduction in the bioaugmented and general sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) during the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline were investigated. The efficiency and stability of nitrate and nitrite reduction in SBR was considerably improved after inoculation with four pyridine- or quinoline-degrading bacterial strains (including three denitrifying strains). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the nosZ gene revealed that the structures of the denitrifier communities in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented reactors were distinct and varied during the course of the experiment. Bioaugmentation protected indigenous denitrifiers from disruptions caused by pyridine and quinoline. Clone library analysis showed that one of the added denitrifiers comprised approximately 6% of the denitrifier population in the bioaugmented sludge. (orig.)

  7. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata Kunt (Rutaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, G-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data (1H, 13C, 1D, 2D, IR, MS) and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia. (author)

  8. Design and microwave-assisted synthesis of naphtho[2,3-f]quinoline derivatives and their luminescent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shujiang; Wu, Shanshan; Yan, Shu; Hao, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiaohong; Cao, Xudong; Han, Zhengguo; Jiang, Bo; Shi, Feng; Xia, Min; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2009-03-01

    A sequential three-component reaction of an aromatic aldehyde with an equimolar amount of 2-aminoanthracene and cyclic 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds (such as tetronic acid, 5,5-dimethyl,3-cyclohexanedione, 1,3-indanedione, 3H-chromene-2,4-dione, quinoline-2,4(1H, 3H)-dione and barbituric acid) in acidic medium under microwave irradiation has been developed. In this one-pot reaction, a series of unusual fused heterocyclic compounds, naphtho[2,3-f]quinoline derivatives, were synthesized. This method has the advantages of operational simplicity, increased safety for small-scale fast synthesis, and minimal environmental impact. Most distinctively, this new class of naphtho[2,3-f]quinoline derivatives exhibit good luminescent properties in the ethanol solution, which can be used potentially as organic electroluminescent (EL) media. PMID:19115830

  9. Experimental and quantum chemical studies on corrosion inhibition performance of quinoline derivatives for MS in 1N HCl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B M Mistry; N S Patel; S Sahoo; S Jauhari

    2012-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of two quinoline derivatives, viz. 2-chloro quinoline 3-carbaldehyde (CQC) and (2-chloro-quinoline-3ylmethyl)--tolyl-amine (CQA) have been investigated against mild steel (MS) in 1N HCl solution using conventional weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The losses in weights of MS samples have proved that both CQC and CQA are efficient inhibitors of corrosion. The mixed mode of inhibition was confirmed by electrochemical polarizations. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have showed changes in the impedance parameters like charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance that confirmed strong adsorption of inhibitors on the MS surface. The inhibition action of these compounds was assumed to occur via adsorption on the steel surface through the active centres contained in the molecules. Furthermore, quantum chemical calculations have been performed at B3LYP/6-31G( , ) level to complement the experimental evidence.

  10. Quinoline alkaloids and friedelane-type triterpenes isolated from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata Kunt (Rutaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuca-Suarez, Luis Enrique; Barrera, Ericsson David Coy [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Quimica; Alvarez Caballero, Juan Manuel [Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta DTCH (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias Basicas

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the phytochemical exploration of the ethanol extract from leaves and wood of Esenbeckia alata, leading to the isolation and identification of quinoline alkaloids 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one, N-methylflindersine, dictamine, kokusaginine, G-fagarine, flindersiamine, as well as the fridelane-type triterpenes, frideline, fridelanol and its acetate derivative. Identification of these compounds was based on full analyses of spectroscopic data ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 1}D, {sup 2}D, IR, MS) and comparison with data reported in literature. Compound 4-methoxy-3-(3'-methyl-but-2'-enyl)-N-methyl-quinolin-2(1 H)-one is reported for the first time for the genus Esenbeckia. (author)

  11. Polyamine quinoline rhodium complexes: synthesis and pharmacological evaluation as antiparasitic agents against Plasmodium falciparum and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Tameryn; Taylor, Dale; Guzgay, Hajira; Shokar, Ajit; Au, Aaron; Smith, Peter J; Hendricks, Denver T; Land, Kirkwood M; Egan, Timothy J; Smith, Gregory S

    2015-09-01

    A series of mono- and bis-salicylaldimine ligands and their corresponding Rh(i) complexes were prepared. The compounds were characterised using standard spectroscopic techniques including NMR, IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The salicylaldimine ligands and complexes were screened for antiparasitic activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum i.e. the NF54 CQ-sensitive and K1 CQ-resistant strain as well as against the G3 isolate of Trichomonas vaginalis. The monomeric salicylaldimine quinolines exhibited good activity against the NF54 strain and the dimeric salicylaldimine quinolines exhibited no cross resistance across the two strains. The binuclear 5-chloro Rh(i) complex displayed the best activity against the Trichomonas vaginalis parasite, possibly a consequence of its enhanced lipophilicity. The compounds were also screened for cytotoxicity in vitro against WHCO1 oesophageal cancer cells. The monomeric salicylaldimine quinolines exhibited high selectivity towards malaria parasites compared to cancer cells, while the dimeric compounds were less selective. PMID:26226082

  12. Efficient example of cross-linked polymeric catalysed synthesis of 7-benzo[ℎ]indeno[1,2-]quinolin-8-one and 8-naphtho[2,3-ℎ]indeno[1,2-]quinolin-9-one

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reza Sandaroos; Mehdi Vadi; Saman Damavandi

    2013-11-01

    Cross-linked poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl propane sulphonic acid) (AMPS) was found to be an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for direct synthesis of 7-benzo[ℎ]indeno[1, 2-]quinolin-8-one and 8-naphtho[2, 3-ℎ]indeno[1, 2-]quinolin-9-one derivatives through one-pot condensation of aromatic aldehydes, 1, 3-indandione and 1-naphthylamine or 1-antharacylamine. The catalyst could be recovered conveniently and reused without any loss of activity. Mild conditions, short reaction times, simplicity, easy workup, and good to excellent yields can be mentioned as the advantages of this research.

  13. (Benzoato-κ2O,O′(quinoline-2-carboxylato-κ2N,O(quinoline-2-carboxylic acid-κ2N,Omanganese(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno D. Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, [Mn(C7H5O2(C10H6NO2(C10H7NO2], contains manganese(II ions six-coordinated in a distorted octahedral environment. The equatorial plane is occupied by four O atoms, two from the carboxylate group of the benzoate ion, the other two from carboxylate/carboxyl groups of the quinaldate/quinaldic acid molecules. The axial positions are occupied by the N atoms of the quinoline ring systems. The metal ion lies on a twofold rotation axis that bisects the benzoate ligand; the quinaldate and quinaldic acid ligands are therefore equivalent by symmetry, and the carboxylate/carboxyl groups are disordered. The complexes are joined together by hydrogen bonds between the carboxylate/carboxyl groups of adjacent quinaldate/quinaldic acid molecules, forming zigzag chains that run along the c axis.

  14. Collaborative health and enforcement operations on the quality of antimalarials and antibiotics in southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yuk Lin; Plançon, Aline; Lau, Yen Hui; Hostetler, Dana M; Fernández, Facundo M; Green, Michael D; Sounvoravong, Sourisak; Nara, Suon; Boravann, Mam; Dumrong, Thitikornkovit; Bangsawan, Nurjaya; Low, Min Yong; Lim, Chin-Chin; Ai, Ruth Lee Choo; Newton, Paul N

    2015-06-01

    Counterfeit (or falsified) and substandard medicines pose a major public health risk. We describe the findings of Operation Storm I and II conducted in 2008-2009 to combat counterfeit medicines through partnership between national customs, Drug Regulatory Agencies (DRAs), and police in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Samples were obtained from seizures and market surveillance by national DRAs. Laboratory analysis using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques and examination of packaging were performed. Ninety-three suspect antibiotics and 95 antimalarial samples were collected. Of the 93 antibiotics, 29 (31%) had % active pharmaceutical ingredient content (%API) 115% (including one counterfeit). Of the 95 antimalarials, 30 (32%) had %API 115% API (including one counterfeit). A significant minority of samples, antimalarials (13%) and antibiotics (15%), were collected in plastic bags with minimal or no labeling. Of 20 ampicillin samples, 13 (65%) contained medicines. PMID:25897069

  15. Influence of smoking on disease severity and antimalarial therapy in cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, A; Sigges, J; Biazar, C;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years it has been controversially discussed in the literature if smoking is associated with the activity of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the efficacy of antimalarial agents. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of smoking on disease severity and antimalarial...... treatment in patients with CLE using the Core Set Questionnaire of the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). METHODS: A total of 1002 patients (768 female, 234 male) with different CLE subtypes were included in this cross-sectional study, which was performed in 14 different countries....... Smoking behaviour was assessed by the EUSCLE Core Set Questionnaire in 838 patients and statistically analysed using an SPSS database. The results were correlated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI) and the efficacy of antimalarial treatment. RESULTS: A high...

  16. Blood schizontocidal activity of methylene blue in combination with antimalarials against Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garavito G.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylene blue (MB is the oldest synthetic antimalarial. It is not used anymore as antimalarial but should be reconsidered. For this purpose we have measured its impact on both chloroquine sensitive and resistant Plasmodium strains. We showed that around 5 nM of MB were able to inhibit 50% of the parasite growth in vitro and that late rings and early trophozoites were the most sensitive stages; while early rings, late trophozoites and schizonts were less sensitive. Drug interaction study following fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC method showed antagonism with amodiaquine, atovaquone, doxycycline, pyrimethamine; additivity with artemether, chloroquine, mefloquine, primaquine and synergy with quinine. These results confirmed the interest of MB that could be integrated in a new low cost antimalarial combination therapy.

  17. Antidiarrheal and thrombolytic effects of methanol extract of Wikstroemia indica (L. C. A. Mey leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Khalilur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Medicinal plants contribute as potential sources of therapeutic uses. Wikstroemia indica, a traditional medicinal plant, has long been used as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antimalarial, anti-mitotic, antitumor, and anti-HIV in different parts of the world. Aims: The aim was to investigate the antidiarrheal and thrombolytic effect of W. indica leaf extract. Settings and Design: Sample collection, identification, solvent extraction, and crude extract preparations were led to evaluate the antidiarrheal effect in in vivo model and the thrombolytic effect in in vitro model. Materials and Methods: Castor oil-induced diarrhea and enteropooling assays and gastrointestinal motility tests were used to examine the in vivo antidiarrheal activity in Wistar albino rat. In vitro clot lysis model was undertaken to investigate the thrombolytic action of the extract. Data were analyzed using statistical software (Statistical Package for Social Science, SPSS, version 19.0, SPSS Inc., USA. Results: The diarrheal episode was inhibited by 18.64% and 28.96% for the methanol extract at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. The extract significantly (P < 0.05 reduced the intestinal volume and intestinal transit in comparison to control. The extract also reduced the rate of defecation, accumulation of fluid, and transit of charcoal oil. The extract showed a moderate thrombolytic effect compared to the reference control. Conclusion: Methanol extract of W. indica might be triggered the premonition of novel drug discovery in the future due to its antidiarrheal effect in the animal model.

  18. Investigation of Traditional Palestinian Medicinal Plant Inula viscosa as Potential Anti-malarial Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akkawi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a life threatening parasitic disease which is prevalent mainly in developing countries; it is the main cause of global mortality and morbidity. Development and search of novel and effective anti-malarial agents to overcome chloroquine resistance have become a very important issue. Most anti-malarial drugs target the erythrocytic stage of malaria infection, where hemozoin synthesis takes place and is considered a crucial process for the parasite survival. Throughout last decades, natural products have been a significant source of chemotherapeutics especially against malaria. Inula viscosa, Inula viscosa , is a shrub that grows around the Mediterranean basin and considered as an important Palestinian traditional medicinal herb. In this research it was found that the Palestinian flora Inula viscosa alcoholic extract has a significant and promising anti-malarial effect in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The crude alcoholic extract of Inula viscosa has the capability to impede the formation of &beta-hematin in vitro; with an efficiency of about 93% when compared to the standard chloroquine which gave 94% at comparable concentrations. in vivo studies showed that this crude extract inhibited the growth of Plasmodium parasites in the red blood cells at a rate of about 96.6%, with an EC50 value of 0.55 ng/mL. Several secondary plant metabolites may be responsible for this anti-malarial activity; the effect also may be most probably due to the presence of high concentrations of nerolidol which has often been found at high concentrationsin this plant. Nerolidol shows a stronger inhibition of hypoxanthine incorporation than quinine. Its anti-malarial effect is potentiated by other essential oils. Nerolidol is also found in several Artemisia species and in Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass and Virola surinamensis, all plants known for their anti-malarial properties.

  19. Monitoring antimalarial safety and tolerability in clinical trials: A case study from Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpimbaza Arthur

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New antimalarial regimens, including artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs, have been adopted widely as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Although these drugs appear to be safe and well-tolerated, experience with their use in Africa is limited and continued assessment of safety is a priority. However, no standardized guidelines for evaluating drug safety and tolerability in malaria studies exist. A system for monitoring adverse events in antimalarial trials conducted in Uganda was developed. Here the reporting system is described, and difficulties faced in analysing and interpreting the safety results are illustrated, using data from the trials. Case description Between 2002 and 2007, eleven randomized, controlled clinical trials were conducted to compare the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of different antimalarial regimens for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. The approach to adverse event monitoring was similar in all studies. A total of 5,614 treatments were evaluated in 4,876 patients. Differences in baseline characteristics and patterns of adverse event reporting were noted between the sites, which limited the ability to pool and analyse data. Clinical failure following antimalarial treatment confounded associations between treatment and adverse events that were also common symptoms of malaria, particularly in areas of lower transmission intensity. Discussion and evaluation Despite prospectively evaluating for adverse events, limitations in the monitoring system were identified. New standardized guidelines for monitoring safety and tolerability in antimalarial trials are needed, which should address how to detect events of greatest importance, including serious events, those with a causal relationship to the treatment, those which impact on adherence, and events not previously reported. Conclusion Although the World Health Organization has supported the development of

  20. Cucurbit[n]urils-induced room temperature phosphorescence of quinoline derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cucurbit[7,8]urils (Q[7] and Q[8])-induced room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) of quinoline and its derivatives were firstly found in the cucurbit[n]urils chemistry. The luminophores (quinolines) and their RTP are affected by the concentration of different Q[n]s, heavy metal ions and amounts, and pH. The RTP lifetime of the luminophore has been investigated. In presence of Na2SO3, the cation Tl+ led to stronger Q[n]-induced RTP, while the RTP lifetimes of luminophore/Q[7 or 8]/KI were generally longer than that of luminophore/Q[7 or 8]/TlNO3, the RTP lifetimes of these systems were between 0.18 and 47.4 ms. Contrary to the stable 1:2 Q[8]:guest ternary inclusion complexes at lower pHs, as suggested by 1H NMR, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, low Q[8]-induced room temperature phosphorescence was observed. However, at higher pHs, high intensity of cucurbit[n]urils-induced room temperature phosphorescence of these quinoline derivatives were observed, and a 1:1 Q[8]:guest inclusion complex was formed. Investigations of dependence of RTP intensity on concentration of Q[n] revealed that the highest intensity of the Q[n]-induced RTP was observed at a low mole ratio of host:guest, which is closed to 1:1. It was presumably resulted from the strong interaction of Q[n] and these guests due to the combined hydrophobic cavity interaction and the hydrophilic portal interaction of the cucurbit[n]urils with the nitrogen heterocycles guest

  1. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of potent antitumor active quinoline and naphthyridine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sanjay K; Jha, Amrita; Agarwal, Shiv K; Mukherjee, Rama; Burman, Anand C

    2007-11-01

    The disease of cancer has been ranked second after cardiovascular diseases and plant-derived molecules have played an important role for the treatment of cancer. Nine cytotoxic plant-derived molecules such as vinblastine, vincristine, navelbine, etoposide, teniposide, taxol, taxotere, topotecan and irinotecan have been approved as anticancer drugs. Recently, epothilones are being emerging as future potential anti-tumor agents. However, targeted cancer therapy has now been rapidly expanding and small organic molecules are being exploited for this purpose. Amongst target specific small organic molecules, quinazoline was found as one of the most successful chemical class in cancer chemotherapy as three drugs namely Gefitinib, Erlotinib and Canertinib belong to this series. Now, quinazoline related chemical classes such as quinolines and naphthyridines are being exploited in cancer chemotherapy and a number of molecules such as compounds EKB-569 (52), HKI-272 (78) and SNS-595 (127a) are in different phases of clinical trials. This review presents the synthesis of quinolines and naphthyridines derivatives, screened for anticancer activity since year 2000. The synthesis of most potent derivatives in each prototype has been delineated. A brief structure activity relationship for each prototype has also been discussed. It has been observed that aniline group at C-4, aminoacrylamide substituents at C-6, cyano group at C-3 and alkoxy groups at C-7 in the quinoline ring play an important role for optimal activity. While aminopyrrolidine functionality at C-7, 2'-thiazolyl at N-1 and carboxy group at C-3 in 1,8-naphthyridine ring are essential for eliciting the cytotoxicity. This review would help the medicinal chemist to design and synthesize molecules for targeted cancer chemotherapy. PMID:18045063

  2. Thermo-optical properties of 1H[3,4-b] quinoline films used in electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglarz, Janusz; Kępińska, Mirosława; Sanetra, Jerzy

    2014-06-01

    Electroluminescence cells with H[3,4-b] quinoline layers are promising devices for a blue light emitting EL diode. This work measured the optical reflectance as a function of temperature in copolymers PAQ layers deposited on Si crystalline substrate. Using the extended Cauchy dispersion model of the film refractive index we determined the thermo-optical coefficients for quinoline layers in the temperature range of 76-333 K from combined ellipsometric and spectrofotometric studies. The obtained values of thermo-optical coefficients of thin PAQ film, were negative and ranged in 5-10 × 10-4 [1/K].

  3. Quinolinic acid effects on amino acid release from the rat cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Connick, J. H.; Stone, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of quinolinic acid, N-methyl-D,L-aspartate (NMDLA) and kainate on the release of endogenous and exogenous amino acids from the rat cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo was studied. 2. Neither quinolinic acid nor NMDLA had any effect on the basal or potassium-evoked release of [3H]-D-aspartate from slices of rat cerebral cortex either in the presence or absence of magnesium. Kainic acid failed to modify the basal efflux of [3H]-D-aspartate but significantly inhibited (by 34.4% +/...

  4. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy J. Hubin; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Amy N. Cain; Le, Justin G.; Stephen J Archibald; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal comple...

  5. Evaluation of the effect of pyrimethamine, an anti-malarial drug, on HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Oguariri, Raphael M.; Joseph W Adelsberger; Michael W Baseler; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2010-01-01

    Co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with malaria is one of the pandemic problems in Africa and parts of Asia. Here we investigated the impact of PYR and two other clinical anti-malarial drugs (chloroquine [CQ] or artemisinin [ART]) on HIV-1 replication. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or MT-2 cells were infected with HIVNL4.3 strain and treated with different concentrations of the anti-malarial drugs. HIV-1 replication was measured using p24 ELISA. We show that 10 μM...

  6. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  7. Crystal structure of bis(3-bromomesityl(quinolin-1-ium-8-ylboron(III tribromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Son

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C27H26.82BBr2.18N+·Br3−, is a cationic triarylborane isolated as its tribromide salt. The aryl substituents include a protonated 8-quinolyl group and two 3-bromomesityl groups. The molecule was prepared on combination of 3:1 Br2 and dimesityl(quinolin-8-ylborane in hexanes. The refinement of the structure indicated a degree of `over-bromination' (beyond two bromine atoms for the cation. There are two tribromide ions in the asymmetric unit, both completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry.

  8. Crystal structure of bis(3-bromomesityl)(quinolin-1-ium-8-yl)boron(III) tribromide

    OpenAIRE

    Jungho Son; Sem Raj Tamang; Hoefelmeyer, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C27H26.82BBr2.18N+·Br3−, is a cationic triarylborane isolated as its tribromide salt. The aryl substituents include a protonated 8-quinolyl group and two 3-bromomesityl groups. The molecule was prepared on combination of 3:1 Br2 and dimesityl(quinolin-8-yl)borane in hexanes. The refinement of the structure indicated a degree of `over-bromination' (beyond two bromine atoms) for the cation. There are two tribromide ions in the asymmetric unit, both completed by crystallograp...

  9. Ring-substituted 4-Hydroxy-1H-quinolin-2-ones: Preparation and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Dohnal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study, a series of twelve ring-substituted 4-hydroxy-1H-quinolin-2-one derivatives were prepared. The procedures for synthesis of the compounds are presented. The compounds were analyzed using RP-HPLC to determine lipophilicity and tested for their photosynthesis-inhibiting activity using spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. All the synthesized compounds were also evaluated for antifungal activity using in vitro screening with eight fungal strains. For all the compounds, the relationships between the lipophilicity and the chemical structure of the studied compounds are discussed, as well as their structure-activity relationships (SAR.

  10. Determination of three physical properties of quinoline ionic liquids with hexafluorophosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Dan; Wang Litao; Yao Shun; Chen Yanwen; Wang Daocai; Song Hang

    2016-01-01

    Densities of one acidic ionic liquid (IL) Quinolinum hexafluorophosphate ([HBpy][PF6]), and four neutral dicationic ionic liquids (ILs) based on quinoline and hexafluoro-phosphate and linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG): ([PEG200-DIL][PF6]2, [PEG400-DIL][PF6]2, [PEG800-DIL][PF6]2 and [PEG1000-DIL][PF6]2) were determined. In addition, the solubilities of six ILs in six lower alcohols, water, acetonitrile and diethyl ether were measured at 288.15 K; and the hydroscopicity of above five ILs ...

  11. Metabolic pathways of quinoline, indole and their methylated analogs by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, S.S.; Licht, D.; Arvin, E.;

    1997-01-01

    The transformation of quinoline, isoquinoline and 3-, 4-, 6- and 8-methylquinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was compared with that of the N-containing analogues indole and 1-, 2-, 3- and 7-methylindole. The metabolites were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV......-methyloxindole and 3- and 4-methyl-2-quinolinone, was observed within 162 days of incubation. These degradation products accumulated in stoichiometric amounts, while 6- and 8-methyl-2-quinolinone were further degraded to 6- and 8-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2-quinolinone in stoichiometric amounts. Isoquinoline, 2...

  12. Synthesis of (iso)quinoline, (iso)coumarin and (iso)chromene derivatives from acetylene compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabukhin, D. S.; Vasilyev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Published data on the methods of synthesis of quinoline, isoquinoline, coumarin, isocoumarin, chromene and isochromene derivatives from acetylene compounds are summarized. The reactions catalyzed by metal complexes (Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh, Au, Ag, Ni, Cu, etc.) and transformations induced by various electrophilic reagents (Brynsted and Lewis acids) are considered. Moieties of the mentioned heterocyclic systems are present in many biologically active natural products and pharmaceutical agents. Besides, derivatives of these heterocycles are used in the manufacture of catalysts, dyes, perfumery and cosmetic products, corrosion inhibitors and so on. The bibliography includes 211 references.

  13. 8-Hydroxy-2-methylquinolinium tetrachlorido(quinolin-8-olato-κ2N,Ostannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzatollah Najafi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2-methylquinolin-8-ol and stannic chloride yields the protonated 8-hydroxy-2-methylquinolinium species. In the title salt, (C10H10NO[Sn(C9H6NOCl4], the SnIV cation is N,O-chelated by the quinolin-8-olate anion and is further coordinated by four Cl− anions in a distorted cis-SnNOCl4 octahedral geometry. In the crystal, the cation is linked to the anion by an O—H...O hydrogen bond.

  14. 2-Oxo-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Asiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the molecule of the title compound, C20H14N2O, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 19.7 (1°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 62.9 (1° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. In the crystal, two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a centrosymmetric dimer.

  15. Bis(quinoline-2-carboxyl­ato-κ2 N,O)lead(II)

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamhossein Mohammadnezhad; Ali Reza Ghanbarpour; Amini, Mostafa M.; Seik Weng Ng

    2010-01-01

    The PbII atom in the title compound, [Pb(C10H6NO2)2], is N,O-chelated by two quinoline-2-carboxylate anions in a distorted Ψ-trigonal–bipyramidal environment; four atoms are connected to the PbII atom by regular coordination bonds. The structure also features two somewhat long Pb...O interactions [2.952 (3) and 3.014 (3) Å]. These long interactions give rise to a layer coordination polymer having the lead atom in a distorted Ψ...

  16. Bis(quinoline-2-carboxylato-κ2N,Olead(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Mohammadnezhad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The PbII atom in the title compound, [Pb(C10H6NO22], is N,O-chelated by two quinoline-2-carboxylate anions in a distorted Ψ-trigonal–bipyramidal environment; four atoms are connected to the PbII atom by regular coordination bonds. The structure also features two somewhat long Pb...O interactions [2.952 (3 and 3.014 (3 Å]. These long interactions give rise to a layer coordination polymer having the lead atom in a distorted Ψ-monocapped octahedral geometry.

  17. Synthesis of new biphenyl-substituted quinoline derivatives, preliminary screening and docking studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nellisara D Shashikumar; Ganganaika Krishnamurthy; Halehatti S Bhojyanaik; Mayasandra R Lokesh; Kaginalli S Jithendrakumara

    2014-01-01

    New quinoline derivatives containing biphenyl ring were synthesized and characterized by IR, 1H NMR and mass spectral studies. The synthesized compounds were screened for antimicrobial, anthelmintic activities as well as free radical scavenging property against the DPPH radical. The minimum inhibition concentration values showed promising inhibiting activity and are potent biological agents. The compounds showed minimum binding energy towards -tubulin. The compounds 11a, 11c, 13c and 13d have good affinity towards the active pocket and may be considered as a good inhibitor of -tubulin.

  18. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  19. Gas producers seek options as methanol falters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanol producers have recently experienced a period of massive demand and price uncertainty. This has occurred despite the fact that methanol is needed in the production of unleaded gasoline, which is increasingly becoming mandatory in many countries to counter the emission of greenhouse gases. This article explores the reasons behind the uncertainty, including health and pollution concerns. The use of methanol to manufacture methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), its benefits and problems are also explored. (UK)

  20. UO2 production process with methanol washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention refers to a process for the recovery of methanol used for washing the ammonium uranyl carbonate obtained during UO2 production. The methanol contains about 50% H2O, about 10% (NH4)2CO3, and is radioactive. According to the invention the methanol is purified at reduced pressure in a distillation unit and then led back to the washing unit. (UWI) 891 HP/UWI 892 MBE

  1. Design configurations of the methanol synthesis loop

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhn, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the chemical industry has undergone considerable changes due to increased environmental regulations and energy costs. This master thesis has evaluated three different design considerations of the methanol synthesis loop using Honeywell's general purpose process simulator UniSim Design (R380 Build 14027) combined with MathWorks programming language MATLAB. The three configurations are Lurgis methanol reactor loop as built on Tjeldbergodden, the use of interstage methanol remova...

  2. Developments in the European methanol market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the late eighties/early nineties the World Methanol Market was basically divided into three regional markets--America, Asia Pacific and Europe. These markets were interrelated but each had its own specific characteristics and traditional suppliers. Now the situation has changed; in the mid nineties there is a Global Methanol Market with global players and effective global pricing and the European market is governed by events world-wide. Europe is however a specific market with specific characteristics which are different from those of other markets although it is also part of the Global Market. Hence before the author focuses on Europe he looks at the World Market. The paper discusses world methanol production and consumption by region, world methanol consumption by end use, world methanol supply demand balance, the west European market, western European methanol production, methanol imports to W. Europe, the Former Soviet Union supplies, W. European methanol consumption by end use, MTBE in Europe, duties on methanol imports into W. Europe, investment in Europe, the effect of the 1994/95 price spike, and key issues for the future of the industry

  3. Mind the gaps - the epidemiology of poor-quality anti-malarials in the malarious world - analysis of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network database

    OpenAIRE

    Tabernero, Patricia; Facundo M Fernández; Green, Michael; Guerin, Philippe J; Newton, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor quality medicines threaten the lives of millions of patients and are alarmingly common in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, the global extent of the problem remains unknown. Accurate estimates of the epidemiology of poor quality medicines are sparse and are influenced by sampling methodology and diverse chemical analysis techniques. In order to understand the existing data, the Antimalarial Quality Scientific Group at WWARN built a comprehensive, open-access, global datab...

  4. Prioritization of anti-malarial hits from nature: chemo-informatic profiling of natural products with in vitro antiplasmodial activities and currently registered anti-malarial drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Egieyeh, Samuel Ayodele; Syce, James; Malan, Sarel F.; Christoffels, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Background A large number of natural products have shown in vitro antiplasmodial activities. Early identification and prioritization of these natural products with potential for novel mechanism of action, desirable pharmacokinetics and likelihood for development into drugs is advantageous. Chemo-informatic profiling of these natural products were conducted and compared to currently registered anti-malarial drugs (CRAD). Methods Natural products with in vitro antiplasmodial activities (NAA) we...

  5. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-01-01

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments. PMID:27301420

  6. Application of Porous Nickel-Coated TiO2 for the Photocatalytic Degradation of Aqueous Quinoline in an Internal Airlift Loop Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxin Huo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available P25 film, prepared by a facile dip-coating method without any binder, was further developed in a recirculating reactor for quinoline removal from synthetic wastewater. Macroporous foam Ni, which has an open three-dimensional network structure, was utilized as a substrate to make good use of UV rays. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the coated/calcinated P25 films consisted of two crystal phases, and had a number of uniform microcracks on the surface. The effects of initial quinoline concentration, light intensity, reaction temperature, aeration, and initial pH were studied. Increased reaction time, light intensity, environmental temperature, and gas aeration were found to significantly improve the quinoline removal efficiency. The aeration effect of oxygen dependency on the quinoline degradation had the trend pure oxygen > air > no gas > pure nitrogen with free O2. The solution pH crucially affected quinoline photodegradation; the high electrostatic adsorption of quinoline molecules on the TiO2 surface was strongly pH dependent. 2-Pyridine-carboxaldehyde, 3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, and 2(1H-quinolinone were identified as the major intermediates of quinoline degradation. Based on these intermediates, a primary degradation mechanism was proposed. This reusable P25 film benefits the photodegradation of water contaminants and has potential in other various applications.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and emission properties of quinolin-8-olato chelated ruthenium organometallics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bikash Kumar Panda

    2004-08-01

    The reaction of Ru(RL1)(PPh3)2(CO)Cl, 1, with quinolin-8-ol (HQ) has afforded complexes of the type [Ru(RL2)(PPh3)2(CO)(Q)], 3, in excellent yield (RL1 is C6H2O-2-CHNHC6H4R()-3-Me-5, RL2 is C6H2OH-2-CHNC6H4R()-3-Me-5 and R is Me, OMe, Cl). In this process, quinolin-8-olato (Q) undergoes five-membered chelation, the iminium-phenolato function tautomerizing to the imine-phenol function. In dichloromethane solution, 3 displays a quasireversible 3+/3 couple near 0×50 V vs SCE (3+ is the ruthenium (III) analogue of 3). Coulometrically generated solutions of 3+ display a strong absorption near 395 nm associated with a shoulder near 475 nm and rhombic EPR spectra with values near 2.55, 2.13, 1.89. Solutions of 3 absorb near 415 nm and emit near 510 nm at 298 K and 585 nm at 77 K. The fluorescence is believed to originate from the 3MLCT state.

  8. Rotational spectra of quinoline and of isoquinoline: spectroscopic constants and electric dipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Z.; Desyatnyk, O.; Pszczółkowski, L.; Charnley, S. B.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2003-01-01

    Rotational spectra of quinoline and of isoquinoline have been observed in the centimeter- and millimeter-wave regions. The spectra were assigned on the basis of bands formed by high- J transitions, which were measured up to J″⩽128 and ν⩽234 GHz. Complementary measurements were also made on low- J, centimeter-wave spectra observed in supersonic expansion and with fully resolved nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure. Accurate rotational, centrifugal distortion and hyperfine splitting constants for the ground states of both molecules are reported. The electric dipole moments for the two molecules were also determined from Stark effect measurements and are μa=0.14355(19), μb=2.0146(17), μtot=2.0197(17) D for quinoline, and μa=2.3602(21), μb=0.9051(14), μtot=2.5278(20) D for isoquinoline. The experimental observables were found to be rather accurately predicted by MP2/6-31G** ab initio calculations, and corresponding molecular geometries are also reported.

  9. The relative signs of NMR proton-carbon coupling constants in quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ono, Machiko

    2012-04-01

    The relative signs of spin-spin coupling constants are of practical significance in spectral analysis and in structural elucidation. The signs, however, cannot be obtained directly from usual NMR spectra. In the present study, we measured 1H and 13C NMR spectra of three quinolines and used the Selective Population Transfer (SPT) to determine the relative sign of their proton-carbon coupling constants. For the determination of the relative signs of JCH, hetero-nuclear SPT experiments accompanied with proton decoupling were applied to systems in which a carbon nucleus couples with four or more protons. SPT was applied to the lowest or highest field 13C satellite of the 1H spectrum. The value of 2JH3C2 of 6-chloro-2-methyl-quinolines (1) was determined to be +2.2 Hz by hetero-nuclear SPT with the decoupling of CH3 protons. Similarly, 2JH6C7 of 7-chloro-8-methylqionoline (2) and 2JH7C8 of 8-hydroxyquinoline (3) were determined to be -2 and -4.0 Hz with the decoupling of CH3 protons of Compound (2) and H4 of Compound (3), respectively.

  10. An environmentally benign one pot synthesis of substituted quinolines catalysed by fluoroboric acid based ionic liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rajendran; C Karthikeyan; K Rajathi; D Ragupathy

    2012-07-01

    Organic synthesis generally required large amount of solvent, avoiding the use of organic solvents in synthesis is a paradigm shift directed at developing more benign chemistry, and with ionic liquids surprisingly can lead to access to new compounds. An elegant one-pot synthesis of quinoline derivatives has been achieved by reaction of substituted anilines with -ketoester at 60°C in ethanol using an ionic liquid [Et3NH]+[BF4]−as catalyst. All the reactions gave products with high degree of purity and excellent yield (78-93%) within the shorter span of time (20-65 min) than those reactions with conventional methods. The screening of solvents as well as the reuse of ionic liquid has been evaluated. The structure of the products has been elucidated by spectral and analytical data. The present scope and potential economic impact of the reaction are demonstrated by the synthesis of substituted quinolines. Remaining challenges and future perspectives of the new transformation are discussed.

  11. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin: The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerapan Krungkrai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu (Chinese name and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Artemisinin was discovered in 1971 by a Chinese medical scientist Youyou Tu, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2015 on her discovering the antimalarial properties of qinghaosu from the traditional Chinese qinghao plant. Nevertheless, artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients has first emerged on the Thai-Cambodian border in 2009, which is now prevalent across mainland Southeast Asia from Vietnam to Myanmar. Here, we reviewed malaria disease severity, history of artemisinin discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of drug action, artemisinin-based combination therapies, emergence and spread of drug resistance, including the recent findings on mechanism of resistance in the falciparum malaria parasite. This poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for the urgent development of new antimalarial drugs.

  12. Probing the antimalarial mechanism of artemisinin and OZ277 (arterolane) with nonperoxidic isosteres and nitroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fügi, Matthias A; Wittlin, Sergio; Dong, Yuxiang; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L

    2010-03-01

    Peroxidic antimalarials such as the semisynthetic artemisinins are critically important in the treatment of drug-resistant malaria. Nevertheless, their peroxide bond-dependent mode of action is still not well understood. Using combination experiments with cultured Plasmodium falciparum cells, we investigated the interactions of the nitroxide radical spin trap, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO), and four of its analogs with artemisinin and the ozonide drug development candidate OZ277. The antagonism observed for combinations of artemisinin or OZ277 with the TEMPO analogs supports the hypothesis that the formation of carbon-centered radicals is critical for the activity of these two antimalarial peroxides. The TEMPO analogs showed a trend toward greater antagonism with artemisinin than they did with OZ277, an observation that can be explained by the greater tendency of artemisinin-derived carbon-centered radicals to undergo internal self-quenching reactions, resulting in a lower proportion of radicals available for subsequent chemical reactions such as the alkylation of heme and parasite proteins. In a further mechanistic experiment, we tested both artemisinin and OZ277 in combination with their nonperoxidic analogs. The latter had no effect on the antimalarial activities of the former. These data indicate that the antimalarial properties of peroxides do not derive from reversible interactions with parasite targets. PMID:20028825

  13. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin:The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerapan Krungkrai

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu (Chinese name) and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Artemisinin was discovered in 1971 by a Chinese medical scientist Youyou Tu, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2015 on her discovering the antimalarial properties of qinghaosu from the traditional Chinese qinghao plant. Nevertheless, artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients has first emerged on the Thai-Cambodian border in 2009, which is now prevalent across mainland Southeast Asia from Vietnam to Myanmar. Here, we reviewed malaria disease severity, history of artemisinin discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of drug action, artemisinin-based combination therapies, emergence and spread of drug resistance, including the recent findings on mechanism of resistance in the falciparum malaria parasite. This poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for the urgent development of new antimalarial drugs.

  14. A SAR and QSAR Study of New Artemisinin Compounds with Antimalarial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleydson Breno R. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Hartree-Fock method and the 6-31G** basis set were employed to calculate the molecular properties of artemisinin and 20 derivatives with antimalarial activity. Maps of molecular electrostatic potential (MEPs and molecular docking were used to investigate the interaction between ligands and the receptor (heme. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were employed to select the most important descriptors related to activity. The correlation between biological activity and molecular properties was obtained using the partial least squares and principal component regression methods. The regression PLS and PCR models built in this study were also used to predict the antimalarial activity of 30 new artemisinin compounds with unknown activity. The models obtained showed not only statistical significance but also predictive ability. The significant molecular descriptors related to the compounds with antimalarial activity were the hydration energy (HE, the charge on the O11 oxygen atom (QO11, the torsion angle O1-O2-Fe-N2 (D2 and the maximum rate of R/Sanderson Electronegativity (RTe+. These variables led to a physical and structural explanation of the molecular properties that should be selected for when designing new ligands to be used as antimalarial agents.

  15. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J. J.; van de Velden, M.; Sauerwein, R. W.; Russel, F. G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involved in drug deposition, as they are located at membranes of many uptake and excretory organs and at protective barriers, where they export endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including pharmaceutica...

  16. New anti-HIV-1, antimalarial, and antifungal compounds from Terminalia bellerica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsaraj, R; Pushpangadan, P; Smitt, U W;

    1997-01-01

    A bioactivity-guided fractionation of an extract of Terminalia bellerica fruit rind led to the isolation of two new lignans named termilignan (1) and thannilignan (2), together with 7-hydroxy-3',4'-(methylenedioxy)flavan (3) and anolignan B (4). All four compounds possessed demonstrable anti-HIV-......, antimalarial, and antifungal activity in vitro....

  17. Deployment of ACT antimalarials for treatment of malaria: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Toby

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following a long period when the effectiveness of existing mono-therapies for antimalarials was steadily declining with no clear alternative, most malaria-endemic countries in Africa and Asia have adopted artemisinin combination therapy (ACT as antimalarial drug policy. Several ACT drugs exist and others are in the pipeline. If properly targeted, they have the potential to reduce mortality from malaria substantially. The major challenge now is to get the drugs to the right people. Current evidence suggests that most of those who need the drugs do not get them. Simultaneously, a high proportion of those who are given antimalarials do not in fact have malaria. Financial and other barriers mean that, in many settings, the majority of those with malaria, particularly the poorest, do not access formal healthcare, so the provision of free antimalarials via this route has only limited impact. The higher cost of ACT creates a market for fake drugs. Addressing these problems is now a priority. This review outlines current evidence, possible solutions and research priorities.

  18. Ruthenium-catalysed synthesis of 2- and 3-substituted quinolines from anilines and 1,3-diols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Madsen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward synthesis of substituted quinolines is described by cyclocondensation of anilines with 1,3-diols. The reaction proceeds in mesitylene solution with catalytic amounts of RuCl3·xH 2O, PBu3 and MgBr2·OEt2. The transformation does not require any stoichiometric additives and only pr...

  19. B(HSO43: An efficient and recyclable catalyst for the preparation of substituted Friedländer quinoline synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghanezhad Seyyed Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substituted quinolines have been synthesized in the presence of catalytic amounts of boron sulfonic acid (BSA in solvent-free conditions. This methodology offers some advantages including high yield, short reaction time, low cost of the catalyst, green conditions by avoiding toxic solvents and recoverable catalyst.

  20. Quinoline-Substituted 10-(naphthalene-7-yl)anthracene Derivatives for Blue Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chanwoo; Park, Soo Na; Lee, Seul Bee; Kim, Young Seok; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Young Kwan; Yoon, Seung Soo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we have designed and synthesized blue emitters based on quinoline-substituted 10-(naphthalene-7-yl)anthracene. Particularly, a material exhibited highly efficient blue electroluminescence with CIE coordinates of (0.15, 0.18). PMID:27433688

  1. Noncovalent-bonded 1D-3D supramolecular architectures from 2-methylquinoline/quinoline with monocarboxylic acid and dicarboxylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjun; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Li; Ye, XiangHang; Zheng, Lu; Li, JingWen; Jin, BinPeng; Wang, Daqi

    2014-10-01

    Studies concentrating on noncovalent weak interactions between the organic base of 2-methylquinoline/quinoline, and carboxylic acid derivatives have led to an increased understanding of the role 2-methylquinoline/quinoline have in binding with carboxylic acids. Here anhydrous multicomponent organic acid-base adducts of 2-methylquinoline/quinoline have been prepared with carboxylic acids that ranged from monocarboxylic acid to dicarboxylic acid such as p-nitrobenzoic acid, (4-chloro-phenoxy)-acetic acid, 4-hydroxy-benzoic acid, 5-bromosalicylic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, and 4-nitrophthalic acid. The seven crystalline complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, m.p., and elemental analysis. These structures adopted the hetero supramolecular synthons. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-7 suggests that there are Nsbnd H⋯O, Osbnd H⋯N, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between the acid and quinoline moieties in the studied compounds. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. These weak interactions combined, these compounds displayed 1D-3D framework structure.

  2. 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline: Switching between single and double-well proton transfer through structural modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hristova, S; Dobrikov, G; Kamounah, F. S.; Kawauchi, S; Hansen, Poul Erik; Deneva, V; Nedelcheva, D; Antonov, L

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer in 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) and structurally modified compounds was investigated experimentally (steady state UV-Vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, NMR and advanced chemometric techniques) and theoretically (DFT and TD-DFT M06-2X/TZVP calculations) in the ground and...

  3. 1-{4-[(1-Isobutyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-4ylamino]phenyl}ethanone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (3 is synthesized by the nucleophilic substitution of 4-chloro-1-isobutyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline 2 with 4-amino acetophenone in n-butanol. Newly prepared imiquimod derivative (3 is characterized by IR, NMR and mass spectral data.

  4. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Shen, Shu-Zhi Liu, Yu-Shi Zhang, Mao-Bo Du, Ai-Hua Liang, Li-Hua Song, Zu-Guang Ye Institute of Chinese Materia Medica, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem–ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data

  5. Hyperparasitaemia and low dosing are an important source of anti-malarial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sue J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventing the emergence of anti-malarial drug resistance is critical for the success of current malaria elimination efforts. Prevention strategies have focused predominantly on qualitative factors, such as choice of drugs, use of combinations and deployment of multiple first-line treatments. The importance of anti-malarial treatment dosing has been underappreciated. Treatment recommendations are often for the lowest doses that produce "satisfactory" results. Methods The probability of de-novo resistant malaria parasites surviving and transmitting depends on the relationship between their degree of resistance and the blood concentration profiles of the anti-malarial drug to which they are exposed. The conditions required for the in-vivo selection of de-novo emergent resistant malaria parasites were examined and relative probabilities assessed. Results Recrudescence is essential for the transmission of de-novo resistance. For rapidly eliminated anti-malarials high-grade resistance can arise from a single drug exposure, but low-grade resistance can arise only from repeated inadequate treatments. Resistance to artemisinins is, therefore, unlikely to emerge with single drug exposures. Hyperparasitaemic patients are an important source of de-novo anti-malarial drug resistance. Their parasite populations are larger, their control of the infection insufficient, and their rates of recrudescence following anti-malarial treatment are high. As use of substandard drugs, poor adherence, unusual pharmacokinetics, and inadequate immune responses are host characteristics, likely to pertain to each recurrence of infection, a small subgroup of patients provides the particular circumstances conducive to de-novo resistance selection and transmission. Conclusion Current dosing recommendations provide a resistance selection opportunity in those patients with low drug levels and high parasite burdens (often children or pregnant women. Patients with

  6. Enol ethers as carbonyl surrogates in a modification of the Povarov synthesis of 3-aryl quinolines and their anti-Toxoplasma activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carla E; McNulty, James; Bordón, Claudia; Yolken, Robert; Jones-Brando, Lorraine

    2016-07-01

    A novel method for the preparation of 2-carboxyl-3-aryl quinoline derivatives from anilines, ethyl glyoxalate and enol ethers as phenylacetaldehyde surrogates is reported. The three-component coupling reaction occurs rapidly under mild conditions in dichloromethane catalysed by TFA. The method allows a more direct access to 3-aryl quinolines, sidestepping issues encountered with phenylacetaldehyde derivatives. This chemistry was used to prepare quinolines with 3-diarylether functionality that showed low micromolar efficacy (IC50 range: 5-26 μM) against in vitro Toxoplasma gondii coupled with little or no cytotoxicity (TD50≥ 320 μM) towards the host cells. PMID:27256871

  7. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology of Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methanol is a high production volume chemical used as a feedstock for chemical syntheses and as a solvent and fuel additive. Methanol is acutely toxic to humans, causing acidosis, blindness in death at high dosages, but its developmental and reproductive toxicity in humans is poo...

  8. Methanol as fuel: evaluation of atmosphere contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the beginning of methanol use as automotive fuel in Sao Paulo city, 1990, were realized special measurements of methanol, formaldehyde, ethanol and acetaldehyde in atmosphere. Other indicators of air quality as carbon and ozone monoxide were also observed in this study. (C.M.)

  9. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Paul N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA containing paracetamol (acetaminophen, counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems.

  10. Substandard artemisinin-based antimalarial medicines in licensed retail pharmaceutical outlets in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Duah & K. Ofori-Kwakye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The artemisinin-based antimalarial medicines are first line medicines in the treatmentof severe and uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Numerous brands of these medicines manufactured in variouscountries are available in the Ghanaian market. The study was aimed at evaluating the authenticity and qualityof selected brands of artemisinin-based antimalarial medicines marketed in Ghana.Methods: In all, 14 artemisinin-based antimalarial medicines were purchased from pharmacies (P and licensedchemical shops (LCSs in the Kumasi metropolis, Ghana. Simple field tests based on colorimetry and thin layerchromatography were employed in determining the authenticity of the samples. Important quality assessmenttests, namely uniformity of mass, crushing strength, disintegration time, and the percentage content of activepharmaceutical ingredients (APIs were determined.Results: All the brands tested contained the stipulated APIs. Artesunate tablet AT2 failed the uniformity of masstest while artesunate tablets AT3 & AT4 as well as amodiaquine tablets AM4 & AM6 failed the crushing strengthtest. All the six artemether-lumefantrine tablet brands passed the uniformity of mass, crushing strength anddisintegration tests. Only artemether-lumefantrine tablet brand AL1 contained the correct amount of the drugs.The other 13 artemisinin products contained either a lower (underdose or higher (overdose amount of thespecified drug. Artesunate monotherapy tablets were readily available in pharmacies and licensed chemicalshops.Interpretation & conclusion: All the artemisinin-based medicines tested (except AL1 were of substandardquality. The results demonstrate the need for continuous monitoring and evaluation of the quality of artemisininbased antimalarials in the Ghanaian market. Also, the practice of artemisinin antimalarial monotherapy is prevalentin Ghana. Determined efforts should, therefore, be made to eradicate the practice to prevent the development

  11. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James S; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N C; Baker, Mark; Möhrle, Jörg J

    2016-06-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.). PMID:27044554

  12. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Mora, Víctor; Bagnarello, Vanessa; Martínez, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonieta; Vanegas, Juan Carlos; Apestegui, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biol6gica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB), were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae); Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae); Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae); Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae); Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae); Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae); Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae); Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae); Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae); Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae); Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae); Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae); Prunus annularis (Rosaceae); Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae); Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae); Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae); Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae) and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae). We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9 microg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  13. Synthesis of 13C-labeled methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel convenient method for the synthesis of 13C-methanol was described. 13C- methanol was prepared by means of catalytic hydrogenation, and then as-synthesized methanol solution was further purified in a microscale high-efficient rectification column. The chemical purity of 13C-methanol was more than 99.5%. The synthetic route was featured by mild conditions and high yields of more than 90% based on isotopic substrate consumed. The product was characterized by GC-MS and 1H NMR, and the 13C abundance of 13C- methanol was more than 97%. Compared with the raw materials, the reduction of relative isotopic abundance of product was less than 1%. (authors)

  14. Investigations into low pressure methanol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharafutdinov, Irek

    The central topic of this work has been synthesis, characterization and optimization of novel Ni-Ga based catalysts for hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. The overall goal was to search for materials that could be used as a low temperature (and low pressure) methanol synthesis catalyst. This is...... required for small scale delocalized methanol production sites, where installation of energy demanding compression units should be avoided. The work was triggered by DFT calculations, which showed that certain bimetallic systems are active towards methanol synthesis from CO2 and H2 at ambient pressure...... containing 5:3 molar ratio of Ni:Ga, the intrinsic activity (methanol production rate per active surface area) is comparable to that of highly optimised Cu/ZnO/Al2O3. Formation of the catalyst was investigated with the aid of in-situ XRD and in-situ XAS techniques. The mechanism of alloying was proposed. It...

  15. Recycling of greenhouse gases via methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Eliasson, B.; Kogelschatz, U. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere can be mitigated by using direct control technologies (capture, disposal or chemical recycling). We report on carbon dioxide and methane recycling with other chemicals, especially with hydrogen and oxygen, to methanol. Methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} is investigated on various catalysts at moderate pressures ({<=}30 bar) and temperatures ({<=}300{sup o}C). The catalysts show good methanol activities and selectivities. The conversion of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} to methanol is also studied in a silent electrical discharge at pressures of 1 to 4 bar and temperatures close to room temperature. Methanol yields are given for mixtures of CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} and also for CH{sub 4} and air mixtures. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  16. Quinoline and derivatives at a tar oil contaminated site: hydroxylated products as indicator for natural attenuation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne-Kirsten Reineke; Thomas Goeen; Alfred Preiss; Juliane Hollender [RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany). Institute of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine

    2007-08-01

    LC-MS-MS analysis of groundwater of a tar oil contaminated site (a former coal mine and coking plant in Castrop-Rauxel, Germany) showed the occurrence of the N-heterocycles quinoline and isoquinoline as well as their hydroxylated and hydrogenated metabolites. The concentrations of the hydroxylated compounds, 2(1H)-quinolinone and 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, were significantly higher than those of the nonsubstituted parent compounds. Therefore, exclusive quantification of the parent compounds leads to an underestimation of the amount of N-heterocycles present in the groundwater. Microbial degradation experiments of quinoline and isoquinoline with aquifer material of the site as inocculum showed the formation of hydroxylated and hydrogenated products under sulfate-reducing conditions, the prevailing conditions in the field. However, since analyses of seven tar products showed that these compounds are also primary constituents, their detection in groundwater is found to be a nonsufficient indicator for the occurrence of biological natural attenuation processes. Instead, the ratio of hydroxylated to parent compound (R{sub metabolite}) is proposed as a useful indicator. We found that 65-83% of all groundwater samples showed R{sub metabolite} for 2(1H)-quinolinone, 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone, and 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, which was higher than the highest ratio found in tar products. With respect to the observed partition coefficient between tar oil and water of 3.5 for quinoline and isoquinoline and 0.3 for 2(1H)-quinolinone and 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, the ratio in groundwater would be approximately 10 times higher than the ratio in tar oil. When paying attention to these two parameters, 19-31% of groundwater samples exceed the highest tar oil ratio. This indicates that biological processes take place in the aquifer of the site and R{sub metabolite} is an applicable indicator for natural attenuation. 42 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of antimalarial activity of curcumin derivatives; Sintese e avaliacao da atividade antimalarica de compostos derivados da curcumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Patricia Ramos; Miguel, Fabio Balbino; Almeida, Mauro Vieira de; Couri, Mara Rubia Costa [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Quimica; Oliveira, Michael Eder de; Ferreira, Vanessa Viana; Guimaraes, Daniel Silqueira Martins; Lima, Aline Brito de; Barbosa, Camila de Souza; Oliveira, Mariana Amorim de; Almeida, Mauro Vieira de; Viana, Gustavo Henrique Ribeiro; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla, E-mail: varotti@ufsj.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao Del Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; and others

    2014-05-15

    ne of the main challenges in the development of new antimalarial drugs is to achieve a viable lead candidate with good pharmacokinetic properties. Curcumin has a broad range of biological activities, including antimalarial activity. Herein, we report the antimalarial activity of six curcumin derivatives (6-12) and an initial analysis of their pharmacokinetic properties. Five compounds have demonstrated potent activity against the P. falciparum in vitro (IC{sub 50} values ranging from 1.7 to 15.2 μg mL{sup -1}), with moderate or low cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line. The substitution of the carbonyl group in 6 by a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone group (to afford 11) increases the Selective Index. These preliminary results indicate curcumin derivatives as potential antimalarial compounds. (author)

  18. Sorption phenomena of methanol on heat treated coal; Netsushori wo hodokoshita sekitan no methanol kyuchaku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, H.; Kaiho, M.; Yamada, O.; Soneda, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Makino, M. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Experiments were carried out to learn methanol sorption characteristics of heat-treated coal. When Taiheiyo coal is heat-treated at 125{degree}C, performed with a first methanol adsorption at 25{degree}C, and then desorption at 25{degree}C, a site with strong interaction with methanol and a site with relatively weak interaction are generated in test samples. A small amount of methanol remains in both sites. Then, when the methanol is desorbed at as low temperature as 70{degree}C, the methanol in the site with strong interaction remains as it has existed therein, but the methanol in the site with relatively weak interaction desorbs partially, hence the adsorption amount in a second adsorption at 25{degree}C increases. However, when desorption is performed at as high temperature as 125{degree}C, the methanol in the site with strong interaction also desorbs, resulting in increased adsorption heat in the second adsorption. The adsorption velocity drops, however. Existence of methanol in a site with strong interaction affects the adsorption velocity, but no effect is given by methanol in a site with weak interaction. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti-malarial

  20. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of tigecycline, a glycylcycline antibiotic, in combination with chloroquine

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Rajnish; Walker, Larry A.; Tekwani, Babu L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several antibiotics have shown promising anti-malarial effects and have been useful for malarial chemotherapy, particularly in combination with standard anti-malarial drugs. Tigecycline, a semi-synthetic derivative of minocycline with a unique and novel mechanism of action, is the first clinically available drug in a new class of glycylcycline antibiotics. Methods Tigecycline was tested in vitro against chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive (D6) and resistant strains (W2) of Plasmodium falcip...

  1. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard Alan E; Dorsey Grant; Gupta Vinay; Rosenthal Philip J; Greenhouse Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary elec...

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies That Recognize the Alkylation Signature of Antimalarial Ozonides OZ277 (Arterolane) and OZ439 (Artefenomel)

    OpenAIRE

    Jourdan, Joëlle; Matile, Hugues; Reift, Ellen; Biehlmaier, Oliver; Dong, Yuxiang; Wang, Xiaofang; Mäser, Pascal; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; Wittlin, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The singular structure of artemisinin, with its embedded 1,2,4-trioxane heterocycle, has inspired the discovery of numerous semisynthetic artemisinin and structurally diverse synthetic peroxide antimalarials, including ozonides OZ277 (arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel). Despite the critical importance of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), the precise mode of action of peroxidic antimalarials is not fully understood. However, it has long been proposed that the peroxide bond in artemisi...

  3. Evaluation of antimalarial activity of leaves of Acokanthera schimperi and Croton macrostachyus against Plasmodium berghei in Swiss albino mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Tigist; Erko, Berhanu; Giday, Mirutse

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria is one of the most important tropical diseases and the greatest cause of hospitalization and death. Recurring problems of drug resistance are reinforcing the need for finding new antimalarial drugs. In this respect, natural plant products are the main sources of biologically active compounds and have potential for the development of novel antimalarial drugs. A study was conducted to evaluate extracts of the leaves of Croton macrostachyus and Acokanthera schimperi for their ...

  4. Development of a Specific Monoclonal Antibody-Based ELISA to Measure the Artemether Content of Antimalarial Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Suqin Guo; Yongliang Cui; Lishan He; Liang Zhang; Zhen Cao; Wei Zhang; Rui Zhang; Guiyu Tan; Baomin Wang; Liwang Cui

    2013-01-01

    Artemether is one of the artemisinin derivatives that are active ingredients in antimalarial drugs. Counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs have become a serious problem, which demands reliable analytical tools and implementation of strict regulation of drug quality. Structural similarity among artemisinin analogs is a challenge to develop immunoassays that are specific to artemisinin derivatives. To produce specific antibodies to artemether, we used microbial fermentation of artemethe...

  5. Antimalarial potential of homeopathic medicines against schizont maturation of Plasmodium berghei in short-term in vitro culture

    OpenAIRE

    Upma Bagai; Aswathy Rajan

    2012-01-01

    In vitro assessment of antimalarial drug susceptibility of Plasmodium has been a major research success, which has paved the way for the understanding of parasite and rapid screening of antimalarial drugs for their effectiveness. In the present study a preliminary screening to check the antiplasmodial activity of mother tincture (ϕ) and various potencies (6C, 30C, 200C) of homeopathic medicines Cinchona officinalis/china (Chin.), Chelidonium majus (Chel.) and Arsenicum album (Ars.) were done ...

  6. Hydrogen Production from Methanol Using Corona Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production at room temperature from liquid methanol has been conductedusing corona discharge. The content of water in methanol solution has a significant effect on thisproduction. When water concentration increases from 1.0 % to 16.7 %, the methanol conversionrate changes from 0.196 to 0.284 mol/h. An important finding in this investigation is theformation of ethylene glycol as a major by-product. The yield of ethylene glycol is ranged from0.0045 to 0.0075 mol/h based on the water content.

  7. A rare presentation of methanol toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is a highly toxic alcohol resembling ethanol in smell and taste. Methanol poisoning is a lethal form of poisoning that can cause severe metabolic acidosis, visual disturbances, and neurological deficit. Brain lesions typically described in methanol toxicity are in the form of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic necrosis of the basal ganglia and sub-cortical white matter. To our knowledge, lesions in the parietal, temporal, or frontal areas of cerebrum and cerebellar hemispheres have been rarely reported so far. We herewith report this rare presentation.

  8. Effect of methanol on winter rape seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Stanisław Kaczmarczy; Robert M. Devlin; Irena I. Zbieć

    2013-01-01

    Oil seed rape seedlings which had been treated with 10-30% methanol grew faster, their yield of fresh matter exceeded that of untreated control plants by 102%, of dry matter by 80%. Although methanol did not affect the content of chlorophyll or carotene in the leaves, the overall pigment yield grew with the dry matter of one seedling. The biomass of rape leaves which had been sprayed with 10 or 20% methanol solutions was by 50-90% higher as compared to untreated plants. The activity of some ...

  9. Synthesis, leishmanicidal and enzyme inhibitory activities of quinoline-4-carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of quinoline-4-carboxylic acids 1-13 was synthesized and screened for their leishmanicidal, phosphodiesterase, beta-glucuronidase and urease inhibitory properties. Only compounds 3 and 7 were found to be active against leishmaniasis with IC/sub 50/ values of 76.26 +- 0.71 and 62.86 +- 0.35 macro g/ml, respectively. In phosphodiesterase assay only compound 13 showed maximum percentage inhibition (47.2%) among all the tested compounds. Compound 9 showed maximum percentage inhibition value (47.4%) against p-glucuronidase enzyme. Compound 13 showed maximum percentage inhibition value i.e. 14.10 % against urease enzyme. The structures of all the synthetic compounds were deduced by spectroscopic techniques, including /sup 1/H NMR, EI-MS, IR, and UV spectroscopy. (author)

  10. 7-Chloro-4-[(E-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidenehydrazin-1-yl]quinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle de Lima Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C19H18ClN3O3, the r.m.s. deviation through the 23 non-H and non-methoxy atoms is 0.088 Å, indicating a planar molecule with the exception of the methoxy groups. One methoxy group, surrounded on either side by the other methoxy groups, is almost normal to the benzene ring to which it is connected [C—O—Car—Car torsion angle = 81.64 (15°]. In the crystal, N—H...O, C—H...O and π–π interactions [between quinoline residues; centroid–centroid distance = 3.4375 (8 Å] link molecules into a three-dimensional architecture.

  11. New pentasubstituted pyrrole hybrid atorvastatin-quinoline derivatives with antiplasmodial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rita C C; Martins, Wagner A; Silva, Tayara P; Kaiser, Carlos R; Bastos, Mônica M; Pinheiro, Luiz C S; Krettli, Antoniana U; Boechat, Núbia

    2016-04-15

    Cerebral malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Atorvastatin (AVA) is a pentasubstituted pyrrole, which has been tested as an adjuvant in the treatment of cerebral malaria. Herein, a new class of hybrids of AVA and aminoquinolines (primaquine and chloroquine derivatives) has been synthesized. The quinolinic moiety was connected to the pentasubstituted pyrrole from AVA by a linker group (CH2)n=2-4 units. The activity of the compounds increased with the size of the carbons chain. Compound with n=4 and 7-chloroquinolinyl has displayed better activity (IC50=0.40μM) than chloroquine. The primaquine derivative showed IC50=1.41μM, being less toxic and more active than primaquine. PMID:26988303

  12. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska-Janusik, M.; Gondek, E.; Kityk, I. V.; Wisła, J.; Sanetra, J.; Danel, A.

    2004-11-01

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 μm varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities.

  13. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 μm varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities

  14. Second-order optical effects in several pyrazolo-quinoline derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowska-Janusik, M. [Solid State Department, Institute of Physics, WSP Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, Czestochowa PL42201 (Poland); Gondek, E. [Institute of Physics, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Podchorazych 1, 30-084 (Poland); Kityk, I.V. [Department of Biology and Biophysics, Technical University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 36, Czestochowa PL-42210 (Poland)]. E-mail: i.kityk@wsp.czest.pl; WisIa, J. [Departament of Chemistry, Hugon Kollataj Agricultural University, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Sanetra, J. [Institute of Physics, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Podchorazych 1, 30-084 (Poland); Danel, A. [Department of Chemistry, Hugon Kollataj Agricultural University, Al. Mickiewicza 24/28, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2004-11-15

    Using optical poling of several pyazolo-quinoline (PAQ) derivatives we have found an existence of sufficiently high second order optical susceptibility at wavelength 1.76 {mu}m varying in the range 0.9-2.8 pm/V. The performed quantum chemical simulations of the UV-absorption for isolated, solvated and incorporated into the polymethacrylate (PMMA) polymer films have shown that the PM3 method is the best among the semi-empirical ones to simulate the optical properties. The calculations of the hyperpolarizabilites have shown a good correlation with experimentally measured susceptibilities obtained from the optical poling. We have found that experimental susceptibility depends on linear molecular polarizability and photoinducing changes of the molecular dipole moment. It is clearly seen for the PAQ4-PAQ6 molecules possessing halogen atoms with relatively large polarizabilities.

  15. Pyrazolo[3,4-h]quinolines promising photosensitizing agents in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Virginia; Parrino, Barbara; Carbone, Anna; Montalbano, Alessandra; Salvador, Alessia; Brun, Paola; Vedaldi, Daniela; Diana, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Barraja, Paola

    2015-09-18

    A new series of pyrazolo[3,4-h]quinolines, heteroanalogues of angelicin was conveniently prepared with a broad substitution pattern. A large number of derivatives was obtained and the cellular photocytotoxicity was evaluated in vitro against 5 different human tumor cell lines with GI50 values reaching the nanomolar level (14.52-0.04 μM). Selected compounds were able to photoinduce a massive cell death with the involvement of mitochondria. Their photodamage cellular targets were proteins and lipids and they did not cause any kind of DNA photodamage. This latter event is of considerable importance in the modulation of long term side effects, generally associated with the use of classical furocoumarins. PMID:26295175

  16. A fluorescence turn-on chemosensor for hydrogen sulfate anion based on quinoline and naphthalimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zaoli; Yin, Kai; Yu, Zhu; Chen, Mengxue; Li, Yan; Ren, Jun

    2016-12-01

    A new fluorescence turn-on chemosensor 1 based on quinoline and naphthalimide was prepared and its anion sensing toward various anions behavior was explored in this paper. Sensor 1 exhibited a highly selective fluorescent response toward HSO4(-) with an 8-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement in the presence of 10equiv. of HSO4(-) in DMSO-H2O (1/1, v/v) solution. The sensor also displayed high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfate and the detection limit was calculated to be 7.79×10(-7)M. The sensing mechanism has been suggested to proceed via a hydrolysis process of the Schiff base group. The hydrolysis product has been isolated and further identified by (1)H NMR and MS. PMID:27323316

  17. Fluorescence in complexes based on quinolines-derivatives: a search for better fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecca, Carolina Z P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Bagatin, Izilda A

    2016-11-01

    Quinoline-derived fluorescent complexes were designed; synthesized by the reaction of 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline and 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline with Al(3+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+) salts (1-8); and characterized. The (1)H NMR spectra of complexes 1 and 5, containing Al(3+), were consistent with an octahedral structure having approximate D3 symmetry, and the results supported the favored facial isomer (fac). Data for complexes 2-4 and 6-8 supported the formation of tetrahedral structures. Intense luminescence was detected for complexes 5-8, even with the naked eye, as indicated by quantum yield values of 0.087, 0.094, 0.051, and 0.021, respectively. Furthermore, in contrast to 5-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline, the 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand exhibited bands at different energies depending on the coordinated metal, which supported its potential application in ionic and biological probes, as well as in cell imaging. PMID:27288961

  18. Efficient One-pot Synthesis of Pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline and Pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoline Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhen-ming; WU Lei; SUN Jing; YAN Chao-guo

    2012-01-01

    A one-pot sequential reaction for efficient synthesis of pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline and pyrrolo[1,2-a]-quinoline derivatives has been developed.The reaction included firstly the Cu-catalyzed three-component reaction of isoquinoline(quinoline),acetylenedicarboxylate and alkynylbenzene and then Cs2CO3-promoted intramolecular cyclization reaction of initially formed 1-alkeny1-2-alkynyl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline(1,2-dihydroquinoline).

  19. SYNTHESIS AND EVALUATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF 1-BENZOYL-1H-PYRAZOLO [4,3-C]QUINOLIN-4(5H-ONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivashankar Murugesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1-benzoyl-1H-pyrazolo [4,3-C]quinolin-4(5H-one, carrying appropriate substituents at the Quinoline ring have been synthesized in good yields via the condensation of 4-chloro-3-formylquinolin-2[1H]ones with benzohydrazide using triethylamine as a base. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antibacterial activities.

  20. Photocytotoxicity of a 5-nitrofuran-ethenyl-quinoline antiseptic (Quinifuryl to P388 mouse leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daghastanli N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinifuryl (MW 449.52, 2-(5'-nitro-2'-furanylethenyl-4-{N-[4'-(N,N-diethylamino-1'-methylbutyl]carbamoyl} quinoline, is a water soluble representative of a family of 5-nitrofuran-ethenyl-quinoline drugs which has been shown to be highly toxic to various lines of transformed cells in the dark. In the present study, the toxicity of Quinifuryl to P388 mouse leukemia cells was compared in the dark and under illumination with visible light (390-500 nm. Illumination of water solutions of Quinifuryl (at concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 9.0 µg/ml in the presence of P388 cells resulted in its photodecomposition and was accompanied by elevated cytotoxicity. A significant capacity to kill P388 cells was detected at a drug concentration as low as 0.09 µg/ml. The toxic effect detected at this drug concentration under illumination exceeded the effect observed in the dark by more than three times. Moreover, the general toxic effect of Quinifuryl, which included cell proliferation arrest, was nearly 100%. Both dose- and time-dependent toxic effects were measured under illumination. The LC50 value of Quinifuryl during incubation with P388 cells was ~0.45 µg/ml under illumination for 60 min and >12 µg/ml in the dark. We have demonstrated that the final products of the Quinifuryl photolysis are not toxic, which means that the short-lived intermediates of Quinifuryl photodecomposition are responsible for the phototoxicity of this compound. The data obtained in the present study are the first to indicate photocytotoxicity of a nitroheterocyclic compound and demonstrate the possibility of its application as a photosensitizer drug for photochemotherapy.

  1. On the molecular basis of the activity of the antimalarial drug chloroquine: EXAFS-assisted DFT evidence of a direct Fe-N bond with free heme in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macetti, Giovanni; Rizzato, Silvia; Beghi, Fabio; Silvestrini, Lucia; Lo Presti, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    4-aminoquinoline antiplasmodials interfere with the biocrystallization of the malaria pigment, a key step of the malaria parasite metabolism. It is commonly believed that these drugs set stacking π···π interactions with the Fe-protoporphyrin scaffold of the free heme, even though the details of the heme:drug recognition process remain elusive. In this work, the local coordination of Fe(III) ions in acidic solutions of hematin at room temperature was investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 4.0-5.5 pH range, both in the presence and in the absence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. EXAFS results were complemented by DFT simulations in polarizable continuum media to model solvent effects. We found evidence that a complex where the drug quinoline nitrogen is coordinated with the iron center might coexist with formerly proposed adduct geometries, based on stacking interactions. Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds among lateral chains of the two molecules play a crucial role in stabilizing this complex, whose formation is favored by the presence of lipid micelles. The direct Fe-N bond could reversibly block the axial position in the Fe 1st coordination shell in free heme, acting as an inhibitor for the crystallization of the malaria pigment without permanently hampering the catalytic activity of the redox center. These findings are discussed in the light of possible implications on the engineering of drugs able to thwart the adaptability of the malaria parasite against classical aminoquinoline-based therapies.

  2. Quinolinic Acid Responses during Interferon-α-Induced Depressive Symptomatology in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection - A Novel Aspect for Depression and Inflammatory Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Andreas; Meinitzer, Andreas; Breitenecker, Robert J.; Amouzadeh-Ghadikolai, Omid; Stauber, Rudolf; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this exploratory study is to gain for the first time a more comprehensive picture of the impact of changes of quinolinic acid concentrations on depressive symptomatology during and after IFN-α therapy. Methods The quinolinic acid concentrations of 35 HCV patients are examined in a prospective survey over the entire period of IFN-α treatment as well as three months later at six different times (baseline, one, three, six and nine months after the beginning of IFN-α treatment, and after the end of treatment). Results During IFN-α treatment Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores rise significantly. At the same time there is greater activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, with a resulting increase in plasma kynurenine concentrations. Compared to baseline values quinolinic acid concentrations increase significantly during therapy, reflecting an increased neurotoxic challenge. In addition, patients with higher scores in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale at six and nine months after starting therapy show significantly higher levels of quinolinic acid concentration. Conclusions The increase of quinolinic acid during IFN-α therapy might contribute to depressive symptomatology through the neurotoxic challenge caused by quinolinic acid. Subsequently, our exploratory study results support the inflammatory hypothesis of depression. The awareness of relevant risk factors of IFN-α treatment-induced depression is essential to develop preventative treatment strategies. PMID:26368809

  3. The impact of mass transport and methanol crossover on the direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.; Taama, W. M.; Argyropoulos, P.; Sundmacher, K.

    The performance of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell based on a Nafion® solid polymer electrolyte membrane is reported. The cell utilises a porous Pt-Ru-carbon supported catalyst anode. The effect of cell temperature, air cathode pressure, methanol fuel flow rate and methanol concentration on the power performance of a small-scale (9 cm 2 area) cell is described. Data reported is analysed in terms of semi-empirical models for the effect of methanol crossover by diffusion on cathode potential and thus cell voltage. Mass transfer characteristics of the anode reaction are interpreted in terms of the influence of carbon dioxide gas evolution and methanol diffusion in the carbon cloth diffusion layer. Preliminary evaluation of reaction orders and anode polarisation agree with a previous suggested mechanism for methanol oxidation involving a rate limiting step of surface reaction between adsorbed CO and OH species.

  4. Stage-specific activity of potential antimalarial compounds measured in vitro by flow cytometry in comparison to optical microscopy and hypoxanthine uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen E Contreras

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of new antimalarial agents using older methods of monitoring sensitivity to antimalarial drugs are laborious and poorly suited to discriminate stage-specific activity. We used flow cytometry to study the effect of established antimalarial compounds, cysteine protease inhibitors, and a quinolone against asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Cultured P. falciparum parasites were treated for 48 h with different drug concentrations and the parasitemia was determined by flow cytometry methods after DNA staining with propidium iodide. P. falciparum erythrocytic life cycle stages were readily distinguished by flow cytometry. Activities of established and new antimalarial compounds measured by flow cytometry were equivalent to results obtained with microscopy and metabolite uptake assays. The antimalarial activity of all compounds was higher against P. falciparum trophozoite stages. Advantages of flow cytometry analysis over traditional assays included higher throughput for data collection, insight into the stage-specificity of antimalarial activity avoiding use of radioactive isotopes.

  5. Regulatory aspects of methanol metabolism in yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formaldehyde is the first and key intermediate in the metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts since it stands at a branch point of pathways for methanol oxidation and assimilation. Methanol and, formaldehyde are toxic compounds which severely affect the growth rate, yield coefficient, etc., of yeasts. Two questions arise when considering regulation of methanol metabolism in yeasts how a nontoxic level of formaldehyde is maintained in the cell and how the formaldehyde flow is distributed into oxidation and assimilation. To answer these questions we studied the role of GSH, which spontaneously binds formaldehyde, yielding S-hydroxymethylglutathione; in vivo rates of formaldehyde dissimilation and assimilation by using [14C]methanol; profiles of enzymes responsible for production and utilization of formaldehyde; and levels of metabolites affecting dissimilation and assimilation of formaldehyde. All of the experiments were carried out with the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii KD1. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Quiet Changes in the Methanol Supply Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The coal chemicals sector, the new coal chemicals sector in particular, has been emerging fast in China in recent years. The production scale of methanol as an important coal chemical product has expanded constantly.

  7. Methanol gasoline blend from petroleum coke sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzer, David [Consulting Chemical Engineer (United States); Wallsgrove, Chris [Process Engineering Manager (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In Alberta, a large amount of petroleum coke is produced as a byproduct from processes relating to bitumen upgrading and refining. Unfortunately, there is little to no market for this product in the province. This presentation addresses concerns relating to the concept of converting the otherwise wasted petcoke into methanol and using it as a blending component in gasoline. The presentation tackles issues relating to environmental impact, economics, renewability, toxicity, safety, and vehicle design by analyzing and comparing the proposed methanol/gasoline (M-10) to that of an ethanol/gasoline (E-10). The presentation covers analysis of the CO2 emissions, an analysis of the finances, and a number of scenarios involving the improper use or accidental spillage of M-10. Through the comparison of methanol/gasoline and ethanol/gasoline, the presentation demonstrated that converting the petcoke byproduct into methanol for use as a gasoline blend is a viable option.

  8. World scale fuel methanol facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Administration announced a clean alternative fuels initiative, industry and government agencies' analyses of the economics of methanol as an alternative motor vehicle fuel have accelerated. In the short run, methanol appears attractive because excess production capacity currently has depressed methanol prices and marginal costs of production are lower than other fuels (current excess capacity). In the long run, however, full costs are the more relevant. To lower average production costs, U.S. policy interest has focused on production from a world-scale, 10,000 tons per day (tpd) methanol plant facility on a foreign site. This paper reviews several important site and financial considerations in a framework to evaluate large scale plant development. These considerations include: risks associated with a large process plant; supply economics of foreign sites; and investment climates and financial incentives for foreign investment at foreign sites

  9. Screening of the antimalarial activity of plants of the Cucurbitaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Zuany Amorim

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Crude ethanolic extracts (CEEs from two species of Cucurbitaceae, Cucurbita maxima and Momordica charantia (commonly called "abóbora moranga" and melão de São Caetano", respectively were assayed for antimalarial activity by the 4-d suppressive test. The CEE of dry C. maxima seeds showed strong antimalarial activity following oral administration (259 and 500 mg/kg, reducing by 50% the levels of parasistemia in Plasmodium berghey-infected mice. Treatment of normal animals with 500 mg/Kg of the extract three days before intravenous injection of P. berghei caused a significant 30% reduction in parasitemic levels. No effect was observed when the animals were treated with the CEE only on the day of inoculation. Oral administration of the CEE of dry M. charantia leaves adminstered orally was ineffective up to 500 mg/Kg in lowering the parasitemic levels of malarious mice.

  10. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. We describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties, and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along mRNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery. PMID:26085270

  11. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M;

    2011-01-01

    women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp) during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform a...... baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods: All drug shops selling...... resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp strategy. Further studies are recommended to find out barriers for ACT utilization and preference for self-medication and to train private drug...

  12. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul A.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.

  13. Exploring the 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole scaffold as a novel antimalarial chemotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sofia A; Lukens, Amanda K; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Wirth, Dyann F; Mazitschek, Ralph; Moreira, Rui; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-09-18

    A series of 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indoles with building block diversity was synthesized based on a hit derived from an HTS whole-cell screen against Plasmodium falciparum. Thirty-eight compounds were obtained following a three-step synthetic approach and evaluated for anti-parasitic activity. The SAR shows that 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole is intolerant to most N-piperidinyl modifications. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a new compound (10d) with lead-like properties (MW = 305; cLogP = 2.42), showing antimalarial activity against drug-resistant and sensitive strains (EC50 values ∼ 3 μM), selectivity for malaria parasite and no cross-resistance with chloroquine, thus representing a potential new chemotype for further optimization towards novel and affordable antimalarial drugs. PMID:26295174

  14. Detection of In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Some Myanmar Medicinal Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to find out the novel effective antimalarials. six medicinal plants, namely Erythrina stricta Roxb. (Kathit), Luffa acutangula Roxb. (Thabut - Kja), Cordia rothii Roem. and Schult. (Thanet), Tribulus terrestris Linn. (Sule). Zizphus oenoplia Mill. (Paung - pe) and Mimusops elengi Roxb. (Khaye) were selected and tested for their antimalarial activity by using in vitro microdilution technique. According to the in vitro test results, Erythrina stricta Roxb. (Kathit) was found to possess significant suppressive effect on Plasmodium falciparum. With the serially diluted extract dosage concentrations ranging from 1.250 ng/ml to 40,000 ng/ml, the schizont suppressive percentage of Eryhrina stricta Roxb. (Kathi) was observed to be 19.57%, 35.44%, 55.18%, 96.04%,100% and 100% respectively

  15. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by substances isolated from Amazonian antimalarial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter F de Andrade-Neto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a quassinoid, neosergeolide, isolated from the roots and stems of Picrolemma sprucei (Simaroubaceae, the indole alkaloids ellipticine and aspidocarpine, isolated from the bark of Aspidosperma vargasii and A. desmanthum (Apocynaceae, respectively, and 4-nerolidylcatechol, isolated from the roots of Pothomorphe peltata (Piperaceae, all presented significant in vitro inhibition (more active than quinine and chloroquine of the multi-drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Neosergeolide presented activity in the nanomolar range. This is the first report on the antimalarial activity of these known, natural compounds. This is also the first report on the isolation of aspidocarpine from A. desmanthum. These compounds are good candidates for pre-clinical tests as novel lead structures with the aim of finding new antimalarial prototypes and lend support to the traditional use of the plants from which these compounds are derived.

  16. California Methanol Assessment; Volume II, Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    O'Toole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    A joint effort by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering has brought together sponsors from both the public and private sectors for an analysis of the prospects for methanol use as a fuel in California, primarily for the transportation and stationary application sectors. Increasing optimism in 1982 for a slower rise in oil prices and a more realistic understanding of the costs of methanol production have had a ne...

  17. Silicon Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries such as lithium-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density. Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density and ease of refueling compared to charging batteri...

  18. Potential of methanol in dual fuel combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Tuominen, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Depleting oil resources together with the climate change due to the use of fossil fuels are motivating to investigate alternative fuels and new combustion strategies used with them. At the moment, dual fuel combustion is one of the most promising new combustion strategies. Combining it to the use of renewable methanol as a primary fuel, it offers an interesting option for the conventional combustion engine. This thesis focuses on investigating the theoretical potential of methanol in dua...

  19. 8-Hy­droxy-2-methyl­quinolinium tetra­chlorido(quinolin-2-olato-κ2 N,O)stannate(IV) methanol disolvate

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzatollah Najafi; Mostafa M. Amini; Seik Weng Ng

    2011-01-01

    In the reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline and stannic chloride, the 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline is protonated, yielding the disolvated title salt, (C10H10NO)[SnCl4(C9H6NO)]·2CH3OH. The SnIV atom in the anion is N,O-chelated by the hydroxyquinolinate in a cis-SnNOCl4 octahedral geometry. In the crystal, the cation, anion and solvent molecules are linked by N—H...O, O—H...O and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, generating a three-dimensiona...

  20. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  1. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions

  2. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar, E-mail: gude@cee.msstate.edu

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  3. Hallazgos complementarios sobre la actividad antimalarica del azul de metileno = Complementary findings on the antimalarial activity and toxicity of methylene blue

    OpenAIRE

    G. Garavito; Bertani, S; Deharo, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Methylene blue was reported as the first synthetic antimalarial by Ehrlich in 1881. It is currently no longer used for that purpose but it should be reconsidered since new economic alternatives are urgently needed in the arsenal of antimalarial drugs. The antimalarial activity of methylene blue is investigated here in vivo against rodent malaria parasites. 15 mg/kg daily dose of methylene blue inhibits 50% of the erythrocytic parasite growth of Plasmodium berghei and R yoelii nigeriensis, whi...

  4. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system. PMID:26920777

  5. Effect of Disposition of Mannich Antimalarial Agents on Their Pharmacology and Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Ruscoe, J. E.; Tingle, M. D.; O’Neill, P. M.; S.A. Ward; Park, B K

    1998-01-01

    The use of the antimalarial agent amodiaquine has been curtailed due to drug-induced idiosyncratic reactions. These have been attributed to the formation of a protein-reactive quinoneimine species via oxidation of the 4-aminophenol group. Therefore, the effects of chemical modifications on the disposition of amodiaquine in relation to its metabolism, distribution, and pharmacological activity have been investigated. The inclusion of a group at the C-5′ position of amodiaquine reduced or elimi...

  6. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low ...

  7. Medicines informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola: counterfeit and sub-standard antimalarials

    OpenAIRE

    Bertocchi Paola; Antoniella Eleonora; Cocchieri Emilia; Di Maggio Anna; Gaudiano Maria; Alimonti Stefano; Valvo Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The presence of counterfeits and sub-standards in African medicines market is a dramatic problem that causes many deaths each year. The increase of the phenomenon of pharmaceutical counterfeiting is due to the rise of the illegal market and to the impossibility to purchase branded high cost medicines. Methods In this paper the results of a quality control on antimalarial tablet samples purchased in the informal market in Congo, Burundi and Angola are reported. The quality ...

  8. Antimalarial Chemotherapy: Natural Product Inspired Development of Preclinical and Clinical Candidates with Diverse Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Álvaro, Elena; Hong, W David; Nixon, Gemma L; O'Neill, Paul M; Calderón, Félix

    2016-06-23

    Natural products have played a pivotal role in malaria chemotherapy progressing from quinine and artemisinin to ozonide-based compounds. Many of these natural products have served as template for the design and development of antimalarial drugs currently in the clinic or in the development phase. In this review, we will detail those privileged scaffolds that have guided medicinal chemistry efforts yielding molecules that have reached the clinic. PMID:26791529

  9. Surveillance of antimalarial drug resistance in China in the 1980s–1990s

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, De-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Since the successful preparation of the microplates and the medium for field application, the resistance degree and its geographical distribution of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, the fluctuation of the resistance degree of P. falciparum to chloroquine, and the sensitivity of the parasite to commonly used antimalarial drugs were investigated between 1980 and 2003 by the in vitro microtest and the in vivo four-week test recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The resu...

  10. A genome wide association study of Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to 22 antimalarial drugs in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P Wendler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug resistance remains a chief concern for malaria control. In order to determine the genetic markers of drug resistant parasites, we tested the genome-wide associations (GWA of sequence-based genotypes from 35 Kenyan P. falciparum parasites with the activities of 22 antimalarial drugs. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parasites isolated from children with acute febrile malaria were adapted to culture, and sensitivity was determined by in vitro growth in the presence of anti-malarial drugs. Parasites were genotyped using whole genome sequencing techniques. Associations between 6250 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and resistance to individual anti-malarial agents were determined, with false discovery rate adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing. We identified expected associations in the pfcrt region with chloroquine (CQ activity, and other novel loci associated with amodiaquine, quinazoline, and quinine activities. Signals for CQ and primaquine (PQ overlap in and around pfcrt, and interestingly the phenotypes are inversely related for these two drugs. We catalog the variation in dhfr, dhps, mdr1, nhe, and crt, including novel SNPs, and confirm the presence of a dhfr-164L quadruple mutant in coastal Kenya. Mutations implicated in sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance are at or near fixation in this sample set. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sequence-based GWA studies are powerful tools for phenotypic association tests. Using this approach on falciparum parasites from coastal Kenya we identified known and previously unreported genes associated with phenotypic resistance to anti-malarial drugs, and observe in high-resolution haplotype visualizations a possible signature of an inverse selective relationship between CQ and PQ.

  11. Anti-malarial drugs and the prevention of malaria in the population of malaria endemic areas

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood Brian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Anti-malarial drugs can make a significant contribution to the control of malaria in endemic areas when used for prevention as well as for treatment. Chemoprophylaxis is effective in preventing deaths and morbidity from malaria, but it is difficult to sustain for prolonged periods, may interfere with the development of naturally acquired immunity and will facilitate the emergence and spread of drug resistant strains if applied to a whole community. However, chemoprophylaxis targeted ...

  12. Synthesis and in vitro antimalarial activity of novel chalcone derivatives / Frans Johannes Smit

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, Frans Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in 106 countries worldwide. This disease is caused by a parasite from the genus Plasmodium. Of the five species that infect humans, Plasmodium falciparum is the most virulent, with over three billion people at risk and around 660 000 deaths reported in 2011. Of these deaths, 91% were in the African region, while 86% were children under the age of five. In light of the widespread development of resistance by malaria parasites against the classic antimalarial drugs, such as c...

  13. Amazonian plant natural products:perspectives for discovery of new antimalarial drug leads

    OpenAIRE

    Lucio H Freitas-Junior; Pedro Cravo; Marcus Vinícius Guimarães Lacerda; André Machado Siqueira; Carolina Borsoi Moraes; Gina Frausin; Luiz Francisco Rocha e Silva; Stefanie Costa Pinto Lopes; Renata Braga Souza Lima; Fabio Trindade Maranhão Costa; Adrian Martin Pohlit

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria parasites are now resistant, or showing signs of resistance, to most drugs used in therapy. Novel chemical entities that exhibit new mechanisms of antiplasmodial action are needed. New antimalarials that block transmission of Plasmodium spp. from humans to Anopheles mosquito vectors are key to malaria eradication efforts. Although P. vivax causes a considerable number of malaria cases, its importance has for long been neglected. Vivax malaria can cau...

  14. ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS IN THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Tatyana Andreyevna Lisitsyna; N. M. Kosheleva

    2010-01-01

    The data available in the literature on experience in using antimalarial drugs in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus are summarized. A major emphasis is placed on therapy with hydroxychlorochine (plaquenil) versus chlorine. Possible mechanisms of action of the drug and its effect on the course of the disease itself and concomitant abnormalities are described. Data on the toxicity of the drug and its safe use in pregnancy and lactation are also discussed

  15. ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS IN THERAPY OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Andreyevna Lisitsyna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The data available in the literature on experience in using antimalarial drugs in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus are summarized. A major emphasis is placed on therapy with hydroxychlorochine (plaquenil versus chlorine. Possible mechanisms of action of the drug and its effect on the course of the disease itself and concomitant abnormalities are described. Data on the toxicity of the drug and its safe use in pregnancy and lactation are also discussed

  16. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes...

  17. Altered plasmodial surface anion channel activity and in vitro resistance to permeating antimalarial compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Lisk, Godfrey; Pain, Margaret; Sellers, Morgan; Gurnev, Philip A.; Pillai, Ajay D.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2010-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have increased permeability to various solutes. These changes may be mediated by an unusual small conductance ion channel known as the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC). While channel activity benefits the parasite by permitting nutrient acquisition, it can also be detrimental because water-soluble antimalarials may more readily access their parasite targets via this channel. Recently, two such toxins, blasticidin S and leupeptin, were used t...

  18. Bis(acetato-κObis(μ3-quinolin-8-olato-κ4N,O:O:Otetrakis(μ2-quinolin-8-olato-κ3N,O:Otetrazinc(II dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Sattarzadeh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the centrosymmetric title compound, [Zn4(C9H6NO6(C2H3O22]·2H2O, the ZnII atom that is bonded to one O atom of the acetate group is chelated by a quinolin-8-olate anion. This Zn atom is also bonded to the oxide O atoms of two other quinolin-8-olate anions, which themselves engage in chelation to the other ZnII atoms. The ZnII atom is five-coordinate in a square-pyramidal coordination geometry. The second ZnII atom is six-coordinate as it is linked to two oxide O atoms of the anions that chelate to the acetate-bound metal atom, and is chelated by two quinolin-8-olate ligands. The uncoordinated water molecule is disordered over two positions in a 4:1 ratio. O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the water molecules and the free O atoms of the carboxylate groups consolidate the crystal packing.

  19. Natural polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanocomposite based biosensor for detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The worrisome trend of antimalarial resistance has already highlighted the importance of artemisinin as a potent antimalarial agent. The current investigation aimed at fabricating a biosensor based on natural polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanoparticle composite mounting on an indium-tin oxide glass plate for the analysis of artemisinin. The biosensor was fabricated using an adsorbing horse-radish peroxidase enzyme on the electrode surface for which cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor the electro-catalytic reduction of artemisinin under diffusion controlled conditions. Electrochemical interfacial properties and immobilization of enzyme onto a polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanoparticle film were evaluated, and confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The differential pulse voltammetric peak current for artemisinin was increased linearly (concentration range of 0.01–0.08 μg mL−1) with sensitivity of 0.26 μA μg mL−1. The greater sensitivity of the fabricated biosensor to artemisinin (optimum limits of detection were 0.0035 μg mL−1 and 0.0036 μg mL−1 in bulk and spiked human serum, respectively) could be of much aid in medical diagnosis. - Highlights: • Extraction of PHA from indigenously isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa BPC2 • Developed PHA/AuNPs/HRP/ITO based biosensor without the use of chemical cross linker • Detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin using the nanocomposite based biosensor

  20. Safety, Tolerability, and Compliance with Long-Term Antimalarial Chemoprophylaxis in American Soldiers in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, David L; Garges, Eric; Manning, Jessica E; Bennett, Kent; Schaffer, Sarah; Kosmowski, Andrew J; Magill, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis is currently used by deployed U.S. military personnel. Previous small, short-term efficacy studies have shown variable rates of side effects among patients taking various forms of chemoprophylaxis, though reliable safety and tolerability data on long-term use are limited. We conducted a survey of troops returning to Fort Drum, NY following a 12-month deployment to Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan from 2006 to 2007. Of the 2,351 respondents, 95% reported taking at least one form of prophylaxis during their deployment, and 90% were deployed for > 10 months. Compliance with daily doxycycline was poor (60%) compared with 80% with weekly mefloquine (MQ). Adverse events (AEs) were reported by approximately 30% with both MQ and doxycycline, with 10% discontinuing doxycycline compared with 4% of MQ users. Only 6% and 31% of soldiers reported use of bed nets and skin repellents, respectively. Compliance with long-term malaria prophylaxis was poor, and there were substantial tolerability issues based on these anonymous survey results, though fewer with MQ than doxycycline. Given few long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis options, there is an unmet medical need for new antimalarials safe for long-term use. PMID:26123954

  1. Pyrazoleamide compounds are potent antimalarials that target Na+ homeostasis in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Akhil B.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Das, Sudipta; Daly, Thomas M.; Otto, Thomas D.; Spillman, Natalie J.; Wyvratt, Matthew; Siegl, Peter; Marfurt, Jutta; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F.; Price, Ric N.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Nagle, Advait; Stasiak, Marcin; Charman, Susan A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Belén Jiménez-Díaz, María; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Avery, Vicky M.; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael; Kirk, Kiaran; Berriman, Matthew; Kortagere, Sandhya; Burrows, Jeremy; Fan, Erkang; Bergman, Lawrence W.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antimalarial drugs, especially those with novel modes of action, is essential in the face of emerging drug-resistant parasites. Here we describe a new chemical class of molecules, pyrazoleamides, with potent activity against human malaria parasites and showing remarkably rapid parasite clearance in an in vivo model. Investigations involving pyrazoleamide-resistant parasites, whole-genome sequencing and gene transfers reveal that mutations in two proteins, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (PfCDPK5) and a P-type cation-ATPase (PfATP4), are necessary to impart full resistance to these compounds. A pyrazoleamide compound causes a rapid disruption of Na+ regulation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Similar effect on Na+ homeostasis was recently reported for spiroindolones, which are antimalarials of a chemical class quite distinct from pyrazoleamides. Our results reveal that disruption of Na+ homeostasis in malaria parasites is a promising mode of antimalarial action mediated by at least two distinct chemical classes. PMID:25422853

  2. Pyrazoleamide compounds are potent antimalarials that target Na+ homeostasis in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Akhil B; Morrisey, Joanne M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Das, Sudipta; Daly, Thomas M; Otto, Thomas D; Spillman, Natalie J; Wyvratt, Matthew; Siegl, Peter; Marfurt, Jutta; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F; Price, Ric N; Chatterjee, Arnab; Nagle, Advait; Stasiak, Marcin; Charman, Susan A; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Belén Jiménez-Díaz, María; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Avery, Vicky M; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael; Kirk, Kiaran; Berriman, Matthew; Kortagere, Sandhya; Burrows, Jeremy; Fan, Erkang; Bergman, Lawrence W

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antimalarial drugs, especially those with novel modes of action, is essential in the face of emerging drug-resistant parasites. Here we describe a new chemical class of molecules, pyrazoleamides, with potent activity against human malaria parasites and showing remarkably rapid parasite clearance in an in vivo model. Investigations involving pyrazoleamide-resistant parasites, whole-genome sequencing and gene transfers reveal that mutations in two proteins, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (PfCDPK5) and a P-type cation-ATPase (PfATP4), are necessary to impart full resistance to these compounds. A pyrazoleamide compound causes a rapid disruption of Na(+) regulation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Similar effect on Na(+) homeostasis was recently reported for spiroindolones, which are antimalarials of a chemical class quite distinct from pyrazoleamides. Our results reveal that disruption of Na(+) homeostasis in malaria parasites is a promising mode of antimalarial action mediated by at least two distinct chemical classes. PMID:25422853

  3. In-vitro antimalarial activity of azithromycin against chloroquine sensitive and chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas S

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available BAKGROUND: The spread of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has made the situation essential to look into new effective therapeutic agents like antibiotics. Azithromycin is a potential, chemotherapeutic agent which possesses antimalarial activity and favourable pharmacokinetic properties. It is an azalide microbiocide derived semi-synthetically from macrolide erythromycin. Like other antibiotics, the azalide azithromycin has ability to inhibit protein synthesis on 70S ribosomes. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The parasiticidal profile was studied in five chloroquine sensitive and five chloroquine resistant P. falciparum isolates obtained from various places of India. The antimalarial activity was evaluated in P. falciparum schizont maturation by short term culture for 24 hours and by exposing the parasites to the drug for 96 hours. Parasites synchronized at ring stage were put for culture with various concentrations of azithromycin dihydrate (0.01-40 micro/ml. RESULTS: At highest concentration (40 micro/ml, parasite growth was inhibited totally in all 10 isolates. Antimalarial activity at 96 hours was greater than at 24 hours in both chloroquine sensitive and resistant parasites, which may indicate that the inhibition of parasite growth may occur at clinically achievable concentration of the drug when parasites were exposed for several asexual cycles. CONCLUSION: Azithromycin shows a potential for eventual use alone or in combination in the treatment of chloroquine sensitive and resistant P. falciparum malaria.

  4. The contribution of microscopy to targeting antimalarial treatment in a low transmission area of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwerinde Ombeni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for improved targeting of antimalarial treatment if artemisinin combination therapy is to be successfully introduced in Africa. This study aimed to explore why malaria slides are requested and how their results guide treatment decisions in an area of low transmission of P. falciparum. Methods Outpatients attending a district hospital in a highland area of Tanzania were studied over a 3-week period. Clinical and social data were collected from patients who had been prescribed an antimalarial or sent for a malaria slide. Hospital slides were re-read later by research methods. Results Of 1,273 consultations 132(10% were treated presumptively for malaria and 214(17% were sent for a malaria slide; only 13(6% of these were reported positive for P. falciparum but 96(48% of the 201 slide-negative cases were treated for malaria anyway. In a logistic regression model, adults (OR 3.86, P Conclusion Progress in targeting of antimalarials in low malaria transmission settings is likely to depend on consistent use of malaria microscopy and on the willingness of health workers to be guided by negative slide results. Further studies are needed to identify how this can be achieved.

  5. Metabolic Dysregulation Induced in Plasmodium falciparum by Dihydroartemisinin and Other Front-Line Antimalarial Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Simon A; Chua, Hwa H; Nijagal, Brunda; Creek, Darren J; Ralph, Stuart A; McConville, Malcolm J

    2016-01-15

    Detailed information on the mode of action of antimalarial drugs can be used to improve existing drugs, identify new drug targets, and understand the basis of drug resistance. In this study we describe the use of a time-resolved, mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolite profiling approach to map the metabolic perturbations induced by a panel of clinical antimalarial drugs and inhibitors on Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages. Drug-induced changes in metabolite levels in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes were monitored over time using gas chromatography-MS and liquid chromatography-MS and changes in specific metabolic fluxes confirmed by nonstationary [(13)C]-glucose labeling. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was found to disrupt hemoglobin catabolism within 1 hour of exposure, resulting in a transient decrease in hemoglobin-derived peptides. Unexpectedly, it also disrupted pyrimidine biosynthesis, resulting in increased [(13)C]-glucose flux toward malate production, potentially explaining the susceptibility of P. falciparum to DHA during early blood-stage development. Unique metabolic signatures were also found for atovaquone, chloroquine, proguanil, cycloguanil and methylene blue. We also show that this approach can be used to identify the mode of action of novel antimalarials, such as the compound Torin 2, which inhibits hemoglobin catabolism. PMID:26150544

  6. Natural polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanocomposite based biosensor for detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phukon, Pinkee [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Radhapyari, Keisham [Analytical Chemistry Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science and Technology, Jorhat 785006, Assam (India); Konwar, Bolin Kumar [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Nagaland University (Central), Lumami, Zunheboto, Nagaland 798627 (India); Khan, Raju, E-mail: khan.raju@gmail.com [Analytical Chemistry Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science and Technology, Jorhat 785006, Assam (India)

    2014-04-01

    The worrisome trend of antimalarial resistance has already highlighted the importance of artemisinin as a potent antimalarial agent. The current investigation aimed at fabricating a biosensor based on natural polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanoparticle composite mounting on an indium-tin oxide glass plate for the analysis of artemisinin. The biosensor was fabricated using an adsorbing horse-radish peroxidase enzyme on the electrode surface for which cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor the electro-catalytic reduction of artemisinin under diffusion controlled conditions. Electrochemical interfacial properties and immobilization of enzyme onto a polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanoparticle film were evaluated, and confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The differential pulse voltammetric peak current for artemisinin was increased linearly (concentration range of 0.01–0.08 μg mL{sup −1}) with sensitivity of 0.26 μA μg mL{sup −1}. The greater sensitivity of the fabricated biosensor to artemisinin (optimum limits of detection were 0.0035 μg mL{sup −1} and 0.0036 μg mL{sup −1} in bulk and spiked human serum, respectively) could be of much aid in medical diagnosis. - Highlights: • Extraction of PHA from indigenously isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa BPC2 • Developed PHA/AuNPs/HRP/ITO based biosensor without the use of chemical cross linker • Detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin using the nanocomposite based biosensor.

  7. Natural and Semi synthetic Antimalarial Compounds: Emphasis on the Terpene Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, G N S; Rezende, L C D; Emery, F S; Gosmann, G; Gnoatto, S C B

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important tropical diseases since more than 40% of the world population is at risk. This disease is endemic to more than 100 nations and remains one of the main leading causes of death in children less than five years of age worldwide. Natural product-derived compounds have played a major role in drug discovery, often as prototypes to obtain more active semi synthetic derivatives. Antimalarial pharmacotherapy is a significant example of plant-derived medicines, such as quinine and artemisinin. This review highlights studies on terpenes and their semi synthetic derivatives from natural sources with antimalarial activity reported in the literature during eleven years (2002-2013). A total of 114 compounds are found among terpenes and their semi synthetic derivatives. Cytotoxicity of the compounds is also found in this review. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of the terpenes addressed are discussed based on seven well established descriptors, which provide a useful source for the elaboration of a terpene library of antimalarial compounds. PMID:25553426

  8. Separation of Th and Zr from acid medium by 3-formyl-4-hydroxy-N-methyl 2(H) quinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-Formyl-4-hydroxy-N-methyl 2(H) quinoline (FHMQ) was synthesized and characterized. This compound was found not soluble in water or nitric acid solutions of different concentration. The uptake of Zr and Th from nitric acid by FHMQ has been investigated. The effect of shaking time on the percent uptake was studied. It was found that the equilibrium uptake of Zr is reached in one step after 2 hrs while in case of Th 4 hrs was required to reach equilibrium. The effect of nitric acid, metal ion and FHMQ on Zr uptake was studied. Studies on the retention capacity of 3-formyl-4-hydroxy-N-methyl 2(H) quinoline showed that its capacity decreases by increasing the nitric acid concentration for both Zr and Th. From the results obtained a selective method for separation of Zr from Th and U(VI) was developed using a floating bed column. (author)

  9. A Novel and Facile Synthesis of 2-(Benzofuran-2-yl)benzo[h]- quinoline-3-carboxylic Acid Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文涛; 姜云; 李阳; 李凤; 闫岩

    2012-01-01

    A simple and concise approach for the synthesis of a series of new heterocyclic systems of 2-(benzofuran-2-yl)- benzo[h]quinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives (3a--3g) is described. The synthetic strategy features the one-pot reaction of ethyl 2-(chloromethyl)benzo[h]quinoline-3-carboxylate (2) with various substituted salicylaldehydes as well as 2-hydroxy-l-naphthaldehyde as a key step. The substrate 2 was prepared in good yield by a mild, efficient and direct reaction of 1-naphthylamine (1) with Vilsmeier-Haack reagent. The structures of all the new compounds were identified by spectral data and elemental analysis.

  10. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of 1,4-disubstituted imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigulla, Yadagiri; Akula, Mahesh; Trivedi, Prakruti; Ghosh, Balaram; Jha, Mukund; Bhattacharya, Anupam

    2016-01-21

    The synthesis and anti-cancer activity evaluation of fused imidazoquinoline compounds is reported in this paper. Yb(OTf)3 has been utilized as a catalyst for the synthesis of 1,4-diaryl substituted imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines via a modified Pictet-Spengler approach. The desired imidazole ring was synthesized from imines using TosMIC (toluenesulfonylmethyl isocyanide) and subsequently functionalized at the C-4 position yielding an imidazoquinoline skeleton. Importantly, the final step was carried out without the aid of any prefunctionalization to obtain the resultant compounds in good yields. The synthesized compounds, when screened for anti-cancer activity, revealed the highest activity with 4-(2-bromophenyl)-1-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline (IC50: 103.3 μM). PMID:26592542

  11. Discovery of Novel 3-Quinoline Carboxamides as Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Inhibitors of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degorce, Sébastien L; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Dishington, Allan; Ducray, Richard; Glossop, Steven C; Hassall, Lorraine A; Lach, Franck; Lau, Alan; McGuire, Thomas M; Nowak, Thorsten; Ouvry, Gilles; Pike, Kurt G; Thomason, Andrew G

    2016-07-14

    A novel series of 3-quinoline carboxamides has been discovered and optimized as selective inhibitors of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. From a modestly potent HTS hit (4), we identified molecules such as 6-[6-(methoxymethyl)-3-pyridinyl]-4-{[(1R)-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)ethyl]amino}-3-quinolinecarboxamide (72) and 7-fluoro-6-[6-(methoxymethyl)pyridin-3-yl]-4-{[(1S)-1-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)ethyl]amino}quinoline-3-carboxamide (74) as potent and highly selective ATM inhibitors with overall ADME properties suitable for oral administration. 72 and 74 constitute excellent oral tools to probe ATM inhibition in vivo. Efficacy in combination with the DSB-inducing agent irinotecan was observed in a disease relevant model. PMID:27259031

  12. Proficient Procedure for Preparation of Quinoline Derivatives Catalyzed by NbCl5 in Glycerol as Green Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Nasseri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolines, an important class of potentially bioactive compounds, have been synthesized by treatment of o-aminoaryl ketones and carbonyl compound utilizing niobium (V chloride (NbCl5 as an available and inexpensive catalyst. The quinoline derivatives were prepared in glycerol, an excellent solvent in terms of environmental impact, with high yields (76–98% and short reaction times (20–90 min. Not only diketones but also ketones afforded the desired products in good to excellent yields. The reaction time of 2-amino-5-chlorobenzophenone and dicarbonyl compounds was longer than that of 2-aminobenzophenone. The reaction of cyclic diketones took place faster than open chain analogues. These reactions also proceeded with acetophenone derivatives. In these cases the reaction times are longer.

  13. Synthesis of spiro[benzo[ℎ]quinoline-7,3'- indolines] via a three-component condensation reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abbas Rahmati; Miranda Eskandari-Vashareh

    2014-01-01

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of a new series of spiro[benzo[ℎ]quinoline-7,3'-indoline] was accomplished simply by the reaction of an isatin, naphthalen-1-amine and a CH-acid (,-dimethylbarbituric acid, barbituric acid, dimedone or 1,3-indandion) in acetic acid. During this process, the effects of solvent and temperature have been investigated on the yield of reactions.

  14. Synthesis of SF5-containing benzisoxazoles, quinolines, and quinazolines by the Davis reaction of nitro-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beier, Petr; Pastýříková, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, Feb 21 (2013), s. 411-416. ISSN 1860-5397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/12/0072 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : benzisoxazoles * pentafluorosulfanyl group * quinazolines * quinolines * sulfurpentafluorides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.803, year: 2013 https://www. beilstein - journal s.org/bjoc/single/articleFullText.htm?vt=f&publicId=1860-5397-9-43&tpn=1&bpn=singleVolume&vn=9

  15. A novel inhibitor of human telomerase derived from 10H-indolo[3,2-b]quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, V; Guyen, B; Opoku-Boahen, Y; Mann, J; Gowan, S M; Kelland, L M; Read, M A; Neidle, S

    2000-09-18

    The bis-dimethylaminoethyl derivative of quindoline (10H-indolo[3,2-b]quinoline), an alkaloid from the West African shrub Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has been synthesised. This has been shown to have modest cytotoxicity, as well as inhibitory activity against the telomerase enzyme. It is hypothesised that the latter activity is due to stabilisation of an intermediate guanine-quadruplex complex, in accordance with computer modelling. PMID:10999471

  16. Production of methanol/DME from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrenfeldt, J.; Birk Henriksen, U.; Muenster-Swendsen, J.; Fink, A.; Roengaard Clausen, L.; Munkholt Christensen, J.; Qin, K.; Lin, W.; Arendt Jensen, P.; Degn Jensen, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this project the production of DME/methanol from biomass has been investigated. Production of DME/methanol from biomass requires the use of a gasifier to transform the solid fuel to a synthesis gas (syngas) - this syngas can then be catalytically converted to DME/methanol. Two different gasifier types have been investigated in this project: 1) The Two-Stage Gasifier (Viking Gasifier), designed to produce a very clean gas to be used in a gas engine, has been connected to a lab-scale methanol plant, to prove that the gas from the gasifier could be used for methanol production with a minimum of gas cleaning. This was proved by experiments. Thermodynamic computer models of DME and methanol plants based on using the Two-Stage Gasification concept were created to show the potential of such plants. The models showed that the potential biomass to DME/methanol + net electricity energy efficiency was 51-58% (LHV). By using waste heat from the plants for district heating, the total energy efficiencies could reach 87-88% (LHV). 2) A lab-scale electrically heated entrained flow gasifier has been used to gasify wood and straw. Entrained flow gasifiers are today the preferred gasifier type for commercial coal gasification, but little information exists on using these types of gasifiers for biomass gasification. The experiments performed provided quantitative data on product and gas composition as a function of operation conditions. Biomass can be gasified with less oxygen consumption compared to coal. The organic fraction of the biomass that is not converted to gas appears as soot. Thermodynamic computer models of DME and methanol plants based on using entrained flow gasification were created to show the potential of such plants. These models showed that the potential torrefied biomass to DME/methanol + net electricity energy efficiency was 65-71% (LHV). Different routes to produce liquid transport fuels from biomass are possible. They include production of RME (rapeseed oil

  17. Methanol Improves Methane Uptake in Starved Methanotrophic Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Sigmund; Priemé, Anders; Bakken, Lars

    1998-01-01

    Methanotrophs in enrichment cultures grew and sustained atmospheric methane oxidation when supplied with methanol. If they were not supplied with methanol or formate, their atmospheric methane oxidation came to a halt, but it was restored within hours in response to methanol or formate. Indigenous forest soil methanotrophs were also dependent on a supply of methanol upon reduced methane access but only when exposed to a methane-free atmosphere. Their immediate response to each methanol additi...

  18. [Bis(quinolin-2-ylcarbonylamido-κ3N,N′,N′′]bromido(N,N-dimethylformamide-κOcopper(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Serajul Haque Faizi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the mononuclear title complex, [CuBr(C20H12N3O2(C3H7NO], synthesized from the quinoline-derived reduced Schiff base 4-(quinolin-2-ylmethylaminophenol, the coordination geometry around Cu2+ is distorted square-pyramidal, comprising a bromide anion at the apex [Cu—Br = 2.4671 (5 Å]. The base of the pyramid is built up from one dimethylformamide O-atom donor [Cu—O = 2.078 (2 Å] and three N-atom donors from the monoanionic, tridentate bis(quinolin-2-ylcarbonyldiimide ligand [Cu—Ndiimide = 1.941 (3 Å, and Cu—Nquinolyl = 2.060 (3 and 2.049 (3 Å]. An intramolecular C—H...O occurs. In the crystal, weak methyl and aromatic C—H...Br and formyl C—H...Ocarbonyl hydrogen-bonding interactions generate an overall layered structure lying parallel to (001.

  19. Quinoline-8-ol modified cellulose as solid phase extractant (SPE) for preconcentrative separation and determination of thorium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose has been functionalized by coupling with 5-chloro-quinoline-8-ol in the presence of alkali. The resulting polymer material has been characterized by IR spectra and has been used for preconcentrating thorium prior to its determination by spectrophotometry. The optimum pH value for quantitative extraction is 5.0-7.0 and can be eluted with 5 cm3 of 1 mol dm-3 of HCl. The retention capacity of the quinoline-8-ol modified cellulose is 20.0 mg g-1. The effect of various cations, anions and neutral electrolytes on the preconcentration of thorium in conjunction with the determination procedure has been studied and we have found that none of interferents including uranium (up to 10 fold amounts) interfere. The enrichment factor for preconcentration of thorium was found to be 200. Ten replicate determinations of 10 μg of thorium (IV) present in 1 dm3 of sample gave a mean absorbance of 0.084 with a relative standard deviation 1.52%. The detection limit (corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank) was found to be 2 μg dm-3. The thorium content of mixed rare earth chloride solution obtained from Indian Rare Earths Limited (IRE), India was estimated by using quinoline-8-ol immobilized cellulose for preconcentration and subsequent determination by spectrophotometry. (orig.)

  20. Quantum mechanical and astrophysical studies of methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineau des Forêts G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Interstellar methanol has been observed extensively at radio frequencies from the ground, and, very recently, it has been observed at higher frequencies, by means of the Herschel satellite. Being a complex molecule, methanol has a rich spectrum exhibiting rotational and internal torsional motions. However, by the same token, the determination of the cross sections and rate coefficients for the excitation of methanol by the principal perturbers, helium and molecular hydrogen, is a far from trivial task. We have recently extended and considerably improved previous calculations of these data. In the case of molecular hydrogen, results are now available for the excitation of both A- and E-type methanol, not only by para- but also by ortho-H2. These data have been used to model the HIFI observations of the outflow source L1157 B1. The methanol emission is computed self-consistently, in parallel with the dynamics and the chemistry, allowing for the optical depths in the emission lines by means of the LVG approximation. The results of these calculations are summarized.

  1. Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

  2. Methanol exchange between grassland and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brunner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations and fluxes of methanol were measured above two differently managed grassland fields (intensive and extensive in central Switzerland during summer 2004. The measurements were performed with a proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometer and fluxes were determined by the eddy covariance method. The observed methanol emission showed a distinct diurnal cycle and was strongly correlated with global radiation and water vapour flux. Mean and maximum daily emissions were found to depend on grassland species composition and, for the intensive field, also on the growing state. The extensive field with a more complex species composition had higher emissions than the graminoid-dominated intensive field, both on an area and on a biomass basis. A simple parameterisation depending on the water vapour flux and the leaf area index allowed a satisfying simulation of the temporal variation of methanol emissions over the growing phase. Accumulated carbon losses due to methanol emissions accounted for 0.024 and 0.048% of net primary productivity for the intensive and extensive field, respectively. The integral methanol emissions over the growing periods were more than one order of magnitude higher than the emissions related to cut and drying events.

  3. New rare-earth quinolinate complexes for organic light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, H. [Physics Department, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Paolini, T.B. [Chemistry Institute, Department of Fundamental Chemistry, University of São Paulo, USP, 05599-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Niyama, E. [Physics Department, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brito, H.F. [Chemistry Institute, Department of Fundamental Chemistry, University of São Paulo, USP, 05599-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Cremona, M., E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br [Physics Department, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-01-01

    Because of its thermal and morphological stability and optical and electrical properties, tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) is one of the most widely used electron transporting materials in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). The search for substitutes for this compound constitutes an important field of research in organic electronics. We report on a study of a new rare-earth tetrakis 8-hydroxyquinoline complex. Synthesis of tris complexes with rare-earth metals and 8-hydroxyquinoline resulted in unstable compounds. However, the inclusion of an additional quinoline group stabilized these compounds. Li[RE(q){sub 4}] (where RE = La{sup 3+}, Lu{sup 3+} and Y{sup 3+} and q = 8-hydroxyquinoline) were synthesized and then used as the electron-transporting and emitting layer in OLEDs. Thin films were deposited in a high-vacuum environment by thermal evaporation on quartz and silicon substrates. Optical characterization of the RE complexes revealed emission in the 510–525 nm range, the same as that observed for Alq{sub 3}, while absorption was observed at wavelengths of 382 nm for the Y/La complexes and 388 nm for the Lu complex. The OLEDs were fabricated with an indium tin oxide layer (ITO) as the anode, (N,N′-bis (1-naphtyl)-N,N′-diphenyl-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine) NPB as the hole-transporting layer (25 nm), Li[RE(q){sub 4}] as the electron-transporting and emitting layer (40 nm) and aluminum as the cathode (120 nm). The electroluminescence (EL) spectra showed a broad band from 520 to 540 nm and green-colored emission associated with the 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand. There was an interesting dependence of the maximum energy peak position and half-width of the emission band in the EL spectra on the atomic radius of the RE ion used. The best luminance for the OLEDs produced in this study was achieved with the Li[RE(q){sub 4}] compound. The optical and electrical properties of this OLED were comparable to those of similar devices based on Alq{sub 3

  4. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil); Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya [Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  5. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to 32P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca2+/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca2+ quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights:

  6. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberico, E.; Nielsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous...

  7. A review of age-old antimalarial drug to combat malaria:efficacy upgradation by nanotechnology based drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satyajit; Tripathy; Somenath; Roy

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is uncontrolled burden in the world till now.Despite of different efforts to develop antimalarial drug for decades,any anti-malarial drug can able to eradicate completely till now.Many anti-malarial substances are practically ineffectual because of their physicochemical limitations,cytotoxicity,chemical instability and degradation,and limited activities against intracellular parasites.Taking into consideration,the amount of research is going to conduct in the field of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems,lead to new ways of improving the treatment of infectious diseases.The study has focused on the progress and advancement of research on nanotechnology based drug delivery to eradicate the malaria.We like to focus the efficacy of nanotechnology based drug application for the opening out of novel chemotherapeutics in laboratory research,which may show the way to better use with age-old antimalarial drug and may draw the attention of pharmaceutical industries for the improvement and designing of effective anti-malarial drugs in future.

  8. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  9. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  10. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  11. Abacavir methanol 2.5-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong-Truc T. Pham

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The structure of abacavir (systematic name: {(1S,4R-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino-9H-purin-9-yl]cyclopent-2-en-1-yl}methanol, C14H18N6O·2.5CH3OH, consists of hydrogen-bonded ribbons which are further held together by additional hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl group and two N atoms on an adjacent purine. The asymmetric unit also contains 2.5 molecules of methanol solvate which were grossly disordered and were excluded using SQUEEZE subroutine in PLATON [Spek, (2009. Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155].

  12. Abacavir methanol 2.5-solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Phuong-Truc T

    2009-01-01

    The structure of abacavir (systematic name: {(1S,4R)-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl]cyclopent-2-en-1-yl}methanol), C14H18N6O·2.5CH3OH, consists of hydrogen-bonded ribbons which are further held together by additional hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl group and two N atoms on an adjacent purine. The asymmetric unit also contains 2.5 molecules of methanol solvate which were grossly disordered and were excluded using SQUEEZE subroutine in PLATON [Spek, (2009...

  13. Several methanol operations are on the block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With growth prospects in the oxygenated fuel-driven market strong but current demand sluggish, a number of methanol holdings have come on the market. Cash-strapped Quantum Chemical has placed a for sale sign on its Deer Park, TX plant, Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) is seeking a new joint venture partner for its Clear Lake, TX plant and Morgan Stanley Leveraged Equity Fund II (New York) is seeking to reduce its stake in Beaumont Methanol (Beaumont, TX). Industry sources also say that Novacor Chemicals (Calgary) is receptive to offers for its Medicine Hat, AB plant

  14. Environmental controls over methanol emission from leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Harley

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is found throughout the troposphere, with average concentrations second only to methane among atmospheric hydrocarbons. Proposed global methanol budgets are highly uncertain, but all agree that at least 60% of the total source arises from the terrestrial biosphere and primary emissions from plants. However, the magnitude of these emissions is also highly uncertain, and the environmental factors which control them require further elucidation.

    Using a temperature-controlled leaf enclosure, we measured methanol emissions from leaves of six plant species by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, with simultaneous measurements of leaf evapotranspiration and stomatal conductance. Rates of emission at 30°C varied from 0.2 to 38 μg g (dry mass−1 h−1, with higher rates measured on young leaves, consistent with the production of methanol via pectin demethylation in expanding foliage. On average, emissions increased by a factor of 2.3 for each 10°C increase in leaf temperature. At constant temperature, emissions were also correlated with co-varying incident photosynthetic photon flux density and rates of stomatal conductance. The data were analyzed using the emission model developed by Niinemets and Reichstein (2003a, b, with the incorporation of a methanol production term that increased exponentially with temperature. It was concluded that control of emissions, during daytime, was shared by leaf temperature and stomatal conductance, although rates of production may also vary diurnally in response to variations in leaf growth rate in expanding leaves. The model, which generally provided reasonable simulations of the measured data during the day, significantly overestimated emissions on two sets of measurements made through the night, suggesting that production rates of methanol were reduced at night, perhaps because leaf growth was reduced or possibly through a direct effect of light on production

  15. Environmental controls over methanol emission from leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Harley

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is found throughout the troposphere, with average concentrations second only to methane among atmospheric hydrocarbons. Proposed global methanol budgets are highly uncertain, but all agree that at least 60% of the total source arises from the terrestrial biosphere and primary emissions from plants. However, the magnitude of these emissions is also highly uncertain, and the environmental factors which control them require further elucidation.

    Using a temperature-controlled leaf enclosure, we measured methanol emissions from leaves of six plant species by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, with simultaneous measurements of leaf evapotranspiration and stomatal conductance. Rates of emission at 30°C varied from 0.3 to 38 μg g (dry mass−1 h−1, with higher rates measured on young leaves, consistent with the production of methanol via pectin demethylation in expanding foliage. On average, emissions increased by a factor of 2.4 for each 10°C increase in leaf temperature. At constant temperature, emissions were also correlated with co-varying incident photosynthetic photon flux density and rates of stomatal conductance. The data were analyzed using the emission model developed by Niinemets and Reichstein (2003a, b, with the incorporation of a methanol production term that increased exponentially with temperature. It was concluded that control of emissions, during daytime, was shared by leaf temperature and stomatal conductance, although rates of production may also vary diurnally in response to variations in leaf growth rate in expanding leaves. The model, which generally provided reasonable simulations of the measured data during the day, significantly overestimated emissions on two sets of measurements made through the night, suggesting that production rates of methanol were reduced at night, perhaps because leaf growth was reduced or possibly through a direct effect of light on production

  16. Thalidomide inhibition of vascular remodeling and inflammatory reactivity in the quinolinic acid-injected rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J K; Jantaratnotai, N; McLarnon, J G

    2009-10-01

    Effects of thalidomide administration on vascular remodeling, gliosis and neuronal viability have been studied in excitotoxin-injected rat striatum. Intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QUIN) caused time-dependent changes (durations of 6 h, 1 and 7 d post-injection) in vascular remodeling. QUIN excitotoxic insult was associated with increased numbers of vessels (laminin or collagen IV markers) demonstrating considerable abnormalities in morphology, including short fragments and vascular loops. Non-lesioned striatum, with injection of phosphate buffer solution (PBS) as a vehicle, showed no evidence for vascular remodeling. A maximal extent of vascular remodeling was measured at 1 d post-QUIN and was correlated with marked increases in microgliosis (ED1 marker) and astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] marker) relative to control PBS injection. Double staining of laminin with ED1 and GFAP demonstrated areas of close association of glial cells with blood vessels. Treatment of QUIN-injected animals with the anti-inflammatory compound, thalidomide significantly inhibited vascular remodeling (by 43%) and reduced microgliosis (by 33%) but was ineffective in modifying extents of astrogliosis. Intrastriatal QUIN injection was associated with a marked loss of striatal neurons relative to non-lesioned control with thalidomide treatment exhibiting a significant degree of neuroprotection (24% recovery) against QUIN-induced neurotoxicity. These results suggest close links between microglial-mediated inflammatory responses and vascular remodeling, with inflammatory reactivity associated with, and contributing to, neuronal damage in excitotoxically-lesioned striatum. PMID:19591904

  17. Effects of impregnation methods and drying conditions on quinoline hydrodenitrogenation over Ni-W based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Fang; Qiu, Zegang; Zhao, Liangfu; Xiang, Hongwei [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Guo, Shaoqing [Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China)

    2014-04-15

    The effects of impregnation methods (co-impregnation and sequential impregnation) and drying conditions (air and vacuum) on the structure and catalytic behavior of MCM-41 supported Ni-W catalysts were investigated. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy (DRS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pyridine adsorbed infrared spectroscopy (Py-IR) techniques. They were tested for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline at temperatures of 300-400 deg C. The HDN results showed that the catalysts prepared by co-impregnation were more active than the catalysts prepared by sequential impregnation and the catalysts prepared by drying under vacuum were more active than the catalysts dried in air. Characterization revealed that the co-impregnation method and drying under vacuum promoted the dispersion of W, the formation of the active phases, and the formation of acidic sites on the catalysts. (author)

  18. Green synthesis of novel quinoline based imidazole derivatives and evaluation of their antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Desai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have described the conventional and microwave method for the synthesis of N-(4-((2-chloroquinolin-3-ylmethylene-5-oxo-2-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-1-yl(arylamides 3a–l. It is observed that the solvent-free microwave thermolysis is a convenient, rapid, high-yielding, and environmental friendly protocol for the synthesis of quinoline based imidazole derivatives when compared with conventional reaction in a solution phase. Antimicrobial activity of the newly synthesized compounds is screened in vitro on the following microbial cultures: Escherichia coli (MTCC 443, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 1688, Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 96, Streptococcus pyogenes (MTCC 442, Candida albicans (MTCC 227, Aspergillus niger (MTCC 282, Aspergillus clavatus (MTCC 1323. All the synthesized bio-active molecules are tested for their in vitro antimicrobial activity by bioassay namely serial broth dilution. Among these compounds 3c, 3d, 3f, 3h and 3j show significant potency against different microbial strains. All the compounds have been characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral data. On the basis of statistical analysis, it is observed that these compounds give significant co-relation.

  19. Determination of three physical properties of quinoline ionic liquids with hexafluorophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Dan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Densities of one acidic ionic liquid (IL Quinolinum hexafluorophosphate ([HBpy][PF6], and four neutral dicationic ionic liquids (ILs based on quinoline and hexafluoro-phosphate and linked with poly(ethylene glycol (PEG: ([PEG200-DIL][PF6]2, [PEG400-DIL][PF6]2, [PEG800-DIL][PF6]2 and [PEG1000-DIL][PF6]2 were determined. In addition, the solubilities of six ILs in six lower alcohols, water, acetonitrile and diethyl ether were measured at 288.15 K; and the hydroscopicity of above five ILs were measured at the temperature of 298.15 K and relative humidity of 79% for 24 h. Densities of five ionic liquids were determined between 283.15 and 333.15 K. Then the densities of five binary system (ILs/acetonitrile were explored between 283.15 and 333.15 K, the type of the ionic liquid, the concentration of five ILs in CH3CN, and the effect of temperature on the binary systems, were correlated with the measured data.

  20. Design, Synthesis and Antibacterial Evaluation of Some New 2-Phenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 2-phenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives was synthesized starting from aniline, 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, pyruvic acid followed by Doebner reaction, amidation, reduction, acylation and amination. All of the newly-synthesized compounds were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and HRMS. The antibacterial activities of these compounds against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, as well as one strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA bacteria were evaluated by the agar diffusion method (zone of inhibition and a broth dilution method (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, and their structure-activity relationships were obtained and discussed. The results revealed that some compounds displayed good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and Compounds 5a4 and 5a7 showed the best inhibition with an MIC value of 64 μg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and with an MIC value of 128 μg/mL against Escherichia coli, respectively. The results of the MTT assay illustrated the low cytotoxicity of Compound 5a4.

  1. Design, Synthesis and Antibacterial Evaluation of Some New 2-Phenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic Acid Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Xie, Xiaoyang; Cai, Yuanhong; Yang, Xiaolan; Li, Jiayu; Li, Yinghan; Chen, Wenna; He, Minghua

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 2-phenyl-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives was synthesized starting from aniline, 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, pyruvic acid followed by Doebner reaction, amidation, reduction, acylation and amination. All of the newly-synthesized compounds were characterized by ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and HRMS. The antibacterial activities of these compounds against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis), as well as one strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria were evaluated by the agar diffusion method (zone of inhibition) and a broth dilution method (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)), and their structure-activity relationships were obtained and discussed. The results revealed that some compounds displayed good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and Compounds 5a₄ and 5a₇ showed the best inhibition with an MIC value of 64 μg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and with an MIC value of 128 μg/mL against Escherichia coli, respectively. The results of the MTT assay illustrated the low cytotoxicity of Compound 5a₄. PMID:26978336

  2. 37 GHz Methanol Masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the Class II Methanol Maser Phase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  3. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Sobolev, A. M. [Astronomical Observatory, Ural Federal University, Lenin avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lo, N., E-mail: Simon.Ellingsen@utas.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago, Casilla 36-D (Chile)

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  4. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  5. 37 GHz methanol masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the class II methanol maser phase?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P; Sobolev, A M; Voronkov, M A; Caswell, J L; Lo, N

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3 and 38.5 GHz towards a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched towards regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesised to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  6. METHANOL REMOVAL FROM METHANOL-WATER MIXTURE USING ACTIVATED SLUDGE, AIR STRIPPING AND ADSORPTION PROCESS: COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALAM K. AL-DAWERY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental research has been carried out in order to examine the removal of methanol from methanol-water mixtures using three different methods; activated sludge; activated carbon and air stripping. The results showed that the methanol was totally consumed by the bacteria as quickly as the feed entered the activated sludge vessel. Air stripping process has a limited ability for removing of methanol due to strong intermolecular forces between methanol and water; however, the results showed that the percentage of methanol removed using air pressure at 0.5 bar was higher than that of using air pressure of 0.25 bar. Removal of methanol from the mixture with a methanol content of 5% using activated carbon was not successful due to the limited capacity of the of the activated carbon. Thus, the activated sludge process can be considered as the most suitable process for the treatment of methanol-water mixtures.

  7. Studies on laser flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis of quinoline and some of its derivatives%喹啉及其衍生物的脉冲辐解和激光光解研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dazhang; WANG Shilong; SUN Xiaoyu; LI Wenzhe; ZENG Kailing; NI Yaming; WANG Wenfeng; YAO Side

    2005-01-01

    Quinoline and some of its derivatives were reported to be carcinogenic, toxic and mutagenic[1-3]. The widespread use of quinoline and its derivatives entails that these compounds are distributed in the environment, polluting soil and water together with many other environmental chemicals.Time-resolved laser flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis have been used to study the reaction of quinoline (Q), 2, 6-dimethyl-quinoline (DMQ) and isoquinoline (IQ) with hydrated electrons, hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen radicals. Transient absorption spectra were obtained and reaction rate constants to the reactions were determined, as showed in Table 1. Rossible mechanisms of the reactions were suggested.In addition, oxidization reactions of SO4·-, Br2·- and N3·- with isoquinoline, quinoline and its derivatives were studied. It showed that SO4- could oxidize quinoline, 2, 6-dimethylquinoline and isoquinoline; Br2·-could oxidize isoquinoline to its cation radicals, but it could not oxidize quinoline or 2, 6-diemethylquinoline; N3·- could oxidize none of them.With a better understandings on photolysis and radiolysis of isoquinoline, quinoline and its derivates, the study is of help for degradation of the chemicals and for environment protection.

  8. CRIMALDDI: a co-ordinated, rational, and integrated effort to set logical priorities in anti-malarial drug discovery initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerig Christian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite increasing efforts and support for anti-malarial drug R&D, globally anti-malarial drug discovery and development remains largely uncoordinated and fragmented. The current window of opportunity for large scale funding of R&D into malaria is likely to narrow in the coming decade due to a contraction in available resources caused by the current economic difficulties and new priorities (e.g. climate change. It is, therefore, essential that stakeholders are given well-articulated action plans and priorities to guide judgments on where resources can be best targeted. The CRIMALDDI Consortium (a European Union funded initiative has been set up to develop, through a process of stakeholder and expert consultations, such priorities and recommendations to address them. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to guide the priorities of the European anti-malarial research as well as the wider global discovery agenda in the coming decade.

  9. In vitro antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity of cochlospermum tinctorium and C. planchonii leaf extracts and essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Vical, F; Valentin, A; Mallié, M; Bastide, J M; Bessière, J M

    1999-05-01

    The antimalarial and toxicological properties of Cochlospermum tinctorium and C. planchonii extracts and essential oils prepared from their leaves were studied. The oil components were extracted by hydrodistillation of the plant leaves and characterized by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Crude extracts and oils were tested for in vitro antimalarial activity on Plasmodium falciparum. The IC50 were evaluated after 24 and 72 h contact between the oils and the parasite culture, and ranged from 22 to 500 micrograms/ml. C. planchonii leaf oil yielded the best antimalarial effect (IC50: 22-35 micrograms/ml), while the most potent effect from crude leaf extracts was induced by C. tinctorium. The cytotoxicity of the leaf crude extracts and oils was assessed on the K562 cell line and showed IC50 values ranging between 33 and 2000 micrograms/ml. PMID:10364849

  10. Direct applications of stabilized methanol from the liquid phase methanol (LPMEOH) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, B.L.; Heydorn, E.C.; Tijm, P.J.A.; Kornosky, R.M.

    1999-07-01

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert synthesis (syngas) gas to methanol. Because of its superior heat management, the process can directly utilize the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. When added to an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant for peak shaving, the LPMEOH process converts a portion of the CO-rich syngas produced by the gasifier to methanol, and the unconverted gas is used to fuel the gas turbine combined-cycle power plant. A 260 short tons per day LPMEOH Process Demonstration Plant has been in operation at Eastman Chemical Company's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee since April 1997. One of the advantages of the LPMEOH Process for coproduction of electric power and methanol from coal-derived syngas is that the as-produced, stabilized (degassed) methanol product is of unusually high quality (e.g. less than 1 wt% water) which may be suitable for direct use premium fuel applications. When compared to conventional methanol synthesis processes, cost savings of $0.04 to $0.11 per gallon of methanol can be achieved in coproduction facilities. However, the suitability of the stabilized product as a fuel must be demonstrated. A product-use test program has been developed to enhance the early commercial acceptance of central clean coal technology processing facilities, coproducing electricity and methanol. The objective of this program is to demonstrate commercial market applications for the ``as produced'' or stabilized methanol as a replacement fuel and as a fuel supplement. Fuel economics will be evaluated for the ``as produced'' methanol for use in municipal, industrial, and utility applications and as fuel supplements for gasoline, diesel, and natural gas. The applications (for example, as a hydrogen source for fuel cells, and as a

  11. Effect of selenium (Se) deficiency on the anti-malarial action of Qinghaosu (QHS) in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levander, O.A.; Ager, A.L.; May, R.

    1986-03-01

    QHS is an endoperoxide, so it occurred to the authors that its anti-malarial action might be potentiated by low glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. Weanling female mice were fed 1 of 4 diets: chow or a Torula yeast-based diet supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 0.5 ppm Se as Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/. After 6 weeks, mean hepatic GSH-Px activities and plasma Se levels in these 4 dietary groups were 17.3, 0.1, 5.4, and 14.5 munits/mg protein and 242, 4, 230, and 532 ng/ml, respectively. At this time, all mice were inoculated i.p. with asexual blood stages of Plasmodium yoelii. Then groups of 7 or 8 mice fed each diet were given 0, 4, 16, or 64 mg QHS/kg orally bid at 3, 4, and 5 days post inoculation. On the 6th day, blood films were taken and antimalarial activity was assessed by determining % parasitemia (% PARA). Mice given 0 or 4 mg QHS/kg averaged 47% PARA and this was not affected by diet. Mice receiving 64 mg QHS/kg averaged about 1% PARA irrespective of diet. However, mice given 16 mg QHS/kg had 25% PARA when fed chow but only 8 to 11% PARA when fed the Torula diet, regardless of Se intake. Thus, while Se status did not appear to influence the antimalarial potency of QHS, some factor(s) in the Torula diet enhanced its activity at intermediate doses vs. the chow diet.

  12. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the antimalarial lead compound SSJ-183 in Plasmodium models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schleiferböck S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Schleiferböck,1,2 Christian Scheurer,1,2 Masataka Ihara,3,4 Isamu Itoh,3,4 Ian Bathurst,5,† Jeremy N Burrows,5 Pascal Fantauzzi,5 Julie Lotharius,5 Susan A Charman,6 Julia Morizzi,6 David M Shackleford,6 Karen L White,6 Reto Brun,1,2 Sergio Wittlin1,21Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, 2University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3Drug Discovery Science Research Center, Hoshi University, Shinagawa, Tokyo, Japan; 4Synstar Japan Co, Ltd, Odawara, Japan; 5Medicines for Malaria Venture, Geneva, Switzerland; 6Centre for Drug Candidate Optimisation, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Parkville, VIC, Australia †Ian Bathurst passed away on 26 June 2011Abstract: The objective of this work was to characterize the in vitro (Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo (Plasmodium berghei activity profile of the recently discovered lead compound SSJ-183. The molecule showed in vitro a fast and strong inhibitory effect on growth of all P. falciparum blood stages, with a tendency to a more pronounced stage-specific action on ring forms at low concentrations. Furthermore, the compound appeared to be equally efficacious on drug-resistant and drug-sensitive parasite strains. In vivo, SSJ-183 showed a rapid onset of action, comparable to that seen for the antimalarial drug artesunate. SSJ-183 exhibited a half-life of about 10 hours and no significant differences in absorption or exposure between noninfected and infected mice. SSJ-183 appears to be a promising new lead compound with an attractive antimalarial profile.Keywords: antimalarial studies, cross-resistance, stage-specificity, Plasmodium falciparum

  13. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  14. Understanding Private Sector Antimalarial Distribution Chains: A Cross-Sectional Mixed Methods Study in Six Malaria-Endemic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palafox, Benjamin; Patouillard, Edith; Tougher, Sarah; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Rueda, Sergio Torres; Kiefer, Sabine; O’Connell, Kathryn A.; Zinsou, Cyprien; Phok, Sochea; Akulayi, Louis; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Chavasse, Desmond

    2014-01-01

    Background Private for-profit outlets are important treatment sources for malaria in most endemic countries. However, these outlets constitute only the last link in a chain of businesses that includes manufacturers, importers and wholesalers, all of which influence the availability, price and quality of antimalarials patients can access. We present evidence on the composition, characteristics and operation of these distribution chains and of the businesses that comprise them in six endemic countries (Benin, Cambodia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia). Methods and Findings We conducted nationally representative surveys of antimalarial wholesalers during 2009–2010 using an innovative sampling approach that captured registered and unregistered distribution channels, complemented by in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders. Antimalarial distribution chains were pyramidal in shape, with antimalarials passing through a maximum of 4–6 steps between manufacturer and retailer; however, most likely pass through 2–3 steps. Less efficacious non-artemisinin therapies (e.g. chloroquine) dominated weekly sales volumes among African wholesalers, while volumes for more efficacious artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) were many times smaller. ACT sales predominated only in Cambodia. In all countries, consumer demand was the principal consideration when selecting products to stock. Selling prices and reputation were key considerations regarding supplier choice. Business practices varied across countries, with large differences in the proportions of wholesalers offering credit and delivery services to customers, and the types of distribution models adopted by businesses. Regulatory compliance also varied across countries, particularly with respect to licensing. The proportion of wholesalers possessing any up-to-date licence from national regulators was lowest in Benin and Nigeria, where vendors in traditional markets are important

  15. Understanding private sector antimalarial distribution chains: a cross-sectional mixed methods study in six malaria-endemic countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Palafox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Private for-profit outlets are important treatment sources for malaria in most endemic countries. However, these outlets constitute only the last link in a chain of businesses that includes manufacturers, importers and wholesalers, all of which influence the availability, price and quality of antimalarials patients can access. We present evidence on the composition, characteristics and operation of these distribution chains and of the businesses that comprise them in six endemic countries (Benin, Cambodia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted nationally representative surveys of antimalarial wholesalers during 2009-2010 using an innovative sampling approach that captured registered and unregistered distribution channels, complemented by in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders. Antimalarial distribution chains were pyramidal in shape, with antimalarials passing through a maximum of 4-6 steps between manufacturer and retailer; however, most likely pass through 2-3 steps. Less efficacious non-artemisinin therapies (e.g. chloroquine dominated weekly sales volumes among African wholesalers, while volumes for more efficacious artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs were many times smaller. ACT sales predominated only in Cambodia. In all countries, consumer demand was the principal consideration when selecting products to stock. Selling prices and reputation were key considerations regarding supplier choice. Business practices varied across countries, with large differences in the proportions of wholesalers offering credit and delivery services to customers, and the types of distribution models adopted by businesses. Regulatory compliance also varied across countries, particularly with respect to licensing. The proportion of wholesalers possessing any up-to-date licence from national regulators was lowest in Benin and Nigeria, where vendors in traditional markets are

  16. Evaluation of the ex vivo antimalarial activity of organotin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate on erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei NK 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Normah; Jumat, Hafizah; Ishak, Shafariatul Akmar; Kamaludin, Nurul Farahana

    2014-06-01

    Malaria is the most destructive and dangerous parasitic disease. The commonness of this disease is getting worse mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against antimalarial drugs. Therefore, the search for new antimalarial drug is urgently needed. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of dibutyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (DBEP), diphenyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (DPEP) and triphenyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (TPEP) compounds as antimalarial agents. These compounds were evaluated against erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 via ex vivo. Organotin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate, [R(n)Sn(C9H10NS2)(4-n)] with R = C4H9 and C6H5 for n = 2; R = C6H5 for n = 3 is chemically synthesised for its potential activities. pLDH assay was employed for determination of the concentration that inhibited 50% of the Plasmodium's activity (IC50) after 24 h treatment at concentration range of 10-0.0000001 mg mL(-1). Plasmodium berghei NK65 was cultured in vitro to determine the different morphology of trophozoite and schizont. Only DPEP and TPEP compounds have antimalarial activity towards P. berghei NK65 at IC50 0.094±0.011 and 0.892±0.088 mg mL(-1), respectively. The IC50 of DPEP and TPEP were lowest at 30% parasitemia with IC50 0.001±0.00009 and 0.0009±0.0001 mg mL(-1), respectively. In vitro culture showed that TPEP was effective towards P. berghei NK65 in trophozoite and schizont morphology with IC50 0.0001±0.00005 and 0.00009±0.00003 μg mL(-1), respectively. In conclusion, DPEP and TPEP have antimalarial effect on erythrocytes infected with P. berghei NK65 and have potential as antimalarial and schizonticidal agents. PMID:26035957

  17. Synthesis in aqueous medium and organic praseodymium complexes with ligands derived from Schiff base quinolinic. Characterization and physicochemical study; Sintesis en medio acuoso y organico de complejos de praseodimio con ligantes derivados de base de Schiff quinolicos. Caracterizacion y estudio fisicoquimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, A.

    2015-07-01

    It was investigated the coordination ability of the quinolinic Schiff base organic tetradentate quinolinic ligand (Q Schiff-(OH){sub 2}) towards the trivalent praseodymium by UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration (St). By St, was studied the formed species between the Q Schiff-(OH){sub 2} ligand and the praseodymium nitrate salt in equimolar concentrations (5.86 x 10{sup -4} M: 5.22 x 10{sup -4} M) in methanol. The statistical analysis of the experimental results suggested three complexed species with 1Pr:3L, 1Pr:2L y 1Pr:1L stoichiometries. The predominant stoichiometries were the second and the latter. Based on these results and data from the scientific literature, the methodology for the syntheses of the complexes Q Schiff-(OH){sub 2}-Pr in aqueous-organic and organic media was established and a molar ratio M:L= 1:2 of praseodymium nitrate and the ligand was used. The new complexes were characterized by UV/Vis, Infrared, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XP S), Diffuse Reflectance (Dr) and Thermogravimetric Analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TGA/DSC). Elemental analysis of C, N, O and Pr by XP S suggested 1Pr:2L:1Na (PrC{sub 32}H{sub 20}N{sub 4}O{sub 4}Na) stoichiometry of the complex synthesized by the aqueous-organic medium while for the complex synthesized by the organic medium it was 1Pr:3L (PrC{sub 48}H{sub 33}N{sub 6}O{sub 6}). In the first case, the praseodymium ion charge was neutralized by the anionic ligands whose remaining charge was compensated by the sodium ion. In the second case, the ion charge was neutralized by the ligands. The minimum formula was Pr(Q Schiff){sub 2}Na for the pure coordination compound from the aqueous-organic medium and the minimum formula Pr(Q Schiff){sub 3} for that from the organic medium. XP S also indicated that the oxidation state of praseodymium ion was maintained. Both complexes were stable in methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile at least for 5 days. The photophysical properties of the studied complexes were

  18. Antibacterial, antimalarial and leishmanicidal activities of Cu (II) and nickel (II) complexes of diclofenac sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal complexes are famous for a wide array of chemotherapeutic effects. The current study was designed to synthesize and evaluate unexplored chemotherapeutic effects of Cu (II) and Nickel (II) complexes of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac. Nickel complex exhibited significant leishmanicidal activity against Lieshmania major, while the copper complex was found to possess low activity against the same pathogen. Both of the complexes revealed low antibacterial activities and were interestingly failed to produce any considerable antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7. Selective leishmanicidal activities of Nickel (II) complex of diclofenac needs further improvement to be developed as potential new metal-based leishmanicidal agent.(author)

  19. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1 for antimalarial drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Deniskin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs. Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1. Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1 homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([3H]adenosine and pyrimidines ([3H]uridine, whereas wild type (fui1Δ yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM, compared to guanosine (14.9 μM and adenosine (142 μM. For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range. IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1. The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel

  20. Four-step synthesis of the antimalarial cardamom peroxide via an oxygen stitching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xirui; Maimone, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    A four-step synthesis of the antimalarial terpene cardamom peroxide, a 1,2-dioxepane-containing natural product, is reported from (-)-myrtenal and molecular oxygen. This highly concise route was guided by biosynthetic logic and enabled by an unusual manganese-catalyzed, tandem hydroperoxidation reaction. The absolute configuration of the cardamom peroxide is reported, and its mode of fragmentation following Fe(II)-mediated endoperoxide reduction is established. These studies reveal the generation of reactive intermediates distinct from previously studied endoperoxide natural products. PMID:24673099

  1. Synthesis, antimalarial properties and 2D-QSAR studies of novel triazole-quinine conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faidallah, Hassan M; Panda, Siva S; Serrano, Juan C; Girgis, Adel S; Khan, Khalid A; Alamry, Khalid A; Therathanakorn, Tanya; Meyers, Marvin J; Sverdrup, Francis M; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Getchell, Stephen G; Katritzky, Alan R

    2016-08-15

    Click chemistry technique led to novel 1,2,3-triazole-quinine conjugates 8a-g, 10a-o, 11a-h and 13 utilizing benzotriazole-mediated synthetic approach with excellent yields. Some of the synthesized analogs (11a, 11d-h) exhibited antimalarial properties against Plasmodium falciparum strain 3D7 with potency higher than that of quinine (standard reference used) through in vitro standard procedure bio-assay. Statistically significant BMLR-QSAR model describes the bio-properties, validates the observed biological observations and identifies the most important parameters governing bio-activity. PMID:27298002

  2. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector and unlicensed facilities (informal sector is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58% anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30 and 11% (5/47 respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32 failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45 in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86% were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to

  3. Antimalarial medicine diversion: stock-outs and other public health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bate

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Roger Bate1,2, Kimberly Hess2, Lorraine Mooney31American Enterprise Institute, Washington, D.C., USA; 2Africa Fighting Malaria, Washington, D.C., USA; 3Africa Fighting Malaria, Cambridge, UKBackground: Antimalarial medicine diversion has been seen across numerous African markets and can lead to serious stock-outs in the public sector, which can be dangerous to countries with high burdens of disease. This study discusses the numbers of diverted antimalarial medicines from several samplings in Africa.Methods: A total of 894 samples of antimalarial medicines were covertly purchased from private pharmacies in 11 African cities from late 2007 to early 2010. All medicine packages were visually inspected for correctness, in line with the protocol established by the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab®, as well as for signs of diversion.Results: Overall, 6.5% (58 out of 894 of collected antimalarial medicines were found to be diverted, comprising 2.4% (5/210 of medicines collected in 2007 from six African cities, all of which were artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs; 2.3% (3/129 of medicines collected in 2008 in Lagos, Nigeria, two of which were ACTs; and 9% (50/555 of medicines collected in 2010 in 10 African cities, 35 of which were ACTs. ACT was by far the most diverted treatment in this study: 15.6% (5/32 of ACTs collected in 2007, and 30.7% (35/114 of ACTs collected in 2010.Conclusion: The number of diverted ACTs over the 33 months covered by this study is probably related to the laudable provision of vast amounts of donated or low-priced ACTs across African nations and the actual increase in diversion of these medicines into the private sector. The small sample sizes in this study might exaggerate any problem, but a potentially serious problem may well exist. To the extent that diversion of medicines exacerbates stock-outs, this is a public health problem, and a perversion of donor intent, but there are other possible harms of

  4. In vitro antimalarial drug susceptibility in Thai border areas from 1998–2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungthin Mathirut

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Thai-Myanmar and Thai-Cambodia borders have been historically linked with the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs. Indeed, the areas are often described as harbouring multi-drug resistant parasites. These areas of Thailand have experienced significant changes in antimalarial drug exposure patterns over the past decade. This study describes the in vitro antimalarial susceptibility patterns of 95 laboratory-adapted P. falciparum isolates, collected between 1998 and 2003,. Methods Ninety five P. falciparum isolates were collected from five sites in Thailand between 1998 and 2003. After laboratory adaptation to in vitro culture, the susceptibility of these parasites to a range of established antimalarial drugs (chloroquine [CQ], mefloquine [MQ], quinine [QN] and dihydroartemisinin [DHA] was determined by the isotopic microtest. Results Mefloquine (MQ sensitivity remained poorest in areas previously described as MQ-resistant areas. Sensitivity to MQ of parasites from this area was significantly lower than those from areas reported to harbour moderate (p = 0.002 of low level MQ resistance (p = 000001. Importantly for all drugs tested, there was a considerable range in absolute parasite sensitivities. There was a weak, but statistically positive correlation between parasite sensitivity to CQ and sensitivity to both QN and MQ and a positive correlation between MQ and QN. In terms of geographical distribution, parasites from the Thai-Cambodia were tended to be less sensitive to all drugs tested compared to the Thai-Myanmar border. Parasite sensitivity to all drugs was stable over the 6-year collection period with the exception of QN. Conclusion This study highlights the high degree of variability in parasite drug sensitivity in Thailand. There were geographical differences in the pattern of resistance which might reflect differences in drug usage in each area. In contrast to many

  5. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Shen S; Liu SZ; Zhang YS; Du MB; Liang AH; Song LH; Ye ZG

    2015-01-01

    Shuo Shen, Shu-Zhi Liu, Yu-Shi Zhang, Mao-Bo Du, Ai-Hua Liang, Li-Hua Song, Zu-Guang Ye Institute of Chinese Materia Medica, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel ...

  6. Anti-malarial market and policy surveys in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevcsik Ann-Marie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At a recent meeting (Sept 18, 2009 in which reasons for the limited access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in sub-Saharan Africa were discussed, policy and market surveys on anti-malarial drug availability and accessibility in Burundi and Sierra Leone were presented in a highly interactive brainstorming session among key stakeholders across private, public, and not-for-profit sectors. The surveys, the conduct of which directly involved the national malaria control programme managers of the two countries, provides the groundwork for evidence-based policy implementation. The results of the surveys could be extrapolated to other countries with similar socio-demographic and malaria profiles. The meeting resulted in recommendations on key actions to be taken at the global, national, and community level for better ACT accessibility. At the global level, both public and private sectors have actions to take to strengthen policies that lead to the replacement of loose blister packs with fixed-dose ACT products, develop strategies to ban inappropriate anti-malarials and regulate those bans, and facilitate technology and knowledge transfer to scale up production of fixed-dose ACT products, which should be readily available and affordable to those patients who are in the greatest need of these medicines. At the national level, policies that regulate the anti-malarial medicines market should be enacted and enforced. The public sector, including funding donors, should participate in ensuring that the private sector is engaged in the ACT implementation process. Research similar to the surveys discussed is important for other countries to develop and evaluate the right incentives at a local level. At the community level, community outreach and education about appropriate preventive and treatment measures must continue and be strengthened, with service delivery systems developed within both public and private sectors, among other measures

  7. Characterization of PfTrxR inhibitors using antimalarial assays and in silico techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Munigunti, Ranjith; Gathiaka, Symon; Acevedo, Orlando; Sahu, Rajnish; Tekwani, Babu; Calderón, Angela I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The compounds 1,4-napthoquinone (1,4-NQ), bis-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)sulfide (2,4-DNPS), 4-nitrobenzothiadiazole (4-NBT), 3-dimethylaminopropiophenone (3-DAP) and menadione (MD) were tested for antimalarial activity against both chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine (CQ)-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum through an in vitro assay and also for analysis of non-covalent interactions with P. falciparum thioredoxin reductase (PfTrxR) through in silico docking studies...

  8. A new phloroglucinol derivative from Hypericum calycinum with antifungal and in vitro antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decosterd, L A; Hoffmann, E; Kyburz, R; Bray, D; Hostettmann, K

    1991-12-01

    The new phloroglucinol derivative 1 has been isolated from the light petroleum ether extract of the aerial parts of Hypericum calycinum. Its structure has been established by means of 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy and by nOe, MHQC, and HMBC experiments on its monomethyl ether derivative 3. Compound 1 was fungicidal against Cladosporium cucumerinum in a TLC bioassay. In addition, this new phloroglucinol derivative was also found to exert an interesting antimalarial activity in an in vitro test system. PMID:1818346

  9. Parameters affecting methanol utilization by yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, M.S.; El-Masry, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Screening of 28 yeast cultures, representing 22 species of various yeasts, with respect to their capabilities to assimilate methanol, has shown that this property was mostly found in certain species of the two genera Hansenula and Candida. When methanol was used as a sole carbon source for a methanol-adapted strain of Hansenula polymorpha, a linear yield response could be obtained with increasing alcohol up to 2% concentration. The amount of inoculum proved to be the decisive factor in determining a priori the ability of the organism to grow at 6% methanol as final concentration. The optimum pH values for growth ranged between 4.5-5.5 with no growth at pH 6.5 or higher. A marked growth stimulation was obtained when the medium was supplied with phosphate up to 0.08 M as final concentration. Within the nitrogen sources tested, corn steep liquor concentrate gave the highest yield of cells. The significance of the obtained results are discussed with reference to feasibilities of application.

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF INHALED METHANOL IN RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Weiss and his colleagues conducted a controlled series of experiments in which they exposed pregnant rats and their newborn offspring to 4,500 parts per million (ppm) methanol by inhalation, and then submitted them to tests of behavioral function. Exposure to 4,500...

  11. Widespread Methanol Emission from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Viti, S; Wardle, M; Royster, M

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4_{-1} to 3$_0 E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66'x18' (160x43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of ~16.6 km/s taken from 41 channels of a VLA continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2--1) and CH3OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km/s clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25+0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H2. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH3OH abundance of 10^{-8} to 10^{...

  12. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy

  13. HYDROGEN BONDING IN THE METHANOL DIMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work, two methanol molecules are placed in different arrangements to study hydrogen bonding in carbohydrate materials such as cellulose. Energy was calculated as a function of both hydrogen bond length and angle over wide ranges, using quantum mechanics (QM). The QM wavefunctions are analyze...

  14. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  15. Synthesis and Optimization of a Methanol Proces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grue, J.; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, a simulation model for a methanol process is proposed. The objective is to develop a model for flowsheet optimization, which requires simple thermodynamic and unit operation models. Simplified thermodynamic models are combined with a more advanced model for the rate of...

  16. Synthesis and Optimization of a Methanol Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grue, J.; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, a simulation model for a methanol process is proposed. The objective is to develop a model for flowsheet optimization, which requires simple thermodynamic and unit operation models. Simplified thermodynamic models are combined with a more advanced model for the rate of...

  17. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese 'just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself 'with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties

  18. Approach to the Treatment of Methanol Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    Methanol intoxication is an uncommon but serious poisoning. Its adverse effects are due primarily to the impact of its major metabolite formic acid and lactic acid resulting from cellular hypoxia. Symptoms including abdominal pain and loss of vision can appear a few hours to a few days after exposure, reflecting the time necessary for accumulation of the toxic byproducts. In addition to a history of exposure, increases in serum osmolal and anion gaps can be clues to its presence. However, increments in both parameters can be absent depending on the nature of the toxic alcohol, time of exposure, and coingestion of ethanol. Definitive diagnosis requires measurement with gas or liquid chromatography, which are laborious and expensive procedures. Tests under study to detect methanol or its metabolite formate might facilitate the diagnosis of this poisoning. Treatment can include administration of ethanol or fomepizole, both inhibitors of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase to prevent formation of its metabolites, and hemodialysis to remove methanol and formate. In this Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, a patient with methanol intoxication due to ingestion of model airplane fuel is described, and the value and limitations of current and new diagnostic and treatment measures are discussed. PMID:27180631

  19. Methanol emission from low mass protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Maret, S; Tielens, A G G M; Caux, E; Le Floc'h, B; Faure, A; Castets, A; Flower, D R

    2005-01-01

    We present observations of methanol lines in a sample of Class 0 low mass protostars. Using a 1-D radiative transfer model, we derive the abundances in the envelopes. In two sources of the sample, the observations can only be reproduced by the model if the methanol abundance is enhanced by about two order of magnitude in the inner hot region of the envelope. Two other sources show similar jumps, although at a lower confidence level. The observations for the other three sources are well reproduced with a constant abundance, but the presence of a jump cannot be ruled out. The observed methanol abundances in the warm gas around low mass protostars are orders of magnitude higher than gas phase chemistry models predict. Hence, in agreement with other evidences, this suggest that the high methanol abundance reflects recent evaporation of ices due to the heating by the newly formed star. The observed abundance ratios of CH3 OH, H2 CO, and CO are in good agreement with grain surface chemistry models. However, the abs...

  20. Methanol abundance in low mass protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Maret, S

    2004-01-01

    Methanol lines observations of a sample of low mass Class 0 protostars are presented. Using a 1D radiative transfer model, I show that several protostars have large abundance jumps in the inner hot and dense region of envelopes, probably because of thermal grain mantle evaporation. These abundances are compared with a grain surface chemistry model.

  1. 3-(2,3,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-1H-cyclopenta[b]quinolin-9-yl-1,5-bis(4-methoxyphenylbiuret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Nishibe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ipidacrine (2,3,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1H-cyclopenta[b]quinolin-9-amine was reacted with 4-methoxyphenyl isocyanate to give the title compound, C28H30N4O4. An intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bond results in an essentially planar [r.m.s. deviation from the mean plane is 0.126 (1 Å] conformation for the biuret unit. The central ring of the quinoline unit is twisted by 78.2 (1° with respect to the biuret mean plane, whereas the two 4-methoxybenzene rings are twisted out of this plane by 24.3 (1° and 48.5 (1°, resulting in an overall propeller-like structure. An intermolecular N—H...N hydrogen bond between the biuret NH atom and the quinoline ring nitrogen defines the crystal packing.

  2. An efficient access to the synthesis of novel 12-phenylbenzo[6,7]oxepino[3,4-b]quinolin-13(6H-one derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Gao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient access to the tetracyclic-fused quinoline systems, 12-phenylbenzo[6,7]oxepino[3,4-b]quinolin-13(6H-one derivatives 4a–l, is described, involving the intramolecular Friedel–Crafts acylation reaction of 2-(phenoxymethyl-4-phenylquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives 3a–l aided by the treatment with PPA (polyphosphoric acid or Eaton’s reagent. The required starting compound (2 was obtained by Friedländer reaction of 2-aminobenzophenone (1 with 4-chloroethylacetoacetate by using CAN (cerium ammonium nitrate, 10 mol % as catalyst at room temperature. The substrates 3a–l were prepared through one-pot reaction of ethyl 2-(chloromethyl-4-phenylquinoline-3-carboxylate (2 and substituted phenols. Our developed strategy, involving a three-step route, offers easy access to tetracyclic-fused quinoline systems in short reaction times, and the products are obtained in moderate to good yields.

  3. Prediction of potential antimalarial targets of artemisinin based on protein information from whole genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN LiPing; HUANG Qiang; NAN Peng; ZHONG Yang

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the genomic data and protein pathway information about Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 from the NCBI taxonomy database and the KEGG database,eight key protein enzymes in the signal pathways were selected to perform molecular docking with artemisinin.The binding modes obtained from the molecular docking suggested that purine nucleoside phosphorylase (pfPNP),peptide deformylase (pfPDF),and ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (pfRpiA) may be involved in the antimalarial mode of action of artemisinin.Artemisinin exhibited its antimalarial activity probably by interfering with the metabolic pathways of purine,pyrimidine,methionine,glyoxylate and dicarboxylate,or pentose phosphate.

  4. Optimized fuel cell grade hydrogen from methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongtaek

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate reaction rates liar making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/gamma-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120˜325°C and atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, water addition to the feed increased the yield of hydrogen and reduced the formation of by-products. XPS analysis of used catalyst samples and time on-stream data showed that the Cu2+ oxidation state of copper favors methanol decomposition. A simplified reaction network of 5 elementary reactions was proposed and all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. For the kinetics of the water gas shift reaction, an empirical rate expression was obtained from the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. For the kinetics of CO preferential oxidation, a reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and the WGS reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. In particular the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Combining the three reactors and several

  5. Zinc and methanol production using HTR process heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc making methods are reviewed and the advantages of zinc oxide reduction by methane pointed out. The synthesis and applications of methanol are discussed. A combined process of zinc making and methanol production using HTGR process heat is proposed. (Auth.)

  6. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino S. Aricò

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK, new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2. This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115.

  7. Enhanced electrokinetic remediation of quinoline-contaminated soils%喹啉污染土壤的电动强化修复研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任大军; 周思思; 刘剑; 张元元

    2012-01-01

    Kaolin was selected as a test soil and quinoline was investigated as a typical pollutant. The characteristic of migration and its effect of quinoline in Kaolin under different voltage gradient and experimental time were studied, revealing the mechanism of using electrokinetic technology to remediate the quinoline-contaminated in soils. The results show that the electrokinetic transport processes can effectively stimulate the desorption and movement of the quinoline in the test soils. Migration rate and distance of quinoline will increase along with the voltage gradient growth under some conditions. Electromigration and electroosmosis are the main mechanisms both driving the quinoline migrate toward the cathode.%以高岭土为实验土壤,喹啉为代表污染物,研究了不同电压梯度和运行时间下土壤中喹啉的迁移特征和效果,揭示了利用电动力学技术迁移土壤中喹啉的作用机理.结果表明:电动力学过程能有效地促进土壤中喹啉的解吸附和迁移,迁移速率和距离在一定条件下随电压强度升高而增大;电渗析和电迁移是其主要作用机理,均推动喹啉向阴极移动.

  8. Minimizing the Entropy Production of the Methanol Producing Reaction in a Methanol Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick; Johannessen, Eivind; Rosjorde, Audun; Nummedal, Lars

    2000-01-01

    The entropy production of the reaction that produces methanol in a methanol reactor, has been minimized. The results show that the entropy production of the reaction can be reduced by more than 70%. The optimal path through the reactor is characterized by a driving force for the chemical reaction that is close to constant. The entropy production due to heat transfer across the reactor walls in this state is large, however. Variations of the reactor design show that it is possible to accomplis...

  9. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  10. Short Review: Mitigation of Current Environmental Concerns from Methanol Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Young; Donny Lesmana; Der-Jong Dai; Ho-Shing Wu

    2013-01-01

    Methanol has become a widely used and globally distributed product. Methanol is very important due to the current depletion of fossil fuels. Industrially, methanol produced from the catalytic reaction of synthetic gas composed of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Methanol production has brought great attention due to carbon dioxide as the main source of greenhouse gas emissions. Combined of reducing CO2 emissions and supplying an alternative fuel source has created the idea of a ...

  11. New constraints on terrestrial and oceanic sources of atmospheric methanol

    OpenAIRE

    Millet, D. B.; Jacob, D. J.; Custer, T. G.; de Gouw, J. A; Goldstein, A. H.; Karl, T.; H. B. Singh; B. C. Sive; R. W. Talbot; Warneke, C.; J. Williams

    2008-01-01

    We use a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to interpret new aircraft, surface, and oceanic observations of methanol in terms of the constraints that they place on the atmospheric methanol budget. Recent measurements of methanol concentrations in the ocean mixed layer (OML) imply that in situ biological production must be the main methanol source in the OML, dominating over uptake from the atmosphere. It follows that oceanic emission and uptake must be viewed as independent terms...

  12. SYNTHESIS AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF NEW 5H-INDOLO[2,3-B]QUINOLINE O-AMINOGLYCOSIDES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Switalska, Marta; Piskozub, Małgorzata; Peczyńska-Czoch, Wanda; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Novel 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline O-aminoglycosides were synthesized in order to check the hypothesis that the construction of hybrids composed of the active 5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline chromophore and daunosaminyl or acosaminyl moiety may result in the cytotoxic activity of the obtained derivatives that is much higher than the one of the parent DIMIQ (5,11-dimethyl-5H-indolo[2,3-b]quinoline) and 6H-indoloquinoline analogs. Actually, 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides showed the anti-proliferative activity in vitro against human lung adenocarcinoma A549, breast cancer MCF-7, melanoma Hs294T, promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, uterine sarcoma MES-SA and colon cancer LoVo cell lines, which was 10 times higher than that of the 6H-analogs and comparable to the one of the referential DIMIQ. Unexpectedly, it appeared that except for HL-60/MX2 (P-gp-independent and topoisomerase II-dependent resistance), other MDR tumor cell lines (LoVo/DX. P-gp-dependent, MRP-, LRP-dependent multidrug resistance) and MES-SA/DX5 (P-gp-dependent resistance to doxorubicin) are also resistant to the 5H-indolo[2,3-b]indoloquinoline O-aminoglycosides tested. This is surprising because 6H-analogs, in general, 10 times less active against non-MDR tumor cell lines, as well as the DIMIQ itself, are able to overcome drug resistance in all MDR cell lines examined. The cytotoxicity of the tested compounds against tumor cell lines and against normal cells (mice fibroblasts BALB/3T3) was comparable. PMID:27476287

  13. Simultaneous observation of water and class I methanol masers toward class II methanol maser sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyunwoo; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Seokho; Park, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    We present a simultaneous single-dish survey of 22 GHz water maser and 44 GHz and 95 GHz class I methanol masers toward 77 6.7 GHz class II methanol maser sources, which were selected from the Arecibo methanol maser Galactic plane survey (AMGPS) catalog.Water maser emission is detected in 39 (51%) sources, of which 15 are new detections. Methanol maser emission at 44 GHz and 95 GHz is found in 25 (32%) and 19 (25%) sources, of which 21 and 13 sources are newly detected, respectively. We find 4 high-velocity (> 30 km/s) water maser sources, including 3 dominant blue- or redshifted outflows.The 95 GHz masers always appear with the 44 GHz maser emission. They are strongly correlated with 44 GHz masers in velocity, flux density, and luminosity, while they are not correlated with either water or 6.7 GHz class II methanol masers. The average peak flux density ratio of 95 GHz to 44 GHz masers is close to unity, which is two times higher than previous estimates. The flux densities of class I methanol masers are more ...

  14. Experimental analysis of methanol cross-over in a direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanol cross-over through the polymeric membrane is one of the main causes limiting direct methanol fuel cell performances. It causes fuel wasting and enhances cathode overpotential. A repeatable and reproducible measurement system, that assures the traceability of the measurement to international reference standards, is necessary to compare different fuel cell construction materials. In this work a method to evaluate methanol cross-over rate and operating condition influence is presented and qualified in term of measurement uncertainty. In the investigated range, the methanol cross-over rate results mainly due to diffusion through the membrane, in fact it is strongly affected by temperature. Moreover the cross-over influence on fuel utilization and fuel cell efficiency is investigated. The methanol cross-over rate appears linearly proportional to electrochemical fuel utilization and values, obtained by measurements at different anode flow rate but constant electrochemical fuel utilization, are roughly equal; methanol wasting, due to cross-over, is considerable and can still be higher than electrochemical utilization. The fuel recirculation effect on energy efficiency has been investigated and it was found that fuel recirculation gives more advantage at low temperature, but fuel cell energy efficiency results are in any event higher at high temperature

  15. Synthesis of 2-(1-Benzofuran-2-yl)-4-(1,3-benzoxazol-2-yl/ 1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl) Quinolines as Blue Green Fluorescent Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Bodke, Yadav D.; Sheelavanth Shankerrao; Hosanagara N. Harishkumar

    2013-01-01

    A series of novel 2-(1-benzofuran-2-yl)-4-(1,3 benzoxazol-2-yl/1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl) quinoline derivatives 4(a–d) were synthesized in one step by the reaction of 2-(1-benzofuran-2-yl) quinoline-4-carboxylic acids 3(a-b) with o-aminophenol and o-amino thiophenol, respectively, using polyphosphoric acid (PPA) as a cyclizing agent. The fluorescent properties of newly synthesized compounds were investigated in three different organic solvents like chloroform (CHCl3), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and d...

  16. Extractive separation of micro amounts of rhenium from molybdenite by quinoline and a modified method of rhenium determination by α-furyl-dioxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extractive separation of rhenium(7) by quinoline in alkaline solution as well as a modification of the spectrophotometric method for the determination of micro amounts of rhenium in a molybdenite from copper-molybdenum ores from Mongolia, using α-furyldioxime has been developed. On the basis of the extractive separation method of perrhenate ion by quinoline from alkaline solution, rhenium has been determined in molybdenite. The molybdenite was decomposed by four different methods. Two of these decomposition methods, the fusion of Na2O2 with NaOH and the sintering of CaO with KMnO4 were found as the best ones. (author)

  17. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  18. Separation, preconcentration and determination of Pb(Ⅱ) in water samples using microcrystalline triphenylmethane loaded with quinolin-8-olate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Na Hu; Zhao Gang Ren

    2009-01-01

    This paper described a novel method for the preconcentration of Pb(II) using microcrystalline triphenylmethane loaded with quinolin-8-olate prior to the determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Pb(II) could be enriched by controlling appropriate condition. The preconcentration factor could reach to 200 and the detection limit of Pb(II) was 0.074 ug/L. The recovery was in a range of 93.5-103% with relative standard deviation of 1.0-2.2%. The proposed method had been successfully applied to the determination of trace Pb(II) in various water samples with satisfactory result.

  19. 2-Oxo-4-(thiophen-2-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    OpenAIRE

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Faidallah, Hassan M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Seik Weng Ng

    2011-01-01

    In the molecule of the title compound, C18H12N2OS, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 16.0 (1)°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 59.5 (2)° (for the major disordered thienyl component) in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. In the crystal, two molecules are linked ...

  20. 2-Oxo-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetra­hydro­benzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    OpenAIRE

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Faidallah, Hassan M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Seik Weng Ng

    2011-01-01

    In the molecule of the title compound, C20H14N2O, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 19.7 (1)°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 62.9 (1)° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. In the crystal, two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds ...

  1. 4-(4-Bromophenyl)-2-oxo-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    OpenAIRE

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Faidallah, Hassan M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Seik Weng Ng

    2011-01-01

    In the molecule of the title compound, C20H13BrN2O, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 17.7 (1)°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 82.3 (1)° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. Two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a cent...

  2. 4-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-2-oxo-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    OpenAIRE

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Faidallah, Hassan M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Seik Weng Ng

    2011-01-01

    In the molecule of the title compound, C21H16N2O2, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 19.7 (1)°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 50.3 (1)° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. In the crystal, two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds...

  3. 4-(4-Methoxyphenyl-2-oxo-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Asiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the molecule of the title compound, C21H16N2O2, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 19.7 (1°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 50.3 (1° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. In the crystal, two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a centrosymmetric dimer.

  4. 4-(1,3-Benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-oxo-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    OpenAIRE

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Faidallah, Hassan M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Seik Weng Ng

    2011-01-01

    In the molecule of the title compound, C21H14N2O3, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 24.3 (1)°. The ring of the benzodioxol system is bent away from the pyridine ring by 61.4 (1)° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. Two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a ce...

  5. 4-(1,3-Benzodioxol-5-yl-2-oxo-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Asiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the molecule of the title compound, C21H14N2O3, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 24.3 (1°. The ring of the benzodioxol system is bent away from the pyridine ring by 61.4 (1° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. Two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a centrosymmetric dimer.

  6. 4-(4-Bromophenyl-2-oxo-1,2,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Asiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the molecule of the title compound, C20H13BrN2O, the tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinoline fused-ring system is buckled owing to the ethylene –CH2CH2– fragment, the benzene ring and the pyridine ring being twisted by 17.7 (1°. The 4-substituted aromatic ring is bent away from the pyridine ring by 82.3 (1° in order to avoid crowding the cyanide substituent. Two molecules are linked by a pair of N—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a centrosymmetric dimer.

  7. DNA adduct formation by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f] quinoline (IQ) in rat colon

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chun-xing; Mondan, Yasumasa; Umemoto, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    A food-born carcinogen, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f] quinoline (IQ) induces cancer in the rat colon. The mechanism for colonic DNA adduct formation leading to cancer by IQ was studied using a colostomized F344 rat model. In this model, the transverse colon of the rat was colostomized, which produced a fecal stream-positive proximal colon and a negative distal colon were produced. When IQ (50 mg/kg) was administered into the distal colon of the colostomized rats (n=5), the ratio of the DNA ...

  8. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prithiviraj Khakhlary; Jubaraj B Baruah

    2015-02-01

    Reactions of zinc halides with 8-hydroxyquinoline (hydroxQ) in equimolar ratio were carried out in different solvents. Respective solvates of tetranuclear clusters, namely [Zn4(oxyQ)6X2].(solvent)2, (when X=Cl, Solvent=dimethylformamide (1), dimethylacetamide (2) and dimethysulphoxide (3); X = Br, solvent = dimethylformamide (4), oxyQ=quinolinate anion) were obtained. Bond parameters of these isostructural clusteres 1–4 are compared from their single crystal structures. Anhydrous form of the cluster have porous packing and is thermally stable below 250° C. Surface area of the clusters 1 and 4 are 8.933 and 6.172 m2/g, respectively. Complexes 1 and 4 can be reversibly hydrated, which is reflected in colour changes. The reaction of zinc chloride with 8-hydroxyquinoline in equimolar ratio followed by crystallization from water gave salt (HhydroxQ)2 [ZnCl4] (5) and a similar reaction followed by crystallization from 3-methylpyridine (3mepy) resulted in the molecular complex [Zn(oxyQ)2(3mepy)]. [Zn(oxyQ)2(3mepy)2].3H2O (6). Complex 5 is formed from a hydrolytic equilibrium of water with zinc chloride yielding tetrachloro zinc anion and zinc hydroxide. Taking advantage of this reaction, a composite material of ZnO@complex 5 exhibiting dual fluorescence at 450 and 575 nm on excitation at 390 nm was prepared. Fluorescence emission properties of all the complexes in solid state are compared with fluorescence emission of the ligand

  9. Phytochemical screening, antimalarial and histopathological studies of Allophylus africanus and Tragia benthamii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oladosu I.A.; Balogun S.O.; Ademowo G.O.

    2013-01-01

    The anti-malarial potential of different parts ofAllophylus africanus P.Beauv and Tragia benthamii Baker were determined in vivo for suppressive,curative and cytotoxic activities in mice receiving 0.2 mL of a standard inoculum size of 1 × 107 infected erythrocytes of Plasmodium berghei (NK-65) intraperitoneally.The A.africanus extracts suppressed parasitaemia following administration to infected mice by 92.82%-97.81% on day 7 post-infection against 96.81% for chloroquine.The infected extract-treated animals had significantly moderate (P < 0.05) packed cell volume (PCV) compared with the infected,untreated animals.Phytochemical screening revealed a predominance of tannins,saponins,flavonoids and carbohydrates in all parts of A.africanus,and alkaloids instead of flavonoids in the extract of T.benthamii.The results suggest that the extract possesses considerable antimalarial activity.These results support further studies on A.africanus.

  10. Gas chromatographic method for the determination of lumefantrine in antimalarial finished pharmaceutical products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Suleman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple method has been developed and validated for quantitative determination of lumefantrine in antimalarial finished pharmaceutical products using gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detector. Lumefantrine was silylated with N,O–bis(trimethyl-silyltrifluoro-acetamide at 70°C for 30 minutes, and chromatographic separation was conducted on a fused silica capillary (HP-5, 30 m length × 0.32 mm i.d., 0.25 μm film thickness column. Evaluation of the method within analytical quality-by-design principles, including a central composite face-centered design for the sample derivatization process and Plackett–Burman robustness verification of the chromatographic conditions, indicated that the method has acceptable specificity toward excipients and degradants, accuracy [mean recovery = 99.5%, relative standard deviation (RSD = 1.0%], linearity (=0.9986, precision (intraday = 96.1% of the label claim, RSD = 0.9%; interday = 96.3% label claim, RSD = 0.9%, and high sensitivity with detection limits of 0.01 μg/mL. The developed method was successfully applied to analyze the lumefantrine content of marketed fixed-dose combination antimalarial finished pharmaceutical products.

  11. Virtual Screening and Docking Studies of Synthesized Chalcones: Potent Anti-Malarial Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of Chalcones were synthesized targets asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum has been analyzed by utilizing a combination of molecular modeling techniques. Statistically significant structure-based quantitative structure activity relationships models were generated and validated through acceptable predictive ability to support internal and external set of compounds. Screening of most valuable drug among of pre-synthesized drug on the basis of binding efficiency to target receptor was carried out by docking view. Prior this pre-computed Mean IC50 and MIC value were also taken in consideration. The most effective compound on the basis all consideration was found. Previous studies have suggested that Ca2+-ATPase (PfATP6 of P. falciparum is the target of many anti-malarial drugs. However, the mechanism of inhibition of Ca2+- ATPase (PfATP6 is not known. Here we address this issue using bioinformatics tools. We generated a molecular model of Ca2+-ATPase (PfATP6 of P. falciparum and performed molecular docking of all chalcones. Molecular docking programme Glide iGEMDock was used to determine binding feasibility of 52 analogues of chalcones. The comparison of docking parameters showed, more than 5 analogues are better ligands of PfATP6. The binding of chalocones to PFATP6 is mediated by both hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and polar interactions. Our results suggest that chalcones analogues are promising lead compounds for the development of anti-malarial drugs

  12. Synthesis, Cytotoxic and Antimalarial Activities of Benzoyl Thiosemicarbazone Analogs of Isoquinoline and Related Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Ruchirawat

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thiosemicarbazone analogs of papaveraldine and related compounds 1–6 were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic and antimalarial activities. The cytotoxic activity was tested against HuCCA-1, HepG2, A549 and MOLT-3 human cancer cell lines. Thiosemicarbazones 1–5 displayed cytotoxicity toward all the tested cell lines, while compounds 2–5 selectively showed potent activity against the MOLT-3 cell lines. Significantly, N(4-phenyl-2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone 4 exhibited the most potent activity against HuCCA-1, HepG2, A549 and MOLT-3 cell lines with IC50 values of 0.03, 4.75, 0.04 and 0.004 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, 2-benzoylpyridine thio-semicarbazones 3 and 4 showed antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 of 10-7 to < 10-6 M. The study demonstrates the quite promising activity of analog 4 as a lead molecule for further development.

  13. Evaluation of the Quality of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Medicines Distributed in Ghana and Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorcas Osei-Safo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, conducted as part of our overall goal of regular pharmacovigilance of antimalarial medicines, reports on the quality of 132 artemisinin-based antimalarial medicines distributed in Ghana and Togo. Three methods were employed in the quality evaluation—basic (colorimetric tests for establishing the identity of the requisite active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs, semi-quantitative TLC assay for the identification and estimation of API content, and HPLC assay for a more accurate quantification of API content. From the basic tests, only one sample totally lacked API. The HPLC assay, however, showed that 83.7% of the ACTs and 57.9% of the artemisinin-based monotherapies failed to comply with international pharmacopoeia requirements due to insufficient API content. In most of the ACTs, the artemisinin component was usually the insufficient API. Generally, there was a good correlation between the HPLC and SQ-TLC assays. The overall failure rates for both locally manufactured (77.3% and imported medicines (77.5% were comparable. Similarly the unregistered medicines recorded a slightly higher overall failure rate (84.7% than registered medicines (70.8%. Only two instances of possible cross-border exchange of medicines were observed and there was little difference between the medicine quality of collections from border towns and those from inland parts of both countries.

  14. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  15. Investigation of Indolglyoxamide and Indolacetamide Analogues of Polyamines as Antimalarial and Antitrypanosomal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pure compound screening has previously identified the indolglyoxy lamidospermidine ascidian metabolites didemnidine A and B (2 and 3 to be weak growth inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 59 and 44 μM, respectively and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 dual drug resistant strain (IC50 41 and 15 μM, respectively, but lacking in selectivity (L6 rat myoblast, IC50 24 μM and 25 μM, respectively. To expand the structure–activity relationship of this compound class towards both parasites, we have prepared and biologically tested a library of analogues that includes indoleglyoxyl and indoleacetic “capping acids”, and polyamines including spermine (PA3-4-3 and extended analogues PA3-8-3 and PA3-12-3. 7-Methoxy substituted indoleglyoxylamides were typically found to exhibit the most potent antimalarial activity (IC50 10–92 nM but with varying degrees of selectivity versus the L6 rat myoblast cell line. A 6-methoxyindolglyoxylamide analogue was the most potent growth inhibitor of T. brucei (IC50 0.18 μM identified in the study: it, however, also exhibited poor selectivity (L6 IC50 6.0 μM. There was no apparent correlation between antimalarial and anti-T. brucei activity in the series. In vivo evaluation of one analogue against Plasmodium berghei was undertaken, demonstrating a modest 20.9% reduction in parasitaemia.

  16. Basigin is a druggable target for host-oriented antimalarial interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenonos, Zenon A; Dummler, Sara K; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R; Rayner, Julian C; Wright, Gavin J

    2015-07-27

    Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for the most lethal form of malaria, an infectious disease that causes a large proportion of childhood deaths and poses a significant barrier to socioeconomic development in many countries. Although antimalarial drugs exist, the repeated emergence and spread of drug-resistant parasites limit their useful lifespan. An alternative strategy that could limit the evolution of drug-resistant parasites is to target host factors that are essential and universally required for parasite growth. Host-targeted therapeutics have been successfully applied in other infectious diseases but have never been attempted for malaria. Here, we report the development of a recombinant chimeric antibody (Ab-1) against basigin, an erythrocyte receptor necessary for parasite invasion as a putative antimalarial therapeutic. Ab-1 inhibited the PfRH5-basigin interaction and potently blocked erythrocyte invasion by all parasite strains tested. Importantly, Ab-1 rapidly cleared an established P. falciparum blood-stage infection with no overt toxicity in an in vivo infection model. Collectively, our data demonstrate that antibodies or other therapeutics targeting host basigin could be an effective treatment for patients infected with multi-drug resistant P. falciparum. PMID:26195724

  17. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakarim Nastaran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain. Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy, Solanum surattense (Burm.f. and Prosopis juliflora (Sw. showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time.

  18. Antimalarial properties of Artemisia vulgaris L. ethanolic leaf extract in a Plasmodium berghei murine malaria model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayan S. Bamunuarachchi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua is the most potent antimalarial drug against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisia vulgaris, an invasive weed, is the only Artemisia species available in Sri Lanka. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the antiparasitic activity of an A. vulgaris ethanolic leaf extract (AVELE in a P. berghei ANKA murine malaria model that elicits pathogenesis similar to falciparum malaria. Methods: A 4-day suppressive and the curative assays determined the antiparasitic activity of AVELE using four doses (250, 500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg, Coartem® as the positive control and 5% ethanol as the negative control in male ICR mice infected with P. berghei. Results: The 500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg doses of AVELE significantly (p ≤0.01 inhibited parasitaemia by 79.3, 79.6 and 87.3% respectively, in the 4-day suppressive assay, but not in the curative assay. Chronic administration of the high dose of AVELE ruled out overt signs of toxicity and stress as well as hepatotoxicity, renotoxicity and haematotoxicity. Interpretation & conclusion: The oral administration of a crude ethonolic leaf extract of A. vulgaris is non-toxic and possesses potent antimalarial properties in terms of antiparasitic activity.

  19. Antimalarial drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum predicted by stage-specific metabolic network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huthmacher Carola

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite enormous efforts to combat malaria the disease still afflicts up to half a billion people each year of which more than one million die. Currently no approved vaccine is available and resistances to antimalarials are widely spread. Hence, new antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. Results Here, we present a computational analysis of the metabolism of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malaria pathogen. We assembled a compartmentalized metabolic model and predicted life cycle stage specific metabolism with the help of a flux balance approach that integrates gene expression data. Predicted metabolite exchanges between parasite and host were found to be in good accordance with experimental findings when the parasite's metabolic network was embedded into that of its host (erythrocyte. Knock-out simulations identified 307 indispensable metabolic reactions within the parasite. 35 out of 57 experimentally demonstrated essential enzymes were recovered and another 16 enzymes, if additionally the assumption was made that nutrient uptake from the host cell is limited and all reactions catalyzed by the inhibited enzyme are blocked. This predicted set of putative drug targets, shown to be enriched with true targets by a factor of at least 2.75, was further analyzed with respect to homology to human enzymes, functional similarity to therapeutic targets in other organisms and their predicted potency for prophylaxis and disease treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that the set of essential enzymes predicted by our flux balance approach represents a promising starting point for further drug development.

  20. An Alternative Paradigm for the Role of Antimalarial Plants in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Maranz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most investigations into the antimalarial activity of African plants are centered on finding an indigenous equivalent to artemisinin, the compound from which current frontline antimalarial drugs are synthesized. As a consequence, the standard practice in ethnopharmacological research is to use in vitro assays to identify compounds that inhibit parasites at nanomolar concentrations. This approach fails to take into consideration the high probability of acquisition of resistance to parasiticidal compounds since parasite populations are placed under direct selection for genetic that confers a survival advantage. Bearing in mind Africa's long exposure to malaria and extensive ethnobotanical experimentation with both therapies and diet, it is more likely that compounds not readily overcome by Plasmodium parasites would have been retained in the pharmacopeia and cuisine. Such compounds are characterized by acting primarily on the host rather than directly targeting the parasite and thus cannot be adequately explored in vitro. If Africa's long history with malaria has in fact produced effective plant therapies, their scientific elucidation will require a major emphasis on in vivo investigation.