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Sample records for antiinflammatory drugs nsaids

  1. Hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer V; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Mørtz, Charlotte G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported to be the second most common cause of drug hypersensitivity. In 2011, experts from the EAACI/ENDA group and GA(2)LEN proposed a new classification system for NSAID hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to classify...... responders reacted to non-pyrazolone drugs. Only one patient could not be classified according to the EAACI/ENDA system. An overlap between respiratory and cutaneous symptoms was found in 15/39 (38%) of patients. CONCLUSIONS: All but one of our patients could be classified according to the EAACI...

  2. Two cases of corneal perforation after oral administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: oral NSAID-induced corneal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ikuya; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Kazuo; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To report 2 cases of corneal perforation associated with the use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In a 62-year-old woman and a 79-year-old woman, corneal perforation occurred after 7 days and 5 months of oral NSAIDs administration, respectively. After NSAIDs were discontinued, the cornea epithelialized and the anterior chamber formed within 14 and 10 days, respectively. It is well known that topical NSAIDs cause corneal perforation. Observations in the present cases suggest that the oral administration of NSAIDs may also cause corneal damage, and hence, medical professionals should consider the risk of damage to the cornea when administering these drugs orally.

  3. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs do not influence the urinary testosterone/epitestosterone glucuronide ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eLundmark

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The UDP Glucuronosyl Transferase (UGT enzymes are important in the pharmacokinetics, and conjugation, of a variety of drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs as well as anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS. Testosterone glucuronidation capacity is strongly associated with a deletion polymorphism in the UGT2B17 gene. As the use of high doses of NSAIDs has been observed in athletes there is a risk for a drug-drug interaction that may influence the doping tests for AAS. In-vitro studies show inhibitory potential on UGT2B7, 2B15 and 2B17 enzymes by NSAIDs. The aim of this study was to investigate if concomitant use of NSAIDs and a single dose of testosterone enanthate would affect the excretion rate of testosterone and epitestosterone glucuronide (TG and EG as well as the T/E ratio, thereby affecting the outcome of the testosterone doping test.The study was designed as an open, randomized, cross-over study with subjects being their own control. The 23 healthy male volunteers, with either two, one or no allele (ins/ins, ins/del or del/del of the UGT2B17 gene, received the maximum recommended dose of NSAID (Ibuprofen or Diclofenac for six days. On day three, 500 mg of testosterone enanthate was administered. Spot urine samples were collected for 17 days. After a wash out period of four months the volunteers received 500 mg testosterone enanthate only, with subsequent spot urine collection for 14 days. The glucuronides of testosterone and epitestosterone were quantified. NSAIDs did not affect the excretion of TG or EG before the administration of testosterone. The concomitant use of NSAIDs and testosterone slightly increased the TG excretion while the EG excretion was less suppressed compared to testosterone use only. The effects of the NSAIDs on the TG and EG excretion did not differ between the UGT2B17 genotype groups. In conclusion, the outcome of testosterone doping tests does not seem to be affected by the use of NSAIDs.

  4. Effects of nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on melanoma cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Huiwen [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shin Hee [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Wang, Lei [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A., E-mail: velazque@ualberta.ca [Chemistry Section, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis and Basic Research Program, SAIC-Frederick Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta, Canada T6G 2N8 (Canada); Wu, Shiyong, E-mail: wus1@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20–30% and fibronectin by 25–44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (∼ 56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. -- Highlights: ► NONO-naproxen, a novel nitric oxide-releasing NSAID, was synthesized. ► NONO-NSAIDs, but not their parent NSAIDs, reduced melanoma adhesion. ► NONO-naproxen, but not NONO-aspirin and NSAIDs, reduced activity of β1 integrin.

  5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for axial spondyloarthritis (ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Feline P. B.; van der Burg, Lennart R. A.; Ramiro, Sofia; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Falzon, Louise; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) comprises ankylosing spondylitis (radiographic axSpA) and non-radiographic (nr-)axSpA and is associated with psoriasis, uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended as first-line drug treatment. To determine

  6. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe–Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1, the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe–Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R-flurbiprofen (2, racemic flurbiprofen (3, and racemic ibuprofen (4, are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5. After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic–aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use.

  7. Clinical guidelines «Rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in clinical practice»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the new version of the clinical guidelines «Rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in clinical practice » prepared by the Association of Rheumatologists of Russia, the Russian Pain Society, the Russian Gastroenterological Association, the Russian Society of Cardiology, the Association of Traumatologists and Orthopedists of Russia, the Association of Interdisciplinary Medicine, and the Russian Association of Palliative Medicine.In our country, NSAIDs are the most important and most popular class of analgesics. Unlike global practice, Russian physicians rather rarely recommend paracetamol as a first-line drug to relieve moderate or severe pain, by giving preference to NSAIDs; the use of opioid analgesics for noncancers is minimized because of tight legal restrictions.NSAIDs are effective and easy-to-use; however, they are far from safe; the administration of these medications may lead to serious gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal, and other complications in a number of cases. So the use of NSAIDs should be compulsorily monitored for adverse reactions and the choice of a specific drug for each clinical case should be based on the objective estimation of a ratio of its efficacy to safety.In recent years, there have been fresh data on the use of NSAIDs for different diseases and a few novel representatives of this drug group have appeared on the Russian pharmacological market.This all has necessitated a new version of the guidelines on the rational use of NSAIDs. These are based on the provisions that have high validity and have been confirmed by the results of well-organized clinical and large-scale population-based studies, as well as by their meta-analysis.The guidelines are intended for physicians of all specialties. 

  8. Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)-Induced Seizures in a Patient with HIV Infection ... interaction not supported by existing literature, and it is possible that the background HIV infection may have a role to .... Foods and Drug Administration and Control.

  9. Attenuation of stress induced memory deficits by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats: Role of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Shaista; Qadeer, Sara; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira

    2017-04-01

    Repeated stress paradigms have been shown to cause devastating alterations on memory functions. Stress is linked with inflammation. Psychological and certain physical stressors could lead to neuroinflammation. Inflammatory process may occur by release of mediators and stimulate the production of prostaglandins through cyclooxygenase (COX). Treatment with COX inhibitors, which restrain prostaglandin production, has enhanced memory in a number of neuroinflammatory states showing a potential function for raised prostaglandins in these memory shortfalls. In the present study, potential therapeutic effects of indomethacin and diclofenac sodium on memory in both unrestraint and restraint rats were observed. Two components, long term memory and short term memory were examined by Morris water maze (MWM) and elevated plus maze (EPM) respectively. The present study also demonstrated the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of antioxidant enzymes along with the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Results of MWM and EPM showed significant effects of drugs in both unrestraint and restraint rats as escape latency and transfer latency, in respective behavioral models were decreased as compared to that of control. This study also showed NSAIDs administration decreased LPO and increased antioxidant enzymes activity and decreased AChE activity in rats exposed to repeated stress. In conclusion this study suggests a therapeutic potential of indomethacin and diclofenac against repeated stress-induced memory deficits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  10. The pattern of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) from 1997 to 2005: a nationwide study on 4.6 million people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gislason, Gunnar H; Jacobsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the nationwide pattern of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the Danish population. METHODS: All Danish citizens aged 10 or above 1 January 1997 were included in the study. The national prescription registry was used to identify all claimed prescriptions...

  11. Nicolau Syndrome after Intramuscular Injection of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Dadaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection that leads to local ischemic necrosis of the skin and adipose tissue. In this paper, we discuss etiologies, risk factors, and treatment options for gluteal Nicolau syndrome referring to patients treated in our hospital. Our study includes 17 women who visited our clinic with symptoms of gluteal necrosis secondary to intramuscular injection. The following variables were taken into account: injection site, drug administered, frequency of injections, the person who administered the injections, needle size, and needle tip color. Magnetic resonance images obtained in the aftermath of intramuscular injection application were carefully analyzed for presence of necrosis, cyst formation and the thickness of the gluteal fat tissue layer. Drugs that had been received in intramuscular injection were exclusively non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mean patient BMI was 41.8 (all patients were considered as obese, and mean gluteal fat thickness was 54 mm. Standard length of needles (3.8 cm had been used in procedures. The wounds were treated with primary closure in 11 patients and with local flap therapy in 6 patients. The observed necrosis was a consequence of misplaced gluteal injection, where drugs were injected into the adipose tissue instead of the muscle due to the extreme thickness of the fat layer, on one hand, and the inappropriate length of standard needles, on the other hand. Intramuscular injection should be avoided in obese patients whenever possible: if it is necessary, proper injection technique should be used.

  12. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) Inhibit the Growth and Reproduction of Chaetomium globosum and Other Fungi Associated with Water-Damaged Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmont, Kelsey; Biles, Charles L; Konsure, Heather; Dahal, Sujita; Rowsey, Tyler; Broge, Matthew; Poudyal, Shubhra; Gurung, Tara; Shrestha, Sabina; Biles, Caleb L; Cluck, Terry; Howard, Alisha

    2017-12-01

    Indoor mold due to water damage causes serious human respiratory disorders, and the remediation to homes, schools, and businesses is a major expense. Prevention of mold infestation of building materials would reduce health problems and building remediation costs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit yeasts and a limited number of filamentous fungi. The purpose of this research was to determine the possible inhibitory activity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on germination, fungal growth, and reproduction of Chaetomium globosum and other important filamentous fungi that occur in water-damaged buildings. Several NSAIDs were found to inhibit C. globosum germination, growth, and reproduction. The most effective NSAIDs inhibiting C. globosum were ibuprofen, diflunisal, and diclofenac. Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Aspergillus niger, and Stachybotrys atra were also tested on the various media with similar results obtained. However, F. oxysporum and A. niger exhibited a higher level of resistance to aspirin and NaSAL when compared to the C. globosum isolates. The inhibition exhibited by NSAIDs was variable depending on growth media and stage of fungal development. These compounds have a great potential of inhibiting fungal growth on building materials such as gypsum board. Formulations of sprays or building materials with NSAID-like chemical treatments may hold promise in reducing mold in homes and buildings.

  13. Knowledge and Use of, and Attitudes toward, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in Practice: A Survey of Ontario Physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Maggie; Norman, Kathleen E

    Purpose: To investigate Ontario physiotherapists' knowledge and use of, and attitudes toward, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to identify whether there is a need for physiotherapists to receive education specific to NSAIDs. Method: An existing survey instrument was modified and tested by five Ontario physiotherapists. The final version was distributed electronically to approximately 4,400 Ontario Physiotherapy Association members as a self-administered online questionnaire. Results: A total of 294 physiotherapists responded to the survey (response rate=6.7%). Respondents demonstrated variability in their knowledge of NSAID contraindications, side effects, and drug interactions. Most respondents (62.6%) were incorrect or unsure about where and how to obtain most NSAIDs, and most demonstrated incorrect or uncertain knowledge of the relevant legislation. Despite this lack of knowledge, 50% of respondents recommend NSAIDs to their patients. Conclusions: Many Ontario physiotherapists who participated in this survey recommend NSAIDs to their patients despite having a variable understanding of the legislation and medication-related factors. A lack of thorough knowledge of risks and contraindications has implications for patient safety. Physiotherapists who incorporate medications into their practice should access comprehensive information on appropriate NSAID use and should inform themselves about legislative restrictions to ensure that associated treatment is provided in a manner that is evidence based, safe, and in keeping with regulatory boundaries.

  14. The Role of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs in the Management of the Post-Embolization Symptoms after Uterine Artery Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Bilhim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Uterine artery embolization (UAE is usually a very painful procedure. Although pain after the procedure can occur as a single symptom, it usually is associated with other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, pelvic pain, general malaise, fever and leukocytosis that characterize the post-embolization syndrome. Management of the post-embolization symptoms and of pain in particular, is paramount if UAE is to be performed as an outpatient procedure. Different protocols have used analgesic and/or anti-inflammatory agents to control these symptoms. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are frequently used in association with analgesic drugs to control post-embolization symptoms. In our institution the patients start oral medication with NSAIDs the day before the procedure and continue it during and after UAE. We also mix NSAIDs with the embolizing particles. This enables a reduction in the inflammation present in the uterine fibroids and helps controlling the pain. The purpose of this paper is to review the importance of NSAIDs in the management of the post-embolization symptoms. We describe the protocol that we use in our institution that enables us to perform the procedure on an outpatient basis with same day discharge and good control of the post-embolization symptoms with oral NSAIDs and analgesics.

  15. Risk of myocardial infarction and death associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among healthy individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, E L; Gislason, G H; Jacobsen, S

    2008-01-01

    Use of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in several patient groups, but whether this excess risk exists in apparently healthy individuals has not been clarified. Using a historical cohort design, we estimated the risk of death...... and myocardial infarction associated with the use of NSAIDs. Participants in the study were selected from the Danish population and were defined as healthy according to a history of no hospital admissions and no concomitant selected pharmacotherapy. The source population consisted of 4,614,807 individuals...

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccleston, Christopher; Cooper, Tess E; Fisher, Emma; Anderson, Brian; Wilkinson, Nick Mr

    2017-08-02

    Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left untreated, views on children's pain have changed over time, and relief of pain is now seen as important.We designed a suite of seven reviews on chronic non-cancer pain and cancer pain (looking at antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and paracetamol) in order to review the evidence for children's pain utilising pharmacological interventions.As the leading cause of morbidity in the world today, chronic disease (and its associated pain) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat pain, reduce fever, and for their anti-inflammation properties. They are commonly used within paediatric pain management. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently licensed for use in Western countries, however they are not approved for infants under three months old. The main adverse effects include renal impairment and gastrointestinal issues. Common side effects in children include diarrhoea, headache, nausea, constipation, rash, dizziness, and abdominal pain. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of NSAIDs used to treat chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents aged between birth and 17 years, in any setting. We searched the Cochrane

  17. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Use in Primary Health Care Centers in A'Seeb, Muscat: A Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shidhani, Asma; Al-Rawahi, Naama; Al-Rawahi, Abdulhakeem

    2015-09-01

    We sought to assess the trend of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in primary health care institutions located in A'Seeb, a province in the capital city of Oman, Muscat. Additionally, we evaluated the relationship between a physician's years of experience and the number of prescription issued, as well as the presence of risk factors and side effects in the patients who received these prescriptions. A clinical audit was conducted in four primary health care centers in the Muscat region over a one-week period in April 2014. The target population included patients aged 18 years or over who attended one of the four health centers and were prescribed NSAIDs. Overall, 272 patients were recruited by systematic random sampling. The data were collected by two methods: direct face-to-face interviews and evaluations of the patient's electronic medical file. The prescribing doctors were blind to the audit. The collected information included patients demographics, past and current medical history of related comorbidities, NSAID type, dose, duration and indications for use, concomitant warfarin or/and aspirin prescriptions, and co-prescription of gastroprotective agents. In total, 15% of patients received an NSAID prescription: females were issued more prescriptions than males. The percentage of patients who received an NSAID prescription across the health centers ranged from 9% to 24%. The main reason for prescribing NSAIDs was musculoskeletal problems. The most frequently prescribed NSAID was ibuprofen. Sixteen percent of patients who received an NSAID prescription had a risk factor related to its use. The mean and median duration of the NSAID prescriptions of all types were 5.6 and 5.0 days, respectively. Physicians with a greater number of years experience prescribed more NSAIDs. Our study showed that the number of prescriptions of NSAIDs among various institutes varied, which could reflect the level of awareness concerning NSAID risks among the prescribing

  18. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs Use in Primary Health Care Centers in A’Seeb, Muscat: A Clinical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Al-Shidhani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We sought to assess the trend of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use in primary health care institutions located in A’Seeb, a province in the capital city of Oman, Muscat. Additionally, we evaluated the relationship between a physician’s years of experience and the number of prescription issued, as well as the presence of risk factors and side effects in the patients who received these prescriptions. Method: A clinical audit was conducted in four primary health care centers in the Muscat region over a one-week period in April 2014. The target population included patients aged 18 years or over who attended one of the four health centers and were prescribed NSAIDs. Overall, 272 patients were recruited by systematic random sampling. The data were collected by two methods: direct face-to-face interviews and evaluations of the patient’s electronic medical file. The prescribing doctors were blind to the audit. The collected information included patients demographics, past and current medical history of related comorbidities, NSAID type, dose, duration and indications for use, concomitant warfarin or/and aspirin prescriptions, and co-prescription of gastroprotective agents. Results: In total, 15% of patients received an NSAID prescription: females were issued more prescriptions than males. The percentage of patients who received an NSAID prescription across the health centers ranged from 9% to 24%. The main reason for prescribing NSAIDs was musculoskeletal problems. The most frequently prescribed NSAID was ibuprofen. Sixteen percent of patients who received an NSAID prescription had a risk factor related to its use. The mean and median duration of the NSAID prescriptions of all types were 5.6 and 5.0 days, respectively. Physicians with a greater number of years experience prescribed more NSAIDs. Conclusion: Our study showed that the number of prescriptions of NSAIDs among various institutes varied, which could reflect the

  19. Piroxicam, a traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) causes apoptosis by ROS mediated Akt activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Neha; Sarkar, Munna; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2015-12-01

    Piroxicam (Px) belongs to the oxicam group of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and have been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects in animal models and cultured animal cells. However, little is known about the mode of action of Px and its cellular targets. We explored the role of Px, in triggering apoptosis and examined the involvement of upstream cellular mechanisms in apoptosis induction by Px. Our studies with human breast cancer cells MCF-7 show that Px induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation along with apoptotic cell death. ROS release lead to Akt activation. On evaluation it became evident that ROS mediated apoptosis induction was due to Akt activation (hyper phosphorylation). Silencing the expression of Akt using siRNA and a specific Akt inhibitor, triciribine further confirmed the findings. However Px failed to cause ROS generation, cell death or Akt phosphorylation in another human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 which is estrogen receptor negative and more aggressive compared to MCF-7 cells. This suggests that Px has cell type specific effects. Thus we revealed for the first time that Px can induce apoptosis by ROS mediated Akt hyperphosphorylation/activation. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Is non-steroidal anti-inflammaory drug (NSAID) enteropathy clinically more important than NSAID gastropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, D; Bjarnason, I

    2006-03-01

    The side effects of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the stomach is undoubtedly a serious public health problem contributing significantly to the morbidity and mortality of patients receiving these drugs. However, the damage of NSAIDs is not confined to the stomach. Indeed the short term and long term damage of NSAIDs on the small bowel (NSAID enteropathy) is more frequent than NSAID gastropathy. Furthermore, NSAID enteropathy is associated with complications (bleeding and protein loss). While many of these are mild, the serious events (significant bleeding, perforation, obstruction, and sudden death) are frequent as that reported for NSAID gastropathy. The diagnosis of NSAID enteropathy has been greatly aided by the introduction of wireless capsule enteroscopy.

  1. Structural Mechanism of the Interaction of Alzheimer Disease Aβ Fibrils with the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Sulindac Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Elke; Bittner, Heiko J; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Lopez Del Amo, Juan Miguel; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Multhaup, Gerd; Hildebrand, Peter W; Reif, Bernd

    2015-11-27

    Alzheimer disease is the most severe neurodegenerative disease worldwide. In the past years, a plethora of small molecules interfering with amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation has been reported. However, their mode of interaction with amyloid fibers is not understood. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known γ-secretase modulators; they influence Aβ populations. It has been suggested that NSAIDs are pleiotrophic and can interact with more than one pathomechanism. Here we present a magic angle spinning solid-state NMR study demonstrating that the NSAID sulindac sulfide interacts specifically with Alzheimer disease Aβ fibrils. We find that sulindac sulfide does not induce drastic architectural changes in the fibrillar structure but intercalates between the two β-strands of the amyloid fibril and binds to hydrophobic cavities, which are found consistently in all analyzed structures. The characteristic Asp(23)-Lys(28) salt bridge is not affected upon interacting with sulindac sulfide. The primary binding site is located in the vicinity of residue Gly(33), a residue involved in Met(35) oxidation. The results presented here will assist the search for pharmacologically active molecules that can potentially be employed as lead structures to guide the design of small molecules for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Moroz; A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin (LDA). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy) rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy). Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gast...

  3. Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: does infection affect the outcome of NSAID therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    1. H. pylori gastritis appears to increase the likelihood of developing dyspeptic symptoms on NSAID therapy. 2. There is preliminary evidence that the histologic severity of H. pylori gastritis may be adversely affected by NSAID therapy, with a consequent increase in the risk of developing a peptic ulcer, possibly with complications. Whether this results from an effect on the inflammatory process or results from a quantitative increase in H. pylori colonization is unknown. In these respects, ASA may differ from other NSAIDs. 3. Ulcers are more likely to develop during the course of NSAID therapy in those infected with H. pylori; eradication of the infection reduces ulcer recurrence in the face of continued NSAID therapy, and it seems likely that this must reduce but not abolish the risk of GI bleeding in those using NSAIDs. Eradication also reduces the damage (and possibly risks) of low-dose aspirin therapy. 4. While H. pylori and NSAID use are independent risk factors for GI bleeding, whether or not they are interactive remains unresolved. 5. The effect of H. pylori infection on the risk of perforation during NSAID therapy, or conversely, the contribution of NSAID therapy to the risk of perforation in H. pylori-infected subjects, is also unclear at the present time. 6. Only large outcome studies of accurately diagnosed patients (with regard to H. pylori gastritis), and with much more specific detail as to the type of NSAID, dose and duration of therapy, employing only well-defined end-points, such as significant hemorrhage, perforation or death, and avoiding all surrogate markers short of these end points can hope to unravel this tangled web. PMID:10378355

  4. The efficacy of tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablets (Ultracet®) as add-on and maintenance therapy in knee osteoarthritis pain inadequately controlled by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Su; Choi, Jin-Jung; Kim, Wan-Uk; Min, June-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Chul-Soo

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg combination tablets (tramadol/APAP) with that of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as maintenance therapy following tramadol/APAP and NSAID combination therapy in knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain which was inadequately controlled by NSAIDs. Subjects with knee OA for over 1 year and moderate pain (numerical rating scale [NRS] ≥5) despite at least 4 weeks' NSAID therapy (meloxicam 7.5 mg or 15 mg qd or aceclofenac 100 mg bid) received tramadol/APAP add-on (combination with NSAID) for 4 weeks. Thereafter, subjects with significant pain improvement (NRS pain intensity (NRS), pain relief score, and subjects' and investigators' overall medication assessments. Of 143 subjects enrolled, 112 completed the 4-week tramadol/APAP and NSAID combination phase and 97 (67.8%) experienced significant pain improvement. Of the 97 subjects randomized, 36 in tramadol/APAP group and 47 in NSAID group completed the 8-week comparator study. On days 29 and 57, WOMAC scores and pain intensities did not increase in both groups compared to measurements immediately after the combination therapy. At these two time points, there were no significant differences in WOMAC scores, pain intensities, and other secondary measures between the two groups. Overall adverse event rates were similar in both groups. Tramadol/APAP add-on significantly improved knee OA pain which had been inadequately controlled by NSAIDs. In those subjects who showed favorable response to tramadol/APAP and NSAID combination therapy, both tramadol/APAP and NSAIDs were effective at maintaining the pain-reduced state and there was no significant difference in efficacy between tramadol/APAP and NSAIDs.

  5. Development and characterisation of cellulose based electrospun mats for buccal delivery of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Kazem; Kontogiannidou, Eleni; Ahmad, Rita Haj; Gratsani, Aggeliki; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Sunar, Burde Suheyla; Armitage, David; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Chang, Ming-Wei; Li, Xiang; Fatouros, Dimitrios G; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2017-05-01

    In this study conventional electrospinning (ESp) was used to prepare a series of buccal films containing indomethacin (INDO, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug), Ethocel (10), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and Tween ® 80 at various concentrations. The films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Drug release behaviour was assessed in vitro (buffer pH6.8). SEM revealed film morphology and mean fibre diameter was dependent on the process formulation. INDO was encapsulated in the amorphous state once electrospun as evidenced from DSC and XRD studies. The presence of other excipients within fibrous matrices was confirmed using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Loading and release of INDO from filamentous structures was influenced by formulation composition; indicating potential to 'fine-tune' dosage forms. Given that ESp is a one-step preparation method and operational at ambient conditions; an attractive route for engineering tailored film type dosage forms is presented. This is a valuable approach for optimizing dosage forms as needed in a single step for various age groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide in a doping control urine sample as the result of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) tablet contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmlin, Hans-Jörg; Mürner, André; Steiner, Samuel; Kamber, Matthias; Weber, Christina; Geyer, Hans; Guddat, Sven; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide-1,1-dioxide) belongs to the class of diuretic agents that represent one of today's cornerstones of the treatment of hypertensive patients. In addition to its clinical relevance, HCTZ is prohibited in sports according to the regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) at all times and has frequently been detected in sports drug testing urine samples worldwide since its ban was introduced in 1988. Despite these facts, the adverse analytical finding concerning HCTZ in an in-competition routine doping control sample collected in December 2014 was further investigated, particularly motivated by the comparably low urinary concentration of the drug accounting for approximately 5ng/mL. The athlete in question did not declare the use of any nutritional supplement or medication other than the ingestion of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prior to competition. Hence, the drug (formulated as coated tablet) provided by the athlete as well as the corresponding retention sample of the manufacturer were analyzed. Noteworthy, both samples confirmed the presence of about 2μg of HCTZ per tablet. In order to further probe for the plausibility of the observed urinary HCTZ concentrations with the scenario of drug ingestion and subsequent doping control sample collection, administration studies with produced HCTZ-spiked placebo-tablets (2.5μg of HCTZ/tablet) were conducted. Urine specimens were collected prior to and after ingestion of the drug and subjected to routine doping control analytical procedures employing liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. While blank urine samples returned negative test results, post-administration specimens were found to contain HCTZ at concentrations of approximately 1-16ng/mL, which supported the athlete's inadvertent intake of HCTZ via contaminated NSAID tablets. Due to the substantial sensitivity of test methods employed today by

  7. Evaluation of biological endpoints in crop plants after exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): implications for phytotoxicological assessment of novel contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Wiebke; Redshaw, Clare H

    2015-02-01

    Human pharmaceuticals have been detected in the terrestrial environment at µg to mg kg(-1) concentrations. Repeated application of sewage sludge (biosolids) and increasing reclaimed wastewater use for irrigation could lead to accumulation of these novel contaminants in soil systems. Despite this, potential phytotoxicological effects on higher plants have rarely been evaluated. These studies aimed to test effects upon germination, development, growth and physiology of two crop plants, namely radish (Raphanus sativus Spakler 3) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa All Year Around), after exposure to different, but structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) at environmentally relevant concentrations. A range of biological endpoints comprising biomass, length, water content, specific root and shoot length, root to shoot ratio, daily progress of stages of cell elongation and organ emergence (primary root, hypocotyl elongation, cotyledon emergence, cotyledon opening, and no change), as well as photosynthetic measurements were evaluated. Compounds from the fenamic acid class were found to affect R. sativus root endpoints (root length and water content), while ibuprofen affected early root development of L. sativa. In general, phytotoxicological effects on root endpoints demonstrated that impacts upon higher plants are not only compound specific, but also differ between plant species. It was found that the usage of a wide range of biological endpoints (all simple, cost-effective and ecologically relevant) were beneficial in detecting differences in plant responses to NSAID exposure. Due to paucity and discrepancy within the few previously available phytotoxicological studies with pharmaceuticals, it is now essential to allocate time and resources to consider development of suitable chronic toxicity tests, and some suggestions regarding this are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A NONSTEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUG (NSAID SELECTION ALGORITHM BASED ON THE ANALYSIS OF RISK FACTORS FOR DRUG-INDUCED COMPLICATIONS IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE: THE RESULTS OF THE ALL-RUSSIAN PRINCIPLE PROJECT (APPLICAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the efficacy and safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, a class of essential medications used to treat acute and chronic pain, is an important and urgent task. For its solution, in 2015 Russian experts provided an NSAID selection algorithm based on the assessment of risk factors (RFs for drug-induced complications and on the prescription of drugs with the least negative effect on the gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system. The PRINCIPLE project was implemented to test the effectiveness of this algorithm.Subjects and methods. A study group consisted of 439 patients (65% were women and 35% – men; their mean age was 51.3±14.4 years with severe musculoskeletal pain, who were prescribed NSAIDs by using the above algorithm. The majority of patients were noted to have RFs: gastrointestinal and cardiovascular ones in 62 and 88% of the patients, respectively. Given the RF, eight NSAIDs were used; these were aceclofenac, diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, meloxicam, naproxen, nimesulide, and celecoxib, the latter being prescribed most commonly (in 57.4% of cases. NSAID was used in combination with proton pump inhibitors in 30.2% of the patients. The follow-up period was 28 days. The investigators evaluated the efficacy of therapy (pain changes on a 10-point numeric rating scale (NRS and the development of adverse events (AE. Results and discussion. Pain was completely relieved in the overwhelming majority (94.9% of patients. There were no significant differences in the efficacy of different NSAIDs according to NRS scores. The number of AE was minimal and did not differ between different NSAIDs, with the exception of a higher frequency of dyspepsia caused by diclofenac (15.7%. There were no serious complications or therapy discontinuation because of AE.Conclusion. The use of the NSAID selection algorithm allows for effective and relatively safe therapy with these drugs in real clinical practice.

  9. Use of Fixed Dose Combination (FDC) Drugs in India: Central Regulatory Approval and Sales of FDCs Containing Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), Metformin, or Psychotropic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, Patricia; Roderick, Peter; Mahajan, Rushikesh; Kadam, Abhay; Pollock, Allyson M.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2012, an Indian parliamentary committee reported that manufacturing licenses for large numbers of fixed dose combination (FDC) drugs had been issued by state authorities without prior approval of the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) in violation of rules, and considered that some ambiguity until 1 May 2002 about states’ powers might have contributed. To our knowledge, no systematic enquiry has been undertaken to determine if evidence existed to support these findings. We investigated CDSCO approvals for and availability of oral FDC drugs in four therapeutic areas: analgesia (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), diabetes (metformin), depression/anxiety (anti-depressants/benzodiazepines), and psychosis (anti-psychotics). Methods and Findings This was an ecologic study with a time-trend analysis of FDC sales volumes (2007–2012) and a cross-sectional examination of 2011–2012 data to establish the numbers of formulations on the market with and without a record of CDSCO approval (“approved” and “unapproved”), their branded products, and sales volumes. Data from the CDSCO on approved FDC formulations were compared with sales data from PharmaTrac, a database of national drug sales. We determined the proportions of FDC sales volumes (2011–2012) arising from centrally approved and unapproved formulations and from formulations including drugs banned/restricted internationally. We also determined the proportions of centrally approved and unapproved formulations marketed before and after 1 May 2002, when amendments were made to the drug rules. FDC approvals in India, the United Kingdom (UK), and United States of America (US) were compared. For NSAID FDCs, 124 formulations were marketed, of which 34 (27%) were centrally approved and 90 (73%) were unapproved; metformin: 25 formulations, 20 (80%) approved, five (20%) unapproved; anti-depressants/benzodiazepines: 16 formulations, three (19%) approved, 13 (81%) unapproved

  10. The cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among healthy people - A nationwide population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup

    2010-01-01

    1,63 CI: 1,52-1,76) var forbundet med en øget risiko for hjertedød, og artiklen konkluderer, at alle mennesker bør vise forsigtighed ved brugen af disse lægemidler. Brug af ibuprofen (HR 1,01 CI: 0,96-1,07) eller naproxen (HR 0,97 CI: 0,83-1,12) er et tilsyneladende sikrere alternativ hvad angår den...... til kardiovasculær død eller fatalt eller non-fatalt stroke. Ibuprofen viste lignende resultater som for celecoxib hvorimod naproxen ikke var associeret med øget kardiovaskulær risiko. KONKLUSION Overordnet konkluderer afhandlingen, at nogle NSAID er forbundet med øget risiko for kardiovaskulær...

  11. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  12. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Moroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin (LDA. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy. Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gastrointestinal mucosa today. The effect of the drug differs from that of PPIs: it is a typical gastroand enteroprotector that enhances the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins and possesses a significant anti-inflammatory potential. Rebamipide has long been widely used by doctors inJapan,South Korea, andChinaas an effective and safe agent for the treatment of many diseases of the digestive system. There is a strong evidence base for the efficacy of rebamipide in preventing and treating NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy (including LDA-induced injuries. Controlled studies have found that the drug is not inferior to the classic gastroprotective agent misoprostol, significantly outperforming the latter in its tolerability. This review describes the mechanism of action of rebamipide and main clinical trials of its therapeutic effect in NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy. 

  13. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  14. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for treatment of acute gout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Durme, Caroline M. P. G.; Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Landewé, Robert B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) associated with better outcomes than cyclooxygenase inhibitors, glucocorticoids, IL-1 inhibitors or placebo in the treatment of acute gout? NSAIDs are not significantly associated with a difference in pain reduction compared with cyclooxygenase

  15. Is non‐steroidal anti‐inflammaory drug (NSAID) enteropathy clinically more important than NSAID gastropathy?

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayo, D; Bjarnason, I

    2006-01-01

    The side effects of conventional non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the stomach is undoubtedly a serious public health problem contributing significantly to the morbidity and mortality of patients receiving these drugs. However, the damage of NSAIDs is not confined to the stomach. Indeed the short term and long term damage of NSAIDs on the small bowel (NSAID enteropathy) is more frequent than NSAID gastropathy. Furthermore, NSAID enteropathy is associated with complications (bl...

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  17. Cause-specific cardiovascular risk associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs among healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Folke, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Studies have raised concern on the cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We studied safety of NSAID therapy in a nationwide cohort of healthy individuals.......Studies have raised concern on the cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We studied safety of NSAID therapy in a nationwide cohort of healthy individuals....

  18. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M.; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs.......To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs....

  19. PHARMACOKINETIC-PHARMACODYNAMIC DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ; DESMET, PAGM

    1994-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are very commonly prescribed, especially in the elderly population. In many countries more than 10 different NSAIDs are available. As the older pyrazole compounds like phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone and azapropazone are most prone to pharmacokinetic

  20. Effects of anti-inflammatory (NSAID) treatment on human tendinopathic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Ohlenschlaeger, Tommy F.; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer

    2017-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to treat tendinopathy, but evidence for this treatment is lacking, and little is known regarding effects of NSAIDs on human tendinopathic tendon. This study investigated the effects of NSAID treatment (ibuprofen) on human tendinopathic...... tendon, with changes in gene expression as the primary outcome, and tendon pain, function, and blood flow as secondary outcomes. Twenty-six adults (16 men, 10 women), diagnosed with chronic Achilles tendinopathy, were randomized to 1-wk treatment with ibuprofen (600 mg ×3/day) (n = 13) or placebo (n = 13......) (double-blinded). Ibuprofen content in blood, visual analog scale score for tendon pain at rest and activity, Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores for tendon function, tendon thickness (with ultrasonography), and color Doppler were measured before and 1 h after treatment...

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of a patient storytelling DVD intervention to encourage physician-patient communication about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael J; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Outman, Ryan C; Ray, Midge N; Gary, Lisa C; Chen, Lang; Cobaugh, Daniel J; Allison, Jeroan J; Saag, Kenneth G

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally-sensitive, patient storytelling intervention to enhance physician-patient communication about NSAID risk. A group randomized trial of 40 medical practices in Alabama was conducted. Patients within intervention practices received a 13-minute DVD that included patient stories related to their experiences with NSAIDs, adverse effects, and importance of communication with their physicians. The proportion of patients who: (1) spoke with their physician about NSAID risk; and (2) used both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) NSAIDS were primary outcomes. Generalized estimating equations for panel data were used for analysis. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no significant differences between intervention (n=102) and control (n=106) groups for patients speaking with their physician about NSAID risk or concomitant use of prescription/OTC NSAIDs (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.11, p=0.670; OR=0.87, p=0.632, respectively). For 54% of patients who watched the DVD, per-protocol (PP) analyses trended toward increased odds of patients speaking with their physician about prescription NSAID risk compared to the control group [OR=1.37, p=0.354] and lower odds of concomitant prescription/OTC NSAIDs use [OR=0.79, p=0.486]. A patient storytelling intervention in DVD format alone may not increase patient-physician interaction. Strategies that facilitate use of patient educational materials delivered by DVD are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Moore,1 Charles Pollack,2 Paul Butkerait2 1Department of Pharmacology, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; 2Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, Madison, NJ, USA Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. Keywords: adverse effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal

  3. [Peroral and transdermal application of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the treatment of regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodinka, László; Bálint, Géza; Budai, Erika; Géher, Pál; Papp, Renáta; Somogyi, Péter; Szántó, Sándor; Vereckei, Edit

    2017-12-01

    In this review the available evidences regarding the most frequently applied medication (peroral and transdermal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents) for the most frequent musculoskeletal complaints (regional pain syndromes) have been collected for the appropriate medical professionals who are most frequently faced with these conditions (general practitioners, rheumatologists, orthopedics, occupational and sports medicine experts). The special population at risk (with repeated and high energy overuse because of occupational or sport activities) and the pathology of their syndromes are identified. Mode of action, pharmacological properties of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the unwanted effects of their application especially in infants and elderly are highlighted. Recommendations of the general and specific pain management guidelines have been selected and listed in the review. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(Suppl. 3): 3-30.

  4. Is non‐steroidal anti‐inflammaory drug (NSAID) enteropathy clinically more important than NSAID gastropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, D; Bjarnason, I

    2006-01-01

    The side effects of conventional non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the stomach is undoubtedly a serious public health problem contributing significantly to the morbidity and mortality of patients receiving these drugs. However, the damage of NSAIDs is not confined to the stomach. Indeed the short term and long term damage of NSAIDs on the small bowel (NSAID enteropathy) is more frequent than NSAID gastropathy. Furthermore, NSAID enteropathy is associated with complications (bleeding and protein loss). While many of these are mild, the serious events (significant bleeding, perforation, obstruction, and sudden death) are frequent as that reported for NSAID gastropathy. The diagnosis of NSAID enteropathy has been greatly aided by the introduction of wireless capsule enteroscopy. PMID:16517800

  5. Lansoprazole for secondary prevention of gastric or duodenal ulcers associated with long-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy: results of a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, double-dummy, active-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kentaro; Kontani, Teiji; Katsuo, Shinichi; Takei, Yoshinori; Sakaki, Nobuhiro; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Mizokami, Yuji; Asaka, Masahiro; Matsui, Shigeyuki; Kanto, Tatsuya; Soen, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Hiramatsu, Naoki

    2012-05-01

    Low-dose lansoprazole has not been intensively evaluated for its efficacy in the prevention of recurrent gastric or duodenal ulcers in patients receiving long-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy for pain relief in such diseases as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and low back pain. This multi-center, prospective, double-blind, randomized, active-controlled study involving 99 sites in Japan was designed to compare the efficacy of lansoprazole (15 mg daily) with gefarnate (50 mg twice daily). Patients with a history of gastric or duodenal ulcers who required long-term NSAID therapy were randomized to receive lansoprazole 15 mg daily (n = 185) or gefarnate 50 mg twice daily (n = 181) and followed up for 12 months or longer prospectively. The cumulative incidence of gastric or duodenal ulcer at days 91, 181, and 361 from the start of the study was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method as 3.3, 5.9, and 12.7%, respectively, in the lansoprazole group versus 18.7, 28.5, and 36.9%, respectively, in the gefarnate group. The risk for ulcer development was significantly (log-rank test, P lansoprazole group than in the gefarnate group, with the hazard ratio being 0.2510 (95% CI 0.1400-0.4499). A long-term follow-up study showed an acceptable safety profile for low-dose lansoprazole therapy, with diarrhea as the most frequent adverse event. Lansoprazole was superior to gefarnate in reducing the risk of gastric or duodenal ulcer recurrence in patients with a definite history of gastric or duodenal ulcers who required long-term NSAID therapy.

  6. NSAID-antihypertensive drug interactions: Which outpatients are at risk for a rise in systolic blood pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; De Smet, Peter Agm; Buurma, Henk; Kramers, Cornelis; Tromp, P. Chris; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management guidelines for drug-drug interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives recommend blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive patients. We measured the short-term effect of initiating NSAIDs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) in users of

  7. NSAID-antihypertensive drug interactions: which outpatients are at risk for a rise in systolic blood pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, A.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Buurma, H.; Kramers, C.; Tromp, P.C.; Belitser, S.V.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management guidelines for drug-drug interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives recommend blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive patients. We measured the short-term effect of initiating NSAIDs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) in users of

  8. [Efficiency of famotidin in prophylaxis of NSAIDs-induced gastropathy: result of multicenter research ZASLON-1 (protection of gastric mucosa from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, L B; Drozdov, V N; Kim, V A

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results of the first Russian randomized study of NSAID-gastropaty prevention at patients receiving NSAIDS. Results of clinical and endoscopic monitoring of two groups of patients: 1st - 108 patients with AA or RA treated with diclofenac and famotidin and 2nd--116 patients with AA or RA receiving diclofenac treatment only. It was shown that combined use of diclofenac and famotidin reduces to 2.6 times frequency and significantly reduces severity of painful dyspepsia symptoms and antipain manifestations reduces more than twice frequency of erosive-ulcerous lesions of gastric mucosa and duodenum.

  9. Controlling pain during orthodontic fixed appliance therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID): a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mudit; Kandula, Srinivas; Laxmikanth, Sarala M; Vyavahare, Shreyas S; Reddy, Satheesha B H; Ramachandra, Chanila S

    2014-11-01

    Despite all the technological advances in orthodontics, orthodontic treatment still seems to involve some degree of discomfort and/or pain. Pain control during orthodontic therapy is of great concern to both orthodontists and patients. However, there has been limited research into controlling such pain. The purpose of this work was to assess patient-perceived pain following fixed orthodontic treatment and to evaluate the comparative analgesic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for controlling pain. A total of 45 patients about to undergo fixed appliance orthodontic treatment were enrolled in this double-blind prospective study. Patients were evenly and randomly distributed in a blinded manner to one of three groups as follows: paracetamol/acetaminophen 500 mg thrice daily; placebo in the form of empty capsules; and etoricoxib 60 mg once daily. Drug administration began 1 h before initiating the bonding procedure and archwire placement, and given until the day 3. The pain perceived was recorded by the patients on a linear and graded Visual Analogue Scale at time intervals of 2 h after insertion of the appliance; 6 h thereafter and again at nighttime of the same day of the appointment; 24 h later and on the 2nd day at nighttime; 48 h after the appointment and on day 3 at nighttime. Our results revealed that moderately intense pain is associated with routine orthodontic treatment, and that the amount of pain individuals perceive varies widely. We observed statistically significant differences in the pain control among the three groups, and that etoricoxib 60 mg proved most efficient. Etoricoxib 60 mg is highly efficacious for controlling pain during fixed orthodontic appliance therapy.

  10. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  11. Can Patients with Cardiovascular Disease Take Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Can Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Take Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs? ... It also does not upset the gastrointestinal tract. Can People With CVD Take an NSAID? If you ...

  12. High risk of drug-induced microscopic colitis with concomitant use of NSAIDs and proton pump inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, B P M; de Vries, F; Masclee, A A M; Keshavarzian, A; de Boer, A; Souverein, P C; Pierik, M J; Jonkers, D M A E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microscopic colitis (MC) is a chronic bowel disorder characterised by watery diarrhoea. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and statins have been associated with MC. However, underlying mechanisms

  13. Combining paracetamol (acetaminophen) with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs: a qualitative systematic review of analgesic efficacy for acute postoperative pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, Robin A.; Lirk, Phillip; Merry, Alan F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a trend over recent years for combining a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) with paracetamol (acetaminophen) for pain management. However, therapeutic superiority of the combination of paracetamol and an NSAID over either drug alone remains controversial. We

  14. Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs for Axial Spondyloarthritis: A Cochrane Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Féline P. B.; van der Burg, Lennart R. A.; Ramiro, Sofia; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Falzon, Louise; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2016-01-01

    To determine the benefits and harms of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). Systematic review using Cochrane Collaboration methodology. randomized controlled trials (RCT) and quasi-RCT (to June 2014), investigating NSAID versus any control for axSpA, and

  15. Helicobacter pylori and risk of ulcer bleeding among users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalykke, C; Lauritsen, Jens; Hallas, J

    1999-01-01

    Peptic ulcer complications related to use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most common serious adverse drug reactions. Whether Helicobacter pylori infection potentiates this gastrointestinal toxicity of NSAIDs is still unresolved. In this study, we investigated...... the role of H. pylori as a cause of bleeding peptic ulcer among NSAID users....

  16. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlansky, Barry; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, antipyretic, and antiinflammatory properties, and aspirin is increasingly employed in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and ischemic stroke. Despite undisputed therapeutic efficacy for these indications, all NSAIDs impart a considerable risk of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A growing body of evidence supports an association between non-aspirin NSAIDs and acute coronary syndromes, and an expanding understanding of the gastroduodenal effects of aspirin, COX-2 selective agents, clopidogrel, and Helicobacter pylori synergism fuel controversies in NSAID use. In this review, we discuss risk stratification of patients taking NSAIDs and the appropriate application of proven gastro-protective strategies to decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal hemorrhage based upon an individualized assessment of risk for potential toxicities. Prevention of NSAID-related gastropathy is an important clinical issue, and therapeutic strategies for both the primary and secondary prevention of adverse events are continually evolving.

  17. Prescribing of gastroprotective drugs among elderly NSAID users in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, KN; ter Huurne, K; de Vries, CS; van den Berg, PB; Brouwers, JRBJ; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Background: Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity, in particular when risk factors are present. Methods: A study was performed to investigate concomitant prescribing of gastroprotective agents (H(2)-receptor

  18. Lansoprazole protects and heals gastric mucosa from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy by inhibiting mitochondrial as well as Fas-mediated death pathways with concurrent induction of mucosal cell renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Pallab; Bindu, Samik; Choubey, Vinay; Alam, Athar; Mitra, Kalyan; Goyal, Manish; Dey, Sumanta; Guha, Mithu; Pal, Chinmay; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2008-05-23

    We have investigated the mechanism of antiapoptotic and cell renewal effects of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, to protect and heal gastric mucosal injury in vivo induced by indomethacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced gastric damage by blocking activation of mitochondrial and Fas pathways of apoptosis. Lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic Bax and Bak and down-regulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl(xL) to maintain the normal proapoptotic/antiapoptotic ratio and thereby arrests indomethacin-induced mitochondrial translocation of Bax and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential followed by cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Lansoprazole also inhibits indomethacin-induced Fas-mediated mucosal cell death by down-regulating Fas or FasL expression and inhibiting caspase-8 activation. Lansoprazole favors mucosal cell renewal simultaneously by stimulating gene expression of prosurvival proliferating cell nuclear antigen, survivin, epidermal growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. The up-regulation of Flt-1 further indicates that lansoprazole activates vascular epidermal growth factor-mediated controlled angiogenesis to repair gastric mucosa. Lansoprazole also stimulates the healing of already formed ulcers induced by indomethacin. Time course study of healing indicates that it switches off the mitochondrial death pathway completely but not the Fas pathway. However, lansoprazole heals mucosal lesions almost completely after overcoming the persisting Fas pathway, probably by favoring the prosurvival genes expression. This study thus provides the detailed mechanism of antiapoptotic and prosurvival effects of lansoprazole for offering gastroprotection against indomethacin-induced gastropathy.

  19. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Peptic Ulcers in Patients Receiving Antithrombotic/Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Ochiai, Toshiaki; Komori, Keishi; Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Munehiro; Nakamura, Norimoto; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Kakigao, Kana; Ogino, Haruei; Ihara, Eikichi; Akiho, Hirotada; Motomura, Yasuaki; Kabemura, Teppei; Harada, Naohiko

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Antithrombotic/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapies increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The features of hemorrhagic peptic ulcer disease in patients receiving antithrombotic/NSAID therapies were investigated. Methods We investigated the medical records of 485 consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and were diagnosed with hemorrhagic gastroduodenal ulcers. The patients treated with antithrombotic agents/NSAIDs were c...

  20. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ulcer complications: a risk factor analysis for clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J M; Hallas, J; Lauritsen, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is recognized as an important cause of peptic ulcer complications. The aim of this nested case-control study was to identify risk factors for NSAID-related ulcer complications.......Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is recognized as an important cause of peptic ulcer complications. The aim of this nested case-control study was to identify risk factors for NSAID-related ulcer complications....

  1. NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. Individuals should consult a qualified health care provider for professional medical advice, diagnosis and treatment of a medical ...

  2. Novel NSAID-Derived Drugs for the Potential Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Cacciatore

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been suggested for the potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Prolonged use of NSAIDs, however, produces gastrointestinal (GI toxicity. To overcome this serious limitation, the aim of this study was to develop novel NSAID-derived drug conjugates (Anti-inflammatory-Lipoyl derivatives, AL4–9 that preserve the beneficial effects of NSAIDS without causing GI problems. As such, we conjugated selected well-known NSAIDs, such as (S-naproxen and (R-flurbiprofen, with (R-α-lipoic acid (LA through alkylene diamine linkers. The selection of the antioxidant LA was based on the proposed role of oxidative stress in the development and/or progression of AD. Our exploratory studies revealed that AL7 containing the diaminoethylene linker between (R-flurbiprofen and LA had the most favorable chemical and in vitro enzymatic stability profiles among the synthesized compounds. Upon pretreatment, this compound exhibited excellent antioxidant activity in phorbol 12-miristate 13-acetate (PMA-stimulated U937 cells (lymphoblast lung from human and Aβ(25–35-treated THP-1 cells (leukemic monocytes. Furthermore, AL7 also modulated the expression of COX-2, IL-1β and TNF-α in these cell lines, suggesting anti-inflammatory activity. Taken together, AL7 has emerged as a potential lead worthy of further characterization and testing in suitable in vivo models of AD.

  3. Endoscopical appearances of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drug (NSAID- enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcellus Simadibrata

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAID have been associated with a sudden and sustained rise in the incidence of gastrointestinal ulcer complications. The aim of the study was to reveal the endoscopical abnormalities found in the duodenum & proximal jejunum due to NSAID. Thirty eight patients taking NSAID for their arthritis or rheumatism were included in this study. Gastro-duodeno-jejunoscopy was done with Olympus PCF-10. The endoscopical appearances of NSAID entero gastropathy were evaluated with a scoring system. The NSAID-entero-gastropathy appearances were endoscopically seen as hyperemia, erosion and ulcer. From all patient recruited, 7.9% complaint of diarrhea and 71.1% complaint of dyspepsia. Endoscopically, in the duodenal bulb we found 79% cases of hyperemia, 39.5% cases of erosion and 7.9% cases of ulcer. In the second part (descending part of the duodenum we found 28.9% cases of hyperemia, 15.8% cases of erosion and 2.6% case of ulcer. In the jejunum, we found 7.9% cases of hyperemia, 2.6% case of erosion and no ulcer. It is concluded that the most frequent abnormal endoscopical appearances in NSAID- enteropathy was hyperemia. The most frequent site of NSAID-enteropathy abnormal findings was in the duodenal bulb. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 225-9Keywords: NSAID-enteropathy, endoscopical appearances.

  4. The prevention of gastropathy and upper abdominal symptoms caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish

    2006-01-01

    The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is increasing, primarily due to arthritis in the aging population. This article reviews current data on the risk of gastrointestinal complications related to NSAIDs and strategies to manage risk in patients taking these agents. Risks of NSAID use include gastrointestinal ulceration, hemorrhage, or perforation; renal dysfunction; death; and dyspepsia. Alternate therapies include use of non-NSAID analgesics; low-dose NSAIDs; and concurrent administration of cytoprotective agents with NSAIDs, acid inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors, and COX-2 agents.

  5. Coprescribing proton-pump inhibitors with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: risks versus benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwee, Kok Ann; Goh, Vernadine; Lima, Graca; Setia, Sajita

    2018-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often coadministered with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) to reduce NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events. This coadministration is generally regarded as safe, and is included in many of the guidelines on NSAID prescription. However, recent evidence indicates that the GI risks associated with NSAIDs can be potentiated when they are combined with PPIs. This review discusses the GI effects and complications of NSAIDs and how PPIs may potentiate these effects, options for prevention of GI side effects, and appropriate use of PPIs in combination with NSAIDs.

  6. Possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory interactions of aspartame with opioids and NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sameer; Jain, N K; Kulkarni, S K

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of aspartame, an artificial sweetner and its combination with various opioids and NSAIDs for a possible synergistic response. The oral administration of aspartame (2-16mg/kg, po) significantly increased the pain threshold against acetic acid-induced writhes in mice. Co-administration of aspartame (2mg/kg, po) with nimesulide (2 mg/kg, po) and naproxen (5 mg/kg, po) significantly reduced acetic acid-induced writhes as compared to effects per se of individual drugs. Similarly when morphine (1 mg/kg, po) or pentazocine (1 mg/kg, po) was co-administered with aspartame it reduced the number of writhes as compared to their effects per se. Aspartame (4,8,16 mg/kg, po) significantly decreased carrageenan-induced increase in paw volume and also reversed the hyperalgesic effects in rats in combination with nimesulide (2 mg/kg, po). The study indicated that aspartame exerted analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects on its own and have a synergistic analgesic response with conventional analgesics of opioid and non-opioid type, respectively.

  7. UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT HEMORRHAGE AND NONSTEROIDALANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS (NSAIDs – A 5-YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are a common cause of digestive tract hemorrhage.Study aims. The purpose of the study was to ascertain the percent of patients taking NSAIDs with upper digestive tract hemorrhage.Type of study. Prospective, analytical.Patients and methods. The study includes patients in which urgent endoscopic investigations of the upper digestive tract were carried out due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1998.Results. 3366 patients were investigated: 1222 women and 2144 men; the average age of our patients was 57.5 years (SD ± 17.1, a 2–97 year span. In 2905 patients (86.3% the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Among our patients 55% were aged over 60 years, 26.7% were older than 80 years. Sequelae of peptic ulcer disease were the most significant cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage, in 47.7% of our patients (1387/2905. In the last week prior to bleeding, 19% of patients (552/2905 were taking regularly NSAIDs, corticosteroids, salycilates or anticoagulant therapy at least in single daily dose. The majority of patients, 94.5%, were taking NSAIDs or salycilates. Among NSAIDs they were taking most often ketoprofen, diclofenac or naproxen/ naproxen natrium, less often ibuprofen, nabumeton, etodolac or piroxicam.Conclusions. Upper digestive tract hemorrhage is a serious complication of NSAIDs medication, particularly in older patients

  8. Recent considerations in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G

    1998-07-27

    Conservative calculations estimate that approximately 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) complications and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each year among arthritis patients alone. The figures for all NSAID users would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally under-appreciated. The Arthritis, Rheumatism, and Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) Post-Marketing Surveillance Program (PMS) has prospectively followed patient status and outcomes, drug side effects, and the economic impact of illness for >11,000 arthritis patients at 8 participating institutions in the United States and Canada. Analysis of these data indicates that: (1) osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are 2.5-5.5 times more likely than the general population to be hospitalized for NSAID-related GI events; (2) the absolute risk for serious NSAID-related GI toxicity remains constant and the cumulative risk increases over time; (3) there are no reliable warning signals- >80% of patients with serious GI complications had no prior GI symptoms; (4) independent risk factors for serious GI events were age, prednisone use, NSAID dose, disability level, and previous NSAID-induced GI symptoms; and (5) antacids and H2 antagonists do not prevent NSAID-induced gastric ulcers, and high-risk NSAID users who take gastro-protective drugs are more likely to have serious GI complications than patients not taking such medications. Currently, limiting NSAID use is the only way to decrease the risk of NSAID-related GI events. Ongoing ARAMIS research is aimed at developing a simple point-score system for estimating individual risks of developing serious NSAID-related GI complications.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Gastroenteropathy Asssociated to Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Ilone

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is a group of drugs used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. High consumption of NSAIDs associated with high gastrointestinal side effects. Common complaint from patients, which ranging from mild heartburn to the onset of gastrointestinal bleeding, often complicates the adequate administration of NSAIDs. Various methods have been developed to reduce the likelihood of gastroenteropathy complication. Early diagnosis, appropriate prompt treatment, as well as adequate monitoring will reduce morbidity and mortality from complications due to NSAIDs. This paper will discuss the diagnosis and management of gastro-enteropathy NSAID through approaching the underlying pathophysiology.

  10. Postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection.......To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection....

  11. Novel delivery systems with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijić Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with increased risk of serious gastrointestinal side effects. Therefore, recent trends in the development of NSAIDs aim to reduce the incidence of side effects, and improve patient compliance. One of the strategies to improve efficacy and safety of oral NSAIDs is the development of combination products that contain gastroprotective agents. Several products containing NSAID in combination with proton pump inhibitors (ketoprofen/omeprazole, naproxen/esomeprazole, H2-receptor antagonists (ibuprofen/famotidine, and prostaglandin analogues (diclofenac/misoprostol are currently available on the market. Another approach refer to the special formulation design to allow dose reduction while preserving drug therapeutic efficacy. An example is SoluMatrix® technology, a manufacturing process that produce submicron-sized drug particles with enhanced dissolution and absorption properties. Patented SoluMatrix® technology has been successfully employed to develop low-dose diclofenac, meloxicam, indomethacin and naproxen products. Topical NSAID formulations enable drug delivery to target tissues, while reducing systemic exposure and concomitant side effects associated with oral NSAIDs. Dermal/transdermal NSAID delivery systems are subject of intensive investigation. So far, several 'advanced' drug delivery systems with diclofenac, ibuprofen and ketoprofen have been designed.

  12. NSAID complications, the balance of risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to promote safe pharmacotherapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs are among the world’s most prescribed drugs, being used on a daily basis by millions of people for effective relief of pain, fever and inflammation. However, NSAID treatment is

  13. Coming to terms with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sanford H

    2012-05-07

    Despite well known complications, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain the most commonly prescribed medications in the US for musculoskeletal disorders such as osteoarthritis. Although there has been a recent focus on the cardiovascular and renal complications associated with these agents, NSAID gastropathy continues to be a particular concern in many patients, especially those at increased risk for serious adverse events, including the elderly. Complicating the diagnosis of NSAID gastropathy is its silent course, which, up to half of the time, is asymptomatic. Several strategies are currently employed by physicians to mitigate the risk of serious gastrointestinal events. These include either addition of a proton pump inhibitor to current nonselective NSAID therapy or the use of a cyclo-oxygenase-2-selective NSAID. Although these agents are effective at mitigating the overall risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, they fail to address NSAID-related cardiovascular and renal risks. Due to their reduced systemic absorption, topical NSAIDs may present a viable option for patients at increased risk for serious NSAID-related adverse events, including gastropathy.

  14. Safety of Etoricoxib, Celecoxib, and Nonselective Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs in Ankylosing Spondylitis and Other Spondyloarthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L E; Jakobsen, A K; Askling, J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Safety data regarding the use of etoricoxib and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients are rather limited. Our objective was to estimate and compare rates of gastrointestinal, renovascular, and cardio......OBJECTIVE: Safety data regarding the use of etoricoxib and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients are rather limited. Our objective was to estimate and compare rates of gastrointestinal, renovascular...

  15. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth SH

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sanford H RothArizona Research and Education, Arthritis Laboratory, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis.Keywords: NSAIDs, osteoarthritis, topical administration, synovial fluid, peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori

  16. Assessment Of Pattern Of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used in the treatment of pains. Self-medication is a common practice all over the world. Unwanted effects from use of this class of medication could pose health challenges. This study evaluated the prevalence and pattern of inappropriate use of NSAIDs among ...

  17. Effects of dietary anticarcinogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on rat gastrointestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logt, E.M.J. van der; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Lieshout, E.M.M. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary compounds or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce cancer rates. Elevation of phase II detoxification enzymes might be one of the mechanisms leading to cancer prevention. We investigated the effects of dietary anticarcinogens and NSAIDs on rat gastrointestinal

  18. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T.M. Enthoven (Wendy); P.D.D.M. Roelofs (Pepijn); R.A. Deyo (Richard); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic back pain is an important health problem. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat people with low back pain, especially people with acute back pain. Short term NSAID use is also recommended for pain relief in people with chronic back

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, Sara; Di Nisio, Marcello; Gerdes, Victor; Porreca, Ettore; Souverein, Patrick; de Boer, Anthonius; Büller, Harry; Kamphuisen, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis, but their effect on venous thrombotic events is less well established. The study aimed to assess the risk of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients using NSAIDs and to evaluate

  20. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk for Alzheimer's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K; Launer, L J; Ott, A

    1995-01-01

    Based on reports that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the cross-sectional relation between NSAID use and the risk for AD in a population-based study of disease and disability in older people. After controlling...

  1. Knowledge and perceptions of the risks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among orthopaedic patients in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Phueanpinit, Pacharaporn; Pongwecharak, Juraporn; Krska, Janet; Jarernsiripornkul, Narumol

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a high incidence of adverse effects from non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Thailand, but patients’ perceptions and knowledge of NSAID risks is unknown. Objective This study aims to assess patients’ perceptions and knowledge of NSAID risks and factors affecting them. Setting University hospital in North-East of Thailand. Method A Cross-sectional study conducted over 4 months, using a self-administered questionnaire. Patients prescribed NSAIDs for at least one...

  2. Lung abscess complicating pneumococcal pneumonia: a causal role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    Gibelin, Aude; de Prost, Nicolas; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary abscess is a distinctly uncommon complication of pneumococcal pneumonia in immunocompetent adults that has recently been reported to occur following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We report herein the case of a 24-year-old patient with no predisposing risk factor who developed a lung abscess after NSAIDs exposure, further illustrating this potentially severe complication of NSAIDs use, especially in the absence of associated antibiotic therapy.

  3. Lung abscess complicating pneumococcal pneumonia: a causal role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelin, Aude; de Prost, Nicolas; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2013-08-20

    Pulmonary abscess is a distinctly uncommon complication of pneumococcal pneumonia in immunocompetent adults that has recently been reported to occur following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We report herein the case of a 24-year-old patient with no predisposing risk factor who developed a lung abscess after NSAIDs exposure, further illustrating this potentially severe complication of NSAIDs use, especially in the absence of associated antibiotic therapy.

  4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heleniak, Zbigniew; Cieplińska, Magdalena; Szychliński, Tomasz; Rychter, Dymitr; Jagodzińska, Kalina; Kłos, Alicja; Kuźmiuk, Izabela; Tylicka, Marzena Jakimowicz; Tylicki, Leszek; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Aims Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of pain management. There are no detailed data on NSAIDs use in Poland, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of NSAIDs use as well as knowledge of their side-effects in patients with CKD. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in 972 individuals with CKD, enrolled in a written survey originally developed by the auth...

  5. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...

  6. Hemostimulating efficiency of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs under modified irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhvoronkov, L.P.; Sklobovskaya, I.Eh.

    1988-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were found to have hemostimulating effect in mice after irradiation. This effect was rather definite under irradiation conditions modified by dose fractioning or radioprotective chemicals. NSAID application during fractionated irradiation with midlethal integral dose leads to almost complete recovery of bone marrow hemopoiesis by the 9th day of radiation illness. NSAID usage combined with chemical radioprotectors provides effective hemopoiesis stimulation leading to survival increase in animals, irradiated with absolutely lethal doses. (author)

  7. Underutilization of preventive strategies in patients receiving NSAIDs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); T.A. Burke; J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); M.J. Tangelder; F. Lee; J.L. Goldstein

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Multiple treatment guidelines for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suggest that patients with one or more risk factors for NSAID-associated upper gastrointestinal (UGI) ulcer complications should be prescribed preventive strategies such as

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that anti-inflammatory drugs, especially the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their beneficial effects may be due to interference in the chronic inflammatory reaction, that takes place in AD.

  9. Coprescribing proton-pump inhibitors with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: risks versus benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwee KA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kok Ann Gwee,1 Vernadine Goh,2 Graca Lima,3 Sajita Setia4 1Stomach, Liver, and Bowel Centre, Gleneagles Hospital, 2Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 3Global Medical Affairs, Asia-Pacific Region, Pfizer, Hong Kong; 4Medical Affairs, Pfizer, Singapore Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are often coadministered with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs to reduce NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI adverse events. This coadministration is generally regarded as safe, and is included in many of the guidelines on NSAID prescription. However, recent evidence indicates that the GI risks associated with NSAIDs can be potentiated when they are combined with PPIs. This review discusses the GI effects and complications of NSAIDs and how PPIs may potentiate these effects, options for prevention of GI side effects, and appropriate use of PPIs in combination with NSAIDs. Keywords: PPIs, COX2 inhibitors, NSAIDs, enteropathy, gastrointestinal

  10. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sanford H

    2011-01-01

    Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less frequent. These complications can be life-threatening in at-risk populations such as older adults, who are common users of long-term oral systemic NSAID therapy. Topical NSAID formulations deliver effective doses of analgesics directly to the affected joints, thereby limiting systemic exposure and potentially the risk of systemic adverse events, such as gastropathy and serious cardiovascular events. There are currently two topical NSAIDs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for osteoarthritis-associated pain, as well as for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis. This review discusses the relative safety, and the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risks of chronic oral or systemic NSAID therapy and topical NSAID formulations in patients with osteoarthritis.

  11. [Reversible infertility from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomsvoll, Johan Fredrik; Rødevand, Erik; Koksvik, Hege Svean; Salvesen, Kjell Asmund; von Düring, Vidar; Rygnestad, Tarjei; Østensen, Monika

    2005-06-02

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may interfere with ovulation and the rupture of the follicle, causing reversible infertility. Literature review. Reversible infertility is shown both in animal and human studies of these drugs. As determined by ultrasound, the drugs may delay or inhibit ovulation. These findings are also confirmed by a few randomized controlled studies showing an increase in time from the luteinizing hormone surge to rupture of the follicle and an increased size of the unruptured follicle. Most of the hormone analyses show values in accordance with the ovulation/menstrual cycle. Also, two epidemiological studies have shown an association between NSAID use and spontaneous abortion. These studies have methodological weaknesses and their findings have to be elucidated in future studies. Women with fertility problems should avoid not only the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but also the traditional NSAIDs. However, women with rheumatic disease responding well to therapy should consult their physicians before stopping treatment. Reduced dose of a NSAID and temporary stop of drug treatment early in the menstrual cycle, or alternative drug treatment, may be a solution. NSAIDs should not be used in the last eight weeks of pregnancy.

  12. Acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resulting from direct toxicity on the bowel mucosa, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID-induced colitis is an underestimated although potentially serious condition. Plain abdominal radiographs and multidetector computed tomography allow to identify a right-sided acute colitis with associated pericolonic inflammation, progressively diminished changes along the descending and sigmoid colon, and rectal sparing, consistent with the hypothesized pathogenesis of NSAID colitis. Increased awareness of this condition should reduce morbidity through both prevention and early recognition. High clinical suspicion and appropriate patient questioning, together with consistent instrumental findings, negative biochemistry, and stool investigations should help physicians not to miss this important diagnosis.

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis for joint pain treatment in patients with osteoarthritis treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS: Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs vs. cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejía-Aranguré Juan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the main causes of disability worldwide, especially in persons >55 years of age. Currently, controversy remains about the best therapeutic alternative for this disease when evaluated from a cost-effectiveness viewpoint. For Social Security Institutions in developing countries, it is very important to assess what drugs may decrease the subsequent use of medical care resources, considering their adverse events that are known to have a significant increase in medical care costs of patients with OA. Three treatment alternatives were compared: celecoxib (200 mg twice daily, non-selective NSAIDs (naproxen, 500 mg twice daily; diclofenac, 100 mg twice daily; and piroxicam, 20 mg/day and acetaminophen, 1000 mg twice daily. The aim of this study was to identify the most cost-effective first-choice pharmacological treatment for the control of joint pain secondary to OA in patients treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS. Methods A cost-effectiveness assessment was carried out. A systematic review of the literature was performed to obtain transition probabilities. In order to evaluate analysis robustness, one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Estimations were done for a 6-month period. Results Treatment demonstrating the best cost-effectiveness results [lowest cost-effectiveness ratio $17.5 pesos/patient ($1.75 USD] was celecoxib. According to the one-way sensitivity analysis, celecoxib would need to markedly decrease its effectiveness in order for it to not be the optimal treatment option. In the probabilistic analysis, both in the construction of the acceptability curves and in the estimation of net economic benefits, the most cost-effective option was celecoxib. Conclusion From a Mexican institutional perspective and probably in other Social Security Institutions in similar developing countries, the most cost-effective option for treatment of knee and/or hip OA

  14. Role of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Livshits

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in obstetrics, gynecology and infertility. These medications are commonly used in different fields of reproductive medicine, for pain management after operative procedures and to relieve dysmenorrhea. In addition to their analgesic effect, NSAIDs are helpful in the management of menorrhagia by decreasing menstrual blood loss. NSAIDs alleviate pain associated with medical abortion, assist in undertaking natural cycle in-vitro fertilization by preventing follicular rupture and reducing premature ovulation, and serve as tocolytics in preterm labor. New NSAIDs may have a growing role in management of women's health.

  15. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  16. Exercise and NSAIDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Susanne Germann; Miller, Ben F; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine muscle and tendon protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR) at rest and after a one-legged kicking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) receiving either placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).......The purpose of this study was to determine muscle and tendon protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR) at rest and after a one-legged kicking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) receiving either placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)....

  17. [Cyclooxygenase inhibitors and antiplatelet effect of acetylsalicylic acid. selective approach to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cardiological practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakin, N V; Gruzdev, A K

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent class of medicines which is wide concerning chemical structure and mechanism of action. In the light of contradictory data on efficacy and safety of NSAID in cardiovascular patients selection of most appropriate NSAID (basing on profile of efficacy and safety) in patients receiving continuous therapy with low dose aspirin appears to be a problem. In this paper we discuss peculiarities of drug interaction between cyclooxygenase inhibitors and acetylsalicylic acid, and principles of selection of adequate NSAI.

  18. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.; Miller, R. Eric; Fowler, Murray E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  19. Inhibition of amyloidogenesis by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their hybrid nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Isaac T.; Abdul-Hay, Samer; Wang, Huali; Vanni, Michael; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor blood-brain barrier penetration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been blamed for the failure of the selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) R-flurbiprofen in phase 3 clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). NO-donor NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs) provide an alternative, gastric-sparing approach to NSAID SALAs, which may improve bioavailability. NSAID analogs were studied for anti-inflammatory activity and for SALA activity in N2a neuronal cells transfected with human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Flurbiprofen (1) analogs were obtained with enhanced anti-inflammatory and anti-amyloidogenic properties compared to 1, however, esterification led to elevated Aβ1–42 levels. Hybrid nitrate prodrugs possessed superior anti-inflammatory activity and reduced toxicity relative to the parent NSAIDs, including clinical candidate, CHF5074. Although hybrid nitrates elevated Aβ1–42 at higher concentration, SALA activity was observed at low concentrations (≤ 1 µM): both Aβ1–42 and the ratio of Aβ1–42/Aβ1–40 were lowered. This biphasic SALA activity was attributed to the intact nitrate drug. For several compounds the selective modulation of amyloidogenesis was tested using an immunoprecipitation MALDI-TOF approach. These data support the development of NO-NSAIDs as an alternative approach towards a clinically useful SALA. PMID:21405086

  20. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug gastropathy: new avenues for safety

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Sandford

    2011-01-01

    Sanford H RothArizona Research and Education, Arthritis Laboratory, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Chronic oral or systemic nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy, ubiquitously used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis-associated pain, is associated with a wide range of symptomatic adverse events, the most frequent and serious of which is gastropathy. Although cardiovascular and renal problems are a very real concern, they are significantly less...

  1. Neostigmine interactions with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Sierralta, Fernando; Pinardi, Gianni

    2002-04-01

    1. The common mechanism of action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is the inhibition of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase (COX), however, this inhibition is not enough to completely account for the efficacy of these agents in several models of acute pain. 2. It has been demonstrated that cholinergic agents can induce antinociception, but the nature of the interaction between these agents and NSAIDs drugs has not been studied. The present work evaluates, by isobolographic analysis, the interactions between the cholinergic indirect agonist neostigmine (NEO) and NSAIDs drugs, using a chemical algesiometric test. 3. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration of NEO and of the different NSAIDs produced dose-dependent antinociception in the acetic acid writhing test of the mouse. 4. The i.p. or i.t. co-administration of fixed ratios of ED(50) fractions of NSAIDs and NEO, resulted to be synergistic or supra-additive for the combinations ketoprofen (KETO) and NEO, paracetamol (PARA) and NEO) and diclofenac (DICLO) and NEO administered i.p. However, the same combinations administered i.t. were only additive. In addition, the combinations meloxicam (MELO) and NEO and piroxicam (PIRO) and NEO, administered either i.p. or i.t., were additive. 5. The results suggest that the co-administration of NEO with some NSAIDs (e.g. KETO, PARA or DICLO) resulted in a synergistic interaction, which may provide evidence of supraspinal antinociception modulation by the increased acetylcholine concentration in the synaptic cleft of cholinergic interneurons. The interaction obtained between neostigmine and the NSAIDs could carry important clinical implications.

  2. Evolving guidelines in the use of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaceda, Casilda M

    2014-01-21

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a standard treatment for osteoarthritis (OA), but the use of oral NSAIDs has been linked to an elevated risk for cardiovascular and gastrointestinal adverse events and renal toxicity. Topical NSAIDs are thought to afford efficacy that is comparable to oral formulations while reducing widespread systemic drug exposure, which may provide a benefit in terms of safety and tolerability. As a result, European treatment guidelines have, for many years, recommended the use of topical NSAIDs as a safe and effective treatment option for OA. Following the recent approval of several topical NSAID formulations by the US Food and Drug Administration, US treatment guidelines are increasingly recommending the use of topical NSAIDs as an alternative therapy and, in some cases, as a first-line option for OA. This commentary summarizes OA treatment guidelines that are currently available and discusses their potential evolution with regard to the increased inclusion of topical NSAIDs.

  3. Pregnant women and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: Knowledge, perception and drug consumption pattern during pregnancy in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Chalelgn Kassaw; Nasir Tajure Wabe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the widely used drugs and are often used by pregnant women. However, they can have significant teratogenic effects. The aim of the study was to investigate pregnant women′s knowledge about NSAIDs use during pregnancy and their perception and consumption pattern. Materials and Methods: The study was a cross sectional study on women waiting for a consultation in the selected maternity hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The pr...

  4. Anti-metastatic Action of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chun Hung

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence and mortality of several types of human cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their chemopreventive and anticancer effects are not fully understood. Cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1 and COX-2 are the main targets for NSAIDs. Recent studies demonstrate that COX-2 is overexpressed in many human cancers and may promote tumorigenesis via: (1 stimulation of cancer cell proliferation; (2 increase of tumor angiogenesis; (3 prevention of cancer cell apoptosis; (4 modulation of immunoregulatory reactions; and (5 enhancement of tumor metastasis. NSAIDs may target the signaling molecules (from upstream activators to downstream effectors involved in these mechanisms to attenuate the development and progression of cancer. In this review, we discuss the recent findings with regard to the mechanisms by which NSAIDs inhibit tumorigenesis and will specifically focus on the elucidation of NSAID-induced inhibition of tumor metastasis.

  5. Prescription Pattern Analysis of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Northeastern Iranian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali, Majid; Tabeshpour, Jamshid; Maziar, Seyed Vahid; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sent, Danielle; Azarkhiavi, Kamal Razavi; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) therapy is a common cause of actual and potential adverse effects, such as bleeding and gastrointestinal ulceration, which exacerbates the patient's medical condition and might even be life threatening. We aimed to evaluate and analyze the prescription pattern of NSAIDs in Northeastern Iranian population and also provide suggestions for a more rational prescription behavior for such drugs. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, pattern of 1-year prescriptions was inspected based on 9.3 million prescriptions from two insurance companies. Type of NSAIDs, all dispensed doses and the number of NSAIDs ordered per prescription, and the route of administration for each patient were extracted from the databases. The prescription pattern of NSAIDs was analyzed seasonally. Out of 9,303,585 prescriptions, 19.3% contained at least one NSAID. Diclofenac was the most commonly prescribed NSAID (49.21%). At least two NSAIDs were simultaneously prescribed in 7% of prescriptions. General practitioners prescribed NSAIDs more frequently (67%) than specialists. Orthopedic surgeons and internists more frequently prescribed NSAIDs in comparison with other physicians (6% and 4%, respectively). Gastroprotective agents (GPAs) were coprescribed to only 7.62% of prescriptions. The frequency of NSAIDs prescription was relatively high in Northeast of Iran. A significant number of prescriptions were associated with irrational prescribing in both coadministration of NSAIDs and GPAs and NSAIDs combination. A strategy must be developed and implemented for prescribing and rational use of medications, e.g., continuing medical education regarding the potential risks of NSAIDs, importance of their appropriate and rational use, and necessity of appropriate prescription writing regarding both content and indication.

  6. Randomized trial of switching from prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to prescribed celecoxib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Thomas M; Hawkey, Chris J; Ford, Ian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and conventional non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) effects. We compared the CV safety of switching to celecoxib vs. continuing nsNSAID therapy in a European setting...

  7. Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of colorectal cancer: A Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren; Poulsen, Aslak H; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2009-01-01

    The optimal duration and dose of aspirin and non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the potential prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been established. We examined this issue in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Self-reported NSAID use at entry (January...... a protective effect against CRC. Further studies of the effective dose of aspirin and the potential interaction between NSAID use and BMI are warranted....

  8. [Adherence with proton pump inhibitor therapy, by continuously taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimanov, S I; Makarenko, E V; Dikareva, E A

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the impact of adherence with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy on the incidence of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy (NSAID gastropathy) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PPI pharmacotherapy adherence was estimated using the Medication Adherence Questionnaire (MAQ) in 92 patients with RA, including 32 patients did not take a PPI and 60 used a PPI. The groups were matched for age, disease duration, and used NSAIDs. All those asked underwent video esophagogastroduodenoscopy. According to the data of MAQ survey, low, moderate, and high adherence subgroups could be identified among the patients treated with a PPI. NSAID gastropathy was detected in 43.8% of the patients taking no PPI, in 50% of those with low PPI treatment adherence, in 12.5% with moderate adherence, and in 4.5% with high adherence. In the patients with low adherence to PPI therapy, NSAID gastropathy was recorded 11 times more frequently than in those with high adherence (c2 = 7.77; p = 0.005). This condition occurred in 28.6% of the patients taking NSAID without preventively using a PPI in the absence of risk factors for NSAID gastropathy. Only 36.7% patients who had been recommended to use a PPI for the prevention of NSAID gastropathy strictly observed their doctor's directions. Low PPI pharmacotherapy adherence may serve as an additional risk factor for NSAID gastropathy in patients in whom preventive antisecretory therapy used in combination with NSAID is indicated.

  9. NSAID Use after Bariatric Surgery : a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; Gertsen, Sanneke; Flapper, Gerbrich; Emous, Marloes; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be avoided in bariatric surgery patients. If use of an NSAID is inevitable, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) should also be used. Aim To determine the effect of an, compared to care-as-usual, additional intervention to reduce NSAID

  10. Consumption and awareness of students about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wawryk-Gawda Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are used by millions of people worldwide to neutralize pain that is of different origin, as well as to treat fever and inflammation. However, NSAIDs misuse/overuse can induce many adverse effects and some potentially serious complications. The aim of the our study was to ascertain young people’s knowledge about non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The research tool was a questionnaire. This study was carried out among students of the Medical University in Lublin, and it involved 236 persons of an average age of 20 years. The questions were intended to assess the frequency of NSAIDs use and the general knowledge that is held with respect to them. The results of this work show that more than 77% of the respondents confirmed that they use NSAIDs. Our results revealed no statistical correlation between the place of living or origin and the use of this drug. Hence, it can be said that while young adults quite often use NSAIDs, their knowledge about the dangers associated with the use of NSAIDs is low. Therefore, it is necessary to more intensively disseminate knowledge on the potential adverse effects of NSAID utilization.

  11. [Meloxicam: the golden mean of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karateev, A E

    2014-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are most commonly used to treat acute and chronic pain in locomotor system (LMS) diseases. However, their administration may be accompanied by the development of dangerous complications as organic and functional disorders of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Physicians have currently a wide range of NSAIDs at their disposal; but none of the representatives of this group can be considered the best. Thus, highly selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (Coxibs) are substantially safer for GIT; however, their use is clearly associated with the increased risk of severe cardiovascular events. Nonselective NSAIDs, such as naproxen or ketoprofen, are safer for CVS, but more frequently cause significant GIT organic and functional disorders. Moderately selective NSAIDs, such as meloxicam (movalis), conceivably could be the most acceptable choice for treating the majority of patients in this situation. This drug has been long and extensively used in global clinical practice and has gained the confidence of physicians and patients. The major benefits of meloxicam are its proven efficacy, convenient treatment regimen, relatively low risk of complications as organic and functional disorders of the GIT and CVD and good compatibility with low-dose aspirin.

  12. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Sciatica: An Updated Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus J A; Roelofs, Pepijn D D M; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2017-04-15

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. To determine the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported adverse effects in people with sciatica. NSAIDs are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for sciatica. We updated a 2008 Cochrane Review through June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that compared NSAIDs with placebo, with other NSAIDs, or with other medication were included. Outcomes included pain using mean difference (MD, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI]). For global improvement and adverse effects risk ratios (RR, 95% CI) were used. We assessed level of evidence using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Ten trials were included (N = 1651). Nine out of 10 trials were assessed at high risk of bias. For pain reduction (visual analog scale, 0 to 100) NSAIDs were no more effective than placebo (MD -4.56, 95% CI -11.11 to 1.99, quality of evidence: very low). For global improvement NSAIDs were more effective than placebo (RR 1.14 [95% CI 1.03 to 1.27], low quality of evidence). One trial reported the effect of NSAIDs on disability with very low-quality evidence that NSAIDs are no more effective than placebo. There was low-quality evidence that the risk for adverse effects is higher for NSAID than placebo (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.93). Our findings show very low-quality evidence that the efficacy of NSAIDs for pain reduction is comparable with that of placebo, low-quality evidence that NSAIDs is better than placebo for global improvement and low-quality evidence for higher risk of adverse effects using NSAIDs compared with placebo. The findings must be interpreted with caution, due to small study samples, inconsistent results, and a high risk of bias in the included trials. 1.

  13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and breast cancer risk in a European prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairat, Manon; Fournier, Agnès; Murphy, Neil

    2018-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown a protective effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on breast cancer development. However, results from epidemiological cohort studies are less consistent. Our objective was to assess the association between NSAID use and breast cancer risk within...... effect modification of MHT use on the association between use of NSAIDs and breast cancer risk which deserves in-depth investigation in studies with accurate data on both NSAID and MHT use. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1992 in 10 European countries. Self-reported information on NSAID use at baseline has been collected in five EPIC countries. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard...

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus Ja; Roelofs, Pepijn Ddm; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2016-10-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for the treatment of sciatica. A previous Cochrane review on the efficacy of NSAIDs summarised findings for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) and sciatica. This is an update of the original review (2008) focusing on people suffering from sciatica. To determine the efficacy of NSAIDs in pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported side effects in people with sciatica. We performed electronic searches up to 24 June 2015 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and two trials registers. We searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews on the topics for additional trials. We included randomised controlled trials (double-blind, single-blind, and open-label) that assessed the efficacy of NSAIDs in sciatica. We included all trials that compared NSAIDs to placebo, to other NSAIDs, or to other medication. Additional interventions were allowed if there was a clear contrast for the treatment with NSAIDs in the trial. Three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Where feasible we calculated pooled results using Review Manager 5.3. We reported pain relief outcomes using mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We used risk ratios (RR) with 95% CI to report global improvement of treatment, adverse effects, and additional medication. We performed a meta-analysis if possible. We assessed level of evidence using the GRADE approach. We used standard methodological procedures recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 10 trials reported in 9 publications (N = 1651). Only one trial out of 10 was assessed at low risk of bias. Five trials used the currently recommended daily dose for the drug, and two trials used lower daily doses available over the counter. Three trials investigated NSAIDs no longer approved for human use. The follow-up duration

  15. Molecular Mechanism for Various Pharmacological Activities of NSAIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Mizushima

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is mediated through their inhibitory effects on cyclooxygenase (COX activity. On the other hand, NSAID use is often associated with gastrointestinal complications. The inhibition of COX by NSAIDs is not the sole explanation for the gastrointestinal side effects of NSAIDs. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have revealed that prolonged NSAID use reduces the risk of cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and a COX-independent unknown mechanism is suggested to be involved in these activities of NSAIDs. In this article, I review our recent work on the COX-independent mechanism involved in NSAID-induced gastric lesions and anti-tumor and anti-AD activities of NSAIDs. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found that NSAIDs affect expression of various genes in a COX-independent manner. We found that membrane permeabilization activity of NSAIDs and resulting NSAID-induced apoptosis are involved in NSAID-induced gastric lesions. On the other hand, induction of expression of tight junction-related genes and endoplasmic reticulum chaperones were suggested to be involved in anti-tumor and anti-AD, respectively, activities of NSAIDs. These results suggest that NSAIDs affect expression of various genes in a COX-independent manner, which is involved in various pharmacological activities of NSAIDs.

  16. Duration of Treatment With Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Impact on Risk of Death and Recurrent Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Prior Myocardial Infarction: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Fosbøl, Emil L; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Background- Despite the fact that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are contraindicated among patients with established cardiovascular disease, many receive NSAID treatment for a short period of time. However, little is known about the association between NSAID treatment duration and ...

  17. [NSAID GASTROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH COMORBID DISEASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, T E; Rykova, S M; Chukina, M A

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use in clinical practice of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), largely due to the general trend towards an aging population and, as a consequence, increase the number of individuals with comorbid conditions and diseases, including the most common are diseases of the cardiovascular system, diseases of the joints and spine, requiring of therapy with, combining the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. However, NSAIDs not only have favorable effects, but have quite a wide range of adverse effects, an important place among which is NSAID-induced gastropathy. The article deals with the rational choice of NSAIDs in patients depending on the degree of cardiovascular risk and gastrointenstinalnogo, as well as the possibility of preventing NSAID-associated gastropathy. Particular attention is paid to the choice of individual NSAIDs with regard to their pharmacological properties.

  18. NONSTEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS: CURRENT ASPECTS OF THEIR USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the basic mechanisms of action of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAID and their classification. It considers riskfactors for NSAID gastropathy and the possibilities of its treatment, prevention in the context of modern medicine.

  19. NONSTEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS: CURRENT ASPECTS OF THEIR USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the basic mechanisms of action of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAID and their classification. It considers riskfactors for NSAID gastropathy and the possibilities of its treatment, prevention in the context of modern medicine.

  20. The Analgesic Efficacy of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents (NSAIDs) in Patients Undergoing Cesarean Deliveries: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Angela M; Nami, Nina F; Wu, Christopher L; Murphy, Jamie D

    Postoperative pain after cesarean delivery, which accounts for approximately 1 in 3 live births in the United States, can be severe in many patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are potent analgesics that are effective in the treatment of postoperative pain. In this meta-analysis, we assessed the analgesic efficacy of NSAIDs in postoperative cesarean delivery patients. An electronic literature search of the Library of Medicine's PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, Scopus, and EMBASE databases was conducted in May 2013 and updated in January 2015 (Appendix, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/AAP/A174). Searches were limited to randomized controlled trials. The primary outcome variable was visual analog scale or numerical rating scale pain scores. Secondary outcomes included cumulative postoperative opioid consumption and opioid-related adverse effects (drowsiness/sedation, nausea, and vomiting). Data extraction was performed independently by 2 reviewers. Extracted data were input into Review Manager. Twenty-two randomized controlled trials compared a NSAID (n = 639) to a control (n = 674). Patients in the NSAID group versus control reported lower pain scores at 12 hours (P = 0.003) and at 24 hours (P breastfeeding.

  1. Negative effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ciprofloxacin, a second generation fluoroquinolone is often co-administered with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in life threatening situations in which Staphylococcus aureus infections are accompanied with pain and inflammation. This study was carried out to investigate possible in vitro interactions in co ...

  2. Effectiveness of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the effectiveness of various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with vertebral fractures. Methods: A total of 78 patients (17 males and 61 females) with a mean age of 69.5 years were included. The major inclusion criterion was an osteoporotic vertebral fracture between T7 and L3.

  3. Prescription Pattern Analysis of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Northeastern Iranian Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinali, Majid; Tabeshpour, Jamshid; Maziar, Seyed Vahid; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sent, Danielle; Azarkhiavi, Kamal Razavi; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) therapy is a common cause of actual and potential adverse effects, such as bleeding and gastrointestinal ulceration, which exacerbates the patient's medical condition and might even be life threatening. We aimed to evaluate and analyze the

  4. Medicinal chemistry and anti-inflammatory activity of nitric oxide-releasing NSAI drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç And, Esra; Küçükgüzel, S Güniz

    2009-05-01

    Nitric Oxide, which acts as a non-specific cytotoxic mediator and a biological messenger on immunological competence, has been gaining significantly increasing importance. As an alternative to conventional NSAIDs having significant side effects, pharmacologically improved and therapeutically enhanced NO releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with less side effects are being planned to produce.

  5. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The use of medications by football players in many populations is known to be high. Data on African players are scarce. Objective. To determine the magnitude of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and nutritional supplements by Zimbabwean football players. Methods. We conducted a ...

  6. [Trends of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use in Spain, 1990 through 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abajo, F J; del Pozo, J García; del Pino, A

    2005-11-01

    To know the trends of supply, consumption and pattern of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Spain from 1990 through 2003, as well as their costs. Drug utilization study. National Health System, outpatient setting. Information on drug utilization was obtained from the ALHAQUEM database of the Spanish Ministry of Health, which contains the number of packages sold in community pharmacies and charged to the National Health System. Data were expressed in defined daily doses (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants per day (DHD). NSAIDs consumption in Spain increased from 23.67 DHD in 1990 to 45.82 DHD in 2003 (a 93.6% increase). Ibuprofen was the NSAID which showed the greatest increase (15.33 DHD in 2003). The consumption of coxibs reached a maximum of 7.74 DHD in 2001, but decreased to 3.59 DHD in 2003 once prior-authorization programs were set up. Over the study period the share of NSAIDs use with a low gastrointestinal risk increased from 29% to 59%. Overall costs of NSAIDs increased from 117 million euro in 1990 to 329 million euro in 2003. Over the study period the consumption of NSAIDs in Spain has increased twofold while costs increased threefold. The pattern of use has remarkably changed showing an increasing use of NSAIDs with a better gastrointestinal profile. The impact of coxibs marketing has been moderate.

  7. New approaches to reduce ulcerogenity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: achievements, unsolved issues and ways to optimize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Hladkykh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the domestic and foreign literature sources devoted to the study of pathogenetic mechanisms of gastropathy caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was done. Current approaches of prevention and treatment of NSAID-induced gastropathy were lined. The appropriateness of drugs with polytropic pharmacological properties (Quercetin, Vinboron and Tiotriazolin to eliminate the side effects of NSAIDs, including ultserogenesis was discusses.

  8. The rise and decline of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-associated gastropathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, James F; Murtagh, Kirsten N; Bennett, Mihoko; Zatarain, Ernesto; Lingala, Bharathi; Bruce, Bonnie

    2004-08-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID)-associated gastropathy is a major cause of hospitalization and death. This study was undertaken to examine whether recent preventive approaches have been associated with a declining incidence of NSAID gastropathy, and, if so, what measures may have caused the decline. We studied 5,598 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 31,262 patient-years at 8 sites. We obtained standardized longitudinal information on the patients that had been previously used to establish the incidence of NSAID gastropathy, and also information on patient risk factors and differences in toxicity between NSAIDs. Consecutive patients were followed up with biannual Health Assessment Questionnaires and medical record audits between 1981 and 2000. The major outcome measure was the annual rate of hospitalization involving bleeding, obstruction, or perforation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and related conditions. Rates of GI-related hospitalizations rose from 0.6% in 1981 to 1.5% in 1992 (P NSAIDs from 52% to 42% of patients, a rise in the use of "safer" NSAIDs from 19% to 48% of patients, and increasing use of proton-pump inhibitors, but not with change in age, NSAID exposure, or GI risk propensity score. The risk of serious NSAID gastropathy has declined by 67% in these cohorts since 1992. We estimate that 24% of this decline was the result of lower doses of NSAIDs, while 18% was associated with the use of proton-pump inhibitors and 14% with the use of less toxic NSAIDs. These declines in the incidence of NSAID gastropathy are likely to continue.

  9. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim eGurpinar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Protective effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal adenomas is modified by a polymorphism in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor [Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, C.L.E.; Tijhuis, M.J.; Kram, N.R.; Soest, van E.M.; Jong, de D.J.; Fodde, R.; Kranen, H.J.; Kampman, E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with a decreased risk of colorectal tumors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in target genes of NSAID action, and their haplotypes, might modulate this protective effect. METHODS: A case-control study including 724 cases

  11. Pregnant women and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: knowledge, perception and drug consumption pattern during pregnancy in ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaw, Chalelgn; Wabe, Nasir Tajure

    2012-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the widely used drugs and are often used by pregnant women. However, they can have significant teratogenic effects. The aim of the study was to investigate pregnant women's knowledge about NSAIDs use during pregnancy and their perception and consumption pattern. The study was a cross sectional study on women waiting for a consultation in the selected maternity hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The pregnant women were selected randomly and then interviewed by using standardized questionnaires. A total of 224 pregnant women were involved in the study. Out of those, 203 (90.6%) of them have taken NSAIDs since the beginning of their pregnancy. About 201 (89.7%), 198 (88.4%) and 189 (84.4%) of the pregnant women considered that ibuprofen, diclofenac and aspirin are not NSAIDs respectively. Regarding analgesic effect of NSAIDs, 97 (43.3%) of the pregnant women believed that NSAIDs are effective for treating pain. Acetaminophen was considered as the most effective treatment for pain by 84 (37.50%) of the patients. Acetaminophen is the most common analgesic that was taken by most pregnant women. The knowledge of pregnant women about NSAIDs is poor.

  12. Approaches to the diagnosis and management of patients with a history of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related urticaria and angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Marek L; Woessner, Katharine; Sanak, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticarial and angioedema reactions are among the most commonly encountered drug hypersensitivity reactions in clinical practice. Three major clinical phenotypes of NSAID-induced acute skin reactions manifesting with angioedema, urticaria, or both have been distinguished: NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced urticaria/angioedema (NIUA), and single NSAID-induced urticaria and angioedema. In some patients clinical history alone might be sufficient to establish the diagnosis of a specific type of NSAID hypersensitivity, whereas in other cases oral provocation challenges are necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, classification of the type of cutaneous reaction is critical for proper management. For example, in patients with single NSAID-induced reactions, chemically nonrelated COX-1 inhibitors can be safely used. However, there is cross-reactivity between the NSAIDs in patients with NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease and NIUA, and thus only use of selective COX-2 inhibitors can replace the culprit drug if the chronic treatment is necessary, although aspirin desensitization will allow for chronic treatment with NSAIDs in some patients with NIUA. In this review we present a practical clinical approach to the patient with NSAID-induced urticaria and angioedema. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and breast cancer risk: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren; Thomassen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies investigating the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on breast cancer have yielded conflicting results. We examined the association between use of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs and breast cancer risk among 28 695 women in the Danish Diet, Cancer...... and Health cohort. Information on NSAID and paracetamol use was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire completed at baseline (1993-1997) and updated through 2003 using a nationwide prescription database. Detailed information on breast cancer incidence and tumour characteristics was obtained from...... nationwide health registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compute incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified 847 breast cancer cases over an average follow-up period of 7.5 years. Any NSAID use at baseline was associated with an increased incidence...

  14. Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Symptomatic Treatment of Episodic Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affaitati, Giannapia; Martelletti, Paolo; Lopopolo, Mariangela; Tana, Claudio; Massimini, Francesca; Cipollone, Francesco; Lapenna, Domenico; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Costantini, Raffaele

    2017-03-01

    Primary headaches have high epidemiologic impact but their symptomatic treatment often remains problematic. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used, but their modality of employment and efficacy/differential efficacy are highly variable. This study investigated current NSAID use for episodic headache at an Italian headache center (January 2000 to February 2013). A retrospective evaluation was performed on 6,443 patient records: migraine (n = 2,330), tension-type headache (TTH; n = 807), and migraine plus TTH (n = 3,306). Among migraine patients, 80% had used NSAIDs in the past year. Preferences were: nimesulide (57%), ketoprofen (25%), and ibuprofen (24%); complete efficacy was significantly higher than incomplete/absent efficacy (P headache was higher than could be hypothesized based on guidelines, with NSAID preferences not entirely coinciding with international recommendations. This outcome suggests the need for greater awareness of all treatment options in headache by both patients and physicians. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  15. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in US adults: changes over time and by demographic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer S; Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, Jihye; Advani, Shailesh M; Peng, Ho-Lan; Banfield, Emilyn; Hawk, Ernest T; Chang, Shine; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin and non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are preventive against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and several cancer types, but long-term use has been associated with significant health risks, resulting in conflicting recommendations on NSAID use for prevention of CVD and cancer. Previous research indicates that aspirin use increases with age and CVD risk factors and that a large percentage of the US population regularly use analgesics, including NSAIDs, but there has not been a recent, in-depth assessment of NSAID use prevalence, changes in use over time or predictors of NSAID use in the USA. We used the cross-sectional, National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1988 to 1994 and three continuous cycles (1999-2004) to assess regular NSAID use prevalence, changes over time and predictors of regular NSAID use. Overall, regular NSAID use increased over time and varied by demographic features. Participants over 60 years of age, women, participants with high body mass index, increased waist circumference or heart disease were significantly more likely to be regular NSAID users. By contrast, non-Hispanic African American and Mexican American participants were significantly less likely to regularly use NSAIDs. This study uses a nationally representative data set (NHANES) to provide an exploration of regular NSAID use patterns over time, highlighting several demographic, lifestyle and clinical conditions associated with regular NSAID use. Understanding who is likely to regularly use NSAIDs enables more targeted messaging both for increasing the preventive benefits and for limiting the toxicities associated with regular use of NSAIDs.

  16. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kroesen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In the present Systematic Review, we investigate whether NSAIDs display any effects as therapy of TB and discuss possible mechanisms of action of NSAIDs as adjunctive therapy of TB. Ten studies, seven preclinical studies in mice and three clinical trials, were included and systematically reviewed. Our results point toward a beneficial effect of NSAIDs as adjunct to current TB therapy regimens, mediated by decreased lung pathology balancing host-immune reaction. The determination of the best timing for their administration in order to obtain the potential beneficial effects needs further investigation. Even if the preclinical evidence requires clinical evaluation, NSAIDs might represent a potential safe, simple, and cheap improvement in therapy of TB.

  17. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidon Mona

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children.

  18. Penetration and pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rat prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Radhakrishnan, Jayashree; Radhakrishnan, Rajan

    2018-02-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) involves inflammation of the prostate and affects the quality of life of men of all ages. It is well reported in clinical studies that the treatment for CP/CPPS using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) produced favorable outcomes. However, currently, there are no guidelines on choice of the NSAIDs for the treatment of CP/CPPS. Therefore, in the current research study, we evaluated the prostate tissue penetration of four NSAIDs in rats to provide guidance on choice of NSAIDs for the treatment of CP/CPPS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered orally with four NSAIDs viz. celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen at 500 mg/kg dose. The animals were then sacrificed at various time points, and their prostate tissues were harvested. The NSAIDs were then extracted from the prostate tissues using liquid extraction technique, and their concentration in prostate tissue was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The prostate tissue penetration and related pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated by non-compartmental analysis. The HPLC method for quantifying NSAIDs in prostate tissue resulted in single, sharp peaks without any interference and all validation parameters were within limits. Celecoxib showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) [146.50 ± 2.75 μg/mL*h] of all NSAID's. A two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) with replication indicated an overall statistically significant difference in the pharmacokinetic parameters for celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen. This study for the first time reported the relative prostate tissue penetration of four NSAIDs. The pharmacokinetic data indicated that celecoxib has the highest penetration and retention in rat prostate tissues. Therefore, celecoxib may be considered as a better choice for the treatment CP/CPPS involving NSAIDs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use and Genomic DNA Methylation in Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Wilson

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use is associated with decreased risk of some cancers. NSAID use modulates the epigenetic profile of normal colonic epithelium and may reduce risk of colon cancer through this pathway; however, the effect of NSAID use on the DNA methylation profile of other tissues including whole blood has not yet been examined.Using the Sister Study cohort, we examined the association between NSAID usage and whole genome methylation patterns in blood DNA. Blood DNA methylation status across 27,589 CpG sites was evaluated for 871 women using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 Beadchip, and in a non-overlapping replication sample of 187 women at 485,512 CpG sites using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip. We identified a number of CpG sites that were differentially methylated in regular, long-term users of NSAIDs in the discovery group, but none of these sites were statistically significant in our replication group.We found no replicable methylation differences in blood related to NSAID usage. If NSAID use does effect blood DNA methylation patterns, differences are likely small.

  20. Synthesis and anti-angiogenic effect of conjugates between serum albumin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Birgitte; Struve, Casper; Friis, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis. Covalent linkage of naproxen to human serum albumin (HSA) has been shown to target it efficiently to the liver and this may potentially be exploited for liver-selective inhibition of angiogenesis. With the aim...... effect on endothelial cells at or above the level of the non-conjugated NSAIDs in an in vitro angiogenesis assay....

  1. Risk of new acute myocardial infarction hospitalization associated with use of oral and parenteral non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs: a case-crossover study of Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and review of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shau Wen-Yi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have documented the increased cardiovascular risk associated with the use of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Despite this, many old NSAIDs are still prescribed worldwide. Most of the studies to date have been focused on specific oral drugs or limited by the number of cases examined. We studied the risk of new acute myocardial infarction (AMI hospitalization with current use of a variety of oral and parenteral NSAIDs in a nationwide population, and compared our results with existing evidence. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study using the Taiwan's National Health Insurance claim database, identifying patients with new AMI hospitalized in 2006. The 1-30 days and 91-120 days prior to the admission were defined as case and matched control period for each patient, respectively. Uses of NSAIDs during the respective periods were compared using conditional logistic regression and adjusted for use of co-medications. Results 8354 new AMI hospitalization patients fulfilled the study criteria. 14 oral and 3 parenteral NSAIDs were selected based on drug utilization profile among 13.7 million NSAID users. The adjusted odds ratio, aOR (95% confidence interval, for risk of AMI and use of oral and parenteral non-selective NSAIDs were 1.42 (1.29, 1.56 and 3.35 (2.50, 4.47, respectively, and significantly greater for parenteral than oral drugs (p for interaction Conclusions The collective evidence revealed the tendency of increased AMI risk with current use of some NSAIDs. A higher AMI risk associated with use of parenteral NSAIDs was observed in the present study. Ketorolac had the highest associated risk in both oral and parenteral NSAIDs studied. Though further investigation to confirm the association is warranted, prescribing physicians and the general public should be cautious about the potential risk of AMI when using NSAIDs.

  2. Combining paracetamol (acetaminophen) with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs: a qualitative systematic review of analgesic efficacy for acute postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cliff K S; Seymour, Robin A; Lirk, Phillip; Merry, Alan F

    2010-04-01

    There has been a trend over recent years for combining a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) with paracetamol (acetaminophen) for pain management. However, therapeutic superiority of the combination of paracetamol and an NSAID over either drug alone remains controversial. We evaluated the efficacy of the combination of paracetamol and an NSAID versus either drug alone in various acute pain models. A systematic literature search of Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PubMed covering the period from January 1988 to June 2009 was performed to identify randomized controlled trials in humans that specifically compared combinations of paracetamol with various NSAIDs versus at least 1 of these constituent drugs. Identified studies were stratified into 2 groups: paracetamol/NSAID combinations versus paracetamol or NSAIDs. We analyzed pain intensity scores and supplemental analgesic requirements as primary outcome measures. In addition, each study was graded for quality using a validated scale. Twenty-one human studies enrolling 1909 patients were analyzed. The NSAIDs used were ibuprofen (n = 6), diclofenac (n = 8), ketoprofen (n = 3), ketorolac (n = 1), aspirin (n = 1), tenoxicam (n = 1), and rofecoxib (n = 1). The combination of paracetamol and NSAID was more effective than paracetamol or NSAID alone in 85% and 64% of relevant studies, respectively. The pain intensity and analgesic supplementation was 35.0% +/- 10.9% and 38.8% +/- 13.1% lesser, respectively, in the positive studies for the combination versus paracetamol group, and 37.7% +/- 26.6% and 31.3% +/- 13.4% lesser, respectively, in the positive studies for the combination versus the NSAID group. No statistical difference in median quality scores was found between experimental groups. Current evidence suggests that a combination of paracetamol and an NSAID may offer superior analgesia compared with either drug alone.

  3. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori does not reduce the incidence of gastroduodenal ulcers in patients on long-term NSAID treatment: double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, Helena T.J.I.; Steen, Kirsti S.S.; Lems, Willem F.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Huisman, A. Margriet; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Houben, Harry H.M.L.; Kadir, Sylvana W.; Kostense, Piet J.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Boers, Maarten; Dijkmans, Ben A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the major causes of gastroduodenal ulcers. Studies on the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in NSAID users yielded conflicting results. Objective: To investigate whether H. pylori eradication in patients on

  4. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Häuser, Winfried; Mücke, Martin; Tölle, Thomas Rudolf; Bell, Rae F; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, despite being considered not to be effective. To assess the analgesic efficacy, tolerability (drop-out due to adverse events), and safety (serious adverse events) of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase for randomised controlled trials from inception to January 2017. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and reviews, and online clinical trial registries. We included randomised, double-blind trials of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing any oral NSAID with placebo or another active treatment for relief of pain in fibromyalgia, with subjective pain assessment by the participant. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality and potential bias. Primary outcomes were participants with substantial pain relief (at least 50% pain relief over baseline or very much improved on Patient Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC)) or moderate pain relief (at least 30% pain relief over baseline or much or very much improved on PGIC), serious adverse events, and withdrawals due to adverse events; secondary outcomes were adverse events, withdrawals due to lack of efficacy, and outcomes relating to sleep, fatigue, and quality of life. Where pooled analysis was possible, we used dichotomous data to calculate risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT), using standard methods. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Our searches identified six randomised, double-blind studies involving 292 participants in suitably characterised fibromyalgia. The mean age of participants was between 39 and 50 years, and 89% to 100% were women. The initial pain intensity was around 7/10 on a 0 to 10 pain scale, indicating severe pain. NSAIDs tested were etoricoxib 90 mg

  5. Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs As Host-Directed Therapy for Tuberculosis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, Vera M.; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Martinson, Neil; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Vilaplana, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Lengthy, antimicrobial therapy targeting the pathogen is the mainstay of conventional tuberculosis treatment, complicated by emerging drug resistances. Host-directed therapies, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in contrast, target host factors to mitigate disease severity. In

  6. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug prescriptions in hospital inpatients: are we assessing the risks?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kitchen, J

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To determine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prescribing practices in a tertiary referral hospital. METHODS: A single time-point audit of drug kardexes and clinical notes of n = 388 patients on 2 July 2008 was carried out assessing demographics, gastrointestinal and coronary heart disease risk factors, renal function and co-prescribed medications. RESULTS: Fifty-seven of 388 (14.7%) hospital patients were on NSAIDs. Forty-nine were prescribed NSAID after admission. Nineteen (32.2%) were on regular NSAID (11\\/19 on PPI) and 38 patients were on PRN NSAID (12\\/38 on PPI). Seventeen of 49 patients were on other medications associated with gastrointestinal bleeding (10\\/17 were on PPI). Nineteen patients (33.3%) were >60 years. Eight patients had three or four risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding; six were on PPI. Thirteen patients had two risks; 7 were on PPI. Six of 19 patients with one risk factor were on PPI. 40.3% had stage 2\\/3 chronic kidney disease. 35.1% had ischaemic heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: NSAIDs and PPIs are often prescribed inappropriately.

  8. Current perspectives in NSAID-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mau; Gautam, Lovely; Shukla, Prakash Kumar; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most highly prescribed drugs in the world. Their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic actions may be beneficial; however, they are associated with severe side effects including gastrointestinal injury and peptic ulceration. Though several approaches for limiting these side effects have been adopted, like the use of COX-2 specific drugs, comedication of acid suppressants like proton pump inhibitors and prostaglandin analogs, these alternatives have limitations in terms of efficacy and side effects. In this paper, the mechanism of action of NSAIDs and their critical gastrointestinal complications have been reviewed. This paper also provides the information on different preventive measures prescribed to minimize such adverse effects and analyses the new suggested strategies for development of novel drugs to maintain the anti-inflammatory functions of NSAIDs along with effective gastrointestinal protection.

  9. Current Perspectives in NSAID-Induced Gastropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the most highly prescribed drugs in the world. Their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic actions may be beneficial; however, they are associated with severe side effects including gastrointestinal injury and peptic ulceration. Though several approaches for limiting these side effects have been adopted, like the use of COX-2 specific drugs, comedication of acid suppressants like proton pump inhibitors and prostaglandin analogs, these alternatives have limitations in terms of efficacy and side effects. In this paper, the mechanism of action of NSAIDs and their critical gastrointestinal complications have been reviewed. This paper also provides the information on different preventive measures prescribed to minimize such adverse effects and analyses the new suggested strategies for development of novel drugs to maintain the anti-inflammatory functions of NSAIDs along with effective gastrointestinal protection.

  10. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and - if possible - eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order...

  11. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, Freija; Friis, Søren; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use has been linked to a reduction in the risk of several cancer types. For endometrial cancer, however, results have been inconsistent. To summarize the available evidence on the risk of endometrial cancer associated with use of aspirin...... a random effects model. RESULTS: Six case-control and seven cohort studies were found eligible for our meta-analysis. We observed risk reductions in endometrial cancer associated with regular use of aspirin (case-control: 11%, cohort: 8%) and NA-NSAIDs (case-control: 9%, cohort: 6%), compared to non...

  12. A binding site for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in FAAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolacci, Laura; Romeo, Elisa; Veronesi, Marina; Magotti, Paola; Albani, Clara; Dionisi, Mauro; Lambruschini, Chiara; Scarpelli, Rita; Cavalli, Andrea; Vivo, Marco De; Piomelli, Daniele; Garau, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    In addition to inhibiting the cyclooxygenasemediated biosynthesis of prostanoids, various widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) enhance endocannabinoid signaling by blocking the anandamidedegrading membrane enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The X-ray structure of FAAH in complex with the NSAID carprofen, along with studies of site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme activity assays, and nuclear magnetic resonance, now reveal the molecular details of this interaction, providing information that may guide the design of dual FAAH-cyclooxygenase inhibitors with superior analgesic efficacy. PMID:23240907

  13. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Ranking by Nondeterministic Assessments of Probabilistic Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina luiza MOLDOVEANU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available With a number of common therapeutic prescriptions, common mechanisms, common pharmacological effects - analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory (acetaminophen excepted, common side effects (SE (platelet dysfunction, gastritis and peptic ulcers, renal insufficiency in susceptible patients, water and sodium retention, edemas, nephropathies, and only a few different characteristics – different chemical structures, pharmacokinetics and different therapeutic possibility, different selectivities according to cyclooxygenase pathway 1 and 2, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs similarities are more apparent than differences. Being known that in a correct treatment benefits would exceed risks, the question “Which anti-inflammatory drug presents the lowest risks for a patient?” is just natural. By the Global Risk Method (GRM and the Maximum Risk Method (MRM we have determined the ranking of fourteen NSAIDs considering the risks presented by each particular NSAID. Nimesulide, Etoricoxib and Celecoxib safety level came superior to the other NSAIDs, whereas Etodolac and Indomethacin present an increased side effects risk.

  14. Amides of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with thiomorpholine can yield hypolipidemic agents with improved anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosis-Nobelos, Panagiotis; Kourti, Malamati; Gavalas, Antonios; Rekka, Eleni A

    2016-02-01

    Novel amides of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), α-lipoic acid and indole-3-acetic acid with thiomorpholine were synthesised by a simple method and at high yields (60-92%). All the NSAID derivatives highly decreased lipidemic indices in the plasma of Triton treated hyperlipidemic rats. The most potent compound was the indomethacin derivative, which decreased total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol by 73%, 80% and 83%, respectively. They reduced acute inflammation equally or more than most parent acids. Hence, it could be concluded that amides of common NSAIDs with thiomorpholine acquire considerable hypolipidemic potency, while they preserve or augment their anti-inflammatory activity, thus addressing significant risk factors for atherogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential Risk of Peptic Ulcer Among Users of Antidepressants Combined With Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju-Young; Song, Inmyung; Lee, Jin-Ho; Yoon, Jong Lull; Kwon, Jun Soo; Park, Byung-Joo

    2017-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to have an increased risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, and the risk may be further increased by combined use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, little has been known about the risk of peptic ulcer associated with other classes of antidepressants or individual antidepressants combined with NSAIDs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to define the risk of peptic ulcer associated with combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs, as compared with use of antidepressants alone. Using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database, we identified a total of 1,127,622 patients who began receiving antidepressants between 2009 and 2012. Propensity-based matching and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of peptic ulcer between antidepressant users with NSAIDs and those without NSAIDs matched in a 1:1 ratio, for a total of 768,850 patients. The risk of peptic ulcer did not increase with combined use of overall antidepressants and NSAIDs, as compared with antidepressant use alone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.06). A slightly increased risk was observed for combined use of NSAIDs with tricyclic antidepressants (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.09-1.21) and with SSRIs (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16). We found that although concomitant use of NSAIDs and antidepressants was not associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer for antidepressants in general, it was so for some specific classes including tricyclic antidepressants and SSRIs. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the increased risk was solely due to NSAID use.

  16. The relationship between non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and cardiovascular risk - the myths, the misconceptions, the news, the realities -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela-Anca STOIA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the number of clinical experiments investigating the effects of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on the cardiovascular (CV events has significantly increased over the last two decades, basic research related to the mechanism by which NSAIDs cause CV dysfunction is limited. High variability in the clinical trials conducted (different populations, dosages, exposure and types of NSAIDs has led to results which are difficult to interpret and compare between studies. Are there some NSAIDs safer than other from the standpoint of CV risk? We have try to answer at some aspects of this question.

  17. NSAID and other analgesic use by endurance runners during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. An increasing popularity of ultra-endurance events coupled with excessive or inappropriate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use during such events could pose considerable potential risks to runners' health. Objective. To evaluate the incidence of NSAID and other analgesic use in distance ...

  18. Quality of Life in Arthritis Patients Using Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingela Wiklund

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a painful and disabling condition. To suppress the pain and the inflammatory process, patients are often chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID users. Chronic use of NSAIDs may induce peptic ulcer, dyspeptic problems and heartburn. Therefore, these patients are often provided with treatment to relieve and/or protect against gastrointestinal problems. Rheumatic disorders also affect a range of health-related quality of life domains. In one study, patients with NSAID-associated gastroduodenal lesions complained about lack of energy, sleep disturbances, emotional distress and social isolation in addition to pain and mobility limitations. The degree of distress and dysfunction differed markedly from scores in an unselected population. Clinical trial data suggest that acid-suppressing therapy with omeprazole is superior to therapy with misoprostol and ranitidine in healing gastroduodenal lesions and preventing abdominal pain, heartburn and indigestion symptoms during continued NSAID treatment. Because arthritic patients are severely incapacitated by their condition regarding most aspects of health-related quality of life, it is important to offer a treatment that is effective in healing and preventing NSAID-induced ulcers and gastrointestinal symptoms during continued NSAID treatment without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. Treatment with omeprazole once daily has been shown to be superior to that with ranitidine and misoprostol in this respect.

  19. Hepatotoxicity of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajaree Sriuttha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the most widely used medication in several countries, including Thailand. NSAIDs have been associated with hepatic side effects; however, the frequency of these side effects is uncertain. Aim of the Review. To systematically review published literature on randomized, controlled trials that assessed the risk of clinically significant hepatotoxicity associated with NSAIDs. Methods. Searches of bibliographic databases EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library were conducted up to July 30, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials of ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, piroxicam, meloxicam, mefenamic acid, indomethacin, celecoxib, and etoricoxib in adults with any disease that provide information on hepatotoxicity outcomes. Results. Among the 698 studies, 18 studies met the selection criteria. However, only 8 studies regarding three NSAIDs (celecoxib, etoricoxib, and diclofenac demonstrated clinically significant hepatotoxic evidence based on hepatotoxicity justification criteria. Of all the hepatotoxicity events found from the above-mentioned three NSAIDs, diclofenac had the highest proportion, which ranged from 0.015 to 4.3 (×10−2, followed by celecoxib, which ranged from 0.13 to 0.38 (×10−2, and etoricoxib, which ranged from 0.005 to 0.930 (×10−2. Conclusion. Diclofenac had higher rates of hepatotoxic evidence compared to other NSAIDs. Hepatotoxic evidence is mostly demonstrated as aminotransferase elevation, while liver-related hospitalization or discontinuation was very low.

  20. Time-trends in gastroprotection with NSAIDs

    OpenAIRE

    Valkhoff , Vera E.; Van Soest , Eva Marianne; Sturkenboom , Miriam C; Kuipers , Ernst J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background: Preventive strategies are advocated in patients at risk of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) complications associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aim: We examined time trends in preventive strategies. Methods: In a study population comprising of 50,126 NSAID users ? 50 yrs from the Integrated Primary Care Information database, we considered two preventive strategies: co-prescription of gastroprotective agents and prescription of a cyc...

  1. The Impact of NSAID Treatment on Cardiovascular Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A. M. S.; Fosbol, E. L.; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2014-01-01

    This MiniReview describes the present evidence for the relationship between cardiovascular risk and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with special focus using Danish register-based data. NSAIDs are among the most widely used drugs worldwide and mainly used for management of pain...... and inflammatory conditions. Through the past decade, much attention has been given to the cardiovascular safety of these drugs, and several studies have shown increased risk of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with NSAID use. Current guidelines discourage any use of NSAIDs in patients with cardiovascular...... observational studies is accumulating, suggesting that NSAIDs are a major public health concern due to the widespread use of these drugs. Although it seems unlikely that we can completely avoid use of NSAIDs, even among high-risk patients, these results highlight the importance of balancing the benefit versus...

  2. NSAIDs: can the presence of infectious agent influence the choice of analgesic drug?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. А. Podpletnya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Considering the significant prevalence of comorbid pathology there is a high probability of NSAID use in patients with concomitant infection. In view of this screening of antimicrobial properties of their main groups was conducted for the purpose of selecting the most promising ones for further in-depth study. Materials and methods. The study of microorganisms’ sensitivity was conducted using standard research methods – the method of "wells" and by determining the antibacterial properties of drugs, using tablets, based on the ability of the drug to diffuse into agar, used for sowing the test-culture. As the test cultures S. aureus, S. mutans, S. pyogenes, P. aeruginosa, E. Coli, isolated from patients who were treated in hospital were used. Predominant blocker of COX-1 (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA, nonselective blockers of COX-1 and COX-2 (ketorolac, diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid, dexketoprofen, predominant blockers of COX-2 (meloxicam and nimesulide, selective blockers of COX-2 (celecoxib, selective blockers of COX-3 (COX-1 in the brain paracetamol and metamizole were tested. Results. The studies found that most of the tested NSAIDs have antimicrobial activity. Leader drugs in expressiveness of antimicrobial effects are drugs that have sufficient COX-1 (3 - activity: ASA, diclofenac, dexketoprofen, metamizole, and lesser extent – paracetamol. Tested NSAIDs showed the highest activity against gram-positive coccal flora, mostly affecting S. Pyogenes. Blockers of COX-3 paracetamol and metamizole, unlike other studied drugs, showed stronger antipseudomonal (both – moderate and antistaphylococcal action (metamizole. Conclusions. NSAIDs with antimicrobial activity can potentially increase the activity of antiinfectious therapy. At the same time, the antimicrobial activity of NSAIDs, theoretically, can promote microbial resistance because of existence of microorganisms in a medium with subthreshold concentrations of drugs

  3. Advances in NSAID Development: Evolution of Diclofenac Products Using Pharmaceutical Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Altman, Roy; Bosch, Bill; Brune, Kay; Patrignani, Paola; Young, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the phenylacetic acid class with anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties. Contrary to the action of many traditional NSAIDs, diclofenac inhibits cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 enzyme with greater potency than it does COX-1. Similar to other NSAIDs, diclofenac is associated with serious dose-dependent gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal adverse effects. Since its introduction in 1973, a number of different diclofen...

  4. Anti-inflammatory drugs in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D

    2007-01-01

    Historically, anti-inflammatory drugs had their origins in the serendipitous discovery of certain plants and their extracts being applied for the relief of pain, fever and inflammation. When salicylates were discovered in the mid-19th century to be the active components of Willow Spp., this enabled these compounds to be synthesized and from this, acetyl-salicylic acid or Aspirin was developed. Likewise, the chemical advances of the 19th-20th centuries lead to development of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), most of which were initially organic acids, but later non-acidic compounds were discovered. There were two periods of NSAID drug discovery post-World War 2, the period up to the 1970's which was the pre-prostaglandin period and thereafter up to the latter part of the last century in which their effects on prostaglandin production formed part of the screening in the drug-discovery process. Those drugs developed up to the 1980-late 90's were largely discovered empirically following screening for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities in laboratory animal models. Some were successfully developed that showed low incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects (the principal adverse reaction seen with NSAIDs) than seen with their predecessors (e.g. aspirin, indomethacin, phenylbutazone); the GI reactions being detected and screened out in animal assays. In the 1990's an important discovery was made from elegant molecular and cellular biological studies that there are two cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme systems controlling the production of prostanoids [prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxane (TxA2)]; COX-1 that produces PGs and TxA2 that regulate gastrointestinal, renal, vascular and other physiological functions, and COX-2 that regulates production of PGs involved in inflammation, pain and fever. The stage was set in the 1990's for the discovery and development of drugs to selectively control COX-2 and spare the COX-1 that is central to

  5. The impact of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the small intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Fukui, Akifumi; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    The small intestine has been called as a dark continent of digestive tract and it had been very difficult to diagnose or treat the disease of small intestine. However recent technological development including video capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted endoscopy has made us to aware the various diseases of small intestine. By using capsule endoscopy, many researchers reported that more than 70% of patients treated continuously with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) exhibit the mu...

  6. Bleeding peptic ulcer. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/acetylsalicylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergard, A.; Bredahl, K.; Muckadell, O.B. de

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)/acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) are risk factors for bleeding peptic ulcer. HP eradication reduces the risk of rebleeding. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and presence of blood...

  7. Direct medical costs of serious gastrointestinal ulcers attributable to non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald E.; Klok, Rogier M.; Postma, Maarten J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.; van de Laar, Mart A.F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The occurrence and prevention of gastrointestinal ulcers attributable to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has become a major health care issue. Analysis of cost effectiveness of preventive strategies has been hampered by a lack of recent cost of illness studies. The

  8. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  9. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Analgesics Use by Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulka-Gierek, Maria; Foroncewicz, Bartosz; Pączek, Leszek; Wawiórko, Elżbieta; Kamińska, Joanna; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Małkowski, Piotr; Małczuk, Bianka; Nazarewski, Sławomir; Mucha, Krzysztof

    2018-03-02

    BACKGROUND Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and analgesics are the most commonly used drugs and are increasingly available over-the-counter (OTC). In certain groups of patients, including kidney transplant recipients, their use may be complicated by adverse effects or drug interactions. The aim of our study was to assess the causes and frequency of OTC NSAIDs or analgesics use, as well as the awareness of related side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 94 randomly selected kidney transplant recipients, who represented 5% of all kidney transplant recipients at our center. An anonymous survey consisting of 23 multiple-choice questions was administered voluntarily and anonymously. RESULTS In all, 63% of study patients confirmed taking the OTC painkillers; 22% of these patients took these drugs at least several times a week, and 4% took these drugs daily. For 38% of the study kidney transplant recipients, NSAIDs or analgesics were reported to be the only way to manage their pain. In addition, 30% of study patients were unaware of the risks associated with these drugs, despite the fact that 89% of the study patients consider physicians the best source of information. CONCLUSIONS Our study found that 63% of kidney transplant recipients regularly took OTC painkillers and 30% were unaware of the potential adverse effects. This necessitates continuous, ongoing education of kidney transplant recipients about the risks of OTC NSAIDs or analgesics use.

  10. Analysis of Adverse Reaction of Analgesics, Antipyretics and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Prescribed by Physicians of Health Care Facilities in Podilskyi Region during 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Stepaniuk, N. H.; Hladkykh, F. V.; Basarab, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of medicines rational use exists all over the world. It concerns particularly analgesics, antipyretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In Ukraine the side effects caused by non-steroidal antiphlogistics rank the second place according to the prevalence among all registered cases.The objective of the research was to analyze adverse drug reaction report forms concerning adverse reactions caused by the use of NSAIDs, analgesics, antipyretics, and were submitted du...

  11. The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on severity of acute pancreatitis and pancreatic necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, K A; Pucher, P H; Berry, D P; Elberm, H; Abu-Hilal, M; Marangoni, G; Hamady, Zzr

    2018-03-01

    Introduction Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common emergency presentation and can be disabling. There is significant morbidity and mortality associated with AP, and it places a considerable burden on the healthcare system. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to have a protective effect in some elective contexts. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs on the course of AP and the severity of the disease. Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out of 324 patients admitted as an emergency with a diagnosis of AP to two UK hospitals. Patients were divided into two groups: those already taking NSAIDs for other co-morbidities and those not taking NSAIDs. Variables compared included: admission to a high dependency or intensive care unit; pancreatic necrosis; pseudocyst development; need for surgery; serum inflammatory markers; modified early warning scores on days 1, 3 and 5; length of stay; and mortality. Results Patients not taking NSAIDs were more likely to have a C-reactive protein level of ≥150mg/l (p=0.007). Patients in the NSAID group experienced less pancreatic necrosis (p=0.019) and lower rates of pseudocyst formation (p=0.010). Other variables showed no difference between the two groups, specifically length of stay and mortality. Conclusions Routine NSAID use may exert a protective effect on the development of AP, its severity, and complications. Therapeutic use of NSAIDs in acute presentations with pancreatitis should be further evaluated.

  12. Gallic acid prevents nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastropathy in rat by blocking oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chinmay; Bindu, Samik; Dey, Sumanta; Alam, Athar; Goyal, Manish; Iqbal, Mohd Shameel; Maity, Pallab; Adhikari, Susanta S; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2010-07-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced oxidative stress plays a critical role in gastric mucosal cell apoptosis and gastropathy. NSAIDs induce the generation of hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) through the release of free iron, which plays an important role in developing gastropathy. Thus, molecules having both iron-chelating and antiapoptotic properties will be beneficial in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. Gallic acid (GA), a polyphenolic natural product, has the capacity to chelate free iron. Here, we report that GA significantly prevents, as well as heals, NSAID-induced gastropathy. In vivo, GA blocks NSAID-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress by preventing mitochondrial protein carbonyl formation, lipid peroxidation, and thiol depletion. In vitro, GA scavenges free radicals and blocks (*)OH-mediated oxidative damage. GA also attenuates gastric mucosal cell apoptosis in vivo as well as in vitro in cultured gastric mucosal cells as evident from the TUNEL assay. GA prevents NSAID-induced activation of caspase-9, a marker for the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, and restores NSAID-mediated collapse of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and dehydrogenase activity. Thus, the inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative stress by GA is associated with the inhibition of NSAID-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of apoptosis in gastric mucosal cells, which are responsible for gastric injury or gastropathy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient's Knowledge and Perception Towards the use of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Rheumatology Clinic Northern Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Ismail, Rosli

    2012-11-01

    In Rheumatology, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been widely prescribed and used. However, despite their clinical benefits in the management of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease, NSAIDs have considerable side effects, mostly affecting the upper gastrointestinal system, which therefore, limit their use. This study was conducted to determine the patients' knowledge and perception regarding the used of NSAIDS. A total of 120 patients who attended the rheumatology clinic Hospital, Raja Permaisuri Bainun, Malaysia, and received NSAIDs more than 3 months were interviewed irrespective of their rheumatological conditions. Patient's knowledge and perception on the side effects of NSAIDs were recorded. Fifty-four percent of the patients obtained information regarding the side effect of NSAIDs either from the rheumatologist, rheumatology staff nurse or other medical staffs (75.4%). The remaining 45.8% were naive of such knowledge. Fifteen percent obtained the information by surfing the internet and 9.2% from printed media. Twenty-four (24.2%) patients, experienced indigestion and/or stomach discomfort attributed to NSAIDs used. Two patients (1.7%) had hematemesis and malena once. This study shows that half of the patients who attended the rheumatology clinic were unaware of the side effect of NSAIDs. Available data showed that most of the knowledgeable patients are more conscience and self-educated. This study also reveals the important roles of clinicians, trained staff nurses as well as the pharmacist in providing the guidance and knowledge of any medication taken by patients.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A6 are not associated with NSAIDs-related peptic ulcer haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Koetsier, Marjolein I. A.; Laheij, Robert J. F.; Roelofs, Hennie M. J.; te Morsche, René H. M.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Verheugt, Freek W. A.; Jansen, Jan B. M. J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2009-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A6 (UGT1A6) is involved in metabolizing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Genotype variation in UGT1A6 may influence the metabolism of NSAIDs and we studied whether this might modulate the gastrointestinal toxicity of NSAIDs. UGT1A6 genotypes of 114

  15. New insights into the use of currently available non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brune K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kay Brune,1 Paola Patrignani2 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany; 2Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, Center of Excellence on Aging, G d’Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, which act via inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX isozymes, were discovered more than 100 years ago. They remain a key component of the pharmacological management of acute and chronic pain. The COX-1 and COX-2 isozymes have different biological functions; analgesic activity is primarily (although not exclusively associated with inhibition of COX-2, while different side effects result from the inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. All available NSAIDs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, are associated with potential side effects, particularly gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects, related to their relative selectivity for COX-1 and COX-2. Since all NSAIDs exert their therapeutic activity through inhibition of the COX isozymes, strategies are needed to reduce the risks associated with NSAIDs while achieving sufficient pain relief. A better understanding of the inhibitory activity and COX-1/COX-2 selectivity of an NSAID at therapeutic doses, based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties (eg, inhibitory dose, absorption, plasma versus tissue distribution, and elimination, and the impact on drug tolerability and safety can guide the selection of appropriate NSAIDs for pain management. For example, many NSAIDs with moderate to high selectivity for COX-2 versus COX-1 can be administered at doses that maximize efficacy (~80% inhibition of COX-2 while minimizing COX-1 inhibition and associated side effects, such as gastrointestinal toxicity. Acidic NSAIDs with favorable tissue distribution and short plasma half-lives can additionally be dosed to provide near-constant analgesia while

  16. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cell proliferation and death in cultured epiphyseal-articular chondrocytes of fetal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.-K.; Wu, S.-C.; Wang, G.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress bone repair. Our previous study further found that ketorolac delayed the endochondral bone formation, and the critical effective timing was at the early stage of repair. Furthermore, we found that NSAIDs suppressed proliferation and induced cell death of cultured osteoblasts. In this study, we hypothesized that chondrocytic proliferation and death, which plays an important role at the early stage of endochondral bone formation, might be affected by NSAIDs. Non-selective NSAIDs, indomethacin, ketorolac, diclofenac and piroxicam; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs, celecoxib and DFU (an analog of rofecoxib); prostaglandins (PGs), PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2α; and each NSAID plus each PG were tested. The effects of NSAIDs on proliferation, cell cycle kinetics, cytotoxicity and cell death of epiphyseal-articular chondrocytes of fetal rats were examined. The results showed that all the tested NSAIDs, except DFU, inhibited thymidine incorporation of chondrocytes at a concentration range (10 -8 to 10 -4 M) covering the theoretic therapeutic concentrations. Cell cycle was arrested by NSAIDs at the G /G 1 phase. Upon a 24 h treatment, LDH leakage and cell death (both apoptosis and necrosis) were significantly induced by the four non-selective NSAIDs in chondrocyte cultures. However, COX-2 inhibitors revealed non-significant effects on cytotoxicity of chondrocytes except higher concentration of celecoxib (10 -4 M). Replenishments of PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2α could not reverse the effects of NSAIDs on chondrocytic proliferation and cytotoxicity. In this study, we found that therapeutic concentrations of non-selective NSAIDs caused proliferation suppression and cell death of chondrocytes, suggesting these adverse effects may be one of the reasons that NSAIDs delay the endochondral ossification during bone repair found in previous studies. Furthermore, these effects of NSAIDs may act via PG

  17. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of osteoarthritis in long-term care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argoff CE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Charles E Argoff1, F Michael Gloth2 1Albany Medical College and Comprehensive Pain Center, Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY, USA; 2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Osteoarthritis is common in patients ≥65 years of age. Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are often prescribed for osteoarthritis pain, they pose age-related cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal risks. Two topical NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG and diclofenac sodium 1.5% in 45.5% dimethylsulfoxide solution (D-DMSO, are approved in the US for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Topical NSAIDs have shown efficacy and safety in knee (DSG, D-DMSO and hand (DSG osteoarthritis. Analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of DSG in hand and knee osteoarthritis demonstrate significant improvement of pain and function in both younger patients (<65 years and older patients (≥65 years and suggest good safety and tolerability. However, long-term safety data in older patients are limited. Topical NSAIDs can ease medication administration and help address barriers to pain management in older patients, such as taking multiple medications and inability to swallow, and are a valuable option for long-term care providers. Keywords: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, long-term care, nursing homes, chronic pain, topical analgesics

  18. Barriers to physician adherence to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug guidelines: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, J M; Naik, A D; Woofter, A; Abraham, N S

    2008-09-15

    Despite wide availability of physician guidelines for safer use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and widespread use of these drugs in the US, NSAID prescribing guidelines have been only modestly effective. To identify and describe comprehensively barriers to provider adherence to NSAID prescribing guidelines. We conducted interviews with 25 physicians, seeking to identify the major influences explaining physician non-adherence to guidelines. Interviews were standardized and structured probes were used for clarification and detail. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Three independent investigators analysed the transcripts, using the constant-comparative method of qualitative analysis. Our analysis identified six dominant physician barriers explaining non-adherence to established NSAID prescribing guidelines. These included (i) lack of familiarity with guidelines, (ii) perceived limited validity of guidelines, (iii) limited applicability of guidelines among specific patients, (iv) clinical inertia, (v) influences of prior anecdotal experiences and (vi) medical heuristics. A heterogeneous set of influences are barriers to physician adherence to NSAID prescribing guidelines. Suggested measures for improving guideline-concordant prescribing should focus on measures to improve physician education and confidence in guidelines, implementation of physician/pharmacist co-management strategies and expansion of guideline scope.

  19. Pathogenesis of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Gastropathy: Clues to Preventative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim MA Bastaki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulceration and bleeding are major impediments to the chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The development of effective therapies for prevention of these adverse effects requires better understanding of their pathogenesis. Several features of NSAIDs contribute to the development of damage in the stomach, including the topical irritant effects of these drugs on the epithelium, impairment of the barrier properties of the mucosa, suppression of gastric prostaglandin synthesis, reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow and interference with the repair of superficial injury. The presence of acid in the lumen of the stomach also contributes to the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced ulcers and bleeding in a number of ways. Acid impairs the restitution process, interferes with hemostasis and can inactivate several growth factors that are important in mucosal integrity and repair. Profound suppression of gastric acid secretion has been shown to be effective in preventing NSAID-induced ulceration. There is a strong possibility that new NSAIDs entering the market will have greatly reduced toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Interaction or relationship between Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kai-Yu; Hu, Fu-Lian

    2006-06-28

    According to a meta-analysis, H pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) independently and significantly increase the risk of gastroduodenal ulcer and ulcer bleeding. Their coincidence is frequent, demonstration of a possible relationship and consequent attitude is of important implications. But unfortunately, no consensus has been approved in the past years and their interactions are still controversial. H pylori and NSAID are known to share a number of pathogenic mechanisms, but there is no evidence for the significant synergic action between these two risk factors. Their relationship is independent, additive, synergistic or antagonistic without considering the influence of other factors because studies on this subject are different in almost all aspects of their methodology, including the definition of a NSAID user as well as the types, doses, duration and their indications for NSAID use, as well as their end-points, definition of dyspepsia and regimes used for eradication of H pylori. These might contribute to the conflicting results and opinions. H pylori infection in humans does not act synergistically with NSAID on ulcer healing, and there is no need to eradicate it. This notion is supported by the finding that the eradication of H pylori does not affect NSAID-induced gastropathy treated with omeprazole and that H pylori infection induces a strong cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression resulting in excessive biosynthesis of gastroprotective prostaglandin which in turn counteracts NSAID-induced gastropathy and heals the existing ulcer. Other investigators claimed that H pylori infection acts synergistically with NSAID on ulcer development, and H pylori should be eradicated, particularly at the start of long-term NSAID therapy. Eradication of H pylori prior to NSAID treatment does not appear to accelerate ulcer healing or to prevent recurrent ulcers in NSAID users. However, some recommendations can be drawn from the results of clinical trails.

  1. The impact of reference pricing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the use and costs of analgesic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootendorst, Paul V; Marshall, John K; Holbrook, Anne M; Dolovich, Lisa R; O'Brien, Bernie J; Levy, Adrian R

    2005-10-01

    To estimate the effect of reference pricing (RP) of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on drug subsidy program and beneficiary expenditures on analgesic drugs. Monthly claims data from Pharmacare, the public drug subsidy program for seniors in British Columbia, Canada, over the period of February 1993 to June 2001. RP limits drug plan reimbursement of interchangeable medicines to a reference price, which is typically equal to the price of the lowest cost interchangeable drug; any cost above that is borne by the patient. Pharmacare introduced two different forms of RP to the NSAIDs, Type 1 in April 1994 and Type 2 in November 1995. Under Type 1 RP, generic and brand versions of the same NSAID are considered interchangeable, whereas under Type 2 RP different NSAIDs are considered interchangeable. We extrapolated average reimbursement per day of NSAID therapy over the months before RP to estimate what expenditures would have been without the policies. These counterfactual predictions were compared with actual values to estimate the impact of the policies; the estimated impacts on reimbursement rates were multiplied by the postpolicy volume of NSAIDS dispensed, which appeared unaffected by the policies, to estimate expenditure changes. After Type 2 RP, program expenditures declined by $22.7 million (CAN), or $4 million (CAN), annually cutting expenditure by about half. Most savings accrued from the substitution of low-cost NSAIDs for more costly alternatives. About 20 percent of savings represented expenditures by seniors who elected to pay for partially reimbursed drugs. Type 1 RP produced one-quarter the savings of type 2 RP. Type 2 RP of NSAIDs achieved its goal of reducing drug expenditures and was more effective than Type 1 RP. The effects of RP on patient health and associated health care costs remain to be investigated.

  2. Laboratory monitoring of patients treated with antihypertensive drugs and newly exposed to non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pascal Fournier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug-Drug Interactions between Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs, Angiotensin Receptor Blocker (ARBs or diuretics can lead to renal failure and hyperkalemia. Thus, monitoring of serum creatinine and potassium is recommended when a first dispensing of NSAID occur in patients treated with these drugs. METHODS: We conducted a pharmacoepidemiological retrospective cohort study using data from the French Health Insurance Reimbursement Database to evaluate the proportion of serum creatinine and potassium laboratory monitoring in patients treated with ACEI, ARB or diuretic and receiving a first dispensing of NSAID. We described the first dispensing of NSAID among 3,500 patients of a 4-year cohort (6,633 patients treated with antihypertensive drugs and analyzed serum creatinine and potassium laboratory monitoring within the 3 weeks after the first NSAID dispensing. RESULTS: General Practitioners were the most frequent prescribers of NSAIDs (85.5%, 95% CI: 84.3-86.6. The more commonly prescribed NSAIDs were ibuprofen (20%, ketoprofen (15%, diclofenac (15% and piroxicam (12%. Serum creatinine and potassium monitoring was 10.7% (95% CI: 9.5-11.8 in patients treated by ACEIs, ARBs or diuretics. Overall, monitoring was more frequently performed to women aged over 60, treated with digoxin or glucose lowering drugs, but not to patients treated with ACEIs, ARBs or diuretics. Monitoring was more frequent when NSAIDs' prescribers were cardiologists or anesthesiologists. CONCLUSION: Monitoring of serum creatinine and potassium of patients treated with ACEIs, ARBs or diuretics and receiving a first NSAID dispensing is insufficiently performed and needs to be reinforced through specific interventions.

  3. Proton-pump inhibitors are associated with a reduced risk for bleeding and perforated gastroduodenal ulcers attributable to non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs: a nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Fernandes, Robert W.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; van Roon, Eric N.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is hampered by gastrointestinal ulcer complications, such as ulcer bleeding and perforation. The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitors in the primary prevention of ulcer complications arising from the use of NSAIDs remains unproven.

  4. Effects of paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetylsalicylic acid, and opioids on bone mineral density and risk of fracture: results of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study (DOPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Hermann, P; Jensen, J-E B

    2012-01-01

    Pain medication has been associated with fractures. We found higher weight in paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) users and lower vitamin D levels in opioid and acetylsalicylic acid users. None of the pain medications influenced bone mineral density or loss. NSAID were...

  5. Incremental cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors for the prevention of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ulcers : a pharmacoeconomic analysis linked to a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, H.E.; Braakman-Jansen, L.M.A.; Klok, R.M.; Postma, M.J.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; van de Laar, M.A.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We estimated the cost effectiveness of concomitant proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in relation to the occurrence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer complications. Methods This study was linked to a nested case-control study. Patients with NSAID ulcer complications were

  6. Population-based analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use among children in four European countries in the SOS project: What size of data platforms and which study designs do we need to assess safety issues?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.E. Valkhoff (Vera); R. Schade (René); G.W. 't Jong (Geert); S.A. Romio (Silvana); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); A. Arfe (Andrea); C. Garbe (Claus); R.M.C. Herings (Ron); S. Lucchi (Silvia); G. Picelli (Gino); J.C. Schink (Julian); H. Straatman (Huub); M. Villa (Marco); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data on utilization patterns and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in children are scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utilization of NSAIDs among children in four European countries as part of the Safety Of non-Steroidal

  7. Low-dose aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective COX-2 inhibitors and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and selective COX-2 inhibitors may improve outcomes in breast cancer patients. We investigated the association of aspirin, NSAIDs, and use of selective COX-2 inhibitors with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: We identified incident...... stage I-III Danish breast cancer patients in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group registry, who were diagnosed during 1996-2008. Prescriptions for aspirin (>99% low-dose aspirin), NSAIDs, and selective COX-2 inhibitors were ascertained from the National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began....... RESULTS: We identified 34,188 breast cancer patients with 233,130 person-years of follow-up. Median follow-up was 7.1 years; 5,325 patients developed recurrent disease. Use of aspirin, NSAIDs, or selective COX-2 inhibitors was not associated with the rate of recurrence (HRadjusted aspirin = 1.0, 95% CI...

  8. Decreased Risk of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck in Users of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Ahmadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the chemopreventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC by conducting a case-control study based on the administration of a standardized questionnaire to 71 incident HNSCC cases and same number of healthy controls. NSAID use was associated with a 75% reduction in risk of developing HNSCC. A significant risk reduction was noted in association with frequency of NSAID use. Restricting the analysis to aspirin users revealed a significant 90% reduction in risk of developing HNSCC. This study provides evidence for a significant reduction in the risk of developing HNSCC in users of NSAIDs, and specifically aspirin users.

  9. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Nanna; Baandrup, Louise; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We examined the association between use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endometrial cancer risk in a nationwide case-control study. METHODS: Cases were all women in Denmark diagnosed with endometrial cancer during 2000-2009. Age...... with use of low-dose aspirin (OR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.89-1.05) or non-aspirin NSAIDs (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.91-1.02) compared with nonuse. The ORs did not vary with increasing duration or intensity of NSAID use or with type of endometrial cancer. Interaction analyses showed reduced endometrial cancer risk...... associated with low-dose aspirin use among nulliparous women (OR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.70-0.95) and with non-aspirin NSAID use among women having used HRT (OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.82-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between use of NSAIDs and endometrial cancer risk overall, although there were some...

  10. Efficacy of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Prophylaxis for Heterotrophic Ossification in Hip Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marco; Jamshidi, Sahab; Horner, Nolan; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prophylaxis for preventing heterotopic ossification (HO) in the setting of hip arthroscopy. A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies comparing the use of NSAID prophylaxis for HO in the setting of hip arthroscopy until March 2015. Study parameters--including sample size, incidence of HO, adverse effects, and level of symptoms--were obtained. Furthermore, the level of evidence of studies was collected and quality assessment was performed. The difference in incidence as well as pooled odds ratios were calculated and analyzed to compare no prophylaxis versus NSAID prophylaxis. This systematic review identified 5 studies, consisting of 1,662 patients, investigating NSAID prophylaxis in hip arthroscopy. HO was diagnosed with the use of postoperative hip radiographs at follow-up, with 95% of cases classified using the Brooker classification. The incidence of HO was 13.4% without NSAID prophylaxis and 3.3% with NSAID prophylaxis. Pooled odds ratios from the prospective studies were 0.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02 to 0.28; P = .0002; I(2) = 0%), showing with statistical significance that NSAID prophylaxis decreased the incidence of HO. The retrospective data similarly showed pooled odds ratios of 0.03 (95% CI, 0.00 to 1.43); P = .08; I(2) = 84%), although it was not statistically significant. Most of the patients who experienced HO in both groups were not reported to be symptomatic. Adverse effects and compliance were not consistently reported. The available orthopaedic literature suggests that the incidence of postoperative HO may be decreased with the use of NSAID prophylaxis in hip arthroscopy. However, the evidence is unclear regarding NSAID drug regimen choice, drug compliance, and adverse effects. Level III, systematic review of Level I, Level II, and Level III studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North

  11. Gastroprotective role of glucocorticoids during NSAID-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaretova, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) make significant contributions to gastric ulcer disease which remains widespread. Although several factors have been postulated as pathogenic elements of the gastric injury induced by NSAIDs, it is, however believed that prostaglandin deficiency plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of this injury. During prostaglandin deficiency, other defensive mechanisms might operate to attenuate NSAID-induced gastropathy. According to our results, NSAIDs, similar to stress, induce an increase in glucocorticoid production that in turn helps the gastric mucosa to resist the harmful actions of these drugs. In this article, we review our experimental data suggesting that glucocorticoids may play a role as natural defensive factors in maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa during NSAID therapy and might operate to attenuate NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  12. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. III. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical advances of the 20th century led to the synthesis of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, beginning from phenylbutazone and indomethacin and continuing with other new drugs, including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, piroxicam and, more recently, the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs. This progress derived from the discovery of the mechanism of action of these drugs: the inhibition of synthesis of prostaglandins due to the cycloxigenase enzyme system, according to the experimental contributions of John R. Vane.

  13. Knowledge and perceptions of the risks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among orthopaedic patients in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phueanpinit, Pacharaporn; Pongwecharak, Juraporn; Krska, Janet; Jarernsiripornkul, Narumol

    2016-10-01

    Background There is a high incidence of adverse effects from non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Thailand, but patients' perceptions and knowledge of NSAID risks is unknown. Objective This study aims to assess patients' perceptions and knowledge of NSAID risks and factors affecting them. Setting University hospital in North-East of Thailand. Method A Cross-sectional study conducted over 4 months, using a self-administered questionnaire. Patients prescribed NSAIDs for at least one month duration from orthopaedic clinic were recruited using systematic random sampling. Main outcome measure Patients' perceptions on NSAID risks, knowledge on risk factors, and their associated factors. Results A total of 474 questionnaires were assessed. Overall perceptions of risks was low (scoring below five on a 0-10 visual analogue scale), with risks associated with the renal system scoring highest. Perceived risk of gastrointestinal problems differed between patients using non-selective and selective NSAIDs (3.47 ± 2.75 vs 2.06 ± 2.98; P information from a health professional was associated with higher risk perception. Most patients (80 %) identified high doses, renal disease and gastrointestinal ulcer increased risks of NSAIDs, but fewer than half recognized that use in the elderly, multiple NSAID use, drinking, hypertension and cardiovascular disease also increased risk of adverse events. Having underlying diseases and receiving side effect information were associated with 1.6-2.0 fold increased knowledge of NSAID risks. Conclusion Perceptions and knowledge concerning NSAID risks was generally low in Thai patients, but higher in those who had received side effect information. Risk-related information should be widely provided, especially in high-risk patients.

  14. Alleviating Promotion of Inflammation and Cancer Induced by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Kyriakopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Relevance. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs including aspirin are of intensive use nowadays. These drugs exert their activity via the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA by cyclooxygenase inhibition. Though beneficial for health in some instances, both unspecific and specific cyclooxygenase inhibitor activity interfere with AA metabolism producing also proinflammatory lipids that may promote cancer. Materials and Methods. This review is based on available literature on clinical uses, biochemical investigations, molecular medicine, pharmacology, toxicity, and epidemiology-clinical studies on NSAIDs and other drugs that may be used accordingly, which was collected from electronic (SciFinder, Medline, Science Direct, and ACS among others and library searches of books and journals. Results. Relevant literature supports the notion that NDSAID use may also promote proinflammatory biochemical events that are also related to precancerous predisposition. Several agents are proposed that may be employed in immediate future to supplement and optimize treatment with NSAIDs. In this way serious side effects arising from promotion of inflammation and cancer, especially in chronic NSAID users and high risk groups of patients, could be avoided.

  15. Efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced ulcer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Yuji

    2009-10-28

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of rabeprazole under continuous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration for NSAID-induced ulcer in Japan. Subjects comprised patients undergoing NSAID treatment in whom upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an ulcerous lesion (open ulcer) with diameter > or = 3 mm, who required continuous NSAID treatment. Endoscopies were performed at the start of treatment, during the treatment period, and at the conclusion (or discontinuation) of treatment. Findings were evaluated as size (maximum diameter) and stage based on the Sakita-Miwa classification. An ulcer was regarded as cured when the "white coating" was seen to have disappeared under endoscopy. As criteria for evaluating safety, all medically untoward symptoms and signs (adverse events, laboratory abnormalities, accidental symptoms, etc.) occurring after the start of rabeprazole treatment were handled as adverse events. Endoscopic cure rate in 38 patients in the efficacy analysis (endoscopic evaluation) was 71.1% (27/38). Among those 38 patients, 35 had gastric ulcer with a cure rate of 71.4% (25/35), and 3 had duodenal ulcer with a cure rate of 66.7% (2/3). Three adverse drug reactions were reported from 64 patients in the safety analysis (interstitial pneumonia, low white blood cell count and pruritus); thus, the incidence rate for adverse drug reactions was 4.7% (3/64). The treatment efficacy of rabeprazole for NSAID-induced ulcer under continuous NSAID administration was confirmed.

  16. Respiratory hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, J S; Burney, P; Jarvis, D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most prevalent drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the prevalence of NSAID-induced respiratory symptoms in population across Europe and to assess its association with upper...... and lower respiratory tract disorders. METHODS: The GA(2) LEN survey was conducted in 22 centers in 15 European countries. Each of 19 centers selected random samples of 5000 adults aged 15-74 from their general population, and in three centers (Athens, Munich, Oslo), a younger population was sampled...... prevalence of NSAID-induced dyspnea was 1.9% and was highest in the three Polish centers [Katowice (4.9%), Krakow (4.8%), and Lodz (4.4%)] and lowest in Skopje, (0.9%), Amsterdam (1.1%), and Umea (1.2%). In multivariate analysis, the prevalence of respiratory reactions to NSAIDs was higher in participants...

  17. Cause-specific cardiovascular risk associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among myocardial infarction patients--a nationwide study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs increase mortality and morbidity after myocardial infarction (MI. We examined cause-specific mortality and morbidity associated with NSAIDs in a nationwide cohort of MI patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: By individual-level linkage of nationwide registries of hospitalization and drug dispensing from pharmacies in Denmark, patients aged >30 years admitted with first-time MI during 1997-2009 and their subsequent NSAID use were identified. The risk of three cardiovascular specific endpoints: cardiovascular death, the composite of coronary death and nonfatal MI, and the composite of fatal and nonfatal stroke, associated with NSAID use was analyzed by Cox proportional hazard analyses. Of 97,698 patients included 44.0% received NSAIDs during follow-up. Overall use of NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-1.49. In particular use of the nonselective NSAID diclofenac and the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death (HR 1.96 [1.79-2.15] and HR1.66 [1.44-1.91], respectively with a dose dependent increase in risk. Use of ibuprofen was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death (HR 1.34[1.26-1.44], whereas naproxen was associated with the lowest risk of (e.g., HR 1.27[1.01-1.59]. CONCLUSION: Use of individual NSAIDs is associated with different cause-specific cardiovascular risk and in particular rofecoxib and diclofenac were associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. These results support caution with use of all NSAIDs in patients with prior MI.

  18. Rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors in combination for rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang W Bolten

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang W BoltenDivision of Rheumatology, Klaus-Miehlke Klinik, Wiesbaden, GermanyAbstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are successfully used to alleviate pain and inflammation in rheumatic diseases. In an appreciable percentage of cases, the use of systemic NSAIDs is associated with adverse lesions of the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa up to life-threatening perforations, ulcers, and bleeding. Reliable warning signals mostly do not arise. Therefore, it is important to take preventive measures to reduce the GI risk. One established method is to assign cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2-specific inhibitors (coxibs instead of traditional NSAIDs (tNSAIDs. Coxibs spare in part the endogenous gastroprotective mechanisms. Another reliable choice to improve the GI safety is the comedication of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs to suppress gastric acid. A fixed NSAID/PPI combination ensures expected protective effects by improving patients’ PPI adherence and physicians’ PPI prescription persistence. A fixed combination of enteric-coated naproxen and immediate-release esomeprazole has just been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. PPI combinations with aspirin, other tNSAIDs, and coxibs are desirable. Patients in all risk groups, even patients at low risk of GI adverse events, benefit from concomitant protective measures. Moreover, the literature suggests that NSAID/PPI combinations are cost effective, including for patients in low-GI-risk groups. Pricing of fixed NSAID/PPI combinations will play a pivotal role for their broad acceptance in the future.Keywords: PPI, NSAID, fixed combination, gastrointestinal, adverse events, prevention

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug related upper gastrointestinal bleeding: types of drug use and patient profiles in real clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostres, Carlos; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patrica; Lanas, Angel

    2017-10-01

    The best available evidence regarding non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding comes from randomized controlled trials including patients who use NSAIDs to manage chronic rheumatic diseases; however, patients with varying background profiles commonly take NSAIDs for many other reasons, often without prescription, and such usage has not been well studied. To define the characteristics of patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding in clinical practice, we conducted a case-control study among patients with endoscopy-proven major upper GI bleeding due to gastroduodenal peptic lesions and control subjects. We used adjusted logistic regression models to estimate bleeding risks. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 22.0. Our analysis included 3785 cases and 6540 controls, including 1270 cases (33.55%) and 834 controls (12.75%) reporting recent use (upper GI bleeding, with an adjusted relative risk of 4.86 (95% CI, 4.32-5.46). Acute musculoskeletal pain (36.1%), chronic osteoarthritis (13.5%), and headache (13.6%) were the most common reasons for NSAID use. Among cases, only 17.31% took NSAIDs and 6.38% took high dose ASA due to chronic osteoarthritis. Demographic characteristics significantly differed between subjects with chronic vs. acute musculoskeletal pain. Proton pump inhibitor use was significantly higher in patients who used NSAIDs due to chronic osteoarthritis compared to patients with acute musculoskeletal pain. NSAID (65.15%) or high-dose ASA use (65.83%) preceding upper GI bleeding was most often short-term. In over half of cases (63.62%), the upper GI bleeding event was not preceded by dyspeptic warning symptoms. The majority of patients hospitalized due to NSAID-related upper GI bleeding reported short-term NSAID use for reasons other than chronic rheumatic disease. These findings suggest that current prevention strategies may not reach a wide population of short-term NSAID users.

  20. Study of Osteoarthritis Treatment with Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor and Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsik Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with osteoarthritis (OA, a condition characterized by cartilage degradation, are often treated with steroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 selective NSAIDs. Due to their inhibition of the inflammatory cascade, the drugs affect the balance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and inflammatory cytokines, resulting in preservation of extracellular matrix (ECM. To compare the effects of these treatments on chondrocyte metabolism, TNF-α was incubated with cultured chondrocytes to mimic a proinflammatory environment with increasing production of MMP-1 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The chondrocytes were then treated with either a steroid (prednisone, a nonspecific COX inhibitor NSAID (piroxicam, or a COX-2 selective NSAID (celecoxib. Both prednisone and celecoxib decreased MMP-1 and PGE-2 production while the nonspecific piroxicam decreased only the latter. Both prednisone and celecoxib decreased gene expression of MMP-1 and increased expression of aggrecan. Increased gene expression of type II collagen was also noted with celecoxib. The nonspecific piroxicam did not show these effects. The efficacy of celecoxib in vivo was investigated using a posttraumatic OA (PTOA mouse model. In vivo, celecoxib increases aggrecan synthesis and suppresses MMP-1. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that celecoxib and steroids exert similar effects on MMP-1 and PGE2 production in vitro and that celecoxib may demonstrate beneficial effects on anabolic metabolism in vivo.

  1. Differential involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome P450 activity, and active transport in the toxicity of structurally related NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, J.S.; Unlü, B; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Vos, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain and inflammation. However, this group of drugs is associated with serious adverse drug reactions. Previously, we studied the mechanisms underlying toxicity of the NSAID diclofenac using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  2. [Recommendation for the prevention and treatment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal ulcers and its complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a broad class of non glucocorticoid drugs which are extensively used in anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic therapies. However, NSAIDs may cause many side effects, most commonly in gastrointestinal(GI) tract. Cardiovascular system, kidney, liver, central nervous system and hematopoietic system are also involved. NSAID-induced GI side effects not only endanger the patients' health, increase mortality, but also greatly increase the cost of medical care. Therefore, how to reduce GI side effects is of particular concern to clinicians. The Chinese Rheumatism Data Center(CRDC) and Chinese Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Treatment and Research Group(CSTAR) compose a "Recommendation for the prevention and treatment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal ulcers and its complications" , as following: (1) GI lesions are the most common side effects of NSAIDs. (2) NSAID-induced GI side effects include gastritis, esophagitis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, bleeding, perforation and obstruction. (3) With the application of capsule endoscopy and small intestinal endoscopy, growing attention is being paid to the NASID-induced small intestine mucosa damage, which is mainly erosion and ulcer. (4) Risk factors related to NSAID-induced GI ulcers include: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, age> 65 years, past history of GI ulcers, high doses of NSAIDs, multiple-drug combination therapy, and comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease and nephropathy.(5) GI and cardiovascular function should be evaluated before using NSAIDs and gastric mucosal protective agents. (6) The risk of GI ulcers and complications caused by selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors is less than that of non-selective COX-2 inhibitors. (7)Hp eradication therapy helps to cure GI ulcers and prevent recurrence when Hp infection is positive in NSAID-induced ulcers. (8) Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is the first choice for the

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Duloxetine in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Who Used versus Did Not Use Concomitant Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs or Acetaminophen: A Post Hoc Pooled Analysis of 2 Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Skljarevski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This subgroup analysis assessed the efficacy of duloxetine in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP who did or did not use concomitant nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs or acetaminophen (APAP. Data were pooled from two 13-week randomized trials in patients with CLBP who were stratified according to NSAID/APAP use at baseline: duloxetine NSAID/APAP user (=137, placebo NSAID/APAP user (=82, duloxetine NSAID/APAP nonuser (=206, and placebo NSAID/APAP nonuser (=156. NSAID/APAP users were those patients who took NSAID/APAP for at least 14 days per month during 3 months prior to study entry. An analysis of covariance model that included therapy, study, baseline NSAID/APAP use (yes/no, and therapy-by-NSAID/APAP subgroup interaction was used to assess the efficacy. The treatment-by-NSAID/APAP use interaction was not statistically significant (=0.31 suggesting no substantial evidence of differential efficacy for duloxetine over placebo on pain reduction or improvement in physical function between concomitant NSAID/APAP users and non-users.

  4. Equilibrium thermodynamics of the partitioning of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs into human erythrocyte ghost membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Ahmed A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Bar diagram representing thermodynamic parameters obtained for the partitioning of NSAIDs into human erythrocyte ghost membranes at physiological pH; 7.4. Highlights: • Partition coefficients of NSAIDs into HEG membranes were determined. • Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and successfully analyzed. • Partitioning of NSAIDs into HEG membranes was exothermic. • Partitioning of NSAIDs into HEG is spontaneous with negative free energy values. • Identical partitioning enthalpy–entropy driven compensation mechanism was shown. -- Abstract: In this work,second derivative spectrophotometry was applied for determining the partition coefficients (K p s) of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; flufenamic, meclofenamic, mefenamic and niflumic acids) into human erythrocyte ghost (HEG) membranes over a temperature range from (283.2 to 313.2) K. The proposed method allowed the evaluation and direct analyses of thermodynamic parameters; enthalpy (ΔH W→M ), Gibbs energy (ΔG W→M ) and entropy (ΔS W→M ) changes of the partitioning of NSAIDs into HEG membranes. The partitioning of NSAIDs between polar aqueous phase and non-polar lipid bilayer HEG membrane phase was exothermic with negative (ΔH W→M ) which compensated for the changes in (ΔS W→M ). The negative values of (ΔG W→M ) revealed that the partitioning of NSAIDs into HEG, owing to their transfer from polar aqueous phase and non-polar HEG phase is spontaneous. The enthalpy–entropy correlation analysis resulted in a good linearity that suggests an identical partitioning enthalpy–entropy driven compensation mechanism for the studied NSAIDs

  5. N-Acetylcysteine enhances the action of anti-inflammatory drugs as suppressors of prostaglandin production in monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hoffer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX, the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for the synthesis of prostaglandins. Since oxygen free radicals can act as second cellular messengers, especially to modulate the metabolism of arachidonic acid and the prostaglandin tract, it seems plausible that antioxidants might affect the production of prostaglandin by activated cells. This research is focused on the effect of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC on the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 formation in activated monocytes by specific and non-specific COX inhibitors. We found that lipopolysaccharide-induced prostaglandin E2 formation was significantly reduced by rofecoxib and by diclofenac, two NSAIDs. Addition of NAC to each of these drugs enhanced the effect of the NSAIDs. These results suggest that one might expect either a potentiation of the anti-inflammatory effect of COX inhibitors by their simultaneous administration with NAC, or obtaining the same anti-inflammatory at lower drug levels.

  6. CYP2C9 polymorphism in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Juan; Yang, Xiu Yan; Qiao, Liang; Liang, Liu Qin; Chen, Min Hu

    2008-05-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) induce gastroduodenal mucosal injury and are metabolized by cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9). It is postulated that CYP2C9 genotype is associated with NSAID-induced gastropathy. This study aims to determine whether individuals with a CYP2C9 allele mutation are susceptible to NSAID-induced gastropathy. A total of 109 patients diagnosed as having rheumatic diseases and taking NSAID were appraised as having gastropathy by endoscopy, stool occult blood test and questionnaire two weeks after entering the study. Their peripheral blood was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). A total of 47.7% gastropathy (33% erosions, 14.7% ulcers, 2.75% ulcer bleeding) and 56% dyspeptic symptoms were presented. Only one CYP2C9*2 heterozygote (*1/*2) was found in the group with gastropathy and two variant alleles (CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9* 3) could not be found in the group without gastropathy. There was no significant difference in both CYP2C9 genotype (0.96%vs 0%) and CYP2C9 variant allele frequency (1.92%vs 0%) between patients with and without gastropathy. These results confirm the high prevalence of NSAID-induced gastropathy but do not support the postulation that CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 contribute to the development of NSAID-induced gastropathy. This may be due to the low frequency of the two alleles in the population studied.

  7. Development of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Models for Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery System of 2-Aryl Propionic Acid NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Wen Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed the quantative structure-property relationships (QSPRs models to correlate the molecular structures of surfactant, cosurfactant, oil, and drug with the solubility of poorly water-soluble 2-aryl propionic acid nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (2-APA-NSAIDs in self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDSs. The compositions were encoded with electronic, geometrical, topological, and quantum chemical descriptors. To obtain reliable predictions, we used multiple linear regression (MLR and artificial neural network (ANN methods for model development. The obtained equations were validated using a test set of 42 formulations and showed a great predictive power, and linear models were found to be better than nonlinear ones. The obtained QSPR models would greatly facilitate fast screening for the optimal formulations of SEDDS at the early stage of drug development and minimize experimental effort.

  8. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornebroek, Marjolijn; de Lau, Lonneke M L; Haag, Mendel D M; Koudstaal, Peter J; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H C; Breteler, Monique M B

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role of inflammatory processes in Parkinson disease, although it is still unclear whether inflammation is a cause or rather a consequence of neurodegeneration. In a prospective population-based cohort study among 6,512 participants aged >or=55 years, with repeated in-person examination, we evaluated the association between cumulative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the risk of Parkinson disease. Complete information on filled prescriptions was available from automated pharmacy records. Data were analyzed by means of Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking habits and coffee consumption. After an average 9.4 years of follow-up, 88 new cases of Parkinson disease were detected. No association was found between use of NSAIDs and the risk of Parkinson disease (adjusted hazard ratio for any NSAID use, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-2.37). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that NSAIDs might decrease the risk of Parkinson disease. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Management of NSAID-associated peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcarne, Luigi; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Calvet, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use increases the risk of gastrointestinal complications such as ulcers or bleeding. The presence of factors like advanced age, history of peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection and the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents increase this risk further. COX-2 inhibitors and antisecretory drugs, particularly proton pump inhibitors, help to minimize the risk of gastrointestinal complications in high-risk patients. This review presents a practical approach to the prevention and treatment of NSAID-associated peptic ulcer disease and examines the new advances in the rational use of NSAIDs.

  10. Safe use of NSAIDs and RAS-inhibitors at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital, Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulendijks, L.G.; Adomako, E.A.; Appiah, E.B.; Kramers, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preventable adverse events of medication are an important cause of hospital admissions in the developed world, in which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS-) inhibitors are frequently involved. NSAIDs and RAS-inhibitors are also often used in

  11. [Experience of treatment of patients with gastropathy induced by non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhrushev, Ia M; Loshchakova, O Iu

    2007-01-01

    A complex study of 147 patients who were taking non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) revealed gastric lesions in 120 patients (81.6%). H2 blocker (ranitidine) was used for treating 40 patients with NSAID-induced gastropathy, proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole) was used for 40 patients, and Gastrozepin combined with Misoprostol--for 40 patients. Pain syndrome and dyspepsia were eliminated in most of the patients as a result of the treatment. Using Gastrozepin and Misoprostol produced an active effect on the trophic processes in the gastric mucous coat and caused erosion and ulcer healing. As compared to ranitidine and omeprazole, Gastrozepin used in combination with Cytotec produces a lower effect on the reduction of the acid-producing stomach function, yet it has a considerably greater effect on the normalization of the gastric mucus structure and restoration of metabolism of the gastric mucous coat collagen.

  12. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of pain due to soft tissue injury: diclofenac epolamine topical patch

    OpenAIRE

    Lionberger, David

    2010-01-01

    David R Lionberger1, Michael J Brennan21Southwest Orthopedic Group, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT, USAAbstract: The objective of this article is to review published clinical data on diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP) in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries, such as strains, sprains, and contusions. Review of published literature on topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac, and DETP in patients with ac...

  13. Differential impairment of aspirin-dependent platelet cyclooxygenase acetylation by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanwen; Fries, Susanne; Li, Ruizhi; Lawson, John A.; Propert, Kathleen J.; Diamond, Scott L.; Blair, Ian A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Grosser, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be influenced by interactions with antiplatelet doses of aspirin. We sought to quantitate precisely the propensity of commonly consumed NSAIDs—ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib—to cause a drug–drug interaction with aspirin in vivo by measuring the target engagement of aspirin directly by MS. We developed a novel assay of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) acetylation in platelets isolated from volunteers who were administered aspirin and used conventional and microfluidic assays to evaluate platelet function. Although ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib all had the potential to compete with the access of aspirin to the substrate binding channel of COX-1 in vitro, exposure of volunteers to a single therapeutic dose of each NSAID followed by 325 mg aspirin revealed a potent drug–drug interaction between ibuprofen and aspirin and between naproxen and aspirin but not between celecoxib and aspirin. The imprecision of estimates of aspirin consumption and the differential impact on the ability of aspirin to inactivate platelet COX-1 will confound head-to-head comparisons of distinct NSAIDs in ongoing clinical studies designed to measure their cardiovascular risk. PMID:25385584

  14. Inhibition of tolbutamide 4-methylhydroxylation by a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in V79-NH cells expressing human cytochrome P4502C10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, W.A.; Groene, E.M. de; Kleij, L.A.; Witkamp, R.F.; Zweers-Zeilmaker, W.M.; Feron, V.J.; Horbach, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    1. To study the role of cytochrome P4502C10 in the metabolism of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) diclofenac, phenylbutazone, fenoprofen, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen, a cell line was developed stably expressing CYP2C10 cDNA. A retroviral vector construct,

  15. Long-term cardiovascular risk of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use according to time passed after first-time myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Fosbøl, Emil L; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular risk after the first myocardial infarction (MI) declines rapidly during the first year. We analyzed whether the cardiovascular risk associated with using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with the time elapsed following first-time MI....

  16. Interaction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2/ABCC2- and MRP4/ABCC4-mediated methotrexate transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Sheikh, A.A.K.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has been used in combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of inflammatory diseases as well as malignancies. Especially at high MTX dosages, severe adverse effects with this combination may occur, usually resulting from an impaired renal

  17. Use of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in high doses increases mortality and risk of reinfarction in patients with prior myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and other nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk, but the risk in patients with established cardiovascular disease is unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the risk of...

  18. Previous use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anticoagulants: the influence on clinical outcome of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeburg, E. M.; de Bruijne, H. W.; Snel, P.; Bartelsman, J. W.; Rauws, E. A.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between prior non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or anticoagulant use and clinical outcome in bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer patients. Prospective cohort-study. All patients (n = 132) admitted because of upper gastrointestinal bleeding during 3 months in

  19. Site-specific effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug lysine clonixinate on rat brain opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, E; Coirini, H; Pico, J C

    1999-04-01

    In addition to effects in the periphery through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, several lines of evidence suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act in the central nervous system. The possibility that the central action of NSAIDs involves regulation of opioid receptors was investigated by quantitative autoradiography of mu, delta, and kappa sites in rat brain slices. Increased (p lysine clonixinate. Labeling of delta receptors was lower in the lateral septum, and kappa sites decreased in thalamic nuclei. These effects were not mediated through direct interaction with opioid-binding sites, since receptor-binding assays using rat brain membranes confirmed that clonixinate up to 1 x 10(-4) mol/l does not inhibit mu, delta, and kappa receptor specific binding. Central effects of NSAIDs might, therefore, involve interaction with the opioid receptor system through indirect mechanisms.

  20. Association between frequent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Raghu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eighty percent of all breast cancers and almost 90% of breast cancer deaths occur among post-menopausal women. We used a nested case control design to examine the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use and breast cancer occurrence among women over 65 years of age. The cyclooxygenase (COX-2 enzyme is expressed more in breast cancers than in normal breast tissue. COX-2 inhibition may have a role in breast cancer prevention. Methods In the Canadian province of Quebec, physician services are covered through a governmental insurance plan. Medication costs are covered for those ≥ 65 years of age and a publicly funded screening program for breast cancer targets all women 50 years of age or older. We obtained encrypted data from these insurance databases on all women ≥ 65 years of age who filled a prescription for COX-2 inhibitors, non-selective NSAIDs (ns-NSAIDs, aspirin, or acetaminophen between January 1998 and December 2002. Cases were defined as those women who have undergone mammography between April 2001 and June 2002 and had a diagnosis of breast cancer within six months following mammography. Controls included those who have undergone mammography between April 2001 and June 2002 without a diagnosis of any cancer during the six months following mammography. The exposure of interest, frequent NSAID use, was defined as use of ns-NSAIDs and/or COX-2 inhibitors for ≥ 90 days during the year prior to mammography. Frequent use served as a convenient proxy for long term chronic use. Results We identified 1,090 cases and 44,990 controls. Cases were older and more likely to have breast cancer risk factors. Logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders showed that frequent use of ns-NSAIDs and/or COX-2 inhibitors was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer (OR: 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.64–0.89. Results were similar for COX-2 inhibitors (0.81, 0.68–0.97 and ns-NSAIDs (0

  1. The diamine oxidase gene is associated with hypersensitivity response to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A G Agúndez

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs most frequently involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions. Histamine is released in the allergic response to NSAIDs and is responsible for some of the clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical association of functional polymorphisms in the genes coding for enzymes involved in histamine homeostasis with hypersensitivity response to NSAIDs. We studied a cohort of 442 unrelated Caucasian patients with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. Patients who experienced three or more episodes with two or more different NSAIDs were included. If this requirement was not met diagnosis was established by challenge. A total of 414 healthy unrelated controls ethnically matched with patients and from the same geographic area were recruited. Analyses of the SNPs rs17740607, rs2073440, rs1801105, rs2052129, rs10156191, rs1049742 and rs1049793 in the HDC, HNMT and DAO genes were carried out by means of TaqMan assays. The detrimental DAO 16 Met allele (rs10156191, which causes decreased metabolic capacity, is overrepresented among patients with crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs with an OR  = 1.7 (95% CI  = 1.3-2.1; Pc  = 0.0003 with a gene-dose effect (P = 0.0001. The association was replicated in two populations from different geographic areas (Pc  = 0.008 and Pc  = 0.004, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The DAO polymorphism rs10156191 which causes impaired metabolism of circulating histamine is associated with the clinical response in crossed-hypersensitivity to NSAIDs and could be used as a biomarker of response.

  2. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and prostate cancer risk: a population-based nested case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheddin M Mahmud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite strong laboratory evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs could prevent prostate cancer, epidemiological studies have so far reported conflicting results. Most studies were limited by lack of information on dosage and duration of use of the different classes of NSAIDs. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study using data from Saskatchewan Prescription Drug Plan (SPDP and Cancer Registry to examine the effects of dose and duration of use of five classes of NSAIDs on prostate cancer risk. Cases (N = 9,007 were men aged ≥40 years diagnosed with prostatic carcinoma between 1985 and 2000, and were matched to four controls on age and duration of SPDP membership. Detailed histories of exposure to prescription NSAIDs and other drugs were obtained from the SPDP. RESULTS: Any use of propionates (e.g., ibuprofen, naproxen was associated with a modest reduction in prostate cancer risk (Odds ratio = 0.90; 95%CI 0.84-0.95, whereas use of other NSAIDs was not. In particular, we did not observe the hypothesized inverse association with aspirin use (1.01; 0.95-1.07. There was no clear evidence of dose-response or duration-response relationships for any of the examined NSAID classes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest modest benefits of at least some NSAIDs in reducing prostate cancer risk.

  3. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of bladder cancer: a population based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heaney John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of phenacetin and other analgesic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs potentially influences bladder cancer incidence, but epidemiologic evidence is limited. Methods We analyzed data from 376 incident bladder cancer cases and 463 controls from a population-based case-control study in New Hampshire on whom regular use of analgesic drugs and NSAIDs was obtained. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed using logistic regression with adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Separate models by tumor stage, grade and TP53 status were conducted. Results We found an elevated odds ratio (OR associated with reported use of phenacetin-containing medications, especially with longer duration of use (OR >8 years = 3.00, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.4–6.5. In contrast, use of paracetamol did not relate overall to risk of bladder cancer. We also found that regular use of any NSAID was associated with a statistically significant decrease in bladder cancer risk (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4–0.9, and specifically use of aspirin. Further, the association with NSAID use was largely among invasive, high grade and TP53 positive tumors. Conclusion While these agents have been investigated in several studies, a number of questions remain regarding the effects of analgesic and NSAID use on risk of bladder cancer.

  4. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M; Bliddal, Henning; Furst, Daniel E; Boers, Maarten; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Rasmussen, Mette; Christensen, Robin

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs. We performed a systematic search in Medline via PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBase via OVID, the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science, and other sources. Eligible trials were parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of oral NSAID therapy in RA patients for which there were extractable CRP data. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated from the differences in means of CRP levels between groups (active treatment minus placebo) divided by the pooled SDs. For the meta-analysis, a random-effects model was used to estimate the overall change in CRP level, and stratified analysis was used to examine differences among NSAIDs. We included 19 trials of 10 different NSAIDs. Overall, NSAIDs showed no effect on the CRP level (SMD 0.01 [95% CI -0.03, 0.06], P = 0.62). However, the prespecified stratified analysis indicated varying effects on the CRP level according to the different NSAIDs; lumiracoxib caused a statistically significant and consistent (I(2) = 0%) increase in the CRP level (SMD 0.13 [95% CI 0.01, 0.25], P = 0.037), whereas naproxen caused a statistically significant and consistent (I(2) = 0%) decrease in the CRP level (SMD -0.11 [95% CI -0.20, -0.02], P = 0.022). Overall, NSAIDs have no effect on the CRP level. However, the nonselective NSAID naproxen was associated with a significant decrease in the CRP level, whereas the cyclooxygenase 2-selective NSAID lumiracoxib was associated with a significant increase in the CRP level. This finding is interesting considering the suspected influence of NSAIDs on cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. NSAIDs: the Emperor’s new dogma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, I; Takeuchi, K; Simpson, R

    2003-01-01

    The spectacular marketing success of the selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors is largely based on efficacy comparable with conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with vastly improved gastrointestinal safety. The additional key to the marketing success is the purity and simplicity of the message—that is, COX-1 inhibition causes the gastrointestinal side effects of NSAIDs (COX-1 dogma) while COX-2 blocking confers the therapeutic benefits (COX-2 dogma). Adherence to the COX dogmas with development of COX-2 selective agents has undoubtedly benefited many patients, but ironically their scientific basis is now seriously challenged by experimentation. PMID:12912873

  6. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in late pregnancy and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Marter, Linda J; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Werler, Martha M; Louik, Carol; Mitchell, Allen A

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a clinical syndrome of late-preterm and full-term infants associated with failure of the normal fetal-to-neonatal circulatory transition. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that risk for PPHN is increased after antenatal exposure to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with particular emphasis on late gestational exposures. Between 1998 and 2003, we interviewed 377 women whose infants had PPHN and 836 control mothers of infants matched to cases by hospital and birth date. Interviews captured information on prescription and over-the-counter medication use in pregnancy as well as a variety of potential confounding factors. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for third-trimester maternal NSAID use were estimated by using multivariate conditional logistic regression. During the third trimester of gestation, 33 infants (8.8%) with PPHN were exposed to any NSAID compared with 80 (9.6%) controls (OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.5-1.3). We observed an elevated OR for PPHN risk among infants whose mothers consumed aspirin during the third-trimester; however, the lower 95% CI included the null. Neither nonaspirin NSAIDs at any time during pregnancy nor ibuprofen use during the third trimester was associated with an elevated risk of PPHN. Similarly, no association was observed between a mother's third-trimester acetaminophen use and the occurrence of PPHN in her newborn. This large multicenter epidemiologic study of PPHN risk revealed no evidence to support the hypothesis that maternal consumption during pregnancy of NSAIDs overall or ibuprofen in particular is associated with PPHN risk.

  7. Implementing ecopharmacovigilance (EPV) from a pharmacy perspective: A focus on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; He, Bingshu; Yan, Dan; Hu, Xiamin

    2017-12-15

    Environmental experts have made great efforts to control pharmaceutical pollution. However, the control of emerged environmental problems caused by medicines should draw more attention of pharmacy and pharmacovigilance researchers. Ecopharmacovigilance (EPV) as a kind of pharmacovigilance for the environment is recognized worldwide as crucial to minimize the environmental risk of pharmaceutical pollutants. But continuing to treat the pollution of pharmaceuticals as a group of substances instead of targeting individual pharmaceuticals on a prioritized basis will lead to a significant waste of resources. Considering vulture population decline caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) residues, we presented a global-scale analysis of 139 reports of NSAIDs occurrence across 29 countries, in order to provide a specific context for implementing EPV. We found a heavy regional bias toward research in Europe, Asia and America. The top 5 most frequently studied NSAIDs included ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, acetaminophen and ketoprofen. The profile of NSAIDs was dominated by acetaminophen in wastewater influents and effluents. Ibuprofen was the most abundant NSAID in surface water. Only 9 NSAIDs were reported in groundwater samples. And majority of NSAIDs were detected in solid matrices at below 1μg/g except for ketoprofen, diclofenac and ibuprofen. From a pharmacy perspective, we get some implication and propose some management practice options for EPV implementation. These include: Further popularizing and applying the concept of EPV, together with developing relevant regulatory guidance, is necessary; More attention should be paid to how to implement EPV for the pollution control of older established drugs; Triggering "a dynamic watch-list mechanism" in conjunction with "source control"; Implementing targeted sewage treatment technologies and strengthening multidisciplinary collaboration; Pharmaceutical levels in aquatic organisms as biological

  8. Dilemma of Timing of Administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents in Relation to Food in the Prevention of Drug Induced Gastritis: Debusting the Myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaykumar, Padmaja; Udaykumar, K; Scandashree, K; Anurag, K

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the signals that indicate the possible benefits of administering Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) at the initiation of meal, compared to immediately after food. This was a randomized, controlled, pilot study in 160 patients who received only NSAIDs for various pain conditions. Patients were randomized to Group I (control group) -NSAID After Food (AF), Group II-NSAID Before Food (BF), Group III-NSAID BF for 2 days and then crossed over to AF for next two days (CO-1) and Group IV-NSAID AF for 2 days and then crossed over to BF for next two days (C0-2 group). Group III & Group IV were given a washout period of 48 hours after the initial two days of treatment. All were followed up for the next 2 drug free days. Patients were observed for the development of gastritis (epigastric distress, epigastric pain, nausea, fullness of stomach, repeated reflux) throughout the study. Symptoms of gastritis were seen in 6.45% (2/31) and 36.11% (13/36) patients in group I and II, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the development of gastritis in AF group. However, statistically significant difference (Pgastritis. Administering NSAIDs at the initiation of meal is better tolerated as indicated by the lower incidence of gastritis. If proved in larger population, routine concurrent administration of medication for prevention of gastritis can be avoided.

  9. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions: an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable signalling of these possible interactions, which are often not explicitly reported, utilising reports of adverse drug reactions in data sets of SRS. As an example, the influence of concomitant use of diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on symptoms indicating a decreased efficacy of diuretics was examined using reports received by the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb. Reports received between 1 January 1990 and 1 January 1999 of patients older than 50 years were included in the study. Cases were defined as reports with symptoms indicating a decreased efficacy of diuretics, non-cases as all other reports. Exposure categories were the use of NSAIDs or diuretics versus the use of neither of these drugs. The influence of the combined use of both drugs was examined using logistic regression analysis. The odds ratio of the statistical interaction term of the combined use of both drugs was increased [adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.7], which may indicate an enhanced effect of concomitant drug use. The findings illustrate that spontaneous reporting systems have a potential for signal detection and the analysis of possible drug-drug interactions. The method described may enable a more active approach in the detection of drug-drug interactions after marketing.

  10. Impact of proton pump inhibitor treatment on gastrointestinal bleeding associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use among post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics and treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? METHODS: This was a nationwide cohort study based on linked.......95) regardless of antithrombotic treatment regimen, type of NSAID, and type of PPI used. The main limitation of the study is its observational non-randomised design. The results suggest that PPI treatment probably has a beneficial effect regardless of underlying gastrointestinal risk and that when NSAIDs cannot...... of NSAID, and type of PPI used. FUNDING, COMPETING INTERESTS, DATA SHARING: AMSO has received a grant from the Danish Council of Independent Research (grant 12-132760). GHG is supported by an unrestricted research scholarship from the Novo Nordisk Foundation....

  11. Preventive efficacy and safety of rebamipide in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mucosal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Soo-Heon; Cho, Chul-Soo; Lee, Soo Teik; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Kim, Sung Kook; Kang, Young Mo; Rew, Jong Sun; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Yong Chan; Park, Won; Lee, Don-Haeng

    2014-07-01

    The use of proton pump inhibitors or misoprostol is known to prevent the gastrointestinal complications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rebamipide is known to increase the mucosal generation of prostaglandins and to eliminate free oxygen radicals, thus enhancing the protective function of the gastric mucosa. However, it is unknown whether rebamipide plays a role in preventing NSAID-induced gastropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rebamipide compared to misoprostol in preventing NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications in patients requiring continuous NSAID treatment. We studied 479 patients who required continuous NSAID treatment. The patients were randomly assigned to groups that received 100 mg of rebamipide three times per day or 200 μg of misoprostol three times per day for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint of the analysis was the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers, as determined by endoscopy after 12 weeks of therapy. Of the 479 patients in the study, 242 received rebamipide, and 237 received misoprostol. Ultimately, 44 patients (18.6%) withdrew from the misoprostol group and 25 patients (10.3%) withdrew from the rebamipide group. There was a significant difference in withdrawal rate between the two groups (p=0.0103). The per protocol analysis set was not valid because of the dropout rate of the misoprostol group; thus, the intention to treat (ITT) analysis set is the main set for the efficacy analysis in this study. After 12 weeks, the occurrence rate of gastric ulcers was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (20.3% vs 21.9%, p=0.6497) according to ITT analysis. In addition, the therapeutic failure rate was similar in the rebamipide and misoprostol groups (13.6% vs 13.1%, p=0.8580). The total severity score of the gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly lower in the rebamipide group than in the misoprostol group (p=0.0002). The amount of antacid used was significantly lower in the rebamipide

  12. Qing Dai attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in gastrointestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Rie; Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Nagano, Yumiko; Suzuki, Hideo; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Mizokami, Yuji; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2015-01-01

    Treatments with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have increased the number of patients with gastrointestinal complications. Qing Dai has been traditionally used in Chinese herbal medicine for various inflammatory diseases such as ulcerative colitis. We previously reported that Qing Dai suppressed inflammations by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ulcerative colitis patients. Thus, Qing Dai can attenuate the production of ROS, which play an important role in NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injuries. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Qing Dai decreased mitochondrial ROS production in NSAID-treated gastrointestinal cells by examining cellular injury, mitochondrial membrane potentials, and ROS production with specific fluorescent indicators. We also performed electron paramagnetic resonance measurement in isolated mitochondria with a spin-trapping reagent (CYPMPO or DMPO). Treatments with indomethacin and aspirin induced cellular injury and mitochondrial impairment in the gastrointestinal cells. Under these conditions, mitochondrial alterations were observed on electron microscopy. Qing Dai prevented these complications by suppressing ROS production in gastrointestinal cells. These results indicate that Qing Dai attenuated the ROS production from the NSAID-induced mitochondrial alteration in the gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Qing Dai treatment may be considered effective for the prevention NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injury.

  13. Use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; García-Rodríguez, L A; Sørensen, H T

    2013-01-01

    Background:Few studies have examined the association between use of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of glioma and the results have been equivocal. We therefore investigated the influence of NSAID use on glioma risk in a nationwide setting.Methods:We used...... exposure to low-dose aspirin or non-aspirin (NA) NSAIDs into ever use or long-term use, defined as continuous use for 5 years. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for glioma associated with NSAID use, adjusted for potential...... confounders.Results:A total of 2688 glioma cases and 18 848 population controls were included in the study. Ever use of low-dose aspirin (OR=0.90; 95% CI: 0.77-1.04) or NA-NSAIDs (OR=1.05; 95% CI: 0.96-1.14) was not associated with glioma risk. Compared with never use, long-term use of low-dose aspirin...

  14. [Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastropathy and preventive effects of teprenone on the gastropathy in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Juan; Yuan, Gang; Chen, Min-hu

    2006-10-31

    To construct the model of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and observe the preventive effects of Teprenone on it in rats. Ninety-one male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into normal saline group, model group (I) and prophylaxis group (II). Group I includes four subgroups (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id) treated by indomethacin (5 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)), combination of indomethacin (5 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) and prednisone (10 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)), celecoxib (100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) and combination of celecoxib (100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) and prednisone (10 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) respectively. Group II also includes four subgroups (IIa, IIb, IIc, IId) pretreated by teprenone (12 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) compared with group I. Lesion index (LI), pathohistology index, cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA detected by RT-PCR were observed after 4 days. Compared with normal saline group, LI (11.00 (1.00 - 22.5), 8.50 (0.75 - 14.50), 11.00 (3.50 - 14.75), P NSAID. Prednisone could promote the risk in NSAID induced gastropathy. In addition to COX-1 inhibition, other factors might also involved in NSAID induced gastropathy. Teprenone could prevented from NSAID induced gastropathy but the actions might be not associated with COXs.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy of Topically Applied Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Retinochoroidal Tissues in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Kozai, Seiko; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Isaka, Mitsuyoshi; Tokushige, Hideki; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of topically applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the retinochoroidal tissues of rabbits. Methods The cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity of diclofenac, bromfenac, and amfenac, an active metabolite of nepafenac, were determined using human-derived COX-1 and COX-2. Each of the three NSAIDs was applied topically to rabbits, and after 0.5 to 8 hrs, the concentration of each drug in the aqueous humor and the retinochoroidal tissues was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics of the drugs in the tissues after repeated doses as is done on patients was calculated by a simulation software. The inhibitory effect of each NSAID on the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier was assessed by the vitreous protein concentration on concanavalin A-induced retinochoroidal inflammation in rabbits. Results The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of diclofenac, bromfenac, and amfenac was 55.5, 5.56, and 15.3 nM for human COX-1, and 30.7, 7.45, and 20.4 nM for human COX-2, respectively. The three NSAIDs were detected in the aqueous humor and the retinochoroidal tissue at all-time points. Simulated pharmacokinetics showed that the levels of the three NSAIDs were continuously higher than the IC50 of COX-2, as an index of efficacy, in the aqueous humor, whereas only the bromfenac concentration was continuously higher than the IC50 at its trough level in the retinochoroidal tissues. The intravitreous concentration of proteins was significantly reduced in rabbits that received topical bromfenac (P = 0.026) but not the other two NSAIDs. Conclusions Topical bromfenac can penetrate into the retinochoroidal tissues in high enough concentrations to inhibit COX-2 and exerts its inhibitory effect on the blood-retinal barrier breakdown in an experimental retinochoroidal inflammation in rabbits. Topical bromfenac may have a better therapeutic benefit than diclofenac and

  16. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of topically applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in retinochoroidal tissues in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Kida

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of topically applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the retinochoroidal tissues of rabbits. METHODS: The cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitory activity of diclofenac, bromfenac, and amfenac, an active metabolite of nepafenac, were determined using human-derived COX-1 and COX-2. Each of the three NSAIDs was applied topically to rabbits, and after 0.5 to 8 hrs, the concentration of each drug in the aqueous humor and the retinochoroidal tissues was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics of the drugs in the tissues after repeated doses as is done on patients was calculated by a simulation software. The inhibitory effect of each NSAID on the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier was assessed by the vitreous protein concentration on concanavalin A-induced retinochoroidal inflammation in rabbits. RESULTS: The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of diclofenac, bromfenac, and amfenac was 55.5, 5.56, and 15.3 nM for human COX-1, and 30.7, 7.45, and 20.4 nM for human COX-2, respectively. The three NSAIDs were detected in the aqueous humor and the retinochoroidal tissue at all-time points. Simulated pharmacokinetics showed that the levels of the three NSAIDs were continuously higher than the IC50 of COX-2, as an index of efficacy, in the aqueous humor, whereas only the bromfenac concentration was continuously higher than the IC50 at its trough level in the retinochoroidal tissues. The intravitreous concentration of proteins was significantly reduced in rabbits that received topical bromfenac (P = 0.026 but not the other two NSAIDs. CONCLUSIONS: Topical bromfenac can penetrate into the retinochoroidal tissues in high enough concentrations to inhibit COX-2 and exerts its inhibitory effect on the blood-retinal barrier breakdown in an experimental retinochoroidal inflammation in rabbits. Topical bromfenac may have a better therapeutic benefit

  17. Amtolmetin: A Reappraisal of NSAID with Gastroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Shoeb, Ahsan; Moodahadu, Latha Subramanya; Sharma, Akhilesh; Gandhi, Arul; Akku, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the gastrosparing effect of amtolmetin guacyl (AMG) against other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with osteo-/rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. A literature search was done in the electronic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase, and Scopus) with key words "amtolmetin guacyl", "amtolmetin", and "arthritis"; filters were applied to obtain publications between 01-Jan-1985 and 01-Oct-2015, which were "clinical trials" in osteo-/rheumatoid arthritis patients and in "English language." Studies were assessed using the Jadad criteria and trials with score ≥ 3 were included in the analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of AMG against other NSAIDs. Results. Search yielded 19 publications of which 3 were included for analysis. Baseline characteristics of patients were comparable between the AMG group and other NSAIDs (diclofenac, celecoxib, and piroxicam) groups in all trials. Efficacy of AMG was similar to the other NSAIDs compared in the trials. The number of adverse events (AEs) reported was similar between both the groups; however, severe AEs reported were significantly lower in the AMG group. Of note was the significant lower number of duodenal ulcers after treatment in the AMG group. Conclusions. AMG has efficacy similar to other NSAIDs and a safer gastrointestinal AE profile when compared to the other NSAIDs.

  18. Amtolmetin: A Reappraisal of NSAID with Gastroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the gastrosparing effect of amtolmetin guacyl (AMG against other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in patients with osteo-/rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. A literature search was done in the electronic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase, and Scopus with key words “amtolmetin guacyl”, “amtolmetin”, and “arthritis”; filters were applied to obtain publications between 01-Jan-1985 and 01-Oct-2015, which were “clinical trials” in osteo-/rheumatoid arthritis patients and in “English language.” Studies were assessed using the Jadad criteria and trials with score ≥ 3 were included in the analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of AMG against other NSAIDs. Results. Search yielded 19 publications of which 3 were included for analysis. Baseline characteristics of patients were comparable between the AMG group and other NSAIDs (diclofenac, celecoxib, and piroxicam groups in all trials. Efficacy of AMG was similar to the other NSAIDs compared in the trials. The number of adverse events (AEs reported was similar between both the groups; however, severe AEs reported were significantly lower in the AMG group. Of note was the significant lower number of duodenal ulcers after treatment in the AMG group. Conclusions. AMG has efficacy similar to other NSAIDs and a safer gastrointestinal AE profile when compared to the other NSAIDs.

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastroprotection with proton pump inhibitors: a focus on ketoprofen/omeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Antonio; Tagarro, Ignacio

    2012-04-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly prescribed agents for rheumatic disorders such as osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Despite the known association between NSAID use and gastropathy, however, only around one-third of patients at risk of NSAID-induced gastrointestinal toxicity receive adequate gastroprotection, and as many as 44% of these patients are non-adherent. We review the co-prescription of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy, with a particular focus on the first fixed-dose NSAID/PPI formulation: ketoprofen/omeprazole modified-release capsules. The ketoprofen/omeprazole fixed-dose combination is available in doses of 100 mg/20 mg, 150 mg/20 mg or 200 mg/20 mg as a single capsule for once-daily administration. Ketoprofen monotherapy has been shown to be generally equivalent to other NSAIDs when used in the treatment of OA. In RA, ketoprofen has demonstrated equivalent efficacy to diclofenac, indometacin, piroxicam, aceclofenac, phenylbutazone, naproxen and flurbiprofen. Studies comparing ketoprofen with ibuprofen and sulindac in patients with RA have, in general, favoured ketoprofen. Studies in AS have generally reported similar efficacy between ketoprofen and phenylbutazone and pirprofen. Prophylaxis with omeprazole is effective for the prevention of gastroduodenal ulcers, maintenance of remission and alleviation of dyspeptic symptoms in NSAID recipients. Omeprazole is well tolerated, and adverse events are generally gastrointestinal in nature. The fixed-dose combination of ketoprofen and omeprazole has demonstrated bioequivalence to the respective monotherapies. The incidence of digestive symptoms and the need for dose reduction was reported to be lower with the combination than with its components. Ketoprofen/omeprazole modified-release capsules are the first fixed-dose NSAID/PPI formulation to be approved. This formulation

  20. New guidelines for topical NSAIDs in the osteoarthritis treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Roy D

    2010-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, often affects hands, hips, and knees and involves an estimated 26.9 million US adults. Women have a higher prevalence of OA, and the risk of developing OA increases with age, obesity, and joint malalignment. OA typically presents with pain and reduced function. Therapeutic programs are often multimodal and must take into account pharmaceutical toxicities and patient comorbidities. For example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and renal adverse events. Topical NSAIDs offer efficacy with reduced systemic drug exposure. This is a review of current guideline recommendations regarding the use of topical NSAIDs in OA of the hand and knee. Articles were identified by PubMed search (January 1, 2000 to May 21, 2010). Several current guidelines for management of OA recommend topical NSAIDs, indicating them as a safe and effective treatment. One guideline recommends that topical NSAIDs be considered as first-line pharmacologic therapy. A US guideline for knee OA recommends topical NSAIDs in older patients and in patients with increased gastrointestinal risk. The consensus across US and European OA guidelines is that topical NSAIDs are a safe and effective treatment for OA. Because the research base on topical NSAIDs for OA is small, guidelines will continue to evolve.

  1. Prescribing patterns of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in chronic kidney disease patients in the South African private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwesen, Willem P; du Plessis, Jesslee M; Burger, Johanita R; Lubbe, Martie S; Cockeran, Marike

    2016-08-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used pharmaceutical agents worldwide. NSAIDs are considered nephrotoxic and should therefore be used with caution or be avoided completely in high risk patients, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Objective This study aimed to investigate the prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients in order to generate awareness and improve the outcome of these patients. Setting The study was conducted using medicine claims data in the private health sector of South Africa. Method A descriptive, quantitative study was performed, using retrospective data obtained from a Pharmaceutical Benefit Management company. Data from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013 were analysed. The study population consisted of all patients with an ICD-10 code for a CKD (N18), in association with a paid claim for an NSAID. Main outcome measure The stratification of NSAID prescribing volume among the CKD population in terms of gender, age, NSAID type, dosage and prescriber type. Results The prescribing of NSAIDs in CKD patients varied between 26 and 40 % over the 5 year study period. No association between gender and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was found, with p > 0.05 and Cramer's V < 0.1 for each year of the study. The association between age groups and CKD patients who received NSAIDs versus those who did not was statistically significant, but practically weak (p < 0.05; Cramer's V ≥ 0.1). Most NSAID prescriptions (52-63 %) were for patients aged 35-64 years. Diclofenac (34.25 %) was the single most frequently prescribed NSAID, but the COX-2-inhibitors (celecoxib, meloxicam and etoricoxib) were the preferred NSAID class to be prescribed. The majority (61.6 %) of the NSAIDs were prescribed by general medical practitioners in dosages meeting and even exceeding the recommended daily dosage of patients with normal kidney function. Conclusions Even though NSAIDs are

  2. Combinatorial effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and NF-κB inhibitors in ovarian cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F Zerbini

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have correlated the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID with reduced risk of ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer, diagnosed usually in late stages of the disease. We have previously established that the pro-apoptotic cytokine melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24 is a crucial mediator of NSAID-induced apoptosis in prostate, breast, renal and stomach cancer cells. In this report we evaluated various structurally different NSAIDs for their efficacies to induce apoptosis and mda-7/IL-24 expression in ovarian cancer cells. While several NSAIDs induced apoptosis, Sulindac Sulfide and Diclofenac most potently induced apoptosis and reduced tumor growth. A combination of these agents results in a synergistic effect. Furthermore, mda-7/IL-24 induction by NSAIDs is essential for programmed cell death, since inhibition of mda-7/IL-24 by small interfering RNA abrogates apoptosis. mda-7/IL-24 activation leads to upregulation of growth arrest and DNA damage inducible (GADD 45 α and γ and JNK activation. The NF-κB family of transcription factors has been implicated in ovarian cancer development. We previously established NF-κB/IκB signaling as an essential step for cell survival in cancer cells and hypothesized that targeting NF-κB could potentiate NSAID-mediated apoptosis induction in ovarian cancer cells. Indeed, combining NSAID treatment with NF-κB inhibitors led to enhanced apoptosis induction. Our results indicate that inhibition of NF-κB in combination with activation of mda-7/IL-24 expression may lead to a new combinatorial therapy for ovarian cancer.

  3. Modeling of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug effect within signaling pathways and miRNA-regulation pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    Full Text Available To date, it is widely recognized that Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs can exert considerable anti-tumor effects regarding many types of cancers. The prolonged use of NSAIDs is highly associated with diverse side effects. Therefore, tailoring down the NSAID application onto individual patients has become a necessary and relevant step towards personalized medicine. This study conducts the systemsbiological approach to construct a molecular model (NSAID model containing a cyclooxygenase (COX-pathway and its related signaling pathways. Four cancer hallmarks are integrated into the model to reflect different developmental aspects of tumorigenesis. In addition, a Flux-Comparative-Analysis (FCA based on Petri net is developed to transfer the dynamic properties (including drug responsiveness of individual cellular system into the model. The gene expression profiles of different tumor-types with available drug-response information are applied to validate the predictive ability of the NSAID model. Moreover, two therapeutic developmental strategies, synthetic lethality and microRNA (miRNA biomarker discovery, are investigated based on the COX-pathway. In conclusion, the result of this study demonstrates that the NSAID model involving gene expression, gene regulation, signal transduction, protein interaction and other cellular processes, is able to predict the individual cellular responses for different therapeutic interventions (such as NS-398 and COX-2 specific siRNA inhibition. This strongly indicates that this type of model is able to reflect the physiological, developmental and pathological processes of an individual. The approach of miRNA biomarker discovery is demonstrated for identifying miRNAs with oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions for individual cell lines of breast-, colon- and lung-tumor. The achieved results are in line with different independent studies that investigated miRNA biomarker related to diagnostics of cancer

  4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, and cognitive function in the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldstein, Shari R; Wendell, Carrington Rice; Seliger, Stephen L; Ferrucci, Luigi; Metter, E Jeffrey; Zonderman, Alan B

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relations between the use of nonaspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin and age-related change in multiple domains of cognitive function in community-dwelling individuals without dementia. Longitudinal, with measures obtained on one to 18 occasions over up to 45 years. General community. A volunteer sample of up to 2,300 participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging free of diagnosed dementia. At each visit, reported NSAID or aspirin use (yes/no) and tests of verbal and visual memory, attention, perceptuo-motor speed, confrontation naming, executive function, and mental status. Mixed-effects regression models revealed that NSAID use was associated with less prospective decline on the Blessed Information-Memory-Concentration (I-M-C) Test, a mental status test weighted for memory and concentration (Prelated to greater prospective decline on the Blessed I-M-C Test (Pfunction, but on only two cognitive measures. In contrast, aspirin use was associated with greater prospective cognitive decline on select measures, potentially reflecting its common use for vascular disease prophylaxis. Effect sizes were small, calling into question clinical significance, although overall public health significance may be meaningful.

  5. Effects of NSAIDs on the Inner Ear: Possible Involvement in Cochlear Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Hara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, two important enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism, are major targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Recent investigations suggest that arachidonic cascades and their metabolites may be involved in maintaining inner ear functions. The excessive use of aspirin may cause tinnitus in humans and impairment of the outer hair cell functions in experimental animals. On the other hand, NSAIDs reportedly exhibit protective effects against various kinds of inner ear disorder. The present review summarizes the effects of NSAIDs on cochlear pathophysiology. NSAIDs are a useful ameliorative adjunct in the management of inner ear disorders.

  6. Ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score is related to NSAID use, especially in patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbo, Marlies J G; Spoorenberg, Anneke; Maas, Fiona; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Bos, Reinhard; Bootsma, Hendrika; van der Veer, Eveline; Wink, Freke; Arends, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are regarded as the cornerstone of conventional treatment for AS. However little is known about concomitant NSAID use during treatment (with TNF-α inhibitors) in daily clinical practice. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Consecutive patients from the

  7. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal

  8. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors or nonselective NSAIDs plus gastroprotective agents: What to prescribe in daily clinical practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M.C. Masclee (Gwen); V.E. Valkhoff (Vera); E.M. van Soest; R. Schade (René); G. Mazzaglia (Giampiero); M. Molokhia (Mariam); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); J.L. Goldstein; S. Hernández-Díaz (Sonia); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground Two strategies for prevention of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) events for nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (nsNSAID) users are replacement of the nsNSAID by a cyclo-oxygenase-2-selective inhibitor (coxib) or co-prescription of a gastroprotective agent (GPA). Aim

  9. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease E2F1 expression and inhibit cell growth in ovarian cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca L Valle

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that the regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs drugs is associated with a reduced risk of various cancers. In addition, in vitro and experiments in mouse models have demonstrated that NSAIDs decrease tumor initiation and/or progression of several cancers. However, there are limited preclinical studies investigating the effects of NSAIDs in ovarian cancer. Here, we have studied the effects of two NSAIDs, diclofenac and indomethacin, in ovarian cancer cell lines and in a xenograft mouse model. Diclofenac and indomethacin treatment decreased cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, diclofenac and indomethacin reduced tumor volume in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. To identify possible molecular pathways mediating the effects of NSAID treatment in ovarian cancer, we performed microarray analysis of ovarian cancer cells treated with indomethacin or diclofenac. Interestingly, several of the genes found downregulated following diclofenac or indomethacin treatment are transcriptional target genes of E2F1. E2F1 was downregulated at the mRNA and protein level upon treatment with diclofenac and indomethacin, and overexpression of E2F1 rescued cells from the growth inhibitory effects of diclofenac and indomethacin. In conclusion, NSAIDs diclofenac and indomethacin exert an anti-proliferative effect in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo and the effects of NSAIDs may be mediated, in part, by downregulation of E2F1.

  10. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the influence of these drugs on muscle satellite cells is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a local NSAID infusion on satellite cells after unaccustomed eccentric...... exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... cells (CD68(+) or CD16(+) cells) was not significantly increased in either of the legs 8 days after exercise and was unaffected by the NSAID. The main finding in the present study was that the NSAID infusion for 7.5 h during the exercise day suppressed the exercise-induced increase in the number...

  11. The peculiarities of pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastrointestinal injuries and current prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatol Święcicki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are among the most widely used medications. However, NSAID intake is accompanied by an increased risk of gastroduodenal side effects. These adverse events are largely attributed to the ability of these drugs to suppress prostaglandin synthesis, penetrate the mucosal layer in the acid media of the stomach and damage epithelial cells. However, it is becoming clear that such mediators as prostaglandins, NO and lipoxins can protect the stomach from injury. This injury can largely be prevented through suppression of gastric acid secretion (mainly with proton pump inhibitors. In contrast, the pathogenesis of intestinal injury induced by NSAIDs is less well understood. There is no evidence that suppression of gastric acid secretion will reduce the incidence or severity of NSAID enteropathy. In this review the results of recent studies are described, which will help to clarify some mechanisms of development of NSAID gastropathies and NSAID enteropathies and to improve the treatment of these patients.

  12. Quantification and qualification of complication risks at use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs as a basis for recommendations on their use and prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Evgenyevich Karateev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID were and still remain the main means for arresting acute and controlling chronic pains in therapeutic practice. However, serious complications that may be caused by these drugs essentially limit their application. Therapists need distinct and reasonable guidelines on NSAID prescription depending on presence of a comorbid pathology and risk factors associated with the gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system. World renowned experts have been actively studying this problem. The main aspects of NSAID efficiency and safety are discussed in this study; the risk factors are ranked according to their significance; and an algorithm of reasonable drug prescription, including prevention of potential complications, is proposed.

  13. Quantification and qualification of complication risks at use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs as a basis for recommendations on their use and prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Evgenyevich Karateev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID were and still remain the main means for arresting acute and controlling chronic pains in therapeutic practice. However, serious complications that may be caused by these drugs essentially limit their application. Therapists need distinct and reasonable guidelines on NSAID prescription depending on presence of a comorbid pathology and risk factors associated with the gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system. World renowned experts have been actively studying this problem. The main aspects of NSAID efficiency and safety are discussed in this study; the risk factors are ranked according to their significance; and an algorithm of reasonable drug prescription, including prevention of potential complications, is proposed.

  14. Cardiovascular risk and inhibition of cyclooxygenase: traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Campanini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The development of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs and, more recently, of selective inhibitors of the cycloooxygenase-2 isoform (COXIBs, has contributed greatly towards the effective management of patients with arthritis and pain complaints. Although COXIBs have demonstrated an improved gastrointestinal tolerability compared with tNSAIDs, the cardiovascular effects of the two drugs types are much controversial. By blocking prostacyclin formation but leaving platelet-derived thromboxane A2 generation unopposed, the potential gastrointestinal benefit of COXIBs may come at cost of increased thrombotic risk. AIM OF THE STUDY This review aims at analysing the cardiovascular effects of the tNSAIDs and COXIBs. METHOD This review addresses the controversy of effects of COXIBs and tNSAIDs in 4 segments. It begins with a discussion about pathophysiological effects of cyclooxygenase inhibition on cardiovascular system. This is followed by a systematic review and meta-analysis of a control, randomized, double blind study and population-based matched case-control study to compare the risk of serious cardiovascular events with tNSAIDs and COXIBs. Then it answers to key questions with the aim to assist the clinicians for a systematic approach to evaluate the risk-benefit-ratio of NSAIDs in the clinical practice. Finally we analyse the open questions associated with the use of NSAIDs and the cardiovascular events. RESULTS The use of rofecoxib demonstrated an increase in adverse cardiovascular events. This toxic effect is not dose-related. The relationship between celecoxib and cardiovascular risk is less clear. The results of different clinical trials are conflicting: some didn’t demonstrate increase in cardiovascular toxicity but the APC study and recently a metanalysis reported a significant incidence of adverse cardiovascular events. Also valdecoxib and parecoxib appear to have increased risk for cardiovascular

  15. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Raj [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Advanced Material Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Siril, Prem Felix, E-mail: prem@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Advanced Material Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Javid, Farideh [School of Applied Science, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30 nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared. • Particle sizes were

  16. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30 nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared. • Particle sizes were

  17. Understanding the NSAID related risk of vascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2006-01-01

    Concern is growing about an increased risk of thrombotic events (including myocardial infarction and stroke) during the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), in particular the so called selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX 2) inhibitors. Although clinical trials give conflicting results

  18. Tryptamine-Gallic Acid Hybrid Prevents Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-induced Gastropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chinmay; Bindu, Samik; Dey, Sumanta; Alam, Athar; Goyal, Manish; Iqbal, Mohd. Shameel; Sarkar, Souvik; Kumar, Rahul; Halder, Kamal Krishna; Debnath, Mita Chatterjee; Adhikari, Susanta; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the gastroprotective effect of SEGA (3a), a newly synthesized tryptamine-gallic acid hybrid molecule against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy with mechanistic details. SEGA (3a) prevents indomethacin (NSAID)-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS) and dysfunctions in gastric mucosal cells, which play a pathogenic role in inducing gastropathy. SEGA (3a) offers this mitoprotective effect by scavenging of mitochondrial superoxide anion (O2˙̄) and intramitochondrial free iron released as a result of MOS. SEGA (3a) in vivo blocks indomethacin-mediated MOS, as is evident from the inhibition of indomethacin-induced mitochondrial protein carbonyl formation, lipid peroxidation, and thiol depletion. SEGA (3a) corrects indomethacin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo by restoring defective electron transport chain function, collapse of transmembrane potential, and loss of dehydrogenase activity. SEGA (3a) not only corrects mitochondrial dysfunction but also inhibits the activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by indomethacin. SEGA (3a) inhibits indomethacin-induced down-regulation of bcl-2 and up-regulation of bax genes in gastric mucosa. SEGA (3a) also inhibits indometacin-induced activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in gastric mucosa. Besides the gastroprotective effect against NSAID, SEGA (3a) also expedites the healing of already damaged gastric mucosa. Radiolabeled (99mTc-labeled SEGA (3a)) tracer studies confirm that SEGA (3a) enters into mitochondria of gastric mucosal cell in vivo, and it is quite stable in serum. Thus, SEGA (3a) bears an immense potential to be a novel gastroprotective agent against NSAID-induced gastropathy. PMID:22157011

  19. Preadmission use of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and 30-day stroke mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morten; Hováth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Petersen, Karin L; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2014-11-25

    To examine whether preadmission use of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) influenced 30-day stroke mortality. We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. Using medical databases, we identified all first-time stroke hospitalizations in Denmark between 2004 and 2012 (n = 100,043) and subsequent mortality. We categorized NSAID use as current (prescription redemption within 60 days before hospital admission), former, and nonuse. Current use was further classified as new or long-term use. Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) of death within 30 days, controlling for potential confounding through multivariable adjustment and propensity score matching. The adjusted HR of death for ischemic stroke was 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.38) for current users of selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors compared with nonusers, driven by the effect among new users (1.42, 95% CI: 1.14-1.77). Comparing the different COX-2 inhibitors, the HR was driven by new use of older traditional COX-2 inhibitors (1.42, 95% CI: 1.14-1.78) among which it was 1.53 (95% CI: 1.02-2.28) for etodolac and 1.28 (95% CI: 0.98-1.68) for diclofenac. The propensity score-matched analysis supported the association between older COX-2 inhibitors and ischemic stroke mortality. There was no association for former users. Mortality from intracerebral hemorrhage was not associated with use of nonselective NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors. Preadmission use of COX-2 inhibitors was associated with increased 30-day mortality after ischemic stroke, but not hemorrhagic stroke. Use of nonselective NSAIDs at time of admission was not associated with mortality from ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors in correlation with incidence, recurrence and death of peptic ulcer bleeding: an ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunxia; Sverdén, Emma; Ljung, Rickard; Söderlund, Claes; Lagergren, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are regarded as two types of drugs that respectively increase and decrease the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding. However, their relation to occurrence, recurrence and death of bleeding in the population level is not clear. Study objective To clarify recent calendar-time correlations between sales of NSAIDs and PPIs and the occurrence of peptic ulcer bleeding, re-bleeding and death. Design Ecological study. Results The time trend of peptic ulcer bleeding did not correlate with PPI sales but did correlate with NSAIDs in mem (Rmale=0.6571, Pmale=0.05). Sales of PPIs (inverse) and NSAIDs correlated with re-bleeding in women (Rmale=−0.8754, Pmale=0.002 and Rfemale=0.7161, Pfemale=0.03, respectively), but not in men. An inverse correlation between PPI sales and 30-day death after bleeding was found (Rmale=−0.9392, Pmale=0.0002 and Rfemale=−0.8561, Pfemale=0.003), and NSAID sales were found to correlate with increased death after bleeding ((Rmale=0.7278, Pmale=0.03, Rfemale=0.7858, Pfemale=0.01). Conclusions The sales of NSAIDs and PPIs correlate with recurrence of peptic ulcer bleeding in women and death after peptic ulcer bleeding in both genders in the population level. PMID:23293249

  1. Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to NSAID Gastropathy That is Unresponsive to Ranitidine

    OpenAIRE

    Erawati, Lusy; Ridho, Sayid; Nainggolan, Ginova; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Manan, Chudahman

    2003-01-01

    Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are now commonly used in clinical practice. On the other hands, this drug could result severe complication such as bleeding and perforation. In such condition, proton pump inhibitor can be used to stop bleeding than H2 antagonists. We reported one cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to NSAID gastropathy that was unresponsive to Ranitidine. The treatment was suitable to proton pump inhibitor that could overcome upper gastrointestinal blee...

  2. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Conjugated Silicon Quantum Dots: Their Cytotoxicity and Biological Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs have great potential for biomedical applications, including their use as biological fluorescent markers and carriers for drug delivery systems. Biologically inert Si-QDs are less toxic than conventional cadmium-based QDs, and can modify the surface of the Si-QD with covalent bond. We synthesized water-soluble alminoprofen-conjugated Si-QDs (Ap-Si. Alminoprofen is a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID used as an analgesic for rheumatism. Our results showed that the “silicon drug” is less toxic than the control Si-QD and the original drug. These phenomena indicate that the condensed surface integration of ligand/receptor-type drugs might reduce the adverse interaction between the cells and drug molecules. In addition, the medicinal effect of the Si-QDs (i.e., the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme was maintained compared to that of the original drug. The same drug effect is related to the integration ratio of original drugs, which might control the binding interaction between COX-2 and the silicon drug. We conclude that drug conjugation with biocompatible Si-QDs is a potential method for functional pharmaceutical drug development.

  3. Compensatory Cellular Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Osteogenic Differentiation in Canine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    OH, Namgil; KIM, Sangho; HOSOYA, Kenji; OKUMURA, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The suppressive effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the bone healing process have remained controversial, since no clinical data have clearly shown the relationship between NSAIDs and bone healing. The aim of this study was to assess the compensatory response of canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to several classes of NSAIDs, including carprofen, meloxicam, indomethacin and robenacoxib, on osteogenic differentiation. Each of the NSAIDs (10 µM) was administered during 20 days of the osteogenic process with human recombinant IL-1β (1 ng/ml) as an inflammatory stimulator. Gene expression of osteoblast differentiation markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin), receptors of PGE2 (EP2 and EP4) and enzymes for prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis (COX-1, COX-2, cPGES and mPGES-1) was measured by using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Protein production levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and PGE2 were quantified using an alkaline phosphatase activity assay, osteocalcin immunoassay and PGE2 immunoassay, respectively. Histologic analysis was performed using alkaline phosphatase staining, von Kossa staining and alizarin red staining. Alkaline phosphatase and calcium deposition were suppressed by all NSAIDs. However, osteocalcin production showed no significant suppression by NSAIDs. Gene expression levels of PGE2-related receptors and enzymes were upregulated during continuous treatment with NSAIDs, while certain channels for PGE2 synthesis were utilized differently depending on the kind of NSAIDs. These data suggest that canine BMSCs have a compensatory mechanism to restore PGE2 synthesis, which would be an intrinsic regulator to maintain differentiation of osteoblasts under NSAID treatment. PMID:24419976

  4. Analysis of the use and adverse effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Aneta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The use and adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in outpatients with rheumatic diseases has not yet been studied enough. The aim of this study was to evaluate the data about the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs obtained from the questionnaires submitted to the outpatients receiving these drugs. Methods. The patients who had been prescribed any of NSAIDs within the period from June to September, 2004 were included in the study. The answers obtained from the questionnaires were statistically analyzed by means of χ2-test. Results. At the time of the study, 150 patients had been prescribed ibuprofen or some other NSAID. Out of the total number of dispensed questionnaires (n = 150, only 45 (30% were shown to be correctly filled-in. Their analysis showed that 64.4% of the patients had suffered from rheumatic diseases for more than five years, and had regularly used NSAIDs. The average age of these patients was about 70 years, and the number of females was double as high as that of the males. The most frequently used NSAIDs were diclofenac and ibuprofen (46.14%, and 23.24%, respectively. According to the answers given by the patients, the most often adverse reactions were gastric complaints such as nausea (11.1%, and stomach pain (8.9%. Due to this, the majority of the patients (64.4% used some of the antiulcer drugs, most often ranitidine (31.1%. Conclusion. The results of this pilot study revealed that among the outpatients suffering from rheumatic diseases, the number of females was double as high as the number of males, that these patients were of the mean age of 70 years, and that their diseases lasted longer than five years. Gastric complains such as nausea and gastric pain of mild intensity were the most often adverse effects of NSAIDs reported by our patients. It could be the consequence of the predominant use of diclofenac and ibuprofen, NSAIDs with mild to moderate ulcerogenic potential, as well as the

  5. Current approaches to prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy – COX selectivity and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jan C; Domschke, Wolfram; Pohle, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is still an important medical and socio-economic problem – despite recent pharmaceutical advances. To prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy, three strategies are followed in clinical routine: (i) coprescription of a gastroprotective drug, (ii) use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, and (iii) eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Proton pump inhibitors are the comedication of choice as they effectively reduce gastrointestinal adverse events of NSAIDs and are safe even in long-term use. Co-medication with vitamin C has only been little studied in the prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy. Apart from scavenging free radicals it is able to induce haeme-oxgenase 1 in gastric cells, a protective enzyme with antioxidant and vasodilative properties. Final results of the celecoxib outcome study (CLASS study) attenuated the initial enthusiasm about the GI safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors, especially in patients concomitantly taking aspirin for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Helicobacter pylori increases the risk for ulcers particularly in NSAID-naive patients and therefore eradication is recommended prior to long-term NSAID therapy at least in patients at high risk. New classes of COX-inhibitors are currently evaluated in clinical studies with very promising results: NSAIDs combined with a nitric oxide releasing moiety (NO-NSAID) and dual inhibitors of COX and 5-LOX. These drugs offer extended anti-inflammatory potency while sparing gastric mucosa. PMID:15563357

  6. Pharmacist intervention reduces gastropathy risk in patients using NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez-Cuevas, Victoria; Lopez-Briz, Eduardo; Guardiola-Chorro, M Teresa

    2008-12-01

    To establish a detection and intervention strategy in order to reduce the number of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) users at risk of gastropathy from receiving either inadequate or no gastroprotection. Community Pharmacies in Valencia, Spain. Prospective longitudinal intervention study without control group carried out by 79 Community Pharmacies. Patients over 18 who asked for any systemic NSAID were interviewed according to standard procedure. Pharmacist intervention was carried out when a patient at risk of serious NSAID-induced gastrointestinal complications due to inadequate or no gastric protection was identified. The doctor responsible was informed in order to then be able to assess the need to prescribe gastroprotection or change it if inadequate. In the case of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, pharmacist intervention mainly involved replacing NSAIDs for safer medications. Firstly, the number of patients who had no prescribed gastroprotection or inadequate gastroprotection was determined. Pharmacist intervention then brought about changes in pharmacotherapy in this situation. Of the 6,965 patients who asked for NSAIDs during the study period, 3,054 (43.9%) presented NSAID gastropathy risk factors. 35.6% of the latter (1,089) were not prescribed gastroprotection or were prescribed inadequate gastroprotection. Pharmacist intervention was carried out in 1,075 of these cases. On 391 occasions such risk situations were reported to doctors, who accepted pharmacist intervention on 309 occasions (79.0%) and then either prescribed gastroprotection (77% of cases); changed it (13.9%); withdrew the NSAID (5.8%) or substituted it (3.2%). 235 Pharmacist interventions took place when dispensing OTC NSAIDs. Our strategy allowed us to identify a large number of patients who asked for NSAIDs in Community Pharmacies and who were at risk of NSAID gastropathy, as they received either inadequate gastroprotection or no gastroprotection whatsoever. Moreover, the

  7. Potential of prescription registries to capture individual-level use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Denmark: trends in utilization 1999–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Morten Schmidt,1 Jesper Hallas,2 Søren Friis1,31Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 3Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Due to over-the-counter availability, no consensus exists on whether adequate information on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use can be obtained from prescription registries.Objectives: To examine utilization of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs in Denmark between 1999 and 2012 and to quantify the proportion of total sales that was sold on prescription.Method: Based on nationwide data from the Danish Serum Institute and the Danish National Prescription Registry, we retrieved sales statistics for the Danish primary health care sector to calculate 1-year prevalences of prescription users of aspirin or nonaspirin NSAIDs, and to estimate the corresponding proportions of total sales dispensed on prescription.Results: Both low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were commonly used in the Danish population between 1999 and 2012, particularly among elderly individuals. The 1-year prevalence of prescribed low-dose aspirin increased throughout the study period, notably among men. Nonaspirin NSAID use was frequent in all age groups above 15 years and showed a female preponderance. Overall, the prevalence of prescribed nonaspirin NSAIDs decreased moderately after 2004, but substantial variation according to NSAID subtype was observed; ibuprofen use increased, use of all newer selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors nearly ceased after 2004, diclofenac use decreased by nearly 50% after 2008, and naproxen use remained stable. As of 2012, the prescribed proportion of individual-level NSAID sales was 92% for low-dose aspirin, 66% for ibuprofen, and 100% for all other NSAIDs.Conclusion: The potential for identifying NSAID use from prescription

  8. Double-contrast barium enteroclysis as a patency tool for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Esaki, Motohiro; Kurahara, Koichi; Hirai, Fumihito; Fuchigami, Tadahiko; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2011-11-01

    Evaluating small bowel patency is recommended for capsule endoscopy in patients suspected of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced (NSAID) enteropathy. The aim of this investigation was to examine whether radiography is a candidate of patency tool in NSAID enteropathy. We reviewed double-contrast barium enteroclysis in 21 patients with NSAID enteropathy diagnosed either by capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted endoscopy. The endoscopic findings were classified into circular ulcers, linear ulcers and small mucosal defects. The radiographic signs of the corresponding endoscopic findings were retrieved and the depiction rate was calculated. Of the 21 patients, endoscopy detected circular ulcers, linear ulcers, and small ulcers in 12, 3 and 12 patients, respectively. Small bowel radiography depicted circular narrowing as pseudo-folds in 10 patients (83%) and linear ulcers as eccentric rigidity in 2 patients (67%). However, radiography was able to depict small mucosal defects in only 3 patients (17%). Two of 5 patients with pseudo-folds experienced retention of the capsule. "Pseudo-folds" is a sign corresponding to circular ulcer in NSAID enteropathy, which may be predictive of capsule retention.

  9. Long-term cardiovascular risk of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use according to time passed after first-time myocardial infarction: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Fosbøl, Emil L; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Folke, Fredrik; Charlot, Mette; Selmer, Christian; Bjerring Olesen, Jonas; Lamberts, Morten; Ruwald, Martin H; Køber, Lars; Hansen, Peter R; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2012-10-16

    The cardiovascular risk after the first myocardial infarction (MI) declines rapidly during the first year. We analyzed whether the cardiovascular risk associated with using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with the time elapsed following first-time MI. We identified patients aged 30 years or older admitted with first-time MI in 1997 to 2009 and subsequent NSAID use by individual-level linkage of nationwide registries of hospitalization and drug dispensing from pharmacies in Denmark. We calculated the incidence rates of death and a composite end point of coronary death or nonfatal recurrent MIs associated with NSAID use in 1-year time intervals up to 5 years after inclusion and analyzed risk by using multivariable adjusted time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models. Of the 99 187 patients included, 43 608 (44%) were prescribed NSAIDs after the index MI. There were 36 747 deaths and 28 693 coronary deaths or nonfatal recurrent MIs during the 5 years of follow-up. Relative to noncurrent treatment with NSAIDs, the use of any NSAID in the years following MI was persistently associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio 1.59 [95% confidence interval, 1.49-1.69]) after 1 year and hazard ratio 1.63 [95% confidence interval, 1.52-1.74] after 5 years) and coronary death or nonfatal recurrent MI (hazard ratio, 1.30 [95% confidence interval,l 1.22-1.39] and hazard ratio, 1.41 [95% confidence interval, 1.28-1.55]). The use of NSAIDs is associated with persistently increased coronary risk regardless of time elapsed after first-time MI. We advise long-term caution in the use of NSAIDs for patients after MI.

  10. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug without Antibiotics for Acute Viral Infection Increases the Empyema Risk in Children: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Ferroni, Agnès; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Varon, Emmanuelle; Thumerelle, Caroline; Brémont, François; Fayon, Michael J; Delacourt, Christophe; Ligier, Caroline; Watier, Laurence; Guillemot, Didier

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the risk factors of empyema after acute viral infection and to clarify the hypothesized association(s) between empyema and some viruses and/or the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). A case-control study was conducted in 15 centers. Cases and controls were enrolled for a source population of children 3-15 years of age with acute viral infections between 2006 and 2009. Among 215 empyemas, 83 cases (children with empyema and acute viral infection within the 15 preceding days) were included, and 83 controls (children with acute viral infection) were matched to cases. Considering the intake of any drug within 72 hours after acute viral infection onset and at least 6 consecutive days of antibiotic use and at least 1 day of NSAIDs exposure, the multivariable analysis retained an increased risk of empyema associated with NSAIDs exposure (aOR 2.79, 95% CI 1.4-5.58, P = .004), and a decreased risk associated with antibiotic use (aOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.11-0.97, P = .04). The risk of empyema associated with NSAIDs exposure was greater for children not prescribed an antibiotic and antibiotic intake diminished that risk for children given NSAIDs. NSAIDs use during acute viral infection is associated with an increased risk of empyema in children, and antibiotics are associated with a decreased risk. The presence of antibiotic-NSAIDs interaction with this risk is suggested. These findings suggest that NSAIDs should not be recommended as a first-line antipyretic treatment during acute viral infections in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of the Effects on Rib Fracture between the Traditional Japanese Medicine Jidabokuippo and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Nakae

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jidabokuippo is a traditional Japanese medicine used for contusion-induced swelling and pain. This open multicenter randomized study was designed to compare the efficacies of jidabokuippo and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in patients with rib fracture by analyzing the treatment duration. Our study involved 170 rib fracture patients capable of oral ingestion divided randomly into 2 groups: the jidabokuippo and NSAID groups. We compared the duration of treatment and healthcare expenditure between these 2 groups. Medication was continued in both groups until the visual analogue scale score decreased to less than 50% of the pretreatment score. We excluded the patients in whom medication was prematurely discontinued. We analyzed 81 patients belonging to the jidabokuippo and NSAIDs groups. No significant intergroup differences were observed in age, gender, severity (injury severity score, and presence/absence of underlying disease. The treatment duration was significantly shorter in the jidabokuippo group than in the NSAIDs group (P=0.0003. Healthcare expenditure was significantly lower in the jidabokuippo group than in the NSAIDs group (P<0.0001. Our results suggest that compared to NSAIDs, jidabokuippo can shorten the duration of treatment in patients with rib fracture and is a promising analgesic agent based on the medical economic viewpoint.

  12. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods.

  13. Significant Acute Kidney Injury Due to Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs: Inpatient Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Dixit

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the United States non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID are freely available over-the-counter. Because of the adverse effects on the kidneys and the popularity of these drugs, unregulated use of NSAIDs is an under recognized and potentially dangerous problem. Fifteen inpatients, mean age of 15.2 ± 2.3 years (five males, 10 females, were referred to nephrology for acute kidney injury. All patients admitted to taking ibuprofen and six also consumed naproxen. None of the patients had underlying renal diseases at the time of admission. Nine patients had proteinuria and 12 had hematuria (including one with gross hematuria. One patient had nephrotic syndrome but the condition resolved spontaneously without steroids and has remained in remission for four years. Two patients required dialysis. Only one of the dialyzed patients required steroid therapy for recovery of renal function. The mean duration of hospitalization was 7.4 ± 5.5 days. The serum creatinine peaked at 4.09 ± 4.24 (range 1.2-15.3 mg/dL. All patients recovered renal function with normalization of serum creatinine to 0.71 ± 0.15 mg/dL. The estimated GFR (glomerular filtration rate at peak of renal failure was 38.2 ± 20.5 mL/min but did improve to a baseline of 134 ± 26.2 mL/min (range 89-177, p < 0.01. However, the duration from onset to normalization of serum creatinine was 37 ± 42 days indicating that majority of patients had abnormal renal function for a prolonged period. In conclusion, NSAIDs pose a significant risk of renal failure for significant duration and as an entity may be under recognized.

  14. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cyanobacteria and algae in laboratory strains and in natural algal assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bácsi, István; B-Béres, Viktória; Kókai, Zsuzsanna; Gonda, Sándor; Novák, Zoltán; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Vasas, Gábor

    2016-05-01

    In recent years measurable concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown in the aquatic environment as a result of increasing human consumption. Effects of five frequently used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, diflunisal, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and piroxicam in 0.1 mg ml(-1) concentration) in batch cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus, Microcystis aeruginosa, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii), and eukaryotic algae (Desmodesmus communis, Haematococcus pluvialis, Cryptomonas ovata) were studied. Furthermore, the effects of the same concentrations of NSAIDs were investigated in natural algal assemblages in microcosms. According to the changes of chlorophyll-a content, unicellular cyanobacteria seemed to be more tolerant to NSAIDs than eukaryotic algae in laboratory experiments. Growth of eukaryotic algae was reduced by all drugs, the cryptomonad C. ovata was the most sensitive to NSAIDs, while the flagellated green alga H. pluvialis was more sensitive than the non-motile green alga D. communis. NSAID treatments had weaker impact in the natural assemblages dominated by cyanobacteria than in the ones dominated by eukaryotic algae, confirming the results of laboratory experiments. Diversity and number of functional groups did not change notably in cyanobacteria dominated assemblages, while they decreased significantly in eukaryotic algae dominated ones compared to controls. The results highlight that cyanobacteria (especially unicellular ones) are less sensitive to the studied, mostly hardly degradable NSAIDs, which suggest that their accumulation in water bodies may contribute to the expansion of cyanobacterial mass productions in appropriate environmental circumstances by pushing back eukaryotic algae. Thus, these contaminants require special attention during wastewater treatment and monitoring of surface waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk of haemorrhage from transurethral prostatectomy in acetylsalicylic acid and NSAID-treated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierød, F S; Frandsen, N J; Jacobsen, J D

    1998-01-01

    the unselected clinical records of all patients undergoing TUR-P in the Department of Urology at Hvidovre Hospital (during 1992-1994) with special focus on the use of ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In total, 457 records were examined: 99 patients on ASA/NSAID received 42 units of blood......, while 358 patients free from such medication received 68 units of blood, a significantly smaller amount (p = 0.0390). We conclude that ASA and NSAIDs increase the risk of bleeding during and after TUR-P, and we recommend the withdrawal of these drugs for one week before TUR-P....

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics prescription trends at a central west bank hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayem, Yasin I; Qubaja, Marwan M; Shraim, Riyad K; Taha, Omar B; Abu Shkheidem, Imadeddin A; Ibrahim, Murad A

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to reliably describe the pattern of outpatient prescription of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antibiotics (ATBs) at a central hospital in the West Bank, Palestine. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study investigating a cohort of 2,208 prescriptions ordered by outpatient clinics and the emergency room over one year in Beit Jala Hospital in Bethlehem, West Bank. The orders were analysed for the rate and types of NSAIDs and ATBs utilised, and the appropriateness of these drugs to the diagnosis. Of the total prescriptions, 410 contained NSAIDs (18.6%), including diclofenac (40.2%), low dose aspirin (23.9%), ibuprofen (17.8%) and indomethacin (15.1%). A minority of these prescriptions contained a combination of these agents (2.5%). Only one prescription contained cyclooxyeganse-2 inhibitors (0.2%). The appropriateness of NSAID use to the diagnosis was as follows: appropriate (58.3%), inappropriate (14.4%) and difficult to tell (27.3%). The rate of ATB use was 30.3% (669 prescriptions). The ATBs prescribed were amoxicillin (23.3%), augmentin (14.3%), quinolones (12.7%), first and second generation cephalosporins (9.4% and 12.7%, respectively) and macrolides (7.2%). ATB combinations were identified in 9.4%, with the most common being second-generation cephalopsorins and metronidazole (4.3%). Regarding the appropriateness of prescribing ATBs according to the diagnosis, it was appropriate in 44.8%, inappropriate in 20.6% and difficult to tell in 34.6% of the prescriptions. These findings revealed a relatively large number and inappropriate utilisation of ATBs and NSAIDs. An interventional programme needs to be adopted to reinforce physicians' knowledge of the rational prescription of these agents.

  17. Incremental cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors for the prevention of NSAID ulcers: a pharmacoeconomic analysis linked to a case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Braakman-Jansen, Louise Marie Antoinette; Klok, Rogier M.; Postma, Maarten J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction We estimated the cost effectiveness of concomitant proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in relation to the occurrence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer complications. Methods This study was linked to a nested case-control study. Patients with NSAID ulcer complications were

  18. Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients on long-term treatment with NSAIDs reduces the severity of gastritis: a rondomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, Helena T.J.I.; Steen, Kirsti S.; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Lems, Willem F.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Janssen, Matthijs; Houben, Harry H.M.L.; Kostense, Piet J.; Boers, Maarten; Dijkmans, Ben A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Maintenance use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by gastropathy. In non-NSAID users, eradication of Helicobacter pylori is associated with decreased mucosal inflammation, and may halt the progression to atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, but the

  19. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients on Long-term Treatment With NSAIDs Reduces the Severity of Gastritis A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leest, de H.T.J.I.; Steen, K.S.S.; Bloemena, E.; Lems, W.F.; Kuipers, E.; Laar, van der M.C.; Bijlsma, J.J.E.; Janssen, M.M.J.; Houben, H.H.; Kostense, P.J.; Boers, M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Maintenance use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by gastropathy. In non-NSAID users, eradication of Helicobacter pylori is associated with decreased mucosal inflammation, and may halt the progression to atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, but the

  20. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients on Long-term Treatment With NSAIDs Reduces the Severity of Gastritis A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, H.T.J.I.; Steen, K.S.S.; Bloemena, E.; Lems, W.F.; Kuipers, E.; van der Laar, M.C.; Bijlsma, J.J.E.; Janssen, M.M.J.; Houben, H.H.; Kostense, P.J.; Boers, M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maintenance use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by gastropathy. In non-NSAID users, eradication of Helicobacter pylori is associated with decreased mucosal inflammation, and may halt the progression to atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, but the

  1. Interference of NSAIDs with the thrombocyte inhibitory effect of aspirin: a placebo-controlled, ex vivo, serial placebo-controlled serial crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, I.L.; Vonkeman, H.E.; Kasemier, J.; Movig, K.L.L.; Laar, M.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) are often prescribed concurrently in patients with nociceptive pain and cardiovascular comorbidity. NSAIDs and ASA inhibit the same COX-enzymes, and thus may interact. ASA's cardioprotective antiplatelet effect is

  2. Interference of NSAIDs with the thrombocyte inhibitory effect of aspirin: A placebo-controlled, ex vivo, serial placebo-controlled serial crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, I.L.; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Kasemier, J.; Movig, K.L.L.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) are often prescribed concurrently in patients with nociceptive pain and cardiovascular comorbidity. NSAIDs and ASA inhibit the same COX-enzymes, and thus may interact. ASA’s cardioprotective antiplatelet effect is

  3. Bio-Electro-Fenton process for the degradation of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadais, Helena; Li, Xiaohu; Alves, Nadine

    2018-01-01

    Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) are ubiquitous municipal wastewater pollutants of which several are resistant to degradation in conventional wastewater treatment, and represent a major environmental health concern worldwide. An alternative treatment, the bio-electro-Fenton process......, has received increasing attention in past years. In this process the strong oxidant •HO is formed using the electrons derived from bacterial oxidation of organic substrate. In this work, a laboratory scale microbial electrolysis cell based bio-electro-Fenton process was developed for the treatment...

  4. Relative efficacy of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and topical capsaicin in osteoarthritis: Protocol for an individual patient data meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, M.S.M. (Monica); Fu, Y. (Yu); Bhattacharya, A. (Archan); Goh, S.-L. (Siew-Li); Middelkoop, Marienke; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita; Walsh, D. (David); Doherty, Michael; Zhang, Weiya

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain is the most troubling issue to patients with osteoarthritis (OA), yet current pharmacological treatments offer only small-to-moderate pain reduction. Current guidelines therefore emphasise the need to identify predictors of treatment response. In line with these recommendations, an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis will be conducted. The study aims to investigate the relative treatment effects of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and topical caps...

  5. Long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of myocardial infarction in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Pérez Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data indicate that chronic use of coxibs leads to an increased occurrence of thrombotic cardiovascular events. This raises the question as to whether traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs might also produce similar hazards. Our aim has been to evaluate the association between the chronic use of tNSAIDs and the risk of myocardial infarction (MI in patients. Methods We performed a nested case-control analysis with 4,975 cases of acute MI and 20,000 controls, frequency matched to cases by age, sex, and calendar year. Results Overall, current use of tNSAID was not associated with an increased risk of MI (RR:1.07;95%CI: 0.95–1.21. However, we found that the relative risk (RR of MI for durations of tNSAID treatment of >1 year was 1.21 (95% CI, 1.00–1.48. The corresponding RR was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.06–1.70 for non-fatal MI. The effect was independent from dose. The small risk associated with long-term use of tNSAIDs was observed among patients not taking low-dose aspirin (RR: 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01–1.65. The effect of long-term use for individual tNSAIDs ranged from a RR of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.47–1.62 with naproxen to 1.38 (95% CI, 1.00–1.90 with diclofenac. Conclusion This study adds support to the hypothesis that chronic treatment with some tNSAIDs is associated with a small increased risk of non-fatal MI. Our data are consistent with a substantial variability in cardiovascular risks between individual tNSAIDs.

  6. Patient’s Knowledge and Perception Towards the use of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Rheumatology Clinic Northern Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Ismail, Rosli

    2012-01-01

    Objective In Rheumatology, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been widely prescribed and used. However, despite their clinical benefits in the management of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease, NSAIDs have considerable side effects, mostly affecting the upper gastrointestinal system, which therefore, limit their use. This study was conducted to determine the patients’ knowledge and perception regarding the used of NSAIDS. Methods A total of 120 patients who attended the rheumatology clinic Hospital, Raja Permaisuri Bainun, Malaysia, and received NSAIDs more than 3 months were interviewed irrespective of their rheumatological conditions. Patient’s knowledge and perception on the side effects of NSAIDs were recorded. Result Fifty-four percent of the patients obtained information regarding the side effect of NSAIDs either from the rheumatologist, rheumatology staff nurse or other medical staffs (75.4%). The remaining 45.8% were naive of such knowledge. Fifteen percent obtained the information by surfing the internet and 9.2% from printed media. Twenty-four (24.2%) patients, experienced indigestion and/or stomach discomfort attributed to NSAIDs used. Two patients (1.7%) had hematemesis and malena once. Conclusion This study shows that half of the patients who attended the rheumatology clinic were unaware of the side effect of NSAIDs. Available data showed that most of the knowledgeable patients are more conscience and self-educated. This study also reveals the important roles of clinicians, trained staff nurses as well as the pharmacist in providing the guidance and knowledge of any medication taken by patients. PMID:23226825

  7. Oxidation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with aqueous permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, Tania; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Triñanes, Sara; Cela, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    Potassium permanganate is a strong oxidant widely used in drinking water treatment, that can react with organic micropollutants. Thus, the oxidation kinetics and transformation route of seven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon reaction with potassium permanganate was investigated. A liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) system was used to follow the time course of pharmaceuticals concentrations and for the identification of their by-products. Under strong oxidation conditions (2 mg L(-1) KMnO4, 24 h), only two NSAIDs were significantly degraded: indomethacine and diclofenac. The degradation kinetics of these two drugs was investigated at different concentrations of permanganate, chlorides, phosphates and sample pH by means of a full factorial experimental design. Depending on these factors, half-lives were in the range: 2-270 h for indomethacine and 3-558 h for diclofenac, equivalent to apparent second order constants between 0.65 and 9.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.27 and 7.4 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Permanganate concentration was the most significant factor on NSAIDs oxidation kinetics, but the pH also played a significant role in diclofenac reaction, being faster at acidic pH. In the case of indomethacine, the dose of permanganate seemed also to play an autocatalytic effect. The use of an accurate-mass high resolution LC-Q-TOF-MS system permitted the identification of a total of 13 by-products. The transformation path of these drugs consisted mainly of hydroxylations, decarboxylations and oxidation of aromatic double bonds, with ring opening. The software predicted toxicity of these products indicates that they are expected not to be more toxic than the NSAIDs, with the exception of two indomethacine by-products. Reaction in real samples was slower and/or incomplete for both pharmaceuticals, depending on the organic matter content of the sample. However, still all transformation products could be detected for

  8. Innovative sampling and extraction methods for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Shivani; Di Carro, Marina; Magi, Emanuele

    2015-03-15

    Two different innovative approaches were used for the determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water: stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and passive sampling, followed by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. SBSE was developed by comparing EG-Silicone and PDMS stir bars and optimizing main parameters to attain high preconcentration. Quantitative analysis was carried out by mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode and multiple reaction monitoring. The SBSE-LC-MS/MS method provided satisfactory figures of merit with LOD (7.5-71 ng L(-1)) and LOQ (22.5-213 ng L(-1)). The developed method was successfully applied to real samples collected from river water and wastewater effluents. The obtained results showed the presence of all analytes at trace levels, in a wide range of concentrations. The passive sampling approach was carried out by using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS); samplers were deployed for 15 days in river and tap water, allowing to detect analytes at ultra-trace levels. Time-Weighted Average concentration of NSAIDs in river water was estimated in the range 0.33-0.46 ng L(-1), using the sampling rates previously obtained by means of a simple calibration system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Side-Effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on the Liver in Dogs and Hepatoprotective Effect of Plant Remedies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szweda Magdalena

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatoprotective effect of plant drugs against hepatic tissue injury induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs was assessed on Beagle dogs. The adverse effects of carprofen and robenacoxib on the hepatic tissue were evaluated on the basis of histopathological examination of liver sections. It was demonstrated that the use of NSAIDs with liquorice and composed plant remedy Pectosol¯ caused a reduction of hepatic adverse effects induced by the administration of NSAIDs. This fact indicates a hepatoprotective effect of the tested plant remedies during the treatment with NSAIDs. However, the results require further studies on a larger group of animals. Liquorice and Pectosol¯ reduce the hepatic side effects, which develop after the treatment with carprofen and, to a lesser extent, robenacoxib in young Beagles. Such studies allow to investigate the negative and positive effects of using robenacoxib and carprofen in dogs and, therefore, help to limit the NSAID-induced side effects on the liver in these animals.

  10. Non-ulcer dyspepsia associated with NSAID intake: possibility of antacid drugs application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the comparative efficacy of Magalphil 800 in NSAID-associated dyspepsia. Patients and methods. 30 pts with rheumatic diseases (RD receiving NSAIDs and having dyspeptic symptoms were included. Pts were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (n=20, 2 males, 18 females, mean age 51,7+12,3 yTs, 7 pts had single erosion of stomach, 1 - multiple erosions, 1 - ulcer of stomach; group 2 (n=10, 1 male. 9 females, mean age 46,2±14,6 yrs, 2 pts had single erosion of stomach. Concomitant therapies (corticosteroids, cytotoxics were approximately the same in both groups. Pts in Group 1 received one tablet of Magalphil 800 four times a day; pts in Group 2 were treated by ranitidine 150 mg bid. Therapy of RD was not changed during the study. Subjective complains were controlled after 2 weeks. Results. Complains related to dyspepsia disappeared in all pts of Group 1 and in 8 pts of Group 2 after 5,2±2,4 and 7,3±3,8 days of treatment respectively (p>0,05. Healing of ulcer in 1 and healing of erosions in 5 pnts was observed in Group 1. Conclusions. Magalphil 800 is effective in NSAID-associated dyspepsia and can be used for treatment of NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  11. NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution in Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumen L Kostadinov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5-8 time points over 6.4-19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1-8.6 off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3-1.5 on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs.

  12. Preoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or steroid and outcomes after trabeculectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breusegem, Christophe; Spielberg, Leigh; Van Ginderdeuren, Rita; Vandewalle, Evelien; Renier, Charlotte; Van de Veire, Sara; Fieuws, Steffen; Zeyen, Thierry; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the benefit of preoperative treatment with either topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or steroid in terms of clinical outcomes following trabeculectomy. Prospective, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-one patients. Between July 2005 and October 2007, 61 consecutive medically uncontrolled glaucoma patients scheduled for first-time trabeculectomy were randomized to 1 of 3 study topical medication groups: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ketorolac), steroids (fluorometholone), or placebo (artificial tears). Patients instilled 1 drop 4 times daily for 1 month before the procedure and were examined on days 1 and 2, at weeks 1, 2, and 4, and at months 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 after trabeculectomy. Incidence of postoperative surgical or medical interventions (needling, laser suture lysis, needling revision, and intraocular pressure [IOP]-lowering medication). Fifty-four patients (54 eyes) were entered for analysis. The mean number of preoperative medications was 2.3+/-0.9. The mean baseline IOP was 21.0+/-6.0 mmHg. The mean postoperative target IOP was 16.5+/-1.8 mmHg. The mean follow-up was 23.6+/-4.0 months. The percentage of patients requiring needling within the first year was 41% in the placebo group, 6% in the NSAID, and 5% in the steroid group (P = 0.006). The percentage of patients requiring IOP-lowering medication to reach the target IOP at 1 year was 24% in the placebo group, 18% in the NSAID group, and 0% in the steroid group (P = 0.054 overall; P = 0.038 for steroids vs. others). The log-rank test showed a significant (P = 0.019) difference in medication-free survival curves between the different groups. More specifically, patients in the steroid group needed significantly less medication over the total follow-up (P = 0.007). Topical ketorolac or fluorometholone for 1 month before surgery was associated with improved trabeculectomy outcomes in terms of likelihood of postoperative needling. In the steroid group, there was

  13. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cancer Death in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

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    Thea Veitonmäki

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, especially aspirin, have been associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality. We examined overall cancer mortality and mortality from specific cancer sites among the 80,144 men in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial. Information on prescription drug use was acquired from the national drug reimbursement database. Over-the-counter use information was gathered by a questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI by prescription and over-the-counter NSAID use for overall and specific cancer deaths were calculated using Cox regression. During the median follow-up time of 15 years, 7,008 men died from cancer. Men with prescription NSAID use had elevated cancer mortality (HR 2.02 95% CI 1.91-2.15 compared to non-users. The mortality risk was increased for lung, colorectal and pancreas cancer mortality (HR 2.68, 95%CI 2.40-2.99, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.57-2.32 and HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.58-2.37, respectively. The increased risk remained in competing risks regression (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18. When the usage during the last three years of follow-up was excluded, the effect was reversed (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.73. Cancer mortality was not decreased for prescription or over-the-counter aspirin use. However, in the competing risk regression analysis combined prescription and over-the-counter aspirin use was associated with decreased overall cancer mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70-0.82. Cancer mortality was increased for NSAID users. However, the risk disappeared when the last 3 years were excluded.

  14. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Aleo, Michael D.; Strock, Christopher J.; Stedman, Donald B.; Wang, Huijun; Will, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary

  15. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleo, Michael D. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Strock, Christopher J. [Cyprotex US, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Stedman, Donald B. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wang, Huijun [Computational Sciences, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Will, Yvonne, E-mail: yvonne.will@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  16. Determining the Molecular Pathways Underlying the Protective Effect of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease: A Bioinformatics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo J Nevado-Holgado

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD represents a substantial unmet need, due to increasing prevalence in an ageing society and the absence of a disease modifying therapy. Epidemiological evidence shows a protective effect of non steroidal anti inflammatory (NSAID drugs, and genome wide association studies (GWAS show consistent linkage to inflammatory pathways; both observations suggesting anti-inflammatory compounds might be effective in AD therapy although clinical trials to date have not been positive.In this study, we use pathway enrichment and fuzzy logic to identify pathways (KEGG database simultaneously affected in both AD and by NSAIDs (Sulindac, Piroxicam, Paracetamol, Naproxen, Nabumetone, Ketoprofen, Diclofenac and Aspirin. Gene expression signatures were derived for disease from both blood (n = 344 and post-mortem brain (n = 690, and for drugs from immortalised human cell lines exposed to drugs of interest as part of the Connectivity Map platform. Using this novel approach to combine datasets we find striking overlap between AD gene expression in blood and NSAID induced changes in KEGG pathways of Ribosome and Oxidative Phosphorylation. No overlap was found in non NSAID comparison drugs. In brain we find little such overlap, although Oxidative Phosphorylation approaches our pre-specified significance level.These findings suggest that NSAIDs might have a mode of action beyond inflammation and moreover that their therapeutic effects might be mediated in particular by alteration of Oxidative Phosphorylation and possibly the Ribosome pathway. Mining of such datasets might prove increasingly productive as they increase in size and richness. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, NSAID, Inflammation, Fuzzy logic, Ribosome

  17. Sucralfate therapy in NSAID bleeding gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagelada, Juan-R; Rodríguez de la Serna, Arturo; Dammann, Hans Gert; Pons, Miquel; Armas, Carlos; Sala, Miquel; Tena, Xavier; Celdrán, Enrique; Mesa, Antoni

    2003-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 2 g sucralfate suspension in treating gastric mucosal lesions caused by long-term treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Only patients given NSAIDs continuously for at least 2 months with positive fecal occult blood (FOB) and endoscopically confirmed mild to moderate mucosal lesions (Lanza scale, grades 2-4) were included. After 1-week run-in phase, patients were stratified into 2 groups according to gastropathy-related symptoms during the preceding 7 days (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) and randomized to 2 g (10 mL) of sucralfate suspension or placebo twice a day over a 6-week period. NSAIDs were given according to each patient's dosage schedule and always after meals. Twenty-five patients received sucralfate and 25 received placebo. At the end of the study, 68% (17/25) of patients given sucralfate had no lesions (Lanza grade 0) on endoscopy compared with 35% (8/23) in controls (P = 0.042). The Lanza grades in patients given sucralfate were significantly improved compared with the placebo patients (P = 0.022). In this target population selected according to positive FOB test and endoscopic evidence of mucosal injury, chronic administration of sucralfate significantly decreased NSAID-induced gastric erosions.

  18. Celecoxib versus a non-selective NSAID plus proton-pump inhibitor: what are the considerations?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Judy T; Pucino, Frank; Resman-Targoff, Beth H

    2006-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are extensively used worldwide. However, associated adverse gastrointestinal effects (NSAID gastropathy) such as bleeding, perforation and obstruction result in considerable morbidity, mortality, and expense. Although it is essential to employ gastroprotective strategies to minimize these complications in patients at risk, controversy remains on whether celecoxib alone or a non-selective NSAID in conjunction with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) is a superior choice. Recent concerns regarding potential cardiovascular toxicities associated with cox-2 selective inhibitors may favor non-selective NSAID/PPI co-therapy as the preferred choice. Concomitant use of low-dose aspirin with any NSAID increases the risk of gastrointestinal complications and diminishes the improved gastrointestinal safety profile of celecoxib; whereas use of ibuprofen plus PPI regimens may negate aspirin's antiplatelet benefits. Evidence shows that concurrent use of a non-selective NSAID (such as naproxen) plus a PPI is as effective in preventing NSAID gastropathy as celecoxib, and may be more cost-effective. Patients failing or intolerant to this therapy would be candidates for celecoxib at the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration of time. Potential benefits from using low-dose celecoxib with a PPI in patients previously experiencing bleeding ulcers while taking NSAIDs remains to be proven. An evidence-based debate is presented to assist clinicians with the difficult decision-making process of preventing NSAID gastropathy while minimizing other complications.

  19. Role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzeri, Erika; Usai, Paolo

    2017-06-14

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is widespread worldwide thanks to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects. However, even more attention is placed upon the recurrence of digestive system complications in the course of their use. Recent data suggests that the complications of the lower gastro-intestinal tract may be as frequent and severe as those of the upper tract. NSAIDs enteropathy is due to enterohepatic recycling of the drugs resulting in a prolonged and repeated exposure of the intestinal mucosa to the compound and its metabolites. Thus leading to so-called topical effects, which, in turn, lead to an impairment of the intestinal barrier. This process determines bacterial translocation and toxic substances of intestinal origin in the portal circulation, leading to an endotoxaemia. This condition could determine a liver inflammatory response and might promote the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, mostly in patients with risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and a high fat diet, which may induce a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis. This alteration of gut microbiota may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its related disorders in two ways: firstly causing a malfunction of the tight junctions that play a critical role in the increase of intestinal permeability, and then secondly leading to the development of insulin resistance, body weight gain, lipogenesis, fibrogenesis and hepatic oxidative stress.

  20. Inflammation in Depression and the Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Karl Ole; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    , nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytokine-inhibitors have shown antidepressant treatment effects compared to placebo, but also statins, poly-unsaturated fatty acids, pioglitazone, minocycline, modafinil, and corticosteroids may yield antidepressant treatment effects. However, the complexity...

  1. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cancer sites other than the colon and rectum: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Rodríguez Luis A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have consistently shown that aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use is associated with a close to 50% reduced risk of colorectal cancer. Studies assessing the effects of NSAIDs on other cancers have shown conflicting results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between NSAID use and cancer other than colorectal. Methods We performed a search in Medline (from 1966 to 2002 and identified a total of 47 articles (13 cohort and 34 case-control studies. Overall estimates of the relative risk (RR were calculated for each cancer site using random effects models. Results Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of cancer of the esophagus and the stomach (RR, 0.51; 95%CI (0.38–0.69, and 0.73; 95%CI (0.63–0.84. Use of NSAIDs was similarly associated with a lower risk of esophageal and gastric cancers (RR,0.65; 95% CI(0.46–0.92 and RR,0.54; 95%CI (0.39–0.75. Among other cancers, only the results obtained for breast cancer were fairly consistent in showing a slight reduced risk among NSAID and aspirin users (RR, 0.77; 95%CI (0.66–0.88, and RR, 0.77; 95%CI (0.69–0.86 respectively. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that the potential chemopreventive role of NSAIDs in colorectal cancer might be extended to other gastrointestinal cancers such as esophagus and stomach. Further research is required to evaluate the role of NSAIDs at other cancers sites.

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use is associated with reduced risk of inflammation-associated cancers: NIH-AARP study.

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    Fatma M Shebl

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation has been linked to cancers, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been associated with reduced risk of several cancers. To further refine the magnitude of NSAID-related associations, in particular for cancers related to inflammation, such as alcohol-, infection-, obesity-, and smoking-related cancers, as well as for less common cancers, we evaluated the use of NSAIDs and cancer risk in a very large cohort. We used propensity scores to account for potential selection bias and hypothesized that NSAID use is associated with decreased cancer incidence.We conducted a prospective study among 314,522 participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Individuals who completed the lifestyle questionnaire, which included NSAID use, in 1996-1997 were followed through 2006. Information on cancer incidence was ascertained by linking to cancer registries and vital status databases.During 2,715,994 person-years of follow-up (median 10.1 person-years, there were 51,894 incident cancers. Compared with non-users of NSAIDs, individuals who reported use in the 12 months prior to interview had a significantly lower risk of all inflammation-related cancer, alcohol-related, infection-related, obesity-related, and smoking-related cancers [hazard ratio (HR (95% CI 0.90 (0.87-0.93, 0.80 (0.74-0.85, 0.82 (0.78-0.87, 0.88 (0.84-0.92, and 0.88 (0.85-0.92 respectively].After accounting for potential selection bias, our data showed an inverse association between NSAID use and alcohol-related, infection-related, obesity-related, and smoking-related cancers and support the hypothesis that inflammation is related to an increased risk of certain cancers.

  3. Combined use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with diuretics and/or renin-angiotensin system inhibitors in the community increases the risk of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischulte, Tobias; Morales, Daniel R; Bell, Samira; Guthrie, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) when used in triple combination with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and diuretics, but previous research reported that NSAIDs in dual combinations with either renin-angiotensin system inhibitors or diuretics alone were not. However, earlier studies relied on hospital coding to define AKI, which may underestimate true risk. This nested case-control study characterized the risk of community-acquired AKI associated with NSAID use among 78,379 users of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and/or diuretics, where AKI was defined as a 50% or greater increase in creatinine from baseline. The AKI incidence was 68/10,000 person-years. The relative increase in AKI risk was similar for NSAID use in both triple (adjusted rate ratio 1.64 (95% CI 1.25-2.14)) and dual combinations with either renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (1.60 (1.18-2.17)) or diuretics (1.64 (1.17-2.29)). However, the absolute increase in AKI risk was higher for NSAIDs used in triple versus dual combinations with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors or diuretics alone (numbers needed to harm for 1 year treatment with NSAID of 158 vs. over 300). AKI risk was highest among users of loop diuretic/aldosterone antagonist combinations, in those over 75 years of age, and in those with renal impairment. Thus, the nephrotoxic potential of both dual and triple combinations of NSAIDs with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and/or diuretics yields a higher incidence of AKI than previously thought.

  4. Patient’s Knowledge and Perception Towards the use of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Rheumatology Clinic Northern Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahinuddin Sulaiman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In Rheumatology, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been widely prescribed and used. However, despite their clinical benefits in the management of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease, NSAIDs have considerable side effects, mostly affecting the upper gastrointestinal system, which therefore, limit their use. This study was conducted to determine the patients’ knowledge and perception regarding the used of NSAIDS.Methods: A total of 120 patients who attended the rheumatology clinic Hospital, Raja Permaisuri Bainun, Malaysia, and received NSAIDs more than 3 months were interviewed irrespective of the irrheumatological conditions. Patient’s knowledge and perception on the side effects of NSAIDs were recorded.Result: Fifty-four percent of the patients obtained information regarding the side effect of NSAIDs either from the rheumatologist, rheumatology staff nurse or other medical staffs (75.4%. The remaining 45.8% were naive of such knowledge. Fifteen percent obtained the information by surfing the internet and 9.2% from printed media. Twenty-four (24.2% patients, experiencedin digestion and/or stomach discomfort attributed to NSAIDsused. Two patients (1.7% had hematemesis and malena once.Conclusion: This study shows that half of the patients who attended the rheumatology clinic were unaware of the side effect of NSAIDs. Available data showed that most of the knowledgeable patients are more conscience and self-educated. This study also reveals the important roles of clinicians, trained staff nurses as well as the pharmacist in providing the guidance and knowledge of any medication taken by patients.

  5. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of pain due to soft tissue injury: diclofenac epolamine topical patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, David R; Brennan, Michael J

    2010-11-10

    The objective of this article is to review published clinical data on diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP) in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries, such as strains, sprains, and contusions. Review of published literature on topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diclofenac, and DETP in patients with acute soft tissue injuries was included. Relevant literature was identified on MEDLINE using the search terms topical NSAIDs, diclofenac, diclofenac epolamine, acute pain, sports injury, soft tissue injury, strain, sprain, and contusion, and from citations in retrieved articles covering the years 1978-2008. Review of published, randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses shows that topical NSAIDs are significantly more effective than placebo in relieving acute pain; the pooled average relative benefit was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.5-1.9). In a limited number of comparisons, topical and oral NSAIDs provided comparable pain relief, but the use of topical agents produced lower plasma drug concentrations and fewer systemic adverse events (AEs). The physical-chemical properties of diclofenac epolamine make it well suited for topical use. In patients with acute soft tissue injuries treated with DETP, clinical data report an analgesic benefit within hours of the first application, and significant pain relief relative to placebo within 3 days. Moreover, DETP displayed tolerability comparable with placebo; the most common AEs were pruritus and other application site reactions. Review of published literature suggests that DETP is generally safe and well tolerated, clinically efficacious, and a rational treatment option for patients experiencing acute pain associated with strains, sprains, and contusions, and other localized painful conditions.

  6. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of pain due to soft tissue injury: diclofenac epolamine topical patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lionberger

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available David R Lionberger1, Michael J Brennan21Southwest Orthopedic Group, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT, USAAbstract: The objective of this article is to review published clinical data on diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries, such as strains, sprains, and contusions. Review of published literature on topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, diclofenac, and DETP in patients with acute soft tissue injuries was included. Relevant literature was identified on MEDLINE using the search terms topical NSAIDs, diclofenac, diclofenac epolamine, acute pain, sports injury, soft tissue injury, strain, sprain, and contusion, and from citations in retrieved articles covering the years 1978–2008. Review of published, randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses shows that topical NSAIDs are significantly more effective than placebo in relieving acute pain; the pooled average relative benefit was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.5–1.9. In a limited number of comparisons, topical and oral NSAIDs provided comparable pain relief, but the use of topical agents produced lower plasma drug concentrations and fewer systemic adverse events (AEs. The physical–chemical properties of diclofenac epolamine make it well suited for topical use. In patients with acute soft tissue injuries treated with DETP, clinical data report an analgesic benefit within hours of the first application, and significant pain relief relative to placebo within 3 days. Moreover, DETP displayed tolerability comparable with placebo; the most common AEs were pruritus and other application site reactions. Review of published literature suggests that DETP is generally safe and well tolerated, clinically efficacious, and a rational treatment option for patients experiencing acute pain associated with strains, sprains, and contusions, and other localized painful conditions

  7. Increased diverticular complications with nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs and other medications: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasnovsky, C L; Papagrigoriadis, S; Bjarnason, I

    2014-06-01

    Complications of colonic diverticula, perforation and bleeding are a source of morbidity and mortality. A variety of drugs have been implicated in these complications. We present a systemic review and meta-analysis of the literature to assess the importance of this relationship. A systematic review of articles in PubMed, Cochrane Reviews, Embase and Google Scholar was undertaken in February 2013. An initial literature search yielded 2916 results that were assessed for study design and topicality. Twenty-three articles were included in the review. A qualitative data synthesis was conducted using forest plots of studies comparing single medication with complications. Individual studies demonstrated the odds of perforation and abscess formation with nonsteridal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (1.46-10.30), aspirin (0.66-2.40), steroids (2.17-31.90) and opioids (1.80-4.51) and the odds of bleeding with NSAIDs (2.01-12.60), paracetamol (0-3.75), aspirin (1.14-3.70) and steroids (0.57-5.40). Pooled data showed significantly increased odds of perforation and abscess formation with NSAIDs (OR = 2.49), steroids (OR = 9.08) and opioids (OR = 2.52). They also showed increased odds of diverticular bleeding from NSAIDs (OR = 2.69), aspirin (OR = 3.24) and calcium-channel blockers (OR = 2.50). Most studies did not describe the duration or dosage of medication used and did not systematically describe the severity of diverticular complications. Various common medications are implicated in complications of diverticular disease. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Effects on growth of human osteoblast-like cells of three nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: metamizole, dexketoprofen, and ketorolac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luna-Bertos, Elvira; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    Some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have adverse effects on bone tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of dexketoprofen, ketorolac, and metamizole on growth of the osteoblast MG63 cell line. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide spectrophotometry results showed that MG63 cell growth was significantly inhibited after 24 hr of culture with doses of 10, 20, 100, or 1,000 µM of each NSAID and with doses of 0.1, 1, or 5 µM of dexketoprofen and ketorolac but not metamizole. Cell-cycle studies revealed that dexketoprofen and ketorolac treatments significantly arrested the cell cycle in phase G0/G1, increasing the percentage of cells in this phase. Apoptosis/necrosis studies showed significant changes versus control cells, with an increased percentage of cells in apoptosis after treatment with 10, 100, or 1,000 µM of metamizole and after treatment with 1, 10, 100, or 1,000 µM of dexketoprofen or ketorolac. In conclusion, treatment of osteoblast-like cells with high doses of the NSAIDs tested increased not only the percentage of cells in apoptosis but also the percentage of necrotic cells. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The nature of hydrogen-bonding interactions in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs revealed by polarized IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachuła, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the solid phase on the IR spectroscopic pattern of the νOsbnd H band of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was studied experimentally by IR spectroscopy with the use of polarized light at two temperatures (293 K and 77 K) and in isotopic dilution. The neat and deuterated crystals of (S)-naproxen ((S)-NPX), (R)-flurbiprofen ((R)-FBP), (RS)-flurbiprofen ((RS)-FBP) and (RS)-ketoprofen ((RS)-KTP) were obtained by melt crystallization between the two squeezed CaF2 plates. The vibrational spectra of selected α-aryl propionic acid derivatives (2APAs) reflected the characteristics of their hydrogen-bond networks, i.e., 2APAs were characterized by the chain ((S)-NPX, (R)-FBP) and by dimeric ((RS)-FBP, (RS)-KTP) arrangement of hydrogen bonds in the crystal lattice. Spectroscopic results showed that the interchain (through-space) exciton coupling, between two laterally-spaced hydrogen bonds, dominates in the crystals of four NSAIDs. The same exciton coupled hydrogen bonds were also responsible for the H/D isotopic recognition mechanism in the crystalline spectra of deuterated 2APAs. The presented spectral results may help to predict the hydrogen bond motifs in the crystalline NSAIDs, which structures are not yet known, based on their IR spectra of hydrogen bond in the crystals.

  10. Statin and NSAID Use and Prostate Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Patricia F.; Kelly, Judith Parsells; Strom, Brian L.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Some studies have reported reduced risks of advanced, but not early, prostate cancer among statin users, and one study found a reduced risk only among statin users who had also used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We have previously reported no association between statin use and prostate cancer in our hospital-based Case Control Surveillance Study. The purpose of the present analyses was to update the findings by cancer stage and to evaluate the joint use of statins and NSAIDs. Methods Cases were 1367 men with prostate cancer and controls were 2007 men with diagnoses unrelated to statin or NSAID use. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for statin use compared with no use, and joint use of statin and NSAIDs compared with use of neither. Results The odds ratio among regular statin users was 1.1 (95% CI 0.9–1.5), and odds ratios were similar among early and late stage cancers. The odds ratio among joint statin and NSAID users was 1.1 (95% CI 0.7–1.6). Conclusion The present results do not support a protective effect of statin use, or statin and NSAID use, on the risk of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:20582910

  11. Risk of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, or anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Arguedas, Yolanda; García, Santiago; Bujanda, Luis; Calvet, Xavier; Ponce, Julio; Perez-Aísa, Ángeles; Castro, Manuel; Muñoz, Maria; Sostres, Carlos; García-Rodríguez, Luis A

    2015-05-01

    Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin is associated with increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. There is little evidence on the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents (APAs), or anticoagulants. We aimed to quantify the relative risk (RR) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of NSAIDs, APAs, or anticoagulants. We performed a case-control study that used data collected from consecutive patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal bleeding (563 upper, mean age, 63.6 ± 16.7 years and 415 lower, mean age, 70.8 ± 13.8 years), confirmed by endoscopy or other diagnostic procedures. Unhospitalized patients were used as controls (n = 1008) and matched for age, hospital, and month of admission. Drug use was considered current when taken within 7 days or less before hospitalization. RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression analysis. Use of anticoagulants, low-dose aspirin, and other drugs (non-aspirin-APA, 82.3% thienopiridines) was associated with upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; the risk was 2-fold higher for anticoagulants (RR, 4.2; 95% CI, 2.9-6.2) than for low-dose aspirin (RR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.3) or other non-aspirin-APA drugs (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6). NSAID use was also associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and greater for upper (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.0-3.5) than lower gastrointestinal bleeding (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9). Use of proton pump inhibitors was associated with reduced risk of upper, but not lower, gastrointestinal bleeding. Anticoagulants, low-dose aspirin, NSAIDs, and other non-aspirin-APA drugs are associated with increased risk of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Use of anticoagulants appears to be the strongest risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. LIVER FUNCTION CHANGES IN PATIENTS WITH SPONDYLOARTHRITIS TAKING NONSTEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS OVER A LONG PERIOD: RESULTS OF A 10-YEAR PROGRESS PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess liver function changes in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA taking NSAIDs regularly over a long period.Patients and methods. The data obtained during a 10-year PROGRESS prospective single-center cohort study of functional status, activity, and comorbidity (including gastrointestinal tract diseases in patients with SpA were analyzed. The data of 363 SpA patients receiving NSAIDs regularly over a long period and followed up for 10 years were also explored. The changes that had occurred over a decade in the liver enzyme levels, the number of discontinued NSAID treatments because of a persistent increase in liver enzyme levels, and the number of prescriptions of hepatoprotective agents were analyzed.Results. For 10 years, 18 patients with SpA discontinued their NSAID intake due to elevated liver enzyme levels (≥3 times greater than the reference value; during that time, the same increase in enzyme levels was observed in 2 healthy individuals (χ2 =1.39; p=0.2. In the patients with SpA as compared to the healthy individuals, the relative risk of abnormal liver function was 1.19 (95% CI, 1.009–1.405; odds ratio was 2.9 (95% CI, 0.65–12.95. There was no increased risk for discontinuation of some NSAIDs, including nimesulide (χ2 =0.03, p=0.85, the frequency of using hepatoprotective drugs was proved to be highest for diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen, nimesulide, and ketoprofen.Conclusion. The regular long-term (as long as 10 years use of NSAIDs to treat SpA is associated with treatment discontinuation because of elevated enzyme levels in every 10 patients. The maximum rate of discontinuation of NSAIDs due to a persistent increase in liver enzyme levels is observed 6–8 years after their regular use, so long-term NSAID therapy requires continuous monitoring of hepatic safety. The longterm intake of nimesulide, as compared with other NSAIDs, is shown to be unassociated with the higher rate of its discontinuation because of

  13. Determinants of self-medication with NSAIDs in a Portuguese community pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes AP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are a widely used therapeutic group in the world, and particularly in the Portuguese population. Objective: To compare NSAID’s use by prescription and self-medication acquisition and to determine the pattern of indication of NSAIDs, their usage profile and possible implications for patients’ safety. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used where individuals presenting at a community pharmacy requesting NSAIDs during the study period (one month were invited to answer a face-to-face interview where socio-demographic characteristics, the indication pattern and previous experience of side effects were assessed. A follow-up interview was performed one week later to assess the incidence of adverse effects. The study was ethically approved. Results: A sample of 130 NSAIDs users was recruited, comprising mostly women (n=87; 66.9%, actively employed (n=77; 59.2% and presenting a mean age of 49.5 years old (SD=20.49. An equal proportion of individuals acquired NSAIDs by self-medication and with medical prescription (n=65; 50%. Over 4/5 of patients (n=57; 87.7% acquiring NSAIDs without a prescription were self-medicated by their own initiative, and only 10.8% (n=7 had been advised by the pharmacist. The most commonly acquired active substances were ibuprofen and diclofenac. Self-medicated users more frequently resorted to topical NSAIDs following short term treatments. The major underlying condition motivating NSAIDs sought were musculoskeletal disorders (45.0%, regardless of the regimen. An important proportion of prevalent users of NSAIDs reported previous experience of adverse effects (11.3%. One week after initiating NSAID therapy, a small proportion of patients reported incidence of adverse effects. Conclusion: Self-medication with NSAIDs is sought for numerous medical conditions. Reported adverse effects (prevalent and incident confirm the need for a more rational use of NSAIDs and ongoing

  14. [Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on colonic lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activities from patients with colonic neoplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, G; Franchi, A; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Farina, M; Fernández de Gimeno, M A

    2001-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate (LC) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with good gastrointestinal tolerance. Treatment with LC at levels equivalent to those found in plasma following therapeutic doses resulted in significant inhibition of both cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and production of 5 hydroxy-eicosatetraeonic acid (5-HETE) and slightly affected levels of cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) in in vitro studies carried out on human tissues. This study deals with the in vivo effect of the drug on human colon segments. Experiment 1: Five patients about to undergo hemicholectomy due to colon neoplasia were treated preoperatively with a continuous infusion of LC, to achieve a steady-state concentration between 4 and 6 mg/ml. Human colon segments from the five patients and from another five control patients receiving no treatment with [14C]-arachidonic acid were incubated. Human colon segments treated with LC showed significant inhibition of PGE2, the only prostaglandin (PG) synthesised by the tissue, as well as of 5-HETE. Experiment 2: Fifteen patients received an i.v. bolus of LC 100 mg (n1 = 5); LC 200 mg (n2 = 5) or indomethacin (INDO) 50 mg (n3 = 5). Both doses of LC showed greater inhibition of PGE2 synthesis than the INDO bolus. Both NSAIDs studied proved to have different effects on the production of 5-HETE; while treatment with LC elicited significant inhibition, levels with INDO remained unchanged. Western blotting analysis showed expression of both COX isoforms in colon segments, COX-2 levels being 20% higher. Both types of in vivo studies conducted continuous infusion and i.v. bolus, revealed that LC exerted significant inhibition of basal synthesis of PGE2 and 5-HETE.

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and paracetamol use in Queensland and in the whole of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tett Susan E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross national drug utilization studies can provide information about different influences on physician prescribing. This is important for medicines with issues around safety and quality of use, like non selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ns-NSAIDs and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors. To enable comparison of prescription medicine use across different jurisdictions with a range of population sizes, data first need to be compared within Australia to understand whether use in a smaller sub-population may be considered as representative of the total use within Australia. The aim of this study was to compare the utilization of non selective NSAID, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol between Queensland and Australia. Method Dispensing data were obtained for concession beneficiaries for Australia for ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol subsidized by the PBS over the period 1997–2003. The same data were purchased for Queensland. Data were converted to Defined Daily Dose (DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day (World Health Organization anatomical therapeutic chemical classification, 2005. Results Total NSAID and paracetamol consumption were similar in Australia and Queensland. Ns-NSAID use decreased sharply with the introduction of COX-2 inhibitors (from approximately 80 to 40 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day. Paracetamol was constant (approximately 45 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day. COX-2 inhibitors consumption was initially higher in Queensland than in the whole of Australia. Conclusion Despite initial divergence in celecoxib use between Queensland and Australia, the use of ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol overall, in concession beneficiaries, was comparable in Australia and Queensland.

  16. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that elevate cardiovascular risk: an examination of sales and essential medicines lists in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McGettigan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs (e.g., rofecoxib [Vioxx] increase the risk of heart attack and stroke and should be avoided in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. Rates of cardiovascular disease are high and rising in many low- and middle-income countries. We studied the extent to which evidence on cardiovascular risk with NSAIDs has translated into guidance and sales in 15 countries. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data on the relative risk (RR of cardiovascular events with individual NSAIDs were derived from meta-analyses of randomised trials and controlled observational studies. Listing of individual NSAIDs on Essential Medicines Lists (EMLs was obtained from the World Health Organization. NSAID sales or prescription data for 15 low-, middle-, and high-income countries were obtained from Intercontinental Medical Statistics Health (IMS Health or national prescription pricing audit (in the case of England and Canada. Three drugs (rofecoxib, diclofenac, etoricoxib ranked consistently highest in terms of cardiovascular risk compared with nonuse. Naproxen was associated with a low risk. Diclofenac was listed on 74 national EMLs, naproxen on just 27. Rofecoxib use was not documented in any country. Diclofenac and etoricoxib accounted for one-third of total NSAID usage across the 15 countries (median 33.2%, range 14.7-58.7%. This proportion did not vary between low- and high-income countries. Diclofenac was by far the most commonly used NSAID, with a market share close to that of the next three most popular drugs combined. Naproxen had an average market share of less than 10%. CONCLUSIONS: Listing of NSAIDs on national EMLs should take account of cardiovascular risk, with preference given to low risk drugs. Diclofenac has a risk very similar to rofecoxib, which was withdrawn from worldwide markets owing to cardiovascular toxicity. Diclofenac should be removed from EMLs.

  17. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernan; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo; González-Aveledo, Luis

    2010-01-01

    After beta lactam antibiotics, hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are the second cause of hypersensitivity to drugs. Acute manifestations affect the respiratory tract (aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease), the skin (urticaria and angioedema), or are generalized (anaphylaxis). Correct diagnosis and treatment in order to prevent unnecessary morbidity and the potential risk of death from these severe reactions, and to provide proper medical advice on future dru...

  18. NSAIDs and serious cardiovascular disorders: especially cox-2 inhibitors and diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used as analgesics expose patients to cardiovascular risks that can be predicted from their pharmacological properties. As of mid-2015, what is known about the cardiovascular harms of the NSAIDs of choice, ibuprofen and naproxen? Most of the data from comparative trials of NSAIDs concern cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen. Few studies have addressed the serious cardiovascular effects of other NSAIDs. In 2013, a U.K. team published a large meta-analysis of hundreds of randomised trials comparing NSAIDs with placebo or one NSAID with another NSAID. Compared with placebo, a statistically significant increase in the risk of serious cardiovascular adverse effects was demonstrated with cox-2 inhibitors and with diclofenac (about +40%). This risk is mainly due to an increase in myocardial infarctions and vascular deaths. Another meta-analysis found similar results in terms of cardiovascular deaths. The results of epidemiological studies are consistent with those of randomised clinical trials. According to meta-analyses of randomised trials, high-dose ibuprofen increases cardiovascular risks to the same degree as diclofenac or cox-2 inhibitors. The risk seems to mainly apply to daily doses of 2400 mg, a finding borne out by epidemiological studies that showed no increased risk with ibuprofen 1200 mg. Two meta-analyses of clinical trials showed that all NSAIDs roughly double the risk of heart failure. One meta-analysis showed a small, statistically significant increase in the risk of atrial fibrillation. In practice, from a cardiovascular perspective, the NSAIDs of choice are ibuprofen, on condition that the dose does not exceed 1200 mg per day, and naproxen. In contrast, it would appear from the study data that cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen (2400 mg per day) are best avoided. As for other NSAIDs, the clinical data are too sparse to allow a meaningful comparison with the better studied

  19. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use and the Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in the General German Population: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, Kathrin; Kollhorst, Bianca; Schink, Tania

    2017-09-01

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been associated with an increased relative risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but the label warnings refer particularly to patients with cardiovascular risk factors. The magnitude of relative AMI risk for patients with and without cardiovascular risk factors varies between studies depending on the drugs and doses studied. The aim of our study was to estimate population-based relative AMI risks for individual and widely used NSAIDs, for a cumulative amount of NSAID use, and for patients with and without a prior history of cardiovascular risk factors. Based on data from the German Pharmacoepidemiological Research Database (GePaRD) of about 17 million insurance members from four statutory health insurance providers, for the years 2004-2009, a nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 3,476,931 new NSAID users classified into current, recent, or past users. Up to 100 controls were matched to each case by age, sex, and length of follow-up using risk set sampling. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Duration of NSAID use was calculated by the cumulative amount of dispensed defined daily doses (DDDs), and stratified analyses were conducted for potential effect modifiers. Overall, 17,236 AMI cases were matched to 1,714,006 controls. Elevated relative AMI risks were seen for current users of fixed combinations of diclofenac with misoprostol (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.45), indometacin (1.69, 1.22-2.35), ibuprofen (1.54, 1.43-1.65), etoricoxib (1.52, 1.24-1.87), and diclofenac (1.43, 1.34-1.52) compared with past use. A low cumulative NSAID amount was associated with a higher relative AMI risk for ibuprofen, diclofenac, and indometacin. The relative risk associated with current use of diclofenac, fixed combinations of diclofenac with misoprostol, etoricoxib, and ibuprofen was highest in the younger age group

  20. Anti-inflammatory drugs and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, W.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the disorder we know as schizophrenia. Although there is treatment for schizophrenia in the form of anti-psychotic drugs, not all patients respond well to this treatment. A large part of patients will have remaining symptoms for the rest of their lives. A number of hypotheses

  1. Use of NSAIDs in triathletes: prevalence, level of awareness and reasons for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, T; Cadore, E Lusa; Pinto, S Santana; da Silva, E Marczwski; Correa, C Silva; Beltrami, F Gabe; Kruel, L F Martins

    2011-02-01

    to determine the level of awareness regarding nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the prevalence and reasons for their consumption among athletes competing at the 2008 Brazil Ironman Triathlon (3.8 km swim, 180 km cycle and 42.2 km run). survey study. 2008 Brazil Ironman Triathlon, Florianópolis, Brazil, May 2008. 327 Of the 1250 athletes competing at the 2008 Brazil Ironman Triathlon were enrolled in the study. athletes answered a questionnaire about NSAID effects, side effects and consumption at the bike checkout or awards lunch. 196 (59.9%) Athletes reported using NSAIDs in the previous 3 months; of these, 25.5% (n=50), 17.9% (n=35) and 47.4% (n=93) consumed NSAIDs the day before, immediately before and during the race, respectively. Among NSAID users, 48.5% (n=95) consumed them without medical prescription. The main reason given for NSAID consumption in the previous 3 months was the treatment of injuries, while the main reason given for consuming NSAIDs during the race was pain prevention. Despite anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, most athletes were unaware of the effects of NSAIDs, and the only adverse effects known by most athletes were the gastrointestinal complications. this study found a high prevalence of NSAID consumption, limited awareness of the effects and side effects of them and a high rate of nonprescribed use. It is suggested that long-distance triathlon events include in their programmes educational devices such as talks or folders about NSAID use, effects and side effects.

  2. Nature is the best source of anti-inflammatory drugs: indexing natural products for their anti-inflammatory bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswad, Miran; Rayan, Mahmoud; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Falah, Mizied; Raiyn, Jamal; Abdallah, Ziyad; Rayan, Anwar

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to index natural products for less expensive preventive or curative anti-inflammatory therapeutic drugs. A set of 441 anti-inflammatory drugs representing the active domain and 2892 natural products representing the inactive domain was used to construct a predictive model for bioactivity-indexing purposes. The model for indexing the natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity was constructed using the iterative stochastic elimination algorithm (ISE). ISE is capable of differentiating between active and inactive anti-inflammatory molecules. By applying the prediction model to a mix set of (active/inactive) substances, we managed to capture 38% of the anti-inflammatory drugs in the top 1% of the screened set of chemicals, yielding enrichment factor of 38. Ten natural products that scored highly as potential anti-inflammatory drug candidates are disclosed. Searching the PubMed revealed that only three molecules (Moupinamide, Capsaicin, and Hypaphorine) out of the ten were tested and reported as anti-inflammatory. The other seven phytochemicals await evaluation for their anti-inflammatory activity in wet lab. The proposed anti-inflammatory model can be utilized for the virtual screening of large chemical databases and for indexing natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. Precision-cut intestinal slices as an in vitro model to predict NSAID induced intestinal toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; van der Bijl, Henk; Groothuis, Geny; de Graaf, Inge

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with high prevalence of gastro-intestinal side-effects. In vivo studies suggest that uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is an important cause of the toxicity and that the toxicity is aggravated by enterohepatic circulation.

  4. Comparative effect of paracetamol, NSAIDs or their combination in postoperative pain management: a qualitative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyllested, M; Jones, S; Pedersen, J L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative reviews of postoperative pain management have demonstrated that the number of patients needed to treat for one patient to achieve at least 50% pain relief (NNT) is 2.7 for ibuprofen (400 mg) and 4.6 for paracetamol (1000 mg), both compared with placebo. However, direct...... comparisons between paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have not been extensively reviewed. The aims of this review are (i) to compare the analgesic and adverse effects of paracetamol with those of other NSAIDs in postoperative pain, (ii) to compare the effects of combined...... paracetamol and NSAID with those of either drug alone, and (iii) to discuss whether the adverse effects of NSAIDs in short-term use are justified by their analgesic effects, compared with paracetamol. METHODS: Medline (1966 to January 2001) and the Cochrane Library (January 2001) were used to perform...

  5. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and dyspepsia in general practice – a prospective, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Skok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of dyspeptic patients is a diagnostic and therapeutic problem frequently encountered by general and family practitioners, by internists and gastroenterologists.Aims: In our study we attempted to assess the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients over 60 who are regular users of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.Patients and methods: This is a prospective cohort study based on an interview during examination in the OPC, the results obtained by the diagnostic procedures and follow-up. It was carried out between 1999 and 2003 at a family practitioner’s and a gastroenterologic OPC. In patients who were regular users of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, we established the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms, the most often used drugs and the type of diagnostic procedure applied to define the cause of dyspepsia. The control group was composed of patients over 60 who were also exhibiting dyspeptic symptoms but not using any NSAID.Results: The study comprised 50 patients, 27 women and 23 men, the mean age was 67.3 years, the range 60–80 years. The control group comprised 50 patients, 28 women and 22 men, the mean age was 66.6 years, the range 61–80 years. All patients of the study group had used NSAR or preparations of acetylsalicylic acid during the past 3 months. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients of both groups as regards the number and use of other drugs, p = 0.65. The average score of dyspeptic complaints in our study group was 3.02, SD ± 0.6, and 70% of patients wished to use H2 antagonists or proton pump inhibitors for these complaints. In patients of the control group, the average score of complaints was 2.72, SD ± 0.7, and they also took drugs for the alleviation of their complaints more rarely.Conclusions: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs belong among the important causes of dyspepsia in the elderly. When making decisions about the various diagnostic procedures for

  6. Efficacy and safety of topical NSAIDs in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannou, François; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2016-02-01

    Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended in international and national guidelines as an early treatment option for the symptomatic management of knee and hand osteoarthritis (OA), and may be used ahead of oral NSAIDs due to their superior safety profile. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends topical NSAIDs for knee OA in addition to the pharmacological background of symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) and rescue analgesia with paracetamol and non-pharmacological treatment, if the patient is still symptomatic. Topical NSAIDs have a moderate effect on pain relief, with efficacy similar to that of oral NSAIDs, with the advantage of a better risk:benefit ratio. In real-life studies, topical and oral NSAIDs demonstrate an equivalent effect on knee pain over 1 year of treatment, with fewer adverse events due to lower systemic absorption of topical NSAIDs compared with oral NSAIDs. As a result, topical NSAIDs may be the preferred treatment option, especially in OA patients aged ≥75 years, and those with co-morbidities or at an increased risk of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or renal side effects. Furthermore, using topical NSAIDs in inflammatory rheumatic diseases leads to a 40% reduction in the need for concomitant oral NSAIDs. When selecting a topical NSAID, absorption and bioavailability are important because of heterogeneity among topical drug formulations. Molecules like etofenamate have a bioavailability of >20% and evidence for accumulation in synovial tissues, with efficacy demonstrated as improvement in pain and function in real-life studies of OA patients. Diclofenac also shows good efficacy alongside evidence that diclofenac accumulates in the synovium. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in chronic pain conditions with special emphasis on the elderly and patients with relevant comorbidities: management and mitigation of risks and adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used drugs, and this widespread use is complicated by safety issues. A Literature review was conducted. NSAIDs are a leading cause of drug-related morbidity, especially in the elderly and patients with comorbidities. Most adverse effects are related to generalized inhibition of the major targets of NSAIDs: cyclooxygenases I and II. These enzymes are not only involved in pain and inflammation pathogenesis but are also required in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract for mucosal protection and gut motility, and in the kidneys for functional integrity. Thus, the mechanisms of NSAID toxicity are well understood, but the consequences are largely uncontrolled in clinical practice. GI ulcers, including bleeding ulcers, may occur in several percent of all chronic unprotected, high-dose NSAID users. Renal side effects may precipitate renal failure, resulting in acute dialysis and chronic retention. This includes sodium retention, resulting in arterial hypertension, heart failure, and atherosclerotic events. Cardiovascular risk may be tripled by chronic high-dose NSAID use in long-term clinical trials though "real-life studies" indicate lower risk ratios. Off-target side effects include allergic reactions, drug-induced liver injury, and central nervous system effects. Management of pain and inflammation must consider those risks and find alternative drugs or approaches to limit the negative impact of NSAIDs on mortality and morbidity. Alternative drugs, low-dose/short-term use, but especially non-pharmacologic approaches, such as physiotherapy, exercise, neurophysiologic measures, and local therapies, need to be further utilized. The appalling equation "less pain-more deaths/morbidity" ultimately necessitates treatment optimization in the individual patient.

  8. Controlled release of non-steroidal antiinflammatory and anticancer drugs from hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravieri, Beatriz Bernardes; Molina, Eduardo Ferreira, E-mail: bia_ms_@hotmail.com [Universidade de Franca, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Chronic inflammation is a well known risk factor for the development of human cancer, and at least one third of all human cancers have been associated with inflammation. This can lead to cellular proliferation, a process which per se increases the risk of abnormal cell formation and ultimately the development of cancer. For treating clinical conditions such as inflammation and cancer, the most common methods (e.g., oral administration, injection) can cause unwanted side effects due to drug delivery to non-target sites and the introduction of high doses of the drug to reach the desired location. An alternative to these problems is the preparation of materials that can release drugs with different activities. Thinking about it, the aim of this study was to use a class of hybrid materials based on siloxane-polyether known as ureasil for controlled release of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (IBU) and naproxen (NAP), and anticancer, such as 5-fluorouracil (5- FU). These drugs have been incorporated in the matrix in different proportions and thereafter, were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, FTIR, DSC and SAXS. In addition, it has been evaluated the release kinetics of these species with different chemical structures. The results have shown that the drug molecules were homogeneously distributed in the xerogel hybrids, which contributed to the drug’s release profile fine-tuning. The chemical environment of the polyether chains was amended by incorporating the drugs. The analysis from XRD, FTIR, SAXS and DSC confirm the good solubility of the substances within hybrid matrix. This hybrid material based on polymers and inorganic compounds may have potential applications in human health. (author)

  9. Controlled release of non-steroidal antiinflammatory and anticancer drugs from hybrid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravieri, Beatriz Bernardes; Molina, Eduardo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Chronic inflammation is a well known risk factor for the development of human cancer, and at least one third of all human cancers have been associated with inflammation. This can lead to cellular proliferation, a process which per se increases the risk of abnormal cell formation and ultimately the development of cancer. For treating clinical conditions such as inflammation and cancer, the most common methods (e.g., oral administration, injection) can cause unwanted side effects due to drug delivery to non-target sites and the introduction of high doses of the drug to reach the desired location. An alternative to these problems is the preparation of materials that can release drugs with different activities. Thinking about it, the aim of this study was to use a class of hybrid materials based on siloxane-polyether known as ureasil for controlled release of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (IBU) and naproxen (NAP), and anticancer, such as 5-fluorouracil (5- FU). These drugs have been incorporated in the matrix in different proportions and thereafter, were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, FTIR, DSC and SAXS. In addition, it has been evaluated the release kinetics of these species with different chemical structures. The results have shown that the drug molecules were homogeneously distributed in the xerogel hybrids, which contributed to the drug’s release profile fine-tuning. The chemical environment of the polyether chains was amended by incorporating the drugs. The analysis from XRD, FTIR, SAXS and DSC confirm the good solubility of the substances within hybrid matrix. This hybrid material based on polymers and inorganic compounds may have potential applications in human health. (author)

  10. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Quickly Resolve Symptoms Associated with EBV-Induced Infectious Mononucleosis in Patients with Atopic Predispositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Itsuro; Miura, Chieko; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2016-02-14

    Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical syndrome most commonly associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In adults, the symptoms can often be severe and prolonged, sometimes causing serious complications. Analgesic or antipyretic drugs are normally used to relieve the symptoms. However, there is no causal treatment for the disease. Two cases of adult patients with atopic predispositions developed nocturnal fever, general fatigue, pharyngitis and lymphadenopathy after an exacerbation of atopic symptoms or those of allergic rhinitis. Due to the positive results for EBV viral-capsid antigen (VCA) IgM and negative results for EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA) IgG, diagnoses of infectious mononucleosis induced by EBV were made in both cases. Although oral antibiotics or acetaminophen alone did not improve the deteriorating symptoms, including fever, headache and general fatigue, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as tiaramide or loxoprofen, completely improved the symptoms quickly after the initiation. In these cases, given the atopic predispositions of the patients, an enhanced immunological response was likely to be mainly responsible for the pathogenesis of the symptoms. In such cases, NSAIDs, that are known to reduce the activity of EBV, may dramatically improve the deteriorating symptoms quickly after the initiation. In the present cases, the immunosuppressive property of these drugs was considered to suppress the activity of lymphocytes and thus provide the rapid and persistent remission of the disease.

  11. The interplay between NSAIDs and Candida albicans on the gastrointestinal tract of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadăş, George C; Taulescu, Marian A; Ciobanu, Lidia; Fiţ, Nicodim I; Flore, Chirilă; Răpuntean, Sorin; Bouari, Cosmina M; Catoi, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that Candida albicans colonization is associated with several gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders and is also responsible for the delay in ulcer healing. No data are reported about the effects of C. albicans on the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)-induced necroinflammatory lesions. On the other hand, beneficial effects of NSAIDs regarding the colonization potential with C. albicans have been reported. Our aim was to investigate whether the association between NSAIDs and C. albicans could potentially induce necroinflammatory lesions in the guinea pigs gastric and enteral mucosa. Three interventional groups of 11 guinea pigs each were investigated after 5 days of receiving indomethacin, C. albicans or the association of both. C. albicans and necroinflammatory lesions were graded based on histological examinations. Statistical analysis used Mann-Whitney nonparametric test. NSAIDs did not significantly decrease C. albicans colonization grades on gastrointestinal mucosa. Administration of indomethacin subsequent to C. albicans determined significantly more severe necroinflammatory lesions compared to group that only received C. albicans. The association of NSAIDs and C. albicans did not cause significantly more severe degenerative or inflammatory lesions compared to the administration of only NSAIDs in this experimental model. Associations between NSAIDs and C. albicans caused significantly more severe necroinflammatory injuries than the lesions produced by C. albicans, without enhancing the mucosal injury or inflammation caused by NSAIDs.

  12. NSAID gastropathy and enteropathy: distinct pathogenesis likely necessitates distinct prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to cause ulceration in the stomach and proximal duodenum are well understood, and this injury can largely be prevented through suppression of gastric acid secretion (mainly with proton pump inhibitors). In contrast, the pathogenesis of small intestinal injury induced by NSAIDs is less well understood, involving more complex mechanisms than those in the stomach and proximal duodenum. There is clear evidence for important contributions to NSAID enteropathy of enteric bacteria, bile and enterohepatic recirculation of the NSAID. There is no evidence that suppression of gastric acid secretion will reduce the incidence or severity of NSAID enteropathy. Indeed, clinical data suggest little, if any, benefit. Animal studies suggest a significant exacerbation of NSAID enteropathy when proton pump inhibitors are co-administered with the NSAID. This worsening of damage appears to be linked to changes in the number and types of bacteria in the small intestine during proton pump inhibitor therapy. The distinct mechanisms of NSAID-induced injury in the stomach/proximal duodenum versus the more distal small intestine likely dictate distinct strategies for prevention. © 2011 The Author. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Resistance Training with Co-ingestion of Anti-inflammatory Drugs Attenuates Mitochondrial Function

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    Daniele A. Cardinale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study aimed to examine the effects of resistance exercise with concomitant consumption of high vs. low daily doses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. As a secondary aim, we compared the effects of eccentric overload with conventional training.Methods: Twenty participants were randomized to either a group taking high doses (3 × 400 mg/day of ibuprofen (IBU; 27 ± 5 year; n = 11 or a group ingesting a low dose (1 × 75 mg/day of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 26 ± 4 year; n = 9 during 8 weeks of supervised knee extensor resistance training. Each of the subject's legs were randomized to complete the training program using either a flywheel (FW device emphasizing eccentric overload, or a traditional weight stack machine (WS. Maximal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (CI+IIP from permeabilized skeletal muscle bundles was assessed using high-resolution respirometry. Citrate synthase (CS activity was assessed using spectrophotometric techniques and mitochondrial protein content using western blotting.Results: After training, CI+IIP decreased (P < 0.05 in both IBU (23% and ASA (29% with no difference across medical treatments. Although CI+IIP decreased in both legs, the decrease was greater (interaction p = 0.015 in WS (33%, p = 0.001 compared with FW (19%, p = 0.078. CS activity increased (p = 0.027 with resistance training, with no interactions with medical treatment or training modality. Protein expression of ULK1 increased with training in both groups (p < 0.001. The increase in quadriceps muscle volume was not correlated with changes in CI+IIP (R = 0.16.Conclusion: These results suggest that 8 weeks of resistance training with co-ingestion of anti-inflammatory drugs reduces mitochondrial function but increases mitochondrial content. The observed changes were not affected by higher doses of NSAIDs consumption, suggesting that the resistance training

  14. Influence of smoking, body mass index and other factors on the preventive effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Chan, Andrew T; Slattery, Martha L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Potter, John D; Gallinger, Steven; Caan, Bette; Lampe, Johanna W; Newcomb, Polly A; Zubair, Niha; Hsu, Li; Schoen, Robert E; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; Le Marchand, Loic; Peters, Ulrike; White, Emily

    2018-06-19

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use has consistently been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, studies showed inconsistent results on which cohort of individuals may benefit most. We performed multivariable logistic regression analysis to systematically test for the interaction between regular use of NSAIDs and other lifestyle and dietary factors on CRC risk among 11,894 cases and 15,999 controls. Fixed-effects meta-analyses were used for stratified analyses across studies for each risk factor and to summarize the estimates from interactions. Regular use of any NSAID, aspirin, or non-aspirin NSAIDs was significantly associated with a lower risk of CRC within almost all subgroups. However, smoking status and BMI were found to modify the NSAID-CRC association. Aspirin use was associated with a 29% lower CRC risk among never-smokers (OR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.64, 0.79), compared to 19% and 17% lower CRC risk among smokers of pack-years below median (OR = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.92) and above median (OR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.94), respectively (p-interaction = 0.048). The association between any NSAID use and CRC risk was also attenuated with increasing BMI (p-interaction = 0.075). Collectively, these results suggest that obese individuals and heavy smokers are unlikely to benefit as much as other groups from the prophylactic effect of aspirin against CRC. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Effect of short-term sequential administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the stomach and proximal portion of the duodenum in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowers, Kristy L; Uhrig, Samantha R; Mama, Khursheed R; Gaynor, James S; Hellyer, Peter W

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate effects of injection with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) followed by oral administration of an NSAID on the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of healthy dogs. 6 healthy Walker Hounds. In a randomized, crossover design, dogs were administered 4 treatments consisting of an SC injection of an NSAID or control solution (day 0), followed by oral administration of an NSAID or inert substance for 4 days (days 1 through 4). Treatment regimens included carprofen (4 mg/kg) followed by inert substance; saline (0.9% NaCl) solution followed by deracoxib (4 mg/kg); carprofen (4 mg/kg) followed by carprofen (4 mg/kg); and carprofen (4 mg/kg) followed by deracoxib (4 mg/kg). Hematologic, serum biochemical, and fecal evaluations were conducted weekly, and clinical scores were obtained daily. Endoscopy of the GIT was performed before and on days 1, 2, and 5 for each treatment. Lesions were scored by use of a 6-point scale. No significant differences existed for clinical data, clinicopathologic data, or lesion scores in the esophagus, cardia, or duodenum. For the gastric fundus, antrum, and lesser curvature, an effect of time was observed for all treatments, with lesions worsening from before to day 2 of treatments but improving by day 5. Sequential administration of NSAIDs in this experiment did not result in clinically important gastroduodenal ulcers. A larger study to investigate the effect of sequential administration of NSAIDs for longer durations and in dogs with signs of acute and chronic pain is essential to substantiate these findings.

  16. An investigation of the concomitant use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucsa, C; Moga, D C; Farcas, A; Mogosan, C; Dumitrascu, D L

    2015-08-01

    To determine in retrospective data the prevalence at hospital discharge of co-prescribing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and ACE-I/NSAIDs and diuretics and to identify factors associated with the co-prescription. Secondary, we evaluated the extent of serum creatinine and potassium monitoring in patients treated with ACE-I and these associations and determined the prevalence of values above the upper normal limit (UNL) in monitored patients. Hospitalized patients with ACE-I in their therapy at discharge were included in 3 groups as follows: ACE-I, DT (double therapy with ACE-I and NSAIDs) and TT (triple therapy with ACE-I, NSAIDs and diuretics) groups. We evaluated differences on demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, medications, laboratory monitoring and quantified the patients with serum creatinine and potassium levels above the UNL using descriptive statistics. Logistic regression analysis with backward elimination was performed to identify significant predictors of combination therapy. Of 9960 admitted patients, 1214 were prescribed ACE-I, 40 were prescribed ACE-I/NSAIDs and 22 were prescribed ACE-I/NSAIDs/diuretics (3.13% and 1.72%, respectively, of the patients prescribed with ACE-I). Serum creatinine and potassium were monitored for the great majority of patients from all groups. The highest percentage of hyperkalemia was found in the DT group (10% of the patients) and of serum creatinine above UNL in the TT group (45.45%). The logistic regression final model showed that younger patients and monitoring for potassium were significantly associated with combination therapy. The prevalence of patients receiving DT/TT was relatively low and their monitoring during hospitalization was high. Factors associated with the combinations were younger patients and patients not tested for serum potassium.

  17. 2-hydroxy arachidonic acid: a new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Lopez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are a family of COX1 and COX2 inhibitors used to reduce the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators. In addition, inflammation often leads to a harmful generation of nitric oxide. Efforts are being done in discovering safer NSAIDs molecules capable of inhibiting the synthesis of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators and nitric oxide to reduce the side effects associated with long term therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analogue of arachidonic acid (AA, 2-hydroxy-arachidonic acid (2OAA, was designed to inhibit the activities of COX1 and COX2 and it was predicted to have similar binding energies as AA for the catalytic sites of COX1 and COX2. The interaction of AA and 2OAA with COX1 and COX2 was investigated calculating the free energy of binding and the Fukui function. Toxicity was determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. COX1 and COX2 (PGH2 production activities were measured in vitro. COX1 and COX2 expression in human macrophage-like U937 cells were carried out by Western blot, immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. NO production (Griess method and iNOS (Western blot were determined in mouse microglial BV-2 cells. The comparative efficacy of 2OAA, ibuprofen and cortisone in lowering TNF-α serum levels was determined in C57BL6/J mice challenged with LPS. We show that the presence of the -OH group reduces the likelihood of 2OAA being subjected to H* abstraction in COX, without altering significantly the free energy of binding. The 2OAA inhibited COX1 and COX2 activities and the expression of COX2 in human U937 derived macrophages challenged with LPS. In addition, 2OAA inhibited iNOS expression and the production of NO in BV-2 microglial cells. Finally, oral administration of 2OAA decreased the plasma TNF-α levels in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate the potential of 2OAA as a NSAID.

  18. Therapeutic Doses of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Inhibit Osteosarcoma MG-63 Osteoblast-Like Cells Maturation, Viability, and Biomineralization Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luna-Bertos, E.; Ramos-Torrecillas, J.; García-Martínez, O.; Guildford, A.; Santin, M.; Ruiz, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used to reduce pain and inflammation. However, their effect on bone metabolisms is not well known, and results in the literature are contradictory. The present study focusses on the effect of dexketoprofen, ketorolac, metamizole, and acetylsalicylic acid, at therapeutic doses, on different biochemical and phenotypic pathways in human osteoblast-like cells. Osteoblasts (MG-63 cell line) were incubated in culture medium with 1–10 μM of dexketoprofen, ketorolac, metamizole, and acetylsalicylic acid. Flow cytometry was used to study antigenic profile and phagocytic activity. The osteoblastic differentiation was evaluated by mineralization and synthesis of collagen fibers by microscopy and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) by spectrophotometric assay. Short-term treatment with therapeutic doses of NSAIDs modulated differentiation, antigenic profile, and phagocyte activity of osteoblast-like cells. The treatment reduced ALP synthesis and matrix mineralization. However, nonsignificant differences were observed on collagen syntheses after treatments. The percentage of CD54 expression was increased with all treatments. CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR showed a decreased expression, which depended on NSAID and the dose applied. The treatments also decreased phagocyte activity in this cellular population. The results of this paper provide evidences that NSAIDs inhibit the osteoblast differentiation process thus reducing their ability to produce new bone mineralized extracellular matrix. PMID:24170983

  19. Therapeutic Doses of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Inhibit Osteosarcoma MG-63 Osteoblast-Like Cells Maturation, Viability, and Biomineralization Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. De Luna-Bertos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are frequently used to reduce pain and inflammation. However, their effect on bone metabolisms is not well known, and results in the literature are contradictory. The present study focusses on the effect of dexketoprofen, ketorolac, metamizole, and acetylsalicylic acid, at therapeutic doses, on different biochemical and phenotypic pathways in human osteoblast-like cells. Osteoblasts (MG-63 cell line were incubated in culture medium with 1–10 μM of dexketoprofen, ketorolac, metamizole, and acetylsalicylic acid. Flow cytometry was used to study antigenic profile and phagocytic activity. The osteoblastic differentiation was evaluated by mineralization and synthesis of collagen fibers by microscopy and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP by spectrophotometric assay. Short-term treatment with therapeutic doses of NSAIDs modulated differentiation, antigenic profile, and phagocyte activity of osteoblast-like cells. The treatment reduced ALP synthesis and matrix mineralization. However, nonsignificant differences were observed on collagen syntheses after treatments. The percentage of CD54 expression was increased with all treatments. CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR showed a decreased expression, which depended on NSAID and the dose applied. The treatments also decreased phagocyte activity in this cellular population. The results of this paper provide evidences that NSAIDs inhibit the osteoblast differentiation process thus reducing their ability to produce new bone mineralized extracellular matrix.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori-Negative, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Related Peptic Ulcer Disease in Patients Referred to Afzalipour Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Mirzaei, Seyed Mahdi; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafiei Pour, Sara

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Although Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the main causes of peptic ulcers disease (PUD), recently the prevalence of idiopathic peptic ulcer (IPU) is increasing in most parts of the world. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of IPU in Kerman, the center of largest province in south-east Iran. METHODS We included 215 patients with peptic ulcer in our study. Combined methods rapid urease test (RUT), histology, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on endoscopic samples of peptic ulcers. NSAID use was determined by medical history. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p valuepeptic ulcer, four (1.8%) had H.pylorinegative and NSAID-negative PUD. There were not significant differences between patients with IPU and patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori or NSAIDs regarding the sex, age, cigarette smoking, and opioid abuse. CONCLUSION Our study showed that in contrast to other reports from western and some Asian countries, the prevalence of IPU is low in Kerman and H.pylori infection is still the major cause of PUD. We recommend a large and multi-central study to determine the prevalence of IPU in Iran.

  1. The extraction of aromatic carboxylic acids by the copper complex with Curtis macrocyclic tetramine and its utilization for photometric determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zseltvay, Ivan; Zheltvay, Olga; Antonovich, Valerij

    2011-01-01

    Copper complex with Curtis macrocyclic tetramine is offered as reagent for extraction-photometric determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), belonging to the class of aromatic carboxylic acids. The studies indicate that this method is suitable for quantitative determination of NSAIDs, which have the constant distribution in the system chloroform/water (log P) no less than 3 and dissolubility in chloroform (S) no less than 10 mg/mL. Under optimum conditions, there are liner relationships between the absorption of chloroform extracts and concentration of NSAID in the range of 0.2-4 mg/mL for indometacin (Ind), 0.2-3 mg/mL for mefenamic acid (Mef) and 0.5-3 mg/mL for diclofenac (Dic). The detection limits (S/N = 3) of Ind, Mef and Dic are 0.2, 0.1 and 0.15 mg/mL, respectively. With the help of calculating method (SPARC V4.2) it was predicted the possibility of utilization of this method for extractive-photometric determination of its detached specimen NSAID.

  2. Repurposing the Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Diflunisal as an Osteoprotective, Antivirulence Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Andrew S; Spoonmore, Thomas J; Wilde, Aimee D; Putnam, Nicole E; Hammer, Neal D; Snyder, Daniel J; Guelcher, Scott A; Skaar, Eric P; Cassat, James E

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis is a common and debilitating invasive infection of bone. Treatment of osteomyelitis is confounded by widespread antimicrobial resistance and the propensity of bacteria to trigger pathological changes in bone remodeling that limit antimicrobial penetration to the infectious focus. Adjunctive therapies that limit pathogen-induced bone destruction could therefore limit morbidity and enhance traditional antimicrobial therapies. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) compound diflunisal in limiting S. aureus cytotoxicity toward skeletal cells and in preventing bone destruction during staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Diflunisal is known to inhibit S. aureus virulence factor production by the accessory gene regulator (agr) locus, and we have previously demonstrated that the Agr system plays a substantial role in pathological bone remodeling during staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Consistent with these observations, we find that diflunisal potently inhibits osteoblast cytotoxicity caused by S. aureus secreted toxins independently of effects on bacterial growth. Compared to commonly used NSAIDs, diflunisal is uniquely potent in the inhibition of skeletal cell death in vitro Moreover, local delivery of diflunisal by means of a drug-eluting, bioresorbable foam significantly limits bone destruction during S. aureus osteomyelitis in vivo Collectively, these data demonstrate that diflunisal potently inhibits skeletal cell death and bone destruction associated with S. aureus infection and may therefore be a useful adjunctive therapy for osteomyelitis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen combination versus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of perioperative pain after total knee arthroplasty: A prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takeshi; Yano, Koichiro; Ikari, Katsunori; Hiroshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Hiromitsu; Kawakami, Kosei; Koenuma, Naoko; Ishibashi, Mina; Shirahata, Toshikatsu; Momohara, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    While many of the commonly used treatments for perioperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been recognized as effective, there is still insufficient evidence for oral medication. In orthopedics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been commonly used for perioperative pain; however, serious adverse events have been reported. Conversely, tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen combination (TRAM/APAP) therapy has been shown to reduce pain, particularly for chronic pain in Japan. This study aimed to determine TRAM/APAP efficacy in comparison with NSAIDs for perioperative pain after TKA. Two hundred eighty patients were enrolled in this study; 137 patients were treated with TRAM/APAP, and 143 patients were treated with NSAID from postoperative (PO) day 2. The primary endpoint was a comparison between the pain visual analog scale (VAS) change from baseline (PO day 2) and PO day 4, day 7, day 10, and day 14. The second endpoint was the number of days until the patient achieved independence from cane walking. Analysis of endpoints included 130 and 139 patients in the TRAM/APAP and NSAID groups, respectively. The pain VAS change in the TRAM/APAP group on any of the measurement days was significantly improved compared with the NSAID group (P pain management after TKA of TRAM/APAP was shown to be superior to that of NSAID; TRAM/APAP was also effective in improving the progress of rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Drug eruptions caused by noncorticoid anti-inflammatory agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roujeau, J C; Guillaume, J C; Revuz, J; Touraine, R

    1984-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) may elicit various kinds of cutaneous side effects. The commonest ones are non-specific erythematous eruptions, sometimes with a phototoxic distribution, and urticaria. Vasculitis and severe bullous eruptions (Stevens-Johnson's syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis) are rare but may have severe outcomes. The overall incidence of cutaneous reactions is about the same for all NSAI, 1 to 3 p. 100, during the clinical studies performed before marketing the drug, but this increases afterwards (up to 45 p. 100 for Benoxaprofen). Drugs with long half-lives may carry a higher risk for severe cutaneous reactions. NSAI are now the main cause of drug induced TEN. Urticarial reactions seem related to pharmacological phenomena while the pathogenic events leading to other kinds of skin reactions remain unknown. An hypersensitivity reaction is postulated. The therapeutic value of corticosteroids for the severe cutaneous side effects of drugs is still controversial.

  5. Simultaneous determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and human serum by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nawaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive method using high performance liquid chromatography has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in pharmaceutical formulations and human serum. Six NSAIDs including: naproxen sodium, diclofenac sodium, meloxicam, flurbiprofen, tiaprofenic and mefenamic acid were analyzed simultaneously in presence of ibuprofen as internal standard on Mediterranea C18 (5 µm, 250 x 0.46 mm column. Mobile phase comprised of methanol: acetonitrile: H2O (60:20:20, v/v; pH 3.35 and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1 using 265 nm UV detection. The method was linear over a concentration range of 0.25-50 µg mL-1 (r² = 0.9999.

  6. Impact of proton pump inhibitor treatment on gastrointestinal bleeding associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use among post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics and treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? METHODS: This was a nationwide cohort study based on linked...... plus antithrombotic therapy was estimated using adjusted time dependent Cox regression models. STUDY ANSWER AND LIMITATIONS: The use of PPIs was independently associated with decreased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics and treated...... gastrointestinal bleeds occurred. The crude incidence rates of bleeding (events/100 person years) on NSAID plus antithrombotic therapy were 1.8 for patients taking PPIs and 2.1 for those not taking PPIs. The adjusted risk of bleeding was lower with PPI use (hazard ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0...

  7. Salicytamide: a New Anti-inflammatory Designed Drug Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Karen Marinho Maciel; Borges, Rosivaldo Santos; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas Andrade; Silva, Andressa Santa Brigida; Fernandes, Luanna Melo Pereira; Cartágenes, Sabrina Carvalho; Pinto, Ana Carla Godinho; Silva, Mallone Lopes; Queiroz, Luana Melo Diogo; Vieira, José Luís Fernandes; Sousa, Pergentino José Cunha; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz

    2018-04-13

    Salicytamide is a new drug developed through molecular modelling and rational drug design by the molecular association of paracetamol and salicylic acid. This study was conducted to assess the acute oral toxicity, antinociceptive, and antioedematogenic properties of salicytamide. Acute toxicity was based on the OECD 423 guidelines. Antinociceptive properties were investigated using the writhing, hot plate and formalin tests in Swiss mice. Antioedematogenic properties were evaluated using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema model and croton oil-induced dermatitis in Wistar rats. Salicytamide did not promote behavioural changes or animal deaths during acute oral toxicity evaluation. Furthermore, salicytamide exhibited peripheral antinociceptive activity as evidenced by the reduction in writhing behaviour (ED50 = 4.95 mg/kg) and licking time in the formalin test's inflammatory phase. Also, salicytamide elicited central antinociceptive activity on both hot plate test and formalin test's neurogenic phase. Additionally, salicytamide was effective in reducing carrageenan or croton oil-induced oedema formation. Overall, we have shown that salicytamide, proposed here as a new NSAID candidate, did not induce oral acute toxicity and elicited both peripheral antinociceptive effects (about 10-25 times more potent than its precursors in the writhing test) and antioedematogenic properties. Salicytamide also presented central antinociceptive activity, which seems to be mediated through opioid-independent mechanisms. These findings reveal salicytamide as a promising antinociceptive/antioedematogenic drug candidate.

  8. Changes in mechanical, chemical, and thermal sensitivity of the cornea after topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, M Carmen; Berenguer-Ruiz, Leticia; García-Gálvez, Alberto; Perea-Tortosa, David; Gallar, Juana; Belmonte, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    In addition to their well-known anti-inflammatory actions, some of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) appear to have an analgesic effect. In human subjects, the changes in threshold and intensity of sensations evoked by mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimulation of the cornea induced by topical administration of two commercial NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium (Voltaren; Novartis, Basel, Switzerland) and flurbiprofen (Ocuflur; Allergan, Irvine, CA), were studied. Corneal sensitivity was measured in 10 young, healthy subjects with a gas esthesiometer. Chemical (10%-70% CO2 in air), mechanical (0-264 mL/min), and thermal (corneal temperature changes between -4.5 degrees C and +3 degrees C around the normal value) stimuli were applied to the center of the cornea. The intensity and perceived magnitude of the psychophysical attributes of the evoked sensation were scored at the end of the pulse in a 10-cm, continuous visual analog scale (VAS). The threshold was expressed as the stimulus intensity that evoked a VAS score >0.5. Sensitivity was measured in both eyes of each subject on two separate days, one without treatment and the other 30 minutes after topical application of 0.03% flurbiprofen (seven subjects) or 0.1% diclofenac sodium (six subjects). Diclofenac attenuated significantly all the sensation parameters evoked by high-intensity mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimuli. Flurbiprofen produced a slight reduction of the sensations evoked by mechanical and chemical stimulation that became significant only for the irritation caused by chemical stimuli of maximum intensity (70% CO2). None of the drugs modified significantly the detection threshold of the different stimuli. Flurbiprofen had a very limited effect on sensations evoked by corneal stimulation, whereas diclofenac reduced the intensity of sensations evoked by stimuli of different modality, suggesting a mild local anesthetic effect of this drug on all types of corneal sensory fibers. Such

  9. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs versus oil of evening primrose in the treatment of mastalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, S; Sultan, N

    2005-02-01

    To compare oil of evening primrose (OEP) and topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) with respect to safety, effectiveness, rapidity of response, cost effectiveness and acceptability in the treatment of breast pain. An open, non-randomised, comparative study of topical (NSAI) gel versus OEP was carried out, over a period of one year. Fifty female patients attending the outpatient department with moderate to severe breast pain were given one of the two agents alternatively, after selection. Results showed that out of 25 patients treated with OEP, 64% had a clinically significant response after three months of treatment, compared with 92% with topical NSAIDs. Only one patient (4%) had side effects with OEP, while no patient had side effects with topical NSAIDs. Twenty per cent and seventy per cent showed acceptability as far as costs were concerned and mode of administration respectively, with OEP. The acceptability rate was 68% and 96% respectively, with topical NSAIDs. This study has shown topical NSAIDs to be safe, effective, rapid and acceptable mode of treatment for cyclical and non-cyclical mastalgia.

  10. Effects of short-term addition of NSAID to diuretics and/or RAAS-inhibitors on blood pressure and renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nygard, Peder; Jansman, Frank G. A.; Kruik-Kolloffel, Willemien J.; Barnaart, Alex F. W.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    Background The combined post-operative use of diuretics and/or renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors may increase the risk of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) associated renal failure because of a drug-drug interaction. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate

  11. Association of individual non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and chronic kidney disease: a population-based case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ylenia Ingrasciotta

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs are known to be associated with renal damage. No clear evidence exists regarding differential risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD, specifically, across various NSAIDs.The aim of this population-based case-control study was to evaluate the association between use of individual NSAIDs and risk of CKD in a general population of Southern Italy.A nested case-control study was carried out using the general practice Arianna database, identifying incident CKD patients as cases and matched controls from 2006 to 2011. The date of first CKD diagnosis was defined as the index date (ID. Conditional logistic regressions were performed to estimate the risk of CKD associated with NSAIDs by class and individual drugs as compared to non-use during different time windows (within one year, six or three months prior to ID, with the latter being defined as current users. Among current users, the effect of cumulative exposure to these drugs was evaluated.Overall, 1,989 CKD cases and 7,906 matched controls were identified. A statistically significant increase in the risk of CKD was found for current users of oxicams (adjusted OR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.15-2.44 and concerning individual compounds, for ketorolac (adj. OR: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.45-4.44, meloxicam (adj. OR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.01-3.87 and piroxicam (adj. OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.19-3.21.The risk of CKD varies across individual NSAIDs. Increased risk has been found for ketorolac, which may precipitate subclinical CKD through acute renal damage, and long-term exposure to oxicams, especially meloxicam and piroxicam.

  12. [Modern approach to the prevention and treatment of NSAID-gastropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, V N; Kim, V A; Lazebnik, L B

    2011-01-01

    The article presents the results of the first Russian open randomized comparative multicenter study on the effectiveness of Famotidine in the prevention of NSAID-gastropathy--Barrier. In addition, were showen the results of studies of the drugs effect used for prevention of NSAID gastropathy (Famotidine, Lansoprazole, Misoprostol) for the synthesis of prostaglandins in the gastric mucosa in patients with osteoarthritis. Was shown the impact of alternative anti-inflammatory drug on the basis of an extract of ginger as joint pain, and the mucous upper gastrointestinal tract in patients with osteoarthritis.

  13. Aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and acetaminophen use and risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trabert, Britton; Ness, Roberta B; Lo-Ciganic, Wei-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. METHODS: We analyzed pooled data from 12...... population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer, including 7776 case patients and 11843 control subjects accrued between 1992 and 2007. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of medication use with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were estimated in individual studies using logistic regression...... and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Associations between frequency, dose, and duration of analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer were also assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval...

  14. Effects of delayed NSAID administration after experimental eccentric contraction injury - A cellular and proteomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Bryant

    Full Text Available Acute muscle injuries are exceedingly common and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are widely consumed to reduce the associated inflammation, swelling and pain that peak 1-2 days post-injury. While prophylactic use or early administration of NSAIDs has been shown to delay muscle regeneration and contribute to loss of muscle strength after healing, little is known about the effects of delayed NSAID use. Further, NSAID use following non-penetrating injury has been associated with increased risk and severity of infection, including that due to group A streptococcus, though the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of delayed NSAID administration on muscle repair and sought mechanisms supporting an injury/NSAID/infection axis.A murine model of eccentric contraction (EC-induced injury of the tibialis anterior muscle was used to profile the cellular and molecular changes induced by ketorolac tromethamine administered 47 hr post injury.NSAID administration inhibited several important muscle regeneration processes and down-regulated multiple cytoprotective proteins known to inhibit the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. These activities were associated with increased caspase activity in injured muscles but were independent of any NSAID effect on macrophage influx or phenotype switching.These findings provide new molecular evidence supporting the notion that NSAIDs have a direct negative influence on muscle repair after acute strain injury in mice and thus add to renewed concern about the safety and benefits of NSAIDS in both children and adults, in those with progressive loss of muscle mass such as the elderly or patients with cancer or AIDS, and those at risk of secondary infection after trauma or surgery.

  15. Results of the PRECISION study: Could an answer be given to the question of how safe coxibs versus traditional NSAIDs are in treating patients at high risk for cardiovascular events?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Dovgan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are one of the most prescribed drugs worldwide and, like any medication, can cause adverse drug reactions. Since NSAIDs belonging to the group of coxibs, are quite commonly used in clinical practice now, the study of the safety of this class of drugs is given the highest priority. The paper analyzes a largest-scale PRECISION study of the safety of NSAIDs, the aim of which was to assess the cardiovascular safety of celecoxib versus that of ibuprofen and naproxen in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

  16. [Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol on hemodynamic changes during postoperative analgesia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leont'ev, D V; Babaev, B D; Shishkov, M V; Ostreĭkov, I F

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comparatively assess the adequacy of postoperative analgesia using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol in children undergone "minor" surgical interventions. For postoperative analgesia in children, the authors used paracetamol in a single dose of 25-30 mg/kg, diclofenac in a dose of 1.5-2.0 mg/kg, which were rectally administered as suppositories, as well as diclofenac in the same dose as intramuscular injections (Group 1). A comparison was made with postoperative analgesia using analgin and promedole (Group 2 (control)). Group 1 comprised 63 patients and Group 2 included 26 patients with identical diseases (inguinal hernias, varicocele, phimosis). Functional parameters were recorded in patients in the lying position before, 30 min, 1, 2, and 3 hours after surgery. The efficiency of postoperative analgesia was evaluated, by using central hemodynamic parameters that many investigators consider to be one of the major criteria for the adequacy of anesthesia. Comparison of postoperative data has revealed a difference between the groups, which suggests that the use of NSAIDs and paracetamol for preventive and postoperative analgesia in children substantially improves the postoperative period and promotes a rapid rehabilitation in patients. Comparative analysis of the efficiency of postoperative analgesia of the above agents has indicated that diclofenac and paracetamol have a sufficient analgesic activity and at the same time do not show the adverse reactions unique to narcotic analgesics.

  17. Aggravation by paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, of antral lesions generated by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Tanaka, Akiko; Nukui, Kazuo; Kojo, Azusa; Gyenge, Melinda; Amagase, Kikuko

    2011-09-01

    Recent clinical studies have suggested a risk of adverse gastric reactions from the concomitant use of selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We examined the adverse effects of SSRIs on antral lesions produced by indomethacin in rats. Rats fasted for 24 h were refed for 1 h, then administered indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.) 1 h after the refeeding and killed 6 h later. Paroxetine (1-10 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before indomethacin. Indomethacin caused antral lesions in refed rats. Paroxetine dose-dependently aggravated these lesions, despite provoking no damage by itself. Similar results were obtained when other NSAIDs such as diclofenac, flurbiprofen, and loxoprofen were coadministered with paroxetine or when indomethacin was coadministered with other antidepressants such as fluvoxamine and milnacipran, but not imipramine or maprotiline. Exogenous 5-HT also worsened the indomethacin-induced antral damage, whereas the aggravating effect of paroxetine was attenuated by ondansetron, a selective 5-HT(3) antagonist, but not antagonists for other 5-HT receptor subtypes. Indomethacin plus paroxetine had no effect on gastric secretion but significantly decreased mucosal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as well as GSH content. The antral damage induced by indomethacin plus paroxetine was significantly prevented by antisecretory (acid or pepsin) agents and mucosal protective agents as well as SOD and allopurinol. These results suggest that SSRIs aggravate NSAID-induced antral lesions, probably via the activation of 5HT(3) receptors, and the mechanism of aggravation may involve the corrosive action of acid/pepsin as well as an impaired antioxidative system.

  18. Thermal nociception as a measure of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug effectiveness in broiler chickens with articular pain☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplen, Gina; Baker, Laurence; Hothersall, Becky; McKeegan, Dorothy E.F.; Sandilands, Victoria; Sparks, Nick H.C.; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E.; Murrell, Joanna C.

    2013-01-01

    Pain associated with poultry lameness is poorly understood. The anti-nociceptive properties of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were evaluated using threshold testing in combination with an acute inflammatory arthropathy model. Broilers were tested in six groups (n = 8 per group). Each group underwent a treatment (saline, meloxicam (3 or 5 mg/kg) or carprofen (15 or 25 mg/kg)) and a procedure (Induced (arthropathy-induction) or sham (sham-handling)) prior to testing. Induced groups had Freund’s complete adjuvant injected intra-articularly into the left intertarsal joint (hock). A ramped thermal stimulus (1 °C/s) was applied to the skin of the left metatarsal. Data were analysed using random-intercept multi-level models. Saline-induced birds had a significantly higher skin temperature (± SD) than saline-sham birds (37.6 ± 0.8 °C vs. 36.5 ± 0.5 °C; Z = −3.47, P carprofen: Z = 2.58, P = 0.010) in induced birds. Saline-induced birds also had significantly lower TT than saline-sham birds (Z = −2.17, P = 0.030). This study found direct evidence of an association between inflammatory arthropathies and thermal hyperalgesia, and showed that NSAID treatment maintained baseline thermal sensitivity (via anti-nociception). Quantification of nociceptive responsiveness in a predictable broiler pain model identified thermal anti-hyperalgesic properties of two NSAIDs, which suggested that therapeutically effective treatment was provided at the doses administered. Such validation of analgesic strategies will increase the understanding of pain associated with specific natural broiler lameness types. PMID:24129110

  19. Review Article: Fabricated Microparticles: An Innovative Method to Minimize the Side Effects of NSAIDs in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Shaivad Shabee Hulhasan; Moin, Afrasim; Veerabhadrappa, Gangadharappa Hosahalli

    2016-01-01

    Microparticles are polymeric bodies ranging 1-1000 µm that constitute a variety of forms such as microcapsules, microspheres, microcages, microshells, microrods, biosensors microparticles, radiolabeled microparticles, and so forth. This review focuses on general microparticles, mainly microcapsules and microspheres. Nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the mostcommonly prescribed medications in the world. Most of the NSAIDs available have severe side effects. With increased awareness of NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, safety has become a priority in treatment of arthritis and other inflammatory diseases with NSAIDs. A trend in NSAID development has been to improve therapeutic efficacy while reducing the severity of GI side effects by altering dosage through modified release to optimize drug delivery. One such approach is the use of fabricated microparticles such as microcapsules and microspheres as carriers of drugs. Microparticles provide delivery of macromolecules and micromolecules via different routes and effectively control the release profile of such drugs. Microcapsules and microspheres are compatible with most natural and synthetic polymers and can be used for several routes of administration, including parenteral, oral, nasal, intra-ocular, topical, and the like. Because of greater stability and multiple manufacturing techniques, microspheres and microcapsules are preferred as drug carriers over other colloidal drug delivery systems. Microparticles provide effective protection of the encapsulated agent against degradation by enzymatic activities, controlled and confined delivery of drugs from a few hours to months, and ingenious administration compared to alternative forms of controlled-release parenteral dosages, such as macro-sized implants. This comprehensive overview of fabricated microparticles describes microencapsulation technologies to produce microparticles for targeted therapy of arthritis and other

  20. Effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the production of reactive oxygen species by activated rat neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paino I.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of reactive oxygen specie (ROS by activated neutrophil is involved in both the antimicrobial and deleterious effects in chronic inflammation. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on the production of ROS by stimulated rat neutrophils. Diclofenac (3.6 µM, indomethacin (12 µM, naproxen (160 µM, piroxicam (13 µM, and tenoxicam (30 µM were incubated at 37ºC in PBS (10 mM, pH 7.4, for 30 min with rat neutrophils (1 x 10(6 cells/ml stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (100 nM. The ROS production was measured by luminol and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for naproxen, NSAIDs reduced ROS production: 58 ± 2% diclofenac, 90 ± 2% indomethacin, 33 ± 3% piroxicam, and 45 ± 6% tenoxicam (N = 6. For the lucigenin assay, naproxen, piroxicam and tenoxicam were ineffective. For indomethacin the inhibition was 52 ± 5% and diclofenac showed amplification in the light emission of 181 ± 60% (N = 6. Using the myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2/luminol system, the effects of NSAIDs on MPO activity were also screened. We found that NSAIDs inhibited both the peroxidation and chlorinating activity of MPO as follows: diclofenac (36 ± 10, 45 ± 3%, indomethacin (97 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, naproxen (56 ± 8, 76 ± 3%, piroxicam (77 ± 5, 99 ± 1%, and tenoxicam (90 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, respectively (N = 3. These results show that therapeutic levels of NSAIDs are able to suppress the oxygen-dependent antimicrobial or oxidative functions of neutrophils by inhibiting the generation of hypochlorous acid.

  1. Effects of photobiomodulation therapy and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on skeletal muscle injury induced by contusion in rats-part 2: biochemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Frigo, Lúcio; Dos Reis Ferreira, Tereza Cristina; Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; Teixeira, Simone; de Almeida, Patrícia; Muscara, Marcelo Nicolas; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Serra, Andrey Jorge; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto

    2017-11-01

    Muscle injuries trigger an inflammatory process, releasing important biochemical markers for tissue regeneration. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is the treatment of choice to promote pain relief due to muscle injury. NSAIDs exhibit several adverse effects and their efficacy is questionable. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been demonstrated to effectively modulate inflammation induced from musculoskeletal disorders and may be used as an alternative to NSAIDs. Here, we assessed and compared the effects of different doses of PBMT and topical NSAIDs on biochemical parameters during an acute inflammatory process triggered by a controlled model of contusion-induced musculoskeletal injury in rats. Muscle injury was induced by trauma to the anterior tibial muscle of rats. After 1 h, rats were treated with PBMT (830 nm, continuous mode, 100 mW of power, 35.71 W/cm 2 ; 1, 3, and 9 J; 10, 30, and 90 s) or diclofenac sodium (1 g). Our results demonstrated that PBMT, 1 J (35.7 J/cm 2 ), 3 J (107.1 J/cm 2 ), and 9 J (321.4 J/cm 2 ) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) genes at all assessed times as compared to the injury and diclofenac groups (p levels of COX-2 only in relation to the injury group (p levels of cytokines TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 at all assessed times as compared to the injury and diclofenac groups (p topical NSAIDs in the modulation of the inflammatory process caused by muscle contusion injuries.

  2. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of developing breast cancer in a population-based prospective cohort study in Washington County, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Visvanathan, Kala; Burke, Alyce; Hoffman, Sandra C; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and the development of breast cancer, and to assess whether this association differed by estrogen receptor (ER) subtype. Data were analyzed from 15,651 women participating in CLUE II, a cohort study initiated in 1989 in Washington County, MD. Medication data were collected at baseline in 1989 and in 1996. Incident cases of invasive breast cancer occurring from baseline to March 27, 2006 were identified through linkage of cohort participants with the Washington County Cancer Registry and the Maryland State Cancer Registry. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate the risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for breast cancer associated with medication use. Among women in the CLUE II cohort, 418 invasive breast cancer cases were identified during the follow-up period. The results showed that self-reported use of NSAIDs in both 1989 and in 1996 was associated with a 50% reduction in the risk of developing invasive breast cancer compared with no NSAID use in either 1989 or 1996 (RR = 0.50; 95% CI 0.28, 0.91). The protective association between NSAID use and the risk of developing breast cancer was consistent among ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers, although only the RR for ER-positive breast cancer was statistically significant. Overall, findings from this study indicate that NSAID use is associated with a decrease in breast cancer risk and that the reduction in risk is similar for ER-positive and ER-negative tumors.

  3. Tratamento com antiinflamatórios tópicos na osteoartrite de joelho Topical anti-inflammatory drugs in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lúcia Alves Pereira

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Os antiinflamatórios não-esteroidais (AINEs orais são eficazes no alívio da dor na osteoartrite (OA, porém têm o risco de efeitos adversos sistêmicos. Para diminuir a toxicidade é necessário reduzir a concentração plasmática uma vez que os efeitos adversos são dose-dependentes. Os AINEs de uso tópico, em teoria, alcançam altas concentrações nos tecidos-alvo com concentrações plasmáticas baixas, sendo portanto uma alternativa terapêutica, especialmente para pacientes de risco. Nossa revisão dos ensaios clínicos randomizados mostrou que os AINEs tópicos foram mais efetivos que o placebo e tão eficazes quanto os AINEs orais. Porém, o pequeno número de ensaios e falhas na metodologia nos impossibilita de fazer conclusões definitivas, sendo necessários estudos bem desenhados e de maior duração.Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatories drugs (NSAIDs are effective in pain relief in osteoarthritis (OA, but are also associated with risks of adverse systemic side effects. In order to reduce its toxicity, it would be desirable to decrease the plasmatic levels of NSAIDs since those side effects are dose-dependent. Topical NSAIDs would be a therapeutic alternative in theory, because while they reach high levels in local tissues, they also produce low plasmatic levels. Our review analyzed clinical randomized and shown that topical NSAIDs were superior to placebo and have similar efficacy to oral NSAIDs, but due a few number of trials and methodological weaknesses we can't make definitive conclusions. Further well designed, long term studies are required.

  4. Motion-Cyclo-oxygenase-2 Selective Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs are as Safe as Placebo for the Stomach: Arguments for the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Hunt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are known to cause gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, and gastrointestinal (GI blood loss, as well as alterations in small bowel permeability. Patients at a high risk for these complications include those who are older than 60 years of age, those with a previous history of complicated peptic disease and bleeding, and those who take high dose or multiple NSAIDs, including low dose aspirin, corticosteroids or anticoagulants. The introduction of selective inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 has provided effective treatment of inflammatory arthritis and musculoskeletal pain, with dramatic reductions in the risk of GI adverse events. The two most widely prescribed coxibs are celecoxib and rofecoxib, and others are being developed. Endoscopic studies have revealed that coxibs are only half as likely to induce upper GI ulceration than are traditional NSAIDs, and are as safe as placebo. Furthermore, the newer drugs do not cause excessive blood loss from the GI tract and do not affect small bowel permeability. The Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research Study (VIGOR revealed that the incidence of myocardial infarction was significantly lower with naproxen than rofecoxib, although this study was not designed to look at this endpoint. Coxibs are an important addition to the pharmacotherapy of inflammatory disease.

  5. Association of NSAID use with risk of bleeding and cardiovascular events in patients receiving antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Gislason, Gunnar H; McGettigan, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Antithrombotic treatment is indicated for use in patients after myocardial infarction (MI); however, concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) could pose safety concerns. OBJECTIVE: To examine the risk of bleeding and cardiovascular events among patients...... with prior MI taking antithrombotic drugs and for whom NSAID therapy was then prescribed. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Using nationwide administrative registries in Denmark (2002-2011), we studied patients 30 years or older admitted with first-time MI and alive 30 days after discharge. Subsequent...... treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, or oral anticoagulants and their combinations, as well as ongoing concomitant NSAID use, was determined. EXPOSURES: Use of NSAIDs with ongoing antithrombotic treatment after first-time MI. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Risk of bleeding (requiring hospitalization...

  6. NSAIDs, Mitochondria and Calcium Signaling: Special Focus on Aspirin/Salicylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Suzuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid is a well-known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that has long been used as an anti-pyretic and analgesic drug. Recently, much attention has been paid to the chemopreventive and apoptosis-inducing effects of NSAIDs in cancer cells. These effects have been thought to be primarily attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis. However, recent studies have demonstrated unequivocally that certain NSAIDs, including aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid, exert their anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects independently of cyclooxygenase activity and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. It is becoming increasingly evident that two potential common targets of NSAIDs are mitochondria and the Ca2+ signaling pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding the roles of mitochondria and Ca2+ in the apoptosis-inducing effects as well as some side effects of aspirin, salicylates and other NSAIDs, and introducing the emerging role of L-type Ca2+ channels, a new Ca2+ entry pathway in non-excitable cells that is up-regulated in human cancer cells.

  7. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Cyphostemma vogelii (Hook

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rita

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Key words: Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, mice, Cyphostemma vogelii, nociception. ... steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are considered the drugs of ..... 44-55. Hughes H, Lang M (1983). Control of pain in dogs and cats In: Kitchell. R, Erickson H (eds.) Animal pain. Baltimore Waverly press. pp. 207-.

  8. Adverse effects of perioperative paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, O; Wetterslev, Jørn; Kontinen, V K

    2014-01-01

    with the most common perioperative non-opioid analgesics: paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids (GCCs), gabapentinoids and their combinations. The review is based on data from systematic reviews with meta-analyses of analgesic efficacy and/or adverse effects...... of perioperative non-opioid analgesics, and randomised trials and cohort/retrospective studies. Generally, data on AE are sparse and related to the immediate post-operative period. For paracetamol, the incidence of AEs appears trivial. Data are inconclusive regarding an association of NSAIDs with mortality...

  9. A novel model for NSAID induced gastroenteropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devendra Pratap; Borse, Swapnil P; Nivsarkar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Progress in management of Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastrointestinal toxicity requires the availability of appropriate experimental animal models that are as close to humans as feasible. Our objective was to develop a rat model for NSAID-induced gastroenteropathy and also to simulate the common clinical scenario of co-administration of NSAID and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to explore if PPI contribute to exacerbation of NSAID-enteropathy. Rats were treated twice daily with pantoprazole sodium (PTZ; 10mg/kg peroral) or vehicle for a total of 10days. In some experiments, Diclofenac sodium (DCF; 9mg/kg) or vehicle was administered orally twice daily for the final 5days of PTZ/vehicle administration. After the last dose on 9th day, rats in all the groups were fasted but water was provided ad libitum. 12h after the last dose on 10th day, rats in all the groups were euthanized and their gastrointestinal tracts were assessed for haemorrhagic lesions, lipid peroxidation, intestinal permeability and gastrointestinal luminal pH alterations. Changes in haemoglobin, haematocrit and serum levels of albumin, total protein, ALT and bilirubin were calculated. The macroscopic and histological evidence suggested that administration of DCF resulted in significant gastroenteropathic damage and co-administration of PTZ resulted in significant exacerbation of NSAID enteropathy, while attenuation of NSAID induced gastropathy was observed. Our results were further supported by the significant decrease in haemoglobin and haematocrit levels and serum levels of albumin and total proteins, an increase in oxidative stress and intestinal permeability with the use of DCF either alone or in combination with PTZ. This model was developed to simulate the human clinical situation during NSAID therapy and indeed the present DCF regimen caused both gastric and small bowel alterations, such as multiple erosive lesions, together with a decrease in haemoglobin, haematocrit

  10. Lansoprazole prevents experimental gastric injury induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs through a reduction of mucosal oxidative damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Natale, Gianfranco; Lubrano, Valter; Vassalle, Cristina; Antonioli, Luca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Tacca, Mario Del

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This study investigated the mechanisms of protection afforded by the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole against gastric injury induced by different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated with indomethacin (100 µmol/kg), diclofenac (60 µmol/kg), piroxicam (150 µmol/kg) or ketoprofen (150 µmol/kg). Thirty minutes before NSAIDs, animals were orally treated with lansoprazole 18 or 90 µmol/kg. Four hours after the end of treatments, the following parameters were assessed: gastric mucosal PGE2, malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) or non-proteic sulfhydryl compounds (GSH) levels; reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mucosal COX-2 mRNA; gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated animals; in vitro effects of lansoprazole (1-300 µmol/L) on the oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) induced by copper sulphate. RESULTS: All NSAIDs elicited mucosal necrotic lesions which were associated with neutrophil infiltration and reduction of PGE2 levels. Increments of MPO and MDA contents, as well as a decrease in GSH levels were detected in the gastric mucosa of indomethacin- or piroxicam-treated animals. Indomethacin enhanced mucosal cyclooxygenase-2 expression, while not affecting cyclooxygenase-1. At the oral dose of 18 µmol/kg lansoprazole partly counteracted diclofenac-induced mucosal damage, whereas at 90 µmol/kg it markedly prevented injuries evoked by all test NSAIDs. Lansoprazole at 90 µmol/kg reversed also the effects of NSAIDs on MPO, MDA and GSH mucosal contents, without interfering with the decrease in PGE2 levels or indomethacin-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. However, both lansoprazole doses markedly inhibited acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats. Lansoprazole concentration-dependently reduced the oxidation of LDLs in vitro. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that, besides the inhibition of acid secretion, lansoprazole protection against NSAID

  11. Post-operative analgesic effects of paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    , and no well-documented 'gold standards' exist. The aim of the present topical, narrative review is to provide an update of the evidence for post-operative analgesic efficacy with the most commonly used, systemic non-opioid drugs, paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)/COX-2 antagonists......, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids, and combinations of these. The review is based on data from previous systematic reviews with meta-analyses, investigating effects of non-opioid analgesics on pain, opioid-requirements, and opioid-related adverse effects. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin....... Trials of pregabalin > 300 mg/day indicated a morphine-sparing effect of 13.4 (4, 22.8) mg morphine/24 h. Notably, though, the available evidence for additive or synergistic effects of most combination regimens was sparse or lacking. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, selective COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin all...

  12. Concomitant NSAID use during antipsychotic treatment and risk of 2-year relapse - a population-based study of 16,253 incident patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Karl Ole; Petersen, Liselotte; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical trials have indicated antipsychotic effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among incident patients with schizophrenia. We aimed to study, in a population-based setting, whether concomitant use of NSAIDs or paracetamol, changed 2-year relapse risk...... for schizophrenia. METHODS: We identified all incident patients with schizophrenia in Denmark diagnosed 1996-2012 initiating antipsychotic treatment within the year after diagnosis. We calculated concomitant treatment intervals for antipsychotic and NSAID or paracetamol use. Hazard rate ratios (HRR) were estimated...... using Cox regression adjusted for important covariates. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 2-year relapse, i.e. (re)-hospitalizations with schizophrenia. RESULTS: Among 16,235 incident patients with schizophrenia using antipsychotics, 1480 (9.1%) used NSAIDs and 767 (4.7%) paracetamol. Concomitant use of NSAIDs...

  13. Motion – Cyclo-oxygenase-2 Selective Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs are as Safe as Placebo for the Stomach: Arguments Against the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Maetzel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclo-oxygenase (COX exists in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2, that direct the synthesis of prostaglandins, prostacyclin and thromboxane. Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs inhibit both isoenzymes, resulting in damage to the mucosa of the stomach and duodenum, but also in cardioprotection. Selective COX-2 inhibitors are less likely to damage the upper gastrointestinal tract, as has been shown by large, randomized, controlled trials. Specifically, the newer agents are superior to ibuprofen and naproxen in this regard, but celecoxib and diclofenac were not significantly different in patients who were not also taking low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. These studies did not include a placebo arm, however, and controlled comparisons of COX-2 inhibitors with placebo have not enlisted enough subjects to demonstrate conclusively that they are equally safe. Selectivity for the COX-2 isoform affords protection against upper gastrointestinal toxicity possibly at the expense of the cardioprotective effect of traditional NSAIDs. This might explain the higher rate of nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients who aregiven rofecoxib compared with naproxen. A traditional NSAID, combined with either misoprostol or a proton pump inhibitor, is still a suitable alternative to selective COX-2 inhibitors for the treatment of arthritis.

  14. Magnetite nanoparticles coated with covalently immobilized ionic liquids as a sorbent for extraction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, Maryam; Yadollah, Yamini; Safari, Meysam; Asiabi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (mag-NPs) of type SiO_2-Fe_3O_4 were covalently modified with the ionic liquid dimethyl octadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl propyl)]ammonium chloride. The NPs were characterized via FTIR and scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with respect to the extraction of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) tolmetin, indometacin and naproxen from blood samples. Supercritical fluid extraction was used to eliminate matrix effects before extraction with the mag-NPs. The effects of pH value of sample solution, amount of adsorbent, times of adsorption and desorption, salt effect, type and volume of suitable solvent for desorption were optimized. Under optimum conditions, magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) resulted in limits of detection that range between 0.1 and 0.3 μg L"−"1. In case of supercritical fluid extraction along with magnetic solid phase extraction (SFE- MSPE), the LODs ranged from 0.2 to 0.3 mg kg"−"1. The analytical ranges for all of the NSAIDs varied within 0.2–15 mg kg"-"1 and 0.1–250 μg L"−"1 in the SFE-MSPE and MSPE methods, respectively. The relative standard deviations for the extraction of the NSAIDs from blood samples via SFE-MSPE are <10.2%. (author)

  15. Comparative efficacy and safety of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs nimesulide and diclofenac in patients with acute subdeltoid bursitis and bicipital tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wober, W; Rahlfs, V W; Büchl, N; Grässle, A; Macciocchi, A

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) 100 mg twice daily were compared with diclofenac 75 mg b.i.d. in short term treatment of acute shoulder (acute subdeltoid bursitis and bicipital tendinitis) in adult patients. In this double-blind (double-dummy), randomised, parallel group study over two weeks, 122 patients were included. The Mann-Whitney statistics revealed therapeutic equivalence of both treatments with a slight superiority for nimesulide. The tolerability of nimesulide, judged by investigators and patients and analysed statistically, was superior to that of diclofenac. Thus, the benefit-risk relationship was better for the test drug than for the reference drug.

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs vs. paracetamol: drug availability, patient's preference and knowledge of toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamir, Q.; Nadeem, A.

    2017-01-01

    Self-medication is a common practice which is influenced by level of education, society factors and health care facilities availability. In our region, Pakistan, it is very common and awareness regarding prescription implementation needs to be ensured. Hence the current study highlights the preference, availability and knowledge of toxicity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and paracetamol in Pakistan. Method: It was a Descriptive, cross sectional, conducted in Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan from May to august 2012. A total of 1000 questionnaires comprising of 21 questions were distributed to the persons with age groups from 18 years to 40 years. Non-probability convenience sampling technique was used for results deduction. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: The most commonly used medicine was Mefenamic acid (n=191, 40.8 percent). Paracetamol was second on the priority list (n=146, 31.3 percent). About 178 out of 467(38.1 percent) used these medications for headache. Very few responders knew about the toxic doses of the medicines they used. Only 52 (11 percent) were aware of the raised bleeding tendency being the most common side effect of acetylsalicylic acid and 129 (28 percent) were aware of liver damage by paracetamol toxicity. Conclusion: In Pakistan, common people take NSAIDs and Paracetamol without prescription and majority of them are unaware of the side effects of these medicines. This is the reason it is important to make the general public aware of the problems they may face if they misuse or over use the drugs without the prescription. (author)

  17. NSAID Antinociception Measured in a Chemical and a Thermal Assay in Mice

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    HF Miranda

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The antinociceptive activity of several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs that were administered either intraperitoneally or intrathecally was assessed in mice by two algesiometric tests. The first was the writhing test, which assessed the abdominal constrictions that were induced by intraperitoneal acetic acid (a chemical test, and the second was the tail flick test, which measured pain responses to heat stimuli. The corresponding effective doses and their relative potencies were compared because these tests use different nociceptive stimuli with different transmission pathways. The intraperitoneal and intrathecal dose-response curves for the antinociception induced by every NSAID that was tested were parallel in the writhing test. In the tail flick test, however, only the intraperitoneal and intrathecal dose-response curves for ketoprofen, piroxicam, naproxen, nimesulide, paracetamol and diclofenac were parallel. The results obtained in this study confirm that NSAIDs possess different abilities to induce inhibition of cyclooxygenase, and they can be indirectly assessed by their different antinociceptive activities, depending on the algesiometric assays that are used. The antinociception of most NSAIDs might involve central mechanisms. The findings demonstrate the increasing importance of the spinal cord in processing and modulating nociceptive input, because intrathecal administration of NSAIDs is always more effective (in terms of potency than systemic administration; thus, the antinociceptive efficacy of NSAIDs strongly depends on the algesiometric assay that is used and on the type of the nociceptive stimulus to which the test subject is exposed.

  18. First detection of an NSAID, flunixin, in sheep's wool using GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Ngaio, E-mail: ngaio.richards@anglia.ac.uk [Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 1PT (United Kingdom); Hall, Sarah [Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 1PT (United Kingdom); Scott, Karen [Forensic Medicine and Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Harrison, Nancy [Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 1PT (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Exposure to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac resulted in the near extinction of three species of Gyps vultures on the Indian subcontinent. Other NSAIDs present in the environment, including flunixin, may pose a similar risk. In the course of a study to determine the feasibility of detecting NSAIDs in keratinous matrices (i.e., hair, nails and feathers) using GC-MS, wool opportunistically collected from a sheep treated with flunixin was analysed for residues. Flunixin was detected qualitatively in external wool wash and extract samples. While residues of veterinary agents and pesticides have previously been found in sheep's wool, our preliminary investigation provides the first instance of an NSAID being detected in this matrix. Here we provide the sample preparation methods and GC-MS parameters used to enable further refinement as part of ongoing conservation and consumer quality control measures. - Highlights: > In this study we qualitatively detected the NSAID flunixin in sheep's wool using GC-MS. > Potential applications of this technique to the conservation of avian scavengers are outlined. > The quantitative and confirmatory steps required to fully validate the method are also provided. - This is the first time that an NSAID has been investigated or detected in sheep's wool. As such, it details a novel exposure pathway for scavenging species in the environment and offers a potential tool for future monitoring effort in vulture conservation.

  19. Diffusion of new medication across different income groups under a universal health insurance program: an example involving newly enlisted nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for elderly osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pen-Jen; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Lee, Cheng-Hua; Pu, Christy

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this research was to determine whether socioeconomic status, as measured by income level, impacts on the diffusion to patients of newly reimbursed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) under the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. We used income tax records to identify the income levels of 324 male and 551 female randomly sampled osteoarthritis patients aged over 60 years in 2000. The study period was 2 years (t (1) = April 2001-March 2002 and t (2) = April 2002-March 2003). Generalized estimating equation models were used to analyze the impact of income level on being prescribed one of the newly reimbursed NSAIDs. The impact of income level on being treated with the new drug was positive and significant for females (OR = 2.11, p < 0.01) but not for males. The interaction term between income groups and the time trend was insignificant. Other factors associated with being treated with the new drug include age, habit of health-care utilization, and residential characteristics. Diffusion of new drugs still depends on income level despite the presence of a universal national health insurance system in Taiwan.

  20. The influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and paracetamol used for pain control of orthodontic tooth movement: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANO S. CORRÊA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to perform a systematic literature review to determine if there is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that interferes less within tooth movement. This research was performed according to the PRISMA statement. Articles were searched in eight electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, LILACS, SciELO, Google Scholar, and Open Grey. Only experimental studies on male Wistar rats were selected, which included experiments related to the influence of NSAIDs on orthodontic movement. Studies in animals with pathological conditions, literature review articles, letters to the editor and/or editorials, case reports, abstracts, books, and book chapters were excluded. Each of the steps of this systematic literature review was performed by two examiners independently. Results: the total sample consisted of 505 articles, from which 6 studies were eligible after a qualitative analysis. From the drugs assessed, paracetamol was unanimous for not interfering within orthodontic movement when compared to the control group. However, drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, sodium diclofenac, and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors caused a reduction in tooth movement when compared to the control group. Conclusion: paracetamol could be considered the drug of choice for pain relief because it interferes less within tooth movement.

  1. Hybrid Compounds Strategy in the Synthesis of Oleanolic Acid Skeleton-NSAID Derivatives

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    Anna Pawełczyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study focuses on the synthesis of several hybrid individuals combining a natural oleanolic acid skeleton and synthetic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug moieties (NSAIDs. It studied structural modifications of the oleanolic acid structure by use of the direct reactivity of hydroxyl or hydroxyimino groups at position C-3 of the triterpenoid skeleton with the carboxylic function of anti-inflammatory drugs leading to new perspective compounds with high potential pharmacological activities. Novel ester- and iminoester-type derivatives of oleanolic unit with the different NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, aspirin, naproxen, and ketoprofen, were obtained and characterized. Moreover, preliminary research of compounds obtaining structure stability under acidic conditions was examined and the PASS method of prediction of activity spectra for substances was used to estimate the potential biological activity of these compounds.

  2. Changes of nitric oxide system and lipid peroxidation parameters in the digestive system of rats under conditions of acute stress, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

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    Fomenko Iryna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in combination with being physiologically stressed often occurs in in the course of different pathologies. This situation may result in the alteration of digestive system functioning. The effect of stress brings about changes in the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, arginase, cyclooxygenase (COX and lipid peroxidation, whereas the use of NSAIDs interrupts the multiple functions of the cell via the inhibition of prostaglandins (PGs synthesis. Taking into account that NOS and COX-systems are connected in their regulation, the aim of the study was to determine the role played by NOS and lipid peroxidation under conditions of the combined action of NSAIDs and stress. In our study, male rats were used. The NSAIDs (naproxen - a non-selective COX inhibitor, celecoxib - a selective COX-2 blocker, and the compound 2A5DHT (which is the active substance of dual COX, and the lipoxygenase (LOX inhibitor, darbufelone were all administered at a dose 10 mg/kg, prior to water restraint stress (WRS. WRS brought about an increase of inducible NOS (iNOS activity in the intestinal mucosal and muscular membranes, as well as in the pancreas. Because of this, constitutive NOS izoform (cNOS and arginase activities decreased. Moreover, the MDA concentration increased, indicating the development of oxidative stress. In our work, pretreatment with naproxen, as in the WRS model, engendered a decrease in iNOS activity. What is more, administration of Celecoxib did not change iNOS activity, as compared to WRS alone, and it showed a tendency to reduce lipid peroxidation. In addition, 2A5DHT prior WRS brought about a decrease of iNOS activity, with the subsequent rise of cNOS activity. Of note, MDA concentration decreased in all studied organs, indicating the reduction of lipid peroxidation under the action of the darbufelone active substance.

  3. Long-term clinical effects of aspirin-desensitization therapy among patients with poorly controlled asthma and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Förster-Ruhrmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA, the levels of asthma symptom control can be divided into controlled, partially controlled and uncontrolled asthma. Optional therapy for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs-hypersensitive asthmatics uses aspirin desensitization, but until now, this therapy is not established in difficult to treat cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin desensitization in patients with poorly controlled asthma. Methods: Patients with poorly controlled asthma, NDAIDs hypersensitivity and aspirin desensitization were included in the retrospective study. The data were compared to those obtained from patients with controlled asthma and aspirin therapy. Lung function, levels of asthma symptom control, asthma medication, the size of nasal polyps (NP and smell function were evaluated over 18 months. Results: Thirty-two patients were included in the study (uncontrolled/partially controlled asthma n = 12; controlled asthma n = 20. After 18 months of follow-up, the patients with poorly controlled asthma had significantly increased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 values, as compared to the baseline (66–82%; p = 0.02, the levels of asthma control improved significantly (p  0.05 and the asthma medication was constant. In relation to nasal parameters the sense of smell improved significantly in both groups, NP-scores did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Patients with a poorly controlled asthma and NSAIDs hypersensitivity profit from an add-on aspirin therapy. Keywords: Asthma, Levels of asthma symptom control, GINA, Uncontrolled asthma, Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD, NSAIDs hypersensitivity, NSAIDs sensitive asthma, Nasal polyps

  4. Tramadol plus metamizole combined or not with anti-inflammatory drugs is clinically effective for moderate to severe chronic pain treatment in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flôr, Patrícia B; Yazbek, Karina V B; Ida, Keila K; Fantoni, Denise T

    2013-05-01

    To test the effectiveness and safety of tramadol plus metamizole combined or not with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for treating moderate to severe chronic neoplastic pain in dogs, and its impact on quality of life (QL). Prospective, uncontrolled, open-label, clinical study. Sixty nine client-owned dogs with multiple forms of cancer and visual analog scale (VAS) pain score ≥ 40 after receiving NSAIDs for at least 7 days. The MN group received metamizole + NSAID, MNT group received metamizole + NSAID + tramadol and MT group received metamizole + tramadol. Pain was scored by the 0 to 100 mm VAS (0 = no pain, 100 = worst pain) and analgesic therapy was considered effective if 25 mm differences in VAS scores were observed between day 0 and the follow ups. The QL was evaluated according to a 0 to 36 scoring method for dogs (0 = worst, 36 = best) and side effects were recorded. Data were registered at day 0 (baseline) and at the first and second follow ups (7 and 14 days after day 0, respectively). The MN group had less analgesia at day 7 (25%) and day 14 (42%) than MNT (59%, p = 0.0274; 76%, p = 0.0251, respectively) and MT groups (69%, p = 0.0151; 81%, p = 0.0341, respectively). The QL scores were lower in the MN group at the first (score 23) and second follow up (score 26) than in MNT (27, p = 0.0847; 30, p = 0.0002) and MT (28, p = 0.0384; 31, p = 0.0001) groups. Side effects were more commonly observed in the MN group (87%) than in MNT (24%, p pain in dogs with cancer and improved QL. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  5. Tryptamine-gallic acid hybrid prevents non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastropathy: correction of mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of apoptosis in gastric mucosal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Chinmay; Bindu, Samik; Dey, Sumanta; Alam, Athar; Goyal, Manish; Iqbal, Mohd Shameel; Sarkar, Souvik; Kumar, Rahul; Halder, Kamal Krishna; Debnath, Mita Chatterjee; Adhikari, Susanta; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2012-01-27

    We have investigated the gastroprotective effect of SEGA (3a), a newly synthesized tryptamine-gallic acid hybrid molecule against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastropathy with mechanistic details. SEGA (3a) prevents indomethacin (NSAID)-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS) and dysfunctions in gastric mucosal cells, which play a pathogenic role in inducing gastropathy. SEGA (3a) offers this mitoprotective effect by scavenging of mitochondrial superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)) and intramitochondrial free iron released as a result of MOS. SEGA (3a) in vivo blocks indomethacin-mediated MOS, as is evident from the inhibition of indomethacin-induced mitochondrial protein carbonyl formation, lipid peroxidation, and thiol depletion. SEGA (3a) corrects indomethacin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo by restoring defective electron transport chain function, collapse of transmembrane potential, and loss of dehydrogenase activity. SEGA (3a) not only corrects mitochondrial dysfunction but also inhibits the activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by indomethacin. SEGA (3a) inhibits indomethacin-induced down-regulation of bcl-2 and up-regulation of bax genes in gastric mucosa. SEGA (3a) also inhibits indometacin-induced activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in gastric mucosa. Besides the gastroprotective effect against NSAID, SEGA (3a) also expedites the healing of already damaged gastric mucosa. Radiolabeled ((99m)Tc-labeled SEGA (3a)) tracer studies confirm that SEGA (3a) enters into mitochondria of gastric mucosal cell in vivo, and it is quite stable in serum. Thus, SEGA (3a) bears an immense potential to be a novel gastroprotective agent against NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  6. Cardiovascular risk with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: systematic review of population-based controlled observational studies.

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    Patricia McGettigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Randomised trials have highlighted the cardiovascular risks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in high doses and sometimes atypical settings. Here, we provide estimates of the comparative risks with individual NSAIDs at typical doses in community settings. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a systematic review of community-based controlled observational studies. We conducted comprehensive literature searches, extracted adjusted relative risk (RR estimates, and pooled the estimates for major cardiovascular events associated with use of individual NSAIDs, in different doses, and in populations with low and high background risks of cardiovascular events. We also compared individual drugs in pair-wise (within study analyses, generating ratios of RRs (RRRs. Thirty case-control studies included 184,946 cardiovascular events, and 21 cohort studies described outcomes in >2.7 million exposed individuals. Of the extensively studied drugs (ten or more studies, the highest overall risks were seen with rofecoxib, 1.45 (95% CI 1.33, 1.59, and diclofenac, 1.40 (1.27, 1.55, and the lowest with ibuprofen, 1.18 (1.11, 1.25, and naproxen, 1.09 (1.02, 1.16. In a sub-set of studies, risk was elevated with low doses of rofecoxib, 1.37 (1.20, 1.57, celecoxib, 1.26 (1.09, 1.47, and diclofenac, 1.22 (1.12, 1.33, and rose in each case with higher doses. Ibuprofen risk was seen only with higher doses. Naproxen was risk-neutral at all doses. Of the less studied drugs etoricoxib, 2.05 (1.45, 2.88, etodolac, 1.55 (1.28, 1.87, and indomethacin, 1.30 (1.19, 1.41, had the highest risks. In pair-wise comparisons, etoricoxib had a higher RR than ibuprofen, RRR = 1.68 (99% CI 1.14, 2.49, and naproxen, RRR = 1.75 (1.16, 2.64; etodolac was not significantly different from naproxen and ibuprofen. Naproxen had a significantly lower risk than ibuprofen, RRR = 0.92 (0.87, 0.99. RR estimates were constant with different background risks for

  7. One-Day Use of Preoperative Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Prevents Intraoperative Prostaglandin Level Elevation During Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Huba J; Takacs, Agnes I; Kranitz, Kinga; Sandor, Gabor L; Toth, Gabor; Gilanyi, Beatrix; Nagy, Zoltan Z

    2016-08-01

    To determine if pretreatment with topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prior to femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) prevents intraoperative prostaglandin level elevation as a potential risk factor of postoperative complications. Thirty-six patients with clinically significant cataract and without any concomitant general or ophthalmic disease were enrolled into the three age-matched groups of the study. The mean age of the patients was 62.3 ± 13.1 years. The first group of patients underwent traditional phacoemulsification (Control group), on the second group of patients FLACS was performed, and the third group of patients received topical 0.1% nepafenac pretreatment for 1one day prior to FLACS. Before the phacoemulsification part of the cataract surgery, approximately 110 µL of aqueous humor was collected in all groups. Total prostaglandin concentrations of the collected aqueous humor samples were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The mean of the total prostaglandin concentrations of the aqueous humor samples was 208.8 ± 140.5 pg/mL in patients in the control group, 1449.1 ± 1019.7 pg/mL in the FLACS group (p > 0.001), and 92.2 ± 51.7 pg/mL in the group pretreated with topical NSAID before the FLACS (p > 0.001 compared to FLACS; p > 0.01 compared to control), respectively. FLACS surgery increases intracameral prostaglandin concentration. However, using preoperative 1-day-long nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drops prior to FLACS, this intraoperative increase diminishes. Our study raises the possibility that NSAID pretreatment may be routinely administered before FLACS cataract surgeries to achieve a further decrease in the potential complications of increased total prostaglandin concentration during FLACS surgeries.

  8. [The assessment of oral NSAID use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Hungary--a cross sectional non interventional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inotai, András; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Mészáros, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    Continuous NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) therapy is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) and cardiovascular (CV) side effects. In this paper, the oral NSAID use of 143 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was assessed focusing on safety and farmacoeconomic aspects in a cross sectional non interventional study. The most widely used NSAIDs were meloxicam (n = 55, 38.5%) and diclofenac (n = 30, 21%). We found that coxibs were overused (n = 13, 9.1%) compared with the average total coxib consumption in Hungary. According to our results, drugs associated with GI friend side effect profile (meloxicam, celecoxib, etoricoxib) were much preferred in patients with previous GI events, than in patients with low GI risk. The previous occurrence of GI events were significantly higher (p = 0.019) in patients currently treated with safer NSAIDs, probably because of the so-called 'indication bias'. No statistically significant difference in patient's quality of life could be proved between NSAID drug groups. The uses of NSAIDs were considered to be rational concerning CV and GI risk as well as cost-effectiveness.

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of myeloperoxidase by anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, A J; Winterbourn, C C

    1991-05-15

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is the most powerful oxidant produced by human neutrophils, and should therefore be expected to contribute to the damage caused by these inflammatory cells. It is produced from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). We used a H2O2-electrode to assess the ability of a variety of anti-inflammatory drugs to inhibit conversion of H2O2 to HOCl. Dapsone, mefenamic acid, sulfapyridine, quinacrine, primaquine and aminopyrine were potent inhibitors, giving 50% inhibition of the initial rate of H2O2 loss at concentrations of about 1 microM or less. Phenylbutazone, piroxicam, salicylate, olsalazine and sulfasalazine were also effective inhibitors. Spectral investigations showed that the inhibitors acted by promoting the formation of compound II, which is an inactive redox intermediate of MPO. Ascorbate reversed inhibition by reducing compound II back to the active enzyme. The characteristic properties that allowed the drugs to inhibit MPO reversibly were ascertained by determining the inhibitory capacity of related phenols and anilines. Inhibition increased as substituents on the aromatic ring became more electron withdrawing, until an optimum reduction potential was reached. Beyond this optimum, their inhibitory capacity declined. The best inhibitor was 4-bromoaniline which had an I50 of 45 nM. An optimum reduction potential enables inhibitors to reduce MPO to compound II, but prevents them from reducing compound II back to the active enzyme. Exploitation of this optimum reduction potential will help in targeting drugs against HOCl-dependent tissue damage.

  10. Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered

  11. Pharmacokinetic equivalence study of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib

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    Tjandrawinata RR

    2018-04-01

    drug/reference drug were 103.40% (98.70%–108.32% for AUC0-72h and 109.26% (100.18%–119.18% for Cmax. No clinically significant differences in tmax and t½values were found between the test drug and the reference drug. No adverse events were experienced by the subjects during this study.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the evaluated generic etoricoxib 120 mg film-coated tablets were bioequivalent to the reference drug. Keywords: bioavailability, bioequivalence, etoricoxib, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor 

  12. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin induces heterogeneity in lipid membranes: potential implication for its diverse biological action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, indomethacin (Indo, has a large number of divergent biological effects, the molecular mechanism(s for which have yet to be fully elucidated. Interestingly, Indo is highly amphiphilic and associates strongly with lipid membranes, which influence localization, structure and function of membrane-associating proteins and actively regulate cell signaling events. Thus, it is possible that Indo regulates diverse cell functions by altering micro-environments within the membrane. Here we explored the effect of Indo on the nature of the segregated domains in a mixed model membrane composed of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di16:0 PC, or DPPC and dioleoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di18:1 PC or DOPC and cholesterol that mimics biomembranes.Using a series of fluorescent probes in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET study, we found that Indo induced separation between gel domains and fluid domains in the mixed model membrane, possibly by enhancing the formation of gel-phase domains. This effect originated from the ability of Indo to specifically target the ordered domains in the mixed membrane. These findings were further confirmed by measuring the ability of Indo to affect the fluidity-dependent fluorescence quenching and the level of detergent resistance of membranes.Because the tested lipids are the main lipid constituents in cell membranes, the observed formation of gel phase domains induced by Indo potentially occurs in biomembranes. This marked Indo-induced change in phase behavior potentially alters membrane protein functions, which contribute to the wide variety of biological activities of Indo and other NSAIDs.

  13. Suboptimal gastroprotective coverage of NSAID use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and ulcers: An observational study using three European databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. van Soest; V.E. Valkhoff (Vera); G. Mazzaglia (Giampiero); R. Schade (René); M. Molokhia (Mariam); J.L. Goldstein; S. Hernández-Díaz (Sonia); G. Trifirò (Gianluca); J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Gastro-protective agents (GPA) are co-prescribed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to lower the risk of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) events. It is unknown to what extent the protective effect is influenced by therapy adherence. Aim: To study the association

  14. TANDA DAN GEJALA GASTROPATI NSAID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaanipriya Gajapathi Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: gastritis is the process of inflammatory in the stomach mucous lining and submucous and in histopathology can be evidenced by the infiltration cells of the area. NSAID used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, osteoartritis or pain. NSAID damage gastric mucous through two mechanism that is topical and systemic. Mucous damage in topikal occurred because NSAID are acidic and lipophilic, making it easier trapping hydrogen ions enter the mucosa and cause damage. Systemic effects of NSAIDs are more important that mucosal damage caused by prostaglandin production decreases significantly. Case: The patient was male, 68 years old, the tribe of Bali, a Hindu came on January 7, 2015 with complaints of pain in the gut for a long time which is about 6 months ago and was advancing from + 2 days ago. Pain feels like a tingling blunt and does not spread, the patient felt throughout the day. Pain initially appears suddenly, felt increasingly become heavy to interfere with the patient's daily activities. The pain did not diminish after patients eat and with drugs. Patients also complained of pain he felt increasingly growing, especially at night. Keywords: Gastritis, NSAIDs, gastropathy

  15. Prospective assessment of NSAIDs induced ADRs in orthopaedic in-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabha TS, Bhaskara K, Nandini T

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are one among the most widely used medications to treat pain and inflammation condition. But inadvertent use of NSAIDs have resulted in gastric upset and even death. Hence to minimize such consequences and to identify the incidence of the Adverse drug reaction (ADRs due to NSAIDs in orthopaedic in-patients to promote rational prescribing. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done in one hundred orthopaedic in-patients of a tertiary care hospital for 3 months from June-Augest 2012. The ADRs pattern were noted with respect to age, gender and drugs involved . The causality of ADRs were assessed by Naranjo’s Algorithm. Results: Among one hundred in- patients 16% developed ADR due to NSAIDs and 1.92% due to Antimicrobial agents (AMAs. The ADRs were more in males (11% than females (5%. Most prescribed NSAID was Diclofenac (76 %, and least was nimesulide (2%. Others were Paracetamol (16%, Ibuprofen (3% and Etoricoxib (3% . Out of 16 ADRs Tablet (Tab Diclofenac accounted for maximum number {87.5%, (n=14} of ADRs, followed by Tab. Paracetamol {12.5 % (n=2}. Conclusion: ADR incidence rate in orthopaedic in-patient due to NSAIDs was 16%. Educating, establishment and encouragement of Pharmacovigilance system among medical and non-health professionals including medical undergraduates improve ADRs identification and to identify the drugs causing it, therefore prolonged hospitalization, treatment cost, morbidity and mortalities can be minimized. Hence, further ADRs due to particular drugs can be reduced in other patients with rational prescription.

  16. Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Natalia; Yuan, Chen; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Cao, Yin; Babic, Ana; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Kraft, Peter; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Clish, Clary B; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2018-04-01

    Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. We considered several exposure classifications to model differing lag times between NSAID exposure and cancer development. We also conducted a nested case-control study of participants from 3 prospective cohorts using conditional logistic regression to evaluate pre-diagnosis levels of plasma salicylurate, a major metabolite of aspirin, in 396 pancreatic cancer cases and 784 matched individuals without pancreatic cancer (controls). In the prospective cohort study, 1122 participants developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma over 4.2 million person-years. Use of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk, even after considering several latency exposure classifications. In a pre-planned subgroup analysis, regular aspirin use was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk among participants with diabetes (relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.94). In the nested case-control study, pre-diagnosis levels of salicylurate were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61; P trend 0.81; comparing participants in the highest quintile with those in the lowest quintile of plasma salicylurate). Regular aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer in participants from several large prospective cohort studies. A possible reduction in risk for pancreatic cancer among people with diabetes who regularly use aspirin should be further examined in preclinical and human studies. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  17. A Randomized Trial Among Compression Plus Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs, Aspiration, and Aspiration With Steroid Injection for Nonseptic Olecranon Bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Yub; Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Joo Hak; Jung, Jae Hong; Sung, Gwang Young; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Jong Soo

    2016-03-01

    Olecranon bursitis might be a minor problem in the outpatient clinic but relatively be common to occur. However, there are few well-designed studies comparing approaches to treatment. (1) Which treatment (compression bandaging with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspiration, or aspiration with steroid injections) is associated with the highest likelihood of resolution of nonseptic olecranon bursitis? (2) Which treatment is associated with earliest resolution of symptoms? (3) What factors are associated with treatment failure by 4 weeks? We enrolled 133 patients from two centers; after applying prespecified exclusions (septic bursitis or concomitant inflammatory arthritis, intraarticular elbow pathology, recent aspiration or steroid injection done elsewhere, and refusal to participate), 90 patients were randomly allocated to receive compression bandaging with NSAIDs (C), aspiration (A), or aspiration with steroid injection (AS) groups (30 patients in each). The groups were similar at baseline in terms of age and gender. Seven patients (four from Group A and three from Group AS) were lost to followup. All patients were followed up weekly for 4 weeks, and the same treatment procedure was repeated if the bursitis recurred with any substantial fluid collection. At 4 weeks, the state of resolution and pain visual analog scale (VAS) were evaluated. Failed resolution was defined as presence of persistent olecranon bursal fluid collection at Week 4 after the initiation of the treatment; on the contrary, if bursal fluid collection was clinically reduced or completely disappeared by the end of Week 4, the treatment was considered successful. We compared the proportion of resolution by Week 4 and the median times to resolution among the treatment groups. In addition, we evaluated whether the resolution affected pain VAS and what factors were associated with the resolution. There were no differences in the proportion of patients whose bursitis resolved by Week 4

  18. Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid has been utilised by physicians for hundreds of years as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic (1). Derived from plant sources, such as the willow tree, it has the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and stimulate.

  19. The heat shock protein response following eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle is unaffected by local NSAID infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Paulsen, G; Schjerling, P

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed in relation to pain and injuries in skeletal muscle, but may adversely affect muscle adaptation probably via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Induction of heat shock proteins (HSP) represents an important adaptive response...... in muscle subjected to stress, and in several cell types including cardiac myocytes prostaglandins are important in induction of the HSP response. This study aimed to determine the influence of NSAIDs on the HSP response to eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle. Healthy males performed 200 maximal...

  20. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from environmental water samples using polyamidoamine dendrimer functionalized with magnetite nanoparticles as a sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinezhad, Heshmatollah; Amiri, Amirhassan; Tarahomi, Mehrasa; Maleki, Behrooz

    2018-06-01

    A novel polyamidoamine dendrimer functionalized with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 @PAMAM) had been fabricated and used as magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) adsorbent. The Fe 3 O 4 @PAMAM nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron spectroscopy, elemental analytical, and thermal gravimetric analysis. The MSPE method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography with an ultraviolet detection system was applied for the separation/analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Major parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the selected drugs were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the enrichment factors for the proposed method were 701835. The linear range, limit of detection, correlation coefficient (r), and relative standard deviation (RSD) were found to be 0.15-500 ng mL -1 , 0.050.08 ng mL -1 , 0.99320.9967, and 4.5-7.0% (n = 5, 0.2, 10 and 300 ng mL -1 ), respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of NSAIDs in the real water samples. The recoveries of spiked water samples were in the range of 93.6-98.9% with RSDs varying from 6.1% to 9.0%, showing the good accuracy of the method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. NEW DATA ON THE SAFETY OF NONSTEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS: THE CONCEPT OF THE HIGH CLASS-SPECIFIC CARDIOVASCULAR RISK OF SELECTIVE CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 INHIBITORS IS OUTDATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the PRECISION trial were published in late 2016. During this trial, a total of 24,081 patients at high cardiovascular risk took celecoxib 200-400 mg/day, naproxen 750–1000 mg/day or ibuprofen 1800–2400 mg/day for more than 1.5 years (20.3±16.0 months. The findings show that the frequency of vascular catastrophes (death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke in patients receiving celecoxib was not higher than that of the similar complications in those taking the control drugs. At the same time, celecoxib demonstrated a statistically significant advantage in reducing the risk of serious gastrointestinal complications. New evidence refutes the concept of high cardiovascular risk that is common to all coxibs and confirms the provisions of national guidelines for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, which were published in 2015. This review presents recent data on the risk of NSAID-related complications, including a brief description of the design and results of the PRECISION trial. 

  2. Advances in NSAID development: evolution of diclofenac products using pharmaceutical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Roy; Bosch, Bill; Brune, Kay; Patrignani, Paola; Young, Clarence

    2015-05-01

    Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the phenylacetic acid class with anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties. Contrary to the action of many traditional NSAIDs, diclofenac inhibits cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 enzyme with greater potency than it does COX-1. Similar to other NSAIDs, diclofenac is associated with serious dose-dependent gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal adverse effects. Since its introduction in 1973, a number of different diclofenac-containing drug products have been developed with the goal of improving efficacy, tolerability, and patient convenience. Delayed- and extended-release forms of diclofenac sodium were initially developed with the goal of improving the safety profile of diclofenac and providing convenient, once-daily dosing for the treatment of patients with chronic pain. New drug products consisting of diclofenac potassium salt were associated with faster absorption and rapid onset of pain relief. These include diclofenac potassium immediate-release tablets, diclofenac potassium liquid-filled soft gel capsules, and diclofenac potassium powder for oral solution. The advent of topical formulations of diclofenac enabled local treatment of pain and inflammation while minimizing systemic absorption of diclofenac. SoluMatrix diclofenac, consisting of submicron particles of diclofenac free acid and a proprietary combination of excipients, was developed to provide analgesic efficacy at reduced doses associated with lower systemic absorption. This review illustrates how pharmaceutical technology has been used to modify the pharmacokinetic properties of diclofenac, leading to the creation of novel drug products with improved clinical utility.

  3. Potentiated clinoptilolite: artificially enhanced aluminosilicate reduces symptoms associated with endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potgieter W

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wilna Potgieter, Caroline Selma Samuels, Jacques Renè SnymanDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South AfricaPurpose: The cation exchanger, a potentiated clinoptilolite (Absorbatox™ 2.4D, is a synthetically enhanced aluminosilicate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of a potentiated clinoptilolite as a gastroprotective agent in reducing the severity of clinical symptoms and signs associated with 1 endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease (ENGORD and 2 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID medication.Methods and patients: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot studies, the ENGORD and NSAID studies, were conducted. After initial negative gastroscopy, a total of 25 patients suffering from ENGORD were randomized to receive either placebo capsules or 750 mg Absorbatox twice daily for 14 days. The NSAID study recruited 23 healthy patients who received orally either 1,500 mg Absorbatox or placebo three times daily, plus 500 mg naproxen twice daily. Patients underwent gastroscopic evaluation of their stomach linings prior to and on day 14 of the study. Gastric biopsies were obtained and evaluated via the upgraded Sydney system, whereas visible gastric events and status of the gastric mucosa were evaluated via a 0–3 rating scale. During both studies, patients recorded gastric symptoms in a daily symptom diary.Results: In the ENGORD study, patients who received the potentiated clinoptilolite reported a significant reduction (P≤0.05 in severity of symptoms including reduction in heartburn (44%, discomfort (54%, and pain (56%. Symptom-free days improved by 41% compared to the group who received placebo (not significant. This was over and above the benefits seen with the proton pump inhibitor. In the NSAID study, the reduction in gastric symptom severity was echoed in the group who received the potentiated

  4. Life cycle assessment and costing of urine source separation: Focus on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Kelly A; Boyer, Treavor H

    2016-11-15

    Urine source separation has the potential to reduce pharmaceutical loading to the environment, while enhancing nutrient recovery. The focus of this life cycle assessment (LCA) was to evaluate the environmental impacts and economic costs to manage nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (i.e., diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen) and nutrients in human urine. Urine source separation was compared with centralized wastewater treatment (WWT) (biological or upgraded with ozonation). The current treatment method (i.e., centralized biological WWT) was compared with hypothetical treatment scenarios (i.e., centralized biological WWT upgraded with ozonation, and urine source separation). Alternative urine source separation scenarios included varying collection and handling methods (i.e., collection by vacuum truck, vacuum sewer, or decentralized treatment), pharmaceuticals removal by ion-exchange, and struvite precipitation. Urine source separation scenarios had 90% lower environmental impact (based on the TRACI impact assessment method) compared with the centralized wastewater scenarios due to reduced potable water production for flush water, reduced electricity use at the wastewater treatment plant, and nutrient offsets from struvite precipitation. Despite the greatest reduction of pharmaceutical toxicity, centralized treatment upgraded with ozone had the greatest ecotoxicity impacts due to ozonation operation and infrastructure. Among urine source separation scenarios, decentralized treatment of urine and centralized treatment of urine collected by vacuum truck had negligible cost differences compared with centralized wastewater treatment. Centralized treatment of urine collected by vacuum sewer and centralized treatment with ozone cost 30% more compared with conventional wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial microbiota profiling in gastritis without Helicobacter pylori infection or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xing Li

    Full Text Available Recent 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA molecular profiling of the stomach mucosa revealed a surprising complexity of microbiota. Helicobacter pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use are two main contributors to gastritis and peptic ulcer. However, little is known about the association between other members of the stomach microbiota and gastric diseases. In this study, cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA was used to profile the stomach microbiota from normal and gastritis patients. One hundred and thirty three phylotypes from eight bacterial phyla were identified. The stomach microbiota was found to be closely adhered to the mucosa. Eleven Streptococcus phylotypes were successfully cultivated from the biopsies. One to two genera represented a majority of clones within any of the identified phyla. We further developed two real-time quantitative PCR assays to quantify the relative abundance of the Firmicutes phylum and the Streptococcus genus. Significantly higher abundance of the Firmicutes phylum and the Streptococcus genus within the Firmicutes phylum was observed in patients with antral gastritis, compared with normal controls. This study suggests that the genus taxon level can largely represent much higher taxa such as the phylum. The clinical relevance and the mechanism underlying the altered microbiota composition in gastritis require further functional studies.

  6. Benzimidazole derivatives: search for GI-friendly anti-inflammatory analgesic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gaba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been successfully used for the alleviation of pain and inflammation in the past and continue to be used daily by millions of patients worldwide. However, gastrointestinal (GI toxicity associated with NSAIDs is an important medical and socioeconomic problem. Local generation of various reactive oxygen species plays a significant role in the formation of gastric ulceration associated with NSAIDs therapy. Co-medication of antioxidants along with NSAIDs has been found to be beneficial in the prevention of GI injury. This paper describes the synthesis and biological evaluation of N-1-(phenylsulfonyl-2-methylamino-substituted-1H-benzimidazole derivatives as anti-inflammatory analgesic agents with lower GI toxicity. Studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that the antioxidant activity of the test compounds decreased GI toxicity.

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Eccleston, Christopher; Cooper, Tess E.; Fisher, Emma; Anderson, Brian; Wilkinson, Nick M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left untreated, views on children's pain have changed over time, and relief of pai...

  8. [Gastropathy caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and its association with Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Heriberto; Jacobo-Karam, Janett S; Jáquez-Quintana, Joel O; Avila-Romero, Hilda G; Galván-Román, Liliana; Lara-Miranda, Sandra C; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis F

    2003-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is related with older patients and NSAIDs use. The frequency of peptic ulcer bleeding varies of 15% to 30% of cases. To determine the gastropathy features of patients who receive nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and its relation with Helicobacter pylori (Hp). Men and women with GU or DU with or without haemorrhage, were included into two groups, NSAIDs users and non users. We determined the incidence rate of peptic ulcer and the frequencies of risk factors as tobacco use, previous peptic ulcer or haemorrhage, concomitant disease presence and its association with Hp infection. We included 434 (67.5%) patients that used NSAIDs and 209 (32.5%) non NSAIDs users control subjects. The average was 62.5 +/- 17.2 years and 49.5 +/- 19.4 years respectively. The annual incidence rate of peptic ulcer in NSAIDs users was 17.5%. Gastrointestinal bleeding was more frequent in NSAIDs users and its relations with Hp infection (23.5%) was smaller than patients without NSAIDs user (47.7%) (OR 0.39 p = 0.0000). The GU was highly frequent in the older people who using NSAIDs. The Hp infection shows lower incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding NSAIDs users.

  9. Upregulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway in NSAIDs mediated chemoprevention of experimental lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Shruti; Sanyal, Sankar N

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act by inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is overexpressed in cancer. The role of COX-2 and apoptosis were evaluated in 9,10-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced lung cancer in rat and chemoprevention with indomethacin, a traditional NSAID and etoricoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. The animals were divided into Control, DMBA, DMBA+ indomethacin and DMBA+ etoricoxib groups. They received a single intratracheal instillation of DMBA while NSAIDs were given orally daily for 32 weeks. Besides morphology and histology of lungs, RT-PCR, western blots and immunohistochemistry were performed for the expression of apoptotic proteins and COX enzymes. Apoptosis was studied by DNA fragmentation and fluorescent staining. The occurrence of tumors and lesions was noted in the DMBA animals, besides constricted alveolar spaces and hyperplasia. COX-1 was found to be uniformly expressed while COX-2 level was raised significantly in DMBA group. The apoptotic proteins, apaf-1, caspase-9 and caspase-3 were highly diminished in DMBA group but restored to normal level in NSAIDs groups. Also, apoptosis was suppressed in carcinogen group by DNA fragmentation analysis and fluorescent staining of the lung cells while co-administration of NSAIDs along with DMBA led to the restoration of apoptosis. DMBA administration to the rats led to tumorigenesis in the lungs, had no effects on COX-1 expression, while elevating the COX-2 levels and suppressing apoptosis. The treatment with NSAIDs led to the amelioration of these effects. However, etoricoxib which is a COX-2 specific inhibitor, was found to be more effective than the traditional NSAID, indomethacin.

  10. Anti-inflammatory drugs suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis through altering expressions of cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic factors in cultured human osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.-K.; Li, C.-J.; Liao, H.-J.; Wang, C.-K.; Wang, G.-J.; Ho, M.-L.

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-inflammatory drugs (AIDs) inhibited bone repair in animal studies, and suppressed proliferation and induced cell death in rat osteoblast cultures. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanisms of AID effects on proliferation and cell death in human osteoblasts (hOBs). We examined the effects of dexamethasone (10 -7 and 10 -6 M), non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): indomethacin, ketorolac, piroxicam and diclofenac (10 -5 and 10 -4 M), and COX-2 inhibitor: celecoxib (10 -6 and 10 -5 M) on proliferation, cytotoxicity, cell death, and mRNA and protein levels of cell cycle and apoptosis-related regulators in hOBs. All the tested AIDs significantly inhibited proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase in hOBs. Celecoxib and dexamethasone, but not non-selective NSAIDs, were found to have cytotoxic effects on hOB, and further demonstrated to induce apoptosis and necrosis (at higher concentration) in hOBs. We further found that indomethacin, celecoxib and dexamethasone increased the mRNA and protein expressions of p27 kip1 and decreased those of cyclin D2 and p-cdk2 in hOBs. Bak expression was increased by celecoxib and dexamethasone, while Bcl-XL level was declined only by dexamethasone. Furthermore, the replenishment of PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2α did not reverse the effects of AIDs on proliferation and expressions of p27 kip1 and cyclin D2 in hOBs. We conclude that the changes in expressions of regulators of cell cycle (p27 kip1 and cyclin D2) and/or apoptosis (Bak and Bcl-XL) by AIDs may contribute to AIDs caused proliferation suppression and apoptosis in hOBs. This effect might not relate to the blockage of prostaglandin synthesis by AIDs

  11. Selective micellar electrokinetic chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of some pharmaceutical binary mixtures containing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. El-Kommos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple and selective micellar electrokinetic chromatographic (MEKC method has been developed for the analysis of five pharmaceutical binary mixtures containing three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The investigated mixtures were Ibuprofen (IP–Paracetamol (PC, Ibuprofen (IP–Chlorzoxazone (CZ, Ibuprofen (IP–Methocarbamol (MC, Ketoprofen (KP–Chlorzoxazone (CZ and Diclofenac sodium (DS–Lidocaine hydrochloride (LC. The separation was run for all mixtures using borate buffer (20 mM, pH 9 containing 15% (v/v methanol and 100 mM sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS at 15 kV and the components were detected at 214 nm. Different factors affecting the electrophoretic mobility of the seven investigated drugs were studied and optimized. The method was validated according to international conference of harmonization (ICH guidelines and United States pharmacopoeia (USP. The method was applied to the analysis of five pharmaceutical binary mixtures in their dosage forms. The results were compared with other reported high performance liquid chromatographic methods and no significant differences were observed. Keywords: Capillary electrophoresis, Micellar electrokinetic chromatographic method, Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Pharmaceutical binary mixtures, Pharmaceutical analysis

  12. Crystal structures of three classes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in complex with aldo-keto reductase 1C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack U Flanagan

    Full Text Available Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3 catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of carbonyl groups in a number of important steroid and prostanoid molecules. The enzyme is also over-expressed in prostate and breast cancer and its expression is correlated with the aggressiveness of the disease. The steroid products of AKR1C3 catalysis are important in proliferative signalling of hormone-responsive cells, while the prostanoid products promote prostaglandin-dependent proliferative pathways. In these ways, AKR1C3 contributes to tumour development and maintenance, and suggest that inhibition of AKR1C3 activity is an attractive target for the development of new anti-cancer therapies. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are one well-known class of compounds that inhibits AKR1C3, yet crystal structures have only been determined for this enzyme with flufenamic acid, indomethacin, and closely related analogues bound. While the flufenamic acid and indomethacin structures have been used to design novel inhibitors, they provide only limited coverage of the NSAIDs that inhibit AKR1C3 and that may be used for the development of new AKR1C3 targeted drugs. To understand how other NSAIDs bind to AKR1C3, we have determined ten crystal structures of AKR1C3 complexes that cover three different classes of NSAID, N-phenylanthranilic acids (meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, arylpropionic acids (flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen, and indomethacin analogues (indomethacin, sulindac, zomepirac. The N-phenylanthranilic and arylpropionic acids bind to common sites including the enzyme catalytic centre and a constitutive active site pocket, with the arylpropionic acids probing the constitutive pocket more effectively. By contrast, indomethacin and the indomethacin analogues sulindac and zomepirac, display three distinctly different binding modes that explain their relative inhibition of the AKR1C family members. This new data from ten crystal structures greatly broadens

  13. Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies have raised concern on the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs. We studied safety of NSAID therapy in a nationwide cohort of healthy individuals.......Studies have raised concern on the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs. We studied safety of NSAID therapy in a nationwide cohort of healthy individuals....

  14. Effect of intracapsular steroid injection in combination with arthrocentesis followed by mouth opening exercises and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment for closed lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakita, Takeshi; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakatsuka, Kensuke

    2010-01-01

    Recent biochemical studies of synovial fluids indicate that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) symptoms are caused by intra-articular inflammation. There are various ways to manage such disorders. Arthrocentesis is one effective treatment for closed lock. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of arthrocentesis (steroid injection) followed by mouth opening exercises during non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy as a primary treatment for closed lock. The ultimate goal was to increase the improvement rate and the number of patients with no TMJ dysfunction. Subjects were selected from a series of patients with newly diagnosed closed lock who presented at Aichi-Gakuin University Hospital between January 2003 and December 2004. Sixty-two patients were confirmed to have closed lock with MRI. The patients underwent two consecutive sessions of arthrocentesis at a 2 week interval and were followed up every 2 weeks for 12 weeks. NSAID administration and mouth opening exercises were performed daily until the patient's symptoms improved. The improvement rate was calculated as the percentage of improved cases among the total number of cases in each group. The improvement rates were 27%, 43%, 56%, 62%, 65%, and 71% after 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks, respectively. Improvement to a TMJ classification of no dysfunction was achieved in 11% of the patients. This combination therapy (steroid injection) is an effective primary treatment because the improvement rate was as higher as 71%, and 11% of all patients had improved to a TMJ classification of no dysfunction. (author)

  15. Beneficial effect of an omega-6 PUFA-rich diet in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced mucosal damage in the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Toshihide; Hokari, Ryota; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Yasutake, Yuichi; Maruta, Koji; Kurihara, Chie; Tomita, Kengo; Komoto, Shunsuke; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Watanabe, Chikako; Usui, Shingo; Nagao, Shigeaki; Miura, Soichiro

    2015-01-07

    To investigate the effect of a fat rich diet on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced mucosal damage in the murine small intestine. C57BL6 mice were fed 4 types of diets with or without indomethacin. One group was fed standard laboratory chow. The other groups were fed a fat diet consisting of 8% w/w fat, beef tallow (rich in SFA), fish oil, (rich in omega-3 PUFA), or safflower oil (rich in omega-6 PUFA). Indomethacin (3 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally from day 8 to day 10. On day 11, intestines and adhesions to submucosal microvessels were examined. In the indomethacin-treated groups, mucosal damage was exacerbated by diets containing beef tallow and fish oil, and was accompanied by leukocyte infiltration (P safflower oil diet than in mice fed the beef tallow or fish oil diet (P safflower oil significantly decreased monocyte and platelet recruitment (P < 0.05). A diet rich in SFA and omega-3 PUFA exacerbated NSAID-induced small intestinal damage via increased leukocyte infiltration. Importantly, a diet rich in omega-6-PUFA did not aggravate inflammation as monocyte migration was blocked.

  16. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among healthy people and specific cerebrovascular safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can increase bleeding and thrombosis, but little is known about the cerebrovascular safety of these drugs, especially among healthy people. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke associated with the use...... stroke). RESULTS: We selected 1,028,437 healthy individuals (median age 39 years). At least one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug was claimed by 44·7% of the study population, and the drugs were generally used for a short period of time and in low doses. High-dose ibuprofen and diclofenac were......·35-3·42)]. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy individuals, use of commonly available nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, and naproxen was associated with increased risk of stroke....

  17. The efficacy and safety of irsogladine maleate in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or aspirin-induced peptic ulcer and gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Sang Gyun; Jo, Yun Ju; Hong, Su Jin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Kyung Sik; Choi, Suck Chei; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Ji Won

    2018-06-01

    Irsogladine maleate, an enhancer of gastric mucosal protective factors, has demonstrated its efficacy for various gastric mucosal injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of irsogladine for prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or aspirin-induced peptic ulcer and gastritis. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, exploratory clinical trial, 100 patients over 50 years of age who needed continuous NSAIDs or aspirin for more than 8 weeks were randomly assigned to either test group (irsogladine maleate 2 mg, twice daily, 39 patients for full analysis) or placebo group (37 patients for full analysis). Primary outcomes were incidence of peptic ulcer and ratio of modified Lanza score (MLS) 2 to 4. Secondary outcome was the number of acute erosions confirmed by endoscopy at 8 weeks. Adverse effects were also compared. There were no significant differences in gastric protective effects between test and placebo groups. However, two cases of peptic ulcer in the placebo group but none in the test group were observed. These two cases of peptic ulcer were Helicobacter pylori-negative. In addition, H. pylori-negative group showed significant changes in MLS score (p = 0.0247) and edema score (p = 0.0154) after the treatment compared to those before treatment in the test group. There was no significant difference in adverse events between the two groups. The efficacy of irsogladine maleate was found in H. pylori-negative group, suggesting its potential as a protective agent against NSAIDs or aspirin-induced peptic ulcer and gastritis.

  18. Disparate effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on apoptosis in guinea-pig gastric mucous cells: inhibition of basal apoptosis by diclofenac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Miranda; Hanson, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Similar actions on normal gastric epithelial cells could contribute to NSAID gastropathy. The present work therefore compared the actions of diclofenac, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and the cyclo-oxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, NS-398, on a primary culture of guinea-pig gastric mucous epithelial cells. Cell number was assessed by staining with crystal violet. Apoptotic activity was determined by condensation and fragmentation of nuclei and by assay of caspase-3-like activity. Necrosis was evaluated from release of cellular enzymes. Ibuprofen (250 μM for 24 h) promoted cell loss, and apoptosis, under both basal conditions and when apoptosis was increased by 25 μM N-Hexanoyl-D-sphingosine (C6-ceramide). Diclofenac (250 μM for 24 h) reduced the proportion of apoptotic nuclei from 5.2 to 2.1%, and caused inhibition of caspase-3-like activity, without causing necrosis under basal conditions. No such reduction in apoptotic activity was evident in the presence of 25 μM C6-ceramide. The inhibitory effect of diclofenac on basal caspase-3-like activity was also exhibited by the structurally similar mefenamic and flufenamic acids (1–250 μM), but not by niflumic acid. Inhibition of superoxide production by the cells increased caspase-3-like activity, but the inhibitory action of diclofenac on caspase activity remained. Diclofenac did not affect superoxide production. Diclofenac inhibited caspase-3-like activity in cell homogenates and also inhibited human recombinant caspase-3. In conclusion, NSAIDs vary in their effect on apoptotic activity in a primary culture of guinea-pig gastric mucous epithelial cells, and the inhibitory effect of diclofenac on basal apoptosis could involve an action on caspase activity. PMID:11815376

  19. P-glycoprotein Modulates Morphine Uptake into the CNS: A Role for the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Diclofenac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M.; Thompson, Brandon J.; Zhang, Yifeng; Laracuente, Mei-Li; DeMarco, Kristin M.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that peripheral inflammatory pain (PIP), induced by subcutaneous plantar injection of λ-carrageenan, results in increased expression and activity of the ATP-dependent efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that is endogenously expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The result of increased P-gp functional expression was a significant reduction in CNS uptake of morphine and, subsequently, reduced morphine analgesic efficacy. A major concern in the treatment of acute pain/inflammation is the potential for drug-drug interactions resulting from P-gp induction by therapeutic agents co-administered with opioids. Such effects on P-gp activity can profoundly modulate CNS distribution of opioid analgesics and alter analgesic efficacy. In this study, we examined the ability of diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly administered in conjunction with the opioids during pain therapy, to alter BBB transport of morphine via P-gp and whether such changes in P-gp morphine transport could alter morphine analgesic efficacy. Administration of diclofenac reduced paw edema and thermal hyperalgesia in rats subjected to PIP, which is consistent with the known mechanism of action of this NSAID. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in P-gp expression in rat brain microvessels not only following PIP induction but also after diclofenac treatment alone. Additionally, in situ brain perfusion studies showed that both PIP and diclofenac treatment alone increased P-gp efflux activity resulting in decreased morphine brain uptake. Critically, morphine analgesia was significantly reduced in animals pretreated with diclofenac (3 h), as compared to animals administered diclofenac and morphine concurrently. These novel findings suggest that administration of diclofenac and P-gp substrate opioids during pain pharmacotherapy may result in a clinically significant drug-drug interaction. PMID:24520393

  20. P-glycoprotein modulates morphine uptake into the CNS: a role for the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Slosky, Lauren M; Thompson, Brandon J; Zhang, Yifeng; Laracuente, Mei-Li; DeMarco, Kristin M; Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that peripheral inflammatory pain (PIP), induced by subcutaneous plantar injection of λ-carrageenan, results in increased expression and activity of the ATP-dependent efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that is endogenously expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The result of increased P-gp functional expression was a significant reduction in CNS uptake of morphine and, subsequently, reduced morphine analgesic efficacy. A major concern in the treatment of acute pain/inflammation is the potential for drug-drug interactions resulting from P-gp induction by therapeutic agents co-administered with opioids. Such effects on P-gp activity can profoundly modulate CNS distribution of opioid analgesics and alter analgesic efficacy. In this study, we examined the ability of diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly administered in conjunction with the opioids during pain therapy, to alter BBB transport of morphine via P-gp and whether such changes in P-gp morphine transport could alter morphine analgesic efficacy. Administration of diclofenac reduced paw edema and thermal hyperalgesia in rats subjected to PIP, which is consistent with the known mechanism of action of this NSAID. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in P-gp expression in rat brain microvessels not only following PIP induction but also after diclofenac treatment alone. Additionally, in situ brain perfusion studies showed that both PIP and diclofenac treatment alone increased P-gp efflux activity resulting in decreased morphine brain uptake. Critically, morphine analgesia was significantly reduced in animals pretreated with diclofenac (3 h), as compared to animals administered diclofenac and morphine concurrently. These novel findings suggest that administration of diclofenac and P-gp substrate opioids during pain pharmacotherapy may result in a clinically significant drug-drug interaction.

  1. P-glycoprotein modulates morphine uptake into the CNS: a role for the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Sanchez-Covarrubias

    Full Text Available Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that peripheral inflammatory pain (PIP, induced by subcutaneous plantar injection of λ-carrageenan, results in increased expression and activity of the ATP-dependent efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp that is endogenously expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The result of increased P-gp functional expression was a significant reduction in CNS uptake of morphine and, subsequently, reduced morphine analgesic efficacy. A major concern in the treatment of acute pain/inflammation is the potential for drug-drug interactions resulting from P-gp induction by therapeutic agents co-administered with opioids. Such effects on P-gp activity can profoundly modulate CNS distribution of opioid analgesics and alter analgesic efficacy. In this study, we examined the ability of diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that is commonly administered in conjunction with the opioids during pain therapy, to alter BBB transport of morphine via P-gp and whether such changes in P-gp morphine transport could alter morphine analgesic efficacy. Administration of diclofenac reduced paw edema and thermal hyperalgesia in rats subjected to PIP, which is consistent with the known mechanism of action of this NSAID. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in P-gp expression in rat brain microvessels not only following PIP induction but also after diclofenac treatment alone. Additionally, in situ brain perfusion studies showed that both PIP and diclofenac treatment alone increased P-gp efflux activity resulting in decreased morphine brain uptake. Critically, morphine analgesia was significantly reduced in animals pretreated with diclofenac (3 h, as compared to animals administered diclofenac and morphine concurrently. These novel findings suggest that administration of diclofenac and P-gp substrate opioids during pain pharmacotherapy may result in a clinically significant drug-drug interaction.

  2. Photoactive platinum(II) complexes of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen: Interaction with biological targets, antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Payal; Singh, Khushbu; Verma, Madhu; Sivakumar, Sri; Patra, Ashis K

    2018-01-20

    The effect on the therapeutic efficacy of Pt(II) complexes on combining non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is an attractive strategy to circumvent chronic inflammation mediated by cancer and metastasis. Two square-planar platinum(II) complexes: [Pt(dach)(nap)Cl] (1) and [Pt(dach)(nap) 2 ] (2), where dach = (1R,2R)-dichloro(cyclohexane-1,2-diamine) and NSAID drug naproxen (nap), have been designed for studying their biological activity. The naproxen bound to the Pt(II) centre get released upon photoirradiation with low-power UV-A light as confirmed by the significant enhancement in emission intensities of the complexes. The compounds were evaluated for their photophysical properties, photostability, reactivity with 5'-guanosine monophophosphate (5'-GMP), interactions with CT-DNA and BSA, antioxidant activity and reactive oxygen species mediated photo-induced DNA damage properties. ESI-MS studies demonstrated the formation of bis-adduct with 5'-GMP and the formation of Pt II -DNA crosslinks by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay and ITC studies. The interaction of the complexes 1 and 2 with the CT-DNA exhibits potential binding affinity (K b  ∼ 10 4  M -1 , K app ∼ 10 5  M -1 ), implying intercalation to CT-DNA through planar naphthyl ring of the complexes. Both the complexes also exhibit strong binding affinity towards BSA (K BSA ∼ 10 5  M -1 ). The complexes exhibit efficient DNA damage activity on irradiation at 365 nm via formation of singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) and hydroxyl radical ( • OH) under physiological conditions. Both the complexes were cytotoxic in dark and exhibit significant enhancement of cytotoxicity upon photo-exposure against HeLa and HepG2 cancer cells giving IC 50 values ranging from 8 to 12 μM for 1 and 2. The cellular internalization data showed cytosolic and nuclear localization of the complexes in the HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Are NSAIDs useful to treat Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P Imbimbo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies suggest that long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may protect subjects carrying one or more ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 against the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The biological mechanism of this protection is not completely understood and may involve the anti-inflammatory properties of NSAIDs or their ability of interfering with the β-amyloid (Aβ cascade. Unfortunately, long-term, placebo-controlled clinical trials with both non-selective and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 selective inhibitors in mild-to-moderate AD patients produced negative results. A secondary prevention study with rofecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, in patients with mild cognitive impairment was also negative. A primary prevention study (ADAPT trial of naproxen (a non-selective COX inhibitor and celecoxib (a COX-2 selective inhibitor in cognitively normal elderly subjects with a family history of AD was prematurely interrupted for safety reasons after a median period of treatment of 2 years. Although both drugs did not reduce the incidence of dementia after two years of treatment, a 4-year follow up assessment surprisingly revealed that subjects previously exposed to naproxen were protected from the onset of AD by 67% compared to placebo. Thus, it could be hypothesized that the chronic use of NSAIDs may be beneficial only in the very early stages of the AD process in coincidence of initial Aβ deposition, microglia activation and consequent release of pro-inflammatory mediators. When the Aβ deposition process is already started, NSAIDs are no longer effective and may even be detrimental because of their inhibitory activity on chronically activated microglia that on long-term may mediate Aβ clearance. The research community should conduct long-term trials with NSAIDs in cognitively normal APOE ε4 carriers.

  4. NSAIDs as potential treatment option for preventing amyloid β toxicity in Alzheimer's disease: an investigation by docking, molecular dynamics, and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Faizul; Alabdullah, Nada Hussin; Ehmedat, Hadeel Mohammed; Abulifa, Abdullah Ramadan; Taban, Ismail; Upadhyayula, Sreedevi

    2018-06-01

    Aggregation of amyloid beta (Aβ) protein considered as one of contributors in development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several investigations have identified the importance of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as Aβ aggregation inhibitors. Here, we have examined the binding interactions of 24 NSAIDs belonging to eight different classes, with Aβ fibrils by exploiting docking and molecular dynamics studies. Minimum energy conformation of the docked NSAIDs were further optimized by density functional theory (DFT) employing Becke's three-parameter hybrid model, Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) correlation functional method. DFT-based global reactivity descriptors, such as electron affinity, hardness, softness, chemical potential, electronegativity, and electrophilicity index were calculated to inspect the expediency of these descriptors for understanding the reactive nature and sites of the molecules. Few selected NSAID-Aβ fibrils complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to illustrate the stability of these complexes and the most prominent interactions during the simulated trajectory. All of the NSAIDs exhibited potential activity against Aβ fibrils in terms of predicted binding affinity. Sulindac was found to be the most active compound underscoring the contribution of indene methylene substitution, whereas acetaminophen was observed as least active NSAID. General structural requirements for interaction of NSAIDs with Aβ fibril include: aryl/heteroaryl aromatic moiety connected through a linker of 1-2 atoms to a distal aromatic group. Considering these structural requirements and electronic features, new potent agents can be designed and developed as potential Aβ fibril inhibitors for the treatment of AD.

  5. Prostaglandin synthesis can be inhibited locally by infusion of NSAIDS through microdialysis catheters in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Helmark, Ida Carøe; Kjaer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, to study the local role of prostaglandins, the formation of prostaglandins within the tissue must be controlled. Microdialysis enables determination of local concentrations of water-soluble substances within the tissue. In the present study......, the microdialysis method was used to infuse NSAIDs locally into human skeletal muscles producing a local block of prostaglandin formation. In addition, the graded blockade at various distances from the infusion site within the muscle during rest, exercise and recovery was determined. Microdialysis was performed...... in thigh muscles (vastus lateralis muscle) in six healthy men. One of the microdialysis catheters was used to block prostaglandin synthesis by infusion of the NSAID indomethacin. Additional catheters were placed 1 and 4 cm away from the infusion and in the contralateral leg (working control). Following 2 h...

  6. Polymorphisms in genes related to inflammation, NSAID use, and the risk of prostate cancer among Danish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Friis, Søren; Christensen, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of prostate cancer (PC) remains mostly unknown, but increasing evidence suggests that chronic inflammation in the prostate is associated with an increased risk of PC. Epidemiological studies have suggested that use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may protect against PC....... Inborn variations in genes involved in the inflammatory response may modulate the risk of PC and interact with NSAIDs. The aims of this study were 1) to evaluate whether polymorphisms and haplotypes of the inflammation-related genes COX-2, Il1B, NFKB1, and PPARG are associated with risk of PC; 2......) to investigate gene–environment interactions between polymorphisms and NSAID use; and 3) to examine whether the studied polymorphisms were associated with the aggressiveness of PC. The study population consisted of 370 cases of PC and 370 risk-set matched (age) controls nested within the prospective Danish “Diet...

  7. NSAID is inversely associated with asymptomatic gastric ulcer: local health examination data from the Korean National Health Insurance Corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Man; Cho, Jae Hee; Choi, Jin Yi; Chun, Song Wook; Kim, Yu Jin; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Song, Si Young; Han, Ki Jun

    2013-12-01

    BACKGROUND. Silent peptic ulcer has been considered to be associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The recent studies have reported no relationship between them. AIM. We attempted to investigate an association between asymptomatic peptic ulcer and NSAID in Korean adults. METHODS. The subjects were enrolled from participants visiting Myongji Hospital for health examination program of the Korean National Health Insurance Corporation. The questionnaires were designed to investigate individual medical information and gastroduodenal symptoms. RESULTS. From May 2005 to March 2009, 5459 participants were enrolled and 299 participants were excluded. Of 5160 participants, 3144 (60.9%) participants were asymptomatic and 424 (8.2%) participants had peptic ulcer. Among 3144 asymptomatic participants, NSAID-taking participants had the odds ratio of 1.4 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7-2.6, p = 0.339] for the risk of peptic ulcer. Among 424 peptic ulcer patients, 247 (58.3%) were asymptomatic. They had lower prevalence of NSAID use (4.9% vs. 14.7%). The asymptomatic gastric ulcer patients had smaller size and more frequent healing stage than the symptomatic gastric ulcer patients. In multivariable analysis of 424 peptic ulcer patients, NSAID patients had the odds ratio of 0.249 (95%CI: 0.115-0.536, p < 0.05) for asymptomatic peptic ulcer. In subgroup analysis of 284 gastric ulcer patients, NSAID-taking patients had the odds ratio of 0.263 (95% CI: 0.105-0.657, p = 0.004) for asymptomatic peptic ulcer. CONCLUSION. NSAID has an inverse association with asymptomatic patients with gastric peptic ulcer, but has no association with gastroduodenal symptoms in duodenal ulcer patients. These suggest that NSAID may be associated with gastroduodenal symptoms rather than masking symptoms, at least in gastric ulcer patients.

  8. Evolution of topical NSAIDs in the guidelines for treatment of osteoarthritis in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    Increasing age is the primary predictor of osteoarthritis, the most prevalent painful condition in the US. Because there are no disease-modifying therapies for osteoarthritis, relief of symptoms and maintenance of quality of life through improving joint function become the focus of management. Although highly effective for pain relief, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with systemic adverse reactions that are sometimes treatment limiting, especially for older patients. Thus, osteoarthritis management in elderly populations is shifting away from traditional NSAIDs to therapies that provide comparable pain relief with improved safety. Since the approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of the use of topical NSAIDs to manage osteoarthritis pain, current treatment guidelines put forth by several professional societies have begun to recommend topical NSAIDs as an alternative therapy and, most recently, as first-line therapy for osteoarthritis management in the elderly. This review provides an overview of the various treatment guidelines that are available to assist prescribers in making safe and effective decisions in the treatment of osteoarthritis in this high-risk patient population.

  9. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flufenamic acid is a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yuan; Li, Kai; Yan, Qiaojing; Koizumi, Schuichi; Shi, Liye; Takahashi, Shuhei; Zhu, Ying; Matsue, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masayuki; Kitamura, Masanori; Yao, Jian

    2011-10-01

    Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties. In addition, it modulates multiple channel activities. The mechanisms underlying the pharmacological actions of FFA are presently unclear. Given that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has both anti-inflammatory and channel-regulating functions, we examined whether FFA induces AMPK activation. 1) Exposure of several different types of cells to FFA resulted in an elevation of AMPKα phosphorylation at Thr172. This effect of FFA was reproduced by functionally and structurally similar mefenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, niflumic acid, and meclofenamic acid. 2) FFA-induced activation of AMPK was largely abolished by the treatment of cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester) (an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator) or depletion of extracellular Ca(2+), whereas it was mimicked by stimulation of cells with the Ca(2+) ionophore 5-(methylamino)-2-({(2R,3R,6S,8S,9R,11R)-3,9,11-trimethyl-8-[(1S)-1-methyl-2-oxo-2-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)ethyl]-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undec-2-yl}methyl)-1,3-benzoxazole-4-carboxylic acid (A23187) or ionomycin. 3) FFA triggered a rise in intracellular Ca(2+), which was abolished by cyclosporine, a blocker of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Cyclosporine also abolished FFA-induced activation of AMPK. 4) Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) with 7-oxo-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benz[de]isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid acetate (STO-609) or down-regulation of CaMKKβ with short interfering RNA largely abrogated FFA-induced activation of AMPK. 5) FFA significantly suppressed nuclear factor-κB activity and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression triggered by interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α. This suppression was also largely abrogated by STO-609. Taken together, we conclude that FFA induces AMPK activation through the Ca(2+)-CaMKKβ pathway

  10. Effects of NSAIDs on the Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide and Prostaglandin E2 from Rat Trigeminal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Vellani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are frequently used to treat migraine, but the mechanisms of their effects in this pathology are not fully elucidated. The trigeminal ganglia and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. The release of CGRP and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 from freshly isolated rat trigeminal ganglia was evaluated after oral administration of nimesulide, etoricoxib, and ketoprofen, NSAIDs with different pharmacological features. Thirty minutes after oral administration, nimesulide, 10 mg/Kg, decreased the GCRP release induced by an inflammatory soup, while the other NSAIDs were ineffective at this point in time. Two hours after oral nimesulide (5 and 10 mg/Kg and ketoprofen (10 mg/Kg, but not of etoricoxib, a significant decrease in the CGRP release was observed. All drugs reduced PGE2, although with some differences in timing and doses, and the action on CGRP does not seem to be related to PGE2 inhibition. The reduction of CGRP release from rat trigeminal ganglia after nimesulide and ketoprofen may help to explain the mechanism of action of NSAIDs in migraine. Since at 30 minutes only nimesulide was effective in reducing CGRP release, these results suggest that this NSAID may exert a particularly rapid effect in patients with migraine.

  11. The Efficacy of Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Primary Prevention of NSAID-induced Gastropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Tkach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of clarifying the efficacy of eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection in primary prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy, we have examined 39 Hp-positive patients, in whom we planned to administer non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs for various arthritis. In group I, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prescribed after anti-helicobacter therapy, in group II eradication was not carried out, and the patients immediately received diclofenac. In both groups the incidence of peptic ulcers has been compared in 1 month after receiving diclofenac. In group I, peptic ulcers occurred in 2 patients (10.5 %, in group II — in 5 patients (26.3 %, ie in the group of eradication therapy they occurred significantly less frequently (χ2 = 0.5221. It is concluded that eradication of Hp-infection can be considered as an effective strategy for primary prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  12. The Influence of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on the Activity of Non-Antibiotic NSAIDS against Gram-Negative Rods.

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    Agnieszka E Laudy

    Full Text Available Most patients with bacterial infections suffer from fever and various pains that require complex treatments with antibiotics, antipyretics, and analgaesics. The most common drugs used to relieve these symptoms are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, which are not typically considered antibiotics. Here, we investigate the effects of NSAIDs on bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and the modulation of bacterial efflux pumps.The activity of 12 NSAID active substances, paracetamol (acetaminophen, and eight relevant medicinal products was analyzed with or without pump inhibitors against 89 strains of Gram-negative rods by determining the MICs. Furthermore, the effects of NSAIDs on the susceptibility of clinical strains to antimicrobial agents with or without PAβN (Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide were measured.The MICs of diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, in the presence of PAβN, were significantly (≥4-fold reduced, decreasing to 25-1600 mg/L, against the majority of the studied strains. In the case of acetylsalicylic acid only for 5 and 7 out of 12 strains of P. mirabilis and E. coli, respectively, a 4-fold increase in susceptibility in the presence of PAβN was observed. The presence of Aspirin resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of ofloxacin against only two strains of E. coli among 48 tested clinical strains, which included species such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and S. maltophilia. Besides, the medicinal products containing the following NSAIDs, diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, did not cause the decrease of clinical strains' susceptibility to antibiotics.The effects of PAβN on the susceptibility of bacteria to NSAIDs indicate that some NSAIDs are substrates for efflux pumps in Gram-negative rods. Morever, Aspirin probably induced efflux-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones in a few E. coli strains.

  13. Gastrointestinal Complications Depending on the Selectivity of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Dzyak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of gastrointestinal complications during administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, commonly used to treat a range of conditions, particularly rheumatic diseases. The results of own researches, which served to define the characteristics of changes in the state of gastric secretory function in patients receiving non-selective and selective anti-inflammatory agent and their comparative analysis, are provided. The data obtained demonstrated a certain contribution to the understanding of the mechanism of development of complications from the gastrointestinal tract when taken drugs of above group.

  14. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use is associated with increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Weeke, Peter; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Arrest Registry, all persons with OHCA during 2001-10 were identified. NSAID use 30 days before OHCA was categorized as follows: diclofenac, naproxen, ibuprofen, rofecoxib, celecoxib, and other. Risk of OHCA associated with use of NSAIDs was analysed by conditional logistic regression in case......-time-control models matching four controls on sex and age per case to account for variation in drug utilization over time. We identified 28 947 persons with OHCA of whom 3376 were treated with an NSAID up to 30 days before OHCA. Ibuprofen and diclofenac were the most commonly used NSAIDs and represented 51.0% and 21.......8% of total NSAID use, respectively. Use of diclofenac (odds ratio [OR], 1.50 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.82]) and ibuprofen [OR, 1.31 (95% CI 1.14-1.51)] was associated with a significantly increased risk of OHCA. Use of naproxen [OR, 1.29 (95% CI 0.77-2.16)], celecoxib [OR, 1.13 (95% CI 0...

  16. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) modulates the ability of NSAIDs to induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Peter; Krygier, Scott; Djakiew, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    Recent evidence indicates that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in the treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. In the study reported here, we investigated the ability of the steroid hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to modulate NSAID-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Using in vitro models of androgen-sensitive and androgen-insensitive human prostate cancer cells, we evaluated the ability of a specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (NS-398) and a nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) to induce apoptosis in the presence of various concentrations of DHT. Apoptosis was quantified using the TUNEL method and verified by electron microscopy. We found that increasing concentrations of DHT significantly enhanced the ability of NS-398 and indomethacin to induce apoptosis of androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells. The ability of NSAIDs to induce apoptosis of androgen-insensitive PC-3 cells, however, was not affected by the presence of DHT. Higher levels of DHT in the incubation medium both before as well as following exposure to NSAIDs enhanced apoptosis of LNCaP cells. Another steroid hormone that interacts with the androgen receptor in LNCaP cells (progesterone) also promoted apoptosis of these cells. Increasing concentrations of DHT caused LNCaP cells to shift from the S and G(2)/M to the G(0)/G(1) stages of the cell cycle. These observations support the use of DHT in combination with NSAIDs in the treatment of prostate cancer, and indicate that DHT is an important issue to address in clinical trials of NSAIDs since androgen ablation is a common treatment for prostate cancer.

  17. Antinociceptive tolerance to NSAIDs in the agranular insular cortex is mediated by opioid mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirkulashvili N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Natia Pirkulashvili,1 Nana Tsiklauri,1 Marina Nebieridze,2 Merab G Tsagareli1 1Laboratory of Pain and Analgesia, 2Laboratory of Brain Metabolism, Beritashvili Center for Experimental Biomedicine, Tbilisi, Georgia Abstract: Several lines of investigations have shown that in some brain areas, in particular, in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter, rostral ventromedial medulla, central nucleus of amygdala, nucleus raphe magnus, and dorsal hippocampus, microinjections of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs induce antinociception with distinct development of tolerance. The agranular insular cortex (AIC is a small region of the cerebral cortex located on the lateral area of the rat’s cerebral hemisphere that is involved in the perception and response to pain. In the present study, we investigated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effects of NSAIDs diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam microinjected into the AIC in rats. Male Wistar rats receiving NSAIDs into the AIC were tested for antinociception by tail-flick and hot plate tests. Treatment with each NSAID significantly enhanced the tail-flick and hot plate latencies on the first day, followed by a progressive decrease in the analgesic effect over a 4-day period, ie, they developed tolerance. Pretreatment with an opioid antagonist naloxone completely prevented, and posttreatment naloxone abolished, the analgesic effects of the three NSAIDs in both behavioral assays. These findings support the notion that the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs is mediated via an endogenous opioid system possibly involving descending pain modulatory systems. Keywords: antinociception, endogenous opioids, descending modulation, nociception, non­opioid tolerance

  18. Mast cells are critical for protection against peptic ulcers induced by the NSAID piroxicam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Hampton

    Full Text Available Many commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs also cause gastrointestinal toxicity, including the development of life-threatening peptic ulcers. We report that mast cell-deficient mice have an extremely high incidence of severe peptic ulceration when exposed to the NSAID piroxicam. This enhanced ulcer susceptibility can be reversed by reconstitution with mast cells. Furthermore, wild type mice treated with diphenhydramine hydrochloride, a commonly used antihistamine that blocks histamine H1 receptors, develop a similarly high incidence of peptic ulcers following piroxicam exposure. The protective effect of mast cells is independent of TNF, blockade of H2 receptors, or acid secretion. These data indicate a critical role for mast cells and the histamine that they produce in prevention and/or repair of piroxicam-induced gastric mucosal injury. Additional studies will be required to determine whether this represents a NSAID class effect that can be exploited to develop novel therapeutic strategies to limit the incidence of NSAID-induced side effects in humans.

  19. Mast Cells Are Critical for Protection against Peptic Ulcers Induced by the NSAID Piroxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Daniel D.; Hale, Laura P.

    2011-01-01

    Many commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) also cause gastrointestinal toxicity, including the development of life-threatening peptic ulcers. We report that mast cell-deficient mice have an extremely high incidence of severe peptic ulceration when exposed to the NSAID piroxicam. This enhanced ulcer susceptibility can be reversed by reconstitution with mast cells. Furthermore, wild type mice treated with diphenhydramine hydrochloride, a commonly used antihistamine that blocks histamine H1 receptors, develop a similarly high incidence of peptic ulcers following piroxicam exposure. The protective effect of mast cells is independent of TNF, blockade of H2 receptors, or acid secretion. These data indicate a critical role for mast cells and the histamine that they produce in prevention and/or repair of piroxicam-induced gastric mucosal injury. Additional studies will be required to determine whether this represents a NSAID class effect that can be exploited to develop novel therapeutic strategies to limit the incidence of NSAID-induced side effects in humans. PMID:21858200

  20. Combined effects of smoking, coffee, and NSAIDs on Parkinson's disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Karen M; Kay, Denise M; Factor, Stewart A; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Higgins, Donald S; Samii, Ali; Nutt, John G; Griffith, Alida; Leis, Berta; Roberts, John W; Martinez, Erica D; Montimurro, Jennifer S; Checkoway, Harvey; Payami, Haydeh

    2008-01-01

    Inverse associations of Parkinson's disease (PD) with cigarette smoking, coffee drinking, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use have been reported individually, but their joint effects have not been examined. To quantify associations with PD for the individual, two-way and three-way combinations of these factors, a case-control association study with 1,186 PD patients and 928 controls was conducted. The study setting was the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium. Subjects completed a structured questionnaire regarding smoking, coffee, and NSAID consumption. Odds ratios were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Smoking, coffee, and over the counter NSAID use as individual factors exhibited significantly reduced risks of 20% to 30%. The two-way and three-way combinations were associated with risk reduction of 37% to 49%, and 62%, respectively. Smoking and coffee exhibited significant inverse risk trends with increasing cumulative exposures, suggesting dose-response relations. With respect to the combination of all three exposures, persons who were at the highest exposure strata for smoking and coffee and used NSAIDs had an estimated 87% reduction in risk (OR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.06-0.29). Whether this finding reflects true biologic protection needs to be investigated. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  1. Diclofenac 1,3,4-Oxadiazole Derivatives; Biology-Oriented Drug Synthesis (BIODS) in Search of Better Non-Steroidal, Non-Acid Antiinflammatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shazia; Arshia; Kazmi, Nida Siraj; Jabeen, Almas; Faheem, Aisha; Dastagir, Nida; Ahmed, Tariq; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Ahmed, Shakil; Raza, Abeer; Perveen, Shahnaz

    2018-03-21

    Inflammation is defined as the response of immune system cells to damaged or injured tissues The major symptoms of inflammation include increased blood flow, cellular influx, edema, elevated cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilation. This normally protective mechanism against harmful agents when this normal mechanism becomes dysregulated that can cause serious illnesses including ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, sepsis, and chronic pulmonary inflammation . In this study synthetic transformations on diclofenac were carried out in search of better non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), non-acidic, antiinflammatory agents. For this purpose diclofenac derivatives (2-20) were synthesized from diclofenac (1). All derivatives (2-20) and parent diclofenac (1) were evaluated for their antiinflammatory effect using different parameters including suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced by whole blood phagocytes, produced by neutrophils, and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production from J774.2 macrophages. Most active compound also evaluated for cytotoxicity activity. Diclofenac (1) inhibited the ROS with an IC50 of 3.9 ± 2.8, 1.2 ± 0.0 μg/mL respectively and inhibited NO with an IC50 of 30.01 ± 0.01 μg/mL. Among its derivatives 4, 5, 11, 16, and 20, showed better antiinflammatory potential. The compound 5 was found to be the most potent inhibitor of intracellular ROS as well as NO with an IC50 values of 1.9 ± 0.9, 1.7 ± 0.4 μg/mL respectively and 7.13 ± 1.0 μg/mL, respectively, and showed good inhibitory activity than parent diclofenac. The most active compounds were tested for their toxic effect on NIH-3T3 cells where all compounds were found to be non-toxic compared to the standard cytotoxic drug cyclohexamide. Five derivatives were found to be active. Compound 5 was found to be the most potent inhibitor of ROS and NO compared to parent

  2. Docking Studies, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of β-aryl-β-hydroxy Propanoic Acids for Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Jelena; Dilber, Sanda; Milenkovic, Marina; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Markovic, Bojan; Vladimirov, Sote; Brboric, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    Nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are numerous and widely used for more than 60 years, but there is still a strong need for developing novel selective NSAIDs. The need is justified by the fact that nonselective NSAIDs can produce serious gastric side effects and that some of the selective NSAID are withdrawn due to their cardiotoxic side effects. Eight β-hydroxy-β-arylpropanoic acids, which belong to the arylpropanoic acid class of compounds, structurally similar to some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), were docked into 3D catalytic site of both cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Seven out of those eight acids were synthesized using already published modification of Reformatsky reaction additionally optimized by increasing temperature. Synthesized compounds were tested in vivo in order to elucidate anti-inflammatory activity, gastric tolerability and impact on liver function of rats. Results of docking studies have indicated that all compounds have potential to selectively inhibit COX-2 isoform, but that the compounds containing polar substituents on phenyl ring are better inhibitors. Results of carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema test have shown that all compounds exhibit dose dependence and good gastric tolerability and none of the tested compounds have shown negative effect on liver function compared to ibuprofen. The compound containing polar nitro group in para position has shown the best docking results, anti-inflammatory activity, low hepatotoxicity and good gastric tolerability. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Autoradiographic and biochemical observations on the distribution of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D; Schweitzer, A; Brune, K

    1981-04-01

    A comparison has been made of the distribution of some new radioactively-labelled non-steroid anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs or pro-drugs with their respective progenitors and/or standard acidic NSAI drugs (i.e. aspirin, indomethacin and phenylbutazone), using whole body autoradiography and scintillation counting. The object of this study was to establish if the distribution of these new NSAI drugs may contribute to changes in their side-, or therapeutic effects compared with the older drugs. All the NSAI drugs accumulated in those tissues wherein the principle therapeutic and side-effects are manifest. The accumulation in inflamed tissues occurs regardless of the structural type of NSAI drugs, i.e. with specific accumulation occurring in this tissue of the acidic drugs or their acidic metabolites. New aspects of the distribution of the acetyl moiety of aspirin are reported which may be significant in relation to the side-effects induced by this drug.

  4. Ankle sprain: the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter A. A.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people per day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

  5. Osteoarthritis guidelines: a progressive role for topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanos SP

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Stanos Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Pain Management, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Current treatment guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis reflect the collective clinical knowledge of international experts in weighing the benefits of pharmacologic therapy options while striving to minimize the negative effects associated with them. Consideration of disease progression, pattern of flares, level of functional impairment or disability, response to treatment, coexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal disorders, and concomitant prescription medication use should be considered when creating a therapeutic plan for a patient with osteoarthritis. Although topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs historically have not been prevalent in many of the guidelines for osteoarthritis treatment, recent evidence-based medicine and new guidelines now support their use as a viable option for the clinician seeking alternatives to typical oral formulations. This article provides a qualitative review of these treatment guidelines and the emerging role of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a therapy option for patients with localized symptoms of osteoarthritis who may be at risk for oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related serious adverse events. Keywords: osteoarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, guidelines, topical analgesics, diclofenac

  6. Smoking, caffeine, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in families with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Dana B; Martin, Eden R; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Jewett, Rita; Stacy, Mark A; Scott, Burton L; Vance, Jeffery M; Scott, William K

    2007-04-01

    To assess associations between Parkinson disease (PD) and putatively protective factors-smoking, caffeine (coffee, tea, and soft drinks), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen). Family-based case-control study. Academic medical center clinic. A total of 356 case subjects and 317 family controls who self-reported environmental exposures. Associations between PD and environmental measures (history, status, dosage, duration, and intensity) of smoking, coffee, caffeine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were examined using generalized estimating equations with an independent correlation matrix while controlling for age and sex. Individuals with PD were significantly less likely to report ever smoking (odds ratio = 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.78). Additional measures of smoking revealed significant inverse associations with PD (Pcoffee drinking was inversely associated with PD (test for trend P = .05). Increasing dosage (trend P = .009) and intensity (trend P = .01) of total caffeine consumption were also inversely associated, with high dosage presenting a significant inverse association for PD (odds ratio = 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.99). There were no significant associations between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PD. Inverse associations of smoking and caffeine were corroborated using families with PD, thus emphasizing smoking and caffeine as important covariates to consider in genetic studies of PD.

  7. Gastric and renal effects of COX-2 selective and non-selective NSAIDs in rats receiving low-dose aspirin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Goetz MORO

    Full Text Available Abstract The consumption of low-dose aspirin (LDA to prevent cardiovascular disease continues to increase worldwide. Consequently, the number of chronic LDA users seeking dental procedures that require complementary acute anti-inflammatory medication has also grown. Considering the lack of literature evaluating this interaction, we analyzed the gastric and renal effects caused by a selective COX-2 inhibitor (etoricoxib and a non-selective COX-2 inhibitor (ibuprofen nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID in rats receiving chronic LDA therapy. Male Wistar rats were divided into six experimental groups (carboxymethylcellulose (CMC - vehicle; LDA; LDA + ibuprofen; ibuprofen; LDA + etoricoxib; and etoricoxib and submitted to long-term LDA therapy with a subsequent NSAID administration for three days by gavage. After the experimental period, we analyzed gastric and renal tissues and quantified serum creatinine levels. The concomitant use of LDA with either NSAID induced the highest levels of gastric damage when compared to the CMC group (F = 20.26, p 0.05. These results suggest that even the acute use of an NSAID (regardless of COX-2 selectivity can induce gastric damage when combined with the long-term use of low-dose aspirin in an animal model. Additional studies, including clinical assessments, are thus needed to clarify this interaction, and clinicians should be careful of prescribing NSAIDs to patients using LDA.

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and benign oesophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, S R; Fellows, I W; Ogilvie, A L; Atkinson, M

    1982-01-01

    Drug histories were obtained from 76 patients at the time of initial Eder-Puestow dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture. Six patients had consumed drugs known to cause oesophageal ulceration (emepronium bromide and potassium preparations). Of the remaining 70 patients, 22 had regularly taken a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug before the onset of dysphagia compared with 10 patients in a control group matched for age and sex; this difference was significant (p less than 0.02). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may have a causative role in the formation of oesophageal stricture in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux, in whom they should be prescribed with caution. PMID:6807392

  9. NSAIDs and Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Ettarh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is common worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in patients. Fortunately, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that continuous therapy with NSAIDs offers real promise of chemoprevention and adjunct therapy for colon cancer patients. Tumour growth is the result of complex regulation that determines the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. How NSAIDs affect this balance is important for understanding and improving treatment strategies and drug effectiveness. NSAIDs inhibit proliferation and impair the growth of colon cancer cell lines when tested in culture in vitro and many NSAIDs also prevent tumorigenesis and reduce tumour growth in animal models and in patients, but the relationship to inhibition of tumour cell proliferation is less convincing, principally due to gaps in the available data. High concentrations of NSAIDs are required in vitro to achieve cancer cell inhibition and growth retardation at varying time-points following treatment. However, the results from studies with colon cancer cell xenografts are promising and, together with better comparative data on anti-proliferative NSAID concentrations and doses (for in vitro and in vivo administration, could provide more information to improve our understanding of the relationships between these agents, dose and dosing regimen, and cellular environment.

  10. Antiinflamatórios não-hormonais: inibidores da ciclooxigenase 2 Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Odete Esteves Hilário

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os antiinflamatórios não-hormonais (AINH inibidores seletivos da Cox 2 quanto ao mecanismo de ação, principais indicações, posologia e efeitos adversos mais comuns. FONTES DOS DADOS: MEDLINE e LILACS, sites da Food and Drug Administration (FDA e da Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Foram selecionados os artigos mais importantes, com destaque para as publicações dos últimos 5 anos. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: As principais indicações dos AINH são o controle da dor e da inflamação aguda e crônica. Não existem evidências que demonstrem maior efetividade de um AINH sobre outro. Até a presente data, nenhum inibidor da Cox2 foi liberado para uso na faixa etária pediátrica. Apenas o meloxicam e o etoricoxibe podem ser prescritos para adolescentes (13 e 16 anos, respectivamente. Os inibidores seletivos da Cox 2 são indicados em pacientes com efeitos adversos comprovadamente relacionados aos AINH não seletivos. Em alguns casos de alergia à aspirina, os Cox 2 seletivos podem ser prescritos, mas seu uso deve ser cuidadoso. Os principais efeitos adversos incluem os cardiovasculares e os fenômenos trombóticos. CONCLUSÕES: Os inibidores seletivos da Cox 2 são medicamentos que vêm sendo utilizados em algumas situações clínicas bem determinadas e podem oferecer algumas vantagens com relação aos AINH não seletivos. No entanto, devido ao custo mais elevado e aos potenciais efeitos adversos cardiovasculares, seu emprego deve ser criterioso.OBJECTIVE: To analyze selective COX 2 inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID in terms of their mechanism of action, principal indications, posology and most common adverse effects. SOURCES: MEDLINE and LILACS databases and Food and Drug Administration (FDA and National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance (ANVISA - Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária websites. The most important articles were selected and preference was given to articles published

  11. In vitro efficacy and release study with anti-inflammatory drugs incorporated in adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefanie; Peters, Nils; Mann, Tobias; Wolber, Rainer; Pörtner, Ralf; Nierle, Jens

    2014-04-01

    The topical application of two different anti-inflammatory extracts incorporated in adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDSs) was investigated. Therefore, anti-inflammatory properties and percutaneous absorption behavior of adhesive TDDSs were characterized in vitro conducting experiments with a dermatologically relevant human skin model. Anti-inflammatory efficacy against UV irradiation of both TDDSs was determined in vitro with EpiDerm™. The reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines by topically applied TDDSs was compared with the reduction during the presence of the specific cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac in the culture medium. A similar anti-inflammatory efficacy of the topically applied TDDSs in comparison with the use of diclofenac in the culture medium should be achieved. Furthermore, percutaneous absorption in efficacy tests was compared with percutaneous absorption in diffusion studies with porcine cadaver skin. Both the topically applied TDDSs showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity. Permeation coefficients through the stratum corneum and the epidermis gained from the release studies on porcine cadaver skin (Magnolia: 2.23·10(-5) cm/h, licorice: 4.68·10(-6) cm/h) were approximately five times lower than the permeation coefficients obtained with the EpiDerm™ skin model (Magnolia: 9.48·10(-5) cm/h, licorice: 24.0·10(-6) cm/h). Therefore, an adjustment of drug doses during experiments with the EpiDerm™ skin model because of weaker skin barrier properties should be considered.

  12. Renal Side Effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Gewillig

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen or indomethacin are commonly prescribed drugs to induce pharmacologic closure of a patent ductus arteriosus in preterm neonates. Based on a recently published Cochrane meta-analysis, both drugs are equally effective to induce closure. Drug choice can therefore be based on differences in side effects or pharmaco-economic arguments. The current review quantifies the negative impact of either ibuprofen or indomethacin on renal function, including diuresis, glomerular filtration rate and renal tubular function. Both ibuprofen and indomethacin have a quantifiable impact on renal function. However, compared to ibuprofen, the negative impact of indomethacin is more pronounced.

  13. Removal of endocrine disruptors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs through wastewater chlorination: the effect of pH, total suspended solids and humic acids and identification of degradation by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Koumaki, Elena; Mamais, Daniel; Nika, Maria-Christina; Bletsou, Anna A; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are two groups of emerging pollutants the significance of which rests on their persistent detection in the aquatic environment and their possible adverse effects. Wastewater treatment plants are one of the major ways for transporting such chemicals in the aquatic environment. Chlorination is usually the last stage of treatment before wastewater being disposed to the aquatic environment. This work focuses on the evaluation of the effect of chlorine dose and specific wastewater characteristics (pH, total suspended solids and humic acids) on the removal of target EDCs and NSAIDs through chlorination. Another objective of this study is the identification of chlorination by-products of specific EDCs and NSAIDs and their dependence on contact time. Based on the results it is concluded that the effect of chlorine dose and humic acids concentration on the degradation of target compounds during chlorination is minimal. On the contrary, pH is a critical parameter which highly affects process performance. Moreover, it is concluded that not only the free available chlorine species, but also the properties of EDCs and NSAIDs under different pH conditions can affect chlorination process performance. The effect of TSS on the degradation of the target compounds during chlorination is more profound for chemicals with high Kow values and therefore higher affinity to partition to the particulate phase (i.e. nonylphenols, triclosan). Several degradation by-products were identified through chlorination of nonylphenol, bisphenol A and diclofenac. The dependence of these by-products on chlorination contact time is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Aldo E; Condorelli, Rosita A; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; La Vignera, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be prescribed. Infection, inflammation, and/or increased oxidative stress often require a specific treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and/or antioxidants. Combined therapies can contribute to improve sperm quality.

  15. Lactobacillus plantarum Strains Can Enhance Human Mucosal and Systemic Immunity and Prevent Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Induced Reduction in T Regulatory Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Paul; Mujagic, Zlatan; de Haan, Bart J.; Siezen, Roland J.; Bron, Peter A.; Meijerink, Marjolein; Wells, Jerry M.; Masclee, Ad A. M.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Faas, Marijke M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    Orally ingested bacteria interact with intestinal mucosa and may impact immunity. However, insights in mechanisms involved are limited. In this randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, healthy human subjects were given Lactobacillus plantarum supplementation (strain TIFN101, CIP104448, or WCFS1) or placebo for 7 days. To determine whether L. plantarum can enhance immune response, we compared the effects of three stains on systemic and gut mucosal immunity, by among others assessing memory responses against tetanus toxoid (TT)-antigen, and mucosal gene transcription, in human volunteers during induction of mild immune stressor in the intestine, by giving a commonly used enteropathic drug, indomethacin [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)]. Systemic effects of the interventions were studies in peripheral blood samples. NSAID was found to induce a reduction in serum CD4+/Foxp3 regulatory cells, which was prevented by L. plantarum TIFN101. T-cell polarization experiments showed L. plantarum TIFN101 to enhance responses against TT-antigen, which indicates stimulation of memory responses by this strain. Cell extracts of the specific L. plantarum strains provoked responses after WCFS1 and TIFN101 consumption, indicating stimulation of immune responses against the specific bacteria. Mucosal immunomodulatory effects were studied in duodenal biopsies. In small intestinal mucosa, TIFN101 upregulated genes associated with maintenance of T- and B-cell function and antigen presentation. Furthermore, L. plantarum TIFN101 and WCFS1 downregulated immunological pathways involved in antigen presentation and shared downregulation of snoRNAs, which may suggest cellular destabilization, but may also be an indicator of tissue repair. Full sequencing of the L. plantarum strains revealed possible gene clusters that might be responsible for the differential biological effects of the bacteria on host immunity. In conclusion, the impact of oral consumption L. plantarum on

  16. Lactobacillus plantarum Strains Can Enhance Human Mucosal and Systemic Immunity and Prevent Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Induced Reduction in T Regulatory Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul de Vos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Orally ingested bacteria interact with intestinal mucosa and may impact immunity. However, insights in mechanisms involved are limited. In this randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, healthy human subjects were given Lactobacillus plantarum supplementation (strain TIFN101, CIP104448, or WCFS1 or placebo for 7 days. To determine whether L. plantarum can enhance immune response, we compared the effects of three stains on systemic and gut mucosal immunity, by among others assessing memory responses against tetanus toxoid (TT-antigen, and mucosal gene transcription, in human volunteers during induction of mild immune stressor in the intestine, by giving a commonly used enteropathic drug, indomethacin [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID]. Systemic effects of the interventions were studies in peripheral blood samples. NSAID was found to induce a reduction in serum CD4+/Foxp3 regulatory cells, which was prevented by L. plantarum TIFN101. T-cell polarization experiments showed L. plantarum TIFN101 to enhance responses against TT-antigen, which indicates stimulation of memory responses by this strain. Cell extracts of the specific L. plantarum strains provoked responses after WCFS1 and TIFN101 consumption, indicating stimulation of immune responses against the specific bacteria. Mucosal immunomodulatory effects were studied in duodenal biopsies. In small intestinal mucosa, TIFN101 upregulated genes associated with maintenance of T- and B-cell function and antigen presentation. Furthermore, L. plantarum TIFN101 and WCFS1 downregulated immunological pathways involved in antigen presentation and shared downregulation of snoRNAs, which may suggest cellular destabilization, but may also be an indicator of tissue repair. Full sequencing of the L. plantarum strains revealed possible gene clusters that might be responsible for the differential biological effects of the bacteria on host immunity. In conclusion, the impact of oral consumption L

  17. Aging Enables Ca2+ Overload and Apoptosis Induced by Amyloid-β Oligomers in Rat Hippocampal Neurons: Neuroprotection by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and R-Flurbiprofen in Aging Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Rodríguez, María; García-Durillo, Mónica; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-07-22

    The most important risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aging. Neurotoxicity in AD has been linked to dyshomeostasis of intracellular Ca2+ induced by small aggregates of the amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ42 oligomers). However, how aging influences susceptibility to neurotoxicity induced by Aβ42 oligomers is unknown. In this study, we used long-term cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, a model of neuronal in vitro aging, to investigate the contribution of aging to Ca2+ dishomeostasis and neuron cell death induced by Aβ42 oligomers. In addition, we tested whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and R-flurbiprofen prevent apoptosis acting on subcellular Ca2+ in aged neurons. We found that Aβ42 oligomers have no effect on young hippocampal neurons cultured for 2 days in vitro (2 DIV). However, they promoted apoptosis modestly in mature neurons (8 DIV) and these effects increased dramatically after 13 DIV, when neurons display many hallmarks of in vivo aging. Consistently, cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ responses induced by Aβ42 oligomers increased dramatically with culture age. At low concentrations, NSAIDs and the enantiomer R-flurbiprofen lacking anti-inflammatory activity prevent Ca2+ overload and neuron cell death induced by Aβ42 oligomers in aged neurons. However, at high concentrations R-flurbiprofen induces apoptosis. Thus, Aβ42 oligomers promote Ca2+ overload and neuron cell death only in aged rat hippocampal neurons. These effects are prevented by low concentrations of NSAIDs and R-flurbiprofen acting on mitochondrial Ca2+ overload.

  18. General study of pyridazine compounds against cyclooxygenase enzyme and their relation with analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increased focus on developed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs containing a pyridazine nucleus. The NSAIDs are one of the most commonly used medications worldwide to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme in varying extent by inhibiting prostaglandin (PGEs synthesis for the treatment of pain, inflammation, arthritis and edema. Their routine and long-term use causes gastrointestinal (GIT and renal toxicities. In order to minimize these side-effects, selective COX-2 inhibitors are prepared with an improved GIT and renal safety profile relative to other NSAIDs. The recent development toward the effective NSAIDs agents causes dual COX and lipooxygenase inhibitory effects because COX-2 inhibitors cause cardiovascular problems. The literature stimulated these above findings. Our attention has been focused on the series of pyridazine or other derivatives that were reported or will be reported in the future as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-arthritic as well as anti-edemic agent.

  19. Acute NSAID-related transmural duodenitis and extensive duodenal ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashash, Jana G; Atweh, Lamya A; Saliba, Teddy; Chakhachiro, Zaher; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad; Tawil, Ayman; Barada, Kassem A

    2007-11-01

    A 40-year-old previously healthy white man presented to the emergency department at American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon, with severe upper abdominal pain of 36-hour duration. The pain started a few hours after the intake of a single tablet of tiaprofenic acid and became more intense after the intake of another tablet 24 hours later. He had no other symptoms. He had no prior upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, ulcer disease, steroidal or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, or ethanol intake. Physical examination revealed mild upper abdominal tenderness. Complete blood count, amylase, lipase, and liver function tests were unremarkable. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed marked thickening of the duodenal wall with surrounding mesenteric streaking. Upper GI endoscopy revealed extensive ulceration involving the duodenal bulb, apex, and proximal D2, as well as a few gastric erosions. Histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsy samples showed extensive epithelial cell necrosis and infiltration of the lamina propria with neutrophils and eosinophils. The patient responded well to rabeprazole 20 mg BID and remains well 5 months later. We performed a literature search of PubMed for all English-language articles published between January 1970 and present (June 2007) using the key words tiaprofenic acid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAID, duodenitis, duodenal erosion, duodenal ulcer, gastritis, gastric erosion, gastric ulcer, or peptic ulcer. We reviewed all randomized controlled trials involving NSAIDs found using PubMed, with a focus on their GI adverse effects. Based on the PubMed search, there were no published reports of acute transmural duodenitis and complicated duodenal ulcers associated with short-term exposure to tiaprofenic acid or other NSAIDs. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction (ADR) probability scale was used and a score of 6 was obtained, indicating a probable ADR from tiaprofenic acid use. We report a patient

  20. Cardiovascular outcomes and systemic anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with severe psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, O; Skov, L; Gislason, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common disease and is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce risk of cardiovascular events. We therefore examined the rate of cardiovascular events, i.e. cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke, in patients...... with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. METHODS: Individual-level linkage of administrative registries was used to perform a longitudinal nationwide cohort study. Time-dependent multivariable adjusted Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence...... intervals (CIs) of cardiovascular events associated with use of biological drugs, methotrexate, cyclosporine, retinoids and other antipsoriatic therapies, including topical treatments, phototherapy and climate therapy. RESULTS: A total of 6902 patients (9662 treatment exposures) with a maximum follow...

  1. Phenylacetic acids and the structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac bind to specific gamma-hydroxybutyric acid sites in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe; Skonberg, Christian

    2009-01-01

    with a twofold higher affinity than GHB. Measuring the affinities of structurally related NSAIDs for the [(3)H]NCS-382 site identified diclofenac, a clinically relevant NSAID (Voltaren, Diclon) of the phenylacetic acid (PAA) type, as a GHB ligand (K(i) value of 5.1 microM). Other non-NSAID PAAs also exhibited...... affinities similar to GHB. Our data raise the interesting possibility that the widely used over-the-counter drug compound, diclofenac, might affect GHB binding at relevant clinical dosages. Furthermore, the identification of PAAs as GHB ligands supplies new information about the structural preferences...

  2. A meta-analysis of PTGS1 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and NSAID intake on the risk of developing cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Nagao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have investigated whether the polymorphisms in the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase 1 (PTGS1 and PTGS2 genes and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use are associated with cancer risk; however, those studies have produced mixed results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between the PTGS1 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and the effect of NSAID use on the risk of developing cancer. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive search in PubMed through March 2012. The odds ratios (ORs with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using the fixed-effect model or the random-effect model. RESULTS: The database search generated 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria. For PTGS1 rs3842787, NSAID users homozygous for the major allele (CC had a significantly decreased cancer risk compared with non-NSAID users (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.59-0.89. For PTGS2 rs5275 and rs20417, there were no significant differences between the gene polymorphism and NSAID use on cancer risk among the 8 and 7 studies, respectively. However, in the stratified analysis by the type of cancer or ethnicity population, NSAID users homozygous for the major allele (TT in rs5275 demonstrated significantly decreased cancer risk compared with non-NSAID users in cancer type not involving colorectal adenoma (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.59-0.83 and among the USA population (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82. NSAID users homozygous for the major allele (GG in rs20417 displayed a significantly decreased cancer risk than non-NSAID users among the US population (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.58-0.88. For the PTGS2 rs689466 and rs2745557 SNPs, there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests that the associations between PTGS polymorphisms and NSAID use on cancer risk may differ with regard to the type of cancer and nationality.

  3. Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelle, Sven; Reichenbach, Stephan; Wandel, Simon; Hildebrand, Pius; Tschannen, Beatrice; Villiger, Peter M; Egger, Matthias; Jüni, Peter

    2011-01-11

    To analyse the available evidence on cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Network meta-analysis. Bibliographic databases, conference proceedings, study registers, the Food and Drug Administration website, reference lists of relevant articles, and reports citing relevant articles through the Science Citation Index (last update July 2009). Manufacturers of celecoxib and lumiracoxib provided additional data. All large scale randomised controlled trials comparing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or placebo. Two investigators independently assessed eligibility. The primary outcome was myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included stroke, death from cardiovascular disease, and death from any cause. Two investigators independently extracted data. 31 trials in 116 429 patients with more than 115 000 patient years of follow-up were included. Patients were allocated to naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib, etoricoxib, rofecoxib, lumiracoxib, or placebo. Compared with placebo, rofecoxib was associated with the highest risk of myocardial infarction (rate ratio 2.12, 95% credibility interval 1.26 to 3.56), followed by lumiracoxib (2.00, 0.71 to 6.21). Ibuprofen was associated with the highest risk of stroke (3.36, 1.00 to 11.6), followed by diclofenac (2.86, 1.09 to 8.36). Etoricoxib (4.07, 1.23 to 15.7) and diclofenac (3.98, 1.48 to 12.7) were associated with the highest risk of cardiovascular death. Although uncertainty remains, little evidence exists to suggest that any of the investigated drugs are safe in cardiovascular terms. Naproxen seemed least harmful. Cardiovascular risk needs to be taken into account when prescribing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

  4. Evaluation of synthetic zeolites as oral delivery vehicle for anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Khodaverdi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In this research, zeolite X and zeolite Y were used as vehicle to prepare intestine targeted oral delivery systems of indomethacin and ibuprofen. Materials and Methods: A soaking procedure was implemented to encapsulate indomethacin or ibuprofen within synthetic zeolites. Gravimetric methods and IR spectra of prepared formulations were used to assess drug loading efficiencies into zeolite structures. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was also utilized to determine morphologies changes in synthetic zeolites after drug loading. At the next stage, dissolution studies were used to predict the in vivo performance of prepared formulations at HCl 0.1 N and PBS pH 6.5 as simulated gastric fluid (SGF and simulated intestine fluid (SIF, respectively. Results: Drug loadings of prepared formulations was determined between 24-26 % w/w. Dissolution tests at SGF were shown that zeolites could retain acidic model drugs in their porous structures and can be able to limit their release into the stomach. On the other hand, all prepared formulations completely released model drugs during 3 hr in simulated intestine fluid. Conclusion: Obtained results indicated zeolites could potentially be able to release indomethacin and ibuprofen in a sustained and controlled manner and reduced adverse effects commonly accompanying oral administrations of NSAIDs.

  5. Molecular modeling and simulation studies of recombinant laccase from Yersinia enterocolitica suggests significant role in the biotransformation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Deepti; Rawat, Surender [Laboratory of Enzymology and Recombinant DNA Technology, Department of Microbiology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana (India); Waseem, Mohd; Gupta, Sunita; Lynn, Andrew [School of Computational & Integrative Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Nitin, Mukesh; Ramchiary, Nirala [School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sharma, Krishna Kant, E-mail: kekulsharma@gmail.com [Laboratory of Enzymology and Recombinant DNA Technology, Department of Microbiology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak 124001, Haryana (India)

    2016-01-08

    The YacK gene from Yersinia enterocolitica strain 7, cloned in pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), showed laccase activity when oxidized with 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and guaiacol. The recombinant laccase protein was purified and characterized biochemically with a molecular mass of ≈58 KDa on SDS-PAGE and showed positive zymogram with ABTS. The protein was highly robust with optimum pH 9.0 and stable at 70 °C upto 12 h with residual activity of 70%. Kinetic constants, K{sub m} values, for ABTS and guaiacol were 675 μM and 2070 μM, respectively, with corresponding Vmax values of 0.125 μmol/ml/min and 6500 μmol/ml/min. It also possess antioxidative property against BSA and Cu{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} model system. Constant pH MD simulation studies at different protonation states of the system showed ABTS to be most stable at acidic pH, whereas, diclofenac at neutral pH. Interestingly, aspirin drifted out of the binding pocket at acidic and neutral pH, but showed stable binding at alkaline pH. The biotransformation of diclofenac and aspirin by laccase also corroborated the in silico results. This is the first report on biotransformation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) using recombinant laccase from gut bacteria, supported by in silico simulation studies. - Highlights: • Laccase from Yersinia enterocolitica strain 7 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). • Recombinant laccase was found to be thermostable and alkali tolerant. • The in silico and experimental studied proves the biotransformation of NSAIDs. • Laccase binds to ligands differentially under different protonation state. • Laccase also possesses free radical scavenging property.

  6. Molecular modeling and simulation studies of recombinant laccase from Yersinia enterocolitica suggests significant role in the biotransformation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Deepti; Rawat, Surender; Waseem, Mohd; Gupta, Sunita; Lynn, Andrew; Nitin, Mukesh; Ramchiary, Nirala; Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-01-01

    The YacK gene from Yersinia enterocolitica strain 7, cloned in pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), showed laccase activity when oxidized with 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and guaiacol. The recombinant laccase protein was purified and characterized biochemically with a molecular mass of ≈58 KDa on SDS-PAGE and showed positive zymogram with ABTS. The protein was highly robust with optimum pH 9.0 and stable at 70 °C upto 12 h with residual activity of 70%. Kinetic constants, K m values, for ABTS and guaiacol were 675 μM and 2070 μM, respectively, with corresponding Vmax values of 0.125 μmol/ml/min and 6500 μmol/ml/min. It also possess antioxidative property against BSA and Cu 2+ /H 2 O 2 model system. Constant pH MD simulation studies at different protonation states of the system showed ABTS to be most stable at acidic pH, whereas, diclofenac at neutral pH. Interestingly, aspirin drifted out of the binding pocket at acidic and neutral pH, but showed stable binding at alkaline pH. The biotransformation of diclofenac and aspirin by laccase also corroborated the in silico results. This is the first report on biotransformation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) using recombinant laccase from gut bacteria, supported by in silico simulation studies. - Highlights: • Laccase from Yersinia enterocolitica strain 7 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). • Recombinant laccase was found to be thermostable and alkali tolerant. • The in silico and experimental studied proves the biotransformation of NSAIDs. • Laccase binds to ligands differentially under different protonation state. • Laccase also possesses free radical scavenging property.

  7. Clinical approach on challenge and desensitization procedures with aspirin in patients with ischemic heart disease and nonsteroidal