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Sample records for antikaons neutral

  1. Antikaon condensation in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, S; Greiner, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the condensation of charged K sup - meson and neutral anti-K sup 0 meson in dense neutron star matter. Calculations are performed in relativistic mean field models in which both the baryon-baryon and (anti)kaon-baryon interactions are mediated by meson exchange. It is found that anti-K sup 0 condensation is quite sensitive to the antikaon optical potential and depends more strongly on the nucleonic equation of state. For moderate values of antikaon potential and a rather stiff equation of state, a significant region of maximum mass star will contain anti-K sup 0 meson. The critical density of anti-K sup 0 condensation is always higher than that of K sup - condensation. With the appearance of K sup - and anti-K sup 0 condensates, pairs of p-K sup - and n-Kbar sup 0 are produced with equal proportion leading to a perfectly symmetric matter of nucleons and antikaons in neutron stars. Along with K sup - condensate, anti-K sup 0 condensate makes the equation of state much softer resulting in smaller...

  2. Antikaon Condensation and In-medium Kaon and Antikaon Production in Protoneutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Jian-Fa; GUO Hua; LI Xi-Guo; LIU Yu-Xin; XU Fu-Rong

    2007-01-01

    Antikaon condensation and kaon and antikaon production in protoneutron stars are investigated in a chiral hadronic model (also referred to as the FST model in this paper). The effects of neutrino trapping on protoneutron stars are analyzed systematically. It is shown that neutrino trapping makes the critical density of K- condensation delay to higher density and Ko condensation not occur. The equation of state (EOS) of (proto)neutron star matter with neutrino trapping is stiffer than that without neutrino trapping. As a result, the maximum masses of (proto)neutron stars with neutrino trapping are larger than those without neutrino trapping. If hyperons are taken into account, antikaon does not form a condensate in (proto)neutron stars. Meanwhile, the corresponding EOS becomes much softer, and the maximum masses of (proto)neutron stars are smaller than those without hyprons. Finally, our results illustrate that the Q values for K+ and K- production in (proto)neutron stars are not sensitive to neutrino trapping and inclusion of hyperons.

  3. Antineutrino induced antikaon production off the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M Rafi; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The charged current antikaon production off nucleons induced by antineutrinos is studied at low and intermediate energies. We extend here our previous calculation on kaon production induced by neutrinos. We have developed a microscopic model that starts from the SU(3) chiral Lagrangians and includes background terms and the resonant mechanisms associated to the lowest lying resonance in the channel, namely, the Sigma*(1385). Our results could be of interest for the background estimation of various neutrino oscillation experiments like MiniBooNE and SuperK. They can also be helpful for the planned antineutrino experiments like MINERvA, NOvA and T2K phase II and for beta-beam experiments with antineutrino energies around 1 GeV.

  4. Towards exclusive antikaonic nuclear cluster search with AMADEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienle, Paul [Stefan Meyer Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna A-1090, Boltzmanngasse 3 (Austria); Physik Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: paul.kienle@ph.tum.de

    2008-05-15

    The recently proposed AMADEUS project makes use of mono energetic, low energy K{sup -} beams from the upgraded high luminosity DA{phi}NE (e{sup +}e{sup -})-collider of the LNF Frascati for the production of antikaon mediated deeply bound nuclear states using the (K{sub stopped}{sup -}, n/p) reaction. The existing KLOE detector with a target for stopping the K{sup -} surrounded by trigger detectors will be used for an exclusive detection of all particles in the production and decay processes of the antikaonic nuclei formed. Using missing mass and invariant mass spectroscopy a conclusive observation of these exotic objects should be in reach and then their properties, such as binding energies, total and partial widths, size and density could be determined, thus opening a new spectroscopy of exotic strongly bound nuclear systems.

  5. Low-energy Antikaon Interaction with Nuclei: The AMADEUS Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, Johann; Bellotti, Giovanni; Berucci, Carolina; Bosnar, Dimitri; Bragadireanu, Mario; Curceanu, Catalina; Clozza, Alberto; Cargnelli, Michael; Butt, Aslan; Del Grande, Raffaele; Fabbietti, Laura; Fiorini, Carlo; Ghio, Francesco; Guaraldo, Carlo; Iliescu, Mihai; Sandri, Paolo Levi; Pietreanu, Dorel; Piscicchia, Kristian; Vidal, Antonio Romero; Scordo, Alessandro; Shi, Hexi; Sirghi, Diana; Sirghi, Florin; Tucakovic, Ivana; Doce, Oton Vazquez; Widmann, Eberhard; Zmeskal, Johann

    2016-01-01

    The low-energy strong interaction of antikaons (K-) with nuclei has many facets and rep- resents a lively and challenging research ?eld. It is interconnected to the peculiar role of strangeness, since the strange quark is rather light, but still much heavier than the up and down quarks. Thus, when strangeness is involved one has to deal with spontaneous and explicit symmetry breaking in QCD. It is well known that the antikaon interaction with nucleons is attractive, but how strong ? Is the interaction strong enough to bind nucleons to form kaonic nuclei and, if so, what are the properties (binding energy, decay width)? There are controversial indications for such bound states and new results are expected to come soon. The existence of antikaon mediated bound states might have important consequences since it would open the possibility for the formation of cold baryonic matter of high density which might have a severe impact in astrophysics for the understanding of the composi- tion of compact (neutron) stars. ...

  6. Role of antikaon condensation in r-mode instability

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effect of antikaon condensed matter on bulk viscosity in rotating neutron stars. We use relativistic field theoretical models to construct the equation of state of neutron stars with the condensate, where the phase transition from nucleonic to $K^-$ condensed phase is assumed to be of first order. We calculate the coefficient of bulk viscosity due to the non-leptonic weak interaction n --> p + K^-. The influence of antikaon bulk viscosity on the gravitational radiation reaction driven instability in the r-modes is investigated. We compare our results with the previously studied non-leptonic weak interaction $n + p --> p + \\Lambda$ involving hyperons on the damping of the r-mode oscillations. We find that the bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic weak process involving the condensate is suppressed by several orders of magnitude in comparison with the non-superfluid hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient. Consequently, the antikaon bulk viscosity may not be able to damp the r-mode in...

  7. Bose–Einstein condensation of anti-kaons and neutron star twins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarmistha Banik; Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the role of Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) of anti-kaons on the equation of state (EoS) and other properties of compact stars. In the framework of relativistic mean field model we determine the EoS for -stable hyperon matter and compare it to the situation when anti-kaons condense in the system. We observe that anti-kaon condensates soften the EoS, thereby lowering the maximum mass of the stars. We also demonstrate that the presence of antikaon condensates in the high density core of compact stars may lead to a new mass sequence beyond white dwarf and neutron stars. The limiting mass of the new sequence stars is nearly equal to that of neutron star branch though they have distinctly different radii and compositions. They are called neutron star twins.

  8. Analysis Of The Semileptonic Neutral D Meson Decays To Neutral Antikaon Pion Muon Neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Segoni, I M

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the semileptonic decay D0→K0p- m+n using FOCUS data. FOCUS is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that studies the physics of the charm quark. Particles containing charm are produced by photon-gluon fusion from the collision of a photon beam on a BeO target. The experiment is characterized by excellent vertex resolution and particle identification. The spectrometer consists of three systems for track reconstruction (two silicon systems and one multiwire proportional chamber system) and two magnets of opposite polarity. The polarity of the magnet is such that the events of e+e− pairs produced in the target (which constitutes the main background) travel through a central opening in the detectors without interactions. Particle momentum is measured from the deflection angle in the magnets. Three multi-cell Čerenkov counters are used for charged particle identification (for e, p , K, and p). Two different tracking systems located after se...

  9. Antikaon-nucleon interaction and Λ(1405) in chiral SU(3) dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yuki; Miyahara, Kenta; Ohnishi, Shota; Ikeda, Yoichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Oset, Eulogio; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    The properties of the Λ (1405) resonance are key ingredients for determining the antikaon-nucleon interaction in strangeness nuclear physics, and the novel internal structure of the Λ (1405) is of great interest in hadron physics, as a prototype case of a baryon that does not fit into the simple three-quark picture. We show that a quantitative description of the antikaon-nucleon interaction with the Λ (1405) is achieved in the framework of chiral SU(3) dynamics, with the help of recent experimental progress. Further constraints on the K bar N subthreshold interaction are provided by analyzing πΣ spectra in various processes, such as the K- d → πΣn reaction and the Λc → ππΣ decay. The structure of the Λ (1405) is found to be dominated by an antikaon-nucleon molecular configuration, based on its wavefunction derived from a realistic K bar N potential and the compositeness criteria from a model-independent weak-binding relation.

  10. In-medium kaon and antikaon properties in the quark-meson coupling model

    CERN Document Server

    Tsushima, K; Thomas, A W; Wright, S V

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the kaon, $K$, and antikaon, $\\kbar$, in nuclear medium are studied in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model. Employing a constituent quark-antiquark (MIT bag model) picture, their excitation energies in a nuclear medium at zero momentum are calculated within mean field approximation. The scalar, and the vector mesons are assumed to couple directly to the nonstrange quarks and antiquarks in the $K$ and $\\kbar$ mesons. It is demonstrated that the $\\rho$ meson induces different mean field potentials for each member of the isodoublets, $K$ and $\\kbar$, when they are embedded in asymmetric nuclear matter. Furthermore, it is also shown that this $\\rho$ meson potential is repulsive for the $K^-$ meson in matter with a neutron excess, and renders $K^-$ condensation less likely to occur.

  11. a Study of Negative Kaon-Proton Interactions at 6.5 Gev/c: Final States with Neutral Anti-Kaon and Neutral Anti-Kaon Mesonic Resonance Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Leland Earl

    In this dissertation, we present a study of K(' -) p interactions at 6.5 GeV/c, using the 12-foot bubble chamber at the Argonne ZGS. This study is based upon events from the two-prong-plus-Vee topology, where the Vee fits a K(,s)('0) decay. Resonance production in the following final states was studied:. K('-) p (--->) K('0) (pi)('-) p (7C-fit) (I). K('-) p (--->) K('0) (pi)('0) (pi)('-) p (4C -fit) (II). K('-) p (--->) K('0) (pi)('+) (pi)('-) n (4C -fit) (III). For the 7C reaction (I), we found signals for K*(892), K*(1430), and K*(1780) with cross sections 181 (+OR-) 22, 41.2 (+OR-) 6, and 8.4 (+OR-) 2.9 (mu)b, respectively. Production of the K*(2080) was not significant in our data. The partial waves contributing to the production of the K('0(' ))(pi)(' -) system from threshold up to 1.7 GeV were studied. The principal conclusions are: (i) K*(892) and K*(1430) production is dominated by natural parity exchange, (ii) the ratio of unnatural- to natural-parity exchange increases with the resonance mass, consistent with the predictions of a triple Regge model, (iii) there is evidence for a broad 0('+) (K(pi)) S-wave enhancement, with considerable S-D and S-P interference, centered at 1.2 GeV, and (iv) the m = 2 amplitudes of (K(pi)) production are negligible. The two 4C reactions (II and III) were found to have considerably more background and ambiguities than reaction I, as expected. Cross sections for various two -body resonances were measured and compared with results obtained at neighboring energies. The m = 0 amplitudes for the production of K*(892) resonance at low t' were found to be large for both reactions II and III. Reaction II shows evidence for double peripheral production of the K* resonance from an analysis of slope parameters of the differential cross sections. The K*(pi) systems of reactions II and III were studied and cross sections were obtained. The K(rho) channels do not exhibit any significant signals. The spin and parity of the K*(pi) systems over the mass range 1.0 - 1.5 GeV were found to be consistent with J('P) = 1('+), 2('+) and contributions from a 0('-) state were also detected. In reaction II, the K*(pi) system is produced mainly by the Deck mechanism, while for reaction III, the K*(pi) system is for the most part resonant with a peak around 1.43 GeV. We also examined K*(DELTA) double resonance production in reactions II and III. The m = 0 amplitudes are large. Our results of the transversity decay distributions gave agreement with the additive quark model predictions of Bia l as and Zalewski for joint resonance decays.

  12. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  13. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  14. Neutralization of English Consonants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞彬彬

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a brief account of English consonant cluster's structure and phonetic features from the perspective of the definition and cause of neutralization of English consonants as well as their distinctive features and oppositions.It comes up with the final conclusion that neutralization exists in only thirteen English consonant clusters,among a large number of consonant clusters.

  15. Recent developments in antikaon-nucleon dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated by various experimental achievements, the study of Kbar N dynamics now enters a new phase. The two-body Kbar N interaction is largely constrained by recent experimental data, and the nature of the Lambda(1405) resonance is being unveiled by several theoretical analyses. These findings provide a basic tool for applications to KbarK-nuclear systems. We summarize the current status of the Kbar N phenomenology and outline the future direction in this field.

  16. Recoil corrections in antikaon-deuteron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the non-relativistic effective field theory approach for K−d scattering, it is demonstrated that a systematic perturbative expansion of the recoil corrections in the parameter ξ = MK/mN is possible in spite of the fact that K−d scattering at low energies is inherently non-perturbative due to the large values of the K̄N scattering lengths. The first order correction to the K−d scattering length due to single insertion of the retardation term in the multiple-scattering series is calculated. The recoil effect turns out to be reasonably small even at the physical value of MK/mN ≃ 0:5.

  17. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  18. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  19. Mod en neutral seksualitet!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    Towards a Neutral Sexuality! or Roland Barthes as a Queer Thinker? This article argues that the work of Roland Barthes has interesting perspectives in common with the queer theory. This argument will be put forward by using his concept of ‘the neutral’ that Barthes defines as “that which outplays...

  20. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  1. Between detection and neutralization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  2. Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T C; Gupta, P; Laha, S; Martinez, Y N; Mickelson, P G; Nagel, S B; Saenz, A D; Simien, C E; Killian, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas are formed by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms near the ionization threshold. Through the application of atomic physics techniques and diagnostics, these experiments stretch the boundaries of traditional neutral plasma physics. The electron temperature in these plasmas ranges from 1-1000 K and the ion temperature is around 1 K. The density can approach $10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$. Fundamental interest stems from the possibility of creating strongly-coupled plasmas, but recombination, collective modes, and thermalization in these systems have also been studied. Optical absorption images of a strontium plasma, using the Sr$^+$ ${^2S_{1/2}} -> {^2P_{1/2}}$ transition at 422 nm, depict the density profile of the plasma, and probe kinetics on a 50 ns time-scale. The Doppler-broadened ion absorption spectrum measures the ion velocity distribution, which gives an accurate measure of the ion dynamics in the first microsecond after photoionization.

  3. Gargamelle: neutral current event

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This event shows real tracks of particles from the 1200 litre Gargamelle bubble chamber that ran on the PS from 1970 to 1976 and on the SPS from 1976 to 1979. In this image a neutrino passes close to a nucleon and reemerges as a neutrino. Such events are called neutral curent, as they are mediated by the Z0 boson which has no electric charge.

  4. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  5. The Weak Neutral Current

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    This is a review of electroweak precision physics with particular emphasis on low-energy precision measurements in the neutral current sector of the electroweak theory and includes future experimental prospects and the theoretical challenges one faces to interpret these observables. Within the minimal Standard Model they serve as determinations of the weak mixing angle which are competitive with and complementary to those obtained near the Z-resonance. In the context of new physics beyond the Standard Model these measurements are crucial to discriminate between models and to reduce the allowed parameter space within a given model. We illustrate this for the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model with or without R-parity.

  6. Organic neutralization agents for neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M Y; McLafferty, F W

    1992-02-01

    Porter has shown that excited neutrals of specified internal energies can be prepared by neutralization of an ion beam with metal vapors of low ionization potential (IP). For specific problems in neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry, a metal with the desired IP value may not be available, or it may present experimental problems such as a high vaporization temperature, instrument contamination, or detector instability. The use of organic neutralization agents such as tetra-p-anisylethylene (IP = 6.0 eV) can minimize these problems (although cross sections for neutralization with these are a factor of 5 lower than those with metals), and can provide a much wider range of IP values. Their utility is demonstrated in the neutralization of C4H4 (+•) and CH8 (+•) ions to produce C4H4 and C4H8 of selected internal energies. However, for CH4 (+•) neutralization, the CH4 neutrals formed have a much lower internal energy than predicted, indicating that electron transfer from the neutralization agent predominantly produces its ions in excited states.

  7. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  8. Strange neutral currents in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ressell, M T; Aufderheide, M B; Bloom, S D; Resler, D A

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects on the nuclear neutral current Gamow-Teller (GT) strength of a finite contribution from a polarized strange quark sea. We perform nuclear shell model calculations of the neutral current GT strength for a number of nuclei likely to be present during stellar core collapse. We compare the GT strength when a finite strange quark contribution is included to the strength without such a contribution. As an example, the process of neutral current nuclear de-excitation via \

  9. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  10. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  11. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  12. Neutral evolution of mutational robustness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimwegen, E. van; Crutchfield, J.P.; Huynen, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population's limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network's adjacency ma

  13. The merits of neutral theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, David; Etienne, Rampal S.; McKane, Alan J.

    2006-01-01

    Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity has challenged the classic niche-based view of ecological community structure. Although there have been many attempts to falsify Hubbell's theory, we argue that falsification should not lead to rejection, because there is more to the theory than neutrality al

  14. The Antiparticles of Neutral Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Perkins, Walton A

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the ability to create and study antihydrogen, we think it is appropriate to consider the possibility that antiphotons might not be identical to photons. First of all, we will look at the experimental evidence concerning multiple neutral pions and multiple photons. Because of its internal structure, the neutral kaon is not identical to its antiparticle. We will consider internal structures for the neutral pion and photon for which the antiparticle differs from the particle. Interestingly, the antiphoton thus created from neutrinos does not interact with electrons because its neutrinos have the wrong helicity.

  15. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  16. Neutrality Versus Materiality: A Thermodynamic Theory of Neutral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Tailleux

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theory for constructing quasi-neutral density variables γ directly in thermodynamic space is formulated, which is based on minimising the absolute value of a purely thermodynamic quantity J n . Physically, J n has a dual dynamic/thermodynamic interpretation as the quantity controlling the energy cost of adiabatic and isohaline parcel exchanges on material surfaces, as well as the dependence of in-situ density on spiciness, in a description of water masses based on γ, spiciness and pressure. Mathematically, minimising | J n | in thermodynamic space is showed to be equivalent to maximising neutrality in physical space. The physics of epineutral dispersion is also reviewed and discussed. It is argued, in particular, that epineutral dispersion is best understood as the aggregate effect of many individual non-neutral stirring events (being understood here as adiabatic and isohaline events with non-zero buoyancy, so that it is only the net displacement aggregated over many events that is approximately neutral. This new view resolves an apparent paradox between the focus in neutral density theory on zero-buoyancy motions and the overwhelming evidence that lateral dispersion in the ocean is primarily caused by non-zero buoyancy processes such as tides, residual currents and sheared internal waves. The efficiency by which a physical process contributes to lateral dispersion can be characterised by its energy signature, with those processes releasing available potential energy (negative energy cost being more efficient than purely neutral processes with zero energy cost. The latter mechanism occurs in the wedge of instability, and its source of energy is the coupling between baroclinicity, thermobaricity, and density compensated temperature/salinity anomalies. Such a mechanism, which can only exist in a salty ocean, is speculated to be important for dissipating spiciness anomalies and neutral helicity. The paper also discusses potential

  17. Neutral theory in community ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    One of the central goals of community ecology is to understand the forces that maintain species diversity within communities. The traditional niche-assembly theory asserts that species live together in a community only when they differ from one another in resource uses. But this theory has some difficulties in explaining the diversity often observed in specie-rich communities such as tropical forests. As an alternative to the niche theory, Hubbell and other ecologists introduced a neutral model. Hubbell argues that the number of species in a community is controlled by species extinction and immigration or speciation of new species. Assuming that all individuals of all species in a trophically similar com-munity are ecologically equivalent, Hubbell's neutral theory predicts two important statistical distributions. One is the asymptotic log-series distribution for the metacommunities under point mutation speciation, and the other is the zero-sum multinomial distribution for both local communities under dispersal limitation and metacommunities under random fission speciation. Unlike the niche-assembly theory, the neutral theory takes similarity in species and individuals as a starting point for investigating species diversity. Based on the fundamental processes of birth, death, dispersal and spe-ciation, the neutral theory provided the first mechanistic explanation of species abundance distribution commonly observed in natural communities. Since the publication of the neutral theory, there has been much discussion about it, pro and con. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the assumption, prediction and speciation mode of the neutral theory, including progress in the theory itself, tests about the assumption of the theory, prediction and speciation mode at the metacommunity level. We also suggest that the most important task in the future is to bridge the niche-assembly theory and the neutral theory, and to add species differences to the neutral theory and

  18. Vendor neutral archive in PACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapesh Kumar Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  19. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector.

  20. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R J

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector. (8 refs).

  1. Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, in which supernovae power a galactic fountain, reproduce the observed velocity and 21cm brightness statistics of galactic neutral hydrogen (HI). The simulated galaxy consists of a thin HI disk, similar in extent and brightness to that observed in the Milky Way, and extra-planar neutral gas at a range of velocities due to the galactic fountain. Mock observations of the neutral gas resemble the HI flux measurements from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) HI, survey, including a high-velocity tail which matches well with observations of high-velocity clouds. The simulated high-velocity clouds are typically found close to the galactic disk, with a typical line-of-sight distance of 13kpc from observers on the solar circle. The fountain efficiently cycles matter from the centre of the galaxy to its outskirts at a rate of around 0.5 M_sun/yr

  2. Instructed neutralization, spontaneous neutralization and prevented neutralization after an obsession-like thought.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van den Hout; M. Kindt; T. Weiland; M. Peters

    2002-01-01

    Building on 2 earlier experiments (S. Rachman et al [1996] and M. A. van den Hout [2001]) the present study investigated the effects of neutralizing the consequences of an obsession-like thought in healthy participants. Just like in the earlier studies, writing out and thinking of such a thought gen

  3. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  4. Neutral Hydrogen in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, N P F; Brough, S; Forbes, D A; Barnes, D G

    2002-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of the neutral hydrogen (HI) properties of an X-ray selected sample of nearby loose galaxy groups. This forms part of a multi-wavelength investigation (X-ray, optical and radio) of the formation and evolution of galaxies within a group environment. Some initial findings of an ATNF Parkes Multibeam wide-area neutral hydrogen imaging survey of 17 nearby galaxy groups include two new, potentially isolated clouds of HI in the NGC 1052 and NGC 5044 groups and significant amounts of HI within the group virial radii of groups NGC 3557 and IC 1459 - two groups with complex X-ray structures that suggest they may still be in the act of virialisation. Here we present ATCA high-resolution synthesis-imaging follow-up observations of the distribution and kinematics of HI in these four groups.

  5. Optical Neutrality: Invisibility without Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Reed; Durach, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys.Rev.E 74, 026607 (2006)] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alu and Engheta [Phys.Rev.E 72, 016623 (2005)], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  6. Neutrality and the social contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Carroll

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the fact of moral disagreement, theories of state neutrality which rely on moral premises will have limited application, in that they will fail to motivate anyone who rejects the moral premises on which they are based. By contrast, contractarian theories can be consistent with moral scepticism, and can therefore avoid this limitation. In this paper, I construct a contractarian model which I claim is sceptically consistent and includes a principle of state neutrality as a necessary condition. The principle of neutrality which I derive incorporates two conceptions of neutrality (consequential neutrality and justificatory neutrality which have usually been thought of as distinct and incompatible. I argue that contractarianism gives us a unified account of these conceptions. Ultimately, the conclusion that neutrality can be derived without violating the constraint established by moral scepticism turns out to rely on an assumption of equal precontractual bargaining power. I do not attempt to defend this assumption here. If the assumption cannot be defended in a sceptically consistent fashion, then the argument for neutrality given here is claimed to be morally minimal, rather than fully consistent with moral scepticism. L’existence d’un désaccord sur les questions morales fait en sorte que les constructions théoriques de la neutralité de l’État se fondant sur des prémisses morales ne peuvent avoir qu’une application limitée, car elles échouent à motiver quiconque rejette ces prémisses fondatrices. Par opposition, les théories contractualistes peuvent s’accommoder d’un scepticisme moral et peuvent donc éviter cette limitation. Cet article développe un modèle contractualiste compatible avec le scepticisme et qui inclut comme condition nécessaire la neutralité de l’État. Le principe de neutralité que je dérive à partir de ce modèle incorpore deux conceptions de la neutralité, soit la neutralité des cons

  7. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  8. Antikaon induced Ξ production from a chiral model at NLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feijoo A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the meson-baryon interaction in the strangeness S = −1 sector using a chiral unitary approach, paying particular attention to the K̄N → KΞ reaction, especially important for constraining the next-to-leading order chiral terms, and considering also the effect of high spin hyperonic resonances. We also present results for the production of Ξ hyperons in nuclei

  9. Neutral Naturalness with Bifundamental Gluinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gherghetta, Tony; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group $SU(3)_C$ and a separate $SU(3)_C'$ group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other non-colored states such as electroweakinos, $Z'$ bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  10. Neutral naturalness with bifundamental gluinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherghetta, Tony; Nguyen, Minh; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-12-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group S U (3 )C and a separate S U (3 )C' group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other noncolored states such as electroweakinos, Z' bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  11. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  12. Electroweak Chiral Lagrangian for Neutral Higgs Boson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shun-Zhi; WANG Qing

    2008-01-01

    A neutral Higgs boson is added into the traditional electroweak chiral Lagrangian by writing down all possible high dimension operators. The matter part of the Lagrangian is investigated in detail. We find that if Higgs field dependence of Yukawa couplings can be factorized out, there will be no flavour changing neutral couplings; neutral Higgs can induce coupling between light and heavy neutrinos.

  13. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewinski, P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective j

  14. ORNL positive ion neutral beam program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whealton, J.H.; Haselton, H.H.; Barber, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    The neutral beam group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has constructed neutral beam generators for the ORMAK and PLT devices, is presently constructing neutral beam devices for the ISX and PDX devices, and is contemplating the construction of neutral beam systems for the advanced TNS device. These neutral beam devices stem from the pioneering work on ion sources of G. G. Kelley and O. B. Morgan. We describe the ion sources under development at this Laboratory, the beam optics exhibited by these sources, as well as some theoretical considerations, and finally the remainder of the beamline design.

  15. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. $\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  17. Primary neutral helium in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Hans-Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Two years of neutral measurements by IBEX-Lo have yielded several direct observations of interstellar neutral helium and oxygen during preferred viewing seasons. Besides the interstellar signal, there are indications of the presence of secondary neutral helium and oxygen created in the heliosphere. Detailed modeling of these particle species is necessary to connect the measured fluxes to the pristine local interstellar medium while accounting for loss and production of neutral particles during their path through the heliosphere. In this contribution, global heliosphere models are coupled to analytic calculations of neutral trajectories to obtain detailed estimates of the neutral distribution function of primary interstellar helium atoms in the heliosphere, in particular in the inner heliosphere.

  18. Molecular clock on a neutral network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Alpan

    2007-09-28

    The number of fixed mutations accumulated in an evolving population often displays a variance that is significantly larger than the mean (the overdispersed molecular clock). By examining a generic evolutionary process on a neutral network of high-fitness genotypes, we establish a formalism for computing all cumulants of the full probability distribution of accumulated mutations in terms of graph properties of the neutral network, and use the formalism to prove overdispersion of the molecular clock. We further show that significant overdispersion arises naturally in evolution when the neutral network is highly sparse, exhibits large global fluctuations in neutrality, and small local fluctuations in neutrality. The results are also relevant for elucidating aspects of neutral network topology from empirical measurements of the substitution process.

  19. Microwave Diagnostics of Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ronghua Lu Li

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an approach for using microwave radiation in diagnostics of ultracold neutral plasma. Microwave scattering from ultracold neutral plasma is calculated . Simple formulations are get and indicate that the dipole radiation power of ultracold neutral plasma does not depend on density profile $n_e(r)$ and $\\omega$ when $\\omega\\gg\\omega_{pe0}$, but on the total electron number $N_e$. This method provides the information of $N_e$ and from which we can get the three body recombination rate of the plasma, which is extremely important in the researches of ultracold neutral plasma.

  20. Alkaline solution neutralization capacity of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline eluate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration residue deposited in landfill alkalizes waste and soil layers. From the viewpoint of accelerating stability and preventing heavy metal elution, pH of the landfill layer (waste and daily cover soil) should be controlled. On the other hand, pH of leachate from existing MSW landfill sites is usually approximately neutral. One of the reasons is that daily cover soil can neutralize alkaline solution containing Ca(2+) as cation. However, in landfill layer where various types of wastes and reactions should be taken into consideration, the ability to neutralize alkaline solutions other than Ca(OH)(2) by soil should be evaluated. In this study, the neutralization capacities of various types of soils were measured using Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH solutions. Each soil used in this study showed approximately the same capacity to neutralize both alkaline solutions of Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH. The cation exchange capacity was less than 30% of the maximum alkali neutralization capacity obtained by the titration test. The mechanism of neutralization by the pH-dependent charge can explain the same neutralization capacities of the soils. Although further investigation on the neutralization capacity of the soils for alkaline substances other than NaOH is required, daily cover soil could serve as a buffer zone for alkaline leachates containing Ca(OH)(2) or other alkaline substances.

  1. Influenza virus antigenicity and broadly neutralizing epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air, Gillian M

    2015-04-01

    A vaccine formulation that would be effective against all strains of influenza virus has long been a goal of vaccine developers, but antibodies after infection or vaccination were seen to be strain specific and there was little evidence of cross-reactive antibodies that neutralized across subtypes. Recently a number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. This review describes the different classes of broadly neutralizing antibodies and discusses the potential of their therapeutic use or for design of immunogens that induce a high proportion of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  2. Liberal Neutrality : Constructivist, not foundationalist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendell Horne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In defending the principle of neutrality, liberals have often appealed to a more general moral principle that forbids coercing persons in the name of reasons those persons themselves cannot reasonably be expected to share. Yet liberals have struggled to articulate a non-arbitrary, non-dogmatic distinction between the reasons that persons can reasonably be expected to share and those they cannot. The reason for this, I argue, is that what it means to “share a reason” is itself obscure. In this paper I articulate two different conceptions of what it is to share a reason; I call these conceptions “foundationalist” and “constructivist.” On the foundationalist view, two people “share” a reason just in the sense that the same reason applies to each of them independently. On this view, I argue, debates about the reasons we share collapse into debates about the reasons we have, moving us no closer to an adequate defense of neutrality. On the constructivist view, by contrast, “sharing reasons” is understood as a kind of activity, and the reasons we must share are just those reasons that make this activity possible. I argue that the constructivist conception of sharing reasons yields a better defense of the principle of neutrality. À travers leur défense du principe de neutralité, les libéraux ont souvent interpellé un principe moral plus général qui interdit de contraindre des personnes pour des raisons dont on ne peut raisonnablement attendre que ces personnes elles-mêmes les partagent. Les libéraux éprouvent cependant de la difficulté à articuler une distinction non-arbitraire et non-dogmatique entre les raisons dont on peut raisonnablement attendre que les personnes les partagent et celles dont on ne le peut pas. Je soutiens dans cet article que cette difficulté provient du fait que «partager une raison » est une notion obscure. Pour illustrer cela, je me pencherai sur deux conceptions distinctes de ce que veut dire

  3. Neutral Beams from Blazar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoyan, Armen M.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2003-03-01

    We treat the production of neutrons, photons, and neutrinos through photomeson interactions of relativistic protons with ambient photons in the compact inner jets of blazars. Internal synchrotron and external isotropic radiation due to scattered optical/UV accretion-disk radiation are considered as target photon fields. Protons are assumed to be accelerated to a maximum energy limited by the size scale and magnetic field of the jet, and by competing energy losses. We characterize the conditions when the photomeson interactions of ultrarelativistic protons become effective, and show that the presence of the external radiation field makes possible strong energy losses for protons with energies Ep>~1015 eV. Without this component, effective energy losses of protons begin at Ep>~1018 eV, and would rapidly disappear with expansion of the blob. We develop a model describing the production and escape of neutrons from a comoving spherical blob, which continue to interact with the ambient external radiation field on the parsec-scale broad-line region (BLR). Neutrons may carry ~10% of the overall energy of the accelerated protons with Ep>~1015 eV outside the BLR. Ultra-high-energy gamma rays produced by photomeson interaction of neutrons outside the blob can also escape the BLR. The escaping neutrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos form a collimated neutral beam with a characteristic opening angle θ~1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the inner jet. Energy and momentum is deposited in the extended jet from the decay of neutrons at distances ld(En)~(En/1017eV) kpc, and through pair-production attenuation of gamma rays with energies Eγ>~1015 eV which propagate to ~10-100 kpc distances. In this scenario, neutral beams of ultra-high-energy gamma rays and neutrons can be the reason for straight extended jets, such as in Pictor A. Fluxes of neutrinos detectable with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes are predicted from flat-spectrum radio quasars such as 3C 279.

  4. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E;

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development of ...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection.......The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay...

  5. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an 'exact' test of neutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.

    2007-01-01

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to d

  6. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an `exact' test of neutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to d

  7. Neutralizing antibodies in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjam B Zeisel; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Isabel Fofana; Heidi Barth; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis world-wide. The majority of infected individuals develop chronic hepatitis which can then progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous viral clearance occurs in about 20%-30% of acutely infected individuals and results in resolution of infection without sequaelae. Both viral and host factors appear to play an important role for resolution of acute infection. A large body of evidence suggests that a strong, multispecific and long-lasting cellular immune response appears to be important for control of viral infection in acute hepatitis C. Due too the lack of convenient neutralization assays,the impact of neutralizing responses for control of viral infection had been less defined. In recent years, the development of robust tissue culture model systems for HCV entry and infection has finally allowed study of antibody-mediated neutralization and to gain further insights into viral targets of host neutralizing responses.In addition, detailed analysis of antibody-mediated neutralization in individual patients as well as cohorts with well defined viral isolates has enabled the study of neutralizing responses in the course of HCV infection and characterization of the impact of neutralizing antibodies for control of viral infection. This review will summarize recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and its impact for HCV pathogenesis.(C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  9. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  10. Topologies for neutral functional differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Bounded topologies are considered for functional differential equations of the neutral type in which present dynamics of the system are influenced by its past behavior. A special bounded topology is generated on a collection of absolutely continuous functions with essentially bounded derivatives, and an application to a class of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations due to Driver (1965) is presented.

  11. Mechanisms of Hemagglutinin Targeted Influenza Virus Neutralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, Boerries; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap; Klaren, Vincent; Tang, Chan; Bujny, Miriam V.; Korse, Hans J.W.M.; Kwaks, Ted; Otterstrom, Jason J.; Juraszek, Jarek; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have been identified which neutralize broad spectra of influenza A or B viruses. Here, we dissect the mechanisms by which such antibodies interfere with infectivity. We distinguish four mechanisms that link the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) epitopes of broadly neutralizing

  12. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  13. Shock acceleration in partially neutral plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Blasi, P; Caprioli, D

    2010-01-01

    We present the non-linear theory of shock acceleration applied to SNRs expanding into partially neutral plasma. Using this theory we show how the Balmer lines detected from young SNRs can be used to test the efficiency of shocks in the production of cosmic rays. In particular we investigate the effect of charge-exchange between protons and neutral hydrogen occurring in the precursor formed ahead of the shock. In this precursor the CR pressure accelerate the ionized component of the plasma and a relative velocity between protons and neutral hydrogen is established. On the other hand the charge-exchange process tends to equilibrate ions and neutrals resulting in the heating of both components. We show that even when the shock converts only a few per cent of the total bulk kinetic energy into CRs, the heating is efficient enough to produce a detectable broadening of the narrow Balmer lines emitted by the neutral hydrogen.

  14. Sensitive neutralization test for rubella antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Albrecht, P; Krugman, S; Ennis, F A

    1979-01-01

    A modified rubella virus plaque neutralization test for measuring rubella antibody was developed based on the potentiation of the virus-antibody complex by heterologous anti-immunoglobulin. The test is highly sensitive, yielding titers on the average 50 to 100 times higher than the haemagglutination inhibition test or the conventional plaque neutralization test. The sensitivity of this enhanced neutralization test is somewhat limited by the existence of a prozone phenomenon which precludes testing of low-titered sera below a dilution of 1:16. No prozone effect was observed with cerebrospinal fluids. The specificity of the enhanced neutralization test was determined by seroconversion of individuals receiving rubella vaccine. Although the rubella hemagglutination inhibition test remains the test of choice in routine diagnostic and surveillance work, the enhanced rubella neutralization test is particularly useful in monitoring low-level antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with neurological disorders and in certain instances of vaccine failure. PMID:107192

  15. Estimating the stoichiometry of HIV neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R

    2010-03-19

    HIV-1 virions infect target cells by first establishing contact between envelope glycoprotein trimers on the virion's surface and CD4 receptors on a target cell, recruiting co-receptors, fusing with the cell membrane and finally releasing the genetic material into the target cell. Specific experimental setups allow the study of the number of trimer-receptor-interactions needed for infection, i.e., the stoichiometry of entry and also the number of antibodies needed to prevent one trimer from engaging successfully in the entry process, i.e., the stoichiometry of (trimer) neutralization. Mathematical models are required to infer the stoichiometric parameters from these experimental data. Recently, we developed mathematical models for the estimations of the stoichiometry of entry [1]. In this article, we show how our models can be extended to investigate the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization. We study how various biological parameters affect the estimate of the stoichiometry of neutralization. We find that the distribution of trimer numbers-which is also an important determinant of the stoichiometry of entry-influences the estimated value of the stoichiometry of neutralization. In contrast, other parameters, which characterize the experimental system, diminish the information we can extract from the data about the stoichiometry of neutralization, and thus reduce our confidence in the estimate. We illustrate the use of our models by re-analyzing previously published data on the neutralization sensitivity [2], which contains measurements of neutralization sensitivity of viruses with different envelope proteins to antibodies with various specificities. Our mathematical framework represents the formal basis for the estimation of the stoichiometry of neutralization. Together with the stoichiometry of entry, the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization will allow one to calculate how many antibodies are required to neutralize a virion or even an entire population of

  16. Net Neutrality: Media Discourses and Public Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Quail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes media and public discourses surrounding net neutrality, with particular attention to public utility philosophy, from a critical perspective. The article suggests that further public education about net neutrality would be beneficial. The first portion of this paper provides a survey of the existing literature surrounding net neutrality, highlighting the contentious debate between market-based and public interest perspectives. In order to contextualize the debate, an overview of public utility philosophy is provided, shedding light on how the Internet can be conceptualized as a public good. Following this discussion, an analysis of mainstream media is presented, exploring how the media represents the issue of net neutrality and whether or not the Internet is discussed through the lens of public utility. To further examine how the net neutrality debate is being addressed, and to see the potential impacts of media discourses on the general public, the results of a focus group are reported and analyzed. Finally, a discussion assesses the implications of the net neutrality debate as presented through media discourses, highlighting the future of net neutrality as an important policy issue.

  17. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Stephen Luke [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL

  18. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO

    CERN Document Server

    McAdams, R

    2013-01-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, ITER is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the DEMO programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  19. Neutral Aggregation in Finite Length Genotype space

    CERN Document Server

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    The advent of modern genome sequencing techniques allows for a more stringent test of the neutrality hypothesis of Evolution, where all individuals have the same fitness. Using the individual based model of Wright and Fisher, we compute the amplitude of neutral aggregation in the genome space, i.e., the probability PL,$\\Theta$,M (k) of finding two individuals at genetic distance k for a genome of size L and mutation and migration number $\\Theta$ and M. In well mixed populations, we show that for $\\Theta$ $\\ll$ L, neutral aggregation is the dominant force and most individuals are found at short genetic distances from each other. For $\\Theta$ $\\sim$ L/2 on the contrary, individuals are randomly dispersed in genome space. For a geographically dispersed population, the controlling parameter is a combination of mutation and migration numbers. The theory we develop can be used to test the neutrality hypothesis in various ecological and evolutionary systems.

  20. Synthesis and structure of neutral double helicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU, Xun-Cheng; ZHOU, Zhi-Fen; ZHU, Shou-Rong; CHEN, Yun-Ti; LENG, Xue-Bing; WENG, Lin-Hong; LIN, Hua-Kuan

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to geaerating supramolecular architectures, based on easy-to-prepare sehiff base ligands, is described to gether with its application to the self-assembly of supramolecu lar neutral double helicates.

  1. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  2. The Framing of Network Neutrality Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, James

    The neutrality of the internet with regard to applications (e.g. search, social networking, email, to mention only three) has been central to innovation and growth in the knowledge-economy over the past two decades. Until recently, neutrality was built into the internet's design via its core stan...... with a critical analysis of their respective operational paradigms, the paper seeks to understand who is framing the debate, how they are doing so, and to what (systemic) effect....

  3. Γ-source Neutral Point Clamped Inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, Wei; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    Transformer based Z-source inverters are recently proposed to achieve promising buck-boost capability. They have improved higher buck-boost capability, smaller size and less components count over Z-source inverters. On the other hand, neutral point clamped inverters have less switching stress...... and better output performance comparing with traditional two-level inverters. Integrating these two types of configurations can help neutral point inverters achieve enhanced votlage buck-boost capability....

  4. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  5. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  6. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra.

  7. The properties of low energy neutral particles in a neutral beam source: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-hoon, E-mail: physh@kaist.ac.k [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Suk Jae [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong-Seock [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Application of a hyperthermal neutral beam source is one of the candidate methods of reducing plasma induced damage problems. The neutral beam is generated by vertical collisions between energetic ions and a reflector composed of metal. However, it is difficult to measure the neutral angle and energy distribution experimentally. We simulate the hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) generation using a molecular dynamics algorithm. In order to obtain a low energy neutral beam, ions with various energies are vertically projected onto the reflector surface. A rough surface structure that has been experimentally measured is used for a realistic simulation. The energy distributions are obtained and the ratio of energy of reflected neutral particles agrees with experimental data.

  8. Automated Facial Coding Software Outperforms People in Recognizing Neutral Faces as Neutral from Standardized Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eLewinski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90% was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%. I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e. smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  9. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people's accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge - automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  10. Species ages in neutral biodiversity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Ryan A; O'Dwyer, James P

    2014-05-01

    Biogeography seeks to understand the mechanisms that drive biodiversity across long temporal and large spatial scales. Theoretical models of biogeography can be tested by comparing their predictions of quantities such as species ages against empirical estimates. It has previously been claimed that the neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography predicts species ages that are unrealistically long. Any improved theory of biodiversity must rectify this problem, but first it is necessary to quantify the problem precisely. Here we provide analytical expressions for species ages in neutral biodiversity communities. We analyse a spatially implicit metacommunity model and solve for both the zero-sum and non-zero-sum cases. We explain why our new expressions are, in the context of biodiversity, usually more appropriate than those previously imported from neutral molecular evolution. Because of the time symmetry of the spatially implicit neutral model, our expressions also lead directly to formulas for species persistence times and species lifetimes. We use our new expressions to estimate species ages of forest trees under a neutral model and find that they are about an order of magnitude shorter than those predicted previously but still unrealistically long. In light of our results, we discuss different models of biogeography that may solve the problem of species ages.

  11. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  12. A Measurement of Coherent Neutral Pion Production in Neutrino Neutral Current Interactions in NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kullenberg, C T

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to $1.44 \\times 10^6$ muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range $2.5 \\leq E_{\

  13. Neutral Delay and a Generalization of Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, Jayme

    2010-01-01

    The equations for the electromagnetic two-body problem are neutral-delay equations that for generic initial data have solutions with discontinuous derivatives. If one wants to use these neutral-delay equations with arbitrary initial data, solutions with discontinuous derivatives must be allowed. Surprisingly, this same neutrality is compatible with the recently developed variational method with mixed-type boundaries for the Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics. We show that two-body electromagnetic orbits with discontinuous velocities are physically necessary by showing that orbits with vanishing far-fields amost everywhere must have some discontinuous velocities on a few points. We generalize the Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics with the variational method to include all continuous trajectories, allowing piecewise-differentiable weak solutions represented by trajectories with fields defined almost everywhere (but on a set of points of zero measure where velocities jump). Along with this generalization we formulate...

  14. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  15. Edge rotation from momentum transport by neutrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotani, JT; Newton, SL; Pusztai, I.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their high cross field mobility, neutral atoms can have a strong effect on transport even at the low relative densities found inside the separatrix. We use a charge-exchange dominated model for the neutrals, coupled to neoclassical ions, to calculate momentum transport when it is dominated by the neutrals. We can then calculate self-consistently the radial electric field and predict the intrinsic rotation in an otherwise torque-free plasma. Using a numerical solver for the ion distribution to allow arbitrary collisionality, we investigate the effects of inverse aspect ratio and elongation on plasma rotation. We also calculate the rotation of a trace carbon impurity, to facilitate future comparison to experiments using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostics.

  16. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  17. Using Neutral Network in Predicting Corporate Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong G. Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the predictive power of three neutral network models: Multi-layer neural network, probabilistic neural network, and logistic regression model in predicting corporate failure. Basing on the database provided by The Corporate Scorecard Group (CSG, we combine financial ratios which deem to be significant predictors of corporate bankruptcy in many previous empirical studies to build our predictive models and test it against the holdout sample. On comparison of the results, we find that three models are good at predicting probability of corporate failure. Moreover, probabilistic neural network model outperforms the others. Therefore, neutral networks are useful and probabilistic neutral network is a promising tool for the prediction of corporate failure.

  18. Evidence for neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in neutrino interactions on hydrocarbon

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, J; Altinok, O; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Diaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman,; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Salinas, C J Solano; Sanchez, S F; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    The MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current neutral pion production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26 +- 0.02 (stat) +- 0.08 (sys) x 10^{-39} cm^{2}. The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino oscillation experiments searching for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations.

  19. Delay-dependent robust stability for neutral systems with mixed discrete-and-neutral delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong HE; Min WU; Jinhua SHE

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of delay-dependent robust stability of neutral systems with different discrete-and-neutral delays and time-varying structured uncertainties.Some new criteria are presented,in which some free weighting matrices are used to express the relationships between the terms in the Leibniz-Newton formula.The criteria include the information on the size of both neutral-and-discrete delays.It is shown that the present results also include the results for identical discrete-and-neutral delays as special cases.A numerical example illustrates the improvement of the proposed methods over the previous methods and the influences between the discrete and neutral delays.

  20. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 120.376 Grounded distribution systems... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must...

  1. Direct CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wojciech Wiślicki

    2004-03-01

    The final result of the NA48 experiment is presented and performed at the CERN SPS neutral kaon beams, on the direct CP violation parameter Re$('/)$, as measured from the decay rates of neutral kaons into two pions. The data collected in the years 1997-2001 yield the evidence for the direct CP violation with Re$('/)=(14.7± 2.2)× 10^{-4}$. Description of experimental method and systematics, comparison with the corresponding FNAL result and discussion of some implications for the theory are given.

  2. Photoproduction of Neutral Pions off Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Crede, V; Wilson, A; Anisovich, A V; Bacelar, J C S; Bantes, R; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Castelijns, R; Dutz, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Frommberger, F; Funke, Chr; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A; Gutz, E; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, P; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Loehner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V A; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Sarantsev, A V; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Sokhoyan, V; Suele, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch

    2011-01-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction $\\gamma p\\to p\\pi^0$ for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The $\\pi^0$ mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: $\\pi^0\\to\\gamma\\gamma$. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, $\\theta_{\\rm c.m.}<60^\\circ$. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances: $G_{17}$(2190), $D_{13}$(2080), and $D_{15}$(2070).

  3. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction γp→pπ0 for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The π0 mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: π0→γγ. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, θc.m.<60∘. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances G17(2190), D13(2080), and D15(2070).

  4. Neutral BSM Higgs searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the latest results of the neutral heavy BSM Higgs boson search, mainly based on data collected by the ATLAS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV in 2015 and 2016, with an integrated luminosity of 3.2-15.4 ${\\rm fb^{-1}}$. Fermionic, bosonic and di-Higgs final states have been investigated in a mass range from 200 GeV to 3000 GeV. No sign for a new heavy neutral resonance has been found in data so far, and stringent upper limits are reported.

  5. Carbon-neutral fuels and energy carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Muradov, Nazim Z

    2011-01-01

    Concerns over an unstable energy supply and the adverse environmental impact of carbonaceous fuels have triggered considerable efforts worldwide to find carbon-free or low-carbon alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Carbon-Neutral Fuels and Energy Carriers emphasizes the vital role of carbon-neutral energy sources, transportation fuels, and associated technologies for establishing a sustainable energy future. Each chapter draws on the insight of world-renowned experts in such diverse fields as photochemistry and electrochemistry, solar and nuclear energy, biofuels and synthetic fuels, ca

  6. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  7. A neutralization-reionization and reactivity mass spectrometry study of the generation of neutral hydroxymethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yawei; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta; Mayer, Paul M

    2011-06-01

    Neutral hydroxymethylene HCOH is an important intermediate in several chemical reactions; however, it is difficult to observe due to its high reactivity. In this work, neutral hydroxymethylene and formaldehyde were generated by charge exchange neutralization of their respective ionic counterparts and then were reionized and detected as positive-ion recovery signals in neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry in a magnetic sector instrument of BEE geometry. The reionized species were characterized by their subsequent collision-induced dissociation mass spectra. The transient hydroxymethylene neutral was observed to isomerize to formaldehyde with an experimental time span exceeding 13.9 µs. The vertical neutralization energy of the HCOH(+•) ion has also been assayed using charge transfer reactions between the fast ions and stationary target gases of differing ionization energy. The measured values match the result of ab initio calculations at the QCISD/6-311 + G(d,p) and CCSD(T)/6-311 + + G(3df,2p) levels of theory. Neutral hydroxymethylene was also produced by proton transfer from CH(2) OH(+) to a strong base such as pyridine, confirmed by appropriate isotopic labeling. There is a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for H(+) versus D(+) transfer from the C atom of the hydroxymethyl cation of ∼3, consistent with a primary KIE of a nearly thermoneutral reaction.

  8. Atomic Structure Calculations for Neutral Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Norah Alonizan; Rabia Qindeel; Nabil Ben Nessib

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and oscillator strengths for neutral oxygen have been calculated using the Cowan (CW), SUPERSTRUCTURE (SS), and AUTOSTRUCTURE (AS) atomic structure codes. The results obtained with these atomic codes have been compared with MCHF calculations and experimental values from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database.

  9. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  10. Linear Sweep Voltammetry of Adsorbed Neutral Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    E. Creager, G. T. Marks, D. A. Aikens and H. H. Richtol Prepared for Publication in Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry Rensselaer Polytechnic... Electroanalytical Chemistry It. KEY WORDS (Continue oun reverse side It necessary mid Ideneliy by block ntaibor) Neutral Red, cyclic voltammetry, adsorbed dye 20

  11. Neutrino emissivity under neutral kaon condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kubis, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino emissivity from neutron star matter with neutral kaon condensate is considered. It is shown that a new cooling channel is opened, and what is more, all previously known channels acquire the greater emissivity reaching the level of the direct URCA cycle in normal matter.

  12. Development of KSTAR Neutral Beam Heating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, B. H.; Song, W. S.; Yoon, B. J. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    The prototype components of a neutral beam injection (NBI) system have been developed for the KSTAR, and a capability of the manufactured components has been tested. High power ion source, acceleration power supply, other ion source power supplies, neutralizer, bending magnet for ion beam separation, calorimeter, and cryo-sorption pump have been developed by using the domestic technologies and tested for a neutral beam injection of 8 MW per beamline with a pulse duration of 300 seconds. The developed components have been continuously upgraded to achieve the design requirements. The development technology of high power and long pulse neutral beam injection system has been proved with the achievement of 5.2 MW output for a short pulse length and 1.6 MW output for a pulse length of 300 seconds. Using these development technologies, the domestic NB technology has been stabilized under the development of high power ion source, NB beamline components, high voltage and current power supplies, NB diagnostics, NB system operation and control.

  13. Intraprostatic injection of neutralized zinc in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, M.S.; Wang, M.; Sutcu, M.F.; Fahim, Z.; Safron, J.A.; Ganjam, V.K. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (United States) Xian Medical University (China))

    1991-03-11

    Zinc has been implicated in steroid endocrinology of the prostate gland. The conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by 5{alpha}-reductase enzyme is believed to express androgenic responses in the prostate. To note the effect of neutralized zinc on the prostate, 50 sexually mature rats, weighing 325 {plus minus} 20 grams, were divided into 5 groups as follows: (1) control, (2) sham, (3) castrated, (4) injected intraprostatically with 10 mg. neutralized zinc, and (5) injected intraprostatically with 20 mg. neutralized zinc. Results in the treated groups indicated significant reduction of prostate weights, 12% and 53% and histologically normal prostate; no significant change in weight and histological structure of testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicles; significant reduction in 5{alpha}-reductase activity and total protein and DNA concentrations in prostate tissue; and no significant effect on progeny of treated animals. These results suggest that direct application of neutralized zinc to the prostate offers a new modality for treatment of prostatitis without affecting spermatogenesis and testosterone production.

  14. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  15. Neutrino emissivity under neutral kaon condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, S

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino emissivity from neutron star matter with neutral kaon condensate is considered. It is shown that a new cooling channel is opened, and what is more, all previously known channels acquire the greater emissivity reaching the level of the direct URCA cycle in normal matter.

  16. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  17. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments.

  18. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  19. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  20. The Effect of Sulfonation and Neutralization on the Dynamics of Zn Neutralized Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Alicia; Wang, Wenqin; Winey, Karen I.; Runt, James

    2011-03-01

    The effect of sulfonation and neutralization levels on structure and dynamics of Zn neutralized sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) ionomers were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray scattering, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. STEM and X-ray scattering revealed the presence of spherical aggregates 2 nm in diameter. Successful fitting of the scattering data to the Kinning-Thomas modified hard sphere model revealed that aggregate size is independent of degree of sulfonation and neutralization level, and that aggregate composition becomes increasingly ionic with increasing neutralization. Two segmental relaxations were identified in dielectric loss spectra corresponding to cooperative motion of chain segments in the unrestricted matrix and motions of chain segments restricted by aggregates. A Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars interfacial polarization process was revealed, with relaxation times that were in good agreement with predictions from a simple model of dispersed ionic spheres.

  1. Research on Stress Neutral Layer Offset in the Straightening Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailian Gui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress neutral layer offset is analyzed by theoretical and numerical calculation methods. In traditional straightening theory, the stress neutral layer was consistent with the geometric central layer. However, there is a phenomenon that the stress neutral layer has some offset with the geometric neutral layer. This offset is a very important factor for improving the precision of the straightening force. The formula of the stress neutral layer offset is obtained by a theoretical method and the change law is given by numerical calculation method. The neutral layer offset theory provides the theoretical basis for establishing the model of straightening force precisely.

  2. On exponential stabilizability of linear neutral systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusser Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with linear neutral functional differential systems. Using an extended state space and an extended control operator, we transform the initial neutral system in an infinite dimensional linear system. We give a sufficient condition for admissibility of the control operator B , conditions under which operator B can be acceptable in order to work with controllability and stabilizability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for exact controllability are provided; in terms of a gramian of controllability N ( μ . Assuming admissibility and exact controllability, a feedback control law is defined from the inverse of the operator N ( μ in order to stabilize exponentially the closed loop system. In this case, the semigroup generated by the closed loop system has an arbitrary decay rate.

  3. Neutral Heavy Leptons and Electroweak Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Pilar

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that baryogenesis occurs during the weak phase transition in a minimal extension of the Standard Model which contains extra neutral leptons and conserves total lepton number. The necessary CP-violating phases appear in the leptonic Yukawa couplings. We compute the CP-asymmetries in both the neutral and the charged lepton fluxes reflected on the bubble wall. Using present experimental bounds on the mixing angles and Standard Model estimates for the parameters related to the scalar potential, we conclude that it seems unlikely to produce the observed baryon to entropy ratio within this type of models. We comment on the possibility that the constraints on the mixings might be naturally relaxed due to small finite temperature effects.

  4. Net Neutrality and Quality of Service

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Eitan; Wong, Sulan; Xu, Manjesh Kumar Hanawal 'and' Yuedong

    2011-01-01

    2010 has witnessed many public consultations around the world concerning Net neutrality. A second legislative phase that may follow, could involve various structural changes in the Internet. The status that the Internet access has in Europe as a universal service evolves as the level of quality of service (QoS) to be offered improves. If guarantees on QoS are to be imposed, as requested by several economic actors, it would require introducing new indicators of quality of services, as well as regulation legislation and monitoring of the offered levels of QoS. This tendency in Europe may change the nature of the Internet from a best effort network to, perhaps, a more expensive one, that offers guaranteed performance. This paper presents an overview of the above issues as well as an overview of recent research on net-neutrality, with an emphasis on game theoretical approaches.

  5. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  6. A new approach to entangling neutral atoms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jongmin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deutsch, Ivan H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Biedermann, Grant W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed a new approach to entangling neutral atoms with a Rydberg-dressed interaction. Entangling neutral atoms is an essential key of quantum technologies such as quantum computation, many-body quantum simulation, and high-precision atomic sensors . The demonstrated Rydberg-dressed protocol involves adiabatically imposing a light shift on the ground state by coupling an excited Rydberg state with a tuned laser field. Using this technique, we have demonstrated a strong and tunable dipole - dipole interaction between two individually trapped atoms with energy shifts of order 1 MHz, which has been challenging to achieve in other protocols . During this program, we experimentally demonstrated Bell-state entanglement and the isomorphism to the Jaynes - Cumming model of a Rydberg-dressed two-atom system. Our theoretical calculations of a CPHASE quantum logic gate and arbitrary Dicke state quantum control in this system encourage further work.

  7. Deterministic nanoassembly: Neutral or plasma route?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2006-07-01

    It is shown that, owing to selective delivery of ionic and neutral building blocks directly from the ionized gas phase and via surface migration, plasma environments offer a better deal of deterministic synthesis of ordered nanoassemblies compared to thermal chemical vapor deposition. The results of hybrid Monte Carlo (gas phase) and adatom self-organization (surface) simulation suggest that higher aspect ratios and better size and pattern uniformity of carbon nanotip microemitters can be achieved via the plasma route.

  8. Neutralizing antibodies to Haemophilus ducreyi cytotoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagergård, T; Purvén, M

    1993-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against cytotoxin produced by Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria were studied in rabbits by an assay employing HEp-2 cells and diluted crude cytotoxin preparations from the organism. Antisera to 12 different H. ducreyi strains were prepared by immunization of rabbits with bacterial sonicates combined with Freund's adjuvant. The antibody response during infection with H. ducreyi was studied in two groups of rabbits which were infected with five live strains by either single o...

  9. Molecular clock in neutral protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Claus O

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent observation in molecular evolution is that amino-acid substitution rates show an index of dispersion (that is, ratio of variance to mean substantially larger than one. This observation has been termed the overdispersed molecular clock. On the basis of in silico protein-evolution experiments, Bastolla and coworkers recently proposed an explanation for this observation: Proteins drift in neutral space, and can temporarily get trapped in regions of substantially reduced neutrality. In these regions, substitution rates are suppressed, which results in an overall substitution process that is not Poissonian. However, the simulation method of Bastolla et al. is representative only for cases in which the product of mutation rate μ and population size Ne is small. How the substitution process behaves when μNe is large is not known. Results Here, I study the behavior of the molecular clock in in silico protein evolution as a function of mutation rate and population size. I find that the index of dispersion decays with increasing μNe, and approaches 1 for large μNe . This observation can be explained with the selective pressure for mutational robustness, which is effective when μNe is large. This pressure keeps the population out of low-neutrality traps, and thus steadies the ticking of the molecular clock. Conclusions The molecular clock in neutral protein evolution can fall into two distinct regimes, a strongly overdispersed one for small μNe, and a mostly Poissonian one for large μNe. The former is relevant for the majority of organisms in the plant and animal kingdom, and the latter may be relevant for RNA viruses.

  10. A focus reduction neutralization assay for hepatitis C virus neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowski Czeslaw

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim The role of humoral immunity in hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is poorly understood. Nevertheless, there is increasing interest in characterizing the neutralizing antibodies in the serum of HCV-infected patients. Focus reduction assays have been widely used to evaluate neutralizing antibody responses against a range of non-cytopathic viruses. Based on the recent development of a HCV cell culture system using the genotype 2 JFH-1-strain, we developed a focus reduction assay for HCV-neutralizing antibodies. Methods The focus reduction assay was based on a standard microneutralization assay in which immunostained foci on tissue culture plates are counted. The neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies titers of purified serum immunoglobulin samples from seventy-seven individuals were determined using a 50% focus reduction neutralization assay. Each titer was determined as the log value of the reciprocal antibody dilution that reduced the number of viral foci by 50%. IgG antibodies were first purified from each serum in order to avoid the facilitating effect of HDL on HCV entry. Results The assay's cut-off using an ELISA and RNA HCV-negative samples was found to be 1.25 log, corresponding to a dilution of 1:18. The assay was compared with a commercial HCV ELISA and exhibited specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 96.5%, respectively, and good reproducibility (with intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 6.7% and 12.6%, respectively. The assay did not show any cross-reactivity with anti-HIV, anti-HBs or heterophile antibody-positive samples. The neutralizing antibodies titers were 2.13 log (1:134 for homologous samples from HCV genotype 2 infected patients harboring the same genotype as JFH-1 and 1.93 log (1:85 for heterologous samples from patients infected by genotypes other than type 2. These results confirm the presence of broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies already reported using the HCV pseudoparticles

  11. Neutral Color Semitransparent Microstructured Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eperon, Giles E.

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, John; Nitz, D.; Sobeck, J.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Among the rare earth species, the spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are some of the most complex. Like other rare earth species, Ce has many lines in the visible which are suitable for elemental abundance studies. Recent work on Ce II transition probabilities [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I for future studies using such lines from astrophysical sources. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2500 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442 and NSF Grant CTS0613277. [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  13. Neutralization of H- at Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The charge transfer rates and the neutralization probabilities for hydrogen anions colliding with nanostructured (vicinal) surfaces are obtained by direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the motion of the active electron in the field of the projectile-surface compound. The electronic structure of the surface is calculated from a Thomas-Fermi - von Weizsaecker statistical model with local density approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. In fixed-ion approximation, the decay rate of the electronic state of the anion in front of the surface is obtained by projecting the density of states of the collision system onto the unperturbed projectile level. The ion neutralization probability is calculated from this static width within a rate equation approach for a set of broken-straight-line collision trajectories for kinetic energies of 1 keV. The dependence of decay rates and neutralization probabilities on the surface morphology and the scattering trajectories, and a comparison of our numerical results with the experiments will be discussed.

  14. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  15. Asymptotical Properties for Parabolic Systems of Neutral Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bao-tong; HAN Mao-an

    2005-01-01

    Asymptotical properties for the solutions of neutral parabolic systems with Robin boundary conditions were analyzed by using the inequality analysis. The oscillations problems for the neutral parabolic systems were considered and some oscillation criteria for the systems were established.

  16. Dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have various climate effects and adverse health effects, which both depend on the size and number concentration of the particles. Freshly-formed particles are not large enough to impact neither health nor climate and they are most susceptible to removal by collisions with larger pre-existing particles. Consequently, the knowledge of both the formation and the growth rate of particles are crucially important when assessing the health and climate effects of atmospheric new particle formation. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our knowledge of the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles with a specific interest towards the particle growth rate and processes affecting the aerosol charging state. A new model, Ion-UHMA, which simulates the dynamics of neutral and charged particles, was developed for this purpose. Simple analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the growth rate due to various processes were derived and used to study the effects of charged particles on the growth rate. It was found that the growth rate of a freshly-formed particle population due to condensation and coagulation could be significantly increased when a considerable fraction of the particles are charged. Finally, recent data-analysis methods that have been applied to the aerosol charging states obtained from the measurements were modified for a charge asymmetric framework. The methods were then tested on data obtained from aerosol dynamics simulations. The methods were found to be able to provide reasonable estimates on the growth rate and proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation, provided that the growth rate is high enough and that the charged particles do not grow much more rapidly than the neutral ones. A simple procedure for estimating whether the methods are suitable for analysing data obtained in specific conditions was provided. In this thesis, the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles were studied in

  17. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research.

  18. Modelling the neutralisation process in neutral beam injectors

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Niall J.

    2009-01-01

    High power neutral beams currently play an important role in heating, fuelling and diagnosing magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas. At the Joint European Torus (JET) in Oxfordshire, England, the formation of such a beam involves passing a positive ion beam through a neutral gas target wherein beam electron-capture collisions result in a neutral beam component. The subsequent beam injection into the fusion plasma requires the sole use of this neutral component, since the charged ...

  19. Influence of Neutralization Attitude in Academic Dishonesty among Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chan Ling; Othman, Jamilah; D'Silva, Jeffrey Lawrence; Omar, Zoharah

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature had proposed that individuals tend to use neutralization to motivate their decisions to engage in deviant behaviours. This indicated that even though students have strong motivations not to cheat may do so anyway after employing neutralizing strategies. Hence, this study attempted to examine the role of neutralization in…

  20. 29 CFR 1207.3 - Compensation of neutrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation of neutrals. 1207.3 Section 1207.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD ESTABLISHMENT OF SPECIAL ADJUSTMENT BOARDS § 1207.3 Compensation of neutrals. (a) Neutrals appointed by the National Mediation Board. All...

  1. Antibody function in neutralization and protection against HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessell, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to induce neutralizing antibodies is generally thought to be of great importance for vaccine efficacy. In HIV-1 research this quality has been elusive as the HIV-1 virus has evolved multiple mechanisms to evade neutralizing antibodies. This thesis traces studies with four broadly neutral

  2. Single neutral pion production by charged-current $\\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, L; Bercellie, A; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Brooks, W K; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Miller, J; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Yepes-Ramirez, H; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2015-01-01

    Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the \\minerva detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for $\\bar{\

  3. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral..., circuit breaker, or fuse in the neutral conductor of the bus-tie feeder connecting the emergency... that aluminum grounding conductors must not be used....

  4. Universal threshold law for ion-neutral-neutral three-body recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    A very recently method for classical trajectory calculations for three-body collision [J. P\\'{e}rez-R\\'{i}os, S. Ragole, J. Wang and C. H. Greene, J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 140}, 044307 (2014)] has been applied to describe ion-neutral-neutral ternary processes for low energy collisions: 0.1 mK - 10 mK. As a result, a threshold law for the three-body recombination cross section is obtained and corroborated both, experimentally and numerically. The derived threshold law predicts the formation of weakly bound dimers, with binding energies comparable to the collision energy of the collisional partners. In this low energy range, this analysis predicts that molecular ions should dominate over molecular neutrals as the most products formed.

  5. Synthetic gauge potentials for ultracold neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic gauge fields for ultracold neutral atoms—engineered using the interaction between laser fields and the atoms’ internal ‘spin’ degrees of freedom—provide promising techniques for generating the large (synthetic) magnetic fields required to reach the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) limit in quantum gases, bosonic or fermionic alike. Because neutral atoms can move in a nearly disorder-free environment and they have extremely simple contact interactions, the resulting FQH states would be revealed in their most essential form. Moreover, bosonic FQH states represent a new frontier and have never been seen in any setting. Going beyond electromagnetism's conventional scalar gauge field, it is possible to create more general non-Abelian gauge potentials. When these are spatially uniform, they are equivalent to spin-orbit coupling familiar in material systems, and can lead to cold atom analogs of topological insulators and topological superconductors. In this tutorial, we introduce basic concepts underlying these gauge fields, making connections to the Aharonov-Bohm phase and geometric phase. We focus on the system of neutral atoms ‘dressed’ by multiple laser beams, where the eigenstates of the resulting Hamiltonian are known as dressed states. Synthetic gauge potentials arise from the unitary transformation required to express these dressed states in terms of the laser-free eigenstates. We discuss stability of laser-dressed atoms corresponding to the adiabatic condition and the probability of non-adiabatic transitions. Adopting both the semiclassical and quantum mechanical approaches, we demonstrate they agree in the suitable limit. We also analyze using both the conventional adiabatic picture and exact picture, where the kinetic energy is neglected in the former and retained in the latter picture.

  6. Exploring potential Pluto-generated neutral tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Hill, Matthew; KollMann, Peter; McHutt, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto is providing unprecedented insight into this mysterious outer solar system body. Escaping molecular nitrogen is of particular interest and possibly analogous to similar features observed at moons of Saturn and Jupiter. Such escaping N2 has the potential of creating molecular nitrogen and N (as a result of molecular dissociation) tori or partial toroidal extended particle distributions. The presence of these features would present the first confirmation of an extended toroidal neutral feature on a planetary scale in our solar system. While escape velocities are anticipated to be lower than those at Enceladus, Io or even Europa, particle lifetimes are much longer in Pluto’s orbit because as a result of much weaker solar interaction processes along Pluto’s orbit (on the order of tens of years). Thus, with a ~248 year orbit, Pluto may in fact be generating an extended toroidal feature along it orbit.For this work, we modify and apply our 3-D Monte Carlo neutral torus model (previously used at Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury) to study/analyze the theoretical possibility and scope of potential Pluto-generated neutral tori. Our model injects weighted particles and tracks their trajectories under the influence of all gravitational fields with interactions with other particles, solar photons and Pluto collisions. We present anticipated N2 and N tori based on current estimates of source characterization and environmental conditions. We also present an analysis of sensitivity to assumed initial conditions. Such results can provide insight into the Pluto system as well as valuable interpretation of New Horizon’s observational data.

  7. Controllability Problem of Fractional Neutral Systems: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Babiarz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article presents recent results of controllability problem of dynamical systems in infinite-dimensional space. Generally speaking, we describe selected controllability problems of fractional order systems, including approximate controllability of fractional impulsive partial neutral integrodifferential inclusions with infinite delay in Hilbert spaces, controllability of nonlinear neutral fractional impulsive differential inclusions in Banach space, controllability for a class of fractional neutral integrodifferential equations with unbounded delay, controllability of neutral fractional functional equations with impulses and infinite delay, and controllability for a class of fractional order neutral evolution control systems.

  8. ABOUT TAX NEUTRALITY AND NON-DISCRIMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Dan Morar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxpayers are required to pay taxes to the state budget by virtue of their position subject to the state, the latter in its capacity as sovereign person of public law. This quality gives them the right to impose against taxpayers by administrative means known, or sometimes with justice, respecting a certain extent the principles and traditions specific to tax. Principles of neutrality and non-discrimination are relevant in terms of describing the relations between public authorities and taxpayers. Although taxpayers are divided into official and legal persons, in fact individuals are those who support the ultimate tax burden.

  9. Neutral wind results from TIMED Doppler interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, T.; Gablehouse, R.; Gell, D.; Johnson, R.; Niciejewski, R.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Kafkalidis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the launch of the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in December 2001, the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) has been collecting lower thermosphere and mesospheric data for over a year. After adjustments to the spectral sampling scheme and operational mode, the instrument has been optimized. Efforts have also been made to improve the instrument performance. Preliminary neutral winds from O2 (0-0) have been analyzed. Tidal features and their seasonal variation are shown clearly in the wind data, which are quantitatively consistent with model prediction. We will report our progress on these efforts.

  10. Toxic emissions and devaluated CO2-neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    with a climate policy whose goals of CO2-reduction were made operational by green-wash. Arguments are given for the devaluation of CO2- neutrality in case of burning wood. Alternative practices as storing C in high quality wood products and/or leaving wood in the forest are recommended. A counter......-productive effect of dioxin formation in the cooling phase of wood burning appliances has been registered akin to de-novo-synthesis in municipal solid waste incinerators. Researchers, regulators and the public are, however, still preoccupied by notions of oven design and operation parameters, assuming that dioxin...

  11. Threshold Neutral Pion Photoproduction on the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Blin, Astrid Hiller; Ledwig, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The neutral pion photoproduction on the proton near threshold has a very small scattering cross section when compared to the charged channels, which in ChPT is explained by strong cancellations between the lowest order pieces. Therefore it is very sensitive to higher-order corrections of chiral perturbation theory. We perform a fully covariant calculation up to chiral order p^3 and we investigate the effect of the inclusion of the Delta(1232) resonance as an explicit degree of freedom. We show that the convergence improves, leading to a much better agreement with data at a wide range of energies.

  12. Framework for identification of neutral B mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a method for the study of CP-violating asymmetries in tagged states of neutral B mesons with arbitrary coherence properties. A set of time-dependent measurements is identified which completely specifies the density matrix of the initial state in a two-component space with basis vectors B0 and B¯ 0, and permits a determination of phases in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. For a given tagging configuration, the measurement of decays both to flavor eigenstates and to CP eigenstates provides the necessary information.

  13. Framework for Identification of Neutral B Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Gronau, Michael; Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a method for the study of CP-violating asymmetries in tagged states of neutral $B$ mesons with arbitrary coherence properties. A set of time-dependent measurements is identified which completely specifies the density matrix of the initial state in a two-component space with basis vectors $B^0$ and $\\overline B^0$, and permits a determination of phases in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. For a given tagging configuration, the measurement of decays both to flavor eigenstates and to CP eigenstates provides the necessary information.

  14. SPARQL Assist Language-Neutral Query Composer

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Luke; Wilkinson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    SPARQL query composition is difficult for the lay-person or even the experienced bioinformatician in cases where the data model is unfamiliar. Established best-practices and internationalization concerns dictate that semantic web ontologies should use terms with opaque identifiers, further complicating the task. We present SPARQL Assist: a web application that addresses these issues by providing context-sensitive type-ahead completion to existing web forms. Ontological terms are suggested using their labels and descriptions, leveraging existing XML support for internationalization and language-neutrality.

  15. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  16. Scientists Explain Catalysis Neutralizing Car's Tail Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The neutralization of the car's tail gas is a problem of practical importance in the eyes of both experimental and theoretical physicists. Recently, a group of CAS scientists join hands with the Queen's University of Belfast in the UK to make advances in exploring the process of CO oxidation in a bid to reduce the air pollution caused by the car's exhaust gas. The work has been supported by the "National 973Program" and the CAS Foundation for Overseas Studies. On March 4,its result was published by the Internet edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

  17. Neutral atomic carbon in dense molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Goldhaber, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The 370 micron 3P2-3P1 fine-structure line of neutral carbon was detected in seven sources: OMC 1, NGC 2024, S140, W3, DR 21, M17, and W51. Simultaneous analysis of J = 2-1 data and available observations of the J = 1-0 line make it possible to deduce optical depths and excitation temperatures for these lines. These data indicate that both C I lines are likely to be optically thin, and that the ratio of C I to CO column densities in these clouds is typically about 0.1.

  18. Large neutral amino acids in daily practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Kirsten Kiær

    2010-01-01

    At the Kennedy Centre for Phenylketonuria, Denmark, large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) are being used to treat adult and adolescent patients who are nonadherent to dietary treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU). At the start of treatment, a patient must undergo dietary analysis and regular blood...... sampling to measure plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations. The aim of this analysis and treatment is that the patient receives 25-30% of the daily protein requirement from LNAA supplementation and the remaining 70-75% from natural, low-phenylalanine proteins (although some patients have difficulties...

  19. Targets for a Neutral Kaon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Christopher [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A secondary beam of neutral Kaons is under consideration for Hall D at Jefferson Lab to perform spectroscopic studies of hyperons produced by K 0 L particles scattering from proton and deuteron targets. The proposed physics program would utilize the GlueX detector package currently installed in Hall D. This contribution looks at potential targets for use in the new facility, paying close attention to the existing infrastructure of GlueX and Hall D. Unpolarized cryotargets of liquid hydrogen and deuerium, as well as polarized solid targets of protons and deuterons are examined.

  20. Surface effects on nitrogen vacancy centers neutralization in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Arthur N.; Dowdell, Dontray A.; Santamore, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy (NV-) based magnetic sensors strongly depends on the stability of nitrogen vacancy centers near the diamond surface. The sensitivity of magnetic field detection is diminished as the NV- turns into the neutralized charge state NV0. We investigate the neutralization of NV- and calculate the ratio of NV0 to total NV (NV-+NV0) caused by a hydrogen terminated diamond with a surface water layer. We find that NV- neutralization exhibits two distinct regions: near the surface, where the NV- is completely neutralized, and in the bulk, where the neutralization ratio is inversely proportional to depth following the electrostatic force law. In addition, small changes in concentration can lead to large differences in neutralization behavior. This phenomenon allows one to carefully control the concentration to decrease the NV- neutralization. The presence of nitrogen dopant greatly reduces NV- neutralization as the nitrogen ionizes in preference to NV- neutralization at the same depth. The water layer pH also affects neutralization. If the pH is very low due to cleaning agent residue, then we see a change in the band bending and the reduction of the two-dimensional hole gas region. Finally, we find that dissolved carbon dioxide resulting from direct contact with the atmosphere at room temperature hardly affects the NV- neutralization.

  1. Weighing neutrinos with cosmic neutral hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the HI mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that HI is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}(z)$, is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modelling the HI distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at $z > 3$, and a simple analytic model at $z<3$, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array ...

  2. A quirky probe of neutral naturalness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the signals arising from top partner pair production at the LHC as a probe of theories of neutral naturalness. We focus on scenarios in which top partners carry electroweak charges, such as folded supersymmetry or the quirky little Higgs. In this class of theories the top partners are pair produced as quirky bound states, since they are charged under a mirror color group whose lightest states are hidden glueballs. The quirks promptly de-excite and annihilate into glueballs, which decay back to Standard Model fermions via Higgs mixing. This can give rise to spectacular signatures at the LHC, such displaced decays, or high-multiplicity prompt production of many hard b ¯b or τ+τ- pairs. We show that signals arising from top partner pair production constitute the primary discovery channel for this class of theories in most regions of parameter space, and might provide the only experimental probe of scenarios with sub-cm glueball decay lengths. The measurement of top partner masses and couplings, which could be used to test the neutral naturalness mechanism directly, is also a tantalizing possibility.

  3. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsuey-Fen; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  4. Punctualism, non-adaptationism, neutralism and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, M V

    1987-01-01

    In its further development the theory of evolution will incorporate molecular biology, synergetics and the theory of information. Using a simple model it is shown that speciation can be similar to phase transition. This is a thermodynamical statement which does not say anything concerning the sharpness and kinetic features of transition. Hence there is no contradiction between punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism. The notion of punctualism can be used in the sense of phase transition. Evolution is directional because of constraints of natural selection due to the structure of organisms already existing and to the possible pathways of development. Correspondingly many characters are non-adaptative. Not only are the structures of proteins important for speciation but also the exact answers to the questions: "how much", "where" and "when"? These answers can be obtained as the results of regulation of genes, particularly of homeiotic regulation. The basis features of the structure of proteins are considered and the sense of the neutral theory is discussed in connection with degeneracy of correlation between the primary structure of a protein, its spatial structure and biological function. Informational aspects of evolution are discussed. Punctualism, non-adaptationism and neutralism form the triad of internally connected features of evolution. The Darwinian theory preserves its fundamental significance.

  5. Amphiphilic paramagnetic neutral gold dithiolene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perochon, Romain; Piekara-Sady, Lydia; Jurga, Witold; Clérac, Rodolphe; Fourmigué, Marc

    2009-04-28

    The sulfiding of benzils with P(4)S(10) in 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvent allows for a direct synthesis of neutral radical, gold dithiolene complexes based on 1,2-bis-(4-alkoxy-phenyl)ethylene-1,2-dithiolate ligands with n-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl chains. The three neutral and soluble complexes Au-OC(4), Au-OC(8) and Au-OC(12) exhibit a near infrared (NIR) absorption band around 1.5 mum and EPR characteristics which confirm a strong delocalization of the spin density on the electron-rich dithiolene ligands. X-Ray crystal structures of Au-OC(4) and Au-OC(12) are compared with those of the corresponding nickel complexes. They are characterised by segregation of the alkyl chains into layered structures with a stacking of the radical complexes into alternated spin chains, confirmed by the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility which attests for antiferromagnetic interactions and a singlet ground state. Observations under polarising microscope and DSC experiments do not reveal a thermotropic behaviour for Au-OC(12).

  6. Neutral Einstein metrics in four dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Peter R.

    1991-11-01

    In Matsushita [J. Math. Phys. 22, 979-982 (1981), ibid. 24, 36-40 (1983)], for curvature endomorphisms for the pseudo-Euclidean space R2,2, an analog of the Petrov classification as a basis for applications to neutral Einstein metrics on compact, orientable, four-dimensional manifolds is provided. This paper points out flaws in Matsushita's classification and, moreover, that an error in Chern's [``Pseudo-Riemannian geometry and the Gauss-Bonnet formula,'' Acad. Brasileira Ciencias 35, 17-26 (1963) and Shiing-Shen Chern: Selected Papers (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1978)] Gauss-Bonnet formula for pseudo-Riemannian geometry was incorporated in Matsushita's subsequent analysis. A self-contained account of the subject of the title is presented to correct these errors, including a discussion of the validity of an appropriate analog of the Thorpe-Hitchin inequality of the Riemannian case. When the inequality obtains in the neutral case, the Euler characteristic is nonpositive, in contradistinction to Matsushita's deductions.

  7. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  8. Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun (Scripps)

    2012-10-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

  9. Measurement of Inclusive Neutral Current Neutral Pion Production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurimoto, Y

    2009-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports inclusive neutral current neutral pion production by a muon neutrino beam on a polystyrene target (C8H8). We obtain (7.7 \\pm 0.5(stat.) \\pm 0.5 (sys.)) x 10^(-2) as the ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section; the mean energy of neutrinos producing detected neutral pions is 1.1 GeV. The result agrees with the Rein-Sehgal model implemented in our neutrino interaction simulation program with nuclear effects. The spectrum shape of the neutral pion momentum and angle agree with the model. We also measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent pion production to total charged current cross section to be (0.9 \\pm 0.5) x 10^(-2).

  10. Measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurimoto, Y; Brice, S J; Bugel, L; Catala-Perez, J; Cheng, G; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Dore, U; Finley, D A; Franke, A J; Giganti, C; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Guzowski, P; Hanson, A; Hayato, Y; Hiraide, K; Jover-Manas, G; Karagiorgi, G; Katori, T; Kobayashi, Y K; Kobilarcik, T; Kubo, H; Louis, W C; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Mahn, K B M; Mariani, C; Masuike, S; Matsuoka, K; McGary, V T; Metcalf, W; Mills, G B; Mitsuka, G; Miyachi, Y; Mizugashira, S; Moore, C D; Nakajima, Y; Nakaya, T; Napora, R; Nienaber, P; Orme, D; Otani, M; Russell, A D; Sanchez, F; Shaevitz, M H; Shibata, T -A; Sorel, M; Stefanski, R J; Takei, H; Tanaka, H -K; Tanaka, M; Tayloe, R; Taylor, I J; Tesarek, R J; Uchida, Y; Van de Water, R; Walding, J J; Wascko, M O; White, H B; Wilking, M J; Yokoyama, M; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2010-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon by a muon neutrino beam with average energy 0.8 GeV. The separation of coherent from inclusive neutral pion production has been improved by detecting recoil protons from resonant neutral pion production. We measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent neutral pion production to total charged current cross sections to be (1.16 +/- 0.24) x 10-2. The ratio of charged current coherent pion to neutral current coherent pion production is calculated to be 0.14+0.30 -0.28, using our published charged current coherent pion measurement.

  11. The Statistics of Neutral Density Maxima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. Y.; Gentile, L. C.; Huang, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Sutton, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have analyzed neutral density observations from the CHAMP and GRACE spacecraft over the interval from launch in 2001 and 2002, respectively, to 2010 (CHAMP) and 2012 (GRACE). We extract maxima which are 30% above the ambient mean values as indications of localized Joule heating. Our analysis of these maxima shows that they occur predominantly at very high latitudes, with a mean of -74⁰ Magnetic Latitude (MLat) in the Southern Hemisphere, and 78⁰ MLat in the Northern Hemisphere. There is a maximum at 11.5-12 Magnetic Local Time (MLT) but the distribution is widely spread across all MLTs. The frequency of occurrence is correlated with the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and with the SymH index. The implications of these results will be discussed in the context of coupling of the thermosphere to the magnetosphere and ionosphere.

  12. A redox-neutral catechol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Yan, Dingyuan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Xiong, Feng; Wei, Wei; Lu, Yi; Sun, Wei-Yin; Li, Jie Jack; Zhao, Jing

    2017-01-27

    Ubiquitous tyrosinase catalyses the aerobic oxidation of phenols to catechols through the binuclear copper centres. Here, inspired by the Fischer indole synthesis, we report an iridium-catalysed tyrosinase-like approach to catechols, employing an oxyacetamide-directed C-H hydroxylation on phenols. This method achieves one-step, redox-neutral synthesis of catechols with diverse substituent groups under mild conditions. Mechanistic studies confirm that the directing group (DG) oxyacetamide acts as the oxygen source. This strategy has been applied to the synthesis of different important catechols with fluorescent property and bioactivity from the corresponding phenols. Finally, our method also provides a convenient route to (18)O-labelled catechols using (18)O-labelled acetic acid.

  13. Quantum computing implementations with neutral particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negretti, Antonio; Treutlein, Philipp; Calarco, Tommaso

    2011-01-01

    We review quantum information processing with cold neutral particles, that is, atoms or polar molecules. First, we analyze the best suited degrees of freedom of these particles for storing quantum information, and then we discuss both single- and two-qubit gate implementations. We focus our...... discussion mainly on collisional quantum gates, which are best suited for atom-chip-like devices, as well as on gate proposals conceived for optical lattices. Additionally, we analyze schemes both for cold atoms confined in optical cavities and hybrid approaches to entanglement generation, and we show how...... optimal control theory might be a powerful tool to enhance the speed up of the gate operations as well as to achieve high fidelities required for fault tolerant quantum computation....

  14. A Quirky Probe of Neutral Naturalness

    CERN Document Server

    Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    We consider the signals arising from top partner pair production at the LHC as a probe of theories of Neutral Naturalness. We focus on scenarios in which the top partners carry electroweak charges, such as Folded SUSY or the Quirky Little Higgs. In this class of theories the top partners are charged under a mirror color group whose lightest states are hidden glueballs. The top partners, once produced, form a quirky bound state that de-excites promptly and annihilates into hidden glueballs. These glueballs can decay through mixing with the Higgs, giving rise to striking displaced signatures at the LHC. We show that the displaced signals arising from top partner pair production constitute the primary discovery channel for this class of theories in most regions of parameter space.

  15. Modelling Neutral Hydrogen Discs of Spiral Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林伟鹏; 洪碧海

    2002-01-01

    We present an analytical model of a neutral hydrogen disc in a spiral galaxy. The gas disc of the spiral galaxy isassumed to have an exponential surface density profile and to be ionized by the cosmic ultraviolet background.To compare with observations, we consider the disc position angle and inclination angle for a line of sight goingthrough the galaxy disc. The HI column densities depend on the strength of ionizing field and disc position andinclination. The model was applied to NGC 3198 and the results were compared with observational data. TheHI disc profile at large disc radii can be tested by further HI observations using radio telescopes with a largeraperture than the present facilities. This HI disc model can be used to predict quasar absorption line systems bygalaxy discs if quasar lines of sight go through the discs.

  16. Electrostatic attraction between overall neutral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Ram M; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Two overall neutral surfaces with positively and negatively charged domains ("patches") have been shown in recent experiments to exhibit long-range attraction when immersed in an ionic solution. Motivated by the experiments, we calculate analytically the osmotic pressure between such surfaces within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, using a variational principle for the surface-averaged free energy. The electrostatic potential, calculated beyond the linear Debye-Hückel theory, yields an overall attraction at large intersurface separations, over a wide range of the system's controlled length scales. In particular, the attraction is stronger and occurs at smaller separations for surface patches of larger size and charge density. In this large patch limit, we find that the attraction-repulsion crossover separation is inversely proportional to the square of the patch-charge density and to the Debye screening length.

  17. Neutralized current acid waste consolidation management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, W.J.; Brown, R.G.; Galbraith, J.; Jensen, C.; Place, D.E.; Reddick, G.W.; Zuroff, W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this evaluation is to recommend a management plan for the high-heat tank waste, including neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) in AY and AZ Tank Farms, and tank C-106 waste. The movement of solids, liquids and salt cake in the designated tank farms is included. Decision analysis techniques were used to determine a recommended alternative. The recommended course of action was replacement of a 75-hp mixer pump in tank AY-102 and in-tank concentration of tank AZ-102 supernate. The alternative includes transfer fo tank C-106 sludge to tank AY-102, then transfer to tank AY-102 and tank C-106 sludge to tank AZ-101 using the new 75-hp mixer pump installed in tank AY-102. Tank AZ-101 becomes a storage tank for high-level waste (HLW) sludge, with the capacity to mix and transfer sludge as desired.

  18. A redox-neutral catechol synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Yan, Dingyuan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ting; Xiong, Feng; Wei, Wei; Lu, Yi; Sun, Wei-Yin; Li, Jie Jack; Zhao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitous tyrosinase catalyses the aerobic oxidation of phenols to catechols through the binuclear copper centres. Here, inspired by the Fischer indole synthesis, we report an iridium-catalysed tyrosinase-like approach to catechols, employing an oxyacetamide-directed C-H hydroxylation on phenols. This method achieves one-step, redox-neutral synthesis of catechols with diverse substituent groups under mild conditions. Mechanistic studies confirm that the directing group (DG) oxyacetamide acts as the oxygen source. This strategy has been applied to the synthesis of different important catechols with fluorescent property and bioactivity from the corresponding phenols. Finally, our method also provides a convenient route to 18O-labelled catechols using 18O-labelled acetic acid.

  19. Meson exchange and neutral weak currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, D.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Measurements of parity-violating electron scattering asymmetries to determine weak neutral currents in nuclei will be effected by the presence of meson exchange currents. Present low momentum transfer calculations, based on a flavor independent framework, show these effects to be small. In general, however, as the momentum transfer increases to values typical of deep-inelastic scattering, fragmentation functions show a clear flavor dependence. It is suggested that a good experimental starting point for understanding the flavor dependence of meson production and exchange currents is the Q{sup 2} dependence of parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive single pion electroproduction. A CEBAF facility with doubled energy is necessary to approach momentum transfers where this process begins to scale.

  20. WEIGHING NEUTRINOS WITH COSMIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Bull, Philip, E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: p.j.bull@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, Ω{sub H} {sub i}(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, M{sub ν} ≡ Σ m{sub ν}. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL)

  1. Flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sahoo; L Maharana

    2004-09-01

    New neutral gauge bosons ' are the features of many models addressing the physics beyond the standard model. Together with the existence of new neutral gauge bosons, models based on extended gauge groups (rank > 4) often predict new charged fermions also. A mixing of the known fermions with new states, with exotic weak-isospin assignments (left-handed singlets and right-handed doublets) will induce tree-level flavour-changing neutral interactions mediated by exchange, while if the mixing is only with new states with ordinary weak-isospin assignments, the flavour-changing neutral currents are mainly due to the exchange of the new neutral gauge boson '. We review flavour-changing neutral currents in models with extra ' boson. Then we discuss some flavour-changing processes forbidden in the standard model and new contributions to standard model processes.

  2. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  3. Cross-reactive broadly neutralizing antibodies: timing is everything

    OpenAIRE

    Euler, Zelda; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2012-01-01

    The recent surge of research into new broadly neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1 infection has recharged the field of HIV-1 vaccinology. In this review we discuss the currently known broadly neutralizing antibodies and focus on factors that may shape these antibodies in natural infection. We further discuss the role of these antibodies in the clinical course of the infection and consider immunological obstacles in inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies with a vaccine.

  4. Cross-reactive broadly neutralizing antibodies: timing is everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Zelda; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2012-01-01

    The recent surge of research into new broadly neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1 infection has recharged the field of HIV-1 vaccinology. In this review we discuss the currently known broadly neutralizing antibodies and focus on factors that may shape these antibodies in natural infection. We further discuss the role of these antibodies in the clinical course of the infection and consider immunological obstacles in inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies with a vaccine.

  5. Stability of a Neutral Stochastic Functional Differential Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bi-wen

    2005-01-01

    Sufficient condition for stochastic unifrom stability of a neutral stochastic functional differential equation is given, especially, new techniques are developed to cope with the neutral delay case, we obtained the sufficient condition for asymptotic stabillty of neutral stochastic differential delay equations. Due to the new techniques developed in this paper, the results obtained are very general and useful. The theory developed here gives a unified treatment for various asymptotic estimates e.g. exponential and polynomial bounds.

  6. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueruqe, NM); Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  7. An open quantum system approach to complementarity in neutral kaon interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    de Souza, Gustavo; Varizi, Adalberto D; Nogueira, Edson C; Sampaio, Marcos D

    2016-01-01

    In bipartite quantum systems, entanglement correlations between the parties exerts direct influence in the phenomenon of wave-particle duality. This effect has been quantitatively analyzed in the context of two qubits by M. Jakob and J. Bergou [Optics Communications 283(5) (2010) 827]. Employing a description of the K-meson propagation in free space where its weak decay states are included as a second party, we study here this effect in the kaon-antikaon oscillations. We show that a new quantitative "triality" relation similar to the one considered by Jakob and Bergou holds. In our case, it relates the distinguishability between the decay products states corresponding to the distinct kaon propagation modes $K_S $, $K_L $, the amount of wave-like path interference between these states, and the amount of entanglement given by the reduced von Neumann entropy. The inequality can account for the complementarity between strangeness oscillations and lifetime information previously considered in the literature, there...

  8. Open-quantum-systems approach to complementarity in neutral-kaon interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Gustavo; de Oliveira, J. G. G.; Varizi, Adalberto D.; Nogueira, Edson C.; Sampaio, Marcos D.

    2016-12-01

    In bipartite quantum systems, entanglement correlations between the parties exerts direct influence in the phenomenon of wave-particle duality. This effect has been quantitatively analyzed in the context of two qubits by Jakob and Bergou [Opt. Commun. 283, 827 (2010), 10.1016/j.optcom.2009.10.044]. Employing a description of the K -meson propagation in free space where its weak decay states are included as a second party, we study here this effect in the kaon-antikaon oscillations. We show that a new quantitative "triality" relation holds, similar to the one considered by Jakob and Bergou. In our case, it relates the distinguishability between the decay-product states corresponding to the distinct kaon propagation modes KS, KL, the amount of wave-like path interference between these states, and the amount of entanglement given by the reduced von Neumann entropy. The inequality can account for the complementarity between strangeness oscillations and lifetime information previously considered in the literature, therefore allowing one to see how it is affected by entanglement correlations. As we will discuss, it allows one to visualize clearly through the K0-K ¯0 oscillations the fundamental role of entanglement in quantum complementarity.

  9. ESTIMATION OF RISK NEUTRAL MEASURE FOR POLISH STOCK MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kliber

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we present the application of risk neutral measure estimation in the analysis of the index WIG20 from Polish stock market. The risk neutral measure is calculated from the process of the options on that index. We assume that risk neutral measure is the mixture of lognormal distributions. The parameters of the distributions are estimated by minimizing the sum of squares of pricing errors. Obtained results are then compared with the model based on a single lognormal distribution. As an example we consider changes in risk neutral distribution at the beginning of March 2014, after the outbreak of political crisis in the Crimea.

  10. New Modulation Strategy to Balance the Neutral-Point Voltage for Three-Level Neutral-Clamped Inverter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Lee, June-Seok; Lee, Kyo-Beum

    2014-01-01

    and medium switching states are employed to help the neutral-point voltage balancing. This method little bit increases the switching events and output total harmonic distortion. However, this method has a strong balancing ability at all regions. Further, it is very simple to implement in both space vector......This paper proposes a new modulation strategy that balances the neutral-point voltage for three-level neutral-clamped inverter systems. The proposed modulation replaces the P-type or N-type small switching states with other switching states that do not affect the neutral-point voltage. The zero...

  11. Measurement of neutral current neutral pion production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kurimoto, Y

    2009-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration has measured neutral current neutral pion production by the muon neutrino beam at a polystyrene target (C8H8). We obtained (7.7+- 0.5(stat.)+0.4-0.5 (sys.)) x 10^-2 as cross section ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section at the mean neutrino energy of 1.16 GeV. This result is consistent with the Monte Carlo prediction based on the Rein-Sehgal model

  12. A new technique to measure the neutralizer cell gas line density applied to a DIII-D neutral beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, D.N.; Hong, R.M.; Riggs, S.P.

    1995-10-01

    The DIII-D tokamak employs eight ion sources for plasma heating. In order to obtain the maximum neutralization of energetic ions (providing maximum neutral beam power) and reduce the heat load on beamline internal components caused by residual energetic ions, sufficient neutral gas must be injected into the beamline neutralizer cell. The neutral gas flow rate must be optimized, however, since excessive gas will increase power losses due to neutral beam scattering and reionization. It is important, therefore, to be able to determine the neutralizer cell gas line density. A new technique which uses the ion source suppressor grid current to obtain the neutralizer cell gas line density has been developed. The technique uses the fact that slow ions produced by beam-gas interactions in the neutralizer cell during beam extraction are attracted to the negative potential applied to the suppressor grid, inducing current flow in the grid. By removing the dependence on beam energy and beam current a normalized suppressor grid current function can be formed which is dependent only on the gas line density. With this technique it is possible to infer the gas line density on a shot by shot basis.

  13. Development of a Coxsackievirus A16 neutralization assay based on pseudoviruses for measurement of neutralizing antibody titer in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Ma, Hongxia; Xu, Lin; An, Dong; Sun, Shiyang; Huang, Xueyong; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2013-02-01

    Serum neutralizing antibody titers are indicative of protective immunity against Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the two main etiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and provide the basis for evaluating vaccine efficacy. The current CV-A16 neutralization assay based on inhibition of cytopathic effects requires manual microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, a high-throughput neutralization assay was developed by employing CV-A16 pseudoviruses expressing luciferase for detecting infectivity in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and measuring serum viral neutralizing antibodies. Without the need to use infectious CV-A16 strains, the neutralizing antibody titer against CV-A16 could be determined within 15h by measuring luciferase signals by this assay. The pseudovirus CV-A16 neutralization assay (pCNA) was validated by comparison with a conventional CV-A16 neutralization assay (cCNA) in testing 174 human serum samples collected from children (age <5 years). The neutralizing antibody titers determined by these two assays were well correlated (R(2)=0.7689). These results suggest that the pCNA can serve as a rapid and objective procedure for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies against CV-A16.

  14. Neutral particle Mass Spectrometry with Nanomechanical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sage, Eric; Alava, Thomas; Morel, Robert; Dupré, Cécilia; Hanay, Mehmet Selim; Duraffourg, Laurent; Masselon, Christophe; Hentz, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches to Mass Spectrometry (MS) necessarily rely on the ionization of the analytes of interest and subsequent spectrum interpretation is based on the mass-to-charge ratios of the ions. The resulting charge state distribution can be very complex for high-mass species which may hinder correct interpretation. A new form of MS analysis based on Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS) was recently demonstrated with high-mass ions. Thanks to a dedicated setup comprising both conventional time-of-flight MS (TOF-MS) and NEMS-MS in-situ, we show here for the first time that NEMS-MS analysis is insensitive to charge state: it provides one single peak regardless of the species charge state, highlighting effective clarification over existing MS analysis. All charged particles were thereafter removed from the beam electrostatically, and unlike TOF-MS, NEMS-MS retained its ability to perform mass measurements. This constitutes the first unequivocal measurement of mass spectra of neutral particles. This ability ...

  15. Predictions for ASKAP Neutral Hydrogen Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Alan R; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J; Koribalski, Barbel S; Gerstmann, Derek; Westerlund, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will revolutionise our knowledge of gas-rich galaxies in the Universe. Here we present predictions for two proposed extragalactic ASKAP neutral hydrogen (HI) emission-line surveys, based on semi-analytic models applied to cosmological N-body simulations. The ASKAP HI All-Sky Survey, known as WALLABY, is a shallow 3 Pi survey (z = 0 - 0.26) which will probe the mass and dynamics of over 600,000 galaxies. A much deeper small-area HI survey, called DINGO, aims to trace the evolution of HI from z = 0 - 0.43, a cosmological volume of 40 million Mpc^3, detecting potentially 100,000 galaxies. The high-sensitivity 30 antenna ASKAP core (diameter ~2 km) will provide an angular resolution of 30 arcsec (at z=0). Our simulations show that the majority of galaxies detected in WALLABY (87.5%) will be resolved. About 5000 galaxies will be well resolved, i.e. more than five beams (2.5 arcmin) across the major axis, enabling kinematic studies of their gaseous disks. Thi...

  16. Innershell Photoionization Studies of Neutral Atomic Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, W C; Lindle, D W; Sant'Anna, M M; Savin, D W

    2014-01-01

    Innershell ionization of a $1s$ electron by either photons or electrons is important for X-ray photoionized objects such as active galactic nuclei and electron-ionized sources such as supernova remnants. Modeling and interpreting observations of such objects requires accurate predictions for the charge state distribution (CSD) which results as the $1s$-hole system stabilizes. Due to the complexity of the complete stabilization process, few modern calculations exist and the community currently relies on 40-year-old atomic data. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study for innershell photoionization of neutral atomic nitrogen for photon energies of $403-475$~eV. Results are reported for the total ion yield cross section, for the branching ratios for formation of N$^+$, N$^{2+}$, and N$^{3+}$, and for the average charge state. We find significant differences when comparing to the data currently available to the astrophysics community. For example, while the branching ratio to N$^{2+}$ is so...

  17. Design considerations for partial neutralization acid injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, T.R.; Van der Cook, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    It is currently estimated that, after vacuum evaporator-crystallizer of Hanford liquid wastes on the order of 10 million gallons of caustic residual liquor will remain. Partial Neutralization, the continuous addition of nitric acid to the slurry is being developed to allow additional volume reduction and reduce interim storage costs. Tests revealed that acid and liquor compositions as well as nozzle design are significant factors in the concentration of NO/sub x/ in the mild steel vessel vent system. The available literature information relating to mixing of up to 20 gallons per minute of acid with 14,000 gallons per minute of slurry is presented. Very rapid and thorough mixing of the injected acid is required, since reaction of even 0.1 percent of the injected acid with sodium nitrite in the slurry would yield unacceptable levels of NO/sub x/ in the vessel vent system. The mixing time calculated by a method developed herein was used to evaluate the proposed conceptual mixing nozzle.

  18. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - SADE NBS Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    One of the main components of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is the Solar Array Drive Electronics (SADE) system. This system interfaces with the Support System Module (SSM) for exchange of operational commands and telemetry data. SADE operates and controls the Solar Array Drive Mechanisms (SADM) for the orientation of the Solar Array Drive (SAD). It also monitors the position of the arrays and the temperature of the SADM. During the first HST servicing mission, the astronauts replaced the SADE component because of some malfunctions. This turned out to be a very challenging extravehicular activity (EVA). Two transistors and two diodes had been thermally stressed with the conformal coating discolored and charred. Soldered cornections became molten and reflowed between the two diodes. The failed transistors gave no indication of defective construction. All repairs were made and the HST was redeposited into orbit. Prior to undertaking this challenging mission, the orbiter's crew trained at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) to prepare themselves for working in a low gravity environment. They also practiced replacing HST parts and exercised maneuverability and equipment handling. Pictured is an astronaut practicing climbing a space platform that was necessary in making repairs on the HST.

  19. Neutral sheet crossings in the distant magnetotail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkila, W.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Smith, E.J.; Baker, D.N.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the magnetic field data from ISEE-3 in the distant magnetotail for 18 crossings of the cross-tail current sheet (or so-called natural sheet) to determine the direction of the normal component B/sub z/. The crossings occurred near the middle of the aberrated magnetotail (0 < y < 30 R/sub e, -10 < z < 5) in GSM coordinates, at a distance of about 220 R/sub e/, January 28 to February 12, 1983; in each case the plasma flow velocity was tailward. In 2 cases we found B/sub z/ negative (southward), as would be required with a magnetic neutral line (reconnection line) earthward of the spacecraft. In 12 cases B/sub z/ was clearly northward (B/sub z/ > 0.4 nT), consistent with closed field lines connected to the earth. In 3 cases B/sub z/ was very close to zero; in several instances there was structure in B/sub y/, suggesting localized currents with x or z directions. One may have been a magnetopause crossing. The strong preponderance of northward B/sub z/ favors a model of the magnetotail which is dominated by boundary layer plasma, flowing tailward on closed magnetic field lines, which requires the existence of an electric field in the sense from dusk to dawn. 37 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Emergent neutrality drives phytoplankton species coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Angel M.; Calliari, Danilo; Kruk, Carla; Conde, Daniel; Bonilla, Sylvia; Fort, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive species coexistence and community dynamics have long puzzled ecologists. Here, we explain species coexistence, size structure and diversity patterns in a phytoplankton community using a combination of four fundamental factors: organism traits, size-based constraints, hydrology and species competition. Using a ‘microscopic’ Lotka–Volterra competition (MLVC) model (i.e. with explicit recipes to compute its parameters), we provide a mechanistic explanation of species coexistence along a niche axis (i.e. organismic volume). We based our model on empirically measured quantities, minimal ecological assumptions and stochastic processes. In nature, we found aggregated patterns of species biovolume (i.e. clumps) along the volume axis and a peak in species richness. Both patterns were reproduced by the MLVC model. Observed clumps corresponded to niche zones (volumes) where species fitness was highest, or where fitness was equal among competing species. The latter implies the action of equalizing processes, which would suggest emergent neutrality as a plausible mechanism to explain community patterns. PMID:21177680

  1. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  2. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator- NB38 -Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory. It was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, the HST was finally designed and built becoming operational in the 1990s. The HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. Pictured is MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) that served as the test center for shuttle astronauts training for Hubble related missions. Shown are astronauts Bruce McCandless and Sharnon Lucid being fitted for their space suits prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  3. Modeling Transport in Ultrathin Si Nanowires: Charged versus Neutral Impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rurali, Riccardo; Markussen, Troels; Suné, Jordi;

    2008-01-01

    of this effect are obtained by computing the electronic transmission through wires with either charged or neutral P and B dopants. The dopant potential is obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Contrary to the neutral case, the transmission through charged dopants cannot be converged within...

  4. Autonomous mine detection system (AMDS) neutralization payload module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, M.; Vanaman, R.; Wright, N.

    2010-04-01

    The Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) program is developing a landmine and explosive hazards standoff detection, marking, and neutralization system for dismounted soldiers. The AMDS Capabilities Development Document (CDD) has identified the requirement to deploy three payload modules for small robotic platforms: mine detection and marking, explosives detection and marking, and neutralization. This paper addresses the neutralization payload module. There are a number of challenges that must be overcome for the neutralization payload module to be successfully integrated into AMDS. The neutralizer must meet stringent size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements to be compatible with a small robot. The neutralizer must be effective against a broad threat, to include metal and plastic-cased Anti-Personnel (AP) and Anti-Tank (AT) landmines, explosive devices, and Unexploded Explosive Ordnance (UXO.) It must adapt to a variety of threat concealments, overburdens, and emplacement methods, to include soil, gravel, asphalt, and concrete. A unique neutralization technology is being investigated for adaptation to the AMDS Neutralization Module. This paper will describe review this technology and how the other two payload modules influence its design for minimizing SWaP. Recent modeling and experimental efforts will be included.

  5. Charged and Neutral Current Neutrino Induced Nucleon Emission Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nieves, J; Vacas, M J V

    2006-01-01

    By means of a Monte Carlo cascade method, to account for the rescattering of the outgoing nucleon, we study the charged and neutral current inclusive one nucleon knockout reactions off nuclei induced by neutrinos. The nucleon emission process studied here is a clear signal for neutral--current neutrino driven reactions, and can be used in the analysis of future neutrino experiments.

  6. Bidding for Nothing? The Pitfalls of overly Neutral Framing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Dürsch (Peter); J. Müller (Julia)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Neutral framing is a standard tool of experimental economics. However, overly neutral instructions, which lack any contextual clues, can lead to strange behavior. In a contextless second price auction for a meaningless good, a majority of subjects enter positive bids -

  7. The zero-sum assumption in neutral biodiversity theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Alonso, David; McKane, Alan J.

    2007-01-01

    The neutral theory of biodiversity as put forward by Hubbell in his 2001 monograph has received much criticism for its unrealistic simplifying assumptions. These are the assumptions of functional equivalence among different species (neutrality), the assumption of point mutation speciation, and the a

  8. Mild Solutions of Neutral Stochastic Partial Functional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Govindan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the existence and uniqueness of a mild solution for a neutral stochastic partial functional differential equation using a local Lipschitz condition. When the neutral term is zero and even in the deterministic special case, the result obtained here appears to be new. An example is included to illustrate the theory.

  9. Implementation of a plasma-neutral model in NIMROD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, S.; Shumlak, U.; King, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between plasma fluid and neutral species is of great importance in the edge region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The presence of neutrals can have beneficial effects such as fueling burning plasmas and quenching the disruptions in tokamaks, as well as deleterious effects like depositing high energy particles on the vessel wall. The behavior of edge plasmas in magnetically confined systems has been investigated using computational approaches that utilize the fluid description for the plasma and Monte Carlo transport for neutrals. In this research a reacting plasma-neutral model is implemented in NIMROD to study the interaction between plasma and neutral fluids. This model, developed by E. T. Meier and U. Shumlak, combines a single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma model with a gas dynamic neutral fluid model which accounts for electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange. Incorporating this model into NIMROD allows the study of the interaction between neutrals and plasma in a variety of plasma science problems. An accelerated plasma moving through a neutral gas background in a coaxial electrode configuration is modeled, and the results are compared with previous calculations from the HiFi code.

  10. A Case Study of Gender Neutral Policies in University Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Gender neutral housing is an innovative new policy being developed in colleges around the country. One reason to create these policies is an attempt to meet the unique needs and challenges of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. As the number of gender neutral housing policies in the United States continues to rise, research has been…

  11. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  12. Observability and controllability for linear neutral type systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rabah, Rabah; Sklyar, Grigory,

    2014-01-01

    International audience; For a large class of linear neutral type systems which include distributed delays we give the duality relation between exact controllability and exact observability. This duality is based on the representation of the abstract adjoint system as a special neutral type system. As a consequence of this duality relation, a characterization of exact observability is obtained. The time of observability is precised.

  13. Liberalism and capabilities: Theories of justice and the neutral state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Lehning (Percy)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractModern liberal theories share the idea that the state and its laws should remain neutral with respect to the varying conceptions of the good life held by individuals. This article discusses the way in which this notion of neutrality is defined and justified. Rawls's theory of justice is

  14. Robust stability of uncertain neutral linear stochastic differential delay system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming-hui; SHEN Yi; LIAO Xiao-xin

    2007-01-01

    The LaSalle-type theorem for the neutral stochastic differential equations with delay is established for the first time and then applied to propose algebraic criteria of the stochastically asymptotic stability and almost exponential stability for the uncertain neutral stochastic differential systems with delay. An example is given to verify the effectiveness of obtained results.

  15. 46 CFR 111.05-15 - Neutral grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neutral grounding. 111.05-15 Section 111.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the...

  16. Genetic mapping of day-neutrality in cultivated strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-neutrality is a highly desirable trait in strawberry (Fragaria L.) breeding programs worldwide due to its importance in extending the harvest season in commercial production. Day-neutral genotypes are photoperiod insensitive and will initiate flowers under any photoperiod conditions as long as t...

  17. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  18. Viral escape from HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies drives increased plasma neutralization breadth through sequential recognition of multiple epitopes and immunotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Kurt Wibmer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 and understanding how these antibodies develop remain important goals in the quest to rationally develop an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA Acute Infection Cohort (CAP257 whose plasma neutralized 84% of heterologous viruses. In this study we showed that breadth in CAP257 was largely due to the sequential, transient appearance of three distinct broadly neutralizing antibody specificities spanning the first 4.5 years of infection. The first specificity targeted an epitope in the V2 region of gp120 that was also recognized by strain-specific antibodies 7 weeks earlier. Specificity for the autologous virus was determined largely by a rare N167 antigenic variant of V2, with viral escape to the more common D167 immunotype coinciding with the development of the first wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Escape from these broadly neutralizing V2 antibodies through deletion of the glycan at N160 was associated with exposure of an epitope in the CD4 binding site that became the target for a second wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization by these CD4 binding site antibodies was almost entirely dependent on the glycan at position N276. Early viral escape mutations in the CD4 binding site drove an increase in wave two neutralization breadth, as this second wave of heterologous neutralization matured to recognize multiple immunotypes within this site. The third wave targeted a quaternary epitope that did not overlap any of the four known sites of vulnerability on the HIV-1 envelope and remains undefined. Altogether this study showed that the human immune system is capable of generating multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies in response to a constantly evolving viral population that exposes new targets as a consequence of escape from earlier neutralizing antibodies.

  19. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition.

  20. Status of ITER neutral beam cell remote handling system

    CERN Document Server

    Sykes, N; Choi, C-H; Crofts, O; Crowe, R; Damiani, C; Delavalle, S; Meredith, L; Mindham, T; Raimbach, J; Tesini, A; Van Uffelen, M

    2013-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam cell will contain up to three heating neutral beams and one diagnostic neutral beam, and four upper ports. Though manual maintenance work is envisaged within the cell, when containment is breached, or the radiological protection is removed the maintenance must be conducted remotely. This maintenance constitutes the removal and replacement of line replaceable units, and their transport to and from a cask docked to the cell. A design of the remote handling system has been prepared to concept level which this paper describes including the development of a beam line transporter, beam source remote handling equipment, upper port remote handling equipment and equipment for the maintenance of the neutral shield. This equipment has been developed complete the planned maintenance tasks for the components of the neutral beam cell and to have inherent flexibility to enable as yet unforeseen tasks and recovery operations to be performed.

  1. Neutralization principles for the Extraction and Transport of Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Riege, H

    2000-01-01

    The strict application of conventional extraction techniques of ion beams from a plasma source is characterized by a natural intensity limit determined by space charge.The extracted current may be enhanced far beyond this limit by neutralizing the space charge of the extracted ions in the first extraction gap of the source with electrons injected from the opposite side. The transverse and longitudinal emittances of a neutralized ion beam, hence its brightness, are preserved. Results of beam compensation experiments, which have been carried out with a laser ion source, are resumed for proposing a general scheme of neutralizing ion sources and their adjacent low-energy beam transport channels with electron beams. Many technical applications of high-mass ion beam neutralization technology may be identified: the enhancement of ion source output for injection into high-intensity, low-and high-energy accelerators, or ion thrusters in space technology, for the neutral beams needed for plasma heating of magnetic conf...

  2. Recent DIII-D neutral beam calibration results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, J.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.

    1991-10-01

    Injected DIII-D neutral beam power is estimated based on three principle quantities: the fraction of ion beam that is neutralized in the neutralizer gas cell, the beamline transmission efficiency, and the fraction of beam reionized in the drift duct. System changes in the past few years have included a new gradient grid voltage operating point, ion source arc regulation, routine deuterium operations and new neutralizer gas flow controllers. Additionally, beam diagnostics have been improved and better calibrated. To properly characterize the beams the principle quantities have been re-measured. Two diagnostics are primarily used to measure the quantities. The beamline waterflow calorimetry system measures the neutralization efficiency and the beamline transmission efficiency, and the target tile thermocouples measure the reionization loss. An additional diagnostic, the target tile pyrometer, confirmed the reionization loss measurement. Descriptions and results of these measurements will be presented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Journalistic neutralism and personalisation in the accountability interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    ’. The article analyses how and when neutralism and personalisation become resources for struggles for journalistic legitimacy and shows how neutralism and personalisation are at the same time interactional accomplishments. The case study reveals that neutralism continues to be a strong journalistic claim...... as truth claims in the accountability interview. The case is critical because the specific news interview was framed and marketed as an adversarial interview with a personalised “signature host”. Accordingly, it can be assumed that neutralism can still be a resource for political sources to challenge...... the legitimacy of the journalistic institution in similar media systems, however challenged by journalistic, personalised truth claims that do not retreat to neutralism in order to claim legitimacy. Consequently, personalisation may continue to engage citizen consumers, not despite but because of its spectacular...

  4. Instabilities in a Plasma Coupled to a Neutral Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughton, W.; Coppi, B.; Catto, P.; Krasheninnikov, S.

    1996-11-01

    Low temperature plasmas are often coupled to a neutral population through charge exchange or elastic collisions. The edge and divertor region of a tokamak and the ionosphere are a few well know examples. The linear stability of a coupled plasma - neutral system in plane geometry is examined and several relevant instabilities have been identified. One of these instabilities is an interchange type flute mode driven by the neutral pressure gradient. The second is a dissipative velocity shear instability^1 driven by the perpendicular gradient of a parallel velocity. Previously(B. Basu and B. Coppi, Journal of Geophysical Research), Vol. 94 No. A5 p. 5316 (1989) the neutral population had been treated as a uniform background insensitive to the perturbations in the plasma while in the present work the instability is allowed to perturb the neutrals as well as the plasma. The relevant dispersion relationships and instability conditions are presented. Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy

  5. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  6. Status of ITER neutral beam cell remote handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, N., E-mail: nick.sykes@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE. Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Belcher, C. [Oxford Technologies Ltd, Abingdon OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); Choi, C.-H. [ITER Organisation, CS90 046, 13067 St. Paul les Durance Cedex (France); Crofts, O. [CCFE. Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Crowe, R. [Oxford Technologies Ltd, Abingdon OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); Damiani, C. [Fusion for Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral-B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Delavalle, S.; Meredith, L. [Oxford Technologies Ltd, Abingdon OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); Mindham, T.; Raimbach, J. [CCFE. Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Tesini, A. [ITER Organisation, CS90 046, 13067 St. Paul les Durance Cedex (France); Van Uffelen, M. [Fusion for Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral-B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The ITER neutral beam cell will contain up to three heating neutral beams and one diagnostic neutral beam, and four upper ports. Though manual maintenance work is envisaged within the cell, when containment is breached, or the radiological protection is removed the maintenance must be conducted remotely. This maintenance constitutes the removal and replacement of line replaceable units, and their transport to and from a cask docked to the cell. A design of the remote handling system has been prepared to concept level which this paper describes including the development of a beam line transporter, beam source remote handling equipment, upper port remote handling equipment and equipment for the maintenance of the neutral shield. This equipment has been developed complete the planned maintenance tasks for the components of the neutral beam cell and to have inherent flexibility to enable as yet unforeseen tasks and recovery operations to be performed.

  7. Divergence at neutral and non-neutral loci in Drosophila buzzatii populations and their hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Holm; Pertoldi, C.; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2008-01-01

    The impact of intraspecific hybridisation on fitness and morphological traits depends on the history of natural selection and genetic drift, which may have led to differently coadapted gene-complexes in the parental populations. The divergence at neutral and non-neutral loci between populations c...

  8. Neutral Buoyancy underwater electrical cornector test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Included in the plans for the space station was a space telescope. This telescope would be attached to the space station and directed towards outerspace. Astronomers hoped that the space telescope would provide a look at space that is impossible to see from Earth because of Earth's atmosphere and other man made influences. Pictured is a large structure that is being used as the antenna base for the space telescope.

  9. Analysis of Titan's neutral upper atmosphere from Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Waite, J. H.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Gell, D. A.; Niemann, H. B.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Borggren, N.; Fletcher, G. G.; Patrick, E. L.; Raaen, E.; Magee, B. A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present an in-depth study of the distributions of various neutral species in Titan's upper atmosphere, between 950 and 1500 km for abundant species (N 2, CH 4, H 2) and between 950 and 1200 km for other minor species. Our analysis is based on a large sample of Cassini/INMS (Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer) measurements in the CSN (Closed Source Neutral) mode, obtained during 15 close flybys of Titan. To untangle the overlapping cracking patterns, we adopt Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to determine simultaneously the densities of different species. Except for N 2, CH 4, H 2 and 40Ar (as well as their isotopes), all species present density enhancements measured during the outbound legs. This can be interpreted as a result of wall effects, which could be either adsorption/desorption of these molecules or heterogeneous surface chemistry of the associated radicals on the chamber walls. In this paper, we provide both direct inbound measurements assuming ram pressure enhancement only and abundances corrected for wall adsorption/desorption based on a simple model to reproduce the observed time behavior. Among all minor species of photochemical interest, we have firm detections of C 2H 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6, CH 3C 2H, C 4H 2, C 6H 6, CH 3CN, HC 3N, C 2N 2 and NH 3 in Titan's upper atmosphere. Upper limits are given for other minor species. The globally averaged distributions of N 2, CH 4 and H 2 are each modeled with the diffusion approximation. The N 2 profile suggests an average thermospheric temperature of 151 K. The CH 4 and H 2 profiles constrain their fluxes to be 2.6×10 cms and 1.1×10 cms, referred to Titan's surface. Both fluxes are significantly higher than the Jeans escape values. The INMS data also suggest horizontal/diurnal variations of temperature and neutral gas distribution in Titan's thermosphere. The equatorial region, the ramside, as well as the nightside hemisphere of Titan appear to be warmer and present some evidence for the depletion

  10. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  11. Fuzzy Controller based Neutral Current Harmonic Suppression in Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Guna Sekar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent surveys of three-phase four-wire electric systems, buildings and industrial plants with computers and non-linear loads shows the excessive currents in the neutral conductor. This is mainly due to unbalancing system and non-linear loads. Third order harmonics are much dominant in the neutral conductor due to the presence of zero sequence components. In response to this concern, this paper presents a concept of series active filter scheme to suppress the neutral current harmonics to reduce the burden of the secondary of the distribution transformer. In this scheme, the series active filteris connected in series with the neutral conductor to eliminate the zero sequence components in the neutral conductor. In this paper, Fuzzy based controller is used to extract the harmonic component in the neutral conductor. The proposed method improves the overall performance of the system and eliminates the burden of the neutral conductor. To validate the proposed simulation results, a scale-down prototype experimental model is developed.

  12. Association with emotional information alters subsequent processing of neutral faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Lily; Fujioka, Takako; Chan, Jessica; McQuiggan, Douglas A; Anderson, Adam K; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2014-01-01

    The processing of emotional as compared to neutral information is associated with different patterns in eye movement and neural activity. However, the 'emotionality' of a stimulus can be conveyed not only by its physical properties, but also by the information that is presented with it. There is very limited work examining the how emotional information may influence the immediate perceptual processing of otherwise neutral information. We examined how presenting an emotion label for a neutral face may influence subsequent processing by using eye movement monitoring (EMM) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) simultaneously. Participants viewed a series of faces with neutral expressions. Each face was followed by a unique negative or neutral sentence to describe that person, and then the same face was presented in isolation again. Viewing of faces paired with a negative sentence was associated with increased early viewing of the eye region and increased neural activity between 600 and 1200 ms in emotion processing regions such as the cingulate, medial prefrontal cortex, and amygdala, as well as posterior regions such as the precuneus and occipital cortex. Viewing of faces paired with a neutral sentence was associated with increased activity in the parahippocampal gyrus during the same time window. By monitoring behavior and neural activity within the same paradigm, these findings demonstrate that emotional information alters subsequent visual scanning and the neural systems that are presumably invoked to maintain a representation of the neutral information along with its emotional details.

  13. The causal topology of neutral 4-manifolds with null boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiou, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers aspects of 4-manifold topology from the point of view of a neutral metric, a point of view we call neutral causal topology. In particular, we construct and investigate neutral 4-manifolds with null boundary that arise from canonical 3- and 4-dimensional settings. A null hypersurface is foliated by its normal and, in the neutral case, inherits a pair of totally null planes at each point. This paper focuses on this structure in a number of classical settings The first construction is the conformal compactification of flat neutral 4-space into the 4-ball. The null foliation on the boundary in this case is the Hopf fibration on the 3-sphere and the totally null planes in the boundary are integrable. The metric on the 4-ball is a conformally flat, scalar-flat, positive Ricci curvature neutral metric. The second constructions are subsets of the 4-dimensional space of oriented geodesics in a 3-dimensional space-form, equipped with its canonical neutral metric. We consider all oriented geodesics ...

  14. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouverney E.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  15. Analysis of variola and vaccinia virus neutralization assays for smallpox vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine M; Newman, Frances K; Davidson, Whitni B; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Yan, Lihan; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Karem, Kevin L; Damon, Inger K

    2012-07-01

    Possible smallpox reemergence drives research for third-generation vaccines that effectively neutralize variola virus. A comparison of neutralization assays using different substrates, variola and vaccinia (Dryvax and modified vaccinia Ankara [MVA]), showed significantly different 90% neutralization titers; Dryvax underestimated while MVA overestimated variola neutralization. Third-generation vaccines may rely upon neutralization as a correlate of protection.

  16. Quantum information science with neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakreungdet, Worawarong

    We study a system of neutral atoms trapped in a three-dimensional optical lattice suitable for the encoding, initialization and manipulation of atomic qubits. The qubits are manipulated by applied electromagnetic fields interacting with dipole moments of the atoms via light shifts, Raman transitions, Zeeman shifts, and microwave transitions. Our lattice is formed by three orthogonal one-dimensional lattices, which have different frequencies so that interference terms average to zero. This geometry allows considerable freedom in designing the component one-dimensional lattices, so that they provide not only confinement but also independent control in each dimension. Our atomic qubits are initialized from a laser-cooled atomic sample by Raman sideband cooling in individual lattice potential wells. We have demonstrated accurate and robust one-qubit manipulation using resonant microwave fields. In practice such control operations are always subject to errors, in our case spatial inhomogeneities in the microwave Rabi frequency and the light shifted qubit transition frequency. Observation of qubit dynamics in near real time allows us to minimize these inhomogeneities, and therefore optimize qubit logic gates. For qubits in the lattice, we infer a fidelity of 0.990(3) for a single pi-pulse. We have also explored the use of NMR-type pulse techniques in order to further reduce the effect of errors and thus improve gate robustness in the atom/lattice system. Our schemes for two-qubit quantum logic operations are based on controlled collisional interactions. We have experimented with two schemes in order to probe these collisions. The first involves manipulation of the center-of-mass wavepackets of two qubits in a geometry corresponding to two partially overlapping Mach-Zender interferometers. Unfortunately, this scheme has proven extremely sensitive to phase errors, as the wavepackets are moved by the optical lattice. The other scheme starts with two qubits in spatially

  17. Energy neutral and low power wireless communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Oner

    Wireless sensor nodes are typically designed to have low cost and small size. These design objectives impose restrictions on the capacity and efficiency of the transceiver components and energy storage units that can be used. As a result, energy becomes a bottleneck and continuous operation of the sensor network requires frequent battery replacements, increasing the maintenance cost. Energy harvesting and energy efficient transceiver architectures are able to overcome these challenges by collecting energy from the environment and utilizing the energy in an intelligent manner. However, due to the nature of the ambient energy sources, the amount of useful energy that can be harvested is limited and unreliable. Consequently, optimal management of the harvested energy and design of low power transceivers pose new challenges for wireless network design and operation. The first part of this dissertation is on energy neutral wireless networking, where optimal transmission schemes under different system setups and objectives are investigated. First, throughput maximization for energy harvesting two-hop networks with decode-and-forward half-duplex relays is studied. For a system with two parallel relays, various combinations of the following four transmission modes are considered: Broadcast from the source, multi-access from the relays, and successive relaying phases I and II. Next, the energy cost of the processing circuitry as well as the transmission energy are taken into account for communication over a broadband fading channel powered by an energy harvesting transmitter. Under this setup, throughput maximization, energy maximization, and transmission completion time minimization problems are studied. Finally, source and channel coding for an energy-limited wireless sensor node is investigated under various energy constraints including energy harvesting, processing and sampling costs. For each objective, optimal transmission policies are formulated as the solutions of a

  18. Gendered Violence, Intersectionalities and Resisting Gender Neutrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Stubbs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Developments in feminist theory and research towards a more complex approach to gender relations and a more differentiated understanding of gendered violence have been positive but also have been the subject of significant debate. Some debates have long histories, while others mark more newly emergent concerns. In this paper I reflect on three areas of debate: intersectionality, complex gendering and complex inequalities; differentiating between forms of gendered violence (with a focus on intimate partner violence (IPV, and criminalisation. In each of these areas, feminist frameworks and knowledge concerning gendered violence have been challenged and the resurgence of gender neutral accounts has been notable. I argue that keeping a structural analysis to the fore provides the best way forward for constructive debate in the field aligned with feminist aspirations for the achievement of substantive equality. El desarrollo de la teoría feminista y la investigación hacia un enfoque más complejo de las relaciones de género y una comprensión más diferenciada de la violencia de género ha sido positivo, pero también ha sido objeto de un importante debate. Algunos debates tienen una larga historia, mientras que otros marcan preocupaciones emergentes surgidas en los últimos tiempos. En este trabajo se reflexiona sobre tres áreas de debate: interseccionalidad, configuración de géneros compleja y desigualdades complejas; diferenciación entre formas de violencia de género (fijándose en la violencia de pareja (VP; y la criminalización. En cada una de estas áreas, se han cuestionado los marcos feministas y el conocimiento relativo a la violencia de género, y ha sido notable el resurgimiento de cuentas de género neutro. Se defiende que fomentar un análisis estructural ofrece la mejor forma de fomentar un debate constructivo en el campo alineado con las aspiraciones feministas para el logro de una igualdad sustantiva. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM

  19. Titan's Complex Neutral Composition as Measured by Cassini INMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Magee, B. A.; Gell, D. A.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Cravens, T.; Vuitton, V. S.; Yelle, R. V.

    2006-12-01

    The composition of Titan's complex neutral atmosphere above 1000 km as observed by the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer on recent flybys of Titan are presented. A rich mixture of hydrocarbons and nitriles are found with mixing ratios that vary from 10-4 to 10-7: acetylene, ethylene, ethane, benzene, toluene, cyanogen, propyne, propene, propane, and various nitriles. The calibration and mass deconvolution processes are presented in order to establish clear boundaries on the systematic errors that can occur in the mass deconvolution process. The role of ion neutral chemistry in forming these compounds will also be discussed.

  20. On delay-dependent robust stability of neutral systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renxin ZHONG; Zhi YANG; Guoli WANG

    2006-01-01

    The delay-dependent robust stability of uncertain linear neutral systems with delays is investigated. Both discrete-delay-dependent/neutral-delay-independent and neutral-/discrete- delay-dependent stability criteria will be developed. The proposed stability criteria are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities and it is easy to check the robust stability of the considered systems. By introducing certain Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional the mathematical development of our result avoids model transformation and bounding for cross terms, which lead to conservatism. Finally, numerical example is given to indicate the improvement over some existing results.

  1. The effects of semantic context on voicing neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Luce, J

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined regressive voice assimilation in Catalan in an attempt to determine a systematic explanation of complete versus incomplete voicing neutralization. Two types of contexts were constructed. In one type, semantic information was present to bias the meaning of target words. In the other type, no semantic information was present. The results showed that vowel duration distinguished underlying voicing in the neutral context only. The results suggest that neutralization occurs when semantic information is present, but that a voicing contrast is realized when it is absent.

  2. Nile Red Staining of Neutral Lipids in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostron, Kerry Ann; Lawrence, Clare Louise

    2017-01-01

    Determination of cellular neutral lipid levels in yeast is important for both the biotechnology industry and biomedical research. However, many of the currently available methods are labor intensive and time consuming. Here we describe a rapid and repeatable method for the detection of neutral lipids, which can be utilized in both oleaginous and non-oleaginous yeast species. The method utilizes the fluorescent dye, Nile red, which enables neutral lipid levels to either be visualized via microscopy or quantified using a 96-well plate assay.

  3. Controllability of Impulsive Neutral Functional Differential Inclusions in Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the controllability of impulsive neutral functional differential inclusions in Banach spaces. Our main aim is to find an effective method to solve the controllability problem of impulsive neutral functional differential inclusions with multivalued jump sizes in Banach spaces. Based on a fixed point theorem with regard to condensing map, sufficient conditions for the controllability of the impulsive neutral functional differential inclusions in Banach spaces are derived. Moreover, a remark is given to explain less conservative criteria for special cases, and work is improved in the previous literature.

  4. Flavor Changing Neutral Currents in a Realistic Composite Technicolor Model

    CERN Document Server

    Carone, C D; Carone, Christopher D.; Hamilton, Rowan T.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a composite technicolor model proposed recently by Georgi. Composite technicolor interactions produce four-quark operators in the low energy theory that contribute to flavor changing neutral current processes. While we expect operators of this type to be induced at the compositeness scale by the flavor-symmetry breaking effects of the preon mass matrices, the Georgi model also includes operators from higher scales that are not GIM-suppressed. Since these operators are potentially large, we study their impact on flavor changing neutral currents and CP violation in the neutral $B$, $D$, and $K$ meson systems.

  5. Broadly neutralizing antibodies developed by an HIV-positive elite neutralizer exact a replication fitness cost on the contemporaneous virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, D Noah; Carbonetti, Sara; Kehayia, Jenny; Kraft, Zane; Mikell, Iliyana; Scheid, Johannes F; Klein, Florian; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 1% of those infected with HIV-1 develop broad and potent serum cross-neutralizing antibody activities. It is unknown whether or not the development of such immune responses affects the replication of the contemporaneous autologous virus. Here, we defined a pathway of autologous viral escape from contemporaneous potent and broad serum neutralizing antibodies developed by an elite HIV-1-positive (HIV-1(+)) neutralizer. These antibodies potently neutralize diverse isolates from different clades and target primarily the CD4-binding site (CD4-BS) of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Viral escape required mutations in the viral envelope glycoprotein which limited the accessibility of the CD4-binding site to the autologous broadly neutralizing anti-CD4-BS antibodies but which allowed the virus to infect cells by utilizing CD4 receptors on their surface. The acquisition of neutralization resistance, however, resulted in reduced cell entry potential and slower viral replication kinetics. Our results indicate that in vivo escape from autologous broadly neutralizing antibodies exacts fitness costs to HIV-1.

  6. Strain-specific V3 and CD4 binding site autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies select neutralization-resistant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M. Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Amos, Joshua D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Alam, S. Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S.; Sam, Noel E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Mascola, John R.; Hahn, Beatrice; Shaw, George M.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses. PMID:26355218

  7. Factsheet on Energy Neutral Housing Construction; Infoblad Energieneutrale woningbouw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    A brief overview is given of all aspects of energy-neutral building and renovating homes. Besides technique, also attention is given to process, financing, management and maintenance. This factsheet is part of a series of three factsheets on energy neutral construction of houses and buildings. The other two are: 'Factsheet on Energy Neutral Building : Definition and ambition' and 'Factsheet Energy Neutral schools and offices' [Dutch] Een kort overzicht wordt gegeven van alle aspecten van energieneutraal bouwen en renoveren van woningen. Naast techniek komen ook proces, financiering en beheer en onderhoud aan de orde. Dit Infoblad maakt deel uit van een serie van drie Infobladen over energieneutraal bouwen voor woningen en gebouwen. De andere twee zijn: 'Infoblad Energieneutraal bouwen: definitie en ambitie' en 'Infoblad Energieneutrale scholen en kantoren'.

  8. Comparison theorems for neutral stochastic functional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaoming; Jiang, Jifa

    2016-05-01

    The comparison theorems under Wu and Freedman's order are proved for neutral stochastic functional differential equations with finite or infinite delay whose drift terms satisfy the quasimonotone condition and diffusion term is the same.

  9. NONDENSELY DEFINED IMPULSIVE NEUTRAL FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL INCLUSIONS WITH NONLOCAL CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueju Cao; Xianlong Fu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, using a fixed point theorem for condensing multi-valued maps, we investigate the existence of integral solutions to a class of nondensely defined neutral evolution impulsive differential inclusions with nonlocal conditions in Banach spaces.

  10. Post-learning psychosocial stress enhances consolidation of neutral stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Diana; Wolf, Oliver T

    2009-10-01

    Post-learning stress has been reported to enhance memory consolidation in humans. This effect was observed in studies using physical stressors or an anticipatory speech task. In the present study 58 participants (28 females and 30 males) were exposed to a psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test) or a control condition following the presentation of neutral and emotionally arousing positive and negative pictures, which were accompanied by a brief narrative. The stressor induced a significant neuroendocrine stress response in men and women. In a 24h delayed free recall test the stress group showed an enhanced memory for neutral but not for emotionally arousing positive and negative items. Additionally, a significant correlation between the cortisol stress response and memory for neutral items was evident. Thus, in contrast to previous studies, post-learning stress primarily enhanced consolidation of neutral material. Several theoretical and methodological explanations for the observed effects are discussed.

  11. Approximate controllability of neutral functional differential system with unbounded delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yeoul Park

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of control systems governed by the neutral functional differential equation with unbounded delay and study the approximate controllability of the system. An example is given to illustrate the result.

  12. OSCILLATION CRITERIA OF NEUTRAL TYPE IMPULSIVE HYPERBOLIC EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晴霞; 刘安平

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, oscillatory properties of all solutions for neutral type impulsive hyperbolic equations with several delays under the Robin boundary condition are investigated and several new sufficient conditions for oscillation are presented.

  13. An Effective Method of Producing Small Neutral Carbon Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhu-Hong; CHEN Cheng-Chu; HSU Yen-Chu

    2007-01-01

    An effective method of producing small neutral carbon clusters Cn (n = 1-6) is described. The small carbon clusters (positive or negative charge or neutral) are formed by plasma which are produced by a high power 532nm pulse laser ablating the surface of the metal Mn rod to react with small hydrocarbons supplied by a pulse valve, then the neutral carbon clusters are extracted and photo-ionized by another laser (266nm or 355nm) in the ionization region of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The distributions of the initial neutral carbon clusters are analysed with the ionic species appeared in mass spectra. It is observed that the yield of small carbon clusters with the present method is about 10 times than that of the traditional widely used technology of laser vaporization of graphite.

  14. Hadrons in compact stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debades Bandyopadhyay

    2006-05-01

    We discuss -equilibrated and charge neutral matter involving hyperons and $\\bar{K}$ condensates within relativistic models. It is observed that populations of baryons are strongly affected by the presence of antikaon condensates. Also, the equation of state including $\\bar{K}$ condensates becomes softer resulting in a smaller maximum mass neutron star.

  15. Effects of stream topology on ecological community results from neutral models

    Science.gov (United States)

    While neutral theory and models have stimulated considerable literature, less well investigated is the effect of topology on neutral metacommunity model simulations. We implemented a neutral metacommunity model using two different stream network topologies, a widely branched netw...

  16. Estimating the hydration enthalpies of neutral alkali metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stace, A J

    2006-10-26

    Using existing data on the ionization energies of alkali metal atoms in small clusters of water, a thermodynamic cycle is proposed from which the hydration enthalpies of the neutral metal atoms can be estimated. Where comparisons are possible, the results are in reasonable agreement with those obtained using both experimental and ab initio methods. Application of the thermodynamic cycle to neutral alkali metal atoms solvated in ammonia yields solvation enthalpies that are significantly lower than those obtained for water.

  17. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design. Final vesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  18. Surface effects on nitrogen vacancy centers neutralization in diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Newell, Arthur N.; Dowdell, Dontray A.; Santamore, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy (NV$^{-}$) based magnetic sensors strongly depends on the stability of nitrogen vacancy centers near the diamond surface. The sensitivity of magnetic field detection is diminished as the NV$^{-}$ turns into the neutralized charge state NV$^{0}$. We investigate the neutralization of NV$^{-}$ and calculate the ratio of NV$^{0}$ to total NV (NV$^{-}$+NV$^{0}$) caused by a hydrogen terminated diamond with a surface water layer. We find that NV$^{-}$ neutralizat...

  19. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  20. Neutral recirculation—the key to control of divertor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, A. S.; Pacher, H. D.

    2016-12-01

    Interaction of the plasma with neutral gas in the divertor affects virtually all aspects of divertor functionality (power loading of the targets, pumping and fuelling, sustaining the operational conditions of the core plasma). In the course of ITER design development, this interaction has been the subject of intense modelling analysis, supported by experiments on various tokamaks. Neutral gas puffing is found to be the most effective means of divertor control. The results of those studies are summarized and assessed in the paper.

  1. Identification and specificity of broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Laura E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Beginning in 2009, studies of the humoral responses of HIV‐positive individuals have led to the identification of scores, if not hundreds, of antibodies that are both broadly reactive and potently neutralizing. This development has provided renewed impetus toward an HIV vaccine and led directly to the development of novel immunogens. Advances in identification of donors with the most potent and broad anti‐HIV serum neutralizing responses were crucial in this effort. Equally, developme...

  2. Stability of neutral equations with constant time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.; Whitesides, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the stability of a scalar neutral equation with constant coefficients and constant time delays. A neutral equation is basically a differential equation in which the highest derivative appears both with and without a time delay. Time delays may appear also in the lower derivatives or the independent variable itself. The method is easily implemented, and an illustrative example is presented.

  3. A superconducting NbN detector for neutral nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Marksteiner, M; Sclafani, M; Haslinger, P; Ulbricht, H; Korneev, A; Semenov, A; Goltsman, G; Arndt, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a proof-of-principle study of superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) for the detection of individual neutral molecules/nanoparticles at low energies. The new detector is applied to characterize a laser desorption source for biomolecules and it allows to retrieve the arrival time distribution of a pulsed molecular beam containing the amino acid tryptophan, the polypeptide gramicidin as well as insulin, myoglobin and hemoglobin. We discuss the experimental evidence that the detector is actually sensitive to isolated neutral particles.

  4. Is Team Formation Gender Neutral? Evidence from Coauthorship Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Boschini, Anne; Sjögren, Anna

    2006-01-01

    We investigate if voluntary team formation is gender neutral. To this end, we model team formation as a random matching process influenced by the agents' preferences for team size and gender composition and derive how team formation depends on the gender ratio in the population of prospective team mates. We then test if the coauthorship pattern in articles published 1991-2002 in three top Economics journals is gender neutral, exploiting the variation in female presence across subfields of Eco...

  5. The experimental study of neutralized electron beams for electron cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; MacCaferri, R; Molinari, G; Tranquille, G; Varenne, F; Korotaev, Yu V; Meshkov, I N; Polyakov, V A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M

    1996-01-01

    In this report we present the latest experimental results on electron beam neutralization. These experiments have been made at LEAR and on the JINR test bench. The main difficulty in obtaining neutralized beams resides in an instability which is dependent on the electron beam current. A number of methods have been developed in order to overcome this instability and have enabled us to further investigate the possibility of generating intense low energy electron beams for the cooling of Pb ions.

  6. Dynamics of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Qing; Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter A.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams. Here we present experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a FEPS plasma. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Near-complete charge neutralization is established 5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS, and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub- μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS suggest that plasma can be generated for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. This is confirmed by fast photography of the plasma in the 1-meter long FEPS on NDCX-II, where effective charge neutralization of the beam was achieved with the optimized FEPS timing. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-AC0209CH11466 (PPPL) and DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL).

  7. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  8. RAZUMIKHIN-TYPE THEOREMS OF NEUTRAL STOCHASTIC FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Shaobo; Hu Shigeng

    2009-01-01

    The stability of stochastic functional differential equation with Markovian switching was studied by several authors, but there was almost no work on the stability of the neutral stochastic functional differential equations with Markovian switching. The aim of this article is to close this gap. The authors establish Razumikhin-type theorem of the neutral stochastic functional differential equations with Markovian switching, and those without Markovian switching.

  9. Angle-resolved neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, A; Turecek, F; McLafferty, F W

    1991-12-01

    Neutralization -reionization mass spectra of 2-propenal, isomeric butenes, and isomeric n-hexenes have been found to depend significantly on the z-axis scattering angle of the neutralization event. As shown by Cooks for ion dissociations, increasing scattering angles generally favor products of higher activation-energy reactions. For isomeric butenes and n-hexenes, these reactions provide more definitive information for isomeric characterization.

  10. The Republic of Moldova between Neutrality and NATO Memebership Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana CEBOTARI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the controversial issues existing in the foreign policy of the Republic of Moldova is that of the status of permanent neutrality of the state. Despite the new vector of Moldova, aimed at European integration processes in the area, Euro-Atlantic integration problem is virtually missing in the local political discourse. This article reveals some intractable problems referring to the status of The Republic of Moldova permanent neutrality.

  11. Neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemczewski, A.P.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis presents an experimental study of neutral particle dynamics in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The primary diagnostic used is a set of six neutral pressure gauges, including special-purpose gauges built for in situ tokamak operation. While a low main chamber neutral pressure coincides with high plasma confinement regimes, high divertor pressure is required for heat and particle flux dispersion in future devices such as ITER. Thus we examine conditions that optimize divertor compression, defined here as a divertor-to-midplane pressure ratio. We find both pressures depend primarily on the edge plasma regimes defined by the scrape-off-layer heat transport. While the maximum divertor pressure is achieved at high core plasma densities corresponding to the detached divertor state, the maximum compression is achieved in the high-recycling regime. Variations in the divertor geometry have a weaker effect on the neutral pressures. For otherwise similar plasmas the divertor pressure and compression are maximum when the strike point is at the bottom of the vertical target plate. We introduce a simple flux balance model, which allows us to explain the divertor neutral pressure across a wide range of plasma densities. In particular, high pressure sustained in the detached divertor (despite a considerable drop in the recycling source) can be explained by scattering of neutrals off the cold plasma plugging the divertor throat. Because neutrals are confined in the divertor through scattering and ionization processes (provided the mean-free-paths are much shorter than a typical escape distance) tight mechanical baffling is unnecessary. The analysis suggests that two simple structural modifications may increase the divertor compression in Alcator C-Mod by a factor of about 5. Widening the divertor throat would increase the divertor recycling source, while closing leaks in the divertor structure would eliminate a significant neutral loss mechanism. 146 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Recent Progress toward Engineering HIV-1-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Sun; Yue Li; Huiwen Zheng; Yiming Shao

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the ...

  13. HIV-2 neutralization by intact V3-specific Fab fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourial Samer

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The V3 region of both HIV-1 gp120 and HIV-2 gp125 surface glycoprotein has been described as a target for neutralizing antibodies. In this study a conformation-sensitive (3C4 and a linear site-specific (7C8 anti-HIV-2 V3 monoclonal antibody (mAb were characterized. The neutralization capacity of the purified mAbs and their respective papain-generated Fab fragments was analyzed. The Fabs were further characterized by sequence analysis. Our results demonstrate that neither purified mAbs were capable of neutralizing HIV-2, while intact Fab fragments from both mAbs blocked in vitro infection of HIV-2 isolates. Moreover, the conformation sensitive 3C4 Fab neutralized both subtype A and B HIV-2 isolates and SIVsm. Sequence analysis of the hypervariable regions of 3C4 Fab and 7C8 Fab revealed that the third CDR of the heavy chain (CDRH3 of the antibodies was not as long as many of the previously characterized neutralizing antibodies. Our findings suggest that whole 7C8 and 3C4 mAbs are sterically hindered from neutralizing HIV-2, whereas the smaller size of Fab fragments enables access to the V3 region on the virion surface.

  14. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A; Krivenko, A S; Murakhtin, S V; Savkin, V Ya; Korepanov, S A; Putvinski, S

    2011-03-01

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 × 10(17) H∕(cm(2) s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is ∼0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  15. Testing the Neutral Theory of Biodiversity with Human Microbiome Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianwei; Ma, Zhanshan Sam

    2016-08-16

    The human microbiome project (HMP) has made it possible to test important ecological theories for arguably the most important ecosystem to human health-the human microbiome. Existing limited number of studies have reported conflicting evidence in the case of the neutral theory; the present study aims to comprehensively test the neutral theory with extensive HMP datasets covering all five major body sites inhabited by the human microbiome. Utilizing 7437 datasets of bacterial community samples, we discovered that only 49 communities (less than 1%) satisfied the neutral theory, and concluded that human microbial communities are not neutral in general. The 49 positive cases, although only a tiny minority, do demonstrate the existence of neutral processes. We realize that the traditional doctrine of microbial biogeography "Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects" first proposed by Baas-Becking resolves the apparent contradiction. The first part of Baas-Becking doctrine states that microbes are not dispersal-limited and therefore are neutral prone, and the second part reiterates that the freely dispersed microbes must endure selection by the environment. Therefore, in most cases, it is the host environment that ultimately shapes the community assembly and tip the human microbiome to niche regime.

  16. Interaction of a neutral cloud moving through a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Current collection by outgassing probes in motion relative to a magnetized plasma may be significantly affected by plasma processes that cause electron heating and cross field transport. Simulations of a neutral gas cloud moving across a static magnetic field are discussed. The authors treat a low-Beta plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with the authors' Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). This study emphasizes the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where electrons are heated and can diffuse across field lines. When ionization or charge exchange collisions occur a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas. In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E times B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating. The thermal electron current is significantly enhanced due to this heating.

  17. Neutralizing Antibodies and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Stoll-Keller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The interplay between the virus and host innate and adaptive immune responses determines the outcome of infection. There is increasing evidence that host neutralizing responses play a relevant role in the resulting pathogenesis. Furthermore, viral evasion from host neutralizing antibodies has been revealed to be an important contributor in leading both to viral persistence in acute liver graft infection following liver transplantation, and to chronic viral infection. The development of novel model systems to study HCV entry and neutralization has allowed a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions during antibody-mediated neutralization. The understanding of these mechanisms will ultimately contribute to the development of novel antiviral preventive strategies for liver graft infection and an urgently needed vaccine. This review summarizes recent concepts of the role of neutralizing antibodies in viral clearance and protection, and highlights consequences of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  18. Fully Bayesian tests of neutrality using genealogical summary statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drummond Alexei J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many data summary statistics have been developed to detect departures from neutral expectations of evolutionary models. However questions about the neutrality of the evolution of genetic loci within natural populations remain difficult to assess. One critical cause of this difficulty is that most methods for testing neutrality make simplifying assumptions simultaneously about the mutational model and the population size model. Consequentially, rejecting the null hypothesis of neutrality under these methods could result from violations of either or both assumptions, making interpretation troublesome. Results Here we harness posterior predictive simulation to exploit summary statistics of both the data and model parameters to test the goodness-of-fit of standard models of evolution. We apply the method to test the selective neutrality of molecular evolution in non-recombining gene genealogies and we demonstrate the utility of our method on four real data sets, identifying significant departures of neutrality in human influenza A virus, even after controlling for variation in population size. Conclusion Importantly, by employing a full model-based Bayesian analysis, our method separates the effects of demography from the effects of selection. The method also allows multiple summary statistics to be used in concert, thus potentially increasing sensitivity. Furthermore, our method remains useful in situations where analytical expectations and variances of summary statistics are not available. This aspect has great potential for the analysis of temporally spaced data, an expanding area previously ignored for limited availability of theory and methods.

  19. Computational study on Kerr constants of neutral and ionized gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.

    2015-08-01

    In order to quantitatively examine the measurement capability of Poisson's field using electro-optic Kerr-effect (EOKE), Kerr constants of neutral molecules and ions are examined by means of first principle calculations. We have systematically computed Kerr constants of neutral molecules and ions of several molecular symmetry groups, with consistent theory level and basis sets. Computed Kerr constants of neutral molecules (N2, CO2, SF6, and CF3I) ranging across two orders of magnitudes are within 50% error of the experimental values, which are comparable to the scattering between experimental values itself. The results show that SF6 has smaller Kerr constant due to its high molecular symmetry compared to those of N2 and CO2. In contrast, CF3I has large Kerr constant due to its permanent dipole. Computed Kerr constants for anions are larger by two orders of magnitude than those of neutral molecules, probably due to the shielding effect. For cations, the opposite holds true; however, due to anisotropic polarizability, computed Kerr constants for some cations are comparable to neutral molecules, while others show smaller values. The ratio of Kerr constants of ions to those of neutral molecules are at most 102; EOKE is valid for measuring electric field in weakly ionized gas whose ionization degree is smaller than 10-3.

  20. HIV-1 neutralization: mechanisms and relevance to vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Michael B; Burton, Dennis R

    2007-11-01

    Antibody (Ab) mediated neutralization is a crucial means of host resistance to many pathogens and will most likely be required in the development of a vaccine to protect against HIV-1. Here we examine mechanistic aspects of HIV-1 neutralization with attention to recent studies on the stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters involved. Neutralization of HIV-1, as with any microbe, minimally requires an initial molecular encounter with Ab. Ab occupancy of functional heterotrimers of the envelope glycoproteins, gp120 and gp41 (Env), indeed appears to be the dominant mechanism of neutralization for HIV-1. However, the Ab-binding site, the parameters mentioned above, as well as the stages and duration of vulnerability to Ab recognition, prior to and leading up to viral entry, each have a distinct impact on the mechanism of neutralization for any given Ab specificity. With HIV-1, the problems of mutational variation and neutralization resistance, coupled with the lability and conformational heterogeneity in Env, have stimulated the search for rational approaches to Env immunogen design that are unprecedented in vaccinology.

  1. Relaxing the zero-sum assumption in neutral biodiversity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegeman, Bart; Etienne, Rampal S

    2008-05-21

    The zero-sum assumption is one of the ingredients of the standard neutral model of biodiversity by Hubbell. It states that the community is saturated all the time, which in this model means that the total number of individuals in the community is constant over time, and therefore introduces a coupling between species abundances. It was shown recently that a neutral model with independent species, and thus without any coupling between species abundances, has the same sampling formula (given a fixed number of individuals in the sample) as the standard model [Etienne, R.S., Alonso, D., McKane, A.J., 2007. The zero-sum assumption in neutral biodiversity theory. J. Theor. Biol. 248, 522-536]. The equilibria of both models are therefore equivalent from a practical point of view. Here we show that this equivalence can be extended to a class of neutral models with density-dependence on the community-level. This result can be interpreted as robustness of the model, i.e. insensitivity of the model to the precise interaction of the species in a neutral community. It can also be interpreted as a lack of resolution, as different mechanisms of interactions between neutral species cannot be distinguished using only a single snapshot of species abundance data.

  2. Mapping of an Approximate Neutral Density Surface with Ungridded Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A neutral density surface is a logical study frame for water-mass mixing since water parcels spread along such a surface without doing work against buoyancy restoring force. Mesoscale eddies are believed to stir and subsequently mix predominantly along such surfaces. Because of the nonlinear nature of the equation of state of seawater, the process of accurately mapping a neutral density surface necessarily involves lateral computation from one conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) cast to the next in a logical sequence. By contrast, the depth of a potential density surface on any CTD cast is found solely from the data on this cast. The lateral calculation procedure causes a significant inconvenience. In a previous paper by present author published in this journal (You,2006), the mapping of neutral density surfaces with regularly gridded data such as Levitus data has been introduced. In this note, I present a new method to find the depth of a neutral density surface from a cast without having to specify an integration path in space.An appropriate reference point is required that is on the neutral density surface and thereafter the neutral density surface can be determined by using the CTD casts in any order. This method is only approximate and the likely errors can be estimated by plotting a scatter diagram of all the pressures and potential temperatures on the neutral density surfaces. The method assumes that the variations of potential temperature and pressure (with respect to the values at the reference point) on the neutral density surface are proportional.It is important to select the most appropriate reference point in order to approximately satisfy this assumption, and in practice this is found by inspecting the θ-p plot of data on the surface. This may require that the algorithm be used twice. When the straight lines on the θ-p plot, drawn from the reference point to other points on the neutral density surface, enclose an area that is external to the

  3. The effects of somatic hypermutation on neutralization and binding in the PGT121 family of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Sok

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bnAbs are typically highly somatically mutated, raising doubts as to whether they can be elicited by vaccination. We used 454 sequencing and designed a novel phylogenetic method to model lineage evolution of the bnAbs PGT121-134 and found a positive correlation between the level of somatic hypermutation (SHM and the development of neutralization breadth and potency. Strikingly, putative intermediates were characterized that show approximately half the mutation level of PGT121-134 but were still capable of neutralizing roughly 40-80% of PGT121-134 sensitive viruses in a 74-virus panel at median titers between 15- and 3-fold higher than PGT121-134. Such antibodies with lower levels of SHM may be more amenable to elicitation through vaccination while still providing noteworthy coverage. Binding characterization indicated a preference of inferred intermediates for native Env binding over monomeric gp120, suggesting that the PGT121-134 lineage may have been selected for binding to native Env at some point during maturation. Analysis of glycan-dependent neutralization for inferred intermediates identified additional adjacent glycans that comprise the epitope and suggests changes in glycan dependency or recognition over the course of affinity maturation for this lineage. Finally, patterns of neutralization of inferred bnAb intermediates suggest hypotheses as to how SHM may lead to potent and broad HIV neutralization and provide important clues for immunogen design.

  4. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkarev, A.I., E-mail: aipush@mail.ru; Isakova, Y.I.; Khaylov, I.P.

    2015-01-15

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250–300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300–500 ns, 100–150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250–300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50–100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20–30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  5. The effect of deleterious mutations on neutral molecular variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlesworth, B.; Morgan, M.T.; Charlesworth, D. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Selection against deleterious alleles maintained by mutation may cause a reduction in the amount of genetic variability at linked neutral sites. This is because a new neutral variant can remain in a large population for a long period of time only if it is maintained in gametes that are free of deleterious alleles, and hence are not destined for rapid elimination from the population by selection. Approximate formulas are derived for the reduction below classical neutral values resulting from such background selection against deleterious mutations, for the mean times of fixation and loss of new mutations, nucleotide site diversity, and number of segregating sites. These formulas apply to random-mating populations with no genetic recombination, and to populations reproducing exclusively asexually or by self-fertilization. For a given selection regime and mating system, the reduction is an exponential function of the total mutation rate to deleterious mutations for the section of the genome involved. Simulations show that the effect decreases rapidly with increasing recombination frequency or rate of outcrossing. The mean time to loss of new neutral mutations and the total number of segregating neutral sites are less sensitive to background selection than the other statistics, unless the population size is of the order of a hundred thousand or more. The stationary distribution of allele frequencies at the neutral sites is correspondingly skewed in favor of rare alleles, compared with the classical neutral result. Observed reductions in molecular variation in low recombination genomic regions of sufficiently large size, for instance in the centromere-proximal regions of Drosophila autosomes or in highly selfing plant populations, may be partly due to background selection against deleterious mutations. 58 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. The neutralization of interferons by antibody. I. Quantitative and theoretical analyses of the neutralization reaction in different bioassay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, S E; Kawade, Y; Kohase, M; Yokoyama, H; Finter, N

    2001-09-01

    The highly specific ability of antibodies to inhibit the biologic activity of cytokines or other therapeutic proteins is widely used in research and a subject of increasing clinical importance. The need exists for a standardized approach to the reporting of neutralizing antibody potency soundly based on theoretical and practical considerations and tested by experimental data. Pursuant to the original studies of Kawade on the theoretical and functional aspects of neutralization of interferons (IFN), experimental data were obtained by different laboratories employing varied methodology to address two hypotheses concerning the nature of IFN neutralization reactions, based on a derived formula that allows expression of neutralizing power as the reduction of 10 laboratory units (LU)/ml to 1 LU/ml, the end point of most bioassays. Two hypotheses are posed: (1) antibody acts to neutralize a fixed amount of biologically active IFN molecules, or (2) antibody reduces IFN activity in a set ratio of added/residual biologically active IFN. The first, or fixed amount, hypothesis relates to the reactivity of high-affinity antibodies neutralizing equimolar amounts of antigen, whereas the second, or constant proportion, hypothesis postulates a reduction in the ratio of total added IFN to residual active IFN molecules, such as a low-affinity antibody might exhibit. Analyses of data of the neutralization of IFN-alpha and IFN-beta are presented, employing human polyclonal antibodies and murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The theoretical constructs of Kawade are extended in the Appendix and correlated with new experimental data in the text. The data clearly indicate that the low-antibody affinity, constant proportion hypothesis, rather than the high-antibody affinity, fixed amount hypothesis, is applicable, if the bioassay is sensitive to IFN. The findings presented here and in the following paper (pp. 743-755, this issue) taken together provide the basis for a standardized method of

  7. Assessment of subtalar joint neutral position:a cadaveric study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yan-xi; YU Guang-rong; MEI Jiong; ZHOU Jia-qian; WANG Wen

    2008-01-01

    Background Subtalar joint(STJ)neutral position is the position typically used by clinicians to obtain a cast representation of a patient's foot before fabrication of biomechanical functional orthosis. But no method for measuring STJ neutral position has been proven accurate and reproducible by different testers. This study was conducted to investigate the STJ neutral position in normal feet in cadavers. Methods Twelve fresh-frozen specimens of amputated lower legs were used. Pressure-sensitive films were inserted into the anterior and posterior articulation of STJ. The contact areas for various foot positions and under axial loads of 600 N were determined based on the gray level of the digitized film. The STJ neutral positions were determined as the ankle-foot position where the maxlmum contact area was achieved, because the neutral position of a joint was defined as the position where the concave and convex surfaces were completely congruous. Results In ankle-foot neutral position, the contact area of STJ was(2.79±0.24)cm2. In the range of motion of adduction-abduction (ADD-ABD), the maximum contact area was(3.00±0.26)cm2 when the foot was positioned 10°of ABD (F=221.361, P<0.05). In the range of motion of dorsiflexion-plantarflexion (DF-PF), the maximum contact area was (3. 61±0. 25)cm2 when the foot was positioned 20°of DF(F=121.067, P<0.05). In the range of motion of inversion-eversion (INV-EV), the maximum contact area was(3. 14+0.26)cm2 when the foot was positioned 10°of EV(F=256. 252, P<0.05). Conclusions Joints, such as STJ, therefore, are not necessarily in neutral position when the ankle. foot is placed in the traditional concept of neutral position. The results demonstrate that the most approximate STJ neutral position was in the foot position of 10°of abduction, 20°of dorsiflexion and 10°of eversion.

  8. Seeking to Improve Low Energy Neutral Atom Detection in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Herrero, F.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of energetic neutral atoms allows for the remote examination of the interactions between plasmas and neutral populations in space. Before these neutral atoms can be measured, they must first be converted to ions. For the low energy end of this spectrum, interaction with a conversion surface is often the most efficient method to convert neutrals into ions. It is generally thought that the most efficient surfaces are low work functions materials. However, by their very nature, these surfaces are highly reactive and unstable, and therefore are not suitable for space missions where conditions cannot be controlled as they are in a laboratory. We therefore are looking to optimize a stable surface for conversion efficiency. Conversion efficiency can be increased either by changing the incident angle of the neutral particles to be grazing incidence and using stable surfaces with high conversion efficiencies. We have examined how to increase the angle of incidence from -80 degrees to -89 degrees, while maintaining or improving the total active conversion surface area without increasing the overall volume of the instrument. We are developing a method to micro-machine silicon, which will reduce the volume to surface area ratio by a factor of 60. We have also examined the material properties that affect the conversion efficiency of the surface for stable surfaces. Some of the parameters we have examined are work function, smoothness, and bond structure. We find that for stable surfaces, the most important property is the smoothness of the surface.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  10. Neutralization of Soybean Oil Deodorizer Distillate for Vitamin Supplement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelem Iribarrem Benites

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean oil deodorizer distillate (SODD, a byproduct of the soybean oil refining process, is a complex mixture of compounds, such as free fatty acids (FFA, hydrocarbons, and sterols, such as tocopherols, a class of major natural antioxidants with vitamin E activity. As the utilization of SODD for tocopherol extraction is shown to be not economically viable, SODD in the semirefined form (neutral is an interesting alternative to animal and possibly human diet enrichment. This study aimed to evaluate the SODD neutralization process varying the alkali (Na2CO3 concentration, temperature, and homogenization time. The optimal conditions for the neutralizing process, in order to obtain the greatest reduction in FFA content, the lowest leaching of tocopherols, and the greatest yield, were the following: Na2CO2 concentration of 4.34 N, temperature of 45.8°C, and homogenization time of 3 min 20 s. The FFA content was reduced from 53.4% to 6.1% after the initial neutralization, thus requiring a second neutralization step. The final FFA content was of 1.8% and total tocopherol (TT accounted for about 11% of SODD.

  11. Neutral lumbar spine sitting posture in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Dea, Patrick; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Peter; Clifford, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2010-12-01

    Sitting is a common aggravating factor in low back pain (LBP), and re-education of sitting posture is a common aspect of LBP management. However, there is debate regarding what is an optimal sitting posture. This pilot study had 2 aims; to investigate whether pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral sitting posture (slight lumbar lordosis and relaxed thorax); and to compare perceptions of neutral sitting posture to habitual sitting posture (HSP). The lower lumbar spine HSP of seventeen pain-free subjects was initially recorded. Subjects then assumed their own subjectively perceived ideal posture (SPIP). Finally, 2 testers independently positioned the subjects into a tester perceived neutral posture (TPNP). The inter-tester reliability of positioning in TPNP was very good (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.91, mean difference = 3% of range of motion). A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that HSP was significantly more flexed than both SPIP and TPNP (p 0.05). HSP was more kyphotic than all other postures. This study suggests that pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral lumbar sitting posture. Further investigation into the role of neutral sitting posture in LBP subjects is warranted.

  12. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  13. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqing; Li, Shaowei; Gu, Ying; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-11-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART) but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  14. Analysis of neutral hydrogenic emission spectra in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Balmer-α radiation by the excitation of thermal and fast neutral hydrogenic particles has been investigated in a magnetically confined fusion device, or tokamak, from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). From the diagnostic point of view, the emission from thermal neutrals is associated with passive spectroscopy and that from energetic neutrals that are usually injected from the outside of the tokamak to the active spectroscopy. The passive spectroscopic measurement for the thermal Balmer-α emission from deuterium and hydrogen estimates the relative concentration of hydrogen in a deuterium-fueled plasma and therefore, makes a useful tool to monitor the vacuum wall condition. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium obtained from this measurement qualitatively correlates with the energy confinement of the plasma. The Doppler-shifted Balmer-α components from the fast neutrals features the spectrum of the motional Stark effect (MSE) which is an essential principle for the measurement of the magnetic pitch angle profile. Characterization of this active MSE spectra, especially with multiple neutral beam lines crossing along the observation line of sight, has been done for the guideline of the multi-ion-source heating beam operation and for the optimization of the narrow bandpass filters that are required for the polarimeter-based MSE diagnostic system under construction at KSTAR.

  15. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P., E-mail: dstotler@pppl.gov; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3}; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%.

  16. Catalytic reactions on neutral Rh oxide clusters more efficient than on neutral Rh clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akira; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2012-03-28

    Gas phase catalytic reactions involving the reduction of N(2)O and oxidation of CO were observed at the molecular level on isolated neutral rhodium clusters, Rh(n) (n = 10-28), using mass spectrometry. Sequential oxygen transfer reactions, Rh(n)O(m-1) + N(2)O → Rh(n)O(m) + N(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were monitored and the rate constant for each reaction step was determined as a function of the cluster size. Oxygen extraction reactions by a CO molecule, Rh(n)O(m) + CO → Rh(n)O(m-1) + CO(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were also observed when a small amount of CO was mixed with the reactant N(2)O gas. The rate constants of the oxygen extraction reactions by CO for m ≥ 4 were found to be two or three orders of magnitude higher than the rate constants for m ≤ 3, which indicates that the catalytic reaction proceeds more efficiently when the reaction cycles turn over around Rh(n)O(m) (m ≥ 4) than around bare Rh(n). Rhodium clusters operate as more efficient catalysts when they are oxidized than non- or less-oxidized rhodium clusters, which is consistent with theoretical and experimental studies on the catalytic CO oxidation reaction on a rhodium surface.

  17. Net Neutrality in Canada and what it means for libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Guindon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Net Neutrality, the idea that the Internet should be provided to all without discrimination based on content or applications, has been an important policy issue in the last few years. A lack of net neutrality could negatively impact libraries, intellectual freedom, cultural diversity, and the right to privacy. This paper looks at the issues that underline the net neutrality debate and describes how they are shaped by the different actors that are concerned with the future of the Internet. Technological issues, such as traffic shaping by Internet Service Providers, and legal issues in the context of Canada’s Telecommunications Act, are also addressed. Finally, the paper reviews the recent CRTC policy on Internet Traffic Management Practices.

  18. Multiplicity distributions and charged-neutral fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan K Nayak; M M Aggarwal; A Agnihotri; Z Ahammed; A L S Angelis; V Antonenko; V Arefiev; V Astakhov; V Avdeitchikov; T C Awes; P V K S Baba; S K Badyal; A Baldine; L Barabach; C Barlag; S Bathe; B Tatiounia; T Bernier; K B Bhalla; V S Bhatia; C Blume; R Bock; E-M Bohne; D Bucher; A Buijs; E-J Buis; H Büsching; L Carlen; V Chalyshev; S Chattopadhyay; K E Chenawi; R Cherbatchev; T Chujo; A Claussen; A C Das; M P Decowski; V Djordjadze; P Donni; I Doubovik; A K Dubey; M R Dutta Majumdar; S Eliseev; K Enosawa; H Feldmann; P Foka; S Fokin; V Frolov; M S Ganti; S Garpman; O Gavrishchuk; F J M Geurts; T K Ghosh; R Glasow; S K Gupta; B Guskov; H A Gustafsson; H H Gutbrod; R Higuchi; I Hrivnacova; M Ippolitov; H Kalechofsky; R Kamermans; K-H Kampert; K Karadjev; K Karpio; S Kato; S Kees; H Kim; B W Kolb; I Kosarev; I Koutcheryaev; A Kugler; P Kulinich; V Kumar; M Kurata; K Kurita; K Kuzmin; I Langbein; A Lebedev; Y Y Lee; H Löhner; D P Mahapatra; V Manko; M Martin; A Maximov; R Mehdiyev; G Mgebrichvili; Y Miake; D Mikhalev; G C Mishra; Y Miyamoto; B Mohanty; D Morrison; D S Mukhopadhyay; V Myalkovski; H Naef; B K Nandi; S K Nayak; T K Nayak; S Neumaier; A Nianine; V Nikitine; S Nikolaev; S Nishimura; P Nomokov; J Nystrand; F E Obenshain; A Oskarsson; I Otterlund; M Pachr; A Parfenov; S Pavliouk; T Peitzmann; V Petracek; F Plasil; M L Purschke; B Raeven; J Rak; R Raniwala; S Raniwala; V S Ramamurthy; N K Rao; F Retiere; K Reygers; G Roland; L Rosselet; I Roufanov; J M Rubio; S S Sambyal; R Santo; S Sato; H Schlagheck; H-R Schmidt; G Shabratova; I Sibiriak; T Siemiarczuk; B C Sinha; N Slavine; K Söderström; N Solomey; G Sood; S P Sørensen; P Stankus; G Stefanek; P Steinberg; E Stenlund; D Stüken; M Sumbera; T Svensson; M D Trivedi; A Tsvetkov; C Twenhöfel; L Tykarski; J Urbahn; N V Eijndhoven; W H V Heeringen; G J V Nieuwenhuizen; A Vinogradov; Y P Viyogi; A Vodopianov; S Vörös; M A Vos; B Wyslouch; K Yogi; Y Yokota; G R Young

    2001-08-01

    Results from the multiplicity distributions of inclusive photons and charged particles, scaling of particle multiplicities, event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations, and charged-neutral fluctuations in 158 GeV Pb+Pb collisions are presented and discussed. A scaling of charged particle multiplicity as $N^{1.07± 0:05}_{\\text{part}}$ and photons as $N^{1.12± 0:03}_{\\text{part}}$ have been observed, indicating violation of naive wounded nucleon model. The analysis of localized charged-neutral fluctuation indicates a model-independent demonstration of non-statistical fluctuations in both charged particles and photons in limited azimuthal regions. However, no correlated charged-neutral fluctuations are observed.

  19. Application Neutrality and a Paradox of Side Payments

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Eitan; Kesidis, George

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate over "net neutrality" covers a broad set of issues related to the regulation of public networks. This paper contains two separate contributions: (a) an extension of the quadratic-utility framework we proposed in a previous paper to study the impact of side payments in a system involving pluralities of access and content providers; and (b) a variation of this model to deal with the question of application neutrality. Our analysis of the generalized framework (a) reveals an interesting "paradox" that did not occur with monopolistic players: side payments handicap the providers who perceive them. Application neutrality (b) refers to price discrimination: ISPs charging consumers different fees depending on their use of the network (web surfing, VoIP, file sharing, etc.). We analyze the consequences of such discrimination for a simple two-application setting.

  20. Exospheres and Energetic Neutral Atoms of Mars, Venus and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Smith, H. Todd; Garnier, Philippe; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Delva, Magda; Gröller, Hannes; Mura, Alessandro

    Our understanding of the upper atmosphere of unmagnetized bodies such as Mars, Venus and Titan has improved significantly in this decade. Recent observations by in situ and remote sensing instruments on board Mars Express, Venus Express and Cassini have revealed characteristics of the neutral upper atmospheres (exospheres) and of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ENA environment in the vicinity of the bodies is by itself a significant study field, but ENAs are also used as a diagnostic tool for the exosphere and the interaction with the upstream plasmas. Synergy between theoretical and modeling work has also improved considerably. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of our understanding of the neutral environment in the vicinity of unmagnetized planets.

  1. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity.

  2. Neutral aggregation in finite-length genotype space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    The advent of modern genome sequencing techniques allows for a more stringent test of the neutrality hypothesis of Darwinian evolution, where all individuals have the same fitness. Using the individual-based model of Wright and Fisher, we compute the amplitude of neutral aggregation in the genome space, i.e., the probability of finding two individuals at genetic (Hamming) distance k as a function of the genome size L , population size N , and mutation probability per base ν . In well-mixed populations, we show that for N ν 1 , on the contrary, individuals are randomly dispersed in genome space. The results are extended to a geographically dispersed population, where the controlling parameter is shown to be a combination of mutation and migration probability. The theory we develop can be used to test the neutrality hypothesis in various ecological and evolutionary systems.

  3. Engineering broadly neutralizing antibodies for HIV prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Casey K; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2016-08-01

    A combination of advances spanning from isolation to delivery of potent HIV-specific antibodies has begun to revolutionize understandings of antibody-mediated antiviral activity. As a result, the set of broadly neutralizing and highly protective antibodies has grown in number, diversity, potency, and breadth of viral recognition and neutralization. These antibodies are now being further enhanced by rational engineering of their anti-HIV activities and coupled to cutting edge gene delivery and strategies to optimize their pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. As a result, the prospects for clinical use of HIV-specific antibodies to treat, clear, and prevent HIV infection are gaining momentum. Here we discuss the diverse methods whereby antibodies are being optimized for neutralization potency and breadth, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and effector function with the aim of revolutionizing HIV treatment and prevention options.

  4. A Non-Structural Investigation of VIX Risk Neutral Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barletta, Andrea; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo; Violante, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We propose a non-structural pricing method to derive the risk-neutral density (RND) implied by options on the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX). The methodology is based on orthogonal polynomial expansions around a kernel density and yields the RND of the underlying asset without the need...... of the RND in a large variety of cases, also when the no-arbitrage and efficient option prices are contaminated by measurement errors. Our empirical investigation, based on a panel of traded VIX options, reveals some stylized facts on the RND of VIX. We find that a common stochastic factor drives the dynamic...... behavior of the risk neutral moments, the probabilities of volatility tail-events are priced in the options as jumps under the risk-neutral measure, and the variance swap term structure depends on two factors, one accounting for the slope and one for the mean-reverting behavior of the VIX....

  5. Flavor changing neutral currents in a realistic composite technicolor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Hamilton, Rowan T.

    1993-03-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a composite technicolor model proposed recently by Georgi. Composite technicolor interactions produce four-quark operators in the low energy theory that contribute to flavor changing neutral current processes. While we expect operators of this type to be induced at the compositeness scale by the flavor-symmetry breaking effects of the preon mass matrices, the Georgi model also includes operators from higher scales that are not GIM-suppressed. Since these operators are potentially large, we study their impact on flavor changing neutral currents and CP violation in the neutral K, B, and D meson systems. Notably, we find that this model gives rise to a typical value for {ɛ‧}/{ɛ} that is much smaller than most standard model estimates.

  6. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  7. Observational Constraints on a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Smith, H. T.; Bagenal, F.; Brown, L. E.; Elliott, H. A.; Haggerty, D. K.; Horanyi, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; McComas, D. J.; Piquette, M. R.; Sidrow, E. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Zirnstein, E.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto's orbit, and place observational constraints based primarily on comparison of New Horizons (NH) measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, should result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto's exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets closer to the Sun, neutrals escape Pluto readily owing, e.g., to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity. Importantly, escaped neutrals have a long lifetime due to the great distance from the Sun, ~100 years for photoionization of N2 and ~180 years for photoionization of N, which results from disassociated N2. Despite the lengthy 248-year orbit, these long e-folding lifetimes may allow an enhanced neutral population to form an extended gas cloud that modifies the N2 spatial profile near Pluto. These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but once ionized N2+ or N+ are picked up by the solar wind, reaching ~50 keV, making these pickup ions (PUIs) detectable by NH's Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument. PEPSSI observations analyzed to date may constrain the N2 density; the remaining ~95% of the encounter data, scheduled for downlink in August along with similarly anticipated data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) experiment, should help determine the Pluto outgassing rates. Measurements from SWAP include the solar wind speed, a quantity that greatly enhances PUI studies by enabling us to directly account for the PUI distribution's sensitive dependence on plasma speed. Note that anomalous cosmic ray Si observed at Voyager is overabundant by a factor of ~3000 relative to interstellar composition. This might be related to "outer source" PUIs, but the fact that N2 and Si are indistinguishable in many instruments could mean that N2 is actually driving this apparent Si discrepancy.

  8. Latitudinal phytoplankton distribution and the neutral theory of biodiversity

    KAUST Repository

    Chust, Guillem

    2012-11-16

    Recent studies have suggested that global diatom distributions are not limited by dispersal, in the case of both extant species and fossil species, but rather that environmental filtering explains their spatial patterns. Hubbell\\'s neutral theory of biodiversity provides a framework in which to test these alternatives. Our aim is to test whether the structure of marine phytoplankton (diatoms, dinoflagellates and coccolithophores) assemblages across the Atlantic agrees with neutral theory predictions. We asked: (1) whether intersite variance in phytoplankton diversity is explained predominantly by dispersal limitation or by environmental conditions; and (2) whether species abundance distributions are consistent with those expected by the neutral model. Location: Meridional transect of the Atlantic (50° N-50° S). Methods: We estimated the relative contributions of environmental factors and geographic distance to phytoplankton composition using similarity matrices, Mantel tests and variation partitioning of the species composition based upon canonical ordination methods. We compared the species abundance distribution of phytoplankton with the neutral model using Etienne\\'s maximum-likelihood inference method. Results: Phytoplankton communities are slightly more determined by niche segregation (24%), than by dispersal limitation and ecological drift (17%). In 60% of communities, the assumption of neutrality in species\\' abundance distributions could not be rejected. In tropical zones, where oceanic gyres enclose large stable water masses, most communities showed low species immigration rates; in contrast, we infer that communities in temperate areas, out of oligotrophic gyres, have higher rates of species immigration. Conclusions: Phytoplankton community structure is consistent with partial niche assembly and partial dispersal and drift assembly (neutral processes). The role of dispersal limitation is almost as important as habitat filtering, a fact that has been

  9. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  10. Experimental investigations of overvoltages in neutral isolated networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukelja, P.I.; Naumov, R.M.; Vucinic, M.M.; Budisin, P.B. (Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1993-09-01

    For more than a decade, the Nikola Tesla Institute has worked intensively on experimental investigations of transient voltages and currents in neutral isolated networks, usually at 6 kV. The paper presents the results of investigations of overvoltages at the instant of appearance of an earth fault and during its interruption, the earth-fault currents and overvoltages during ferroresonance. Investigations were performed on cable station service networks in hydro- and thermal-power plants, industrial and similar installations in Yugoslavia. On the basis of these investigations, some measures are suggested for improving the reliability of operation of neutral isolated networks. (author)

  11. Search for isosinglet neutral heavy leptons in Z 0 decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelov, T.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Atamanchuk, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Baneriee, S.; Bao, J.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Behrens, J.; Beingessner, S.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocciolini, M.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boseti, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brocks, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Buisson, C.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, F.; Cartacci, A. M.; Castello, R.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.; Chen, M.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W. Y.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Chmeissani, M.; Choi, M. T.; Chung, S.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Contin, A.; Crijns, F.; Cui, X. R.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, K.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; Dhina, M.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Driever, T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Easo, S.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, S. J.; Fackler, O.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Hesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.; Filthaut, F.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Foreman, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Friebel, W.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gele, D.; Gentile, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Göttlicher, P.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Grinnell, C.; Gruenewald, M.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Herten, G.; Herten, U.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jezequel, S.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, D.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Krivshich, A.; Kuijten, H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kunin, A.; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Leedom, I.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Lettry, J.; Leytens, X.; Li, C.; Li, H. T.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Linnhofer, D.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Ma, W. G.; MaxDermott, M.; Malhotra, P. K.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mao, D. N.; Mao, Y. F.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marion, F.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Matsuda, T.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Newman, H.; Neyer, C.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Produit, N.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, W.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rose, J.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Scott, I.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shen, D. Z.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Soderstrom, E.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Starosta, R.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sumner, R. L.; Sun, L. Z.; Suter, H.; Sutton, R. B.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Terzi, G.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, C. R.; Wang, G. H.; Wang, J. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weber, J.; Weill, R.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wenninger, J.; White, M.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, R. J.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, Y. G.; Wysłouch, B.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, Y. D.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yan, X. J.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Yang, K. S.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; Yin, Z. W.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.; L3 Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    We search for neutral heavy leptons that are isosinglets under the standard SU (2) L gauge group. Such neutral heavy leptons are expected in many extensions of the standard model. Three types of heavy leptons N e, N μ, N τ associated with the three neutrino types ve, vμ, vτ have been directly searched for and no evidence for a signal has been found. We set the limit Br(N Su0 → vℓN ℓ) < 3 x 10 -5 at the 95% CL for mass range from 3 GeV up to Mz.

  12. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircase and Laughlin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-10-01

    We present a method for creating fields that couple to neutral atoms in the same way that electromagnetic fields couple to charged particles. We show that this technique opens the door for a range of neutral atom experiments, including probing the interplay between periodic potentials and quantum Hall effects. Furthermore, we propose, and analyze, seemingly paradoxical geometries which can be engineered through these techniques. For example, we show how to create a ring of sites where an atom continuously reduces its potential energy by moving in a clockwise direction.

  13. Topological Quantum Information in a 3D Neutral Atom Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-02

    v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 12-23-2014 Final 12-01-2008-9-30-2014 ( DARPA ) TOPOLOGICAL QUANTUM INFORMATION IN A 3D NEUTRAL ATOM ARRAY FA9550-09...1-0041 David Weiss Penn State UP76XR0 AFOSR DARPA Approved for public release Work was performed to build core elements of a quantum computer...Hamiltonian within our trapped neutral atoms architecture. quantum computing, ultracold atoms David Weiss 814-861-3578 1 DARPA Final Report Grant

  14. Exponential stability for uncertain neutral systems with Markov jumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuping HE; Fei LIU

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the global exponential stability problems for stochastic neutral Markov jump sys-tems(MJSs) with uncertain parameters and multiple time-delays,The delays are respectively considered as constant and time varying cases,and the uncertainties are assumed to be norm bounded.By selecting appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functions,it gives the sufficient condition such that the uncertain neutral MJSs are globally exponentially stochastically stable for all admissible uncertainties.The stability criteria are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities(LMIs),which can be easily checked in practice.Finally,two numerical examples are exploited to illustrate the effectiveness of the developed techniques.

  15. Identification of the two rotavirus genes determining neutralization specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offit, P.A.; Blavat, G.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus NCDV and simian rotavirus SA-11 represent two distinct rotavirus serotypes. A genetic approach was used to determine which viral gene segments segregated with serotype-specific viral neutralization. There were 16 reassortant rotarviruses derived by coinfection of MA-104 cells in vitro with the SA-11 and NCDV strains. The parental origin of reassortant rotavirus double-stranded RNA segments was determined by gene segment mobility in polyacrylamide gels and by hybridization with radioactively labeled parental viral transcripts. The authors found that two rotavirus gene segments found previously to code for outer capsid proteins vp3 and vp7 cosegreated with virus neutralization specificities.

  16. Electric polarizability of neutral hadrons from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank; Alexandru, Andrei; Lujan, Michael; Freeman, Walter

    2017-01-01

    We report on the electric polarizability for the neutron, neutral pion, and neutral kaon from lattice QCD. The results are based on dynamical QCD ensembles at two different pion masses: 306 and 227 MeV. An infinite volume extrapolation is performed for each hadron at both pion masses. The resulting polarizabilities are compared with other lattice calculations, ChPT, and experiment. This work is supported in part by the NSF CAREER grant PHY-1151648, the U.S. Department of Energy grant DE-FG02-95ER40907, and the ARCS foundation.

  17. Intermediate energy semileptonic probes of the hadronic neutral current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musolf, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)]|[Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[CEBAF Theory Group, Newport News, VA (United States); Donnelly, T.W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Dubach, J. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Pollock, S.J. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Amsterdam (Netherlands). Sectie K; Kowalski, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Beise, E.J. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). W.K. Kellogg Radiation Lab.]|[Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-06-01

    The present status and future prospects of intermediate-energy semileptonic neutral current studies are reviewed. Possibilities for using parity-violating electron scattering from nucleons and nuclei to study hadron structure and nuclear dynamics are emphasized, with particular attention paid to probes of strangeness content in the nucleon. Connections are drawn between such studies and tests of the electroweak gauge theory using electron or neutrino scattering. Outstanding theoretical issues in the interpretation of semileptonic neutral current measurements are highlighted and the prospects for undertaking parity-violating electron or neutrino scattering experiments in the near future are surveyed.

  18. Correlation of Density Pedestal Width and Neutral Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. Q.; Nevins, W. M.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2003-10-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D and C-Mod find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length.[1][2] These results suggest that the width may be set by the combined effects of neutral and plasma transport. This paper is a report on fluid simulations of boundary plasma using BOUT code [3] with neutral source added. Thus both neutral and plasma physics are treated. The plasma transport is self-consistently driven by boundary turbulence due to the resistive X-point mode, while neutral is described by a simple fluid diffusive model. The plasma profiles are evolved on the same time scale as the turbulence for the given heat source from the core plasma and particle source from the neutrals. For prescribed neutral profiles, we find the formation of a density pedestal inside the separatrix in the L-mode even though the calculated plasma diffusion coefficients are almost radially constant and without the formation of a temperature pedestal. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling can provide the dominant control for the size of the H-mode density barrier. The width of the density barrier, and its relationship to pedestal height and neutral penetration length at the midplane, will be given by using hyperbolic-tangent fit to the simulation data. [1] R.J.Groebner, M.A.Mahdavi, A.W.Leonard, 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference(Lyon, France, 14 to 19 October 2002), IAEA-CN-94/EX/C2-3. [2] D.Mossessian, J.W.Hughes, M.Greenwald, et al., ``Local dimensionless identity method as a tool for studying H-mode pedestal'', The 9th Joint US-European TTF workshop (Madison, Wisconsin, April 2nd - 5th, 2003). [3] X.Q.Xu, R.H.Cohen, T.D.Rognlien and J.R.Myra, Physics of Plasma, Vol. 7, 1951-1958 (2000).

  19. Optic diagnosis of neutral beam injection on HL-1M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑银甲; 冯震; 雷光玖; 姜韶风; 卢大伦; 罗俊林

    2002-01-01

    During the operation of a high-power neutral beam injection (NBI) system on the H L-1M tokamak, an optical diagnostic means using CCD camera was developed to characterize the NBI performance. The vacuum valve opening process and NBI period in the HL-1M experiment were displayed by a lot of photos taken with this means. Thus, the Hα emission profiles of the neutral beam (NB) and its interaction with plasma were given. Finally, the reason possible for plasma breakdown during NBI mode Ⅱ discharge was investigated. Therefore, this in-situ diagnosis can provide more information of the NBI.

  20. Neutral particle behaviour and particle confinement studies in Heliotron E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, K.; Uchino, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Matsuo, K.; Akazaki, M.; Maeda, M.; Sudo, S.; Kondo, K.; Motojima, O.; Sano, F.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of neutral-hydrogen density by laser fluorescence spectroscopy on Heliotron E revealed the anisotropy of its distribution in the poloidal cross section and the dependence of the anisotropy on the average electron density for the first time. This indicates the relative importance of the recycling of charged particles localized at divertor traces and that of charge-exchanged neutrals distributed over a surface. These results are used to calculate the global particle confinement time, which is to be correlated with the measurements of H/sub /alpha// emission intensity and the electron density fluctuations, the initial results of which are also shown. (orig.).

  1. Simulations of Neutral Beam Ion Ripple Loss on EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李吉波; 丁斯晔; 吴斌; 胡纯栋

    2012-01-01

    Predictions on the ripple loss of neutral beam fast ions on EAST are investigated with a guiding center code, including both ripple and collisional effects. A 6% to 16% loss of neutral beam ions is predicted for typical EAST experiments, and a synergistic enhancement of fast ion loss is found for toroidal field (TF) ripples with collisions. The lost ions are strongly localized and will cause a maximum heat load of - 0.05 MW/m^2 on the first wall.

  2. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA...... cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement...

  3. Simulations of space charge neutralization in a magnetized electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerity, James [Texas A-M; McIntyre, Peter M. [Texas A-M; Bruhwiler, David Leslie [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Hall, Christopher [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Moens, Vince Jan [Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne; Park, Chong Shik [Fermilab; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2017-02-02

    Magnetized electron cooling at relativistic energies and Ampere scale current is essential to achieve the proposed ion luminosities in a future electron-ion collider (EIC). Neutralization of the space charge in such a cooler can significantly increase the magnetized dynamic friction and, hence, the cooling rate. The Warp framework is being used to simulate magnetized electron beam dynamics during and after the build-up of neutralizing ions, via ionization of residual gas in the cooler. The design follows previous experiments at Fermilab as a verification case. We also discuss the relevance to EIC designs.

  4. Positive, Neutral, and Negative Mass-Charges in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As shown, any four-dimensional proper vector has two observable projections onto time line, attributed to our world and the mirror world (for a mass-bearing particle, the projections posses are attributed to positive and negative mass-charges. As predicted, there should be a class of neutrally mass-charged particles that inhabit neither our world nor the mirror world. Inside the space-time area (membrane the space rotates at the light speed, and all particles move at as well the light speed. So, the predicted particles of the neutrally mass-charged class should seem as light-like vortices.

  5. Auger neutralization rates of multiply charged ions near metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Janev, R.K.; Lazur, V.Y.

    1988-08-15

    Transition rates for the Auger neutralization processes of multiply charged ions on metal surfaces are calculated in closed analytical form. The core potential of a multiply charged ion is represented by a pseudopotential, which accounts for the electron screening effects and allows transition to the pure Coulomb case (fully stripped ions). The relative importance of various neutralization channels in slow-ion--surface collisions is discussed for the examples of He/sup 2+/+Mo(100) and C/sup 3+/+Mo(100) collisional systems.

  6. Evidence for the Production of Neutral Mesons by Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberger, J; Panofsky, Wolfgang Kurt Hermann

    1950-01-01

    In the bombardment of nuclei by 330-Mev x-rays, multiple gamma-rays are emitted. From their angular correlation it is deduced that they are emitted in pairs in the disintegration of neutral particles moving with relativistic velocities and therefore of intermediate mass. The neutral mesons are produced with cross sections similar to those for the charged mesons and with an angular distribution peaked more in the forward direction. The production cross section in hydrogen and the production cross section per nucleon in C and Be are comparable.

  7. Neutral pion form factor measurement at NA62

    CERN Document Server

    Goudzovski, Evgueni

    2016-01-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN collected a large sample of charged kaon decays with a highly efficient trigger for decays into electrons in 2007. The kaon beam represents a source of tagged neutral pion decays in vacuum. A measurement of the electromagnetic transition form factor slope of the neutral pion in the time-like region from $1.05\\times10^6$ fully reconstructed $\\pi^0$ Dalitz decay is presented. The limits on dark photon production in $\\pi^0$ decays from the earlier kaon experiment at CERN, NA48/2, are also reported.

  8. Modeling neutralization kinetics of HIV by broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in genital secretions coating the cervicovaginal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A McKinley

    Full Text Available Eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAb in cervicovaginal mucus (CVM represents a promising "first line of defense" strategy to reduce vaginal HIV transmission. However, it remains unclear what levels of bnAb must be present in CVM to effectively reduce infection. We approached this complex question by modeling the dynamic tally of bnAb coverage on HIV. This analysis introduces a critical, timescale-dependent competition: to protect, bnAb must accumulate at sufficient stoichiometry to neutralize HIV faster than virions penetrate CVM and reach target cells. We developed a model that incorporates concentrations and diffusivities of HIV and bnAb in semen and CVM, kinetic rates for binding (kon and unbinding (koff of select bnAb, and physiologically relevant thicknesses of CVM and semen layers. Comprehensive model simulations lead to robust conclusions about neutralization kinetics in CVM. First, due to the limited time virions in semen need to penetrate CVM, substantially greater bnAb concentrations than in vitro estimates must be present in CVM to neutralize HIV. Second, the model predicts that bnAb with more rapid kon, almost independent of koff, should offer greater neutralization potency in vivo. These findings suggest the fastest arriving virions at target cells present the greatest likelihood of infection. It also implies the marked improvements in in vitro neutralization potency of many recently discovered bnAb may not translate to comparable reduction in the bnAb dose needed to confer protection against initial vaginal infections. Our modeling framework offers a valuable tool to gaining quantitative insights into the dynamics of mucosal immunity against HIV and other infectious diseases.

  9. Measurement of Neutral Current Neutral Pion Production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of the π0 production via neutrino-nucleus neutral current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for the neutrino oscillation experiments. In this thesis, we present a study of neutral current π0 production from muon neutrinos scattering on a polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE experiment. All neutrino beam data corresponding to 0.99 × 1020 protons on target have been analyzed. We have measured the cross section ratio of the neutral current π0 production to the total charge current interaction and the π0 kinematic distribution such as momentum and direction. We obtain [7.7 ± 0.5(stat.) ± 0.5(sys.)] × 10-2 as the ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section; the mean energy of neutrinos producing detected neutral pions is 1.1 GeV. The result agrees with the Rein- Sehgal model, which is generally used for the Monte Carlo simulation by many neutrino oscillation experiments. We achieve less than 10 % uncertainty which is required for the next generation search for νµ → νe oscillation. The spectrum shape of the π0 momentum and the distribution of the π0 emitted angle agree with the prediction, which means that not only the Rein-Sehgal model but also the intra-nuclear interaction models describe our data well. We also measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent pion production to total charged current cross section to be (1.17 ± 0.23 ) × 10-2 based on the Rein and Sehgal model. The result gives the evidence for non-zero coherent pion production via neutral current interaction at the mean neutrino energy of 1.0 GeV.

  10. The Affective Consequences of Cognitive Inhibition: Devaluation or Neutralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischen, Alexandra; Ferrey, Anne E.; Burt, Dustin H. R.; Pistchik, Meghan; Fenske, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Affective evaluations of previously ignored visual stimuli are more negative than those of novel items or prior targets of attention or response. This has been taken as evidence that inhibition has negative affective consequences. But inhibition could act instead to attenuate or "neutralize" preexisting affective salience, predicting opposite…

  11. Testing fundamental physical principles with entangled neutral K mesons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Domenico Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This paper will focus on a novel method to perform direct T and CPT symmetry tests exploiting the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations of neutral kaon pairs produced at a ϕ-factory. The statistical significance of the test achievable with the KLOE-2 experiment at DAΦNE, the Frascati ϕ-factory, is also briefly discussed.

  12. Alfven eigenmode structure during off-axis neutral beam injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobias, B.; Bass, E. M.; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C.W.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The spatial structure of Alfven eigenmodes on the DIII-D tokamak is compared for contrasting fast ion deposition profiles resulting from on- and off-axis neutral beam injection (NBI). In both cases, poloidal mode rotation and eigenmode twist, or radial phase variation, are correlated with the direct

  13. A plea for neutral comparison studies in computational sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Boulesteix

    Full Text Available In computational science literature including, e.g., bioinformatics, computational statistics or machine learning, most published articles are devoted to the development of "new methods", while comparison studies are generally appreciated by readers but surprisingly given poor consideration by many journals. This paper stresses the importance of neutral comparison studies for the objective evaluation of existing methods and the establishment of standards by drawing parallels with clinical research. The goal of the paper is twofold. Firstly, we present a survey of recent computational papers on supervised classification published in seven high-ranking computational science journals. The aim is to provide an up-to-date picture of current scientific practice with respect to the comparison of methods in both articles presenting new methods and articles focusing on the comparison study itself. Secondly, based on the results of our survey we critically discuss the necessity, impact and limitations of neutral comparison studies in computational sciences. We define three reasonable criteria a comparison study has to fulfill in order to be considered as neutral, and explicate general considerations on the individual components of a "tidy neutral comparison study". R codes for completely replicating our statistical analyses and figures are available from the companion website http://www.ibe.med.uni-muenchen.de/organisation/mitarbeiter/020_professuren/boulesteix/plea2013.

  14. Designing and Implementing a Successful Gender-Neutral Housing Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Gender-neutral housing (GNH) offers a safe and inclusive environment for students who have need and desire for a space that is gender inclusive and does not limit placement to sex as assigned at birth. In predominant gender-based housing models, students who are gender nonconforming find limited options. The request for, and implementation of, GNH…

  15. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  16. Size structure of earthworms populations and the theory of neutrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. М. Kunah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper points that neutrality theory allows to describe a distribution of earthworms’ body weight classes in the population. The statistical parameters can be interpreted in terms of the population ecology. The dynamics of parameters distribution over seasons and under anthropogenic impact demonstrates that sense assigned to the distribution parameters is very close to real processes in animal population.

  17. BEPS Action 2: Neutralizing the Effects on Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, R.; Marres, O.

    2015-01-01

    Curbing tax arbitrage is one of the main priorities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (endorsed by the G20 and the G8) ever since the public debate on base erosion fully erupted. Neutralizing the effect of hybrid mismatch arrangements has become Action No. 2 of the

  18. Entanglement of two ground state neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Browaeys, Antoine; Evellin, Charles;

    2011-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in trapping and manipulation of internal states of single neutral rubidium atoms in optical tweezers. We demonstrate the creation of an entangled state between two ground state atoms trapped in separate tweezers using the effect of Rydberg blockade. The quality...... of the entanglement is measured using global rotations of the internal states of both atoms....

  19. Module for dielectric surfaces modification by fast neutral particles beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchenko, V. T.; Lisenkov, A. A.; Babinov, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the module for dielectric and wide-gap semiconductor surfaces modification by fast neutral beam. The module can be used for cleaning, etching or assisting of films deposition. The surface proceeding by neutral beam can prevent an accumulation of surface charge without using current compensation by inserting electrons to the beam or RF power supply. The module beside cathode and anode contains an electrode with floating potential. Insertion of the additional electrode causes electron retention in an electrostatic trap resulting the reducing of the module operating pressure. Moreover, the electrode with floating potential allows increasing the current efficient of the module. An important feature of the module is that neutralization of the ions extracted from the plasma occurs in the cathode potential well. Thereby ions that have not neutralized cannot leave nearcathode region and there are no fast ions in the output beam. Module does not contain sources of the magnetic fields or elements heated by external sources. Module operates with free cooling. Thus, the module does not need water cooling and can be freely moved in the vacuum chamber.

  20. Antigenic variation and resistance to neutralization in poliovirus type 1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Diamond; B.A. Jameson; J. Bonin; M. Kohara; S. Abe; H. Itoh; T. Komatsu; M. Arita; S. Kuge; A. Nomoto; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R. Crainic; E. Wimmer

    1985-01-01

    textabstractMutations have been identified in variants of poliovirus, type 1 (Mahoney) on the basis of their resistance to neutralization by individual monoclonal antibodies. The phenotypes of these variants were defined in terms of antibody binding; the pattern of epitopes expressed or able to be e

  1. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  2. A Journal-Neutral Ratio for Marketing Faculty Scholarship Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeck, Matt; Baruca, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a journal-neutral Publication to Citation Ratio (PCR) to complement qualitative methods to evaluate a marketing educator's scholarship for reappointment, promotion, tenure, and post-tenure review (RPTP) decisions. We empirically establish a minimum time period to evaluate scholarship data, then benchmark publication and…

  3. Approximating solutions of neutral stochastic evolution equations with jumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we establish existence and uniqueness of the mild solutions to a class of neutral stochastic evolution equations driven by Poisson random measures in some Hilbert space. Moreover, we adopt the Faedo-Galerkin scheme to approximate the solutions.

  4. CO2 neutral glass manufacturing?: a study of the possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonson, B.; Zethrasus, B.; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Lankhorst, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The technological needs to achieve CO2 neutrality during glass manufacturing have been investigated by theoretical calculations on energy balances and experimental investigations on batch reactivity and fining efficiency. The concept is based on the assumption of utilization of woody bio fuel combus

  5. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  6. Lanthanoid abundance of some neutral hot spring waters in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikawada, Yoshikazu; Oi, Takao [Jochi Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Honda, Teruyuki

    1999-06-01

    Contents of lanthanoids (Ln's) in some neutral hot spring waters as well as in acidic hot spring waters were determined by neutron activation analysis. It was found that a higher pH resulted in lower concentrations of Ln's; the value of correlation coefficient (r) between the logarithm of the concentration of Sm ([Sm]), chosen as the representative of Ln's, and the logarithm of pH was -0.90. The sum of [Al] and [Fe] was strongly correlated with [Ln]'s in the pH range of 1.3 and 8.8; the correlation was expressed as log[Sm] = 0.893 log([Al] + [Fe]) - 5.45 with the r value of 0.98. The sum of [Al] and [Fe] was thus a good measure of the Ln contents in acidic and neutral hot spring waters. The Ln abundance patterns of neutral hot spring waters with normal CO{sub 2} concentrations had concave shapes with relative depletion in the middle-heavy Ln's and seemed to reflect the solubility of Ln carbonates. The neutral hot spring water with a high CO{sub 2} content of 1,800 ppm showed a Ln pattern with a relative enrichment in the heavy Ln's and seemed to reflect the solubility of Ln's observed for CO{sub 2}-rich solutions. (author)

  7. Bell inequality and CP violation in the neutral kaon system

    CERN Document Server

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A; Hiesmayr, B C

    2001-01-01

    For the entangled neutral kaon system we formulate a Bell inequality sensitive to CP violation in mixing. Via this Bell inequality we obtain a bound on the leptonic CP asymmetry which is violated by experimental data. Furthermore, we connect the Bell inequality with a decoherence approach and find a lower bound on the decoherence parameter which practically corresponds to Furry's hypothesis.

  8. The neutral theory of biodiversity with random fission speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Haegeman, Bart

    2011-01-01

    The neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography emphasizes the importance of dispersal and speciation to macro-ecological diversity patterns. While the influence of dispersal has been studied quite extensively, the effect of speciation has not received much attention, even though it was already

  9. Evidence for the Production of Neutral Mesons by Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, J.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Steller, J.

    1950-04-01

    Evidence in favor of the existence of a gamma unstable neutral meson; report on the detection of the coincidences between the two gamma rays produced by the bombardment of various nuclei in the x-ray beam of the Berkeley synchrotron.

  10. Violation of Bell’s inequality in neutral kaons system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj K Samal; Dipankar Home

    2002-08-01

    We show by general considerations that it is not possible to test violation of the existing versions of Bell’s inequality in entangled neutral kaons system using experimentally accessible thin regenerators. We point out the loophole in the recent argument (A Bramon and M Nowakowski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1 (1999)) that claimed such a test to be possible.

  11. Existence of solutions for neutral functional integrodifferential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Murugesu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, by using fractional power of operators and Sadovskii's fixed point theorem, we study the existence of mild and strong solutions of nonlinear neutral functional integrodifferential equations. The results we obtained are a generalization and continuation of the recent results on this issue.

  12. Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer Array on NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Shinohara, K.; Darrow, D. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Medley, S. S.; Cecil, F. E.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2004-11-01

    A Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) array has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure the energy distribution of charge exchange fast neutral particles. The array consists of four Si diode detectors on chords with fixed tangency radii (60, 90, 100, and 120 cm), which view across the three co-injection neutral beam (NB) lines. The calibrated energy range is 40 120KeV and its energy resolution is about 10KeV. Time resolved measurements have been obtained and compared with the E//B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) results. It is observed that particle fluxes increase strongly and then decay rapidly to a steady level just after NB injection commences. Though this temporal behavior is also observed in the E//B NPA, it is not predicted in TRANSP simulations. In addition, the increase and decay rates in the two NPA systems are different. Example data from plasma discharges will be presented with explanations of these differences.

  13. An Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy Scale with a Neutral Wording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Kåre

    In this book chapter I present a multidimensional entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) scale. The scale builds on three established ESE-scales, but the reliability of it is improved compared to the original three scales as the highly discipline-specific jargon is transformed to a more neutral...

  14. Tribological Properties of Neutral Polysaccharide Solutions under Simulated Oral Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinoviadou, K.; Janssen, A.M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Predictability of the perception of foods thickened by polysaccharides is only poor. Therefore, the effect of saliva on the lubrication properties of 2 types of neutral polysaccharides, cross-linked starch and locust bean gum, was studied. Despite the similar bulk rheological behavior of the 2 polys

  15. The edge of neutral evolution in social dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Jonas; Reichenbach, Tobias; Frey, Erwin

    2009-09-01

    The functioning of animal as well as human societies fundamentally relies on cooperation. Yet, defection is often favorable for the selfish individual, and social dilemmas arise. Selection by individuals' fitness, usually the basic driving force of evolution, quickly eliminates cooperators. However, evolution is also governed by fluctuations that can be of greater importance than fitness differences, and can render evolution effectively neutral. Here, we investigate the effects of selection versus fluctuations in social dilemmas. By studying the mean extinction times of cooperators and defectors, a variable sensitive to fluctuations, we are able to identify and quantify an emerging 'edge of neutral evolution' that delineates regimes of neutral and Darwinian evolution. Our results reveal that cooperation is significantly maintained in the neutral regimes. In contrast, the classical predictions of evolutionary game theory, where defectors beat cooperators, are recovered in the Darwinian regimes. Our studies demonstrate that fluctuations can provide a surprisingly simple way to partly resolve social dilemmas. Our methods are generally applicable to estimate the role of random drift in evolutionary dynamics.

  16. The edge of neutral evolution in social dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany); Reichenbach, Tobias [Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Laboratory of Sensory Neuroscience, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: jonas.cremer@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2009-09-15

    The functioning of animal as well as human societies fundamentally relies on cooperation. Yet, defection is often favorable for the selfish individual, and social dilemmas arise. Selection by individuals' fitness, usually the basic driving force of evolution, quickly eliminates cooperators. However, evolution is also governed by fluctuations that can be of greater importance than fitness differences, and can render evolution effectively neutral. Here, we investigate the effects of selection versus fluctuations in social dilemmas. By studying the mean extinction times of cooperators and defectors, a variable sensitive to fluctuations, we are able to identify and quantify an emerging 'edge of neutral evolution' that delineates regimes of neutral and Darwinian evolution. Our results reveal that cooperation is significantly maintained in the neutral regimes. In contrast, the classical predictions of evolutionary game theory, where defectors beat cooperators, are recovered in the Darwinian regimes. Our studies demonstrate that fluctuations can provide a surprisingly simple way to partly resolve social dilemmas. Our methods are generally applicable to estimate the role of random drift in evolutionary dynamics.

  17. LIPSS results for photons coupling to light neutral scalar bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2008-06-01

    The LIPSS search for a light neutral scalar boson coupling to optical photons is reported. The search covers a region of parameter space of approximately 1.0 meV and coupling strength greater than 10^-6 GeV^-1. The LIPSS results show no evidence for scalar coupling in this region of parameter space.

  18. Approximate controllability of semilinear neutral systems in Hilbert spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Mahmudov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The approximate controllability of semilinear neutral systems in Hilbert spaces is studied using the Schauder fixed point theorem. It is shown that the approximate controllability of the semilinear system under some conditions is implied by the approximate controllability of its linear part.

  19. Approximate controllability of neutral stochastic integrodifferential systems in Hilbert spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Balachandran

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper sufficient conditions are established for the controllability of a class of neutral stochastic integrodifferential equations with nonlocal conditions in abstract space. The Nussbaum fixed point theorem is used to obtain the controllability results, which extends the linear system to the stochastic settings with the help of compact semigroup. An example is provided to illustrate the theory.

  20. Neutralizing antibodies in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Tozzini; D. Matteucci; P. Bandecchi; F. Baldinotti; C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M. Bendinelli

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSera from cats experimentally infected with five isolates of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) from various geographical regions and from FIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-seropositive field cats from four European countries neutralized the Petaluma strain of FIV (FIV-P), originall

  1. The Dynamics of Revenue-Neutral Trade Liberalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, J.E.; van der Meijden, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The paper studies the dynamic welfare and macroeconomic effects of a revenue-neutral strategy of offsetting tariff reductions with increases in destination-based consumption taxes. To this end, we employ a dynamic general equilibrium model of a small open developing economy, featuring endo

  2. LHCb; Neutral Higgs $ \\to \\tau \\tau$ Limits at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Ilten, P

    2013-01-01

    LHCb is fully instrumented in the forward region, $2 \\leq \\eta \\leq 5$, and provides compelentary results to the central measurements of ATLAS and CMS. Preliminary limits are presented on neutral Higgs production usint $\\tau \\tau$ final states in the forward region of LHCb.

  3. Nanostructure formation enhances the activity of LPS-neutralizing peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mas-Moruno, C.; Cascales, L.; Cruz, L.J.; Mora, P.; Perez-Paya, E.; Albericio, F.

    2008-01-01

    Peptides that interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can provide the basis for the development of new antisepsis agents. In this work, several LPS-neutralizing acyl peptides derived from LALF, BPI, and SAP were prepared, structurally characterized, and biologically evaluated. In all cases, peptides

  4. Quantification of Transient Changes of Thermospheric Neutral Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-24

    Pedersen conductivity at high latitudes . Based on Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites...capture more random behavior of the electric field variability. The notable exception to this trend is EOF 11, which captures mid- latitude variations on...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0320 Quantification of Transient Changes of Thermospheric Neutral Density Arthur Richmond UNIVERSITY CORPORATION FOR ATMOSPHERIC

  5. EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairala, Juniper C.; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph J.; Sipila, Stepahnie A.; Ney, Zane A.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Thomason, Arthur H.

    2012-01-01

    As an early step in the preparation for future Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. Neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Facility to date have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the International Space Station (ISS). With the retirement of the Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial players for human transportation to space, evaluations at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) will take on a new focus. Test objectives are selected for their criticality, lack of previous testing, or design changes that justify retesting. Assembly tasks investigated are performed using procedures developed by the flight hardware providers and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance tasks are performed using a more systematic set of procedures, EVA Concept of Operations for the International Space Station (JSC-33408), also developed by the MOD. This paper describes the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated.

  6. Anomalous electrodynamics of neutral pion matter in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Kadam, Saurabh V.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state of quantum chromodynamics in sufficiently strong external magnetic fields and at moderate baryon chemical potential is a chiral soliton lattice (CSL) of neutral pions [1]. We investigate the interplay between the CSL structure and dynamical electromagnetic fields. Our main result is that in presence of the CSL background, the two physical photon polarizations and the neutral pion mix, giving rise to two gapped excitations and one gapless mode with a nonrelativistic dispersion relation. The nature of this mode depends on the direction of its propagation, interpolating between a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave [2] and a neutral pion surface wave, which in turn arises from the spontaneously broken translation invariance. Quite remarkably, there is a neutral-pion-like mode that remains gapped even in the chiral limit, in seeming contradiction to the Goldstone theorem. Finally, we have a first look at the effect of thermal fluctuations of the CSL, showing that even the soft nonrelativistic excitation does not lead to the Landau-Peierls instability. However, it leads to an anomalous contribution to pressure that scales with temperature and magnetic field as T 5/2( B/f π )3/2.

  7. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Sommerstein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy.

  8. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerstein, Rami; Flatz, Lukas; Remy, Melissa M; Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; Ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy.

  9. Neutral kaon decay without symmetry violation a nonstandard theoretical speculation

    CERN Document Server

    Hannibal, L

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that if antiparticles are realized in quantum field theory by negative frequency states, which nevertheless have positive energy density, the resulting theory provides a qualitative explanation for the experiments on the neutral K mesons, without assumming any symmetry violation.

  10. STABILITY OF NONLINEAR NEUTRAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION VIA FIXED POINT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a nonlinear neutral differential equation is considered.By a fixed point theory,we give some conditions to ensure that the zero solution to the equation is asymptotically stable.Some existing results are improved and generalized.

  11. The CO{sub 2}neutral workplace; Den CO2 neutrale arbejdsplads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentzen, B.; Bartholin Holm, K.; Koehler, R.; Harboe, R.K. (Faktor 3 ApS, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Poulsen, Peter; Dam-Hansen, C.; Thorseth, A. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, DTU Fotonik, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    As the world develops, the requirement for more electrical equipment in everyday life is increasing rapidly. The power consumption of electrical appliances both in operation and in standby mode therefore greatly contributes to our total energy consumption. When regarding the energy lifetime of an electrical product, the amount of energy used for standby cannot be neglected and will in many cases exceed the power used in operation. The potential of PVs used indoor to supply the standby power is a fairly unexploited field, but can have a revolutionary effect on the total energy consumption worldwide. This paper presents the results gained in the project 'The CO{sub 2}neutral work space', which was started up in 2008. The objective of the project is focused on elucidating and uncovering the great potential for usage of PVs in indoor applications to power the standby electricity consumption. To integrate solar cells into a design object has proved to be challenging. Throughout the development process it has been extremely important with the coherence between technology and design in a close dialogue between all parties. The project team has made three distinctive designs, where design solutions are created in cooperation between the PV-technology and a user-friendly approach based on the observations of the secretaries have shown that the desk is often covered by electronic devices and paper material. The final three design concepts adapt to Montanas existing aesthetics and design as a transparent screen, a desk integration and a flexible solution. All three design concepts are displayed in either 1:1 or functioning prototypes, depending on allowance and performance in the chosen PV-technologies. The prototypes have been shown at various design shows and scientific conferences internationally and nationally. A LED based solar simulator has been build and follows the IEC904-9 requirements for a Class A solar simulator though at an irradiation level of about

  12. Vaccine Elicitation of High Mannose-Dependent Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3-Glycan Broadly Neutralizing Epitope in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kevin O; Nicely, Nathan I; Wiehe, Kevin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Meyerhoff, R Ryan; Parks, Robert; Walkowicz, William E; Aussedat, Baptiste; Wu, Nelson R; Cai, Fangping; Vohra, Yusuf; Park, Peter K; Eaton, Amanda; Go, Eden P; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Barouch, Dan H; Zhang, Ruijun; Von Holle, Tarra; Overman, R Glenn; Anasti, Kara; Sanders, Rogier W; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette; Desaire, Heather; Santra, Sampa; Letvin, Norman L; Nabel, Gary J; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Danishefsky, Samuel J; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-02-28

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that target HIV-1 envelope (Env) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development. A bnAb target is the Env third variable loop (V3)-glycan site. To determine whether immunization could induce antibodies to the V3-glycan bnAb binding site, we repetitively immunized macaques over a 4-year period with an Env expressing V3-high mannose glycans. Env immunizations elicited plasma antibodies that neutralized HIV-1 expressing only high-mannose glycans-a characteristic shared by early bnAb B cell lineage members. A rhesus recombinant monoclonal antibody from a vaccinated macaque bound to the V3-glycan site at the same amino acids as broadly neutralizing antibodies. A structure of the antibody bound to glycan revealed that the three variable heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions formed a cavity into which glycan could insert and neutralized multiple HIV-1 isolates with high-mannose glycans. Thus, HIV-1 Env vaccination induced mannose-dependent antibodies with characteristics of V3-glycan bnAb precursors.

  13. Energy Neutral Districts in 2050. The Dutch Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonska, B.; Roossien, B.; Ruijg, G.J.; Visser, H.; Bakker, E.J. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Willems, E. [Cauberg-Huygen Raadgevende Ingenieurs, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    According to the EPBD, from the end of 2020 on all new buildings should be built as nearly zero energy buildings. Instead of focusing on buildings only, a district approach to energy supply and consumption can be advantageous as regards the energy performance and economics. The potential of renewable energy technologies can be utilized to a larger extent while fewer energy generators are needed. An example is a so called energy-hub, in which exchange, conversion and seasonal storage of energy can lead to energy neutral districts before 2050. The Dutch study Transition in Energy and Process for a Sustainable District Development (Transep-DGO), financed largely by the AgentschapNL, has shown that this is possible. For energy neutral district development in 2050, six innovative energy concepts have been elaborated and the extent of energy neutrality in 2020, 2035 and 2050 calculated. Three concepts are based on an idea of an energy hub - bio hub, geo hub and a solar hub. Other concepts are all-electric, conventional and hydrogen concepts. Calculations show that implementation of each of the concepts can lead to energy neutral districts in 2050 or even earlier. When personal transport is included, energy neutrality in 2050 is not feasible. Based on the six general concepts, the most optimal energy concepts tailored for four Dutch cities have been elaborated as pilots, in close cooperation with municipality representatives. Solar hub has been dynamically simulated in order to show the added value of the exchange, conversion and storage of energy flows on a district scale. Energy Pattern Generator (EPG) has been applied for simulation of a virtual district with 1,000 dwellings of various categories. A solar hub with collective heat storage can reduce the demanded storage capacity by 26%, and the total required solar collector surface by 30% at maximum compared to individual seasonal heat storage capacity in dwellings that are not connected in an energy hub. Energy hub

  14. A General Nonlinear Fluid Model for Reacting Plasma-Neutral Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, E T; Shumlak, U

    2012-04-06

    A generalized, computationally tractable fluid model for capturing the effects of neutral particles in plasmas is derived. The model derivation begins with Boltzmann equations for singly charged ions, electrons, and a single neutral species. Electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge exchange reactions are included. Moments of the reaction collision terms are detailed. Moments of the Boltzmann equations for electron, ion, and neutral species are combined to yield a two-component plasma-neutral fluid model. Separate density, momentum, and energy equations, each including reaction transfer terms, are produced for the plasma and neutral equations. The required closures for the plasma-neutral model are discussed.

  15. Neutral-current detection in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, T.J.; Doe, P.J.; Fowler, M.M.; Hime, A.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Thornewell, P.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wouters, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) will have the capability of detecting all active species of neutrinos with energies greater than 2.2 MeV by the neutral-current disintegration of deuterium. The comparison of this rate with the rate of inverse beta decay of the deuteron will yield a nearly model-independent answer to the question of whether electron neutrinos from the sun oscillate into mu or tau neutrinos. The signal of a neutral-current interaction is the liberation of a free neutron in the heavy-water detector, and we discuss a technique employing {sup 3}He proportional counters for registering these neutrons, particularly from the standpoint of the ultra-low backgrounds needed.

  16. Neutral-current detection in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, T.J.; Doe, P.J.; Fowler, M.M.; Hime, A.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Thornewell, P.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wouters, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) will have the capability of detecting all active species of neutrinos with energies greater than 2.2 MeV by the neutral-current disintegration of deuterium. The comparison of this rate with the rate of inverse beta decay of the deuteron will yield a nearly model-independent answer to the question of whether electron neutrinos from the sun oscillate into mu or tau neutrinos. The signal of a neutral-current interaction is the liberation of a free neutron in the heavy-water detector, and we discuss a technique employing [sup 3]He proportional counters for registering these neutrons, particularly from the standpoint of the ultra-low backgrounds needed.

  17. Collaboration essential for an energy neutral urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijns, Jos; Mulder, Mirabella; Roorda, Jelle; Schepman, Hans; Voskamp, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Two Dutch water boards prepared a Master Plan with measures to substantially reduce their energy use by 2027. In total, more than 100 measures were identified such as bubble aeration and heat recovery from effluent. Together these measures result in a 90-95% reduction in energy use at the water boards. However, for the whole urban water cycle, thus including the energy required for warm water use in households, the total energy reduction from these measures at the water boards is only 5-6%. To attain the objective to have an energy neutral urban water cycle, collaboration with other sectors such as housing, energy, agriculture and industry will be essential. Active collaboration of the water boards through the incorporation of energy efficient water measures as part of the carbon neutral effort of cities is recognized to be a promising strategy.

  18. Moving mesh cosmology: properties of neutral hydrogen in absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Simeon; Sijacki, Debora; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2012-01-01

    We examine the distribution of neutral hydrogen in cosmological simulations carried out with the new moving-mesh code AREPO and compare it with the corresponding GADGET simulations based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The two codes use identical gravity solvers and baryonic physics implementations, but very different methods for solving the Euler equations, allowing us to assess how numerical effects associated with the hydro-solver impact the results of simulations. Here we focus on an analysis of the neutral gas, as detected in quasar absorption lines. We find that the high column density regime probed by Damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLS) exhibits significant differences between the codes. GADGET produces spurious artefacts in large halos in the form of gaseous clumps, boosting the LLS cross-section. Furthermore, it forms halos with denser central baryonic cores than AREPO, which leads to a substantially greater DLA cross-section from smaller halos. AREPO thus p...

  19. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. S., E-mail: johnsvogel@yahoo.com [University of California, 8300 Feliz Creek Dr., Ukiah, California 95482 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Focused Cs{sup +} beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm{sup 2} C{sup −} current density compared to the 20 μA/mm{sup 2} from a 1 mm recess.

  20. Discovery of Phenylglycine Lactams as Potent Neutral Factor VIIa Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Nicholas R; Parkhurst, Brandon L; Jiang, Wen; DeLucca, Indawati; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ladziata, Vladimir; Cheney, Daniel L; Bozarth, Jeffrey R; Rendina, Alan R; Wei, Anzhi; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wu, Yiming; Wong, Pancras C; Seiffert, Dietmar A; Wexler, Ruth R; Priestley, E Scott

    2016-12-08

    Inhibitors of Factor VIIa (FVIIa), a serine protease in the clotting cascade, have shown strong antithrombotic efficacy in preclinical thrombosis models with minimal bleeding liabilities. Discovery of potent, orally active FVIIa inhibitors has been largely unsuccessful because known chemotypes have required a highly basic group in the S1 binding pocket for high affinity. A recently reported fragment screening effort resulted in the discovery of a neutral heterocycle, 7-chloro-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-1(2H)-one, that binds in the S1 pocket of FVIIa and can be incorporated into a phenylglycine FVIIa inhibitor. Optimization of this P1 binding group led to the first series of neutral, permeable FVIIa inhibitors with low nanomolar potency.

  1. Neutral Complex Extraction and Synergistic Extraction of Macrolide Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the theory of reactive extraction, new solvent systems were developed to replace butylacetate for extraction of macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, kitasamycin, spiramycin meleumycin etc.). A new neutral complex solvent extraction system, fatty alcohol-kerosene (marked by E1), was used for extraction of erythromycin, one of the macrolide antibiotics. The extraction equilibrium equation is obtained, and the extraction distribution is as follows The effects of several parameters on extraction equilibrium were investigated. Furthermore, a new synergistic extraction system (marked by E2) was developed, in which another solvent was used as synergistic agent to replace the diluent kerosene in the neutral complex extraction system. Based on these new extraction systems, an improved process for extraction of erythromycin was developed, showing remarkable advantages in technology and economics owing to its low solvent consumption of 3kg per billion unit compared with 9-10 for butylacetate. The recovery process of solvent from raffinate may be eliminated.

  2. On delay-dependent robust stability for uncertain neutral systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Yong; Wu Min

    2005-01-01

    The problem of delay-dependent criteria for the robust stability of neutral systems with time-varying structured uncertainties and identi-eal neutral-delay and discrete-delay is concerned. A criterion for nominal systems is presented by taking the relationship between the terms in the Leibniz-Newton formula into account, which is described by some freeweighting matrices. In addition, this criterion is extended to robust stability of the systems with time-varying structured uncertainties. All of the criteria are based on linear matrix inequality such that it is easy to calculate the upper bound of the time-delay and the free-weighting matrices. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness and the improvement over the existing results.

  3. Egypt's Popular Uprising and the Stakes of Medical Neutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Sherine F; Bayoumi, Soha

    2016-06-01

    Amidst the recent political uprisings in the Arab region, physicians and other healthcare workers have found themselves in the crossfire. This paper focuses on Egypt's doctors, paying special attention to how many have both appealed to and practiced medical neutrality as its own potent and contested political stance, particularly since the period of military rule following Mubarak's removal from power. Our paper draws on interviews with physicians who served as volunteers in the field hospitals in the days of unrest and violence, and with others who played a major role in documenting protesters' injuries, police brutality, and other forms of state violence against unarmed citizens. Based on interviews with doctors who belong to organizations such as "Tahrir Doctors" and "Doctors Without Rights," our paper reveals how these doctors' commitment to professional ethics put them at odds with the orders of military personnel, rendering their appeal to "medical neutrality" a weighty political act in and of itself.

  4. On Dirichlet eigenvectors for neutral two-dimensional Markov chains

    CERN Document Server

    Champagnat, Nicolas; Miclo, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    We consider a general class of discrete, two-dimensional Markov chains modeling the dynamics of a population with two types, without mutation or immigration, and neutral in the sense that type has no influence on each individual's birth or death parameters. We prove that all the eigenvectors of the corresponding transition matrix or infinitesimal generator \\Pi\\ can be expressed as the product of "universal" polynomials of two variables, depending on each type's size but not on the specific transitions of the dynamics, and functions depending only on the total population size. These eigenvectors appear to be Dirichlet eigenvectors for \\Pi\\ on the complement of triangular subdomains, and as a consequence the corresponding eigenvalues are ordered in a specific way. As an application, we study the quasistationary behavior of finite, nearly neutral, two-dimensional Markov chains, absorbed in the sense that 0 is an absorbing state for each component of the process.

  5. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in neutral liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonin, E B, E-mail: sonin@cc.huji.ac.i [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was discovered as a quantum-mechanical effect for charged particles, but it has its counterpart in classical wave mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm interference arises at the scattering of a sound wave by a vortex in classical and quantum hydrodynamics. This interference leads to a transverse force between quasiparticles and vortices in superfluids and superconductors. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was also generalized to neutral particles with magnetic or electric dipole momenta. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for charge particles and its modification for magnetic momenta (the Aharonov-Casher effect) have already been experimentally observed, and the efforts to detect the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrically polarized neutral particles are on the way. A possible system for this detection is a Bose-condensate of excitons in a double quantum well. Observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system would provide direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in neutral liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2010-09-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was discovered as a quantum-mechanical effect for charged particles, but it has its counterpart in classical wave mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm interference arises at the scattering of a sound wave by a vortex in classical and quantum hydrodynamics. This interference leads to a transverse force between quasiparticles and vortices in superfluids and superconductors. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was also generalized to neutral particles with magnetic or electric dipole momenta. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for charge particles and its modification for magnetic momenta (the Aharonov-Casher effect) have already been experimentally observed, and the efforts to detect the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrically polarized neutral particles are on the way. A possible system for this detection is a Bose-condensate of excitons in a double quantum well. Observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system would provide direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  7. Brief review on plasma propulsion with neutralizer-free systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-06-01

    Electric space propulsion is an intensively developing field addressing new demands and challenges for long-term spacecraft operation. Many novel plasma propulsion concepts aim to find new acceleration principles, use alternative propellants, upscale or downscale thrusters for large thrust or for very small spacecrafts etc. In this work we review the neutralizer-free concepts, where both positive and negative particles are extracted and accelerated from plasmas. We can divide these concepts into three main categories, defined by their acceleration principle: (i) neutral beam generation, (ii) plasma acceleration/expansion and (iii) bipolar beam acceleration. We describe the basic physical principles and evaluate the main advantages and drawbacks in view of general space applications. We also present here further detail on a recent concept where RF voltages are used to accelerate quasi-simultaneously positive ions and electrons from the same source.

  8. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  9. Semileptonic branching fractions of charged and neutral B mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Athanas, M; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Gronberg, J B; Kutschke, R; Menary, S R; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Balest, R; Cho, K; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, David G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Crowcroft, D S; Drell, P S; Dumas, D J P; Ehrlich, R; Gaidarev, P B; García-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Henderson, S; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Würthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A P; Rodríguez, J; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Bellerive, A; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Spaan, B; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N K; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M S; Kotov, S A; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Momayezi, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Poling, R A; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Ling, Z; Mahmood, A H; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Wappler, F; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R L; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Zoeller, M M; Butler, F; Fu, X; Nemati, B; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Wood, M; Bishai, M; Fast, J; Gerndt, E; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang Pei Ning; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Gibbons, L K; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Gao, M; Golberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Vasseur, G; Xing, X; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Gibaut, D; Kinoshita, K; Pomianowski, P A; Barish, B C; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J

    1994-01-01

    An examination of leptons in {\\Upsilon (4S)} events tagged by reconstructed B decays yields semileptonic branching fractions of b_-=(10.1 \\pm 1.8\\pm 1.4)\\% for charged and b_0=(10.9 \\pm 0.7\\pm 1.1)\\% for neutral B mesons. This is the first measurement for charged B. Assuming equality of the charged and neutral semileptonic widths, the ratio b_-/b_0=0.93 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.12 is equivalent to the ratio of lifetimes. A postscript version is available through World-Wide-Web in http://w4.lns.cornell.edu/publi c/CLNS/1994

  10. Emotion Processing for Arousal and Neutral Content in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Satler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the ability of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients to perceive emotional information and to assign subjective emotional rating scores to audiovisual presentations. Materials and Methods. 24 subjects (14 with AD, matched to controls for age and educational levels were studied. After neuropsychological assessment, they watched a Neutral story and then a story with Emotional content. Results. Recall scores for both stories were significantly lower in AD (Neutral and Emotional: P=.001. CG assigned different emotional scores for each version of the test, P=.001, while ratings of AD did not differ, P=.32. Linear regression analyses determined the best predictors of emotional rating and recognition memory for each group among neuropsychological tests battery. Conclusions. AD patients show changes in emotional processing on declarative memory and a preserved ability to express emotions in face of arousal content. The present findings suggest that these impairments are due to general cognitive decline.

  11. Dynamical output feedback stabilization for neutral systems with mixed delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei QIAN; Guo-jiang SHEN; You-xian SUN

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of stabilization for the linear neutral systems with mixed delays.The attention is focused on the design of output feedback controllers which guarantee the asymptotical stability of the closed-loop systems.Based on the model transformation of neutral type,the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method is employed to establish the delay-dependent stability criterion.Then,through the controller parameterization and some matrix transformation techniques,the desired parameters are determined under the delay-dependent design condition in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs),and the desired controller is explicitly formulated.A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Neutral and positively charged excitons in narrow quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras Monroy, L. C.; Rodríguez-Prada, F. A.; Mikhailov, I. D. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2014-05-15

    We study theoretically quantized states of a neutral and a positively charged exciton (trion X{sup +}) confined in a heterostructure with the ring-like geometry. In order to assess the experimentally relevant domain of parameters, we adopt a simple model of a narrow ring when 3D wave equations for the neutral and positively charged excitons can be separated. By using the Fourier series method, we have calculated the energy spectra of excitons complexes in a quantum ring as a function of the electron-to-hole mass ratio, the ring radius, and the magnetic field strength. The quantum-size effect and the size-dependent magnetic oscillations of energy levels of excitons' complexes spectra have been revealed.

  13. NEUTRALIZATION OF ACIDIC GROUND WATER NEAR GLOBE, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychaner, James H.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Highly acidic contaminated water is moving through a shallow aquifer and interacting with streams near Globe, Arizona. Dissolved concentrations reach 3,000 mg/L iron, 150 mg/L copper, and 16,400 mg/L total dissloved solids; pH is as low as 3. 6. Samples from 16 PVC-cased observation wells include uncontaminated, contaminated, transition, and neutralized waters. Chemical reaction with sediments and mixing with uncontaminated water neutralizes the acidic water. The reactions form a transition zone where gypsum replaces calcite and most metals precipitate. Ferric hydroxide also precipitates if sufficient oxygen is available. Abundant gypsum crystals and ferric hydroxide coatings have been recovered from well cuttings. Large sulfate concentrations produce sulfate complexes with many metals that inhibit removal of metals from solution.

  14. Neutral evolution: A null model for language dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blythe, R A

    2011-01-01

    We review the task of aligning simple models for language dynamics with relevant empirical data, motivated by the fact that this is rarely attempted in practice despite an abundance of abstract models. We propose that one way to meet this challenge is through the careful construction of null models. We argue in particular that rejection of a null model must have important consequences for theories about language dynamics if modelling is truly to be worthwhile. Our main claim is that the stochastic process of neutral evolution (also known as genetic drift or random copying) is a viable null model for language dynamics. We survey empirical evidence in favour and against neutral evolution as a mechanism behind historical language changes, highlighting the theoretical implications in each case.

  15. Charge neutrality breakdown in confined aqueous electrolytes: Theory and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Thiago; Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We study, using Density Functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations, aqueous electrolyte solutions between charged infinite planar surfaces, in contact with a bulk salt reservoir. In agreement with recent experimental observations [Z. Luo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 6358 (2015)], we find that the confined electrolyte lacks local charge neutrality. We show that a DFT based on a bulk-HNC expansion properly accounts for strong electrostatic correlations and allows us to accurately calculate the ionic density profiles between the charged surfaces, even for electrolytes containing trivalent counterions. The DFT allows us to explore the degree of local charge neutrality violation, as a function of plate separation and bulk electrolyte concentration, and to accurately calculate the interaction force between the charged surfaces.

  16. The coherence problem with the Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James S

    2012-04-01

    The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity (UNTB), proposed as an alternative to niche theory, has been viewed as a theory that species coexist without niche differences, without fitness differences, or with equal probability of success. Support is claimed when models lacking species differences predict highly aggregated metrics, such as species abundance distributions (SADs) or species area distributions (SARs). Here, I summarize why UNTB generates confusion, and is not actually relevant to niche theory (i.e. an explanation for why and how many species coexist). Equal probability is not a theory, but lack of one; it does not include or exclude any process relevant to coexistence of competitors. Models lacking explicit species can make useful predictions, but this does not support neutral theory. I provide s suggestions that could help reduce confusion generated by the debate.

  17. Constraints on a system of two neutral fermions from cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binetruy, P.; Girardi, G.; Salati, P.

    1984-05-14

    Using the standard model of cosmology we study the evolution of the population of a coupled system of two neutral fermions in which the lighter one is stable. During the expansion their population can be frozen at a certain level which makes them contribute to the mass density of the universe. The details of the freezing depend crucially on the couplings and on the masses of these two fermions, so that, comparison with the measured mass density in the universe gives constraints on the parameters of the physical system we examine. We discuss in detail different configurations for the coupling among these fermions; in particular in the case of large mixing we obtain restrictive bounds on both masses. Our study is relevant to supersymmetric grand unified models which predict the occurrence of light interacting neutral fermions, particularly higgsinos.

  18. Millimeter Wave Scattering from Neutral and Charged Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Heifetz, Alexander; Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, N Sami; Raptis, A C Paul

    2010-01-01

    We investigated 94GHz millimeter wave (MMW) scattering from neutral and charged water mist produced in the laboratory with an ultrasonic atomizer. Diffusion charging of the mist was accomplished with a negative ion generator (NIG). We observed increased forward and backscattering of MMW from charged mist, as compared to MMW scattering from an uncharged mist. In order to interpret the experimental results, we developed a model based on classical electrodynamics theory of scattering from a dielectric sphere with diffusion-deposited mobile surface charge. In this approach, scattering and extinction cross-sections are calculated for a charged Rayleigh particle with effective dielectric constant consisting of the volume dielectric function of the neutral sphere and surface dielectric function due to the oscillation of the surface charge in the presence of applied electric field. For small droplets with (radius smaller than 100nm), this model predicts increased MMW scattering from charged mist, which is qualitative...

  19. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. 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F.; Vannerem, P.; Vértesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Wells, P. S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Heinemeyer, S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Weiglein, G.

    2006-09-01

    The four LEP collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, have searched for the neutral Higgs bosons which are predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). The data of the four collaborations are statistically combined and examined for their consistency with the background hypothesis and with a possible Higgs boson signal. The combined LEP data show no significant excess of events which would indicate the production of Higgs bosons. The search results are used to set upper bounds on the cross-sections of various Higgs-like event topologies. The results are interpreted within the MSSM in a number of “benchmark” models, including CP-conserving and CP-violating scenarios. These interpretations lead in all cases to large exclusions in the MSSM parameter space. Absolute limits are set on the parameter cosβ and, in some scenarios, on the masses of neutral Higgs bosons.

  20. Oxidation mechanism of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen species, the spores were treated with an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source and observed in-situ using a fluorescent confocal-laser microscope. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1‧-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3‧-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as the cell membranes in the spores treated with the oxygen radical source were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes. DPPP staining revealed that the organelles were oxidized by the oxygen radical treatment. These results suggest that neutral oxygen species, especially atomic oxygen, induce a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles through the penetration of reactive oxygen species into the cell.

  1. A proposal for sympathetically cooling neutral molecules using cold ions

    CERN Document Server

    Robicheaux, F

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for cooling neutral molecules that have magnetic and electric dipole moments using collisions with cold ions. An external magnetic field is used to split the ground rovibrational energy levels of the molecule. The highest energy state within the ground rovibrational manifold increases in energy as the distance to the ion decreases leading to a repelling potential. At low energy, inelastic collisions are strongly suppressed due to the large distance of closest approach. Thus, a collision between a neutral molecule and a cold ion will lead to a decrease in the molecule's kinetic energy with no change in internal energy. We present results for the specific case of OH molecules cooled by Be$^+$, Mg$^+$, or Ca$^+$ ions.

  2. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Kraan, A.C.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Mannocchi, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Muller, A.S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Ward, J.J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Bohrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; 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Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Achard, P.; Zupan, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V.P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, G.; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, A.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, J.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, L.W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberra, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, J.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Nowak, H.; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Rembeczki, S.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, C.; Ting, S.C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.; Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, R.M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; de Jong, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, K.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Heinemeyer, S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Weiglein, G.

    2006-01-01

    The four LEP collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, have searched for the neutral Higgs bosons which are predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The data of the four collaborations are statistically combined and examined for their consistency with the background hypothesis and with a possible Higgs boson signal. The combined LEP data show no significant excess of events which would indicate the production of Higgs bosons. The search results are used to set upper bounds on the cross-sections of various Higgs-like event topologies. The results are interpreted within the MSSM in a number of ``benchmark" models, including CP-conserving and CP-violating scenarios. These interpretations lead in all cases to large exclusions in the MSSM parameter space. Absolute limits are set on the parameter tanb and, in some scenarios, on the masses of neutral Higgs bosons.

  3. Thermal transparency with the concept of neutral inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao; Wu, Linzhi

    2013-09-01

    The concept of the electromagnetic wave transparency is introduced into the thermal field. The conditions of the thermal transparency for a multilayered sphere with isotropic coatings, a coated spheroid with an isotropic coating, and a coated sphere with a radial anisotropic core or a radial anisotropic coat are deduced with the help of the idea of the neutral inclusion. The thermal transparency can be achieved by making the effective thermal conductivity of the composite inclusion equal to the thermal conductivity of the surrounding matrix. The validity of the theoretical analysis is checked by the corresponding simulated results, which indicate that the designed neutral inclusion can be transparent perfectly. A specific case of interest of the thermal transparency is its application to cancel the thermal stress concentration resulting from the existence of the inclusions in the particle (even the thermal-insulated particle) -reinforced composites.

  4. State-dependent neutral delay equations from population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, M V; Hadeler, K P; Kuttler, C

    2014-10-01

    A novel class of state-dependent delay equations is derived from the balance laws of age-structured population dynamics, assuming that birth rates and death rates, as functions of age, are piece-wise constant and that the length of the juvenile phase depends on the total adult population size. The resulting class of equations includes also neutral delay equations. All these equations are very different from the standard delay equations with state-dependent delay since the balance laws require non-linear correction factors. These equations can be written as systems for two variables consisting of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) and a generalized shift, a form suitable for numerical calculations. It is shown that the neutral equation (and the corresponding ODE--shift system) is a limiting case of a system of two standard delay equations.

  5. Transcriptomic insights into human brain evolution: acceleration, neutrality, heterochrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somel, Mehmet; Rohlfs, Rori; Liu, Xiling

    2014-12-01

    Primate brain transcriptome comparisons within the last 12 years have yielded interesting but contradictory observations on how the transcriptome evolves, and its adaptive role in human cognitive evolution. Since the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, the human prefrontal cortex transcriptome seems to have evolved more than that of the chimpanzee. But at the same time, most expression differences among species, especially those observed in adults, appear as consequences of neutral evolution at cis-regulatory sites. Adaptive expression changes in the human brain may be rare events involving timing shifts, or heterochrony, in specific neurodevelopmental processes. Disentangling adaptive and neutral expression changes, and associating these with human-specific features of the brain require improved methods, comparisons across more species, and further work on comparative development.

  6. Calculation of Ion Equilibrium Temperature in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金星; 曹明涛; 韩亮; 齐越蓉; 张首刚; 高宏; 李福利; T.C.Killian

    2011-01-01

    We provide a fast iteration method to calculate the ion equilibrium temperature in an ultracold neutral plasma (UNP). The temperature as functions of electron initial temperature and ion density is obtained and compared with the recent UNP experimental data. The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results very well. The calculated ion equilibrium temperature by this method can be applied to study the UNP expansion process more effectively.%We provide a fast iteration method to calculate the ion equilibrium temperature in an ultracold neutral plasma (UNP).The temperature as functions of electron initial temperature and ion density is obtained and compared with the recent UNP experimental data.The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results very well.The calculated ion equilibrium temperature by this method can be applied to study the UNP expansion process more effectively.

  7. Colorado's Voucher Law:Examining the Claim of Fiscal Neutrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Welner

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Colorado's voucher law was declared unconstitutional by the Colorado Supreme Court on June 28, 2004. Voucher supporters have begun drafting revised legislation designed to address the legal problem. This article calls into question the key financial claim of revenue neutrality'a claim that was central to the promotion and passage of the departing voucher law. The author concludes that the voucher law was not revenue neutral, even though it attempts to exclude from eligibility those children already enrolled in private schools. In fact, this law, as well as any revised law with similar eligibility provisions, would actually cost taxpayers an additional $10 million per year once fully implemented because the eligibility provision provides little more than a short-term damper on the law's long-term fiscal impact.

  8. Neutral stability calculations for boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Padhye, A.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the parallel neutral stability of three-dimensional incompressible, isothermal boundary-layer flows. A Taylor-series expansion of the dispersion relation is used to derive the general eigenvalues. These equations are functions of the complex group velocity. These relations are verified by numerical results obtained for two- and three-dimensional disturbances in two- and three-dimensional flows.

  9. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricca, Alessandra [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Allamandola, Louis J., E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  10. Improved Stabilization Criteria for Neutral Time-Delay Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lianglin Xiong; Haiyang Zhang; Yongkun Li; Zixin Liu

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the stabilization conditions for neutral systems with mixed time delays. By constructing a novel class of Lyapunov functionals which contains an augmented Lyapunov functional, using a new class of improved Jensen’s like inequalities, two improved delay-dependent stability criteria are firstly established. Next, state feedback controllers are designed according to the stability conditions in different cases. Finally, five numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the ...

  11. Anomalous screening of quantum impurities by a neutral environment

    OpenAIRE

    Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    It is a common knowledge that an effective interaction of a quantum impurity with an electromagnetic field can be screened by surrounding charge carriers, whether mobile or static. Here we demonstrate that very strong, `anomalous' screening can take place in the presence of a neutral, weakly-polarizable environment, due to an exchange of orbital angular momentum between the impurity and the bath. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to generalize all phenomena related to isolated impuriti...

  12. Biomass and Neutral Lipid Production in Geothermal Microalgal Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Faye Bywaters

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems- in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011;Bird et al., 2012. Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 368 to 3246 mg C L-1 d-1. The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production ranged from zero to 38.74 mg free fatty acids and triacylglycerols L-1 d-1, the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment – all results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels.

  13. $\\mu^+e^- <---> \\mu^- e^+$ Transitions via Neutral Scalar Bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Wei-Shu; Wong, Gwo-Guang

    1995-01-01

    With $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$ decay forbidden by multiplicative lepton number conservation, we study muonium--antimuonium transitions induced by neutral scalar bosons. Pseudoscalars do not induce conversion for triplet muonium, while for singlet muonium, pseudoscalar and scalar contributions add constructively. This is in contrast to the usual case of doubly charged scalar exchange, where the conversion rate is the same for both singlet and triplet muonium. Complementary to muonium conversion studies...

  14. Glucosamine derived DISAL donors for stereoselective glycosylations under neutral conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathe, S.; Thygesen, M.B.; Larsen, K.

    2005-01-01

    DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosa/icylate) D-glcosyl, D-galactosyl, D-mannosyl, and L-quinovosyl donors have previously provided the efficient glycosylation of a range of substrates under either strictly neutral, mildly basic, or very mildly Lewis acidic (LiClO4) conditions. Herein we report the synthe...... the difficult glycosylation of the 3-OH of a glucosamine derivative....

  15. An atomic model for neutral and singly ionized uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceda, E. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the atomic levels above ground state in neutral, U(0), and singly ionized, U(+), uranium is described based on identified atomic transitions. Some 168 states in U(0) and 95 in U(+) are found. A total of 1581 atomic transitions are used to complete this process. Also discussed are the atomic inverse lifetimes and line widths for the radiative transitions as well as the electron collisional cross sections.

  16. Asymptotic Growth of Solutions of Neutral Type Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklyar, G. M., E-mail: sklar@univ.szczecin.pl; Polak, P., E-mail: piotr.polak@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl [University of Szczecin, Institute of Mathematics (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    We consider a differential system of neutral type with distributed delay. We obtain a precise norm estimation of semigroup generated by the operator corresponding to the system in question. Our result is based on a spectral analysis of the operator and some uniform estimation of norms of the exponentials of matrices. We also discuss the stability properties of corresponding solutions and the existence of the fastest growing solution.

  17. A search for the neutral Higgs boson at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Atamanchuk, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bachmann, S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Bao, J.; Barillére, R.; Barone, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Behrens, J.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Bosetti, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brock, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Castello, R.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, W. Y.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Chung, S.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Contin, A.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; Dhina, M.; Dibitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Djambazov, L.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Easo, S.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, S. J.; Fackler, O.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.; Filthaut, F.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Foreman, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Friebel, W.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gele, D.; Gentile, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Herten, G.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jezequel, S.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, D.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Krivshich, A.; Kuijten, H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kunin, A.; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Leedom, I.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Leytens, X.; Li, C.; Li, H. T.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Malhotra, P. K.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marion, F.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Neyer, C.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Pascala, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Qi, Z. D.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rose, J.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schulte, S.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Scott, I.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shen, D. Z.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickerman, T.; Spillantini, P.; Starosta, R.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Terzi, G.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, C. R.; Wang, G. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weber, J.; Weill, R.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wenninger, J.; White, M.; Willmout, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, J. G.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; Yin, Z. W.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.

    1993-04-01

    We update the results of a search for the Standard Model neutral Higgs boson using a data sample corresponding to 1 062 000 hadronic Z decays. We exclude the existence of the Minimal Standard Model Higgs boson in the mass range 0 <= mH < 57.7 GeV at the 95% confidence level. Supported by the Hungarian OTKA fund under contract number 2970.

  18. Constructing the phase diagram of finite neutral nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. B.; Moretto, L. G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G. J.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D. A.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Gilkes, M. L.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J. C.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lisa, M. A.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Müller, W. F.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Sann, H.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J.; Tincknell, M.; Tuvé, C.; Wang, S.; Warren, P.; Wieman, H. H.; Wienold, T.; Wolf, K.

    2003-02-01

    The fragment yields from the multifragmentation of gold, lanthanum, and krypton nuclei obtained by the EOS Collaboration are examined in terms of Fisher’s droplet formalism modified to account for Coulomb energy. The critical exponents σ and τ and the surface energy coefficient c0 are obtained. Estimates are made of the pressure-temperature and temperature-density coexistence curve of finite neutral nuclear matter as well as the location of the critical point.

  19. PERIODIC SOLUTIONS OF LINEAR NEUTRAL INTEGRO-DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马世旺; 王志成; 许强

    2004-01-01

    Consider the linear neutral FDEd/dt[x(t)+ Ax(t -7)] =∫R[dL(8)]x(t+s)+f(t)where x and f are n-dimensional vectors;A is an n×n constant matrix and L(s) is an n×n matrix function with bounded total variation. Some necessary and sufficient conditions are given which guarantee the existence and uniqueness of periodic solutions to the above equation.

  20. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs.

  1. Wind Turbines on CO2 Neutral Luminaries in Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In the present work, an overview of three different wind turbines used in hybrid luminaries is presented. The turbines are: vertical-axis twisted Savonius, three-blade horizontal-axis, and vertical-axis three-blade helical H-rotor. The considered luminaries are also equipped with photovoltaic pan...... buildings. A new vertical-axis twisted Savonius rotor is proposed for a luminary being designed for such a district within the “Development of CO2 neutral urban luminary” project....

  2. Wind Turbines on CO2 Neutral Luminaries in Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Bak, Christian; Beller, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, an overview of three different wind turbines used in hybrid luminaries is presented. The turbines are: vertical-axis twisted Savonius, three-blade horizontal-axis, and vertical-axis three-blade helical H-rotor. The considered luminaries are also equipped with photovoltaic pan...... buildings. A new vertical-axis twisted Savonius rotor is proposed for a luminary being designed for such a district within the “Development of CO2 neutral urban luminary” project....

  3. OSCILLATION FOR NONAUTONOMOUS NEUTRAL DYNAMIC DELAY EQUATIONS ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The article is concerned with oscillation of nonautonomous neutral dynamic delay equations on time scales. Sufficient conditions are established for the existence of bounded positive solutions and for oscillation of all solutions of this equation. Some results extend known results for difference equations when the time scale is the set Z+ of positive integers and for differential equations when the time scale is the set R of real numbers.

  4. Neutral- and Multi-Colored Semitransparent Perovskite Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kyu-Tae Lee; L. Jay Guo; Hui Joon Park

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite “islands” and transparent electrodes—the latter of which include thin metallic films, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, and transparent conductive oxides for achieving optical transparency—are investigated. Moreover, the perovskite...

  5. Limits on Neutral D Mixing in Semileptonic Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cawlfield, C; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Arms, K; Gan, K K; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S S; Müller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Pappas, S P; Weinstein, A J; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Credé, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P

    2005-01-01

    Using the CLEO II.V detector observing e+e- collisions at around 10.6 GeV we search for neutral D mixing in semileptonic D0 decays tagged in charged D* decays. Combining the results from the Kenu and K*enu channels we find that the rate for D mixing is less than 0.0078 at 90% C.L.

  6. Neutral beam heating of the TFTR vacuum vessel protective plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sink, D.A.

    1976-04-01

    The transmission of neutral beams through plasmas expected in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been investigated. An analytical expression for the transmission coefficient of a 120 keV deuterium beam through a tritium plasma was used and a model for the flux profile of the TFTR Neutral Beam System designed by LBL/LLL was developed and incorporated. The plasma is assumed to have a parabolic profile and is characterized by a major radius of 310 cm, a minor radius of 57 cm, and a central plasma density of greater than or equal to 0.4 x 10/sup 14/ cm-/sup 3/. To protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel walls of the TFTR device, tungsten plates are located inside the vessel. The loading of the tungsten protective plates during normal operation is well below the neutral beam fluxes which would melt the tungsten. The TFTR Neutral Beam System will inject a total of 20 MW of 120 keV deuterium atoms from twelve sources, as well as approximately 12 MW of 60 keV deuterium atoms. The fluxes anticipated on the tungsten plates due to an unattenuated beam which would be incident at an angle of 45/sup 0/ are less than or equal to 6.5 kW/cm/sup 2/. The fluxes due to an attenuated beam are calculated to be less than or equal to 0.35 kW/cm/sup 2/. For the maximum injection time of 0.5 second, a fault condition in which the plasma was not formed at the time of injection could induce a surface temperature very near the melting point of tungsten. For the standard 0.1 second injection time anticipated for TFTR, a similar fault condition would not cause the temperature to rise to more than 2000 K which is well below the melting point (3640 K) of tungsten.

  7. A Trade Study of Thermosphere Empirical Neutral Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    into the ram direction, and m is the satellite mass. The velocity ?⃗? equals to the satellite velocity in the corotating Earth frame ?⃗?...drag force. In a trade study we have investigated a methodology to assess performances of neutral density models in predicting orbit against a... assess overall errors in orbit prediction expected from empirical density models. They have also been adapted in an analysis tool Satellite Orbital

  8. Method for Flavor Tagging in Neutral B Meson Decays

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    A method is proposed for tagging the flavor of neutral $B$ mesons in the study of CP-violating decay asymmetries. The method makes use of a possible difference in interactions in $B \\pi$ or $B^* \\pi$ systems with isospins 1/2 and 3/2, and would be particularly clean if the $I = 1/2$ systems can be detected as ``$B^{**}$'' resonances.

  9. Method for flavor tagging in neutral B meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L; Gronau, Michael; Nippe, Alex; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed for tagging the flavor of neutral $B$ mesons in the study of CP-violating decay asymmetries. The method makes use of a possible difference in interactions in $B \\pi$ or $B^* \\pi$ systems with isospins 1/2 and 3/2, and would be particularly clean if the $I = 1/2$ systems can be detected as ``$B^{**}$'' resonances.

  10. Method for flavor tagging in neutral B meson decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Michael; Nippe, Alex; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is proposed for tagging the flavor of neutral B mesons in the study of CP-violating decay asymmetries. The method makes use of a possible difference in interactions in Bπ or B*π systems with isospins 1/2 and 3/2, and would be particularly clean if the I=1/2 systems can be detected as ``B**'' resonances.

  11. Neutral Spinning Particles in Electromagnetic Fields and Neutron Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁秀香; 梁九卿

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of neutral spinning particles in electromagnetic fields is investigated. The phase interference of unpolarized neutron beams is reasonably interpreted as the observed spin precession in external fields instead of potential effects in the quantum physics; namely, the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher effects. It is also pointed out that the recent experiment claimed to be the verification of Aharonov-Casher phase with neutron interferometry, however, can be considered as a test of new anyon model.

  12. NEUTRALIZATION OF HERBICIDE NEGATIVE IMPACT ON SUGAR BEET WITH BIOSTIMULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarenko D. Y.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Most modern chemicals designed to protect crop also actually cause negative effects on the protected plants mostly due to side effects and/or not following the application procedures correctly. It is possible to neutralize the negative effects of herbicides they have on cultivated plants with precise use of immunostimulants which will increase the plants' natural immunity against the negative effects of biotic and abiotic environmental factors

  13. Differential Dengue Tropism & Neutralization: Potential Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-04

    neutralization of two animal viruses , western equine encephalitis virus and poliomyelitis virus . Virology 2, 162-205. Endy, T.P., Nisalak, A., Chunsuttitwat...8035 was more efficient at utilizing both lectin receptors than American viruses overall; however Asian virus preferentially utilized L-SIGN at all...streptomycin (100µg/ml), L-glutamine, and nonessential amino acids at 28ºC/5% CO2. Virus seed production. The dengue viruses used in this study

  14. Local behavior of autonomous neutral functional differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Basic problems for a special class of neutral functional differential equations (NFDE) are formulated, and some contributions to a general qualitative theory in the neighborhood of an equilibrium point are indicated. The properties of a NFDE (G,f) are examined to determine in what sense these properties are insensitive to small changes in (G,f) in the topology G x F. The special class of equations that is introduced includes retarded functional differential equations and difference equations.

  15. Biomass and neutral lipid production in geothermal microalgal consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywaters, Kathryn F; Fritsen, Christian H

    2014-01-01

    Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems - in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011, 2012). Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass, and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 39.0 to 344.1 mg C L(-1) day(-1). The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production) ranged from 0 to 38.74 mg free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerols (TAG) L(-1 )day(-1); the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio) decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment. All results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels.

  16. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  17. Modeling of Neutral Entrainment in an FRC Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    nonequilibirum; ion, electron, and neutral temperatures strongly differ, and the electron distribution function is non - Maxwellian . This indicates that a...as keii = ∫ gσeii(g) fe(g)dg, (1) where g is the relative collision velocity and fe is the Maxwellian distribution function. For the charge exchange...plasma temperature and concentration of reacting species, non -equlibrium of their velocity distributions, and the relashionship between different reaction

  18. Search for New Physics in Neutral Kaon Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comfort, Joseph R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-04-30

    This report will summarize contributions made by the ASU group during the grant period. Focus will be given to three areas: (1) Monte Carlo simulations; (2) signal processing in the electronics; and (3) data analysis software. For reference, a drawing of the KOTO detector is shown in Fig. 1. The production target for the neutral beam particles was about 20 meters upstream of the detector.

  19. DNA barcoding works in practice but not in (neutral theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Y Stoeckle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcode differences within animal species are usually much less than differences among species, making it generally straightforward to match unknowns to a reference library. Here we aim to better understand the evolutionary mechanisms underlying this usual "barcode gap" pattern. We employ avian barcode libraries to test a central prediction of neutral theory, namely, intraspecific variation equals 2 Nµ, where N is population size and µ is mutations per site per generation. Birds are uniquely suited for this task: they have the best-known species limits, are well represented in barcode libraries, and, most critically, are the only large group with documented census population sizes. In addition, we ask if mitochondrial molecular clock measurements conform to neutral theory prediction of clock rate equals µ. RESULTS: Intraspecific COI barcode variation was uniformly low regardless of census population size (n = 142 species in 15 families. Apparent outliers reflected lumping of reproductively isolated populations or hybrid lineages. Re-analysis of a published survey of cytochrome b variation in diverse birds (n = 93 species in 39 families further confirmed uniformly low intraspecific variation. Hybridization/gene flow among species/populations was the main limitation to DNA barcode identification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first large study of animal mitochondrial diversity using actual census population sizes and the first to test outliers for population structure. Our finding of universally low intraspecific variation contradicts a central prediction of neutral theory and is not readily accounted for by commonly proposed ad hoc modifications. We argue that the weight of evidence-low intraspecific variation and the molecular clock-indicates neutral evolution plays a minor role in mitochondrial sequence evolution. As an alternate paradigm consistent with empirical data, we propose extreme

  20. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies: Enhancement of Neutralizing Potency in Polyclonal Mixtures and IgA Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenqian; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Duty, J. Andrew; Moran, Thomas M.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current influenza virus vaccines rely upon the accurate prediction of circulating virus strains months in advance of the actual influenza season in order to allow time for vaccine manufacture. Unfortunately, mismatches occur frequently, and even when perfect matches are achieved, suboptimal vaccine efficacy leaves several high-risk populations vulnerable to infection. However, the recent discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk domain has renewed hope that the development of “universal” influenza virus vaccines may be within reach. Here, we examine the functions of influenza A virus hemagglutinin stalk-binding antibodies in an endogenous setting, i.e., as polyclonal preparations isolated from human sera. Relative to monoclonal antibodies that bind to the HA head domain, the neutralization potency of monoclonal stalk-binding antibodies was vastly inferior in vitro but was enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the polyclonal context. Furthermore, we demonstrated a surprising enhancement in IgA-mediated HA stalk neutralization relative to that achieved by antibodies of IgG isotypes. Mechanistically, this could be explained in two ways. Identical variable regions consistently neutralized virus more potently when in an IgA backbone compared to an IgG backbone. In addition, HA-specific memory B cells isolated from human peripheral blood were more likely to be stalk specific when secreting antibodies of IgA isotypes compared to those secreting IgG. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that HA stalk-binding antibodies perform optimally when in a polyclonal context and that the targeted elicitation of HA stalk-specific IgA should be an important consideration during “universal” influenza virus vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses remain one of the most worrisome global public health threats due to their capacity to cause pandemics. While seasonal vaccines fail to protect against the

  1. Recovering Risk-Neutral Densities from Brazilian Interest Rate Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Haas Ornelas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Building Risk-Neutral Density (RND from options data is one useful way for extracting market expectations about a financial variable. For a sample of IDI (Brazilian Interbank Deposit Rate Index options from 1998 to 2009, this paper estimates the option-implied Risk-Neutral Densities for the Brazilian short rate using three methods: Shimko, Mixture of Two Log-Normals and Generalized Beta of Second Kind. Our in-sample goodness-of-fit evaluation shows that the Mixture of Log-Normals method provides better fitting to option’s data than the other two methods. The shape of log-normal distributions seems to fit well to the mean-reversal dynamics of Brazilian interest rates. We have also calculated the RND implied Skewness, showing how it could have provided market early-warning signals of the monetary policy outcomes in 2002 and 2003. Overall, Risk-Neutral Densities implied on IDI options showed to be a useful tool for extracting market expectations about future outcomes of the monetary policy.

  2. Neutral position of persistent direction-changing positional nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the neutral position of direction-changing apogeotropic positional nystagmus (heavy cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal) and persistent direction-changing geotropic positional nystagmus (light cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal). We conducted a prospective case series study on 31 patients with heavy cupula (12 males, 19 females; mean age, 64.3 years) and 33 patients with light cupula (10 males, 23 females; mean age, 60.9 years). We measured the angle of the neutral position in patients with heavy cupula (θ 1) and that in patients with light cupula (θ 2) using a large protractor. The mean value and standard deviation of θ 1 was 31.6 ± 22.4°, minimum value was 5°, and maximum value was 89°. The mean value and standard deviation of θ 2 was 44.4 ± 20.5°, minimum value was 5°, and maximum value was 85°. θ 2 was significantly greater than θ 1 (p < 0.05). The neutral position varies widely. Some patients exhibit a great angle (more than 40°); therefore, examiners should make patients adopt a completely lateral position in the supine head roll test and should confirm the direction of nystagmus in order to avoid mistaking positional nystagmus for spontaneous nystagmus.

  3. Fast ion behavior during neutral beam injection in ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; Rome, J.A.; England, A.C.; Fowler, R.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Aceto, S.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In stellarators, single-particle confinement properties can be more complex than in their tokamak counterparts. Fast-ion behavior in tokamaks has been well characterized through an abundance of measurements on various devices and in general has been shown to be consistent with classical slowing-down theory, although anomalous ion behavior has been observed during intense beam injection in ISX-B, during fishbone instabilities in PDX, and in experiments on TFR. In contrast, fast ion behavior in stellarators is not as wel established experimentally with the primary experiments to date focusing o near-perpendicular or perpendicular neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Wendelstein 7-A stellarator (91 and Heliotron-E. This paper addresses fast-ion confinement properties in a large-aspect-ratio, moderate-shear stellarator, the Advanced Toroidal Facility, during tangential NBI. The primary data used in this study are the experimentally measured energy spectra of charge-exchange neutrals escaping from the plasma, using a two-dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer. This diagnostic method is well established, having been used on several devices since the early 1970`s. Various aspects of fast-ion behavior are investigated by comparing these data with computed theoretical spectra based on energeticion distributions derived from the fastion Fokker-Planck equation. Ion orbits are studied by computer orbit following, by the computation of J* surfaces, and by Monte Carlo calculations.

  4. Recombinant Sheep Pox Virus Proteins Elicit Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Chervyakova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity and neutralizing activity of sheep pox virus (SPPV; genus Capripoxvirus, family Poxviridae structural proteins as candidate subunit vaccines to control sheep pox disease. SPPV structural proteins were identified by sequence homology with proteins of vaccinia virus (VACV strain Copenhagen. Four SPPV proteins (SPPV-ORF 060, SPPV-ORF 095, SPPV-ORF 117, and SPPV-ORF 122, orthologs of immunodominant L1, A4, A27, and A33 VACV proteins, respectively, were produced in Escherichia coli. Western blot analysis revealed the antigenic and immunogenic properties of SPPV-060, SPPV-095, SPPV-117 and SPPV-122 proteins when injected with adjuvant into experimental rabbits. Virus-neutralizing activity against SPPV in lamb kidney cell culture was detected for polyclonal antisera raised to SPPV-060, SPPV-117, and SPPV-122 proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the virus-neutralizing activities of antisera raised to SPPV-060, SPPV-117, and SPPV-122 proteins.

  5. Precision Determination of the Lifetime of the Neutral Pion

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment aims at a determination of the lifetime of the neutral pion with an accuracy of l\\%, as against at present 5\\% for the best measurement by the indirect, Primakoff method, and 18\\% by a direct measurement. 2 gold foils with different separations are traversed by the extracted proton beam to the High Intensity Area. Positive particles of 160 GeV/c momentum from this target are transported by the H6 beam to the North Area. The electron component is separated from heavier particles by synchrotron losses in the bending magnets, and is further identified by a lead glass Cerenkov counter, in coincidence with scintillation counters (Fig.~1). The electron flux from the double foil target depends on the distance between the foils, since for small separations the neutral pions will have to decay before electrons can be materialised by the decay $\\gamma$ rays. The average momentum of neutral pions from a 400 GeV~pN reaction, giving a 160 GeV/c electron, is about 250~GeV/c, and the corresponding decay lengt...

  6. Observation Of Cp Violation In The Neutral B Meson System

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, S L

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation presents a measurement of time- dependent CP -violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-11 asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of about 88 million ϒ(4S) → BB¯ decays collected between 1999 and 2002. We study events in which one neutral B meson decay to the CP-eigenstates J/yK0S,y2S K0S,cc1K0 S , and hcK0S , or to flavor-eigenstates involving D(*)π/ρ/ a1 and J/y K*0(K*0 → K+ π−), is fully reconstructed. The flavor of the other neutral B meson is tagged at the time of its decay, mainly using the charge of identified leptons and kaons. The proper time elapsed between the meson decays is determined by measuring the distance between the decay vertices. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the Standard Model is proportional to sin2β, is determined from a simultaneous maximum-likelihood f...

  7. Observation of CP violation in the neutral B meson system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Stephen Leonard

    This dissertation presents a measurement of time-dependent CP -violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-11 asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of about 88 million Upsilon(4S) → BB¯ decays collected between 1999 and 2002. We study events in which one neutral B meson decay to the CP-eigenstates J/yK0S,y2S K0S,cc1K0 S , and hcK0S , or to flavor-eigenstates involving D(*)pi/rho/ a1 and J/y K*0(K*0 → K+ pi-), is fully reconstructed. The flavor of the other neutral B meson is tagged at the time of its decay, mainly using the charge of identified leptons and kaons. The proper time elapsed between the meson decays is determined by measuring the distance between the decay vertices. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the Standard Model is proportional to sin2beta, is determined from a simultaneous maximum-likelihood fit to the time-difference distribution of the flavor- and CP-eigenstate samples. We measure sin2beta = 0.755 +/- 0.074 (stat) +/-0.030 (syst).

  8. Neutral null models for diversity in serial transfer evolution experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpak, Arbel; Sella, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Evolution experiments with microorganisms coupled with genome-wide sequencing now allow for the systematic study of population genetic processes under a wide range of conditions. In learning about these processes in natural, sexual populations, neutral models that describe the behavior of diversity and divergence summaries have played a pivotal role. It is therefore natural to ask whether neutral models, suitably modified, could be useful in the context of evolution experiments. Here, we introduce coalescent models for polymorphism and divergence under the most common experimental evolution assay, a serial transfer experiment. This relatively simple setting allows us to address several issues that could affect diversity patterns in evolution experiments, whether selection is operating or not: the transient behavior of neutral polymorphism in an experiment beginning from a single clone, the effects of randomness in the timing of cell division and noisiness in population size in the dilution stage. In our analyses and discussion, we emphasize the implications for experiments aimed at measuring diversity patterns and making inferences about population genetic processes based on these measurements.

  9. Neutralization of red mud using CO2 sequestration cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ramesh Chandra; Patel, Raj Kishore; Ray, Bankim Chandra

    2010-07-15

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the ability of neutralization of red mud (RM) using carbon dioxide gas sequestration cycle at ambient conditions. The neutralized red mud (NRM) was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, FT-IR and auto titration method. X-ray diffraction pattern of NRM was revealed that the intensity of gibbsite was increased prominently and formed ilmenite due to dissolution of minerals. EDX analysis was showed that the %(w/w) of Na, C, O, Si were higher in the carbonated filtrate as compared to the RM and NRM. The permanently sequestered CO(2)%(w/w) per 10 g of red mud were approximately 26.33, approximately 58.01, approximately 55.37, and approximately 54.42 in NRM and first, second, third cycles of carbonated filtrate, respectively. The pH of red mud was decreased from approximately 11.8 to approximately 8.45 and alkalinity was decreased from approximately 10,789 to approximately 178 mg/L. The acid neutralizing capacity of NRM was approximately 0.23 mol H(+)/kg of red mud. The specific advantages of these cyclic processes are that, large amount of CO(2) can be captured as compared to single step.

  10. Ends and Ways: The Algorithmic Politics of Network Neutrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenwick McKelvey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet in Canada is an assemblage of private and public networks. A variety of institutions and networking codes manage these networks. Conflicts exist between these parties despite their interconnection. Tensions heightened when commercial ISPs began managing traffic on their network using sophisticated routing algorithms. Concerned parties demanded legislation based on a network neutrality principle to prevent undue discrimination. While the network neutrality controversy has been addressed as a question of public policy, the controversy also includes a conflict between various codes constituting networks in Canada. The conflict between codes involve two key networking software that manifest incongruous networks. Their algorithms, the logics embedded in code, differentiate the different types of networking code. The two types of algorithms are Quality of Service and End-to-End. These algorithms treat different modalities of Internet communication differently, in part due to their deployment by different institutions. Quality of Service allows for the tiering of traffic by carriers. Commercial carriers have popularized this algorithm to promote value-added services and prevent network congestions. End-to-end algorithms, on the other hand, enforce a strict equality between modalities of communication. Peer-to-peer applications have popularized an extreme version of the end-to-algorithm, treating all nodes as equals. The popularity and growth of both these algorithms pulls the Internet in different directions, creating conflicts over its future. Through an extended review of these two algorithms and their intersection, this paper confronts how code plays a role in the network neutrality controversy.

  11. Creation of neutral disks during outbursts of symbiotic binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Carikova, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    Multiwavelength modelling of the spectral energy distribution of symbiotic binaries suggests that a neutral disk-like zone is created around the hot star near the orbital plane during active phases. Presumably, this is connected with the enhanced wind from the active hot star. To test this idea, we applied the wind compression model to active hot stars in symbiotic binaries, within which the wind particles are compressed more to the equatorial plane due to a fast rotation of the hot star. Accordingly, we calculated the ionization structure for such compressed wind and ionizing photons from the hot star. We found that the hot star wind, enhanced during active phases to \\sim (10^-7 - 10^-6) M_sun yr^-1, and the rotational velocity of 100 - 350 km s^-1 at the star's equator lead to formation of a neutral disk-shaped zone. The presence of such disks is transient, being connected with the active phases of symbiotic binaries. During quiescent phases, such neutral disks cannot be created, because of insufficient mas...

  12. Recognition determinants of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against dengue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Kikuti, Carlos M; Navarro Sanchez, M Erika; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Haouz, Ahmed; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Shepard, William E; Desprès, Philippe; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Dussart, Philippe; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2015-04-02

    Dengue disease is caused by four different flavivirus serotypes, which infect 390 million people yearly with 25% symptomatic cases and for which no licensed vaccine is available. Recent phase III vaccine trials showed partial protection, and in particular no protection for dengue virus serotype 2 (refs 3, 4). Structural studies so far have characterized only epitopes recognized by serotype-specific human antibodies. We recently isolated human antibodies potently neutralizing all four dengue virus serotypes. Here we describe the X-ray structures of four of these broadly neutralizing antibodies in complex with the envelope glycoprotein E from dengue virus serotype 2, revealing that the recognition determinants are at a serotype-invariant site at the E-dimer interface, including the exposed main chain of the E fusion loop and the two conserved glycan chains. This 'E-dimer-dependent epitope' is also the binding site for the viral glycoprotein prM during virus maturation in the secretory pathway of the infected cell, explaining its conservation across serotypes and highlighting an Achilles' heel of the virus with respect to antibody neutralization. These findings will be instrumental for devising novel immunogens to protect simultaneously against all four serotypes of dengue virus.

  13. Constructive neutral evolution: exploring evolutionary theory’s curious disconnect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoltzfus Arlin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Constructive neutral evolution (CNE suggests that neutral evolution may follow a stepwise path to extravagance. Whether or not CNE is common, the mere possibility raises provocative questions about causation: in classical neo-Darwinian thinking, selection is the sole source of creativity and direction, the only force that can cause trends or build complex features. However, much of contemporary evolutionary genetics departs from the conception of evolution underlying neo-Darwinism, resulting in a widening gap between what formal models allow, and what the prevailing view of the causes of evolution suggests. In particular, a mutationist conception of evolution as a 2-step origin-fixation process has been a source of theoretical innovation for 40 years, appearing not only in the Neutral Theory, but also in recent breakthroughs in modeling adaptation (the “mutational landscape” model, and in practical software for sequence analysis. In this conception, mutation is not a source of raw materials, but an agent that introduces novelty, while selection is not an agent that shapes features, but a stochastic sieve. This view, which now lays claim to important theoretical, experimental, and practical results, demands our attention. CNE provides a way to explore its most significant implications about the role of variation in evolution. Reviewers Alex Kondrashov, Eugene Koonin and Johann Peter Gogarten reviewed this article.

  14. Whistler oscillitons revisited: the role of charge neutrality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying transverse modes propagating parallel to a static magnetic field, an apparent contradiction arises between the weakly nonlinear results obtained from the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, predicting envelope solitons (where the amplitude is stationary in the wave frame, but the phase is not, and recent results for whistler oscillitons, indicating that really stationary structures of large amplitude are possible. Revisiting this problem in the fluid dynamic approach, care has been taken not to introduce charge neutrality from the outset, because this not only neglects electric stresses compared to magnetic stresses, which is reasonable, but could also imply from Poisson's equation a vanishing of the wave electric field. Nevertheless, the fixed points of the remaining equations are the same, whether charge neutrality is assumed from the outset or not, so that the solitary wave solutions at not too large amplitudes will be very similar. This is borne out by numerical simulations of the solutions under the two hypotheses, showing that the lack of correspondence with the DNLS envelope solitons indicates the limitations of the reductive perturbation approach, and is not a consequence of assuming charge neutrality.

  15. Obliquely propagating large amplitude solitary waves in charge neutral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals in a consistent way with the implications, for the existence of large amplitude stationary structures in general plasmas, of assuming strict charge neutrality between electrons and ions. With the limit of pair plasmas in mind, electron inertia is retained. Combining in a fluid dynamic treatment the conservation of mass, momentum and energy with strict charge neutrality has indicated that nonlinear solitary waves (as e.g. oscillitons cannot exist in electron-ion plasmas, at no angle of propagation with respect to the static magnetic field. Specifically for oblique propagation, the proof has turned out to be more involved than for parallel or perpendicular modes. The only exception is pair plasmas that are able to support large charge neutral solitons, owing to the high degree of symmetry naturally inherent in such plasmas. The nonexistence, in particular, of oscillitons is attributed to the breakdown of the plasma approximation in dealing with Poisson's law, rather than to relativistic effects. It is hoped that future space observations will allow to discriminate between oscillitons and large wave packets, by focusing on the time variability (or not of the phase, since the amplitude or envelope graphs look very similar.

  16. Drag Forces, Neutral Wind and Electric Conductivity Changes in the Ionospheric E Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nenovski, Petko

    2014-01-01

    The neutrals in the Earth environment are in fact free and subjected to drag forces (by ions). In this study we show that drag or friction forces in the ionosphere-thermosphere system initiate changes in the plasma flow, neutral wind, and the conductivity, as well. Ions and electrons embedded in neutral wind field of velocity u acquire drifts perpendicular both to the initial neutral wind velocity and to the ambient magnetic field producing a perpendicular electric current. This perpendicular electric current is defined by a conductivity derived previously and the polarization electric field u x B. Self-consistently, the free neutrals acquires an additional neutral velocity component perpendicular to the initial neutral wind velocity u. The Pedersen and Hall currents wane within a specific time inversely proportional to neutral-ion collision frequency. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of electric current generation, distribution and closure in weakly ionized plasmas where charged particle...

  17. A Novel Neutral Point Voltage Control Strategy for Three-Level NPC APF Based on SVPWM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unbalance of the neutral point voltage is an inherent problem of three-level neutral-point-clamped (NPC Active Power Filter (APF; this paper analyzes the causes of unbalanced neutral point voltage and studies the reason of the unbalance of the neutral point voltage. A novel neutral point voltage control strategy using Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM is proposed. The proposed strategy is based on the traditional SVPWM, by controlling the effect time of small vector, which can change the state of the midpoint voltage fluctuation, and the neutral point voltage can be maintained balance. The influence of the vector on neutral point balance is investigated in depth. Simulation results show the neutral point voltage balancing control strategy based on SPWM is effective.

  18. The ITER neutral beam front end components integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbani, M., E-mail: marc.urbani@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Hemsworth, R.; Schunke, B.; Graceffa, J.; Delmas, E.; Svensson, L.; Boilson, D. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Krylov, A.; Panasenkov, A. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Agarici, G. [Fusion For Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral-B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Stafford Allen, R.; Jones, C.; Kalsey, M.; Muir, A.; Milnes, J. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Geli, F. [FGI Consulting, Le Garde d’Estienne, 4565 route du Puy Sainte Reparade, 13540 Puyricard (France); Sherlock, P. [AMEC Limited, Booths Park Chelford Road, Knutsford Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    The neutral beam (NB) system for ITER is composed of two heating neutral beam injectors (HNBs) and a diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNB). A third HNB can be installed as a future up-grade. This paper will present the design development of the components between the injectors and the tokamak; the so-called ‘front end components’: the drift duct consists of the NB bellows and the drift duct liner, the vacuum vessel pressure suppression system box (VVPSS box), the absolute valve, and the fast shutter. These components represent the key links between the ITER tokamak and the vessels of the NB injectors. The design of these components is demanding due to the different loads that these components will have to stand. The paper will describe the different design solutions which have to be implemented regarding the primary vacuum confinement, the power handling capability and the remote maintenance operations. The sizes of the components are determined by the large cross section of the neutral beam. The power handling capability is driven by the anticipated re-ionization of the neutral beam and the electromagnetic fields in this region. The drift duct bellows (with an inner diameter of 2.5 m) shall guarantee a leak tight vacuum enclosure during the vertical and radial displacements of the ITER vacuum vessel. The conductance of the VVPSS box must be maximized in the available space. The absolute valve remains a challenging development. The total leak rate through the valve must be ≤1 × 10{sup −8} Pa m{sup 3}/s when the valve is closed. Due to the radiation environment, the seals of the gate valve will be metallic. An R and D program has been launched to develop a suitable metallic seal solution with the required dimensions. The maximum allowed closing time for the fast shutter shall be less than 1 s. For all these components the leak tightness will be guaranteed by a welded lip seal and the mechanical stability by bolted structures.

  19. Interhemispheric asymmetry of ionospheric conductance and neutral dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Sheng, C.; Yue, X.; Huang, Y.; Wu, Q.; Noto, J.; Drob, D. P.; Kerr, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Interhemispheric asymmetry has been identified in a number of studies with hemispheric power (HP) and convection pattern between the two hemispheres. The asymmetry of geomagnetic forcing in the two hemispheres can strongly influence the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling process. Subsequently the responses of the thermospheric dynamics and density to geomagnetic storms between the two hemispheres were reported to be different as well. In our study, the asymmetry has been examined in both ionosphere and thermosphere. First, the Pedersen conductance at high latitudes has been estimated from the electron density profiles (EDPs) of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) satellites observations during 2008 to 2011. The ratio of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivities between E (100-150 km) and F (150-600 km) regions has been calculated. The analysis shows that the ratio reaches maximum in local winter and minimum in local summer, but the variation of the ratio from local summer to local winter in the southern hemisphere is larger than that in the northern hemisphere, which indicates that the energy partition between the E and F regions in the southern hemisphere changes more significantly than that in the northern hemisphere. Secondly, the seasonal variation of F region neutral wind from the mid-latitude conjugate Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) observations has been studied. The neutral winds from Palmer station (64◦S, 64◦W) have been compared with those from the geomagnetic conjugate location, Millstone Hill (MH). At equinox, the local
time variation of neutral wind shows a very good conjugacy between these two locations. But at June solstice, the similarity in the zonal wind becomes less clear. The annual variation of daily average neutral wind from Palmer and MH has also been compared. The annual variation of neutral wind, especially the zonal component, is much less symmetric between the two

  20. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chan, Woan-Eng [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ko, Tzu-Ping [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Jiann-Shiun [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, Andrew H.-J., E-mail: ahjwang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  1. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi

    The central theme of this dissertation is to explore the impact of neutral depletion and coupling between plasma and neutral gas in weakly ionized unmagnetized plasma. Since there have been few systematic studies of the mechanism which leads to non-uniform neutral distribution in processing plasmas, this work investigated the spatial profiles of neutral temperature and pressure experimentally, and the mechanism of resulting neutral depletion by simulation. The experimental work is comprised of neutral temperature measurements using high resolution atomic spectroscopy and molecular spectroscopy, and neutral pressure measurements considering thermal transpiration. When thermal transpiration effects are used to correct the gas pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile is also obtained from the measured neutral gas temperature and the corrected pressure measurements. The results show that neutral gas temperature rises close to ˜ 900 [K], and the neutral gas density at the center of plasma chamber has a significant (factor of 2-4x) decrease in the presence of a plasma discharge. In numerical work, neutral and ion transport phenomena were simulated by a hybrid-type direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of one dimensional (1D) electrostatic plasma to identify the mechanism of the neutral gas density depletion in Ar/N2 mixtures. The simulation reveals that the neutral depletion is the result of the interplay between plasma and neutral gas, and a parametric study indicates that neutral depletion occurs mainly due to gas heating and pressure balance for the typical condition of plasma processing. In high density plasma sources (Te ≈ 2-5 eV, ne ≈ 1011-1012 cm-3) where the plasma pressure becomes comparable to neutral pressure, total pressure (neutral pressure and plasma pressure) is conserved before and after the discharge. Therefore

  2. Sub-domains of ricin's B subunit as targets of toxin neutralizing and non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Yermakova

    Full Text Available The B subunit (RTB of ricin toxin is a galactose (Gal-/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNac-specific lectin that mediates attachment, entry, and intracellular trafficking of ricin in host cells. Structurally, RTB consists of two globular domains with identical folding topologies. Domains 1 and 2 are each comprised of three homologous sub-domains (α, β, γ that likely arose by gene duplication from a primordial carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD, although only sub-domains 1α and 2γ retain functional lectin activity. As part of our ongoing effort to generate a comprehensive B cell epitope map of ricin, we report the characterization of three new RTB-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. All three mAbs, JB4, B/J F9 and C/M A2, were initially identified based on their abilities to neutralize ricin in a Vero cell cytotoxicity assay and to partially (or completely block ricin attachment to cell surfaces. However, only JB4 proved capable of neutralizing ricin in a macrophage apoptosis assay and in imparting passive immunity to mice in a model of systemic intoxication. Using a combination of techniques, including competitive ELISAs, pepscan analysis, differential reactivity by Western blot, as well as affinity enrichment of phage displayed peptides, we tentatively localized the epitopes recognized by the non-neutralizing mAbs B/J F9 and C/M A2 to sub-domains 2α and 2β, respectively. Furthermore, we propose that the epitope recognized by JB4 is within sub-domain 2γ, adjacent to RTB's high affinity Gal/GalNAc CRD. These data suggest that recognition of RTB's sub-domains 1α and 2γ are critical determinants of antibody neutralizing activity and protective immunity to ricin.

  3. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: Conservation of carbohydrate Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  4. Turbomachine component having an internal cavity reactivity neutralizer and method of forming the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Meschter, Peter Joel

    2017-03-07

    A turbomachine component includes a body having an exterior surface and an interior surface, an internal cavity defined by the interior surface, and a reactivity neutralizing member arranged within the internal cavity. The reactivity neutralizing member is configured and disposed to neutralize turbomachine combustion products on the interior surface of the body.

  5. Heterologous expression and characterization of recombinant Lactococcus lactis neutral endopeptidase (Neprilysin)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lian, W; Wu, D; Konings, W.N; Mierau, I; Hersh, L.B

    1996-01-01

    A neutral endopeptidase (NEP) from Lactococcus lactis has recently been cloned and shown to contain high sequence homology with the human neutral endopeptidase, endopeptidase 24.11 (I. Mierau et al., J. Bacteriol. 175, 2087-2096, 1993). The gene for the neutral endopeptidase from L. lactis was clone

  6. The Relative Influences of Neutralizing Behavior and Subcultural Values on Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curasi, Carolyn F.

    2013-01-01

    The author examined the influence of neutralizing techniques and subcultural values on academic dishonesty using a sample of 327 ethnically diverse business majors. Findings suggest that both neutralizing behavior and subcultural norms are correlated with academic dishonesty; however, neutralization techniques have a stronger association. Findings…

  7. The Emergence of Gender-Neutral Housing on American University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian J.; Larsen, Jeffrey K.; Carroll, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    American college housing is beginning to introduce gender-neutral housing, or the housing of students in the same room regardless of gender. This study provides a descriptive overview of gender-neutral housing from 148 universities and documents central areas of debate in current policy discussions. Information regarding gender-neutral housing…

  8. RAZUMIKHIN-TYPE THEOREM FOR NEUTRAL STOCHASTIC FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH UNBOUNDED DELAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Fuke; Hu Shigeng; Mao Xuerong

    2011-01-01

    This paper establishes the Razumikhin-type theorem on stability for neutral stochastic functional differential equations with unbounded delay.To overcome difficulties from unbounded delay,we develop several different techniques to investigate stability.To show our idea clearly,we examine neutral stochastic delay differential equations with unbounded delay and linear neutral stochastic Volterra unbounded-delay-integro-differential equations.

  9. Neutral-point current modeling and control for Neutral-Point Clamped three-level converter drive with small DC-link capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Busquets-Monge, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    -point current. A new simplified model of the neutral-point voltage dynamics is derived for the proposed modulation strategy. This model shows that the neutral-point current is proportional to the power drawn from the converter and it enables the use of well established classical control theory for neutral......-point voltage controller design. A PI controller is used for neutral-point voltage balance. The implementation of the proposed modulation strategy and controller is simple. It does not require any information about the output phase currents. The controller is implemented in a 7.5 kW induction machine based...

  10. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-07-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by streamer discharge in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head, where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After its propagation, densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using an electron kinetics model and by assuming that the electric field and electron density are in the head region. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by the first atomic nitrogen and oxygen product, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance, predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40 70 km. From this affirmative result of long-time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have the power to impact local chemistry at night. We also discuss the consistency with previous theoretical and observational studies, along with future suggestions.

  11. Building concepts for a transition towards energy neutrality in 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Boer, B.J.; Paauw, J. [TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Delft (Netherlands); Opstelten, I.J.; Bakker, E.J. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-03-15

    In this paper building concepts for the near future are described which enable the transition towards a net energy neutral building sector in the Netherlands by the year 2050. With 'net energy neutrality' is meant that, on a yearly basis, the total energy consumption in the built environment is compensated by local renewable energy production e.g. by using solar thermal (T), photovoltaic (PV), PVT and/or wind. A study concerning the feasibility of a 'net energy neutral built environment by 2050' set the energetic ambitions for the building concepts to be developed. This resulted in different concepts for residential buildings and for office-buildings. The building concepts are based on passive house technology to minimise the heating and cooling demand, and make optimal use of active and passive solar energy. Concepts for new to build domestic buildings are in fact energy producing to compensate for the remaining energy demand of existing, renovated dwellings. In all concepts the 'trias energetica' or 'energy pyramid' served as a general guideline, striving for minimisation of energy demand, maximal usage of renewable energy and usage of fossil fuels as efficiently as possible. Different full roof integrated options for using solar energy (PV, T or PVT) with variable storage options have been compared by making simulations with a dynamic simulation programme, to gain insight on their impact on energy, building engineering and economic impact. Also different possibilities for installations to fulfil the heating demand for the space heating and DHW demand are compared. For each concept, the resulting primary energy profiles for space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, electricity consumption for lighting, ventilation and household appliances are given.

  12. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yağmur Derman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18 by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E. In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans.

  13. Characteristics of and constraints on a secondary interstellar neutral stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.; Simpson, D.; Roberts, A.; Szabo, A.; Fuselier, S. A.; Wurz, P.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    2003-04-01

    It has been recently proposed based on myriad data from IMAGE, ACE, ISEE-3, Wind, and SOHO that there may exist a secondary stream of neutral atoms entering the heliosphere from somewhere between 262 and 292 degrees ecliptic longitude, 10-40 degrees from the nominal upstream direction. Constraints may be placed on secondary stream properties using various data sets. For example, based on SOHO/SWAN data, rough estimates place an upper limit on the secondary stream density, assuming a bulk velocity of between 0 and 200 km/s, of about 0.001 cm{}-3. However, the presence of a strong suprathermal tail on the neutral population can yield high neutral fluxes of the order of 2x10{}^5/cm{}^2/s in spite of the low density. The presence of wave activity at 1 AU observed by ISEE-3 and Wind, as well as wave activity at 5 AU observed by Ulysses, may be related to this secondary stream as it "piles-up" around the hydrogen parabolic exclusion boundary near 1 AU, which will be present provided the force due to radiation pressure exceeds that due to gravity. Finally, we will examine various ideas about the origin of the secondary stream including asymmetries induced by the presence of a tilted interstellar magnetic field as well as possible charge exchange of the hot, 10{}^6 K, local bubble gas with the dense gas of our local cloud which may be observable due to the heliosphere's proximity to the edge of the local interstellar cloud in the direction of the Galactic center.

  14. Young children's agent-neutral representations of action roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Gräfenhain, Maria; Clüver, Annette; Dalhoff, Ann Christin Schulze; Sternkopf, Anika

    2014-12-01

    Recent developmental research has shown that young children coordinate complementary action roles with others. But what do they understand about the logical structure of such roles? Do they have an agent-neutral conception of complementary action roles, grasping that such roles can be variably filled by any two agents or even by one agent over time? Accordingly, can they make use of such representations for planning both their own and others' actions? To address these questions, 3- and 4-year-olds were introduced to an activity comprising two action roles, A and B, by seeing either two agents performing A and B collaboratively or one agent performing A and B individually. Children's flexible inferences from these demonstrations were then tested by asking them later on to plan ahead for the fulfillment of one of the roles either by themselves or by someone else. The 4-year-olds competently drew inferences in all directions, from past individual and collaborative demonstrations, when planning how they or someone else would need to fulfill the roles in the future. The 3-year-olds, in contrast, showed more restricted competence; they were capable of such inferences only when planning in the immediate present. Taken together, these results suggest that children form and use agent-neutral representations of action roles by 3 years of age and flexibly use such representations for episodic memory and future deliberation in planning their own and others' actions by 4 years of age. The findings are discussed in the broader context of the development of understanding self-other equivalence and agent-neutral frames of references.

  15. IN VIVO NEUTRALIZATION OF NAJA NIGRICOLLIS VENOM BY UVARIA CHAMAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omale James

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uvaria chamae is a well known medicinal plant in Nigerian traditional medicine for the management of many diseases, but investigations concerning its pharmacological characteristics are rare. In this study, we evaluate its venom neutralizing properties against Naja nigricollis venom in rats. Freshly collected Uvaria chamae leaves were air dried, powdered and extracted in methanol. To study the antivenom properties, albino rats were orally administered with a dose of 400 mg kg-1 body weight and one hour later, the venom was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.08 mg kg-1 body weight of rats. Albino rats (male weighing between 180-200g were randomly divided into five (5 groups of three (3. Groups 1-5 received water, normal saline, venom, Uvaria chamae and venom, Uvaria chamae respectively. Blood clothing time, bleeding time, antipyretic activity, haemoglobin, RBC, WBC, creatine kinase, AST, ALP and ALT activities total protein antioxidant activity and some blood electrolytes, plasma urea and uric acid were measured. Our results showed that Uvaria chamae methanol extract neutralized some biological effects of Naja nigricollis venom. The venom increased the rectal temperature, enzyme activities, bleeding time and other blood parameters. The plant extract was able to reduce these parameters in the extract treated groups. Details of the results are discussed. From this study, it is clear that U. chamae leaf extract had antivenom activity in animal models. The above results indicate that the plant extract possess potent snake venom neutralizing capacity and could potentially be used for therapeutic purpose in case of snake bite envenomation.

  16. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Selby, Katja; Miethe, Sebastian; Frenzel, André; Liu, Yvonne; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Lindström, Miia; Hust, Michael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis)-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18) by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD) in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans. PMID:27626446

  17. Status of the ITER heating neutral beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsworth, R.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Schunke, B.; Tanaka, M.; Dremel, M.; Tanga, A.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Geli, F.; Milnes, J.; Inoue, T.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sonato, P.; Zaccaria, P.

    2009-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam (NB) injectors are the first injectors that will have to operate under conditions and constraints similar to those that will be encountered in a fusion reactor. These injectors will have to operate in a hostile radiation environment and they will become highly radioactive due to the neutron flux from ITER. The injectors will use a single large ion source and accelerator that will produce 40 A 1 MeV D- beams for pulse lengths of up to 3600 s. Significant design changes have been made to the ITER heating NB (HNB) injector over the past 4 years. The main changes are: Modifications to allow installation and maintenance of the beamline components with an overhead crane. The beam source vessel shape has been changed and the beam source moved to allow more space for the connections between the 1 MV bushing and the beam source. The RF driven negative ion source has replaced the filamented ion source as the reference design. The ion source and extractor power supplies will be located in an air insulated high voltage (-1 MV) deck located outside the tokamak building instead of inside an SF6 insulated HV deck located above the injector. Introduction of an all metal absolute valve to prevent any tritium in the machine to escape into the NB cell during maintenance. This paper describes the status of the design as of December 2008 including the above mentioned changes. The very important power supply system of the neutral beam injectors is not described in any detail as that merits a paper beyond the competence of the present authors. The R&D required to realize the injectors described in this paper must be carried out on a dedicated neutral beam test facility, which is not described here.

  18. ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYANILINE FILMS-EFFECT OF NEUTRAL SALTS ADDED DURING POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical properties of polyaniline (PANI) films synthesized by the presence of the selected neutral salts in the polymerization were measured as a function of the properties and the concentration of the selected neutral salts, and the protonation state. It was found that both the electrical and mechanical properties of PANI films were enhanced by adding neutral salts in the polymerization. The adding of the neutral salts in the polymerization resulted in extended conformation of polymer chain and increasing of molecular weight of PANI, which may be the reasons why the electrical and mechanical properties of PANI films were improved by the presence of neutral salts in the polymerization.

  19. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  20. Anomalies Dismissed of Ambiguities and the Neutral Pion Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A

    2002-01-01

    The correlation between the neutral electromagnetic pion decay, the Sutherland-Veltman paradox and the $AVV$ triangle anomaly phenomenon is discussed within the framework of an alternative strategy to handle the divergences involved in the perturbative evaluation of the associated physical amplitudes. We show that the general characteristic of the adopted strategy allows us to recover the traditional treatment for the problem as well as allows us to construct an alternative way to look at the problem where the ambiguities play no relevant role.

  1. Artificial electromagnetism for neutral atoms: Escher staircases and Laughlin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Erich J.

    2004-03-01

    Cold gas experimentalists are attempting to produce analogs of solid state systems by placing neutral atoms in periodic `optical lattice' potentials. I show how lasers can manipulate the internal states of such atoms to simulate the effects of electric and magnetic fields on charged particles. Unlike similar ideas of Jaksch and Zoller [New J. Phys. 5, 56 (2003)], an external linear potential is unnecessary. Since these effective electric and magnetic fields do not obey Maxwell's equations, seemingly paradoxical geometries are possible. For example, one can construct a ring of sites where an atoms potential energy continuously decreases as it moves in a clockwise direction.

  2. Pulsewidth Modulation of Neutral-Point-Clamped Indirect Matrix Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Poh Chiang, Loh; Gao, Feng

    2008-01-01

    discussed in the existing literature. Addressing the previously described issues, this paper focuses on the operational mode analysis of a three-level indirect matrix converter implemented using a neutral-point-clamped inversion stage and the design of a number of PWM and modulation ratio compensation...... schemes for controlling the converter with improved waveform quality. The performances and practicalities of the designed schemes are verified in simulation and experimentally using an implemented laboratory prototype with some representative results captured and presented in this paper....

  3. Maturation Pathways of Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimiter S. Dimitrov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs and antibody fragments, including the best characterized in terms of structure-function b12 and Fab X5, exhibit relatively potent and broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity. However, the elicitation of b12 or b12-like antibodies in vivo by vaccine immunogens based on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env has not been successful. B12 is highly divergent from the closest corresponding germline antibody while X5 is less divergent. We have hypothesized that the relatively high degree of specific somatic hypermutations may preclude binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env to closest germline antibodies, and that identifying antibodies that are intermediates in the pathways to maturation could help design novel vaccine immunogens to guide the immune system for their enhanced elicitation. In support of this hypothesis we have previously found that a germline-like b12 (monovalent and bivalent scFv as an Fc fusion protein or IgG lacks measurable binding to an Env as measured by ELISA with a sensitivity in the μM range [1]; here we present evidence confirming and expanding these findings for a panel of Envs. In contrast, a germline-like scFv X5 bound Env with high (nM affinity. To begin to explore the maturation pathways of these antibodies we identified several possible b12 intermediate antibodies and tested their neutralizing activity. These intermediate antibodies neutralized only some HIV-1 isolates and with relatively weak potency. In contrast, germline-like scFv X5 neutralized a subset of the tested HIV-1 isolates with comparable efficiencies to that of the mature X5. These results could help explain the relatively high immunogenicity of the coreceptor binding site on gp120 and the abundance of CD4-induced (CD4i antibodies in HIV-1-infected patients (X5 is a CD4i antibody as well as the maturation pathway of X5. They also can help identify antigens that can bind specifically to b12 germline and

  4. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    to the atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented......For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important...

  5. Review of BSM neutral Higgs results in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Zucchetta, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Searches for beyond the standard model neutral Higgs bosons at the CMS experiment are presented. The analyses are based on proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV center-of-mass energy in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to $4.9 fb^{-1}$ and $19.7 fb^{-1}$. No evidence for additional Higgs bosons other than the 125 GeV standard model-like Higgs boson are found, and stringent exclusion limits are derived.

  6. Dynamics of finite size neutrally buoyant particles in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhimer, M; Jean, A; Praud, O; Bazile, R; Marchal, M; Couteau, G, E-mail: elhimer@imft.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles suspended in a turbulent flow is investigated experimentally, with particles having diameters larger than the Kolmogorov length scale. To that purpose, a turbulence generator have been constructed and the resulting flow characterized. The fluid was then seeded with polystyrene particles of diameter about 1 mm and their velocity measured separately and simultaneously with the surrounding fluid. Comparison of the velocities statistics between the two phases shows no appreciable discrepancy. However, simultaneous velocity measurement shows that particles may move in different direction from the underlying flow.

  7. Unified mass-action theory for virus neutralization and radioimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautman, R

    1976-01-01

    All ideas implicit in the papers since 1953 involved in applying mass-action thermodynamics to antibody-antigen reactions are unified by the use of: (a) the intermediary concept of extent of reaction; (b) the concept of intrinsic association constant; (c) a statistical analysis for probable complexes; and (d) identification of the complex or complexes that contribute to the bioassay. Several general theoretical examples are given that show the limitations of linear interpretations of equilibrium data. Two practical examples from the literature illustrate foot-and-mouth disease virus and influenza virus neutralization.

  8. Uncertainty quantification of bacterial aerosol neutralization in shock heated gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, J. C.; Gottiparthi, K. C.; Menon, S.

    2015-01-01

    A potential method for the neutralization of bacterial endospores is the use of explosive charges since the high thermal and mechanical stresses in the post-detonation flow are thought to be sufficient in reducing the endospore survivability to levels that pose no significant health threat. While several experiments have attempted to quantify endospore survivability by emulating such environments in shock tube configurations, numerical simulations are necessary to provide information in scenarios where experimental data are difficult to obtain. Since such numerical predictions require complex, multi-physics models, significant uncertainties could be present. This work investigates the uncertainty in determining the endospore survivability from using a reduced order model based on a critical endospore temperature. Understanding the uncertainty in such a model is necessary in quantifying the variability in predictions using large-scale, realistic simulations of bacterial endospore neutralization by explosive charges. This work extends the analysis of previous large-scale simulations of endospore neutralization [Gottiparthi et al. in (Shock Waves, 2014. doi:10.1007/s00193-014-0504-9)] by focusing on the uncertainty quantification of predicting endospore neutralization. For a given initial mass distribution of the bacterial endospore aerosol, predictions of the intact endospore percentage using nominal values of the input parameters match the experimental data well. The uncertainty in these predictions are then investigated using the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence and polynomial chaos expansion. The studies show that the endospore survivability is governed largely by the endospore's mass distribution and their exposure or residence time at the elevated temperatures and pressures. Deviations from the nominal predictions can be as much as 20-30 % in the intermediate temperature ranges. At high temperatures, i.e., strong shocks, which are of the most interest, the

  9. LHCb: Can LHCb Study Three Body Decays with Neutrals?

    CERN Multimedia

    Fawcett, W

    2013-01-01

    In this poster we present the first attempt to use a new method to measure CP violation in Dalitz plots. This method is unbinned, model independent and has a greater sensitivity than binned methods. Preliminary studies have been made using the three body decays $D^0 \\rightarrow K_\\rm{S}^0 \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$, which is especially challenging since there is one neutral particle in each of the final states. An attempt to visualise where CP violation occurs in Dalitz plots is also presented.

  10. Moldova Quo Vadis: Neutrality and European Integration? Problems of Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    public/840/en/Paper%20Nato5.doc (accessed 1 September 2007). 65 Heinz Vetschera, “Austria,” in The Missing Link: West European Neutrals and Regional...Twenty-First Century,” in Europe’s New Security Challenges, ed., Heinz Gaertner, Adrian Hyde-Price, and Erich Reiter (London: Lynne Rienner...Institutions: Bridging the Gap,” The 64th Rose- Roth Seminar, (Chisinau, Moldova), http://www.nato- pa.int/default.asp?SHORTCUT=1085 (accessed 21 February

  11. A selector for structural isomers of neutral molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Filsinger, Frank; von Helden, Gert; Küpper, Jochen; Meijer, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    We have selected and spatially separated the two conformers of 3-aminophenol (C$_6$H$_7$NO) present in a molecular beam. Analogous to the separation of ions based on their mass-to-charge ratios in a quadrupole mass filter, the neutral conformers are separated based on their different mass-to-dipole-moment ratios in an ac electric quadrupole selector. For a given ac frequency, the individual conformers experience different focusing forces, resulting in different transmissions through the selector. These experiments demonstrate that conformer-selected samples of large molecules can be prepared, offering new possibilities for the study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  12. Stochastic Stability Analysis for Markovian Jump Neutral Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the stability problem is studied for a class of Markovian jump neutral nonlinear systems with time-varying delay. By Lyapunov-Krasovskii function approach, a novel mean-square exponential stability criterion is derived for the situations that the system's transition rates are completely accessible, partially accessible and non-accessible, respectively. Moreover, the developed stability criterion is extended to the systems with different bounded sector nonlinear constraints. Finally, some numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  13. Two-Dimensional Arrays of Neutral Atom Quantum Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-20

    Isenhower, X. Zhang, A. Gill, T. Walker, M. Saffman. Deterministic entanglement of two neutral atoms via Rydberg blockade, Physical Review A, (09 2010...squeezing of atomic ensembles by multicolor quantum nondemolition measurements, Physical Review A, (02 2009): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.023831 10/19/2012...collective encoding in holmium atoms, Physical Review A, (07 2008): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.012336 10/19/2012 10.00 M Saffman, X L Zhang, A T

  14. HYDROGEN NEUTRAL OUTFLOWING DISKS OF B[E] SUPERGIANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kraus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos modelado la línea [Oi] de emisión en la supergigante B[e] R126 en la LMC asumiendo un disco con flujo de masa. Encontramos que el hidrógeno en el disco debe estar ionizado al menos un 0.1%, lo que implica que el material del disco debe ser predominantemente neutral. La emisión libre-libre se calcula del viento polar y el contraste mínimo de densidad entre el viento polar y del disco debe ser de - 10.

  15. Outflows of neutral (and ionized) gas in radio galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.; Tadhunter, C.

    2004-01-01

    Outflows up to 1500 km/s of atomic neutral hydrogen are detected in a growing number of radio galaxies. Outflows with similar velocities are also detected in ionized gas, suggesting a common origin for the extreme kinematics of these two phases of the gas. The high detection rate ofsuch outflows in young (or restarted) radio sources appears to be related to the existence of a dense ISM around these objects. Such a dense ISM can have important consequences for the evolution of the radio source...

  16. Control System of Neutral Beam Injection on HT-7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yongjun; Hu Chundong; Liu Zhimin; Liu Sheng; Song Shihua; Yang Daoye

    2005-01-01

    Neutral Beam Injection control system (NBICS) is constructed to measure the plasma current, Magnet current, vacuum pressure, cryopump temperature, control water cooling, filament voltage, and power supply, etc. The NBICS, consisting mainly of a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) subsystem, data acquisition and processing subsystem and cryopump and vacuum pressure monitoring subsystem, has successfully been used on a NBI device. In this article, the design of NBICS on HT-7 is discussed and each subsystem is described in particular.In addition, some experimental results are reported which are very important data for further research related to the HT-7 tokamak.

  17. Spectrum of Neutral Helium in Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M D; Ceperley, D M; Jones, Matthew D.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Ceperley, David M.

    1998-01-01

    We present extensive and accurate calculations for the excited state spectrum of spin-polarized neutral helium in a range of magnetic field strengths up to $10^{12}$ G. Of considerable interest to models of magnetic white dwarf stellar atmospheres, we also present results for the dipole strengths of the low lying transitions among these states. Our methods rely on a systematically saturated basis set approach to solving the Hartree--Fock self-consistent field equations, combined with an ``exact'' stochastic method to estimate the residual basis set truncation error and electron correlation effects. We also discuss the applicability of the adiabatic approximation to strongly magnetized multi-electron atoms.

  18. Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, R; Serianni, G; Sonato, P; Agostini, M; Brombin, M; Croci, G; Dalla Palma, M; De Muri, M; Gazza, E; Gorini, G; Pomaro, N; Rizzolo, A; Spolaore, M; Zaniol, B

    2012-02-01

    The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H(-)∕D(-) production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

  19. Neutralization process of Xeq+ ion grazing on Al(111) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A code has been developed to simulate the neutralization and grazing process of slow highly charged ion Xeq+ on Al(111) surface under the classical-over-the-barrier model. The image energy gain of Xeq+ ions are calculated and compared with experiment data. The simulation results of image energy gain are in good agreement with the experiment data. Meanwhile, in the present work, the reflection coefficient of incident Xeq+ on Al(111) surface as a function of the incidence angle, energy and charge state is also studied.

  20. Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Cassini INMS) designed and built by Hasso Niemann has revolutionized our understanding of the Saturn system and demonstrated the importance of mass spectrometry as a tool for understanding formation, evolution, and chemical processes. In this talk that honors the accomplishments of Hasso I will discuss: 1) the major discoveries of INMS at Titan, Enceladus, and the other icy moons of Saturn, 2) the new perspective this has given us on understanding the formation and evolution of the outer solar system, and 3) the implications for future studies in the outer solar system using mass spectrometry.