WorldWideScience

Sample records for antihydrogen formation dynamics

  1. Resonant antihydrogen formation in antiproton–positronium collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazauskas, R.; Hervieux, P.-A.; Dufour, M.; Valdes, M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of narrow resonances on antihydrogen formation cross sections via the three-body reaction \\bar{{{p}}}+{{Ps}}*\\to {\\bar{{{H}}}}*+{{{e}}}-. The latter is of interest for the gravitational behavior of antihydrogen at rest experiment that will be performed at CERN in the near future. The complex scaling method is employed to compute the positions and widths of these resonances, whereas the Kohn-variational principle is used for the determination of the scattering cross sections. A very good agreement is found with available theoretical results. The impact of these resonances on the cross section is analyzed.

  2. Formation of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Testera, G; Bonomi, G; Boscolo, I; Brambilla, N; Brusa, R S; Byakov, V M; Cabaret, L; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Castelli, F; Cialdi, S; de Combarieu, M; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Djourelov, N; Doser, M; Drobychev, G; Dupasquier, A; Fabris, D; Ferragut, R; Ferrari, G; Fischer, A; Fontana, A; Forget, P; Formaro, L; Lunardon, M; Gervasini, A; Giammarchi, M G; Gninenko, S N; Gribakin, G; Heyne, R; Hogan, S D; Kellerbauer, A G; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Manuzio, G; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Merkt, F; Moretto, S; Morhard, C; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pari, P; Petracek, V; Prevedelli, M; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Quasso, F; Rohne, O; Pesente, S; Rotondi, A; Stapnes, S; Sillou, D; Stepanov, S V; Stroke, Hinko Henry; Tino, G; Vairo, Antonio; Viesti, G; Walters, H; Warring, U; Zavatarelli, S; Zenoni, A; Zvezhinskij, D S

    2008-01-01

    The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

  3. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale (∼ 50 μeV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge (∼1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  4. Progress with cold antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of cold antihydrogen by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations, working at CERN's unique Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility, has ushered in a new era in atomic physics. This contribution will briefly review recent results from the ATHENA experiment. These include discussions of antiproton slowing down in a cold positron gas during antihydrogen formation, information derived on the dependence of the antihydrogen formation rate upon the temperature of the stored positron plasma and, finally, upon the spatial distribution of the emitted anti-atoms. We will discuss the implications of these studies for the major outstanding goal of trapping samples of antihydrogen for precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. The physics motivations for undertaking these challenging experiments will be briefly recalled

  5. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with highenergy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature’s fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 1014 for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational be...

  6. Antiparticle sources for antihydrogen production and trapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, M.; Bruun Andresen, Gorm; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, Paul David; Bray, C.C.; Butler, E.; Chapman, S.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayano, R.S.; Hayden, M.E.; Humphries, A.J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L.V.; Kerrigan, S.J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D.M.; So, C.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; Van Der Werf, D.P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2011-01-01

    located at CERN. Operations performed on the clouds of antiparticles to facilitate their mixing to produce antihydrogen are described. These include accumulation, cooling and manipulation. The formation of antihydrogen and some of the characteristics of the anti-atoms that are created are discussed...

  7. Study of the anti-hydrogen atom and ion formation in the collisions antiproton-positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future CERN experiment called GBAR intends to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter on Earth using cold (neV) anti-hydrogen atoms undergoing a free fall. The experiment scheme first needs to cool anti-hydrogen positive ions, obtained thanks to two consecutive reactions occurring when an antiproton beam collides with a dense positronium cloud.The present thesis studies these two reactions in order to optimise the production of the anti-ions. The total cross sections of both reactions have been computed in the framework of a perturbation theory model (Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State), in the range 0 to 30 keV antiproton kinetic energy; several excited states of positronium have been investigated. These cross sections have then been integrated to a simulation of the interaction zone where antiprotons collide with positronium; the aim is to find the optimal experimental parameters for GBAR. The results suggest that the 2P, 3D or, to a lower extend, 1S states of positronium should be used, respectively with 2, less than 1 or 6 keV antiprotons. The importance of using short pulses of antiprotons has been underlined; the positronium will have to be confined in a tube of 20 mm length and 1 mm diameter. In the prospect of exciting the 1S-3D two-photon transition in positronium at 410 nm, a pulsed laser system had already been designed. It consists in the frequency doubling of an 820 nm pulsed titanium-sapphire laser. The last part of the thesis has been dedicated to the realisation of this laser system, which delivers short pulses (9 ns) of 4 mJ energy at 820 nm. (author)

  8. The ATHENA antihydrogen apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATHENA apparatus that recently produced and detected the first cold antihydrogen atoms is described. Its main features, which are described herein, are: an external positron accumulator, making it possible to accumulate large numbers of positrons; a separate antiproton catching trap, optimizing the catching, cooling and handling of antiprotons; a unique high resolution antihydrogen annihilation detector, allowing an clear determination that antihydrogen has been produced; an open, modular design making variations in the experimental approach possible and a ''nested'' Penning trap situated in a cryogenic, 3T magnetic field environment used for the mixing of the antiprotons and positrons

  9. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gerber, S; Tietje, I C; Allkofer, Y R; Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Testera, G; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Merkt, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V E; Mariazzi, S; Fesel, J V; Nesteruk, K P; Eisel, W T; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  10. Physics of antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CPT-transformation relates particles to antiparticles, atoms to antiatoms, elements to antielements, in general matter to antimatter. No CPT violation has yet been observed. The present-day theory of the universe states that during the Big Bang exactly the same amount of matter and antimatter was produced. Under such conditions and if both - matter and antimatter were subject to the same laws of physics - then the world would not exist. Why we owe our existence to a tiny residue of matter over antimatter is one of the exciting questions of physics. Two collaborations (ATHENA and ATRAP) at the antiproton decelerator (AD) of CERN want to test the CPT-invariance in high precision comparison of the antihydrogen and antihydrogen systems. Both working groups announced first results of the production of cold antihydrogen during the second half of 2002. (author)

  11. ERC supports antihydrogen research

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    As part of a Europe-wide effort to promote high-level research, the European Research Council (ERC) has awarded a €2.14 million grant to ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst, which will further the collaboration’s study of the antihydrogen spectrum. The grant will be used to purchase laser spectroscopy equipment for the new ALPHA-2 set-up.   ALPHA Spokesperson, Jeffrey Hangst, in front of the new ALPHA-2 set-up. The incorporation of lasers into ALPHA-2 will allow the team to take precise measurements of trapped antihydrogen. Among the new equipment financed by the grant will be a high-precision laser and stabilisation system to study the transition from the ground state to the first excited state in antihydrogen. As this spectral line is very well known in hydrogen, its study in antihydrogen will provide essential data for matter/antimatter symmetry investigations. “The grant has come at a perfect time for us,” says Jeffrey Hangst. “We wil...

  12. ALPHA: antihydrogen and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Niels

    2014-02-01

    Detailed comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen promise to be a fruitful test bed of fundamental symmetries such as the CPT theorem for quantum field theory or studies of gravitational influence on antimatter. With a string of recent successes, starting with the first trapped antihydrogen and recently resulting in the first measurement of a quantum transition in anti-hydrogen, the ALPHA collaboration is well on its way to perform such precision comparisons. We will discuss the key innovative steps that have made these results possible and in particular focus on the detailed work on positron and antiproton preparation to achieve antihydrogen cold enough to trap as well as the unique features of the ALPHA apparatus that has allowed the first quantum transitions in anti-hydrogen to be measured with only a single trapped antihydrogen atom per experiment. We will also look at how ALPHA plans to step from here towards more precise comparisons of matter and antimatter.

  13. An Improved Antihydrogen Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Rita Rani

    2015-01-01

    The recent demonstration of trapped atomic antihydrogen for 15 to 1000 seconds is a milestone towards precise spectroscopy for tests of CPT invariance. The confinement of a total of 105±21 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap was made possible by several improved methods. Improved accumulation techniques give us the largest numbers of constituent particles yet: up to 10 million antiprotons and several billion positrons. A novel cooling protocol leads to 3.5 K antiprotons, the coldest ever obse...

  14. Antihydrogen makes a fleeting debut

    CERN Multimedia

    Goss Levi, B

    1996-01-01

    The generation of antihydrogens by merging positrons and antiprotons at the CERN laboratory lasted only for 37 ns before they were destroyed by electrons in the detector. There was insufficient time for comparing the antimatter with hydrogen.

  15. Antihydrogen Production and Precision Experiments The ATHENA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Filippini, V

    2002-01-01

    The ATHENA (AnTiHydrogEN Apparatus) experiment has the goal of producing slow antihydrogen atoms and comparing their physical properties to those of hydrogen. For example, the measurement of the 1S-2S transition offers the possibility for comparing hydrogen and antihydrogen to a precision of 1 part in 10$^{15}$, owing to the long lifetime of the metastable 2S state (122 msec). This would be the most precise test of CPT invariance in the lepton and baryon sector. The first phase of the experiment, which has been installed and commissioned at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - is devoted to the study of antihydrogen production. For this purpose, about 10$^{5}$ antiprotons (p=100 MeV/c ) are trapped and cooled to milli-eV energies. Independently, about 10$^{8}$ low energy positrons per minute are collected in the positron accumulator, using a Na-22 source (2 GBq). Formation of antihydrogen will take place in the recombination region, where the antiproton cloud is made to interact with the dense positron plasma tr...

  16. ANTIHYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND PRECISION SPECTROSCOPY WITH ATHENA/AD-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. HOLZSCHEITER; C. AMSLER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    CPT invariance is a fundamental property of quantum field theories in flat space-time. Principal consequences include the predictions that particles and their antiparticles have equal masses and lifetimes, and equal and opposite electric charges and magnetic moments. It also follows that the fine structure, hyperfine structure, and Lamb shifts of matter and antimatter bound systems should be identical. It is proposed to generate new stringent tests of CPT using precision spectroscopy on antihydrogen atoms. An experiment to produce antihydrogen at rest has been approved for running at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. We describe the fundamental features of this experiment and the experimental approach to the first phase of the program, the formation and identification of low energy antihydrogen.

  17. Muonic Anti-hydrogen Formation in Low-energy Three-body Reactions. Slow bar{p}+(μ^{+}μ^{-})_{1s}} collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanov, Renat A.; Guster, Dennis

    2013-08-01

    A few-body type computation is performed for a three-charge-particle collision with participation of a slow antiproton and a muonic muonium atom (true muonium), i.e. a bound state of two muons in its ground state. The total cross section of the following reaction , where muonic anti-hydrogen is a bound state of an antiproton and positive muon, is computed in the framework of a set of coupled two-component Faddeev-Hahn-type equation. A better known negative muon transfer low energy three-body reaction: is also computed as a test system. Here, t+ is triton and d+ is deuterium.

  18. Fundamental symmetry tests with antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospects for testing CPT invariance and the weak equivalence principle (WEP) for antimatter with spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen are discussed. The potential precisions of these tests are compared with those from other measurements. The arguments involving energy conservation, the behavior of neutral kaons in a gravitational field and the equivalence principle for antiparticles are reviewed in detail

  19. GBAR. Graviational behavior of antihydrogen at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GBAR project aims to perform the first test of the Equivalence Principle with antimatter by measuring the free fall of ultra-cold antihydrogen atoms. The objective is to measure the gravitational acceleration to better than a percent in a first stage, with a long term perspective to reach a much higher precision using gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen. The production of ∼20 μK atoms proceeds via sympathetic cooling of H-bar+ ions by Be+ ions. H-bar+ ions are produced via a two-step process, involving the interaction of bursts of 107 slow antiprotons from the AD (or ELENA upgrade) at CERN with a dense positronium cloud. In order to produce enough positronium, it is necessary to realize an intense source of slow positrons, a few 108 per second. This is done with a small electron linear accelerator. A few 1010 positrons are accumulated every cycle in a Penning–Malmberg trap before they are ejected onto a positron-to-positronium converter. The overall scheme of the experiment is described and the status of the installation of the prototype positron source at Saclay is shown. The accumulation scheme of positrons is given, and positronium formation results are presented. The estimated performance and efficiency of the various steps of the experiment are given.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Hyperfine Transitions of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbinger, B; Diermaier, M; Lehner, S; Malbrunot, C; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Simon, M C; Widmann, E

    2015-01-01

    One of the ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration's goals is the measurement of the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of one of the best known systems in physics. This high precision experiment yields a sensitive test of the fundamental symmetry of CPT. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms have been performed providing information on the required antihydrogen events and the achievable precision.

  1. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration’s goals is the measurement of the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of one of the best known systems in physics. This high precision experiment yields a sensitive test of the fundamental symmetry of CPT. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms have been performed providing information on the required antihydrogen events and the achievable precision

  2. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbinger, B., E-mail: bernadette.kolbinger@oeaw.ac.at; Capon, A.; Diermaier, M.; Lehner, S. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Widmann, E. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    One of the ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration’s goals is the measurement of the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of one of the best known systems in physics. This high precision experiment yields a sensitive test of the fundamental symmetry of CPT. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms have been performed providing information on the required antihydrogen events and the achievable precision.

  3. Measurement of the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The hydrogen atom is one of the most extensively studied atomic systems, and its ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of νHFS = 1.42 GHz has been measured with an extremely high precision of δνHFS/νHFS ∼ 10-12. Therefore, the antimatter counterpart of hydrogen, the antihydrogen atom, consisting of an antiproton and a positron, is an ideal laboratory for studying the CPT symmetry. As a test of the CPT invariance, measuring νHFS of antihydrogen can surpass in accuracy a measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency proposed by other groups. In fact, it has several advantages over a 1S-2S measurement. Firstly, it does not require the (neutral) antihydrogen atoms to be trapped. Secondly, the only existing consistent extension of the standard model, which is based on a microscopic theory of CPT and Lorentz violation, predicts that νHFS should be more sensitive to CPT violations. In addition, the parameters introduced by Kostelecky et al. have the dimension of energy (or frequency). Therefore, by measuring a relatively small quantity on an energy scale (like the 1.42 GHz GS-HFS splitting), a smaller relative accuracy is needed to reach the same absolute precision for a CPT test. This makes a determination of νHFS with a relative accuracy of 10-4 competitive to the measured relative mass difference of K0 and --K0 of 10-18, which is often quoted as the most precise CPT test so far. The ASACUSA collaboration at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) has recently submitted a proposal to measure νHFS of antihydrogen in an atomic beam apparatus similar to the ones which were used in the early days of hydrogen HFS spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of two sextupole magnets for the selection and analysis of the spin of the antihydrogen atoms, and a microwave cavity to flip the spin. This method has the advantage that antihydrogen atoms of temperatures up to 150 K, 'evaporating' from a formation region, can be used. Numerical simulations show that such an

  4. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Fujiwara, M C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  5. Tests of fundamental symmetries with trapped antihydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Chris Ørum

    2016-01-01

    questions in modern physics. Since 2010, it has been possible to perform such tests on magnetically trapped antihydrogen, and this work reports on several recent studies. Analysing the temporal and spatial distribution of annihilations as antihydrogen atoms are released from the magnetic trap, we set limits...... any putatively charged antihydrogen atoms. From the lack of response to these potentials, we can set a limit for the charge of antihydrogen at |Q| < 7.1 E-10 e. From this measurement, the limit on the positron charge anomaly can also be improved. As the main focus of this work, we consider the...

  6. Possible Coexistence of Antihydrogen with Hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    2007-01-01

    Recent productions of large numbers of cold antiprotons as well as the formation of antihydrogens at CERN and Fermilab have raised basic questions about possible coexistence of matter and antimatter in nature. In the present work, previous mathematical considerations are revisited which support the possible coexistence of Antihydrogen with Hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium atoms. In particular, the main objective of the present work is to present computational treatments which confirm the possible formation of these quasi molecules in laboratory. These treatments are based on a nonadiabatic picture of the system in which generalized basis functions are adjusted within the framework of Rayleigh-Ritz' variational method. Thus, the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic picture of the system, which implies the formation of exotic molecules composed explicitly of fixed quasi heavy atoms (containing at least two leptons, e.g. protonium) and quasi light atoms (e.g. positronium), is ruled out in the present work. In other words, ...

  7. Collaborative Research: Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Plasma Physics of Antihydrogen Generation and Trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2013-03-29

    Ever since Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter in 1928, it has excited our collective imagination. Seventy-four years later, two collaborations at CERN, ATHENA and ATRAP, created the first slow antihydrogen. This was a stunning achievement, but the most important antimatter experiments require trapped, not just slow, antihydrogen. The velocity, magnetic moment, and internal energy and state of the antihydrogen depend strongly on how it is formed. To trap antihydrogen, physicists face two broad challenges: (1) Understanding the behavior of the positron and antiprotons plasmas from which the antihydrogen is synthesized; and (2) Understanding the atomic processes by which positrons and antiprotons recombine. Recombination lies on the boundary between atomic and plasma physics, and cannot be studied properly without employing tools from both fields. The proposed collaborative research campaign will address both of these challenges. The collaboration members have unique experience in the relevant fields of experimental and theoretical non-neutral plasma physics, numerical modeling, nonlinear dynamics and atomic physics. This expertise is not found elsewhere amongst antihydrogen researchers. The collaboration members have strong ties already, and seek to formalize them with this proposal. Three of the four PIs are members of the ALPHA collaboration, an international collaboration formed by most of the principal members of the ATHENA collaboration.

  8. ATRAP on the road to cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The ATRAP collaboration has succeeded in slowing down antiprotons with positrons, the two ingredients of antihydrogen atoms. This is an important step towards capturing and studying antihydrogen. Members of the ATRAP Collaboration with the apparatus that first demonstrated positron cooling. It was in extremis. Last December, during the six short hours of beam remaining to them, ATRAP researchers achieved their initial goal. For the first time, positrons were used to cool antiprotons. To what end, you may ask? The answer is much simpler than the process: physicists think that this is the most effective means of observing antihydrogen. Recall that an antihydrogen atom is composed of an antiproton and a positron. The first atoms of antihydrogen were produced five years ago at LEAR. But their small number and the brevity of their existence made it impossible to study them in depth. However, to understand the subtle nuances between matter and antimatter, which would explain the imbalance in nature between the tw...

  9. Production of antihydrogen via double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition of antihydrogen confined in a neutral atom trap and comparison with the equivalent spectral line in hydrogen will provide an accurate test of CPT symmetry and the first one in a mixed baryon-lepton system. Also, with neutral antihydrogen atoms, the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter can be tested unperturbed by the much stronger Coulomb forces. Antihydrogen is regularly produced at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator by three-body-recombination (TBR) of one antiproton and two positrons. The method requires injecting antiprotons into a cloud of positrons, which raises the average temperature of the antihydrogen atoms produced way above the typical 0.5 K trap depths of neutral atom traps. Therefore only very few antihydrogen atoms can be confined at a time. Precision measurements, like laser spectroscopy, will greatly benefit from larger numbers of simultaneously trapped antihydrogen atoms. Therefore, the ATRAP collaboration developed a different production method that has the potential to create much larger numbers of cold, trappable antihydrogen atoms. Positrons and antiprotons are stored and cooled in a Penning trap in close proximity. Laser excited cesium atoms collide with the positrons, forming Rydberg positronium, a bound state of an electron and a positron. The positronium atoms are no longer confined by the electric potentials of the Penning trap and some drift into the neighboring cloud of antiprotons where, in a second charge exchange collision, they form antihydrogen. The antiprotons remain at rest during the entire process, so much larger numbers of trappable antihydrogen atoms can be produced. Laser excitation is necessary to increase the efficiency of the process since the cross sections for charge-exchange collisions scale with the fourth power of the principal quantum number n. This method, named double charge-exchange, was demonstrated by ATRAP in 2004. Since then, ATRAP constructed a new combined

  10. Antihydrogen for precision tests in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, M; Jørgensen, L V; Madsen, N; van der Werf, D P

    2008-01-01

    The creation of atoms of antihydrogen under controlled conditions has opened up a new era in physics with antimatter. We describe the experimental realisation of low energy antihydrogen, via the mixing of carefully prepared clouds of positrons and antiprotons, and some of the progress that has been made in the last few years in characterising properties of the nascent anti-atoms. Ongoing efforts aimed at trapping the anti-atoms in magnetic field minima are discussed. Some of the motivations for undertaking experiments with antihydrogen are presented.

  11. Proposed gravity measurement with antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter has never been tested experimentally. The AEGIS experiment (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) intends to measure for the first time the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen. anti H will be obtained through a charge exchange process between Rydberg positronium atoms and antiprotons. The antiprotons will be delivered by the CERN AD (Antiproton Decelerator). After being captured and confined inside a cylindrical Penning trap, they will be cooled down to ∼100 mK. At the same time, positronium will be produced by bombardment of a nanoporous insulator material with positrons. A double laser pulse will excite the positronium to a Rydberg state immediately before the interaction with the antiprotons, such as to increase the cross-section for the charge exchange process. The produced antihydrogen atoms will be accelerated to form a horizontal beam and projected through a Moire deflectometer with a velocity of a few 100 m/s along a path of about 1 m length. The deflectometer consists of two gratings and a position-sensitive detector able to measure the vertical displacement and the time of flight of anti H atoms. With this setup an initial precision on the measurement of g(anti H) of 1% is expected

  12. Getting to grips with antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, the ALPHA Collaboration announced that they had successfully managed to trap and hold atoms of antimatter for 1000 seconds. Last week they announced that their success in changing the internal state of antihydrogen and made the first ever measurement of its spectrum. The Collaboration is now installing an all-new experimental set-up – ALPHA-2 – and shows no signs of slowing down its investigations into the anti-world.   The ALPHA experiment hall. Newspapers and magazines around the world described the recent ALPHA announcement as the first step towards explaining why antimatter and matter did not cancel each other out in the first instances of creation, that is, why our universe of matter exists. Understanding the behaviour of matter and antimatter can help scientists solve this conundrum. With this in mind, the ALPHA collaboration has begun the study of the antihydrogen spectrum. So far, the Collaboration has been focused on proving that they can alter the ...

  13. The ASACUSA CUSP: an antihydrogen experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Ulmer, S. [RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit (Japan); Murtagh, D. J.; Gorp, S. Van [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory (Japan); Nagata, Y. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Diermaier, M. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); Federmann, S. [CERN (Switzerland); Leali, M. [Università di Brescia & Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l’Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Mascagna, V. [Università di Brescia & Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l’Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Massiczek, O. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); Michishio, K. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Mizutani, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Mohri, A. [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Sciences (Japan); Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Radics, B. [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter (Japan); Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); and others

    2015-11-15

    In order to test CPT symmetry between antihydrogen and its counterpart hydrogen, the ASACUSA collaboration plans to perform high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen atom in-flight. We have developed an apparatus (“cusp trap”) which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and multiple ring electrodes. For the preparation of slow antiprotons and positrons, Penning-Malmberg type traps were utilized. The spectrometer line was positioned downstream of the cusp trap. At the end of the beamline, an antihydrogen beam detector was located, which comprises an inorganic Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) single-crystal scintillator housed in a vacuum duct and surrounding plastic scintillators. A significant fraction of antihydrogen atoms flowing out the cusp trap were detected.

  14. Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Collier, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fine, K S; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Holzscheiter, M H; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Marchesotti, M; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rochet, J; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Watson, T L; CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical underpinning of the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions is CPT invariance, which requires that the laws of physics be invariant under the combined discrete operations of charge conjugation, parity and time reversal. Antimatter, the existence of which was predicted by Dirac, can be used to test the CPT theorem experimental investigations involving comparisons of particles with antiparticles are numerous. Cold atoms and anti-atoms, such as hydrogen and anti-hydrogen, could form the basis of a new precise test, as CPT invariance implies that they must have the same spectrum. Observations of antihydrogen in small quantities and at high energies have been reported at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and at Fermilab, but were not suited to precision comparison measurements. Here we demonstrate the production of antihydrogen atoms at very low energy by mixing trapped antiprotons and positrons in a cryogenic environment. The neutral anti-atoms have been detected...

  15. Quantum ballistic experiment on antihydrogen fall

    CERN Document Server

    Voronin, A Yu; Dufour, G; Reynaud, S

    2015-01-01

    We study an interferometric approach to measure gravitational mass of antihydrogen. The method consists of preparing a coherent superposition of antihydrogen quantum state localized near a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth, and then observing the time distribution of annihilation events followed after the free fall of an initially prepared superposition from a given height to the detector plate. We show that a corresponding time distribution is related to the momentum distribution in the initial state that allows its precise measurement. This approach is combined with a method of production of a coherent superposition of gravitational states by inducing a resonant transition using oscillating gradient magnetic field. We estimate an accuracy of measuring the gravitational mass of antihydrogen atom which could be deduced from such a measurement.

  16. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  17. Antihydrogen atoms may have been drifters

    CERN Multimedia

    Reich, Eugenie Samuel

    2003-01-01

    "It is a mystery of cosmic proportions: why is the universe filled with matter and not antimatter? Physicists hoping to find the answer have been left scratching their heads this week by an analysis which claims that some antihydrogen atoms created last year may not be normal antiatoms after all. Instead, they may sit on the blurry line between atoms and plasma" (1 page)

  18. Why antihydrogen and antimatter are different

    CERN Document Server

    Zichichi, Antonino

    2009-01-01

    As Paul Dirac realized, the existence of antihydrogen does not in itself prove the existence of antimatter. A look through the history of the subject, and in particular the role played by the CPT theorem, shows that ultimately it came down to experiment to prove the existence of antimatter through the discovery of the antideuteron at CERN in 1965.

  19. Cold Antihydrogen for Precise Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Bachor, P T; Gabrielse, G S; Walz, J; Hessels, E A; Tan, J; Oelert, W; George, M C; Grzonka, D J; Kossick, M; Storry, C H; Sefzick, T

    2002-01-01

    %AD-2 %title\\\\ \\\\The Antihydrogen TRAP Collaboration (ATRAP) seeks to do precise laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen. Comparisons of antihydrogen and hydrogen atoms should provide the most stringent test of CPT invariance involving baryons and leptons. ATRAP is an expansion of the TRAP collaboration that developed the techniques to take CERN antiprotons from an energy of 6 MeV (momentum 100 MeV/c) all the way down to thermal equilibrium at 4 K for storage. This storage energy is lower than realized previously by more than ten orders of magnitude. The TRAP techniques include slowing, capturing, electron cooling and stacking of antiprotons. ATRAP and other collaborations will use antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). This new facility makes sense for such experiments because we showed that antiprotons can be accumulated in a trap at much lower expense than was required in the earlier CERN AC-AA-LEAR complex. In the closest approach yet to the production of cold antihydrogen, collaboration members wer...

  20. Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lai, W; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  1. The detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATRAP experiment at CERN's antiproton decelerator (AD) aims for a test of CPT violation and Lorentz invariance by a comparison of hydrogen to antihydrogen atom spectroscopy and a measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter atoms. The experiment is divided into two parts: ATRAP-I, where successfully antihydrogen atoms were produced and intensive studies on the charged clouds of positrons and antiprotons were performed, and ATRAP-II which was commissioned during the beam-time 2006. ATRAP-II includes a much larger superconducting solenoid bore allowing the installation of an extended detection system as well as an optimized combined Penning-Ioffe trap. Another essential part is a new positron accumulator and delivery system which will increase the ATRAP-II efficiency drastically. Thus ATRAP-II now allows for much larger flexibility, increased performance, higher robustness, and better efficiency for the production and storage of cold antihydrogen atoms. A general overview of the experimental setup for the second phase of the ATRAP experiment will be presented in this thesis. The antiproton annihilation detector system, consisting of several layers of scintillating fibers, counts the antihydrogen atoms and determines the annihilation vertex of the atoms. This diagnostic element will allow to optimize the production of cold antihydrogen sufficiently to permit optical observations and measurements. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations concerning the track fitting and vertex reconstruction have been developed during the planned interruption of antiproton production at AD in the year 2005. Different event generators, magnetic field distributions as well as data reconstruction algorithms on simulated data were established and the results were compared to data in 2006. To improve the detector position resolution, a constraint-fit procedure was adopted. Further possible improvements, by applying certain cuts on the data, were investigated. Real-time measurements

  2. Dynamics in European identity formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kolind, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of European identity formation with the purpose of contributing to our understanding of the circumstances affecting the potential for collective identity formation within the EU. Theoretically the thesis draws upon self-categorization theory according to which collective identities take form on the basis of a very basic human need for a social identity. As such collective identities emerge when individual’s social identity are activated. In such situatio...

  3. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  4. CPT-symmetry studies with antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Ralf, E-mail: ralehner@indiana.edu [Indiana University Center for Spacetime Symmetries (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Various approaches to physics beyond the Standard Model can lead to small violations of CPT invariance. Since CPT symmetry can be measured with ultra-high precision, CPT tests offer an interesting phenomenological avenue to search for underlying physics. We discuss this reasoning in more detail, comment on the connection between CPT and Lorentz invariance, and review how CPT breaking would affect the (anti)hydrogen spectrum.

  5. CPT-symmetry studies with antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Various approaches to physics beyond the Standard Model can lead to small violations of CPT invariance. Since CPT symmetry can be measured with ultrahigh precision, CPT tests offer an interesting phenomenological avenue to search for underlying physics. We discuss this reasoning in more detail, comment on the connection between CPT and Lorentz invariance, and review how CPT breaking would affect the (anti)hydrogen spectrum.

  6. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  7. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Chaves

    Full Text Available Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia.

  8. The dynamics of fragment formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac's BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy

  9. Tests of CPT, Lorentz invariance and the WEP with antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; ATHENA Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invariance. Equally well, such a system could be used for searches of violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) at high precision. The author describes his plans to form a significant number of cold, trapped antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen and comment on possible first experiments.

  10. Modeling of Dynamic FRC Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Yung; Barnes, Dan; Dettrick, Sean

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a 2-D resistive MHD code, Lamy Ridge, to simulate the entire FRC formation process in Tri Alpha's C2 device, including initial formation, translation, merging and settling into equilibrium. Two FRC's can be created simultaneously, and then translated toward each other so that they merge into a single FRC. The code couples the external circuits around the formation tubes to the partially ionized plasma inside. Plasma and neutral gas are treated as two fluids. Dynamic and energetic equations, which take into account ionization and charge exchange, are solved in a time advance manner. The geometric shape of the vessel is specified by a set of inputs that defines the boundaries, which are handled by a cut-cell algorithm in the code. Multiple external circuits and field coils can be easily added, removed or relocated through individual inputs. The design of the code is modular and flexible so that it can be applied to future devices. The results of the code are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements on the C2 device.

  11. A source of antihydrogen for in-flight hyperfine spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, N; Murtagh, D J; Van Gorp, S; Nagata, Y; Diermaier, M; Federmann, S; Leali, M; Malbrunot, C; Mascagna, V; Massiczek, O; Michishio, K; Mizutani, T; Mohri, A; Nagahama, H; Ohtsuka, M; Radics, B; Sakurai, S; Sauerzopf, C; Suzuki, K; Tajima, M; Torii, H A; Venturelli, L; Wünschek, B; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N; Higaki, H; Kanai, Y; Lodi Rizzini, E; Nagashima, Y; Matsuda, Y; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, Y

    2014-01-01

    Antihydrogen, a positron bound to an antiproton, is the simplest antiatom. Its counterpart—hydrogen—is one of the most precisely investigated and best understood systems in physics research. High-resolution comparisons of both systems provide sensitive tests of CPT symmetry, which is the most fundamental symmetry in the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. Any measured difference would point to CPT violation and thus to new physics. Here we report the development of an antihydrogen source using a cusp trap for in-flight spectroscopy. A total of 80 antihydrogen atoms are unambiguously detected 2.7 m downstream of the production region, where perturbing residual magnetic fields are small. This is a major step towards precision spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using Rabi-like beam spectroscopy.

  12. CERN experiment provides first glimpse inside cold antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The ATRAP experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has detected and measured large numbers of cold antihydrogen atoms. Relying on ionization of the cold antiatoms when they pass through a strong electric field gradient, the ATRAP measurement provides the first glimpse inside an antiatom, and the first information about the physics of antihydrogen. The results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  13. Quantum ballistic experiment on antihydrogen fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. Yu; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Dufour, G.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose an approach to measuring gravitational mass of antihydrogen (\\bar{{{H}}}) based on interferometry of time distribution of free-fall events of antiatoms. Our method consists of preparing a coherent superposition of quantum states of \\bar{{{H}}} localized near a material surface in the gravitational field of the Earth, and then observing the time distribution of annihilation events after the free-fall of the initially prepared superposition from a given height to a detector plate. We show that the time distribution of interest is mapped to a precisely predictable velocity distribution of the initial wave packet. This approach is combined with production of a coherent superposition of gravitational states by inducing a resonant transition using an oscillating gradient magnetic field. We show that the relative accuracy of measuring the \\bar{{{H}}} atom gravitational mass can be achieved with this approach is 10-4, with 103 antiatoms settled in lowest gravitational states.

  14. Dynamic Aspects of Synapse Formation

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, A. Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) requires the proper formation of exquisitely precise circuits to function correctly. These neuronal circuits are assembled during development by the formation of synaptic connections between thousands of differentiating neurons. Proper synapse formation during childhood provides the substrate for cognition while improper formation or function of these synapses leads to neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation and autism. Recent work...

  15. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  16. Confinement of antihydrogen for 1,000 seconds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Andresen, Gorm; Ashkezari, M.D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, Paul David; Butler, E.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayano, R.S.; Hayden, M.E.; Humphries, A.J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kemp, S.L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, Chris Ørum

    2011-01-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, made entirely of antiparticles, is believed to be stable, and it is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter–antimatter symmetry. We have recently...... demonstrated trapping of antihydrogen atoms by releasing them after a confinement time of 172 ms. A critical question for future studies is: how long can anti-atoms be trapped? Here, we report the observation of anti-atom confinement for 1,000 s, extending our earlier results by nearly four orders of magnitude....... Our calculations indicate that most of the trapped anti-atoms reach the ground state. Further, we report the first measurement of the energy distribution of trapped antihydrogen, which, coupled with detailed comparisons with simulations, provides a key tool for the systematic investigation of trapping...

  17. Antihydrogen physics: gravitation and spectroscopy in AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Ferragut, R; Stroke, H H; Dassa, L; Rohne, O; Hogan, S D; Cialdi, S; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Formaro, L; Sandaker, H; Testera, G; Stepanov, S V; Folegati, P; Morhard, C; Warring, U; Prelz, F; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Consolati, G; Ferrari, G; Lagomarsino, V; Krasnicky, D; Drobychev, G; Giammarchi, M G; Heyne, R; Zenoni, A; Castelli, F; Mariazzi, S; Cabaret, L; Fischer, A; Boscolo, I; Sillou, D; Villa, F; Perini, D; Djourelov, N; Zavatarelli, S; Oberthaler, M K; Manuzio, G; Carraro, C; Matveev, V A; Jorgensen, L V; Nedelec, P; Prevedelli, M; Comparat, D; Dupasquier, A; Turbabin, A V; Zvezhinskij, D S; Fontana, A; Kellerbauer, A; Canali, C; Dudarev, A; Petracek, V; Riccardi, C; Nebbia, G; Gninenko, S N; Brusa, R S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Calloni, A; Doser, M; Byakov, V M; Quasso, F; Trezzi, D

    2011-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter experiment: gravity, interferometry, spectroscopy) is an experiment approved by CERN with the goal of studying antihydrogen physics. In AEgIS, antihydrogen will be produced by charge exchange reactions of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms excited in a Rydberg state (n > 20). In the first phase of the experiment, controlled acceleration by an electric field gradient (Stark effect) and subsequent measurement of free fall in a Moire deflectometer will allow a test of the weak equivalence principle. In a second phase, the antihydrogen will be slowed, confined, and laser-cooled to perform CPT studies and detailed spectroscopy. In the present work, after a general description of the experiment, the present status of advancement will be reviewed, with special attention to the production and excitation of positronium atoms.

  18. Extrasolar planets formation, detection and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    This latest, up-to-date resource for research on extrasolar planets covers formation, dynamics, atmospheres and detection. After a look at the formation of giant planets, the book goes on to discuss the formation and dynamics of planets in resonances, planets in double stars, atmospheres and habitable zones, detection via spectra and transits, and the history and prospects of ESPs as well as satellite projects.Edited by a renowned expert in solar system dynamics with chapters written by the leading experts in the method described -- from the US and Europe -- this is an ideal textbook for g

  19. Investigation of two-frequency Paul traps for antihydrogen production

    CERN Document Server

    Leefer, Nathan; Bertsche, William; Budker, Dmitry; Fajans, Joel; Folman, Ron; Haeffner, Hartmut; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) Paul traps operated with multifrequency rf trapping potentials provide the ability to independently confine charged particle species with widely different charge-to-mass ratios. In particular, these traps may find use in the field of antihydrogen recombination, allowing antiproton and positron clouds to be trapped and confined in the same volume without the use of large superconducting magnets. We explore the stability regions of two-frequency Paul traps and perform numerical simulations of small, multispecies charged-particle mixtures that indicate the promise of these traps for antihydrogen recombination.

  20. Dynamic formation control for autonomous underwater vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕雪峰; 古锋; 宋琛; 胡晓琳; 潘毅

    2014-01-01

    Path planning and formation structure forming are two of the most important problems for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to collaborate with each other. In this work, a dynamic formation model was proposed, in which several algorithms were developed for the complex underwater environment. Dimension changeable particle swarm algorithm was used to find an optimized path by dynamically adjusting the number and the distribution of the path nodes. Position relationship based obstacle avoidance algorithm was designed to detour along the edges of obstacles. Virtual potential point based formation-keeping algorithm was employed by incorporating dynamic strategies which were decided by the current states of the formation. The virtual potential point was used to keep the formation structure when the AUV or the formation was deviated. Simulation results show that an optimal path can be dynamically planned with fewer path nodes and smaller fitness, even with a concave obstacle. It has been also proven that different formation-keeping strategies can be adaptively selected and the formation can change its structure in a narrow area and restore back after passing the obstacle.

  1. Dynamics of sheet nacre formation in bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Marthe; Meibom, Anders; Gèze, Marc; Bourrat, Xavier; Angellier, Martine; Lopez, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Formation of nacre (mother-of-pearl) is a biomineralization process of fundamental scientific as well as industrial importance. However, the dynamics of the formation process is still not understood. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and high spatial resolution ion microprobe depth-profiling to image the full three-dimensional distribution of organic materials around individual tablets in the top-most layer of forming nacre in bivalves. Nacre formation proceeds by lateral, symmetric g...

  2. European scientists produce - and measure - atoms of antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    Koppel, N

    2002-01-01

    "Scientists working on an experiment called ATRAP at the European Particle Physics Laboratory, or CERN, said Tuesday that they were able to register the creation of antihydrogen atoms at the moment when they were destroyed again. The results are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  3. An experimental limit on the charge of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Vendeiro, Z; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I; Charman, A E

    2014-01-01

    The properties of antihydrogen are expected to be identical to those of hydrogen, and any differences would constitute a profound challenge to the fundamental theories of physics. The most commonly discussed antiatom-based tests of these theories are searches for antihydrogen-hydrogen spectral differences (tests of CPT (charge-parity-time) invariance) or gravitational differences (tests of the weak equivalence principle). Here we, the ALPHA Collaboration, report a different and somewhat unusual test of CPT and of quantum anomaly cancellation. A retrospective analysis of the influence of electric fields on antihydrogen atoms released from the ALPHA trap finds a mean axial deflection of 4.1±3.4 mm for an average axial electric field of 0.51 V mm−1. Combined with extensive numerical modelling, this measurement leads to a bound on the charge Qe of antihydrogen of Q=(−1.3±1.1±0.4) × 10−8. Here, e is the unit charge, and the errors are from statistics and systematic effects.

  4. Dynamic models of lateritic bauxite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, V. V.; Bogatyrev, B. A.

    2012-09-01

    2D dynamic models of bauxite formation in the weathering mantle covering denudation areas drained by river systems are discussed. The role of relief-forming factors (tectonic uplift, river erosion and denudation of drainage divides), the interrelation of hydrogeological and lithologic structure of the bauxitebearing weathering mantle, and the dynamics of zoning formation above and below groundwater level are described in the models. Creative and destructive epochs of lateritic bauxite formation differing in tectonic regime are distinguished. During the creative epochs, lateritic weathering develops against a background of decreasing denudation and an increase in areas of bauxite formation. The destructive epochs are characterized by intense denudation, cutting down the areas of lateritic bauxite formation and eventually leading to the complete removal of the weathering mantle. Different morphogenetic types and varieties of bauxite-bearing weathering mantles develop during creative and destructive epochs. The morphology of the weathering mantle sections at the deposits of Cenozoic lateritic bauxite in the present-day tropical zone of the Earth corresponds to the destructive epoch, which is characterized by declining areas of lateritic bauxite formation and will end with complete denudation of lateritic bauxite.

  5. Proposed antimatter gravity measurement with an antihydrogen beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G

    2008-01-01

    The principle of the equivalence of gravitational and inertial mass is one of the cornerstones of general relativity. Considerable efforts have been made and are still being made to verify its validity. A quantum-mechanical formulation of gravity allows for non-Newtonian contributions to the force which might lead to a difference in the gravitational force on matter and antimatter. While it is widely expected that the gravitational interaction of matter and of antimatter should be identical, this assertion has never been tested experimentally. With the production of large amounts of cold antihydrogen at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator, such a test with neutral antimatter atoms has now become feasible. For this purpose, we have proposed to set up the AEGIS experiment at CERN/AD, whose primary goal will be the direct measurement of the Earth’s gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen with a classical Moiré deflectometer.

  6. ALPHA experiment : limit on the charge of antihydrogen atom

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists due to its apparent absence in the observable universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter should have appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Stan- dard Model offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half of the universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms1–4 of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter.

  7. Emulsion detectors for the antihydrogen detection in AEgIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AEgIS experiment at CERN aims to perform the first direct measurement of gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter by measuring the deviation of a cold antihydrogen beam in the Earth gravitational field. The design of the experiment has been recently updated to include emulsion films as position sensitive detector. The submicrometric position accuracy of emulsions leads indeed to a significant improvement of the experimental sensitivity. We present results of preliminary tests and discuss perspectives for the final measurement

  8. Emulsion detectors for the antihydrogen detection in AEgIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistillo, C., E-mail: ciro.pistillo@cern.ch [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (Switzerland); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano (Italy); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (Switzerland); Belov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Heidelberg University, Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics (Germany); Bremer, J. [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Brusa, R. S. [University of Trento, Department of Physics (Italy); Cabaret, L. [University of Paris-Sud, Laboratory Aim Cotton, CNRS (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano (Italy); Caravita, R. [University of Genova, Department of Physics (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University (Czech Republic); Cialdi, S. [INFN Milano (Italy); Comparat, D. [University of Paris-Sud, Laboratory Aim Cotton, CNRS (France); Consolati, G. [Politecnico of Milano (Italy); Demetrio, A. [Heidelberg University, Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics (Germany); and others

    2015-08-15

    The AEgIS experiment at CERN aims to perform the first direct measurement of gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter by measuring the deviation of a cold antihydrogen beam in the Earth gravitational field. The design of the experiment has been recently updated to include emulsion films as position sensitive detector. The submicrometric position accuracy of emulsions leads indeed to a significant improvement of the experimental sensitivity. We present results of preliminary tests and discuss perspectives for the final measurement.

  9. Ultralow-energy antiprotons for antihydrogen spectroscopy and antimatter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large-scale Penning trap at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. Up to 65% of the captured antiprotons have subsequently been electron cooled to energies below 1 eV and have been stored up to one hour. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultralow-energy antiprotons for gravitational physics, as well as for precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen for CPT tests

  10. The dynamics of group formation among leeches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eBisson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Leeches exploring a new environment continuously meet each other and merge in temporary groups. After 2-3 hours, leeches become attracted to each other eventually forming a large and stable group. When their number is reduced, leeches remain solitary, behaving independently. Group formation is facilitated by body injection of serotonin (5-HT and the level of endogenous 5-HT is elevated in leeches forming a large group. In contrast, intravenous injection of 5-HT antagonists prevented injected leeches from joining a large group of conspecifics. When sensilla near the head were ablated or the supraesophageal ganglion disconnected, leeches remained solitary, but explored the environment swimming and crawling. These results suggest that group formation is initiated by a release of 5-HT triggered by sensilla stimulation and its dynamics can be explained by the establishment of a reinforcement dynamics, as observed during human group formation. As 5-HT affects social interactions also in humans, group formation in leeches and humans share a similar dynamics and hormonal control.

  11. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M.D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.;

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms...

  12. Spectroscopy Apparatus for the Measurement of The Hyperfine Structure of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Malbrunot, C; Diermaier, M; Dilaver, N; Friedreich, S; Kolbinger, B; Lehner, S; Lundmark, R; Massiczek, O; Radics, B; Sauerzopf, C; Simon, M; Widmann, E; Wolf, M; Wunschek, B; Zmeskal, J

    2014-01-01

    The ASACUSA CUSP collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN is planning to measure the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using an atomic spectroscopy beamline. We describe here the latest developments on the spectroscopy apparatus developed to be coupled to the antihydrogen production setup (CUSP).

  13. Trapping of antiprotons -- a first step on the way to antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first step towards producing and effectively utilizing antihydrogen atoms consists of trapping antiprotons. The immediate next step must then be to control, i.e. trap the produced antihydrogen. The current state of the art in trapping antiprotons and positrons is reviewed, and the challenges in trapping the resulting neutral particles are discussed

  14. Habit Formation, Dynastic Altruism, and Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Andreas; Valente, Simone

    2007-01-01

    We study the general equilibrium properties of two growth models with overlapping generations, habit formation and endogenous fertility. In the neoclassical model, habits modify the economy's growth rate and generate transitional dynamics in fertility; station- ary income per capita is associated with either increasing or decreasing population and output, depending on the strength of habits. In the AK specification, growing population and increasing consumption per capita require that the hab...

  15. Quantitative dynamics of telomere bouquet formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Richards

    Full Text Available The mechanism by which homologous chromosomes pair during meiosis, as a prelude to recombination, has long been mysterious. At meiosis, the telomeres in many organisms attach to the nuclear envelope and move together to form the telomere bouquet, perhaps to facilitate the homologous search. It is believed that diffusion alone is not sufficient to account for the formation of the bouquet, and that some directed movement is also required. Here we consider the formation of the telomere bouquet in a wheat-rye hybrid both experimentally and using mathematical modelling. The large size of the wheat nucleus and wheat's commercial importance make chromosomal pairing in wheat a particularly interesting and important process, which may well shed light on pairing in other organisms. We show that, prior to bouquet formation, sister chromatid telomeres are always attached to a hemisphere of the nuclear membrane and tend to associate in pairs. We study a mutant lacking the Ph1 locus, a locus ensuring correct homologous chromosome pairing, and discover that bouquet formation is delayed in the wild type compared to the mutant. Further, we develop a mathematical model of bouquet formation involving diffusion and directed movement, where we show that directed movement alone is sufficient to explain bouquet formation dynamics.

  16. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t 2. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments

  17. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman, E-mail: evelee@berkeley.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  18. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  19. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  20. The dynamics of travertine terrace formation

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, O; Jamtveit, B; Dysthe, Dag K.; Hammer, Oyvind; Jamtveit, Bjorn

    2006-01-01

    Travertine (limestone) terraces are common in caves, springs and rivers worldwide, and represent one of the most striking examples of geological pattern formation on the Earth's surface. The terraces form over a wide range of scales, from millimeters to tens of meters. Their origin has been poorly understood, but most likely involves a coupling between the precipitation rate and hydrodynamics. Microbial activity may also play a role. Here we present a minimal model based on shallow water flow and an empirical positive correlation between the flow velocity and precipitation rate. The resulting selforganizing pattern formation process displays rich and unusual dynamics, consistent with field observations. Terraces coarsen with time, fold into lobes and migrate downstream with differential rates, resulting in striking patterns. This model, in which topography grows rather than erodes in response to rapid flow, produces patterns that are completely different from those generated by flow driven erosion.

  1. Dynamical Models of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lunine, Jonathan I; Raymond, Sean N; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Quinn, Thomas; Graps, Amara

    2009-01-01

    We review the problem of the formation of terrestrial planets, with particular emphasis on the interaction of dynamical and geochemical models. The lifetime of gas around stars in the process of formation is limited to a few million years based on astronomical observations, while isotopic dating of meteorites and the Earth-Moon system suggest that perhaps 50-100 million years were required for the assembly of the Earth. Therefore, much of the growth of the terrestrial planets in our own system is presumed to have taken place under largely gas-free conditions, and the physics of terrestrial planet formation is dominated by gravitational interactions and collisions. The earliest phase of terrestrial-planet formation involve the growth of km-sized or larger planetesimals from dust grains, followed by the accumulations of these planetesimals into ~100 lunar- to Mars-mass bodies that are initially gravitationally isolated from one-another in a swarm of smaller planetesimals, but eventually grow to the point of sig...

  2. Antihydrogen Production in $ \\bar{p} $ Z - interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS210 \\\\ \\\\ The production of the antihydrogen atom $ \\bar {H}^0 \\equiv \\bar{p}e $ as the simplest atomic bound state of antimatter has been studied. Nine $ \\bar {H}^0 $ have been observed.\\\\ \\\\ The production of $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is predominantly mediated by the two-photon mechanism in the antiproton-nucleus interaction. In principle $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is well suited for investigations of fundamental CPT violation studies under different forces, however, in the present experiment we concentrated on the production of this antimatter object, since so far it never had been observed.

  3. Prospects of CPT tests using antiprotonic helium and antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing CPT to the highest possible precision using the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms (a neutral three-body system consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron) is the current goal of ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. The present status and future prospects are discussed in the first half of the talk. Our program will be extended in the future to include the microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen. The physics motivations and possible measurement schemes are presented in the second half

  4. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties. PMID

  5. Status Report: A Detector for Measuring the Ground State Hyperfine Splitting of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbinger, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN aims to measure the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen. A Rabi-like spectrometer line has been built for this purpose. A detector for counting antihydrogen is located at the end of the beam line. This contribution will focus on the tracking detector, whose challenging task it is to discriminate between background events and antiproton annihilations originating from antihydrogen atoms which are produced only in small amounts.

  6. Group formation stabilizes predator-prey dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, John M; Mosser, Anna; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2007-10-25

    Theoretical ecology is largely founded on the principle of mass action, in which uncoordinated populations of predators and prey move in a random and well-mixed fashion across a featureless landscape. The conceptual core of this body of theory is the functional response, predicting the rate of prey consumption by individual predators as a function of predator and/or prey densities. This assumption is seriously violated in many ecosystems in which predators and/or prey form social groups. Here we develop a new set of group-dependent functional responses to consider the ecological implications of sociality and apply the model to the Serengeti ecosystem. All of the prey species typically captured by Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) are gregarious, exhibiting nonlinear relationships between prey-group density and population density. The observed patterns of group formation profoundly reduce food intake rates below the levels expected under random mixing, having as strong an impact on intake rates as the seasonal migratory behaviour of the herbivores. A dynamical system model parameterized for the Serengeti ecosystem (using wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) as a well-studied example) shows that grouping strongly stabilizes interactions between lions and wildebeest. Our results suggest that social groups rather than individuals are the basic building blocks around which predator-prey interactions should be modelled and that group formation may provide the underlying stability of many ecosystems. PMID:17960242

  7. Production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen atoms A first step towards high precision CPT test

    CERN Document Server

    Variola, A; Bonomi, G; Boutcha, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Riedler, P; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P

    2003-01-01

    Observations of anti-hydrogen in small quantities have been reported at CERN and at FermiLab, but these experiments were not suited to spectroscopy experiments. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration reported the production and detection of very low energy anti-hydrogen atoms produced in cryogenic environment. This is the first major step in the study of antiatom's internal structure and it can lead to a high precision test of the CPT fundamental symmetry. The method of production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen will be introduced. The absolute rate of anti-hydrogen production and the signal to background ratio in the ATHENA experiment will be discussed. (7 refs) .

  8. Development and testing of a positron accumulator for antihydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A positron accumulator based on a modified Penning-Malmberg trap has been constructed and undergone preliminary testing prior to being shipped to CERN in Geneva where it will be a part of an experiment to synthesize low-energy antihydrogen. It utilises nitrogen buffer gas to cool and trap a continuous beam of positrons emanating from a 22Na radioactive source. A solid neon moderator slows the positrons from the source down to epithermal energies of a few eV before being injected into the trap. It is estimated that around 108 positrons can be trapped and cooled to ambient temperature within 5 minutes in this scheme using a 10 mCi source

  9. Boundedness of Formation Configuration for Nonlinear Three-body Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peng; SONG Yongduan

    2011-01-01

    The configuration boundedness of the three-body model dynamics is studied for Sun-Earth formation flying missions. The three-body formation flying model is built up with considering the lunar gravitational acceleration and solar radiation pressure. Because traditional linearized dynamics based method has relatively lower accuracy, a modified nonlinear formation configuration analysis method is proposed in this paper. Comparative studies are carried out from three aspects, i.e., natural formation configuration with arbitrary departure time, initialization time and formation configuration boundedness, and specific initialization time for bounded formation configuration. Simulations demonstrate the differences between the two schemes,and indicate that the nonlinear dynamic method reduces the error caused by the model linearization and disturbance approximation, and thus provides higher accuracy for boundedness analysis, which is of value to initial parameters selection for natural three-body formation flying.

  10. Chromatin state dynamics during blood formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lara-Astiaso, David; Weiner, Assaf; Lorenzo-Vivas, Erika; Zaretsky, Irina; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Mildner, Alexander; Winter, Deborah; Jung, Steffen; Friedman, Nir; Amit, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin modifications are crucial for development, yet little is known about their dynamics during differentiation. Hematopoiesis provides a well-defined model to study chromatin state dynamics, however technical limitations impede profiling of homogeneous differentiation intermediates. We developed a high sensitivity indexing-first chromatin immunoprecipitation approach (iChIP) to profile the dynamics of four chromatin modifications across 16 stages of hematopoietic differentiation. We ide...

  11. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the formation of spherical lipidic vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, E Hernandez; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-01

    We propose a free energy expression accounting for the formation of spherical vesicles from planar lipidic membranes and derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution describing the dynamics of vesicle formation. We found that formation may occur as an activated process for small membranes and as a transport process for sufficiently large membranes. We give explicit expressions for the transition rates and the characteristic time of vesicle formation in terms of the relevant physical parameters.

  12. Design of a 1.42 GHz Spin-Flip Cavity for Antihydrogen Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The ground state hyperfine transition frequency of hydrogen is known to a very high precision and therefore the measurement of this transition frequency in antihydrogen is offering one of the most accurate tests of CPT symmetry. The ASACUSA collaboration at CERN will run an experiment designed to produce ground state antihydrogen atoms in a cusp trap. These antihydrogen atoms will pass with a low rate in the order of one per second through a spin-flip cavity where they get excited depending on their polarization by a 1.42 GHz magnetic field. Due to the small amount of antihydrogen atoms that will be available the requirement of good field homogeneity is imposed in order to obtain an interaction with as many antihydrogen atoms as possible. This leads to a requirement of an RF field deviation of less than ± 10% transverse to the beam direction over a beam aperture with 10 cm diameter. All design aspects of this new spin-flip cavity, including the required field homogeneity and vacuum aspects, are discussed. (author)

  13. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Carruth, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Charman, A E; Eriksson, S; Evans, L T; Evetts, N; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Ishida, A; Jones, S A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Maxwell, D; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Michan, J M; Momose, T; Munich, J J; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sacramento, R L; Sameed, M; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2016-01-21

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement. PMID:26791725

  14. Chondrocyte growth dynamics and spatial pattern formation

    OpenAIRE

    Palumberi, Viviana

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we study the generation of patterns in cell culture refering to the important work of Elsdale where fibroblast cultures were analyzed to investigate how densely packed cells organize. A mathematical model was introduced in Edelstein-Keshet and Ermentrout (1990) to prove that the pattern formation can be caused by the mere interactions of individual cells, although it is a population phenomena. Until then the formation of structures was only attributed to other m...

  15. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic membrane (DM) formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition ...

  16. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Charman, A E; Menary, S; Capra, A; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Fajans, J; Ashkezari, M D; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2013-01-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5%; worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regim...

  17. Experimental limit on the ratio of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan; Charman, Andrew; Zhmoginov, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    Physicists have long wondered if the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. While there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist, i.e., that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. By searching for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap, we have determined that we can reject ratios of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen greater than about 100 at a statistical significance level of 5%. A similar search places somewhat lower limits on a negative gravitational mass, i.e., on antigravity.

  18. Why We Already Know that Antihydrogen is Almost Certainly NOT Going to Fall "Up"

    CERN Document Server

    Menary, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The ALPHA collaboration (of which I am a member) has made great strides recently in trapping antihydrogen and starting down the path of making spectroscopic measurements. The primary goal of the experiment is to test CPT invariance but there is also interest in testing another fundamental issue -- the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter (the so-called question of "antigravity"). As well as the other antihydrogen trapping experiments -- ASACUSA and ATRAP -- there is also a new experiment in the Antiproton Decelerator hall at CERN called AEGIS which is dedicated to testing the gravitional interaction between antihydrogen and the Earth. It has been claimed in the literature that there "is no compelling evidence or theoretical reason to rule out such a difference (i.e., between $g$ and $\\bar{g}$) at the 1% level." I argue in this short paper that bending of light by the sun provides a more stringent limit than this.

  19. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Collaboration; Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2013-04-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5% worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime.

  20. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Charman, A. E.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, L. T.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms- of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10-21e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  1. On mirror symmetry, CSB and antihydrogen symmetry in natural atom H

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hooydonk, G

    2002-01-01

    Molecular band spectra reveal a left-right symmetry for atoms (Van Hooydonk, Spectrochim. Acta A, 2000, 56, 2273). Intra-atomic left-right symmetry points to anti-atom states and, to make sense, this must also show in line spectra. H Lyman ns1/2 singlets show a mirror plane at quantum number n0=pi/2. Symmetry breaking oscillator (1-0.5pi/n)exp2 means that some of these n-states are anti-hydrogenic. This view runs ahead of CERN's AD-project on antihydrogen.

  2. Mexican hat curve for hydrogen and antihydrogen-states in natural atom H

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hooydonk, G

    2004-01-01

    Molecular band spectra as well as atomic line spectra reveal a left-right symmetry for atoms (Van Hooydonk, Spectrochim. Acta A, 2000, 56, 2273 and CERN-Ext-2002-041). We now extract a Mexican hat shaped or double well curve from the line spectrum (Lyman ns1/2 singlets) of natural atom H. An H CSB theory and its oscillator contribution (1-0.5pi/n)esp2/nexp2 lead to unprecedented results for antihydrogen physics, ahead of the CERN AD-project on artificial antihydrogen.

  3. SOLITONS: Dynamics of strong coupling formation between laser solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanov, Nikolai N.; Fedorov, S. V.; Shatsev, A. N.

    2005-03-01

    The dynamics of the strong coupling formation between two solitons with the unit topological charge is studied in detail for a wide-aperture class A laser. The sequence of bifurcations of the vector field of energy fluxes in the transverse plane was demonstrated during the formation of a soliton complex.

  4. Dynamics of Perceived Parenting and Identity Formation in Late Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, Wim; Goossens, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Identity formation is a dynamic process of person-context interactions, and part of this context are parents, even in late adolescence. Several theories on parent-adolescent relationships share the idea that parents influence the process of identity formation. However, up to now, empirical evidence, particularly longitudinal evidence for this link…

  5. Quasi-satellite dynamics in formation flight

    CERN Document Server

    Mikkola, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The quasi-satellite (QS) phenomenon makes two celestial bodies to fly near each other (Mikkola et al. 2006) and that effect can be used also to make artificial satellites move in tandem. We consider formation flight of two or three satellites in low eccentricity near Earth orbits. With the help of weak ion thrusters it is possible to accomplish tandem flight. With ion thrusters it is also possible to mimic many kinds of mutual force laws between the satellites. We found that both a constant repulsive force or an attractive force that decreases with the distance are able to preserve the formation in which the eccentricities cause the actual relative motion and the weak thrusters keep the mean longitude difference small. Initial values are important for the formation flight but very exact adjustment of orbital elements is not important. Simplicity is one of our goals in this study and this result is achieved at least in the way that, when constant force thrusters are used, the satellites only need to detect the...

  6. Antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiproton discrimination: Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    OpenAIRE

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; S. Chapman; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected s...

  7. AEgIS experiment: Towards anti-hydrogen beam production for antimatter gravity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) is an experiment that aims to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration g of anti-hydrogen in the Earth's field. A cold anti-hydrogen beam will be produced by charge exchange reaction between cold antiprotons and positronium excited in Rydberg states. Rydberg positronium (with quantum number n between 20 and 30) will be produced by a two steps laser excitation. The anti-hydrogen beam, after being accelerated by Stark effect, will fly through the gratings of a 'moire' deflectometer. The deflection of the horizontal beam due to its free fall will be measured by a position sensitive detector. It is estimated that the detection of about 103 anti-hydrogen atoms is required to determine the gravitational acceleration with a precision of 1%. In this report an overview of the AEgIS experiment is presented and its current status is described. Details on the production of slow positronium and its excitation with lasers are discussed. (authors)

  8. First step in the process of calculating the cross section for muonic antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Maher, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    The end goal of the project is to measure the charge radius of the antiproton with muons. However a necessary step first is to calculate cross section of Muonium and antiprotons in the production of antihydrogen to determine the feasibility of such an experiment.

  9. Towards Measuring the Ground State Hyperfine Splitting of Antihydrogen -- A Progress Report

    CERN Document Server

    Sauerzopf, C; Dupré, P.; Higashi, Y.; Kaga, C.; Kolbinger, B.; Leali, M.; Lehner, S.; Rizzini, E.Lodi; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Murtagh, D.J.; Nagata, Y.; Radics, B.; Simon, M.C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Ulmer, S.; Vamosi, S.; van Gorp, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Breuker, H.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kuroda, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful commissioning and testing of a dedicated field-ioniser chamber for measuring principal quantum number distributions in antihydrogen as part of the ASACUSA hyperfine spectroscopy apparatus. The new chamber is combined with a beam normalisation detector that consists of plastic scintillators and a retractable passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector.

  10. AEgIS experiment: Towards antihydrogen beam production for antimatter gravity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mariazzi, Sebastiano; Amsler, Claude; Ariga, Akitaka; Ariga, Tomoko; Belov, Alexandre S; Bonomi, Germano; Bräunig, Philippe; Brusa, Roberto S; Bremer, Johan; Cabaret, Louis; Canali, Carlo; Caravita, Ruggero; Castelli, Fabrizio; Cerchiari, Giovanni; Cialdi, Simone; Comparat, Daniel; Consolati, Giovanni; Dassa, Luca; Derking, Jan Hendrik; Di Domizio, Sergio; Di Noto, Lea; Doser, Michael; Dudarev, Alexey; Ereditato, Antonio; Ferragut, Rafael; Fontana, Andrea; Genova, Pablo; Giammarchi, Marco; Gligorova, Angela; Gninenko, Sergei N; Hogan, Stephen D; Haider, Stefan; Jordan, Elena; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Kawada, Jiro; Kellerbauer, Alban; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Knecht, Andreas; Krasnický, Daniel; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Lehner, Sebastian; Malbrunot, Chloe; Matveev, Viktor A; Merkt, Frederic; Moia, Fabio; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Nédélec, Patrick; Oberthaler, Markus K; Pacifico, Nicola; Petráček, Vojtech; Pistillo, Ciro; Prelz, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Regenfus, Christian; Riccardi, Cristina; Røhne, Ole; Rotondi, Alberto; Sandaker, Heidi; Scampoli, Paola; Storey, James; Subieta Vasquez, Martin A.; Spaček, Michal; Czech Technical U. in Prague - FNSPE - B\\oehova 7 - 11519 - Praha 1 - Czech Aff25 Testera, Gemma; Vaccarone, Renzo; Villa, Fabio; Widmann, Eberhard; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zmeskal, Johann

    2014-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) is an experiment that aims to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration g of antihydrogen in the Earth’s field. A cold antihydrogen beam will be produced by charge exchange reaction between cold antiprotons and positronium excited in Rydberg states. Rydberg positronium (with quantum number n between 20 and 30) will be produced by a two steps laser excitation. The antihydrogen beam, after being accelerated by Stark effect, will fly through the gratings of a moir ́ e deflectometer. The deflection of the horizontal beam due to its free fall will be measured by a position sensitive detector. It is estimated that the detection of about 10 3 antihydrogen atoms is required to determine the gravitational acceleration with a precision of 1%. In this report an overview of the AEgIS experiment is presented and its current status is described. Details on the production of slow positronium and its excitation with lasers ar...

  11. Geneva University: On our way to anti-hydrogen at rest

    CERN Multimedia

    Geneva University

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium On our way to anti-hydrogen at rest Prof. Walter Oelert, Research Center Jülich, Germany Trapped cold atoms of anti-hydrogen are optimal for testing possible CPT violations in comparison of spectral lines and gravitational effects on matter and anti-matter. For this reason it is mandatory to optimize the properties of the clouds of anti-protons and positrons used to produce the anti-hydrogen atoms. The ATRAP-collaboration at CERNs AD did perform such experiments by studying the temperature of these clouds and their stability at different conditions. Though detailed tests have been performed to verify the trapping of anti-hydrogen atoms in a magnetic gradient field no statistically significant signal was detected yet. Re...

  12. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M.D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.;

    2013-01-01

    gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5%; worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with...

  13. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  14. Dynamic Phases, Pinning, and Pattern Formation for Driven Dislocation Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  15. Formation of protonium and positronium in atomic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, R J

    2001-01-01

    method. Statistically accurate cross sections for protonium and antihydrogen formation have been obtained and the energy dependence of the process established. Antihydrogen formation from antiproton collisions with positronium in the presence of a laser has also been simulated with the CTMC method and the effects of laser polarisation, frequency and intensity studied. Enhancements of the antihydrogen formation cross section were observed and it is suggested that more sophisticated calculations should be undertaken. A minimum-norm method has been developed for solving the coupled integro-differential equations describing the scattering of positrons by one-electron targets in which the rearrangement channels for positronium formation have been explicitly included. The minimum-norm method, applied to this application for the first time in this thesis, is an enhancement of a previously reported least-squares method which has enabled the extension to a significantly larger basis consisting of up to 26 states on th...

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  17. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten;

    2013-01-01

    from redox potential, pH, conductivity, and turbidity of the solution enables distinct observation of reduction and nucleation/growth of AuNPs phases. The dynamics of the electrochemical potential shows that reduction of gold salt (HAuCl 4 and its hydrolyzed forms) occurs via intermediate [AuCl 2......Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... have been employed in the present report to monitor time-dependent physical and chemical properties in aqueous solution during the chemical synthesis. Chemical synthesis of AuNPs is a reduction process accompanied by release of ions and protons, and formation of solid particles. Dynamic information...

  18. Dynamics of exciton formation and relaxation in photoexcited semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Veljko; Vukmirović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the exciton formation and relaxation on a picosecond time scale following a pulsed photoexcitation of a semiconductor. The study is conducted in the framework of the density matrix theory complemented with the dynamics controlled truncation scheme. We truncate the phonon branch of the resulting hierarchy of equations and propose the form of coupling among single-phonon-assisted and higher-order phonon-assisted density matrices so as to ensure the energy and particle-number conservation in a closed system. Time scales relevant for the exciton formation and relaxation processes are determined from numerical investigations performed on a one-dimensional model for the values of model parameters representative of a typical organic and inorganic semiconductor. The exciton dynamics is examined for different values of central frequency of the exciting field, temperature, and microscopic model parameters, such as the strengths of carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon couplings. We find that for typical organic semiconductor parameters, formation of bound excitons occurs on a several-hundred-femtosecond time scale, while their subsequent relaxation and equilibration take at least several picoseconds. These time scales are consistent with recent experimental studies of the exciton formation and relaxation in conjugated polymer-based materials.

  19. Dynamics of multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alary, D.; Andreev, K.; Boyko, P.; Ivanova, E.; Pritykin, D.; Sidorenko, V.; Tourneur, C.; Yarotsky, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of a multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation rotating about its axis of symmetry in the nominal mode. Whereas the combination of rotation and gravity-gradient forces is insufficient to maintain the mutual positions of satellites, they are assumed to be equipped with low-thrust rocket engines. We propose a control strategy that allows the stabilization of the nominal spin state and demonstrate the system's proper operation by numerically simulating its controlled motion. The discussed multi-tethered formations could be employed, for example, to provide co-location of several satellites at a slot in geostationary orbit.

  20. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re<<1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this letter, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such "viscous liquid" state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand an external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions.

  1. Narrowband solid state vuv coherent source for laser cooling of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michan, J. Mario [TRIUMF (Canada); Polovy, Gene; Madison, Kirk W. [The University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Fujiwara, Makoto C. [TRIUMF (Canada); Momose, Takamasa, E-mail: momose@chem.ubc.ca [The University of British Columbia, Department of Chemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    We describe the design and performance of a solid-state pulsed source of narrowband (< 100 MHz) Lyman-α radiation designed for the purpose of laser cooling magnetically trapped antihydrogen. Our source utilizes an injection seeded Ti:Sapphire amplifier cavity to generate intense radiation at 729.4 nm, which is then sent through a frequency doubling stage and a frequency tripling stage to generate 121.56 nm light. Although the pulse energy at 121.56 nm is currently limited to 12 nJ with a repetition rate of 10 Hz, we expect to obtain greater than 0.1 μJ per pulse at 10 Hz by further optimizing the alignment of the pulse amplifier and the efficiency of the frequency tripling stage. Such a power will be sufficient for cooling a trapped antihydrogen atom from 500 mK to 20mK.

  2. Prospects for measuring the gravitational free-fall of antihydrogen with emulsion detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of the AEgIS experiment at CERN is to test the weak equivalence principle for antimatter. AEgIS will measure the free-fall of an antihydrogen beam traversing a moir and apos;e deflectometer. The goal is to determine the gravitational acceleration g-bar with an initial relative accuracy of 1% by using an emulsion detector combined with a silicon μ-strip detector to measure the time of flight. Nuclear emulsions can measure the annihilation vertex of antihydrogen atoms with a precision of ∼ 1–2 μm r.m.s. We present here results for emulsion detectors operated in vacuum using low energy antiprotons from the CERN antiproton decelerator. We compare with Monte Carlo simulations, and discuss the impact on the AEgIS project

  3. On the production of the positive antihydrogen ion H-bar + via radiative attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide an estimate of the cross section for the radiative attachment of a second positron into the (1S21Se) state of the H-bar + ion using Ohmura and Ohmura’s (1960 Phys. Rev. 118 154) effective range theory and the principle of detailed balance. The H-bar + ion can potentially be created using interactions of positrons with trapped antihydrogen, and our analysis includes a discussion in which estimates of production rates are given. Motivations to produce H-bar + include its potential use as an intermediary to cool antihydrogen to ultra-cold (sub-mK) temperatures for a variety of studies, including spectroscopy and probing the gravitational interaction of the anti-atom. (paper)

  4. Gravitational interaction of antihydrogen: the AEgIS experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The AEgIS experiment aims to directly measure the gravitational acceleration g on a pulsed beam of cold antihydrogen atoms. Rydberg antihydrogen atoms produced by mixing of antiprotons with positronium atoms laser-excited into a Rydberg state (Ps*) will be accelerated horizontally. The minute vertical deflection and the flight time will be measured using a moiré deflectometer similarly to what has been done with Ar atoms. The experimental apparatus has been completed and commissioned in 2012 with antiprotons and positrons. A description of the experimental setup, of results of the 2012 data taking and of the on-going studies as well as future perspectives will be presented. (author)

  5. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.

    2013-03-21

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers\\' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Des atomes d'antihydrogene produits en quantites substantielles au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sevestre, G

    2002-01-01

    "Des quantites relativement substantielles d'atomes d'antihydrogene a basse temperature ont ete produites cet ete au Laboratoire europeen de physique des particules, le CERN a Geneve, ouvrant la voie a une etude approfondie de cette antimatiere qui pourrait remettre en cause les theories actuelles, a annonce mercredi sur le site Internet de la revue Nature une equipe internationale de chercheurs" (1 page).

  7. Anti-hydrogen: The cusp between quantum mechanics and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue that the crossing (CPT) symmetry of relativistic quantum mechanics requires that both the coulombic and the Newtonian force between pairs of particles will reverse when one is replaced by its anti-particle. For consistency, this requires a theory in which both the equivalence principles and gauge invariance are abandoned. thus whether anti-hydrogen ''falls'' up or down will provide an experiment crusis separating general relativity and gauge invariance from this version of quantum mechanics

  8. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Teck-Ghee; Wong Cheuk-Yin; Wang Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H-H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6a.u. and a barrier rising at r<~ 5a.u.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Primary Ferrofluid Aggregate Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Tanygin, B. M.; Kovalenko, V. F.; Petrychuk, M.V.; Dzyan, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the phase transitions and self-organization in the magnetic aggregates are of the fundamental and applied interest. The long-range ordering structures described in the Tom\\'anek's systematization (M. Yoon, and D. Tom\\'anek, 2010 [1]) are not yet obtained in the direct molecular dynamics simulations. The resulted structures usually are the linear chains or circles, or, else, amorphous (liquid) formations. In the present work, it was shown, that the thermodynamically equilibri...

  10. On a New Mechanism of Pattern Formation in Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Génieys, Stéphane; Volpert, Vitaly; Auger, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    We study a reaction-diffusion equation with an integral term describing nonlocal consumption of resources. We show that a homogeneous equilibrium can lose its stability resulting in appearance of stationary spatial structures. It is a new mechanism of pattern formation in population dynamics that can explain emergence of biological species due to intra-specific competition and random mutations.Travelling waves connecting an unstable homogeneous equilibrium and a periodic in space stationary s...

  11. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate that...... these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  12. Progress Toward a Format Standard for Flight Dynamics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Hildreth, Bruce L.

    2006-01-01

    In the beginning, there was FORTRAN, and it was... not so good. But it was universal, and all flight simulator equations of motion were coded with it. Then came ACSL, C, Ada, C++, C#, Java, FORTRAN-90, Matlab/Simulink, and a number of other programming languages. Since the halcyon punch card days of 1968, models of aircraft flight dynamics have proliferated in training devices, desktop engineering and development computers, and control design textbooks. With the rise of industry teaming and increased reliance on simulation for procurement decisions, aircraft and missile simulation models are created, updated, and exchanged with increasing frequency. However, there is no real lingua franca to facilitate the exchange of models from one simulation user to another. The current state-of-the-art is such that several staff-months if not staff-years are required to 'rehost' each release of a flight dynamics model from one simulation environment to another one. If a standard data package or exchange format were to be universally adopted, the cost and time of sharing and updating aerodynamics, control laws, mass and inertia, and other flight dynamic components of the equations of motion of an aircraft or spacecraft simulation could be drastically reduced. A 2002 paper estimated over $ 6 million in savings could be realized for one military aircraft type alone. This paper describes the efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) to develop a standard flight dynamic model exchange standard based on XML and HDF-5 data formats.

  13. Dynamical surface gravity in spherically symmetric black hole formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study dynamical surface gravity in a general spherically symmetric setting using Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates. Our analysis includes several definitions that have been proposed in the past as well as two new definitions adapted to Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates. Various properties are considered, including general covariance, value at extremality, locality and static limit. We illustrate with specific examples of 'dirty' black holes that even for spacetimes possessing a global timelike Killing vector, local definitions of surface gravity can differ substantially from 'nonlocal' ones that require an asymptotic normalization condition. Finally, we present numerical calculations of dynamical surface gravity for black hole formation via spherically symmetric scalar field collapse. Our results highlight the differences between the various definitions in a dynamical setting and provide further insight into the distinction between local and nonlocal definitions of surface gravity.

  14. Dynamics and pattern formation in a cancer network with diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion is ubiquitous inside cells, and it is capable of inducing spontaneous pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems on a spatially homogeneous domain. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a diffusive cancer network regulated by microRNA and obtain the condition that the network undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and a Turing pattern bifurcation. In addition, we also develop the amplitude equation of the network model by using Taylor series expansion, multi-scaling and further expansion in powers of a small parameter. As a result of these analyses, we obtain the explicit condition on how the dynamics of the diffusive cancer network evolve. These results reveal that this system has rich dynamics, such as spotted stripe and hexagon patterns. The bifurcation diagram helps us understand the biological mechanism in the cancer network. Finally, numerical simulations confirm our analytical results.

  15. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  16. A natural experiment of social network formation and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tuan Q; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2015-05-26

    Social networks affect many aspects of life, including the spread of diseases, the diffusion of information, the workers' productivity, and consumers' behavior. Little is known, however, about how these networks form and change. Estimating causal effects and mechanisms that drive social network formation and dynamics is challenging because of the complexity of engineering social relations in a controlled environment, endogeneity between network structure and individual characteristics, and the lack of time-resolved data about individuals' behavior. We leverage data from a sample of 1.5 million college students on Facebook, who wrote more than 630 million messages and 590 million posts over 4 years, to design a long-term natural experiment of friendship formation and social dynamics in the aftermath of a natural disaster. The analysis shows that affected individuals are more likely to strengthen interactions, while maintaining the same number of friends as unaffected individuals. Our findings suggest that the formation of social relationships may serve as a coping mechanism to deal with high-stress situations and build resilience in communities. PMID:25964337

  17. Finite size effects in the dynamics of opinion formation

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, R; Tessone, Claudio J.; Toral, Raul

    2006-01-01

    For some models of relevance in the social sciences we review some examples in which system size plays an important role in the final outcome of the dynamics. We discuss the conditions under which changes of behavior can appear only when the number of agents in the model takes a finite value. Those changes of behavior can be related to the apparent phase transitions that appear in some physical models. We show examples in the Galam's model of opinion transmission and the Axelrod's model of culture formation stressing the role that the network of interactions has on the main results of both models. Finally, we present the phenomenon of system-size stochastic resonance by which a forcing signal (identified as an advertising agent) is optimally amplified by a population of the right (intermediate) size. Our work stresses the role that the system size has in the dynamics of social systems and the inappropriateness of taking the thermodynamic limit for these systems.

  18. Building better oscillators using nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M C Cross; Eyal Kenig; John-Mark A Allen

    2015-03-01

    Frequency and time references play an essential role in modern technology and in living systems. The precision of self-sustained oscillations is limited by the effects of noise, which becomes evermore important as the sizes of the devices become smaller. In this paper, we review our recent theoretical results on using nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation to reduce the effects of noise and improve the frequency precision of oscillators, with particular reference to ongoing experiments on oscillators based on nanomechanical resonators. We discuss using resonator nonlinearity, novel oscillator architectures and the synchronization of arrays of oscillators, to improve the frequency precision.

  19. Effects of Planetesimal Dynamics on the Formation of Terrestrial Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, R R

    2003-01-01

    Formation of terrestrial planets by agglomeration of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks sensitively depends on the velocity evolution of planetesimals. We describe a novel semi-analytical approach to the treatment of planetesimal dynamics incorporating the gravitational scattering by massive protoplanetary bodies. Using this method we confirm that planets grow very slowly in the outer Solar System if gravitational scattering is the only process determining planetesimal velocities, making it hard for giant planets to acquire their massive gaseous envelopes within less than 10 Myr. We put forward several possibilities for alleviating this problem.

  20. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Yu

    Full Text Available Dynamic membrane (DM formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes.

  1. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic membrane (DM) formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes. PMID:26436551

  2. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-11-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such ``viscous liquid'' state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows.

  3. The Formation and Dynamics of Super-Earth Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Super-Earths, objects slightly larger than Earth and slightly smaller than Uranus, have found a special place in exoplanetary science. As a new class of planetary bodies, these objects have challenged models of planet formation at both ends of the spectrum and have triggered a great deal of research on the composition and interior dynamics of rocky planets in connection to their masses and radii. Being relatively easier to detect than an Earth-sized planet at 1 AU around a G star, super-Earths have become the focus of worldwide observational campaigns to search for habitable planets. With a range of masses that allows these objects to retain moderate atmospheres and perhaps even plate tectonics, super-Earths may be habitable if they maintain long-term orbits in the habitable zones of their host stars. Given that in the past two years a few such potentially habitable super-Earths have in fact been discovered, it is necessary to develop a deep understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of these obje...

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the primary ferrofluid aggregate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanygin, B.M., E-mail: b.m.tanygin@gmail.com [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, 4G, Acad. Glushkov Ave., Kyiv UA-03127 (Ukraine); Kovalenko, V.F.; Petrychuk, M.V.; Dzyan, S.A. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, 4G, Acad. Glushkov Ave., Kyiv UA-03127 (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Investigations of the phase transitions and self-organization in the magnetic aggregates are of the fundamental and applied interest. The long-range ordering structures described in the Tomanek's systematization (M. Yoon, and D. Tomanek, 2010 ) are not yet obtained in the direct molecular dynamics simulations. The resulted structures usually are the linear chains or circles, or, else, amorphous (liquid) formations. In the present work, it was shown, that the thermodynamically equilibrium primary ferrofluid aggregate has either the long-range ordered or liquid phase. Due to the unknown steric layer force and other model idealizations, the clear experimental verification of the real equilibrium phase is still required. The predicted long-range ordered (crystallized) phase produces the faceting shape of the primary ferrofluid aggregate, which can be recognized experimentally. The medical (antiviral) application of the crystallized aggregates has been suggested. Dynamic formation of all observed ferrofluid nanostructures conforms to the Tomanek's systematization. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary ferrofluid aggregate has either the long-range ordered or liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulation of ferrofluid nanostructures conforms to the Tomanek's systematization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range ordered phase produces the faceting shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The medical (antiviral) application is possible.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of the primary ferrofluid aggregate formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of the phase transitions and self-organization in the magnetic aggregates are of the fundamental and applied interest. The long-range ordering structures described in the Tománek's systematization (M. Yoon, and D. Tománek, 2010 ) are not yet obtained in the direct molecular dynamics simulations. The resulted structures usually are the linear chains or circles, or, else, amorphous (liquid) formations. In the present work, it was shown, that the thermodynamically equilibrium primary ferrofluid aggregate has either the long-range ordered or liquid phase. Due to the unknown steric layer force and other model idealizations, the clear experimental verification of the real equilibrium phase is still required. The predicted long-range ordered (crystallized) phase produces the faceting shape of the primary ferrofluid aggregate, which can be recognized experimentally. The medical (antiviral) application of the crystallized aggregates has been suggested. Dynamic formation of all observed ferrofluid nanostructures conforms to the Tománek's systematization. - Highlights: ► Primary ferrofluid aggregate has either the long-range ordered or liquid phase. ► Simulation of ferrofluid nanostructures conforms to the Tománek's systematization. ► Long-range ordered phase produces the faceting shape. ► The medical (antiviral) application is possible.

  6. Raindrop impact on sand: dynamic and crater formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song-Chuan; de Jong, Rianne; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2015-03-01

    Droplet impact on a granular bed is very common in nature, industry, and agriculture and extends from raindrops falling on earth to wet granulation in the production process of many pharmaceuticals. In contrast to more traditionally studied impact phenomena, such as a droplet impact on solid substrate and solid object impact on fluid-like substrate, raindrop impact on sand induces more complicated interactions. First, both the intruder and the target deform during impact; second, the liquid composing the droplet may penetrate into the substrate during the impact and may, in the end, completely merge with the grains. These complex interactions between the droplet intruder and the granular target create the very diverse crater morphologies that has been described in the literature. An appealing and natural question is how the craters are formed. To gain insight in the mechanism of crater formation, we resolve the dynamics with high-speed laser profilometry and study the dependence of the dynamics on impact speed and packing fraction of the granular substrate. Finally, we establish a dynamical model to explain the various crater morphologies.

  7. PSEUDOBULGE FORMATION AS A DYNAMICAL RATHER THAN A SECULAR PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in 'Eris', a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky-Way-like massive late-type spiral in an cold dark matter universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass M{sub vir} {approx_equal} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, a photometric stellar mass M{sub *} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers, both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolved from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift due to tidal interactions with satellites, was destroyed by minor mergers at z {approx} 3, re-formed shortly after, and weakened again following a steady gas inflow at z {approx}< 1. The gradual dissolution of the bar ensued at z {approx} 1 and continues until the present without increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner regions. In this scenario, the pseudobulge is not a separate component from the inner disk in terms of formation path; rather, it is the first step in the inside-out formation of the baryonic disk, in agreement with the fact that pseudobulges of massive spiral galaxies typically have a dominant old stellar population. If our simulations do indeed reproduce the formation mechanisms of massive spirals, then the progenitors of late-type galaxies should have strong bars and small photometric pseudobulges at high redshift.

  8. An atomic hydrogen beam to test ASACUSA’s apparatus for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diermaier, M., E-mail: martin.diermaier@oeaw.ac.at; Caradonna, P.; Kolbinger, B. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Wolf, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration aims to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart to atomic hydrogen. Comparisons of the corresponding transitions in those two systems will provide sensitive tests of the CPT symmetry, the combination of the three discrete symmetries charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal. For offline tests of the GS-HFS spectroscopy apparatus we constructed a source of cold polarised atomic hydrogen. In these proceedings we report the successful observation of the hyperfine structure transitions of atomic hydrogen with our apparatus in the earth’s magnetic field.

  9. Prospects of In-Flight Hyperfine Spectroscopy of (Anti)Hydrogen for Tests of CPT Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen promises one of the most sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The ASACUSA collaboration is pursuing a measurement of this splitting in a Rabi-type experiment using a polarized beam from a CUSP magnet at the Antiproton Decelerator of CERN. With the initial intention of characterizing the Rabi apparatus, a polarized source of cold hydrogen was built and the $\\sigma_1$ transition of hydrogen was measured to a few ppb precision. A measurement of the $\\pi_1$ transition is being prepared. The availability of this beam opens the possibility to perform first measurements of some coefficients within the nonminimal Standard-Model Extension.

  10. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we propose that in contrast with this picture, a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by Super-Earth type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory composition material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ~100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring p...

  11. Star formation in isolated AMIGA galaxies: dynamical influence of bars

    CERN Document Server

    Verley, S; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Bergond, G; Leon, S

    2007-01-01

    Star formation depends strongly both on the local environment of galaxies, and on the internal dynamics of the interstellar medium. To disentangle the two effects, we obtained, in the framework of the AMIGA project, Ha and Gunn r photometric data for more than 200 spiral galaxies lying in very low-density regions of the local Universe. We characterise the Ha emission, tracing current star formation, of the 45 largest and less inclined galaxies observed for which we estimate the torques between the gas and the bulk of the optical matter. We could subsequently study the Ha morphological aspect of these isolated spiral galaxies. Using Fourier analysis, we focus on the modes of the spiral arms and also on the strength of the bars, computing the torques between the gas and newly formed stars (Ha) and the bulk of the optical matter (Gunn r). We interpret the various bar/spiral morphologies observed in terms of the secular evolution experienced by galaxies in isolation. We also classify the different spatial distrib...

  12. Dynamics of drop formation of surfactant-containing liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiram Subramani, Hariprasad

    2005-11-01

    Surfactants are used to control the breakup of jets and drops in applications as diverse as inkjet printing, pesticide spraying, and DNA microarraying. While the breakup of surfactant-free jets/drops has been exhaustively studied, little is known by comparison about interface rupture when the jet/drop liquids contain surfactants. High speed imaging is employed here to gain insights into differences between the dynamics of formation of drops of pure liquids, such as water, diethylene glycol, a 50 wt % solution of 20 cSt and 50 cSt polydimethyl siloxane, and those of solutions consisting of different concentrations of a nonionic surfactant, pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether C12E5 in mixtures of 75 wt % (GW75) and 90 wt % (GW90) glycerol/water, from a capillary tube. Equilibrium surface tensions of solutions of C12E5 are fitted with the Langmuir-Szyskowski equation and the critical micelle concentrations (cmc) are found to be 0.25 and 0.40 mM. Changes in dynamics of drop breakup are studied by varying surfactant concentration (below and above cmc), flow rate, tube radius, and liquid viscosity.

  13. Planetary Dynamics and Habitable Planet Formation In Binary Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Whether binaries can harbor potentially habitable planets depends on several factors including the physical properties and the orbital characteristics of the binary system. While the former determines the location of the habitable zone (HZ), the latter affects the dynamics of the material from which terrestrial planets are formed (i.e., planetesimals and planetary embryos), and drives the final architecture of the planets assembly. In order for a habitable planet to form in a binary star system, these two factors have to work in harmony. That is, the orbital dynamics of the two stars and their interactions with the planet-forming material have to allow terrestrial planet formation in the habitable zone, and ensure that the orbit of a potentially habitable planet will be stable for long times. We have organized this chapter with the same order in mind. We begin by presenting a general discussion on the motion of planets in binary stars and their stability. We then discuss the stability of terrestrial planets, ...

  14. Dynamics of alliance formation and the egalitarian revolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Gavrilets

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arguably the most influential force in human history is the formation of social coalitions and alliances (i.e., long-lasting coalitions and their impact on individual power. Understanding the dynamics of alliance formation and its consequences for biological, social, and cultural evolution is a formidable theoretical challenge. In most great ape species, coalitions occur at individual and group levels and among both kin and non-kin. Nonetheless, ape societies remain essentially hierarchical, and coalitions rarely weaken social inequality. In contrast, human hunter-gatherers show a remarkable tendency to egalitarianism, and human coalitions and alliances occur not only among individuals and groups, but also among groups of groups. These observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of human coalitions can only be understood in the context of social networks and cognitive evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we develop a stochastic model describing the emergence of networks of allies resulting from within-group competition for status or mates between individuals utilizing dyadic information. The model shows that alliances often emerge in a phase transition-like fashion if the group size, awareness, aggressiveness, and persuasiveness of individuals are large and the decay rate of individual affinities is small. With cultural inheritance of social networks, a single leveling alliance including all group members can emerge in several generations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a simple and flexible theoretical approach for studying the dynamics of alliance emergence applicable where game-theoretic methods are not practical. Our approach is both scalable and expandable. It is scalable in that it can be generalized to larger groups, or groups of groups. It is expandable in that it allows for inclusion of additional factors such as behavioral, genetic, social, and cultural features. Our results suggest that a rapid

  15. International Workshop on Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E; Curceanu, C; Trento 2006; Trento06

    2006-01-01

    These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

  16. Producing the positive antihydrogen ion {\\bar{{\\rm{H}}}}^{+} via radiative attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, C. M.; Pak, K. Y.; Straton, Jack C.

    2016-04-01

    We provide an estimate of the cross section for the radiative attachment of a second positron into the (1 {{{s}}}2 {}1{{{S}}}e) state of the {\\bar{{{H}}}}+ ion that uses a 200-term two-positron wave function composed of explicitly correlated exponentials. This is done by analytically integrating the six-dimensional, three body photoionization integrals that enter into this result (and those utilizing, the alternative, Hylleraas wave functions) and applying the principle of detailed balance. Finally, we obtain the rate coefficient {α }{RA} for attaching a second positron to antihydrogen as a function of temperature via a numerical integral that is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of the product of positron velocity and cross section. Our motivation in studying the production of {\\bar{{{H}}}}+ lies in its potential use as an intermediate stage in the cooling of antihydrogen to ultra-cold (sub-mK) temperatures for spectroscopic studies and probing the gravitational interaction of the anti-atom. Estimates of the reaction rates are given for positron temperatures T e in the range from 50 K to 5 K.

  17. A new application of emulsions to measure the gravitational force on antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Ariga, T; Braccini, S; Canali, C; Ereditato, A; Kawada, J; Kimura, M; Kreslo, I; Pistillo, C; Scampoli, P; Storey, J W

    2013-01-01

    We propose to build and operate a detector based on the emulsion film technology for the measurement of the gravitational acceleration on antimatter, to be performed by the AEgIS experiment (AD6) at CERN. The goal of AEgIS is to test the weak equivalence principle with a precision of 1% on the gravitational acceleration g by measuring the position of the annihilation vertex antihydrogen atoms after their free fall in a horizontal vacuum pipe. With the emulsion technology developed at the University of Bern we propose to improve the performance of AEgIS by exploiting the superior position resolution of emulsion films over other particle detectors. The idea is to use a new type of emulsion films, especially developed for applications in vacuum, to yield a spatial resolution of the order of one micron in the measurement of the sag of the antihydrogen atoms in the gravitational field. This is an order of magnitude better than what was planned in the original AEgIS proposal.

  18. Pseudobulge Formation as a Dynamical Rather than a Secular Process

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, Javiera; Carollo, Marcella; Madau, Piero

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in "Eris", a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky Way-like massive late-type spiral in a cold dark matter (LCDM) universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass Mvir=8x10^11 Msun, a photometric stellar mass M*=3.2x10^10 Msun, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolves from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift, was destroyed by minor mergers at z~3, reformed shortly after, and weakened again ...

  19. Cellulose microfibril formation within a coarse grained molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Abdolmadjid; Shklyaev, Oleg; Crespi, Vincent; Zhao, Zhen; Zhong, Linghao; CLSF Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Cellulose in biomass is mostly in the form of crystalline microfibrils composed of 18 to 36 parallel chains of polymerized glucose monomers. A single chain is produced by cellular machinery (CesA) located on the preliminary cell wall membrane. Information about the nucleation stage can address important questions about intermediate region between cell wall and the fully formed crystalline microfibrils. Very little is known about the transition from isolated chains to protofibrils up to a full microfibril, in contrast to a large body of studies on both CesA and the final crystalline microfibril. In addition to major experimental challenges in studying this transient regime, the length and time scales of microfibril nucleation are inaccessible to atomistic molecular dynamics. We have developed a novel coarse grained model for cellulose microfibrils which accounts for anisotropic interchain interactions. The model allows us to study nucleation, kinetics, and growth of cellulose chains/protofibrils/microfibrils. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of The Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation, an Energy Frontier Research Center.

  20. Narrowband solid state vuv coherent source for laser cooling of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michan, J. Mario; Polovy, Gene; Madison, Kirk W.; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Momose, Takamasa

    2015-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a solid-state pulsed source of narrowband (amplifier cavity to generate intense radiation at 729.4 nm, which is then sent through a frequency doubling stage and a frequency tripling stage to generate 121.56 nm light. Although the pulse energy at 121.56 nm is currently limited to 12 nJ with a repetition rate of 10 Hz, we expect to obtain greater than 0.1 μJ per pulse at 10 Hz by further optimizing the alignment of the pulse amplifier and the efficiency of the frequency tripling stage. Such a power will be sufficient for cooling a trapped antihydrogen atom from 500 mK to 20mK.

  1. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  2. Continuous Lyman-alpha generation by four-wave mixing in mercury for laser-cooling of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbe, D; Diehl, T; Koglbauer, A; Müllers, A; Scheid, M; Stappel, M; Steinborn, R; Walz, J

    2010-01-01

    Cooling antihydrogen atoms is important for future experiments both to test the fundamental CPT symmetry by high-resolution laser spectroscopy and also to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Laser-cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1S-2P transition at the wavelength of Lyman-alpha (121.6nm). A continuous-wave laser at the Lyman-alpha wavelength based on solid-state fundamental lasers is described. By using a two-photon and a near one photon resonance a scan across the whole phasematching curve of the four-wave mixing process is possible. Furthermore the influence of the beam profile of one fundamental beam on the four-wave mixing process is studied.

  3. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  4. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muranaka, T; Debu, P; Dupre, P; Liszkay, L; Mansoulie, B; Perez, P; Rey, J M; Ruiz, N; Sacquin, Y [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crivelli, P; Gendotti, U; Rubbia, A, E-mail: tomoko.muranaka@cea.f [Institut fuer TelichenPhysik, ETHZ, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5{center_dot}10{sup 11} per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  5. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  6. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage

  7. Quenching of $para$-H$_2$ with an ultra-cold anti-hydrogen atom $\\bar{H}_{1s}$

    OpenAIRE

    Sultanov, Renat A.; Adhikari, Sadhan K.; Guster, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report the results concerning calculations for quantum-mechanical rotational transitions in molecular hydrogen, H$_2$, induced by an ultra-cold ground state anti-hydrogen atom $\\bar{H}_{1s}$. The calculations are accomplished using a non-reactive close-coupling quantum-mechanical approach. The H$_2$ molecule is treated as a rigid rotor. The total elastic scattering cross section $\\sigma_{el}(\\epsilon)$ at energy $\\epsilon$, state-resolved rotational transition cross sections $...

  8. Discrete Dynamical Models Showing Pattern Formation in Subaqueous Bedforms

    CERN Document Server

    Tufillaro, N B

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: A new class of ``toy models'' for subaqueous bedform formation are proposed and examined. These models all show a similar mechanism of wavelength selection via bedform unification, and they may have applications to bedform stratigraphy. The models are also useful for exploring general issues of pattern formation and complexity in stochastically driven far from equilibrium systems.

  9. Research on framework for formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xian-Song; Xu, Hong-Gen; Zhang, Ming-Jun

    2004-12-01

    In this paper a practical framework is proposed to keep formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment. The approach is a viable solution to solve formation problem. The approach allows online planning of the formation paths using a Dijkstra’s search algorithm based on the current sensor data. The formation is allowed to be dynamically changed in order to avoid obstacles in the environment. A controller is designed to keep the robots in their planned trajectories. It is shown that the approach is effective and feasible by the simulation of computer.

  10. Dynamics of formation of ferromanganese nodules in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Ghosh, A.K.

    sediment-water interface, low rate of sedimentation, presence of nutrient-rich bottom water mass and an oxidizing environment. We present here an integrated assessment of process of formation of ferromanganese nodules from the IONF, which are variable even...

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics, Lorenz Model and Formation of Binary Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yi-Fang

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Lorenz model derived from the equations of hydrodynamics of nebula, we discuss the formation of binary stars by the qualitative analysis theory of nonlinear equation. Here the two wings in the Lorenz model form just the binary stars, whose Roche surface is result of evolution under certain condition. The nonlinear interaction plays a crucial role, and is necessary condition of the formation of binary stars and of multiple stars. While the linear equations form only a single star....

  12. Opinion Formation and the Collective Dynamics of Risk Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Moussaïd, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    The formation of collective opinion is a complex phenomenon that results from the combined effects of mass media exposure and social influence between individuals. The present work introduces a model of opinion formation specifically designed to address risk judgments, such as attitudes towards climate change, terrorist threats, or children vaccination. The model assumes that people collect risk information from the media environment and exchange them locally with other individuals. Even thou...

  13. Some Welfare Effects of Dynamic Customs Union Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Haveman, Jon D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with an issue of increasing importance in a world where preferential trading arrangements are the call of the day: the effects on world welfare of sequential customs union foration. A computational model of customs union formation is developed and simulated under a variety of assumptions. These assumptions concern various characteristics of the world, the pattern of customs union formation, and GATT restrictions on the common external tariff imposed by the customs union. ...

  14. Dynamic dimer formation between superionic fluorines in PbF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobutaka; Tsumuraya, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    Recently Tsumuraya et al .(J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81,055603(2012).) have elucidated the formation of the dynamic dimers in the superionic conductor α-CuI with the first principles molecular dynamics (MD) method. They, for the first time in research, confirmed the dimer formation through the analyses the origin of the correlation peaks of the partial pair distribution functions and the partial angle distribution functions. The present study elucidates the dynamic structure of the superionc fluorines in PbF2 crystal with the MD method through identifying the origins of the correlation peaks. The fluorines form the dynamic 32 f-8 c and 4 b-8 c dimers.

  15. Spontaneous formation of dynamical groups in an adaptive networked system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Menghui; Guan Shuguang [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117508 (Singapore); Lai, C-H, E-mail: tsllm@nus.edu.s [Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Systems (Singapore), National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2010-10-15

    In this work, we investigate a model of an adaptive networked dynamical system, where the coupling strengths among phase oscillators coevolve with the phase states. It is shown that in this model the oscillators can spontaneously differentiate into two dynamical groups after a long time evolution. Within each group, the oscillators have similar phases, while oscillators in different groups have approximately opposite phases. The network gradually converts from the initial random structure with a uniform distribution of connection strengths into a modular structure that is characterized by strong intra-connections and weak inter-connections. Furthermore, the connection strengths follow a power-law distribution, which is a natural consequence of the coevolution of the network and the dynamics. Interestingly, it is found that if the inter-connections are weaker than a certain threshold, the two dynamical groups will almost decouple and evolve independently. These results are helpful in further understanding the empirical observations in many social and biological networks.

  16. Dynamics of Surfactants Spreading on Gel-like Materials: Cracking and Pattern Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Spandagos, Constantine; Luckham, Paul; Matar, Omar

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics of surfactants spreading on gels, paying particular attention to the pattern formation accompanying the flow. The latter results from gel-cracking, promoted by Marangoni stresses, and resemble starbursts.

  17. Methodological Framework Of Formation Structural-Dynamic Theory Inside Environmental Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Lubov Zharova

    2012-01-01

    In the article the results of analysis of modern theoretical trends and practical examples in framework of nature management are represented. The series of propositions for formation structure-dynamic theory are formulated.

  18. The self-adaptation to dynamic failures for efficient virtual organization formations in grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous and dynamic resources, dynamic failures in the distributed grid environment usually occur more than in traditional computation platforms, which cause failed VO formations. In this paper, we develop a novel self-adaptive mechanism to dynamic failures during VO formations. Such a self-adaptive scheme allows an individual and member of VOs to automatically find other available or replaceable one once a failure happens and therefore makes systems automatically recover from dynamic failures. We define dynamic failure situations of a system by using two standard indicators: mean time between failures (MTBF) and mean time to recover (MTTR). We model both MTBF and MTTR as Poisson distributions. We investigate and analyze the efficiency of the proposed self-adaptation mechanism to dynamic failures by comparing the success probability of VO formations before and after adopting it in three different cases: (1) different failure situations; (2) different organizational structures and scales; (3) different task complexities. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme can automatically adapt to dynamic failures and effectively improve the dynamic VO formation performance in the event of node failures, which provide a valuable addition to the field.

  19. Diffusive Dynamics of Contact Formation in Disordered Polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B

    2016-02-12

    Experiments measuring contact formation between probes in disordered chains provide information on the fundamental time scales relevant to protein folding. However, their interpretation usually relies on one-dimensional (1D) diffusion models, as do many experiments probing a single distance. Here, we use all-atom molecular simulations to capture both the time scales of contact formation, as well as the scaling with peptide length for tryptophan triplet quenching experiments, revealing the sensitivity of the experimental quenching times to the configurational space explored by the chain. We find a remarkable consistency between the results of the full calculation and from Szabo-Schulten-Schulten theory applied to a 1D diffusion model, supporting the validity of such models. The significant reduction in diffusion coefficient at the small probe separations which most influence quenching rate, suggests that contact formation and Förster resonance energy transfer correlation experiments provide complementary information on diffusivity. PMID:26919016

  20. Diffusive Dynamics of Contact Formation in Disordered Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerze, Gül H.; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments measuring contact formation between probes in disordered chains provide information on the fundamental time scales relevant to protein folding. However, their interpretation usually relies on one-dimensional (1D) diffusion models, as do many experiments probing a single distance. Here, we use all-atom molecular simulations to capture both the time scales of contact formation, as well as the scaling with peptide length for tryptophan triplet quenching experiments, revealing the sensitivity of the experimental quenching times to the configurational space explored by the chain. We find a remarkable consistency between the results of the full calculation and from Szabo-Schulten-Schulten theory applied to a 1D diffusion model, supporting the validity of such models. The significant reduction in diffusion coefficient at the small probe separations which most influence quenching rate, suggests that contact formation and Förster resonance energy transfer correlation experiments provide complementary information on diffusivity.

  1. A Broad Dynamical Model for Pattern Formation by Lateral Inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Arcak, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Many patterning events in multi-cellular organisms rely on cell-to-cell contact signaling, such as the Notch pathway in metazoans. A particularly interesting phenomenon in this form of communication is lateral inhibition where a cell that adopts a particular fate inhibits its immediate neighbors from doing the same. Dynamical models are of great interest for understanding the circuit topologies involved in lateral inhibition and for predicting the associated patterns. Several simplified models have been employed for Notch signalling pathways in the literature. The objective of this paper is to present an abstract dynamical model that captures the essential features of lateral inhibition and to demonstrate with dynamical systems techniques that these features indeed lead to patterning.

  2. Dynamical Formation of the GW150914 Binary Black Hole

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Haster, Carl-Johan; Chatterjee, Sourav; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility that GW150914, the binary black hole merger recently detected by Advanced LIGO, was formed by gravitational interactions in the core of a dense star cluster. Using models of globular clusters with detailed $N$-body dynamics and stellar evolution, we show that a typical cluster with a mass of $3\\times10^5M_{\\odot}$ to $6\\times10^5M_{\\odot}$ is optimal for forming GW150914-like binary black holes that will merge in the local universe. We identify the most likely dynam...

  3. Dynamic channeling of electromagnetic radiation by extended plasma formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpakov, V. I.; Norinskii, L. V.; Rogov, V. S.

    1991-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using axisymmetric extended plasma formations (EPFs) as guide lines for the transmission of electromagnetic radiation. The EPF was formed as a result of optical breakdown in air via radiation from an Nd:glass laser. The results obtained demonstrate the channeling of microwave radiation in an EPF with a blurred boundary.

  4. Dynamical Formation of the GW150914 Binary Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Carl L; Chatterjee, Sourav; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility that GW150914, the binary black hole merger recently detected by Advanced LIGO, was formed by gravitational interactions in the core of a dense star cluster. Using models of globular clusters with detailed $N$-body dynamics and stellar evolution, we show that a typical cluster with a mass of $3\\times10^5M_{\\odot}$ to $6\\times10^5M_{\\odot}$ is optimal for forming GW150914-like binary black holes that will merge in the local universe. We identify the most likely dynamical processes for forming GW150914 in such a cluster, and we show that the detection of GW150914 is consistent with the masses and merger rates expected for binary black hole mergers from globular clusters. Our results show that dynamical processes provide a significant and well-understood pathway for forming binary black hole mergers in the local universe. Understanding the contribution of dynamics to the binary black hole merger problem is a critical step in unlocking the full potential of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  5. The formation of cosmic structure with modified Newtonian dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    I consider the growth of inhomogeneities in a low-density, baryonic, vacuum energy-dominated universe in the context of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). I first write down a two-field Langrangian-based theory of MOND (nonrelativistic) that embodies several assumptions, such as constancy of the MO

  6. Generic modes of consensus formation in stochastic language dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, R A

    2009-02-01

    We introduce a class of stochastic models for the dynamics of two linguistic variants that are competing to become the single, shared convention within an unstructured community of speakers. Different instances of the model are distinguished by the way agents handle variability in the language (i.e., multiple forms for the same meaning). The class of models includes as special cases two previously studied models of language dynamics, the Naming Game, in which agents tend to standardize on variants that they have encountered most frequently, and the Utterance Selection Model, in which agents tend to preserve variability by uniform sampling of a pool of utterances. We reduce the full complexities of the dynamics to a single-coordinate stochastic model which allows the probability and time taken for speakers to reach consensus on a single variant to be calculated for large communities. This analysis suggests that in the broad class of models considered, consensus is formed in one of three generic ways, according to whether agents tend to eliminate, accentuate or sample neutrally the variability in the language. These different regimes are observed in simulations of the full dynamics, and for which the simplified model in some cases makes good quantitative predictions. We use these results, along with comparisons with related models, to conjecture the likely behaviour of more general models, and further make use of empirical data to argue that in reality, biases away from neutral sampling behaviour are likely to be small.

  7. Dynamic Slicing: a Generic Analysis Based on a Natural Semantics Format

    OpenAIRE

    Gouranton, Valérie; Le Métayer, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Slicing analyses have been proposed for different programming languages. Rather than defining a new analysis from scratch for each programming language, we would like to specify such an analysis once for all, in a language-independent way, and then specialise it for different programming languages. In order to achieve this goal, we propose a notion of natural semantics format and a dynamic slicing analysis format. The natural semantics format formalises a class of natural semantics and the an...

  8. Opinion Formation and the Collective Dynamics of Risk Perception

    CERN Document Server

    Moussaid, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    The formation of collective opinion is a complex phenomenon that results from the combined effects of mass media exposure and social influence between individuals. The present work introduces a model of opinion formation specifically designed to address risk judgments, such as attitudes towards climate change, terrorist threats, or children vaccination. The model assumes that people collect risk information from the media environment and exchange them locally with other individuals. Even though individuals are initially exposed to the same sample of information, the model predicts the emergence of opinion polarization and clustering. In particular, numerical simulations highlight two crucial factors that determine the collective outcome: the propensity of individuals to search for independent information, and the strength of social influence. This work provides a quantitative framework to anticipate and manage how the public responds to a given risk, and could help understanding the systemic amplification of ...

  9. A dynamic model of droplet formation in GMA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative analysis of different approaches is carried out, which mathematically describes the metal droplet formation process in an electrode during gas metal arc (GMA) welding. It was shown that a hydrostatical model of the droplet's free surface could not correctly describe the formation and transfer of electrode metal droplets. The complete hydrodynamic model, which uses the whole system of Navier–Stokes equations, requires significant computer resources for numerical realization. This limits its application to small computational experiments. As an alternative for this model, the approximate hydrodynamic model adapted to GMA welding conditions is considered. It is shown that this model allows the prediction of droplet geometry right up to its detachment. The influence of the welding current and magnetic pressure on the droplet size and detachment frequency is studied. (paper)

  10. Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results

  11. Gas Dynamics and the Formation of Galaxies and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Abraham

    1998-01-01

    This performance report lists papers that were written during 19978/98. These papers focus on structure formation in the universe at high redshifts, and accomplish various aspects of the research goals of this grant. Some of the papers included in this report are: 1) The First Stars and Quasars; 2) Direct Measurement of Cosmological Parameters from the Cosmic Deceleration of Extragalactic Objects; and 3) The Expected Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows In Supernova Searches.

  12. The Dynamics of City Formation: Finance and Governance

    OpenAIRE

    J. Henderson; Venables, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    This Paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behaviour. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models. Equilibrium city size...

  13. Trajectory Dynamics of Gas Molecules and Galaxy Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Llanos, Pedro J.; Miller, James K.; Hintz, Gerald R.

    2013-01-01

    The probability distribution of the velocity of gas molecules in a closed container is described by the kinetic theory of gases. When molecules collide or impact the walls of a container, they exchange energy and momentum in accordance with Newton's laws of motion. Between collisions, the trajectory of individual molecules is a straight line, neglecting gravity. During the formation of a galaxy, the stars are constrained to a region of space and exchange energy and momentum in a manner simila...

  14. The dynamics of streamer formation and its growth mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of experimental studies of physical processes responsible for the transformation of the electron avalanche to the streamer and its growth towards the cathode. The new experimental data on the mechanism of formation and the structure of the streamer allow a more concrete understanding of the pattern of evolution of long spark discharges, including the lightning, and the interrelation of basic processes in such discharges. (author)

  15. Dynamics of Aerial Tower Formation in Bacillus subtilis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Wilking, James; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are highly-organized colonies of bacteria that form on surfaces. These colonies form sophisticated structures which make them robust and difficult to remove from environments such as catheters, where they pose serious infection problems. Previous work has shown that sub-mm sized aerial towers form on the surface of Bacillus subtilis colony biofilms. Spore-formation is located preferentially at the tops of these towers, known as fruiting bodies, which aid in the dispersal and propagation of the colony to new sites. The formation of towers is strongly affected by the quorum-sensing molecule surfactin and the cannibalism pathway of the bacteria. In the present work, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to study the development of individual fruiting bodies, allowing us to visualize the time-dependent spatial distribution of matrix-forming and sporulating bacteria within the towers. With this information, we investigate the physical mechanisms, such as surface tension and polymer concentration gradients, that drive the formation of these structures.

  16. On the Interface Formation Model for Dynamic Triple Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the theory of Y. Shikhmurzaev on forming interfaces as a continuum thermodynamical model for dynamic triple lines. We start with the derivation of the balances for mass, momentum, energy and entropy in a three-phase fluid system with full interfacial physics, including a brief review of the relevant transport theorems on interfaces and triple lines. Employing the entropy principle in the form given in [Bothe & Dreyer, Acta Mechanica, doi:10.1007/s00707-014-1275-1] but extended to this more general case, we arrive at the entropy production and perform a linear closure, except for a nonlinear closure for the sorption processes. Specialized to the isothermal case, we obtain a thermodynamically consistent mathematical model for dynamic triple lines and show that the total available energy is a strict Lyapunov function for this system.

  17. Dynamics of black hole formation: Evidence for nonextensivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dynamics of a bounded collapsing configuration emitting gravitational waves, whose exterior spacetime is described by the Robinson-Trautman metric. In this process mass is lost due to gravitational wave emission until the Schwarzschild black hole is formed. By performing a careful computation of the distribution of the mass fraction extracted by gravitational radiation, we have shown that it satisfies the distribution law of Tsallis nonextensive statistics, and this result is independent of the initial data considered

  18. Femtosecond dynamics of hydrogen elimination: benzene formation from cyclohexadiene

    OpenAIRE

    Feyter, Steven De; Diau, Eric W.-G.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2000-01-01

    Using femtosecond-resolved mass spectrometry in a molecular beam, we report real-time study of the hydrogen elimination reaction of 1,4-cyclohexadiene. The experimental observation of the ultrafast stepwise H-elimination elucidates the reaction dynamics and mechanism. With density-functional theory (ground-state) calculations, the nature of the reaction (multiple) pathways is examined. With the help of recent conical-intersection calculations, the excited-state and ground-state pathways are c...

  19. Laboratory experiments on dynamics of anthropogenic ferrimagnetics in sand formations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapička, Aleš; Fialová, Hana; Petrovský, Eduard; Kodešová, R.; Kopáč, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, Special issue (2008), s. 52-53. ISSN 1335-2806. [Paleo, Rock and Environmental Magnetism. Castle Meeting /11./. 22.06.2008-28.06.2008, Bojnice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : soil pollution * dynamics of anthropogenic particles * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  20. Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in January 1996

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime, so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been produced came on 4 January 1996.

  1. Dynamically-induced structures formation in congested magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.

    2008-12-01

    Crystal fabrics preserved in igneous rocks offer a glimpse into the magma emplacement process. Detailed field mapping, in combination with AMS studies, seem to provide the best available data for unravelling intrusion architecture on the decimetre scale. However, a full and proper understanding of the fluid dynamics of congested fluid-particle mixtures during shear remains elusive. This is a shame as without recourse to such fundamental understanding, the interpretation of structural field data in the context of magma flow remains problematic. One way to gain insight into the process is to treat flowing magma as a dynamic material with a rheology similar to sheared, congested slurries. The fancy that dense magma equates to a high temperature slurry is an attractive one, and opens up a way to examine the emplacement process that does not rely exclusively on equilibrium thermodynamics as a final explanation of commonly observed igneous structures. Instead, using examples from mafic rocks where cooling has been rapid, the idea is put forward that in high Peclet number suspensions (where particle diffusion is negligible), shearing and non- Newtonian behaviour imparts a rich diversity of structures including layering, grading and flow segregation. Key to understanding the rheology, hence flow dynamics of congested magma, is the particle microstructure, a still poorly known essence of suspension flows. Where magma transport is continental in scale and long lived (e.g. Large Igneous Provinces), rotation of the earth may in theory endow a small but potentially measurable imprint on the preserved flow fabric.

  2. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, E. N.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  3. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, E. N., E-mail: evgeniy.n.egorov@gmail.com; Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E. [Chernyshevsky Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  4. Construction and Operational Experience with a Superconducting Octupole Used to Trap Antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanderer P.; Escallier, J.; Marone, A.; Parker, B.

    2011-09-06

    A superconducting octupole magnet has seen extensive service as part of the ALPHA experiment at CERN. ALPHA has trapped antihydrogen, a crucial step towards performing precision measurements of anti-atoms. The octupole was made at the Direct Wind facility by the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnet was wound with a six-around-one NbTi cable about 1 mm in diameter. It is about 300 mm long, with a radius of 25 mm and a peak field at the conductor of 4.04 T. Specific features of the magnet, including a minimal amount of material in the coil and coil ends with low multipole content, were advantageous to its use in ALPHA. The magnet was operated for six months a year for five years. During this time it underwent about 900 thermal cycles (between 4K and 100K). A novel operational feature is that during the course of data-taking the magnet was repeatedly shut off from its 950 A operating current. The magnet quenches during the shutoff, with a decay constant of 9 ms. Over the course of the five years, the magnet was deliberately quenched many thousands of times. It still performs well.

  5. The dynamics of primordial black-hole formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine numerically the formation of small black holes from primordial density fluctuations in a radiation-dominated spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. Large amplitude fluctuations might be expected to form black holes, while smaller fluctuations will be washed out by the expansion of the universe. We have studied the interface between these two types of behaviour. Unlike earlier studies which suggested that there was no lower limit to the mass of a black hole, this work suggests that there is a minimum mass for a primordial black hole of the order of one ten thousandth of the mass contained within the horizon. We discuss the implications for critical collapse studies

  6. Adaptive RBFNN Formation Control of Multi-mobile Robots with Actuator Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan-dong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of formation control and trajectory tracking for multiple nonholonomic mobile robots with actuator and formation dynamics. An adaptive neural-network (NN control strategy that integrated kinematic controller with input voltages controller of actuator was proposed. A control law was designed by backstepping technique based on separation-bearing formation control structure of leader-follower. The radial basis function neural network (RBFNN was adopted to achieve on-line estimation for the dynamics nonlinear uncertain part for follower and leader robots. The adaptive robust controller was adopted to compensate modeling errors of NN. This strategy not only overcomed all kinds of uncertainties of mobile robots, but also ensured the desired trajectory tracking of robot formation in the case of maintaining formation. The stability and convergence of the control system were proved by using the Lyapunov theory. The simulation results showed the effectiveness of this proposed method.

  7. CONSENSUS FORMATION OF TWO-LEVEL OPINION DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yilun SHANG

    2014-01-01

    Opinion dynamics have received significant attention in recent years. This pa-per proposes a bounded confidence opinion model for a group of agents with two different confidence levels. Each agent in the population is endowed with a confidence interval around her opinion with radius αd or (1-α)d, where α ∈ (0, 1/2] represents the differentiation of confidence levels. We analytically derived the critical confidence bound dc =1/(4α) for the two-level opinion dynamics on Z. A single opinion cluster is formed with probability 1 above this critical value regardless of the ratio p of agents with high/low confidence. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate our theoretical results. Noticed is a clear impact of p on the collective behavior: more agents with high confidence lead to harder agreement. It is also experimentally revealed that the sharpness of the threshold dc increases with αbut does not depend on p.

  8. Distributed Consensus-Based Robust Adaptive Formation Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots with Partial Known Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the distributed consensus-based robust adaptive formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots with partially known dynamics. Firstly, multirobot formation control problem has been converted into a state consensus problem. Secondly, the practical control strategies, which incorporate the distributed kinematic controllers and the robust adaptive torque controllers, are designed for solving the formation control problem. Thirdly, the specified reference trajectory for the geometric centroid of the formation is assumed as the trajectory of a virtual leader, whose information is available to only a subset of the followers. Finally, numerical results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approaches.

  9. Social Influence and the Collective Dynamics of Opinion Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Moussaid, Mehdi; Analytis, Pantelis P; Neth, Hansjoerg

    2013-01-01

    Social influence is the process by which individuals adapt their opinion, revise their beliefs, or change their behavior as a result of social interactions with other people. In our strongly interconnected society, social influence plays a prominent role in many self-organized phenomena such as herding in cultural markets, the spread of ideas and innovations, and the amplification of fears during epidemics. Yet, the mechanisms of opinion formation remain poorly understood, and existing physics-based models lack systematic empirical validation. Here, we report two controlled experiments showing how participants answering factual questions revise their initial judgments after being exposed to the opinion and confidence level of others. Based on the observation of 59 experimental subjects exposed to peer-opinion for 15 different items, we draw an influence map that describes the strength of peer influence during interactions. A simple process model derived from our observations demonstrates how opinions in a gro...

  10. Dynamical Evidence for a Late Formation of Saturn's Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija; Nesvorný, David

    2016-01-01

    We explore the past evolution of Saturn's moons using direct numerical integrations. We find that the past Tethys-Dione 3:2 orbital resonance predicted in standard models likely did not occur, implying that the system is less evolved than previously thought. On the other hand, the orbital inclinations of Tethys, Dione and Rhea suggest that the system did cross the Dione-Rhea 5:3 resonance, which is closely followed by a Tethys-Dione secular resonance. A clear implication is that either the moons are significantly younger than the planet, or that their tidal evolution must be extremely slow (Q > 80,000). As an extremely slow-evolving system is incompatible with intense tidal heating of Enceladus, we conclude that the moons interior to Titan are not primordial, and we present a plausible scenario for the system's recent formation. We propose that the mid-sized moons re-accreted from a disk about 100 Myr ago, during which time Titan acquired its significant orbital eccentricity. We speculate that this disk has f...

  11. Equilibria, Dynamics and Current Sheets Formation in Magnetically Confined Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of magnetic fields in closed regions of solar and stellar coronae are investigated with a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model in the framework of Parker scenario for coronal heating. A novel analysis of reduced MHD equilibria shows that their magnetic fields have an asymmetric structure in the axial direction with variation length-scale $z_\\ell \\sim \\ell B_0/b$, where $B_0$ is the intensity of the strong axial guide field, $b$ that of the orthogonal magnetic field component, and $\\ell$ the scale of $\\mathbf{b}$. Equilibria are then quasi-invariant along the axial direction for variation scales larger than approximatively the loop length $z_\\ell \\gtrsim L_z$, and increasingly more asymmetric for smaller variation scales $z_\\ell \\lesssim L_z$. The $critical$ $length$ $z_\\ell \\sim L_z$ corresponds to the magnetic field intensity threshold $b \\sim \\ell B_0/L_z$. Magnetic fields stressed by photospheric motions cannot develop strong axial asymmetries. Therefore fields with intensities below such t...

  12. The dynamics of protein body formation in developing wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Katie L; Tosi, Paola; Palmer, Richard; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Grovenor, Chris R M; Shewry, Peter R

    2016-09-01

    Wheat is a major source of protein in the diets of humans and livestock but we know little about the mechanisms that determine the patterns of protein synthesis in the developing endosperm. We have used a combination of enrichment with (15) N glutamine and NanoSIMS imaging to establish that the substrate required for protein synthesis is transported radially from its point of entrance in the endosperm cavity across the starchy endosperm tissues, before becoming concentrated in the cells immediately below the aleurone layer. This transport occurs continuously during grain development but may be slower in the later stages. Although older starchy endosperm cells tend to contain larger protein deposits formed by the fusion of small protein bodies, small highly enriched protein bodies may also be present in the same cells. This shows a continuous process of protein body initiation, in both older and younger starchy endosperm cells and in all regions of the tissue. Immunolabeling with specific antibodies shows that the patterns of enrichment are not related to the contents of gluten proteins in the protein bodies. In addition to providing new information on the dynamics of protein deposition, the study demonstrates the wider utility of NanoSIMS and isotope labelling for studying complex developmental processes in plant tissues. PMID:26898533

  13. Dynamics and structure formation in thin polymer melt films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of thin liquid coatings plays a fundamental role in everyday life. We studied the stability conditions of thin (3 to 300 nm) liquid polymer films on various substrates. The key role is played by the effective interface potential φ of the system air/film/substrate, which determines the dewetting scenario in case the film is not stable. We describe in this study how to distinguish a spinodal dewetting scenario from heterogeneous and homogeneous dewetting by analysing the emerging structures of the film surface by e.g. Minkowski measures. We also include line tension studies of tiny droplets, showing that the long-range part of φ does affect the drop profile, but only very close to the three phase boundary line. The dynamic properties of the films are characterized via various experimental methods: the form of the dewetting front, for example, was recorded by scanning probe microscopy and gives insight into the boundary condition between the liquid and the substrate. We further report experiments probing the viscosity and the glass transition temperature of nm-thick films using e.g. ellipsometry. Here we find that even short-chained polymer melts exhibit a significant reduction of the glass transition temperature as the film thickness is reduced below 100 nm

  14. Dynamical simulation of disoriented chiral condensate formation in Bjorken rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a semiclassical treatment of the linear σ model, we simulate the dynamical evolution of an initially hot cylindrical rod endowed with a longitudinal Bjorken scaling expansion (a ''Bjorken rod''). The field equation is propagated until full decoupling has occurred and the asymptotic many-body state of free pions is then obtained by a suitable Fourier decomposition of the field and a subsequent stochastic determination of the number of quanta in each elementary mode. The resulting transverse pion spectrum exhibits visible enhancements below 200 MeV due to the parametric amplification caused by the oscillatory relaxation of the chiral order parameter. Ensembles of such final states are subjected to various event-by-event analyses. The factorial moments of the multiplicity distribution suggest that the soft pions are nonstatistical. Furthermore, their emission patterns exhibit azimuthal correlations that have a bearing on the domain size in the source. Finally, the distribution of the neutral pion fraction shows a significant broadening for the soft pions which grows steadily as the number of azimuthal segments is increased. All of these features are indicative of disoriented chiral condensates and it may be interesting to apply similar analyses to actual data from high-energy nuclear collision experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. The fluid dynamics of xenocryst formation in mafic enclaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Paul; Blundy, Jon; Cashman, Katharine; Huppert, Herbert; Mader, Heidy

    2014-05-01

    Mafic enclaves produced by the mingling of felsic and mafic magmas commonly contain xenocrysts; crystals akin to those in the felsic host. These crystals are interpreted as having crossed the interface between the two magmas at some stage during the rock evolution. An understanding of the physical conditions that allow this exchange would give insight into the state of the system at the time of assimilation, providing information about the magmatic history of the rock. Using both numerical models and analogue experiments, the low Reynolds number gravitational settling of spheres on to fluid-fluid interfaces is studied as an analogue to this problem. Theoretical treatment suggests that whether or not a particle sinks or floats at an interface depends on four dimensionless parameters; Bond number, the viscosity ratio, a modified density ratio and the contact angle. Spheres are allowed to settle onto an interface for different values of the dimensionless groups and the behavioural regime boundaries are determined. Experimentally this consists of dropping spheres of varying radii and density onto an interface between two density stratified fluids (silicon oil and polyethylene glycol solution), both of which are lighter than the sphere. The spheres are sputter coated in gold to ensure a constant surface interaction. The numerical models are used to validate these results and apply them in geologic settings. Early results suggest that the presence of even a small interfacial tension between the two magmas is sufficient to inhibit the passage of crystals across interfaces in magmatic systems. An interesting feature of note in mafic enclaves is that the xenocrysts often occur in clusters. This can be compared with observations from the analogue experiments where 6mm nylon spheres were dropped onto the fluid interface. Although the spheres are light and small enough to individually be supported by the interface, the successive addition of spheres leads to the formation of

  16. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  17. Process Dynamics and Fractal Analysis of New Phase Formation in Thermal Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang J; Shen Z.W; Shen Z. Q

    2001-01-01

    Boiling and fouling are taken as typical examples of new phase formation process to be analyzed and discussed in this paper. The process dynamics of nucleate boiling is analyzed and its mechanism is discussed from the view point of self-organization. Fouling, which is a more complicated phenomenon of new phase formation, involves series of underlying processes. The morphology and fractal analysis of fouling on low-energy surface and that with fouling inhibitors are studied and discussed. It is suggested that considering the process dynamics, fractal analysis and self-organization, a new avenue of research should be found.

  18. Traveling waves and dynamical formation of autonomous pacemakers in a bistable medium with periodic boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Igor A.; Vadivasova, Tatiana E.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2015-03-01

    The problem of spatiotemporal pattern formation in the wall of arterial vesselsmay be reduced to 1D or 2D models of nonlinear active medium. We address this problem using the discrete array of non-oscillating (bistable) active units. We show how the specific choice of initial conditions in a 1D model with periodic boundary conditions triggers the self-sustained behaviour. We reveal the core of observed effects being the dynamical formation of localized (few-element size) autonomous pacemakers.

  19. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  20. Fluorescence-Based Quasicontinuous and In Situ Monitoring of Biofilm Formation Dynamics in Natural Marine Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Matthias; Friedrichs, Gernot; Lachnit, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the dynamics of biofilm formation helps to deepen our understanding of surface colonization in natural environments. While methods for screening biofilm formation in the laboratory are well established, studies in marine environments have so far been based upon destructive analysis of individual samples and provide only discontinuous snapshots of biofilm establishment. In order to explore the development of biofilm over time and under various biotic and abiotic conditions, we applie...

  1. A Fuzzy Programming approach for formation of Virtual Cells under dynamic and uncertain conditions

    OpenAIRE

    R.Jayachitra,; A.Revathy; P.S.S.Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by principles and advantages of the group technology (GT) philosophy, part family formation for a virtual Cellular Manufacturing System (VCMS) using Fuzzy logic is designed for dynamic and uncertain conditions. In real manufacturing systems, the input parameters such as part demand and the capacity are fuzzy in nature. In such cases, the fluctuations in part demand and the availability of manufacturing facilities in each period can be regarded as fuzzy. In a dynamic environment, the ...

  2. Understanding visual map formation through vortex dynamics of spin Hamiltonian models

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, M W; Cho, Myoung Won; Kim, Seunghwan

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a general method for cerebral cortical map generation and apply it to pattern formation in orientation and ocular dominance columns of the brain. From a known cortical structure, we build spin Hamiltonian models with long-range interactions of the Mexican hat type. These Hamiltonian models allow a coherent interpretation of the diverse phenomena in the map formation in the visual cortex with the help of relaxation dynamics of spins. In particular, we predict various phenomena of self-organization in orientation and ocular map formation including the pinwheel annihilation and its dependency on the columnar wave vector and boundary conditions.

  3. Star Formation and Gas Dynamics in Galactic Disks: Physical Processes and Numerical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, Eve C

    2010-01-01

    Star formation depends on the available gaseous "fuel" as well as galactic environment, with higher specific star formation rates where gas is predominantly molecular and where stellar (and dark matter) densities are higher. The partition of gas into different thermal components must itself depend on the star formation rate, since a steady state distribution requires a balance between heating (largely from stellar UV for the atomic component) and cooling. In this presentation, I discuss a simple thermal and dynamical equilibrium model for the star formation rate in disk galaxies, where the basic inputs are the total surface density of gas and the volume density of stars and dark matter, averaged over ~kpc scales. Galactic environment is important because the vertical gravity of the stars and dark matter compress gas toward the midplane, helping to establish the pressure, and hence the cooling rate. In equilibrium, the star formation rate must evolve until the gas heating rate is high enough to balance this co...

  4. Designing a Robust Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Controller for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseok Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust nonlinear dynamic inversion (RNDI control technique is proposed to keep the relative position of spacecrafts while formation flying. The proposed RNDI control method is based on nonlinear dynamic inversion (NDI. NDI is nonlinear control method that replaces the original dynamics into the user-selected desired dynamics. Because NDI removes nonlinearities in the model by inverting the original dynamics directly, it also eliminates the need of designing suitable controllers for each equilibrium point; that is, NDI works as self-scheduled controller. Removing the original model also provides advantages of ease to satisfy the specific requirements by simply handling desired dynamics. Therefore, NDI is simple and has many similarities to classical control. In real applications, however, it is difficult to achieve perfect cancellation of the original dynamics due to uncertainties that lead to performance degradation and even make the system unstable. This paper proposes robustness assurance method for NDI. The proposed RNDI is designed by combining NDI and sliding mode control (SMC. SMC is inherently robust using high-speed switching inputs. This paper verifies similarities of NDI and SMC, firstly. And then RNDI control method is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by simulations applied to spacecraft formation flying problem.

  5. Enantioselective Formation of a Dynamic Hydrogen-Bonded Assembly Based on the Chiral Memory Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishi-i, Tsutomu; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Timmerman, Peter; Reinhoudt, David N.; Shinkai, Seiji

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report the enantioselective formation of a dynamic noncovalent double rosette assembly 1a3·(CYA)6 composed of three 2-pyridylcalix[4]arene dimelamines (1a) and six butylcyanuric acid molecules (BuCYA). The six 2-pyridyl functionalities of the assembly interact stereoselectively wit

  6. Dynamics of formation of particles of the condensed carbon phase at shock compression of organic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, M G; Luckjanchikov, L A; Lyakhov, N Z; Sharafutdinov, M R; Sheromov, M A; Ten, K A; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Zubkov, P I

    2001-01-01

    Results of the SR study of the density behavior and dynamics of formation of condensed carbon particles at expansion of shock waves in organic materials and some low-sensitive explosives as well as at shock loading of ultra-dispersed diamonds are presented. Appearance of particles of the condensed carbon phase was observed in carbon-rich organic materials.

  7. The Romulus Cosmological Simulations: A Physical Approach to the Formation, Dynamics and Accretion Models of SMBHs

    CERN Document Server

    Tremmel, Michael; Governato, Fabio; Volonteri, Marta; Quinn, Tom; Pontzen, Andrew; Anderson, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel implementation of supermassive black hole (SMBH) formation, dynamics, and accretion in the massively parallel tree+SPH code, ChaNGa. This approach improves the modeling of SMBHs in fully cosmological simulations, allowing for a more detailed analysis of SMBH-galaxy co-evolution throughout cosmic time. Our scheme includes novel, physically motivated models for SMBH formation, dynamics and sinking timescales within galaxies, and SMBH accretion of rotationally supported gas. The sub-grid parameters that regulate star formation (SF) and feedback from SMBHs and SNe are optimized against a comprehensive set of z = 0 galaxy scaling relations using a novel, multi-dimensional parameter search. We have incorporated our new SMBH implementation and parameter optimization onto a new set of high resolution, large-scale cosmological simulations called Romulus. We present initial results from our flagship simulation, Romulus25, showing that our SMBH model results in SF efficiency, SMBH masses, and global c...

  8. Bifurcation and spatial pattern formation in spreading of disease with incubation period in a phytoplankton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir Singh Baghel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose a three dimensional mathematical model of phytoplankton dynamics with the help of reaction-diffusion equations that studies the bifurcation and pattern formation mechanism. We provide an analytical explanation for understanding phytoplankton dynamics with three population classes: susceptible, incubated, and infected. This model has a Holling type II response function for the population transformation from susceptible to incubated class in an aquatic ecosystem. Our main goal is to provide a qualitative analysis of Hopf bifurcation mechanisms, taking death rate of infected phytoplankton as bifurcation parameter, and to study further spatial patterns formation due to spatial diffusion. Here analytical findings are supported by the results of numerical experiments. It is observed that the coexistence of all classes of population depends on the rate of diffusion. Also we obtained the time evaluation pattern formation of the spatial system.

  9. Formation dynamics of FeN thin films on Cu(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the structural and magnetic properties of thin films of FeN we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of their formation on Cu(100) substrates. The iron nitride layers exhibit a p4gm(2 × 2) reconstruction and order ferromagnetically in agreement with experiment. We establish the dynamics and time scale of the film formation as a function of the film thickness. The process is split in two phases: formation of almost flat FeN layers and optimization of the distance to the substrate. Our calculated magnetic moments are 1.67 μ B, 2.14 μ B, and 2.21 μ B for one, two, and three monolayers of iron nitride. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pattern formation and dynamics of plasma filaments in dielectric barrier discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) operating in a transient glow discharge regime offer a large variety of self-organized filamentary static or dynamical structures and constitute an excellent physical system for the study of nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation. The plasma filaments of DBDs can exhibit particle-like behavior, with motion, generation, annihilation, and scattering as well as collective effects leading to self-organized structures (hexagons, stripes, concentric rings, spirals, etc) that are typical of reaction–diffusion systems. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the detailed physics of pattern formation in DBDs on the basis of numerical fluid simulations and experiments in order to provide a deeper understanding of the nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the self-organization and dynamics of filaments. (paper)

  11. DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF CAVITY FOR COMPOSED THERMAL HYPERELASTIC SPHERES IN NON-UNIFORM TEMPERATURE FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Dynamical formation and growth of cavity in a sphere composed of two incompressible thermal-hyperelastic Gent-Thomas materials were discussed under the case of a non-uniform temperature field and the surface dead loading. The mathematical model was first presented based on the dynamical theory of finite deformations. An exact differential relation between the void radius and surface load was obtained by using the variable transformation method. By numerical computation, critical loads and cavitation growth curves were obtained for different temperatures. The influence of the temperature and material parameters of the composed sphere on the void formation and growth was considered and compared with those for static analysis. The results show that the cavity occurs suddenly with a finite radius and its evolvement with time displays a non-linear periodic vibration and that the critical load decreases with the increase of temperature and also the dynamical critical load is lower than the static critical load under the same conditions.

  12. The Impact of Polymer Dynamics on Photoinduced Carrier Formation in Films of Semiconducting Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yudai; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Keiji

    2015-12-01

    A better understanding of the carrier formation process in photosemiconducting polymers is crucial to design and construct highly functionalized thin film organic photodevices. Almost all studies published focus on the effect of structure on the photoinduced carrier formation process. Here, we study the dynamics of polymer chain impacts on the carrier formation process for a series of poly(3-alkylthiophene)s (P3ATs) with different alkyl side-chain lengths. The formation of polarons (P) from polaron pairs (PP) was accelerated at a temperature at which the twisting motion of thiophene rings occurs. Among all P3ATs employed, in P3AT with hexyl groups, or poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), it was easiest to twist the thiophene rings and generate P from PP. The activation energy for P formation was proportional to that of thiophene ring motion. This makes it clear that chain dynamics, in addition to the crystalline structure, is a controlling factor for the carrier formation process in photosemiconducting polymers. PMID:26574654

  13. Formation Dynamics and Quantitative Prediction of Hydrocarbons of the Superpressure System in the Dongying Sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Fenggui; HAO Xuefeng; LIU Qing; ZHUO Qingong; ZHANG Shouchun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the theory of formation dynamics of oil/gas pools, the Dongying sag can be divided into three dynamic systems regarding the accumulation of oil and gas: the superpressure closed system,the semi-closed system and the normal pressure open system. Based on the analysis of genesis of superpressure in the superpressure closed system and the rule of hydrocarbon expulsion,it is found that hydrocarbon generation is related to superpressure, which is the main driving factor of hydrocarbon migration. Micro fractures formed by superpressure are the main channels for hydrocarbon migration. There are three dynamic patterns for hydrocarbon expulsion: free water drainage, hydrocarbon accumulation and drainage through micro fissures. In the superpressure closed system, the oil-driving-water process and oil/gas accumulation were completed in lithologic traps by way of such two dynamic patterns as episodic evolution of superpressure systems and episodic pressure release of faults. The oil-bearing capacity of lithologic traps is intimately related to reservoir-forming dynamic force. Quantitative evaluation of dynamic conditions for pool formation can effectively predict the oil-bearing capability of traps.

  14. Dynamics of Semantic and Word-Formation Subsystems of the Russian Language: Historical Dynamics of the Word Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ivanovna Dmitrieva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides comprehensive justification of the principles and methods of the synchronic and diachronic research of word-formation subsystems of the Russian language. The authors also study the ways of analyzing historical dynamics of word family as the main macro-unit of word-formation system. In the field of analysis there is a family of words with the stem 'ход-' (the meaning of 'motion', word-formation of which is investigated in different periods of the Russian literary language. Significance of motion-verbs in the process of forming a language picture of the world determined the character and the structure of this word family as one of the biggest in the history of the Russian language. In the article a structural and semantic dynamics of the word family 'ход-' is depicted. The results of the study show that in the ancient period the prefixes of verbal derivatives were formed, which became the apex-branched derivational paradigms existing in modern Russian. The old Russian period of language development is characterized by the appearance of words with connotative meaning (with suffixes -ishk-, -ichn-, as well as the words with possessive semantics (with suffixes –ev-, -sk-. In this period the verbs with the postfix -cz also supplement the analyzed word family. The period of formation of the National Russian language was marked by the loss of a large number of abstract nouns and the appearance of neologisms from some old Russian abstract nouns. The studied family in the modern Russian language is characterized by the following processes: the appearance of terms, the active semantic derivation, the weakening of word-formation variability, the semantic differentiation of duplicate units, the development of subsystem of words with connotative meanings, and the preservation of derivatives in all functional styles.

  15. Population synthesis of planet formation using a torque formula with dynamic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Population synthesis studies into planet formation have suggested that distributions consistent with observations can only be reproduced if the actual Type I migration timescale is at least an order of magnitude longer than that deduced from linear theories. Although past studies considered the effect of the Type I migration of protoplanetary embryos, in most cases they used a conventional formula based on static torques in isothermal disks, and employed a reduction factor to account for uncertainty in the mechanism details. However, in addition to static torques, a migrating planet experiences dynamic torques that are proportional to the migration rate. These dynamic torques can impact on planet migration and predicted planetary populations. In this study, we derived a new torque formula for Type I migration by taking into account dynamic corrections. This formula was used to perform population synthesis simulations with and without the effect of dynamic torques. In many cases, inward migration was slowed si...

  16. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Darabi Sahneh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. METHOD: This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. RESULTS: The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. CONCLUSION: The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  17. Dislocation dynamics. II. Applications to the formation of persistent slip bands, planar arrays, and dislocation cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic organization of dislocations into spatially heterogeneous substructures is demonstrated by applying the principles of dislocation dynamics that were outlined in the preceding paper. Here it is shown that the formation of persistent slip bands is a consequence of the competition between dipole formation and annihilation of dislocations of opposite Burgers vectors in the absence of temperature-enhanced climb recovery under cyclic stress conditions. Planar arrays, which are also uniaxial structures, are shown to arise from enhanced dislocation multiplication and the formation of stable dipole configurations along a slip plane at lower temperatures where climb is unimportant. Biaxial dislocation systems experience additional degrees of freedom compared with uniaxial systems because of available motion along additional slip systems. It is demonstrated that for a system of orthogonal slip directions at high temperatures in which climb and glide motion are competitive, dislocation cellular structures form as a result of immobile dipole and junction formation and by the internal elastic strain energy minimization caused by long-range self-shielding. It is shown that the internal elastic strain energy is reduced by the self-organization process. However, the short-range nonlinear processes (i.e., dipole and junction formation) are shown not to allow absolute elastic energy minimization

  18. Gas dynamic effects on formation of carbon dimers in laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the effect of helium and nitrogen pressures on the dynamics of molecular species formation during laser ablation of carbon. For producing plasmas, planar carbon targets were irradiated with 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from an Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The emission from excited C2 and CN molecules was studied using space resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast imaging. The intensity oscillations in C2 and CN monochromatic fast imaging and their emission space-time contours suggest that recombination is the major mechanism of C2 formation within the laser ablation carbon plumes in the presence of ambient gas.

  19. Contribution of the Atmospheric Dynamics to the Sporadic Sodium Layer Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国韬; 王嘉珉; 刘炳模; 程学武; 万卫星; 龚顺生

    2002-01-01

    We report on a sporadic sodium layer (SSL) event observed by our Na fluorescence lidar at Wuhan, China (31°N, 114°E) on 16 March 1999, and we reveal some special behaviour. From careful analysis of various sodium content variations of the layer during the development of this SSL event, it is found that besides the sodium injection mechanism as expected, another mechanism which we call atmospheric dynamics also made a noticeable contribution to this SSL formation. Computer simulations confirmed that under the combined action ora suitable sodium injection and a bi-direction vertical wind field, an SSL profile can be reproduced with a pronounced SSL peak on a normal sodium layer, as we observed in this event. From these results, it is emphasized that atmospheric dynamics is important for SSL formation.

  20. Dynamical entanglement formation and dissipation effects in two double quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Pulido, L D [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Rojas, F [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)

    2006-11-01

    We study the static and dynamic formation of entanglement in charge states of a two double quantum dot array with two mobile electrons under the effect of an external driving field. We include dissipation via contact with a phonon bath. By using the density matrix formalism and an open quantum system approach, we describe the dynamical behaviour of the charge distribution (polarization), concurrence (measure of the degree of entanglement) and Bell state probabilities (two qubit states with maximum entanglement) of such a system, including the role of dot asymmetry and temperature effects. Our results show that it is possible to obtain entangled states as well as a most probable Bell state, which can be controlled by the driving field. We also evaluate how the entanglement formation based on charge states deteriorates as the temperature or asymmetry increases.

  1. Hydrogen Spectroscopy with a Lamb-shift Polarimeter - An Alternative Approach Towards Anti-Hydrogen Spectroscopy Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Westig, M P; Grigoryev, K; Mikirtytchiants, M; Rathmann, F; Schieck, H Paetz gen; Schug, G; Vasilyev, A; Ströher, H; 10.1140/epjd/e2010-00016-9

    2011-01-01

    A Lamb-shift polarimeter, which has been built for a fast determination of the polarization of protons and deuterons of an atomic-beam source and which is frequently used in the ANKE experiment at COSY-J\\"ulich, is shown to be an excellent device for atomic-spectroscopy measurements of metastable hydrogen isotopes. It is demonstrated that magnetic and electric dipole transitions in hydrogen can be measured as a function of the external magnetic field, giving access to the full Breit-Rabi diagram for the $2^2S_{1/2}$ and the $2^2P_{1/2}$ states. This will allow the study of hyperfine structure, $g$ factors and the classical Lamb shift. Although the data are not yet competitive with state-of-the-art measurements, the potential of the method is enormous, including a possible application to anti-hydrogen spectroscopy.

  2. Habit Formation in Natural Cheese Consumption An Approach Based on Dynamic Demand Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WAKABAYASHI, Katsufumi

    2010-01-01

    In expectation of growing cheese consumption, natural cheese production is being increased to reduce surplus milk and create high added value in raw milk. Other studies found positive trends in cheese consumption. However, those studies neither clarified recent trends, nor distinguished natural cheese from processed cheese. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structure of natural cheese consumption, focusing on habit formation. We test structural changes in cheese demand using dynamic...

  3. The Last Stages of Terrestrial Planet Formation: Dynamical Friction and the Late Veneer

    OpenAIRE

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Warren, Paul H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the clean-up of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets to circular and coplanar orbits after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M_⊕ of chondritic ma...

  4. From collisions to clusters: first steps of sulphuric acid nanocluster formation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2014-08-01

    The clustering of sulphuric acid with base molecules is one of the main pathways of new-particle formation in the Earth's atmosphere. First step in the clustering process is likely the formation of a (sulphuric acid)1(base)1(water)n cluster. Here, we present results from direct first-principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong enough to overcome the possible initial non-optimal collision orientations. No post-collisional cluster break up is observed. The reasons for the efficient clustering are (i) the proton transfer reaction which takes place in each of the collision simulations and (ii) the subsequent competition over the proton control. As a consequence, the clusters show very dynamic ion pair structure, which differs from both the static structure optimisation calculations and the equilibrium first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In some of the simulation runs, water mediates the proton transfer by acting as a proton bridge. In general, water is able to notably stabilise the formed clusters by allocating a fraction of the released clustering energy.

  5. Formation and degradation of multicomponent multicore micelles: insights from dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2013-05-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation is employed to examine (i) the multicomponent multicore micelle (MMM) formation from two kinds of star-shaped copolymers: A2B4B4 and C2B4B4 where A, B, and C are the segments of the copolymers and (ii) the degradation of multicomponent multicore micelles. Regarding the micelle formation, single-core micelles with the core composed of two components (SCII), multicomponent multicore micelles with each core composed of two components (MMII), multicomponent multicore micelles with each of the cores composed of one component (MMI), and multicomponent multicore rod micelles (MMRI) are considered. By changing the ratio between the number of segments of one of the polymers and the total number of segments of the two copolymers, the number of cores generated and their composition can be controlled. Considering that only C2B4B4 is degraded to 2C1 + 2B4, it was found that SCII, MMII, and MMI micelles degraded to a single irregular network core, to multicores with cores formed of loose aggregates, and to multicore micelles, respectively. The dynamics of micelle formation has several stages (small aggregates (nuclei) → growth of aggregates → micellization) whereas the dynamics of degradation involves the diffusion of the degraded components inside and outside micelles and the rearrangement of the cores of the micelles into new cores. PMID:23578256

  6. Dynamic organization of actin cytoskeleton during the polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xia; Zl Huijun; SUN Yina; REN Haiyun

    2004-01-01

    The formation of the polarity of pollen protoplast and the dynamics of actin cytoskeleton were observed by non-fixation, Alexa-Phalloidin probing and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results showed that the protoplast obtained from stored pollen contained numerous crystalline fusiform bodies to constitute a storage form of actin. When dormant pollen was hydrated, the actin cytoskeleton forms a fine network spreading uniformly in the protoplast. In the process of polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplast, actin filaments marshaled slowly to the brim, and then formed multilayer continuous actin filament bundles surrounding the cortical of the protoplast. When the protoplast was exposed to actin filament-disrupting drugs, such as Latrunculin A and Cytochalasin D, continuously arranged actin bundles were disturbed and in this condition, the protoplast could not germinate. But when exposed to actin filament stabiling drug-phalliodin, the dynamics of actin filaments in the protoplasts behaved normally and the protoplasts could germinate normally. These results were also confirmed by the pharmacology experiments on pollen grains. And when Latrunculin A or Cytochalasin D was washed off, the ratio of pollen germination was resumed partly. All the results above show that the dynamic organization of the actin cytoskeleton are critical in the cell polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplast, and that the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton is mainly due to the rearrangement of actin filament arrays.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of deuterium trapping and bubble formation in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Deuterium tungsten interaction was simulated using classical molecular dynamic methods. ► Low energy deuterium atoms tend to affix to high temperature tungsten surface. ► Tungsten substrate temperature barely affects the low energy deuterium implantation depth. ► Deuterium bubble formation resulting from near surface super-saturation was predicted. -- Abstract: The interaction between plasma particles and tungsten as plasma facing material is one of the critical issues in successfully using tungsten in Tokamak reactors environment. The deuterium bombardment of monocrystalline tungsten was modeled by molecular dynamics simulation using LAMMPS code and Tersoff type interatomic potential. The deuterium trapping rate, implantation depth, and the stopping time in tungsten at several temperatures ranging from 600 to 2000 K bombarded by 5–100 eV deuterium atoms were simulated. Deuterium bubble formation at near tungsten surface was also studied. Irradiated monocrystalline tungsten became amorphous state prior to deuterium cluster formation, and gas bubbles were observed in the 600, 900, and 1200 K tungsten samples. The formation of gas bubbles were caused by the near surface deuterium super-saturation region and the subsequent plastic deformation induced by the local high gas pressure

  8. OH formation dynamics in 193 nm photolysis of 2-methoxyethanol: A laser induced fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SenGupta, Sumana; Upadhyaya, Hari P., E-mail: haripu@barc.gov.in; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • First results on dynamics of OH radical formation in the photodissociation of 2-methoxyethanol. • At least three types of mechanisms for OH radical formation is reported. • Dissociation from excited as well ground state, supported by theoretical calculation. • Effect of hydrogen bonding in the photodissociation process is reported. - Abstract: Dynamics of OH radical formation in the 193 nm photolysis of 2-methoxyethanol is studied using Laser Photolysis–Laser Induced Fluorescence technique. The nascent state distribution of the OH radical is measured. The OH fragments are formed vibrationally cold, characterized by a Boltzmann-like single rotational temperature of 450 ± 100 K. The spin–orbit and Λ-doublet ratios of OH fragments are measured. The relative average translational energy of the OH channel is determined to be 17.0 ± 3.0 kcal/mol. The experimental studies along with theoretical calculations suggest a complex mechanism for OH formation consisting of at least three pathways. The prominent pathway at shorter timescale (<50 ns) involves crossing over to the nearby repulsive state, whereas, at longer timescale (>1 ms) involves a series of reaction with initial H{sub 3}C–OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH bond cleavage, followed by rearrangement of {sup ·}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH to {sup ·}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}OH, and a final concerted step to generate OH and ethylene epoxide.

  9. Dynamical Stability of Imaged Planetary Systems in Formation: Application to HL Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Tamayo, Daniel; Menou, Kristen; Rein, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    We present a general and simple framework for understanding the dynamical stability of planets embedded in a protoplanetary nebula over typical disk lifetimes, and provide estimates for the maximum allowable planetary masses. We collect these easily evaluated dynamical constraints into a workflow that can help guide the design and interpretation of new observational campaigns and numerical simulations of gap opening in such systems. We argue that the locations of resonances should be significantly shifted from integer period ratios in massive disks like HL Tau, and that theoretical uncertainties in the exact shift, together with observational errors, imply a large uncertainty in the dynamical state and stability in such disks. This renders our results largely insensitive to an improved determination of the gaps' orbital radii, and presents an important barrier to using systems like HL Tau as a proxy for the initial conditions following planet formation. An important observational avenue to breaking this degen...

  10. Modeling of anaerobic formate kinetics in mixed biofilm culture using dynamic membrane mass spectrometric measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornseiffer, P; Meyer, B; Heinzle, E

    1995-02-01

    The dynamics of the anaerobic conversion of formate in a microbial mixed culture taken from an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor was studied using a new stirred micro reactor equipped with a membrane mass spectrometer. The microreactor with a toroidally shaped bottom and pitched blade turbine and a cylindrical flow guide was thermostated and additionally equipped with a pH electrode and pH control. During fed-batch experiments using formate, the dissolved gases (methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide), as well as the acid consumption rates for pH control were monitored continuously. Initially and at the end of each experiment, organic acids were analyzed using ion chromatography (IC). It was found that about 50% of the formate was converted to methane via hydrogen and carbon dioxide, 40% gave methane either directly or via acetate. This was calculated from experiments using H(13)CO(3) (-) pulses and measurement of (12)CH(4) and (13)CH(4) production rates. About 10% of the formate was converted to lactate, acetate, and propionate, thereby increasing the measured CO(2)/CH(4) production ratio. The nondissociated formic acid was shown to be rate determining. From the relatively high K(s) value of 2.5 mmol m(-3), it was concluded that formate cannot play an important role in electron transfer. During dynamic feeding of formate, hydrogen concentration always increased to a maximum before decreasing again. This peak was found to be very discriminative during modeling. From the various models set up, only those with two-stage degradation and double Monod kinetics, both for CO(2) and hydrogen, were able to describe the experimental data adequately. Additional discrimination was possible with the IC measurement of organic acids. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623141

  11. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows - the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the \\'hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting\\', is discovered where the influence of the capillary\\'s radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where excellent agreement is obtained. Practical recommendations on the spatial resolution required by the numerical scheme for a given set of non-dimensional similarity parameters are provided, and a comparison to asymptotic results available in limiting cases confirms that the code is converging to the correct solution. The appendix gives a user-friendly step-by-step guide specifying the entire implementation and allowing the reader to easily reproduce all presented results, including the benchmark calculations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Cloud fluid models of gas dynamics and star formation in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large dynamic range of star formation in galaxies, and the apparently complex environmental influences involved in triggering or suppressing star formation, challenges the understanding. The key to this understanding may be the detailed study of simple physical models for the dominant nonlinear interactions in interstellar cloud systems. One such model is described, a generalized Oort model cloud fluid, and two simple applications of it are explored. The first of these is the relaxation of an isolated volume of cloud fluid following a disturbance. Though very idealized, this closed box study suggests a physical mechanism for starbursts, which is based on the approximate commensurability of massive cloud lifetimes and cloud collisional growth times. The second application is to the modeling of colliding ring galaxies. In this case, the driving processes operating on a dynamical timescale interact with the local cloud processes operating on the above timescale. The results is a variety of interesting nonequilibrium behaviors, including spatial variations of star formation that do not depend monotonically on gas density

  13. Resolving the HONO formation mechanism in the ionosphere via ab initio molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongxing; Li, Lei; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-04-26

    Solar emission produces copious nitrosonium ions (NO(+)) in the D layer of the ionosphere, 60 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. NO(+) is believed to transfer its charge to water clusters in that region, leading to the formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and protonated water cluster. The dynamics of this reaction at the ionospheric temperature (200-220 K) and the associated mechanistic details are largely unknown. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and transition-state search, key structures of the water hydrates-tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 and pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5-are identified and shown to be responsible for HONO formation in the ionosphere. The critical tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 exhibits a chain-like structure through which all of the lowest-energy isomers must go. However, most lowest-energy isomers of pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5 can be converted to the HONO-containing product, encountering very low barriers, via a chain-like or a three-armed, star-like structure. Although these structures are not the global minima, at 220 K, most lowest-energy NO(+)(H2O)4 and NO(+)(H2O)5 isomers tend to channel through these highly populated isomers toward HONO formation. PMID:27071120

  14. The formation of vault-tubes: a dynamic interaction between vaults and vault PARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2003-11-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles that are composed of a major vault protein (MVP), two minor vault proteins [telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP)] and small untranslated RNA molecules. Not all expressed TEP1 and VPARP in cells is bound to vaults. TEP1 is known to associate with the telomerase complex, whereas VPARP is also present in the nuclear matrix and in cytoplasmic clusters (VPARP-rods). We examined the subcellular localization and the dynamics of the vault complex in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line expressing MVP tagged with green fluorescent protein. Using quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) it was shown that vaults move temperature independently by diffusion. However, incubation at room temperature (21 degrees C) resulted in the formation of distinct tube-like structures in the cytoplasm. Raising the temperature could reverse this process. When the vault-tubes were formed, there were fewer or no VPARP-rods present in the cytoplasm, suggesting an incorporation of the VPARP into the vault-tubes. MVP molecules have to interact with each other via their coiled-coil domain in order to form vault-tubes. Furthermore, the stability of microtubules influenced the efficiency of vault-tube formation at 21 degrees C. The dynamics and structure of the tubes were examined using confocal microscopy. Our data indicate a direct and dynamic relationship between vaults and VPARP, providing further clues to unravel the function of vaults. PMID:13130096

  15. Characterization and Dynamics of Aggresome Formation by a Cytosolic Gfp-Chimera✪

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mata, Rafael; Bebök, Zsuzsa; Sorscher, Eric J.; Sztul, Elizabeth S.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of a novel structure, the aggresome, has been proposed to represent a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins (Johnston, J.A., C.L. Ward, and R.R. Kopito. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 143:1883–1898; Wigley, W.C., R.P. Fabunmi, M.G. Lee, C.R. Marino, S. Muallem, G.N. DeMartino, and P.J. Thomas. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:481–490). To test the generality of this finding and characterize aspects of aggresome composition and its formation, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a cytosolic protein chimera (GFP-250) in cells. Overexpression of GFP-250 caused formation of aggresomes and was paralleled by the redistribution of the intermediate filament protein vimentin as well as by the recruitment of the proteasome, and the Hsp70 and the chaperonin systems of chaperones. Interestingly, GFP-250 within the aggresome appeared not to be ubiquitinated. In vivo time-lapse analysis of aggresome dynamics showed that small aggregates form within the periphery of the cell and travel on microtubules to the MTOC region where they remain as distinct but closely apposed particulate structures. Overexpression of p50/dynamitin, which causes the dissociation of the dynactin complex, significantly inhibited the formation of aggresomes, suggesting that the minus-end–directed motor activities of cytoplasmic dynein are required for aggresome formation. Perinuclear aggresomes interfered with correct Golgi localization and disrupted the normal astral distribution of microtubules. However, ER-to-Golgi protein transport occurred normally in aggresome containing cells. Our results suggest that aggresomes can be formed by soluble, nonubiquitinated proteins as well as by integral transmembrane ubiquitinated ones, supporting the hypothesis that aggresome formation might be a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins. PMID:10491388

  16. Characterization and dynamics of aggresome formation by a cytosolic GFP-chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mata, R; Bebök, Z; Sorscher, E J; Sztul, E S

    1999-09-20

    Formation of a novel structure, the aggresome, has been proposed to represent a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins (Johnston, J.A., C.L. Ward, and R.R. Kopito. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 143:1883-1898; Wigley, W.C., R.P. Fabunmi, M.G. Lee, C.R. Marino, S. Muallem, G.N. DeMartino, and P.J. Thomas. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:481-490). To test the generality of this finding and characterize aspects of aggresome composition and its formation, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a cytosolic protein chimera (GFP-250) in cells. Overexpression of GFP-250 caused formation of aggresomes and was paralleled by the redistribution of the intermediate filament protein vimentin as well as by the recruitment of the proteasome, and the Hsp70 and the chaperonin systems of chaperones. Interestingly, GFP-250 within the aggresome appeared not to be ubiquitinated. In vivo time-lapse analysis of aggresome dynamics showed that small aggregates form within the periphery of the cell and travel on microtubules to the MTOC region where they remain as distinct but closely apposed particulate structures. Overexpression of p50/dynamitin, which causes the dissociation of the dynactin complex, significantly inhibited the formation of aggresomes, suggesting that the minus-end-directed motor activities of cytoplasmic dynein are required for aggresome formation. Perinuclear aggresomes interfered with correct Golgi localization and disrupted the normal astral distribution of microtubules. However, ER-to-Golgi protein transport occurred normally in aggresome containing cells. Our results suggest that aggresomes can be formed by soluble, nonubiquitinated proteins as well as by integral transmembrane ubiquitinated ones, supporting the hypothesis that aggresome formation might be a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins. PMID:10491388

  17. Formation, dynamics, and decay of quantized vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates: Elements of quantum turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Tyler William

    Turbulence in classical fluids has been the subject of scientific study for centuries, yet there is still no complete general theory of classical turbulence connecting microscopic physics to macroscopic fluid flows, and this remains one of the open problems in physics. In contrast, the phenomenon of quantum turbulence in superfluids has well-defined theoretical descriptions, based on first principles and microscopic physics, and represents a realm of physics that can connect the classical and quantum worlds. Studies of quantum turbulence may thus be viewed as a path for progress on the long-standing problem of turbulence. A dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is, in most cases, a superfluid that supports quantized vortices, the primary structural elements of quantum turbulence. BECs are particularly convenient systems for the study of vortices, as standard techniques allow the microscopic structure and dynamics of the vortices to be investigated. Vortices in BECs can be created and manipulated using a variety of techniques, hence BECs are potentially powerful systems for the microscopic study of quantum turbulence. This dissertation focuses on quantized vortices in BECs, specifically experimental and numerical studies of their formation, dynamics, and decay, in an effort to understand the microscopic nature of vortices as elements of quantum turbulence. Four main experiments were performed, and are described in the main chapters of this dissertation, after introductions to vortices, experimental methods, and turbulence are presented. These experiments were aimed at understanding various aspects of how vortices are created and behave in a superfluid system. They involved vortex dipole nucleation in the breakdown of superfluidity, persistent current generation from a turbulent state in the presence of energy dissipation, decay of angular momentum of a BEC due to trapping potential impurities, and exploration of the spontaneous formation of vortices during the

  18. Hydrogen Recombination and Dimer Formation on Graphite from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolo, S; Tantardini, G F; Martinazzo, R

    2016-07-14

    We studied Eley-Rideal molecular hydrogen formation on graphite using ab initio molecular dynamics, in the energy range relevant for the chemistry of the interstellar medium and for terrestrial experiments employing cold plasma (0.02-1 eV). We found substantial projectile steering effects that prevent dimer formation at low energies, thereby ruling out any catalytic synthetic pathways that form hydrogen molecules. Ortho and para dimers do form efficiently thanks to preferential sticking, but only at energies that are too high to be relevant for the chemistry of the interstellar medium. Computed reaction cross sections and ro-vibrational product populations are in good agreement with available experimental data and capable of generating adsorbate configurations similar to those observed with scanning tunneling microscopy techniques. PMID:26905385

  19. Formation of NiZr2 Binary Metallic Glass: Experimental and Molecular Dynamics Analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; ZHANG Yan-Ning; MAO Xiu-Ming; PENG Chuan-Xiao

    2007-01-01

    @@ The local atomic structure of an amorphous NiZr2 alloy is identified by using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimeter. Based on the experimental results, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to investigate the glass formation of liquid NiZr2 alloy. Some relevant features of the pair correlation functions are in good agreement with those obtained by experiment. The pair analysis parameters are calculated, suggesting that there exist icosahedral ordering, four-fold symmetrical bipyramid and triangularfaced polyhedral units in the amorphous NiZr2 structure. The result is beneficial to open avenues toward the understanding of fundamental theoretical problems of glass formation of simple binary alloys.

  20. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  1. Ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation via laser double pulses excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guangqing; Wu, Yanmin; Uddin, Noor; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Bian, Hao; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    The ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation on gold film via ultrafast laser double pulses excitation is theoretically investigated by numerical simulations. The non-equilibrium thermal modulations with respect to the electron and phonon energy transfers within gold film is proposed for predicting the nano-ripples formation. It is revealed that the nano-ripples contrast on gold film surface can be well controlled via tuning the pulse energy ratio, pulse separation and pulse exchange of ultrafast laser double-pulse. It is attributed to the tunable energy transfer routes between the electron thermal diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling via tuning double pulses parameters. The study provides theoretical basis for producing high-contrast ripples for a wide range application in the fields such as high-absorptive solar cells, surface friction devices and super-hydrophobic surface.

  2. Spacecraft Formation Control: Managing Line-of-Sight Drift Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sammer. Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    In a quest to improve space-based observational capability, an increasing number of investigators are proposing missions with precision formation flying architectures. Typical missions include the Micro- Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), Stellar Imager (SI), and the New Worlds Observer (NWO). Missions designed to explore targets in deep-space generally require holding a formation configuration fixed in inertial space during science observation. Analysis in this paper is specifically aimed at the NWO architecture, characterizing the natural drift of the line-of-sight and the separation range for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) libration point. Analysis employs a linear form of the relative dynamics associated with an n-body gravity field. The study is designed to identify favorable observation directions, characterized by minimal line-of-sight drift, along the mission timeline.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ion focusing and crowdion formation in self-ion-irradiated Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Di [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Shao Lin, E-mail: lshao@mailaps.org [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate damage and defect development in a Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Fe substrate upon 2 keV Fe ion bombardment. The damage cascade formation is accompanied by atomic shifting over a limited distance along the direction of one atomic row, which leads to formation of crowdions aligned with Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket direction. At the end of structural relaxation and defect recombination, crowdions lead to formation of dumbbell defects - a type of vacancy-interstitial complexes having one vacancy between a pair of slightly displaced interstitials. The dumbbell defects are initially oriented along Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket direction. After a typical period of 0.2 ps, some dumbbell defects rotate towards Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket direction. Crowdion and dumbbell defect formation influence the time dependent damage buildups.

  4. Aperiodic dynamics in a deterministic model of attitude formation in social groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Homophily and social influence are the fundamental mechanisms that drive the evolution of attitudes, beliefs and behaviour within social groups. Homophily relates the similarity between pairs of individuals' attitudinal states to their frequency of interaction, and hence structural tie strength, while social influence causes the convergence of individuals' states during interaction. Building on these basic elements, we propose a new mathematical modelling framework to describe the evolution of attitudes within a group of interacting agents. Specifically, our model describes sub-conscious attitudes that have an activator-inhibitor relationship. We consider a homogeneous population using a deterministic, continuous-time dynamical system. Surprisingly, the combined effects of homophily and social influence do not necessarily lead to group consensus or global monoculture. We observe that sub-group formation and polarisation-like effects may be transient, the long-time dynamics being quasi-periodic with sensitive ...

  5. Deracemization of Axially Chiral Nicotinamides by Dynamic Salt Formation with Enantiopure Dibenzoyltartaric Acid (DBTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitoshi Yagishita

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic atroposelective resolution of chiral salts derived from oily racemic nicotinamides and enantiopure dibenzoyltartaric acid (DBTA was achieved by crystallization. The absolute structures of the axial chiral nicotinamides were determined by X-ray structural analysis. The chirality could be controlled by the selection of enantiopure DBTA as a chiral auxiliary. The axial chirality generated by dynamic salt formation was retained for a long period after dissolving the chiral salt in solution even after removal of the chiral acid. The rate of racemization of nicotinamides could be controlled based on the temperature and solvent properties, and that of the salts was prolonged compared to free nicotinamides, as the molecular structure of the pyridinium ion in the salts was different from that of acid-free nicotinamides.

  6. Formation of '3D' multiplanet systems by dynamical disruption of multiple-resonance configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Libert, A -S

    2012-01-01

    Assuming that giant planets are formed in thin protoplanetary discs, a '3D' system can form, provided that the mutual inclination is excited by some dynamical mechanism. Resonant interactions and close planetary encounters are thought to be the primary inclination-excitation mechanisms, resulting in a resonant and non-resonant system, respectively. Here we propose an alternative formation scenario, starting from a system composed of three giant planets in a nearly coplanar configuration. As was recently shown for the case of the Solar system, planetary migration in the gas disc (Type II migration) can force the planets to become trapped in a multiply resonant state. We simulate this process, assuming different values for the planetary masses and mass ratios. We show that such a triple resonance generally becomes unstable as the resonance excites the eccentricities of all planets and planet-planet scattering sets in. One of the three planets is typically ejected from the system, leaving behind a dynamically 'h...

  7. Global format for energy-momentum based time integration in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    A global format is developed for momentum and energy consistent time integration of second‐order dynamic systems with general nonlinear stiffness. The algorithm is formulated by integrating the state‐space equations of motion over the time increment. The internal force is first represented in...... mean value products at the element level or explicit use of a geometric stiffness matrix. An optional monotonic algorithmic damping, increasing with response frequency, is developed in terms of a single damping parameter. In the solution procedure, the velocity is eliminated and the nonlinear...

  8. Spike Train Dynamics Underlying Pattern Formation in Integrate-and-Fire Oscillator Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, P. C.; Coombes, S.

    1998-09-01

    A dynamical mechanism underlying pattern formation in a spatially extended network of integrate-and-fire oscillators with synaptic interactions is identified. It is shown how in the strong coupling regime the network undergoes a discrete Turing-Hopf bifurcation of the firing times from a synchronous state to a state with periodic or quasiperiodic variations of the interspike intervals on closed orbits. The separation of these orbits in phase space results in a spatially periodic pattern of mean firing rate across the network that is modulated by deterministic fluctuations of the instantaneous firing rate.

  9. Rydberg atom formation in ultracold plasmas: Non-equilibrium dynamics of recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg atom formation is a source of heating in plasmas. The rate of three-body recombination in an ultracold neutral plasma was measured and electron temperature was derived from it using standard equilibrium recombination rates. With large-scale Monte Carlo and particle-in-cell simulations, we have calculated ab initio the rate of excitation, de-excitation, ionization (and recombination) in electron-Rydberg atom collision and investigated the short-time dynamics of three-body recombination in an ultracold neutral plasma. Comparison with observed rates is quite good. Particular attention is paid to the low-frequency microfield effect on Rydberg state cut-off in the plasma.

  10. The Formation of Uranus and Neptune in Solid-Rich Feeding Zones: Connecting Chemistry and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The core accretion theory of planet formation has at least two fundamental problems explaining the origins of Uranus and Neptune: (1) dynamical times in the trans-Saturnian solar nebula are so long that core growth can take > 15 Myr, and (2) the onset of runaway gas accretion that begins when cores reach 10 Earth masses necessitates a sudden gas accretion cutoff just as the ice giant cores reach critical mass. Both problems may be resolved by allowing the ice giants to migrate outward after t...

  11. FORMATION OF MICRO-POROUS SPHERICAL PARTICLES OF CALCIUM SILICATE (XONOTLITE) IN DYNAMIC HYDROTHERMAL PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoqiang Li; Hongxun Liang

    2004-01-01

    Stirring during hydrothermal synthesis plays an important role in the formation of porous spherical xonotlite particles. The size of spherical particles formed during dynamic hydrothermal process is related to the size of minimum vortices in the reaction slurry, which is determined by stirring speed. The kinetics of growth of xonotlite particles is determined by measuring the apparent viscosity of the reactant slurry at various reaction time and reaction temperatures. It is found that the growth of particles follows the contracting-volume equation, and the activation energies for nucleation and growth are 104 and 123 kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  12. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t ff). This implies a star formation efficiency per t ff of εff ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  13. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation

  14. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl, E-mail: ndario@ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ε{sub ff} ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  15. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, Ingo; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel; Marks, Michael [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (HISKP), Universität Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-02-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation.

  16. Mediating Dynamic Supply Chain Formation by Collaborative Single Machine Earliness/Tardiness Agents in Supply Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a trend of forming dynamic supply chains with different trading partners over different e-marketplaces has emerged. These supply chains, which are called “supply mesh,” generally refer to heterogeneous electronic marketplaces in which dynamic supply chains, as per project (often make-to-order, are formed across different parties. Conceptually, in a supply mesh a dynamic supply chain is formed vertically, mediating several companies for a project. Companies that are on the same level horizontally are either competitors or cohorts. A complex scenario such as this makes it challenging to find the right group of members for a dynamic supply chain. Earlier on, a multiagent model called the collaborative single machine earliness/tardiness (CSET model was proposed for the optimal formation of make-to-order supply chains. This paper contributes the particular agent designs, for enabling the mediation of CSET in a supply mesh, and the possibilities are discussed. It is demonstrated via a computer simulation, based on samples from the U.S. textile industry, that by using intelligent agents under the CSET model it is possible to automatically find an ideal group of trading partners from a supply mesh.

  17. Aperiodic dynamics in a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan A.; Grindrod, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive network models, in which node states and network topology coevolve, arise naturally in models of social dynamics that incorporate homophily and social influence. Homophily relates the similarity between pairs of nodes' states to their network coupling strength, whilst social influence causes coupled nodes' states to convergence. In this paper we propose a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups that includes these effects, and in which the attitudinal dynamics are represented by an activato-inhibitor process. We illustrate that consensus, corresponding to all nodes adopting the same attitudinal state and being fully connected, may destabilise via Turing instability, giving rise to aperiodic dynamics with sensitive dependence on initial conditions. These aperiodic dynamics correspond to the formation and dissolution of sub-groups that adopt contrasting attitudes. We discuss our findings in the context of cultural polarisation phenomena. Social influence. This reflects the fact that people tend to modify their behaviour and attitudes in response to the opinions of others [22-26]. We model social influence via diffusion: agents adjust their state according to a weighted sum (dictated by the evolving network) of the differences between their state and the states of their neighbours. Homophily. This relates the similarity of individuals' states to their frequency and strength of interaction [27]. Thus in our model, homophily drives the evolution of the weighted ‘social' network. A precise formulation of our model is given in Section 2. Social influence and homophily underpin models of social dynamics [21], which cover a wide range of sociological phenomena, including the diffusion of innovations [28-32], complex contagions [33-36], collective action [37-39], opinion dynamics [19,20,40,10,11,13,15,41,16], the emergence of social norms [42-44], group stability [45], social differentiation [46] and, of particular relevance

  18. Sediment infilling and wetland formation dynamics in an active crevasse splay of the Mississippi River delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Donald R.; White, David A.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Crevasse splay environments provide a mesocosm for evaluating wetland formation and maintenance processes on a decadal time scale. Site elevation, water levels, vertical accretion, elevation change, shallow subsidence, and plant biomass were measured at five habitats along an elevation gradient to evaluate wetland formation and development in Brant Pass Splay; an active crevasse splay of the Balize delta of the Mississippi River. The processes of vertical development (vertical accretion, elevation change, and shallow subsidence) were measured with the surface elevation table–marker horizon method. There were three distinct stages to the accrual of elevation capital and wetland formation in the splay: sediment infilling, vegetative colonization, and development of a mature wetland community. Accretion, elevation gain, and shallow subsidence all decreased by an order of magnitude from the open water (lowest elevation) to the forest (highest elevation) habitats. Vegetative colonization occurred within the first growing season following emergence of the mud surface. An explosively high rate of below-ground production quickly stabilized the loosely consolidated sub-aerial sediments. After emergent vegetation colonization, vertical development slowed and maintenance of marsh elevation was driven both by sediment trapping by the vegetation and accumulation of plant organic matter in the soil. Continued vertical development and survival of the marsh then depended on the health and productivity of the plant community. The process of delta wetland formation is both complex and nonlinear. Determining the dynamics of wetland formation will help in understanding the processes driving the past building of the delta and in developing models for restoring degraded wetlands in the Mississippi River delta and other deltas around the world.

  19. Dynamical formation and evolution of (2+1)-dimensional charged black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical formation and evolution of (2 + 1)-dimensional charged black holes. We numerically study dynamical collapses of charged matter fields in an anti-de Sitter background and note the formation of black holes using the double-null formalism. Moreover, we include renormalized energy-momentum tensors assuming the S-wave approximation to determine thermodynamical back-reactions to the internal structures. If there are no semi-classical effects, the amount of charge determines the causal structures. If the charge is sufficiently small, the causal structure has a space-like singularity. However, as the charge increases, an inner Cauchy horizon appears. If we have sufficient charge, we see a space-like outer horizon and a time-like inner horizon, and if we give excessive charge, black hole horizons disappear. We have some circumstantial evidence that weak cosmic censorship is still satisfied, even for such excessive charge cases. Also, we confirm that there is mass inflation along the inner horizon, although the properties are quite different from those of four-dimensional cases. Semi-classical back-reactions will not affect the outer horizon, but they will affect the inner horizon. Near the center, there is a place where negative energy is concentrated. Thus, charged black holes in three dimensions have two types of curvature singularities in general: via mass inflation and via a concentration of negative energy. Finally, we classify possible causal structures. (paper)

  20. An aerosol dynamics model for simulating particle formation and growth in a mixed flow chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vesterinen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we model the aerosol size distribution dynamics in a mixed flow chamber in which new particles are formed via nucleation and subsequent condensation of oxidation products of VOCs emitted from Norway spruce seedlings. The microphysical processes included in the model are nucleation, condensation, deposition and coagulation. The aerosol dynamics in the chamber is a competition between aerosol growth and scavenging/deposition which results in a cyclic particle formation process. With a simple 1-product model, in which the formed gas is able to both condense to the particles and nucleate, we are able to catch both the oscillatory features of the particle formation process and the evolution of the number concentration in a reasonable way. The gas-phase chemistry was adjusted using pre-estimated reaction rate constant in the simulations and the particle deposition rate as a function of size was determined experimentally. Despite this, some of the essential features of the physical properties of the aerosol population could still be captured and investigated without the detailed knowledge of the physical processes underlying the problem by using the constructed model. The size dependency of the wall loss coefficient was investigated using a slightly modified measurement set-up.

  1. Dark-ages Reionization & Galaxy Formation Simulation I: The dynamical lives of high redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Gregory B; Mutch, Simon J; Power, Chris; Duffy, Alan R; Geil, Paul M; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) program and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation program upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programs is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z=35 to z=5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from "universal" behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (~20%) of galactic halos are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: i) halo...

  2. Dynamics of identity in the academic field and implications to science students' identity formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Flavia

    2011-03-01

    Aydeniz and Hodge investigated how college professors negotiate their responsibilities as teachers and as researchers and the rationales behind their pedagogical approaches. Their findings illustrate how difficult it can be to keep the balance between these two responsibilities in a university that does not support professor's enactment of teaching goals. Thinking identity as a dynamics in self and institutional boundary, Albrecht and Fortney in their forum contribution, expand the analysis of Professor G's professional identity and conclude that in his case, institutional boundary is impermeable as it values research scientist more than teacher identity. In this forum contribution I emphasize the role of institutional culture in the identitarian process, interpreting the identity and identity formation of a science college teacher within the dynamics of the academic field. I expand the discussion to the other side of the problem, bringing excerpts of an interview with a Physics student from a Brazilian university as an illustration of how the academic habitus can impact the formation of a student's identity.

  3. Formation of the widest binary stars from dynamical unfolding of triple systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2012-12-13

    The formation of very wide binary systems, such as the α Centauri system with Proxima (also known as α Centauri C) separated from α Centauri (which itself is a close binary A/B) by 15,000 astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), challenges current theories of star formation, because their separation can exceed the typical size of a collapsing cloud core. Various hypotheses have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the suggestion that ultrawide binaries result from the dissolution of a star cluster--when a cluster star gravitationally captures another, distant, cluster star. Recent observations have shown that very wide binaries are frequently members of triple systems and that close binaries often have a distant third companion. Here we report N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of newborn triple systems still embedded in their nascent cloud cores that match observations of very wide systems. We find that although the triple systems are born very compact--and therefore initially are more protected against disruption by passing stars--they can develop extreme hierarchical architectures on timescales of millions of years as one component is dynamically scattered into a very distant orbit. The energy of ejection comes from shrinking the orbits of the other two stars, often making them look from a distance like a single star. Such loosely bound triple systems will therefore appear to be very wide binaries. PMID:23222523

  4. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stensitzki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We combined femtosecond (fs VIS pump–IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump–supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8(py2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80 fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm−1 is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3 ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm−1 and at 1508 cm−1. These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems.

  5. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensitzki, T; Yang, Y; Berg, A; Mahammed, A; Gross, Z; Heyne, K

    2016-07-01

    We combined femtosecond (fs) VIS pump-IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump-supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8)(py)2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80) fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm(-1) is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3) ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm(-1) and at 1508 cm(-1). These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems. PMID:27226980

  6. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  7. The recycling of gas and metals in galaxy formation: predictions of a dynamical feedback model

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, S; Thomas, P A; Bertone, Serena; Lucia, Gabriella De; Thomas, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a new feedback scheme implemented in the Munich galaxy formation model. The new scheme includes a dynamical treatment of galactic winds powered by supernovae explosions and stellar winds and is an excellent alternative to empirically-motivated recipes for feedback in galaxy formation. Model results are in good agreement with the observed luminosity function and stellar mass function for galaxies in the local Universe. In particular, the new scheme predicts a number density of dwarfs that is lower than in previous models. The model is also able to reproduce the observed mass--stellar metallicity and luminosity-gas metallicity relations. This demonstrates that our scheme provides a significant improvement in the treatment of the feedback in dwarf galaxies. A new feature of the model allows an estimate of the amount of mass and metals that haloes can permanently deposit into the IGM. It is this loss of material that leads to a suppression of star formation in small haloes and therefore to a...

  8. New Worlds Observer Formation Control Design Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission is designed for the direct detection and characterization of extrasolar planets. The NWO mission concept employs a two spacecraft leader-follower formation on a trajectory around the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) Libration Point. The leader spacecraft is baselined as a 4 meter optical telescope. The follower, Starshade spacecraft, is designed to suppress light from a central body star permitting direct detection of a surrounding exoplanetary system. The current design requires a nominal leader-follower separation range of 72 Megameters. NWO poses many challenges including formation control. NWO cycles between three principal control modes during the nominal mission timeline: science (fine pointing), realignment and transition. This paper examines formation control strategies in the context of dynamics of relative motion for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2)libration point. The paper presents an overview of the equations of relative motion followed by a discussion of each of the control modes. Discussion and analysis characterize control strategies for each of the mission control modes, including requirements, implementation challenges and project fuel budgets.

  9. A genetic algorithm for a bi-objective mathematical model for dynamic virtual cell formation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradgholi, Mostafa; Paydar, Mohammad Mahdi; Mahdavi, Iraj; Jouzdani, Javid

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, with the increasing pressure of the competitive business environment and demand for diverse products, manufacturers are force to seek for solutions that reduce production costs and rise product quality. Cellular manufacturing system (CMS), as a means to this end, has been a point of attraction to both researchers and practitioners. Limitations of cell formation problem (CFP), as one of important topics in CMS, have led to the introduction of virtual CMS (VCMS). This research addresses a bi-objective dynamic virtual cell formation problem (DVCFP) with the objective of finding the optimal formation of cells, considering the material handling costs, fixed machine installation costs and variable production costs of machines and workforce. Furthermore, we consider different skills on different machines in workforce assignment in a multi-period planning horizon. The bi-objective model is transformed to a single-objective fuzzy goal programming model and to show its performance; numerical examples are solved using the LINGO software. In addition, genetic algorithm (GA) is customized to tackle large-scale instances of the problems to show the performance of the solution method.

  10. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  11. Dynamical formation signatures of black hole binaries in the first detected mergers by LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Ryan M; Kocsis, Bence

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical formation of stellar-mass black hole-black hole binaries has long been a promising source of gravitational waves for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Mass segregation, gravitational focusing, and multibody dynamical interactions naturally increase the interaction rate between the most massive black holes in dense stellar systems, eventually leading them to merge. We find that dynamical interactions enhance the merger rate of black hole binaries with total mass M_tot roughly as ~M_tot^beta, with beta >~ 4. We find that this relation holds mostly independently of the initial mass function, but the exact value depends on the degree of mass segregation. The detection rate of such massive black hole binaries is only further enhanced by LIGO's greater sensitivity to massive black hole binaries with M_tot <~ 80 solar masses. We find that for power-law BH mass functions dN/dM ~ M^-alpha with alpha <~ 2, LIGO is most likely to detect black hole binaries with a mass tw...

  12. Equilibrium configurations of the tethered three-body formation system and their nonlinear dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Xu; Jian-Min Zhu; Tian Tan; Shi-Jie Xu

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers nonlinear dynamics of tethered three-body formation system with their centre of mass staying on a circular orbit around the Earth,and applies the theory of space manifold dynamics to deal with the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of the equilibrium configurations of the system.Compared with the classical circular restricted three body system,sixteen equilibrium configurations are obtained globally from the geometry of pseudo-potential energy surface,four of which were omitted in the previous research.The periodic Lyapunov orbits and their invariant manifolds near the hyperbolic equilibria are presented,and an iteration procedure for identifying Lyapunov orbit is proposed based on the differential correction algorithm.The non-transversal intersections between invariant manifolds are addressed to generate homoclinic and heteroclinic trajectories between the Lyapunov orbits.(3,3)-and (2,1)-heteroclinic trajectories from the neighborhood of one collinear equilibrium to that of another one,and (3,6)-and (2,1)-homoclinic trajectories from and to the neighborhood of the same equilibrium,are obtained based on the Poincaré mapping technique.

  13. Modeling contact formation between atomic-sized gold tips via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and rupture of atomic-sized contacts is modelled by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Such nano-contacts are realized in scanning tunnelling microscope and mechanically controlled break junction experiments. These instruments routinely measure the conductance across the nano-sized electrodes as they are brought into contact and separated, permitting conductance traces to be recorded that are plots of conductance versus the distance between the electrodes. One interesting feature of the conductance traces is that for some metals and geometric configurations a jump in the value of the conductance is observed right before contact between the electrodes, a phenomenon known as jump-to-contact. This paper considers, from a computational point of view, the dynamics of contact between two gold nano-electrodes. Repeated indentation of the two surfaces on each other is performed in two crystallographic orientations of face-centred cubic gold, namely (001) and (111). Ultimately, the intention is to identify the structures at the atomic level at the moment of first contact between the surfaces, since the value of the conductance is related to the minimum cross-section in the contact region. Conductance values obtained in this way are determined using first principles electronic transport calculations, with atomic configurations taken from the molecular dynamics simulations serving as input structures

  14. Dynamics for multistage pool formation of Lunnan low uplift in Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Lunnan area in the Tarim Basin has become an important onshore oil production base in China. Formation of the oil and gas pools in the low uplift of Lunnan has experienced a comparatively complex process of dynamics. Based on the hydrocarbon generation period of source rocks, the formation period of cap rocks and traps, the analysis of organic inclusion and the analysis of bitumen in the reservoir, this paper draws the conclusion that the low uplift area of Lunnan has experienced three pool formation periods: the Permian period, the Cretaceous-Early Tertiary period and the Late Tertiary-Quaternary period and two oil and gas reservoir adjustment periods: the Late Permian period and the Late Tertiary-Quaternary period. The comprehensive study indicates that the large-scale Ordovician buried hill, formed in Early Hercynian, became the reservoir during the Permian period, because the Cambrian-Lower Ordovician oil was discharged laterally into the reservoir along the top of the Ordovician weathering crust from south to north. The reservoir experienced a complicated process--reconstruc- tion in the end of Permian, adjustment in Cretaceous-Early Tertiary and re-discharging process in Late Tertiary-Qua- ternary, leading to the early original heavy oil reservoir of marine facies and the late original light oil reservoir and gas pool. Carboniferous, Triassic and Jurassic oil and gas reservoirs result from upward adjustment and re-distribution of Ordovician oil and gas reservoirs. Of those results, the formation of Triassic-Jurassic oil and gas pools came under the influence of the northward-tilting structure. The oil and gas sourcing from the different hydrocarbon source rock intervals vertically migrated into the base unconformity of Triassic system. Then the oil and gas migrated laterally from north to south and accumulated into the reservoir.

  15. A molecular dynamics simulation study of small cluster formation and migration in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the kinetics and energetics of self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters in vanadium, tantalum and copper. The formation energies of the SIA clusters in all the metals are well represented by a power function with a 0.75 exponent of the cluster size. The cluster diffusivities strongly depend on their structure. In vanadium and tantalum, all the SIA pairs in clusters are located along the direction rather than the direction. The clusters can migrate one-dimensionally in the direction with a small activation energy of around 0.1 eV. In copper, the collective orientation preference of the SIA pairs is not observed indicating that rotation of several pairs in the cluster is required for the cluster to migrate. The activation energy for the rotation is not so high as the cluster migration energy itself. The difference in the SIA cluster migration behavior between bcc and fcc metals is discussed

  16. Observation of bubble formation in water during microwave irradiation by dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Munenaga, Takuya; Nakata, Ryosuke

    2015-10-01

    A microwave reactor was designed for in situ observation of nano- and micro-bubbles, and size profiles during and after irradiation were measured with respect to irradiation power and time. Bubble formation in water during irradiation was observed even at temperatures below the boiling point of water. The maximum size strongly depended on radiation power and time, even at a given temperature. Nano-particles in the dispersion medium were found to play an important role in achieving more stable nucleation of bubbles around particles, and stable size distributions were obtained from clear autocorrelation by a dynamic light scattering system. Moreover, a combination of microwave induction heating and the addition of nano-particles to the dispersion medium can prevent heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on the cell wall. Quantitative nano-bubble size profiles obtained by in situ observation provide useful information regarding microwave-based industrial processes for nano-particle production.

  17. Strain dynamics during La2O3/Lu2O3 superlattice and alloy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proessdorf, André; Niehle, Michael; Grosse, Frank; Rodenbach, Peter; Hanke, Michael; Trampert, Achim

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of strain relaxation and intermixing during molecular beam epitaxy of La2O3 and Lu2O3 superlattices and alloys consisting of both binaries on Si(111) have been studied by real-time in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The presence of both hexagonal and cubic polymorphs of La2O3 influences the epitaxial formation within the superlattice. The process of strain relaxation is closely related to the presence of a (La,Lu)2O3 alloy adopting a cubic symmetry. It is formed by interdiffusion of La and Lu atoms reducing internal lattice mismatch within the superlattice. An interface thickness dominated by interdiffusion regions of about 3 monolayers is determined by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Studies of the effects of electron cloud formation on beam dynamics at CesrTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) has commenced operation as a linear collider damping ring test bed following its conversion from an e+e--collider in 2008. A core component of the research program is the measurement of effects of synchrotron-radiation-induced electron cloud formation on beam dynamics. We have studied the interaction of the beam with the cloud with measurements of coherent tune shifts and emittance growth in various bunch train configurations, bunch currents, beam energies, and bunch lengths, for both e+ and e- beams. This paper compares a subset of these measurements to modeling results from the two-dimensional cloud simulation packages ECLOUD and POSINST. These codes each model most of the tune shift measurements with remarkable accuracy, while some comparisons merit further investigation.

  19. Metamorphic sole formation, emplacement and blueschist overprint: early obduction dynamics witnessed by W. Turkey ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunder, Alexis; Agard, Philippe; Chopin, Christian; Soret, Mathieu; Okay, Aral; Whitechurch, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Western Turkey, with a >200 km long-belt of unmetamorphosed ophiolite overlying continental lithosphere is one or even the largest obducted ophiolite on Earth and therefore a key example to study obduction and early subduction dynamics. All Western Turkish ophiolite fragments are considered as part of the same Neotethyan branch resulting of a long-lived continental subduction (or underthrusting). Synchronous (ca. ~ 93 Ma) metamorphic sole formation and preservation at the base of most of the Turkish ophiolite fragments support this single event and place a strong constraint on the age of subduction initiation. Metamorphic soles are indeed generally considered to have formed during the early and hot subduction zone at 25 ± 10 km depths and welded to the overriding oceanic lithosphere. In Western Turkey however (as for most places worldwide) a systematic study of the pressure-temperature conditions with modern thermobarometric tools is generally lacking, and fundamental mechanisms of formation or accretion to the upper plate are poorly (if at all) constrained. We herein reappraise Western Turkish metamorphic soles focusing on the following points and issues: (i) detailed structures of metamorphic sole and other subduction derived units, petrological evolution and refined pressure-temperature conditions; peak pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole were estimated using garnet, clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase as the peak paragenesis at 10.5 ± 2 kbar and 800 ± 50°C based on pseudosections using the Theriak/Domino package (ii) the rather unique (and enigmatic) blueschist facies overprint found in places was investigated in terms of structural position and pressure-temperature conditions. Conditions of overprint were estimated around 12 kbar and 425 °C from the presence of glaucophane, lawsonite, jadeite and garnet overgrowing the amphibolite-facies assemblage. This field-based study provides clues to mechanisms of metamorphic sole underplating

  20. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene in a slit supersonic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Agarwal, Jay; Allen, Wesley D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene are investigated in a slit jet supersonic discharge and probed with sub-Doppler resolution (≈60 MHz) on the fundamental antisymmetric CH stretch mode (ν5). The triacetylene is generated in the throat of the discharge by sequential attack of ethynyl radical with acetyelene and diacetylene: (i) HCCH → HCC + H, (ii) HCC + HCCH → HCCCCH + H, (iii) HCC + HCCCCH → HCCCCCCH + H, cooled rapidly in the slit expansion to 15 K, and probed by near shot-noise-limited absorption sensitivity with a tunable difference-frequency infrared laser. The combination of jet cooled temperatures (Trot = 15 K) and low spectral congestion permits (i) analysis of rotationally avoided crossings in the ν5 band ascribed to Coriolis interactions, as well as (ii) first detection of ν5 Π-Π hot band progressions built on the ν12 sym CC bend and definitively assigned via state-of-the-art ab initio vibration-rotation interaction parameters (αi), which make for interesting comparison with recent spectroscopic studies of Doney et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 316, 54 (2015)]. The combined data provide direct evidence for significantly non-equilibrium populations in the CC bending manifold, dynamically consistent with a strongly bent radical intermediate and transition states for forming triacetylene product. The presence of intense triacetylene signals under cold, low density slit jet conditions provides support for (i) barrierless addition of HCC with HCCCCH and (ii) a high quantum yield for HCCCCCCH formation. Complete basis set calculations for energetics [CCSD(T)-f12/VnZ-f12, n = 2,3] and frequencies [CCSD(T)-f12/VdZ-f12] are presented for both radical intermediate and transition state species, predicting collision stabilization in the slit jet expansion to be competitive with unimolecular decomposition with increasing polyyne chain length.

  1. Dynamics of Asp23-Lys28 salt-bridge formation in Abeta10-35 monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarus, Bogdan; Straub, John E; Thirumalai, D

    2006-12-20

    In the amyloid fibrils formed from long fragments of the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta-protein), the monomers are arranged in parallel and lie perpendicular to the fibril axis. The structure of the monomers satisfies the amyloid self-organization principle; namely, the low free energy state of the monomer maximizes the number of intra- and interpeptide contacts and salt bridges. The formation of the intramolecular salt bridge between Asp(D)23 and Lys(K)28 ensures that unpaired charges are not buried in the low-dielectric interior. We have investigated, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, whether the D23-K28 interaction forms spontaneously in the isolated Abeta10-35 monomer. To validate the simulation protocol, we show, using five independent trajectories spanning a total of 100 ns, that the pKa values of the titratable groups are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The computed free energy disconnectvity graph shows that broadly the ensemble of compact random coil conformations can be clustered into four basins that are separated by free energy barriers ranging from 0.3 to 2.7 kcal/mol. There is significant residual structure in the conformation of the peptide in each of the basins. Due to the desolvation penalty, the structural motif with a stable turn involving the residues VGSN and a preformed D23-K28 contact is a minor component of the simulated structures. The extent of solvation of the peptides in the four basins varies greatly, which underscores the dynamical fluctuations in the monomer. Our results suggest that the early event in the oligomerization process must be the expulsion of discrete water molecules that facilitates the formation of interpeptide-interaction-driven stable structures with an intramolecular D23-K28 salt bridge and an intact VGSN turn. PMID:17165769

  2. Star formation properties and dynamics of Luminous Infrared Galaxies with adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, Petri; Ryder, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Near infrared adaptive optics observations are crucial to be able to interpret kinematic and dynamical data and study star formation properties within the often extremely dusty interacting luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs). NIR AO data are also needed to find supernovae in their bright and dusty central regions and to fully characterize the young stellar clusters found in these kinds of systems. We have used AO in the K-band to survey a sample of LIRGs at 0.1 arcsec (30 to 100 pc) resolution. The data are merged with SALT and AAT spectroscopic follow-up and HST and Spitzer archival imaging. The first AO detected SNe are reported as well as details of the first studied LIRGs. One LIRG showed an unexpected third component in the interaction, which moreover turned out to host the most active star formation. Another target showed evidence in the NIR of a very rare case of leading spiral arms, rotating in the same direction as the arms open.

  3. The role of reconsolidation and the dynamic process of long-term memory formation and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Alberini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the processes of memory formation and storage are exquisitely dynamic. Elucidating the nature and temporal evolution of the biological changes that accompany encoding, storage and retrieval is key to understand memory formation. For explicit or medial temporal lobe-dependent memories that form after a discrete event and are stored for a long time, the physical changes underlying the encoding and processing of the information (memory trace or engram remain in a fragile state for some time. However, over time, the new memory becomes increasingly resistant to disruption until it is consolidated. Retrieval or reactivation of an apparently consolidated memory can render the memory labile again, and reconsolidation is the process that occurs to mediate its restabilization. Reconsolidation also evolves with the age of the memory: Young memories are sensitive to postreactivation disruption, but older memories are more resistant. Why does a memory become labile again if it is retrieved or reactivated? Here I suggest that the main function of reconsolidation is to contribute to the lingering consolidation process and mediate memory strengthening. I also discuss the literature and results regarding the influence of the passage of time on the reconsolidation of memory. These points have important implications for the use of reconsolidation in therapeutic settings.

  4. The role of loop stacking in the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mosayebi, Majid; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation using oxDNA, a nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of DNA. In particular, we explore the effects of the loop stacking interactions and non-native base pairing on the hairpin closing times. We find a non-monotonic variation of the hairpin closing time with temperature, in agreement with the experimental work of Wallace et al. [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 5584-5589]. The hairpin closing process involves the formation of an initial nucleus of one or two bonds between the stems followed by a rapid zippering of the stem. At high temperatures, typically above the hairpin melting temperature, an effective negative activation enthalpy is observed because the nucleus has a lower enthalpy than the open state. By contrast, at low temperatures, the activation enthalpy becomes positive mainly due to the increasing energetic cost of bending a loop that becomes increasingly highly stacked as the temperature decreases. We show that stacking must be very strong to induc...

  5. Sensitivity study of fluid dynamic effects on nitric oxide formation in CFB combustion of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, S.; Kilpinen, P.; Konttinen, J. [Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland); Leckner, B.; Armand, L.E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    The type of fuel and operating conditions in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) can vary widely. Potential fuels include coals, biofuels and wastes. The use of biofuels as an energy source has stimulated much interest around the world, but the nitric oxide (NO) emissions from CFB combustion of wood is of the same order of magnitude as from combustion of coal with high N content. This paper presents a newly developed 1.5D numerical model that examines the formation of NO and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions in a CFBC under varying operating conditions and different fuel types. A comprehensive kinetic scheme was used for the homogeneous chemistry and a single particle model for char combustion. Gas mixing and release of volatiles were the fluid dynamic factors that were examined for wood combustion under normal air staging conditions. The formation of high NO emissions from wood burning was found to depend greatly on the pattern of volatile releases as well as the mixing of secondary air and gas. Nitric oxide was found to form higher in the riser during wood combustion compared to coal combustion. The large amount of char at the bottom of the bed is an important source of nitric oxide. 14 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  6. Dynamics, Fluxes, Stability, Succession and Landscape Formation in Cold Environments: The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2015-04-01

    Within Europe there is a wide array of high-latitude and high-altitude landscapes, covering a significant proportion of the total land area. These defined cold climate landscapes represent a variety of stages of deglaciation history and landscape formation. We find landscapes at different levels of postglacial stabilization, providing the unique opportunity to study the interactions between geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic systems at the land surface. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network (2004 - ) bridges across the geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic sciences in order to investigate the complex dynamics of stabilization, succession and landscape formation during and after ice retreat and under human impact. The Network provides a multidisciplinary forum where research groups come together. It is linking and integrating a number of networks and programs and creates an umbrella program and a forum for sharing knowledge. The focus of this network is relevant for different end users, including risk and vulnerability assessment, sustainable land use, land management and conservation. Also questions closely related to Global Change like, e.g., hazards, permafrost degradation, loss of biodiversity are addressed.

  7. A Dynamical Model for the Formation of Gas Rings and Episodic Starbursts Near Galactic Centres

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    We develop a simple dynamical model for the evolution of gas in the centres of barred spiral galaxies, using the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ, i.e., the central few hundred pc) as a case study. We show that, in the presence of a galactic bar, gas in a disc in the central regions of a galaxy will be driven inwards by angular momentum transport induced by acoustic instabilities within the bar's inner Lindblad resonance. This transport process drives turbulence within the gas that temporarily keeps it strongly gravitationally stable and prevents the onset of rapid star formation. However, at some point the rotation curve must transition from approximately flat to approximately solid body, and the resulting reduction in shear reduces the transport rates and causes gas to build up, eventually producing a gravitationally-unstable region that is subject to rapid and violent star formation. For the observed rotation curve of the Milky Way, the accumulation happens $\\sim 100$ pc from the centre of the Galax...

  8. The role of reconsolidation and the dynamic process of long-term memory formation and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberini, Cristina M

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the processes of memory formation and storage are exquisitely dynamic. Elucidating the nature and temporal evolution of the biological changes that accompany encoding, storage, and retrieval is key to understand memory formation. For explicit or medial temporal lobe-dependent memories that form after a discrete event and are stored for a long time, the physical changes underlying the encoding and processing of the information (memory trace or engram) remain in a fragile state for some time. However, over time, the new memory becomes increasingly resistant to disruption until it is consolidated. Retrieval or reactivation of an apparently consolidated memory can render the memory labile again, and reconsolidation is the process that occurs to mediate its restabilization. Reconsolidation also evolves with the age of the memory: Young memories are sensitive to post-reactivation disruption, but older memories are more resistant. Why does a memory become labile again if it is retrieved or reactivated? Here I suggest that the main function of reconsolidation is to contribute to the lingering consolidation process and mediate memory strengthening. I also discuss the literature and results regarding the influence of the passage of time on the reconsolidation of memory. These points have important implications for the use of reconsolidation in therapeutic settings. PMID:21436877

  9. Dynamic Light Scattering Analysis of the Effect of Phosphorylated Osteopontin Peptides on Mineral Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Maryam; Goiko, Maria; de Bruyn, John; Goldberg, Harvey

    2015-03-01

    Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms synthesize minerals. Osteopontin (OPN), a mineral-associated protein, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of mineral formation, a process that is dependent on phosphorylation. To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of inhibition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to monitor the initial stages of nucleation, providing information about the size and relative concentration of the growing crystals as a function of time. DLS was used to investigate the effect of phosphorylated (P3, pOPAR) and non-phosphorylated (P0, OPAR) OPN peptides on the formation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals from supersaturated solutions of calcium and phosphate ions. The non-phosphorylated P0 had a limited effect on HA nucleation and growth, while its thrice-phosphorylated isoform, P3, was a potent inhibitor of HA nucleation. The aspartic acid-rich OPAR was found to moderately inhibit nucleation but not growth, while its singly-phosphorylated isoform, pOPAR, inhibited HA nucleation more effectively, with some effect on HA crystal growth. The order of the inhibitory potential of these peptides was pOPAR>OPAR>P3>P0. This work confirms that highly acidic and phosphorylated peptides can inhibit the nucleation of HA more effectively.

  10. A triphasic constrained mixture model of engineered tissue formation under in vitro dynamic mechanical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao S; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    While it has become axiomatic that mechanical signals promote in vitro engineered tissue formation, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Moreover, efforts to date to determine parameters for optimal extracellular matrix (ECM) development have been largely empirical. In the present work, we propose a two-pronged approach involving novel theoretical developments coupled with key experimental data to develop better mechanistic understanding of growth and development of dense connective tissue under mechanical stimuli. To describe cellular proliferation and ECM synthesis that occur at rates of days to weeks, we employ mixture theory to model the construct constituents as a nutrient-cell-ECM triphasic system, their transport, and their biochemical reactions. Dynamic conditioning protocols with frequencies around 1 Hz are described with multi-scale methods to couple the dissimilar time scales. Enhancement of nutrient transport due to pore fluid advection is upscaled into the growth model, and the spatially dependent ECM distribution describes the evolving poroelastic characteristics of the scaffold-engineered tissue construct. Simulation results compared favorably to the existing experimental data, and most importantly, distinguish between static and dynamic conditioning regimes. The theoretical framework for mechanically conditioned tissue engineering (TE) permits not only the formulation of novel and better-informed mechanistic hypothesis describing the phenomena underlying TE growth and development, but also the exploration/optimization of conditioning protocols in a rational manner. PMID:26055347

  11. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result

  12. A Fuzzy Programming approach for formation of Virtual Cells under dynamic and uncertain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Jayachitra,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by principles and advantages of the group technology (GT philosophy, part family formation for a virtual Cellular Manufacturing System (VCMS using Fuzzy logic is designed for dynamic and uncertain conditions. In real manufacturing systems, the input parameters such as part demand and the capacity are fuzzy in nature. In such cases, the fluctuations in part demand and the availability of manufacturing facilities in each period can be regarded as fuzzy. In a dynamic environment, the planning horizon can be divided into smaller time periods where each period and/or each part has different product mix and demand. A mathematical model for virtual cellular manufacturing system as binary-integer programming is proposed to minimize the total costs consisting of fixed machine costs, variable costs of all machines and the logical group movement costs. To verify the behavior of the proposed model, a comprehensive example is solved by a branch- and-bound (B&B method with the LINGO 12.0 software and the virtual cells(VC are formed by defuzzification using maximizing decision level λ (lambda-cut and the computational results are reported and compared with simulated annealing algorithm and rank order clustering algorithm .

  13. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Duan, Xiaoxi; Ouyang, Jiting

    2015-12-01

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  14. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting, E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Duan, Xiaoxi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  15. The poleward edge of the mid-latitude trough - Its formation, orientation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, A. S.; Brace, L. H.; Hoegy, W. R.; Winningham, J. D.

    1986-08-01

    Data from the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS) deployed at Halley, Antarctica (76-deg S, 27-deg W; L = 4.2) and the Dynamics Explorer-2 spacecraft (DE-2) are used to investigate several aspects of the formation processes and dynamics of the poleward edge of the midlatitude electron density trough. These include a study of the flux and energy of charged particles precipitating into the F-region as a function of Magnetic Local Time. It is found that local energetic electron precipitation is a major source of ionization of the poleward edge in the evening sector, but only after magnetic midnight transport processes become more important. Occasionally a significant increase in the flux of conjugate photoelectrons is colocated with the poleward edge of the trough in the morning sector. The combination of AIS and DE-2 data has allowed identification of significant longitudinal structure on the poleward edge of the trough that may be the result of substorm activity. It is found that the orientation of the poleward edge of the trough and the locus of the plasmapause predicted from the 'tear-drop' model vary in rather a similar manner with local time, though no close physical link between the two features is inferred from this coincidence.

  16. Mechanism underlying formation of SSC in optical glass due to dynamic impact of single diamond scratch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 赵航; 张飞虎; 张元晶; 张勇

    2015-01-01

    During the grinding of optical glass, the abrasion directly affects the morphology and depth of subsurface cracks(SSC). The effect of dynamic impact of grinding abrasives on optical glass is an important issue in the field of optics manufacturing. In this work, a single diamond scratch was used to grind optical glass, and grinding parameters were collaboratively controlled to ensure that the cutting layer remained constant. A dynamometer was used to record the duration of the impact process, and the cross-section of the test piece was polished for scanning electron microscopy(SEM) to determine the depth of the SSCs. The experimental results show that as wheel speed increases, SSC depth tends to decrease. When the wheel speed gradually increases from 500 r/min to 2500 r/min, the probability distribution curve for the maximum SSC depth shifts downward by around 80 μm. The effect of the dynamic impact of single diamond scratch is found to be an important cause of SSC formation in optical glass during grinding, i.e., the faster the grinding, the shallower the SSCs.

  17. Mechanism underlying formation of SSC in optical glass due to dynamic impact of single diamond scratch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 赵航; 张飞虎; 张元晶; 张勇

    2015-01-01

    During the grinding of optical glass, the abrasion directly affects the morphology and depth of subsurface cracks (SSC). The effect of dynamic impact of grinding abrasives on optical glass is an important issue in the field of optics manufacturing. In this work, a single diamond scratch was used to grind optical glass, and grinding parameters were collaboratively controlled to ensure that the cutting layer remained constant. A dynamometer was used to record the duration of the impact process, and the cross-section of the test piece was polished for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the depth of the SSCs. The experimental results show that as wheel speed increases, SSC depth tends to decrease. When the wheel speed gradually increases from 500 r/min to 2500 r/min, the probability distribution curve for the maximum SSC depth shifts downward by around 80 µm. The effect of the dynamic impact of single diamond scratch is found to be an important cause of SSC formation in optical glass during grinding, i.e., the faster the grinding, the shallower the SSCs.

  18. Clear band formation simulated by dislocation dynamics: Role of helical turns and pile-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogaret, Thomas [SIMAP-GPM2, INP Grenoble, CNRS/UJF, BP46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); SRMA, CEA DEN/DMN Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Rodney, David [SIMAP-GPM2, INP Grenoble, CNRS/UJF, BP46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)], E-mail: dvd.rodney@gmail.com; Fivel, Marc [SIMAP-GPM2, INP Grenoble, CNRS/UJF, BP46, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Robertson, Christian [SRMA, CEA DEN/DMN Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-10-15

    We present dislocation dynamics simulations of the glide of dislocations in random populations of Frank loops. Specific local rules of interaction are developed to reproduce elementary interaction mechanisms obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We show that absorption of Frank loops as helical turns on screw dislocations is at the heart of the process of clear band formation because (1) it transforms the loops into jogs on dislocations, (2) when the dislocations unpin, the jogs are transported along the dislocation lines, leading to a progressive clearing of the band and (3) the dislocations are re-emitted in a glide plane different from the initial one, allowing for a broadening of the band. We also show that isolated dislocations cannot form a clear band of finite thickness because the clearing process would be limited to one plane tilted with respect to the {l_brace}111{r_brace} primary plane. Rather, a pile-up of dislocations is needed, leading to collective effects between dislocations that are analyzed in details.

  19. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed

  20. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells. PMID:27424155

  1. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  2. Molecular dynamics studies of aqueous silica nanoparticle dispersions: salt effects on the double layer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, Lucas S; Rigo, Vagner A; Michelon, Mateus F; Metin, Cigdem O; Nguyen, Quoc P; Miranda, Caetano R

    2015-08-19

    The ion distribution around hydroxylated silica nanoparticles (NP-H) dispersed in brine was investigated by fully atomistic molecular dynamics. The NP-H dispersions in aqueous electrolyte media are simulated in solutions of varying salinity (NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2), salt concentration (0.06  ×  10(-3) to 3.00  ×  10(-3) mole fraction [Formula: see text]), and temperature (300 and 350 K) at 1 atm. The NP-H models reproduce the observed experimental concentration of silanol and geminal surface sites, which are responsible for local charge variations on the nanoparticles' surface. Interestingly, under certain salt concentration conditions, the formation of an electrical double layer (DL) around the overall neutral NP-H occurs. The resulting DLs are attenuated with increasing temperature for all evaluated salts. With increasing salt concentration, a sign inversion of the effective charge at the first ion layer is observed, which modifies the electrostatic environment around the nanoparticle. The minimum salt concentration that leads to a DL formation at 300 K is 1.05  ×  10(-3), 0.37  ×  10(-3), and 0.06  ×  10(-3) χs for NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2, respectively. The width of the DL decreases sequentially in ionic strength from NaCl to CaCl2 to MgCl2, which is similar to that found for highly charged surfaces. These results are in line with our previous experimental data for negative charged NP-H. All together, these observations suggest an interplay mechanism between the formation and narrowing of electric double layers on the stability of NP dispersions in both neutral and negatively charged NP-H. PMID:26194994

  3. Medium polarization dynamics with atomic cluster formation in radioactive lutetium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The study of processes in a material of a radioactive sources was begun by us in connection with our work directed to the accuracy increase of electron-spectroscopy researches of nucleus decays. It was necessary to draw large attention to the form of electronic spectra and separate conversion lines, their dynamics and to research explanations of their anomalies with use for this purpose not only nuclear-spectroscopy methods, but also opportunities of auto-emission and Auger-spectroscopy. The analysis of all experimental results of our long-time research (∼ 13 years) of the radioactive lutetium oxide, deposited on a platinum support, as a radioactive source, has resulted us in the following assumptions of processes occurring in the source material. The lutetium oxide is a dielectric, having spontaneous polarization varying in the radiation field of the radioactive decay. The polarization is determined by domains - areas with various directions of polarization. Under action of an electrical field the volumes of the polarized along the field domains are increased at the expense of the ones, polarized against the field. The domain borders fixed on inhomogeneities move, for example, under action of internal conversion electrons accompanying the decay of radioactive nuclei. The experimentally observable energy losses of such electrons achieve 500 eV. In the cluster formation process the multipole character of nucleus decay electron radiation causing transfer of the angular moment by the electrons to atoms with collision with them plays a significant role. The auto-emission and Auger-spectra specify a determining role of the M4- and M5-subshells of ytterbium atoms in the cluster formation. It is possible to assume, that in the lutetium oxide electrical dipole medium at first the metal ytterbium clusters are formed. Their valent electrons are not located in space and are conducting electrons, for example, the electrons of the destroyed N-shell. It is possible

  4. Dynamics and drivers for dense shelf water formation, migration and cascading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Davide; Benetazzo, Alvise; Barbariol, Francesco; Bergamasco, Andrea; Boldrin, Alfredo; Marcello Falcieri, Francesco; Langone, Leonardo; Sclavo, Mauro; Trincardi, Fabio; Carniel, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Dense Shelf Waters formation and their descent towards the deep ocean are generally accepted as one of the main factors driving large-scale thermohaline and biogeochemical fluxes from the continental shelf. With reference to a particularly intense event occurred in winter 2012 in the northern Adriatic Sea (namely Gulf of Venice), an epicontinental basin of the Mediterranean Sea, a set of high-resolution (1 km horizontal discretization) numerical experiments carried out by means of the COAWST (Coupled Ocean, Atmosphere Waves and Sediment Transport) modelling system allowed to explore the dynamics underlying such phenomena. The role of external factors (freshwater input, tides, and continental margin topography) was investigated as well as the mutual interactions involving atmosphere, waves and ocean circulation. The so-called North Adriatic Dense Water (NAdDW) forms in the Gulf of Venice as a consequence of the cooling and salinization of the sub-basin induced by cold air jets blowing from northeast across the Eastern Alps and Balkans. Partially recirculating in a double-gyre structure, newly formed water masses progressively leave the formation region flowing southeastwards leant on the Italian shelf. Along its path, significant fractions of NAdDW are intercepted by mid-Adriatic pits and by the continental shelf break off the Apulian coast. Whilst riverine freshwater input is crucial in preconditioning the NAdDW formation basin and controlling the intrusion of saltier waters from the south, atmosphere-wave-ocean dynamics drive the generation proper by governing air-sea heat and momentum exchanges and ocean circulation, with substantial effects on the modes of buoyancy extraction and on the extent of the water masses involved in this process. The trajectory of the dense stream leaving the northernmost basin tends to a geostrophic equilibrium determined by water mass momentum and density, which in turn reflect the interplay of the factors acting on the generation

  5. The impact of turbulence and phytoplankton dynamics on foam formation, seawater viscosity and chlorophyll concentration in the eastern English Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Kesaulya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The space-time dynamics of chlorophyll a concentration and seawater excess viscosity has been investigated in the hydrographically contrasting inshore and offshore water masses of the eastern English Channel. This was done during the phytoplankton spring bloom dominated by Phaeocystis globosa before and after the very large-scale formation of foam induced by an increase in wind-driven turbulence and the related wave breakings. The results suggest that the dynamics of chlorophyll a concentration and seawater excess viscosity are differentially controlled by the formation of foam through the intensity of the spring bloom and wind-generated turbulence.

  6. Dynamics and neutrino signal of black hole formation in non-rotating failed supernovae. II. progenitor dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Sumiyoshi, K.; Yamada, S; Suzuki, H.

    2008-01-01

    We study the progenitor dependence of the black hole formation and its associated neutrino signals from the gravitational collapse of non-rotating massive stars, following the preceding study on the single progenitor model in Sumiyoshi et al. (2007). We aim to clarify whether the dynamical evolution toward the black hole formation occurs in the same manner for different progenitors and to examine whether the characteristic of neutrino bursts is general having the short duration and the rapidl...

  7. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Y Alexandrova

    Full Text Available Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs, and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow, and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body. Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base.

  8. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  9. REGULATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES IN MULTIPHASE GALACTIC DISKS: A THERMAL/DYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a model for the regulation of galactic star formation rates ΣSFR in disk galaxies, in which interstellar medium (ISM) heating by stellar UV plays a key role. By requiring that thermal and (vertical) dynamical equilibrium are simultaneously satisfied within the diffuse gas, and that stars form at a rate proportional to the mass of the self-gravitating component, we obtain a prediction for ΣSFR as a function of the total gaseous surface density Σ and the midplane density of stars+dark matter ρsd. The physical basis of this relationship is that the thermal pressure in the diffuse ISM, which is proportional to the UV heating rate and therefore to ΣSFR, must adjust until it matches the midplane pressure value set by the vertical gravitational field. Our model applies to regions where Σ ∼sun pc-2. In low-ΣSFR (outer-galaxy) regions where diffuse gas dominates, the theory predicts that ΣSFR∝Σ√(ρsd). The decrease of thermal equilibrium pressure when ΣSFR is low implies, consistent with observations, that star formation can extend (with declining efficiency) to large radii in galaxies, rather than having a sharp cutoff at a fixed value of Σ. The main parameters entering our model are the ratio of thermal pressure to total pressure in the diffuse ISM, the fraction of diffuse gas that is in the warm phase, and the star formation timescale in self-gravitating clouds; all of these are (at least in principle) direct observables. At low surface density, our model depends on the ratio of the mean midplane FUV intensity (or thermal pressure in the diffuse gas) to the star formation rate, which we set based on solar-neighborhood values. We compare our results to recent observations, showing good agreement overall for azimuthally averaged data in a set of spiral galaxies. For the large flocculent spiral galaxies NGC 7331 and NGC 5055, the correspondence between theory and observation is remarkably close.

  10. IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, 10-14 March 2013, Fukuoka, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-06-01

    This special issue of Fluid Dynamics Research contains the first of a two-part publication of the papers presented at the IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, held at the Centennial Hall, Kyushu University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan, during the week of 10-14 March 2013. Vortices are ubiquitous structures in fluid mechanics spanning the range of scales from nanofluidics and microfluidics to geophysical and astrophysical flows. Vortices are the key to understanding many different phenomena. As a result, the subject of vortex dynamics continues to evolve and to constantly find new applications in biology, biotechnology, industrial and environmental problems. Vortices can be created by the separation of a flow from the surface of a body or at a density interface, and evolve into coherent structures. Once formed, a vortex acquires a function, depending on its individual structure. In this way, for example, insects gain lift and fish gain thrust. Surprisingly, despite the long history of vortex dynamics, only recently has knowledge about formation, structure and function of vortices been combined to yield new perspectives in the subject, thereby helping to solve outstanding problems brought about by modern advances in computer technology and improved experimental techniques. This symposium is a continuation, five years on, of the IUTAM Symposium '50 Years of Vortex Dynamics', Lyngby, Denmark that took place between 12-16 October 2008, organized by the late Professor Hassan Aref. Originally, Professor Aref was a member of the International Scientific Committee of this symposium and offered his enthusiasm and great expertise, to support its organization. To our shock, he suddenly passed away on 9 September 2011. Furthermore, Professor Slava Meleshko, a leading scientist of fluid and solid mechanics and an intimate friend of Professor Aref, was expected to make an eminent contribution to the symposium. Soon after this sad loss

  11. Dynamic coupling of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W; Brand, Michael

    2009-10-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation. PMID:19823566

  12. Dynamic Processes of Altered Layer Formation in Cu-Pt Alloys Under Ion Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfei; Asahata, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Ryuichi

    Three different experimental approaches have been developed to study the dynamic process of subsurface altered layer formation in a Cu-Pt alloy under Ar+ ion bombardment: (1) sputter neutral mass spectrometry by multiphoton ionization (MPI-SNMS) for the study of preferential sputtering caused by the collision cascade process in the very initial stage of sputtering; (2) ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS)-Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) sequential measurements for investigating radiation-enhanced Gibbsian segregation in the transient stage of sputtering; (3) an approach based on ISS monitoring by prompt switching of the ion bombardment with (He++Ar+) ions to that with He+ ions, for revealing the cooling effect in radiation-enhanced diffusion in the final steady state of sputtering. For this we have developed a specific coevaporating device for depositing Cu and Pt simultaneously on a substrate at constant deposition rate. The coevaporating device was attached to both of the specimen chambers of the Auger microprobe, JAMP-3, and of the MPI-SNMS apparatus. The results have clearly revealed: (i) ion bombardment causes a preferential sputtering of Cu atoms in the very initial stage of sputtering, (ii) followed by gradual formation of an altered layer as ion sputtering proceeds in the transient stage, and (iii) finally the alloy system approaches a steady state where the composition profile is controlled by cascade mixing, radiation-enhanced Gibbsian segregation and radiation-enhanced diffusion to satisfy the mass balance law. In the steady state the approach (3) has, first, revealed that the cooling effect does exist in radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  13. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity

  14. THE LAST STAGES OF TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION: DYNAMICAL FRICTION AND THE LATE VENEER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the clean-up of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets to circular and coplanar orbits after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M⊕ of chondritic material was delivered as 'late veneer' by planetesimals to the terrestrial planets after the end of giant impacts. Here, we combine these two independent lines of evidence for a leftover population of planetesimals and show that: (1) a residual population of small planetesimals containing 0.01 M⊕ is able to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets after giant impacts to their observed values. (2) At the same time, this planetesimal population can account for the observed relative amounts of late veneer added to the Earth, Moon, and Mars provided that the majority of the accreted late veneer was delivered by small planetesimals with radii ∼⊕/ρmars)(R⊕/Rmars)4 ∼ 17, which agrees well with the mass accretion ratio inferred from HSEs of 12-23. For the Earth-Moon system, we find a mass accretion ratio of ∼200, which, as we show, is consistent with estimates of 150-700 derived from HSE abundances that include the lunar crust as well as the mantle component. We conclude that small residual planetesimals containing about ∼1% of the mass of the Earth could provide the dynamical friction needed to relax the terrestrial planet's eccentricities and inclinations after giant impacts, and also may have been the dominant source for the late veneer added to Earth, Moon, and Mars.

  15. Molecular dynamics of wetting layer formation and forced water invasion in angular nanopores with mixed wettability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs has prompted the oil and gas industry to search for unconventional resources such as shale gas/oil reservoirs. In shale rocks, considerable amounts of hydrocarbon reside in nanoscale pore spaces. As a result, understanding the multiphase flow of wetting and non-wetting phases in nanopores is important to improve oil and gas recovery from these formations. This study was designed to investigate the threshold capillary pressure of oil and water displacements in a capillary dominated regime inside nanoscale pores using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The pores have the same cross-sectional area and volume but different cross-sectional shapes. Oil and water particles were represented with a coarse grained model and the NEMD simulations were conducted by assigning external pressure on an impermeable piston. Threshold capillary pressures were determined for the drainage process (water replaced by oil) in different pores. The molecular dynamics results are in close agreements with calculations using the Mayer-Stowe-Princen (MS-P) method which has been developed on the premise of energy balance in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the drainage simulations, a change in wall particles’ wettability from water-wet to oil-wet was implemented based on the final configuration of oil and water inside the pore. Waterflooding simulations were then carried out at the threshold capillary pressure. The results show that the oil layer formed between water in the corner and in the center of the pore is not stable and collapses as the simulation continues. This is in line with the predictions from the MS-P method

  16. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T., E-mail: tctm3@cam.ac.uk; Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J., E-mail: tpjk2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-07

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  17. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-08-01

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  18. Decreased Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on nanomodified endotracheal tubes: a dynamic lung model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mary C; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a serious complication of mechanical ventilation that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality rates and medical costs in the pediatric intensive care unit. Currently, there is no cost-effective solution to the problems posed by VAP. Endotracheal tubes (ETTs) that are resistant to bacterial colonization and that inhibit biofilm formation could provide a novel solution to the problems posed by VAP. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate differences in the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on unmodified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ETTs and on ETTs etched with a fungal lipase, Rhizopus arrhizus, to create nanoscale surface features. These differences were evaluated using an in vitro model of the pediatric airway to simulate a ventilated patient in the pediatric intensive care unit. Each experiment was run for 24 hours and was supported by computational models of the ETT. Dynamic conditions within the ETT had an impact on the location of bacterial growth within the tube. These conditions also quantitatively affected bacterial growth especially within the areas of tube curvature. Most importantly, experiments in the in vitro model revealed a 2.7 log reduction in the number (colony forming units/mL) of P. aeruginosa on the nanoroughened ETTs compared to the untreated PVC ETTs after 24 hours. This reduction in total colony forming units/mL along the x-axis of the tube was similar to previous studies completed for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, this dynamic study showed that lipase etching can create surface features of nanoscale roughness on PVC ETTs that decrease bacterial attachment of P. aeruginosa without the use of antibiotics and may provide clinicians with an effective and inexpensive tool to combat VAP. PMID:27563242

  19. Vortex formation in coalescence of droplets with a reservoir using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; Bonaccurso, Elmar; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2016-10-01

    The flow patterns generated by the coalescence of aqueous ethanol droplets with a water reservoir are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The influence of surface tension gradient, which leads to the spreading of the droplet along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir, is studied by changing the ethanol concentration of the droplet. The internal circulation (vortex strength) of the droplet and the reservoir are analyzed separately. Simulation results reveal the formation of swirling flows within the droplet at early times when the radius of the coalescence neck due to the capillary forces increases rapidly with time. The vortex strength is found to be higher at lower concentrations of ethanol (higher liquid-vapor surface tension of the droplet), where the driving force for the contact line movement (capillary force) is stronger. The circulation diminishes by moving the center of mass of the droplet toward the reservoir. The lower surface tension of the droplet compared to the reservoir leads to surface tension gradient driven flow, which transports the droplet molecules along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir. Such a flow motion results in the generation of convective flows in the underlying water, which forms swirling flows within the reservoir. Therefore, the vortex strength of the reservoir is higher at higher ethanol concentrations of the droplet. The reservoir circulation decays to zero as soon as the ethanol concentration becomes homogeneous along the interface of the pool. The time evolution of circulation within the droplet and the reservoir are correlated with the center of mass motion of the droplet toward the surface, the time variation of the precursor film radius and the dynamic surface tension of the reservoir. PMID:27388133

  20. Lattice dynamical study of omega phase formation in Zr-Al system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hexagonal ω phase occurs in the alloys in which the high temperature β phase (bcc) is stabilized with respect to the martensitic β -> ω transformation. The compositional ranges over which the ω phase can be stabilized is the characteristic of the alloy system under consideration. The formation of ordered ω (B82 -Zr2Al) phase, having space group P63/mmc has been viewed in terms of a superimposition of displacive and replacive components of phase transformation. While the lattice collapse mechanism of β -> ω transformation is displacive in nature; a replacive transformation involving diffusion is required for decorating different sublattice sites by different atomic species. Although, the extent of overlap of these transformations in the formation of ordered ω phase has not been established so far; attempts have been made to explore this aspect by examining the sequential formation of several intermediate stable/metastable phases. The partial collapse of 2nd - 3rd and 5th - 6th planes along (111) direction leads to intermediate trigonal ω ' phase upto which the transformation is purely displacive in nature. A chemical ordering sets in after this step leading to B82 structure via ω'' structure. Density functional plane wave based calculations using the projector augmented wave (PAW) potentials are employed under the generalized gradient approximation to exchange and correlation to study (a) relative ground state stabilities of these phases, (b) variation of total energy as a function of displacement (z, z = 0 to 1/12) and (c) Frozen-phonon calculations for 2/3 longitudinal phonon along (111) direction. The energy-displacement curve for the B2 structure shows nearly harmonic behavior for small displacements but shows strong anharmonic behavior for large displacements making trigonal ω ' structure metastable with respect to this kind of transformations. The phonon dispersion of B2 structure exhibits imaginary frequencies along (111) making it a

  1. AEg¯$\\overline {\\rm{g}}$IS Experiment: Measuring the acceleration g of the earth’s gravitational field on antihydrogen beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subieta Vasquez M. A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The AEg¯ $\\overline {\\rm{g}}$IS experiment [1] aims at directly measuring the gravitational acceleration g on a beam of cold antihydrogen (H¯$\\overline {\\rm{H}}$ to a precision of 1%, performing the first test with antimatter of the (WEP Weak Equivalence Principle. The experimental apparatus is sited at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. After production by mixing of antiprotons with Rydberg state positronium atoms (Ps, the H¯$\\overline {\\rm{H}}$ atoms will be driven to fly horizontally with a velocity of a few 100 ms−1 for a path length of about 1 meter. The small deflection, few tens of μm, will be measured using two material gratings (of period ∼ 80 μm coupled to a position-sensitive detector working as a moiré deflectometer similarly to what has been done with matter atoms [2]. The shadow pattern produced by the H¯$\\overline {\\rm{H}}$ beam will then be detected by reconstructing the annihilation points with a spatial resolution (∼ 2 μm of each antiatom at the end of the flight path by the sensitive-position detector. During 2012 the experimental apparatus has been commissioned with antiprotons and positrons. Since the AD will not be running during 2013,during the refurbishment of the CERN accelerators, the experiment is currently working with positrons, electrons and protons, in order to prepare the way for the antihydrogen production in late 2014.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  3. Dynamical Emergence of Universal Horizons during the formation of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Saravani, Mehdi; Mann, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Motivations for the existence of a fundamental preferred frame range from pure phenomenology to attempts to solve the non-renormalizability of quantum gravity, the problem of time (and scale), and the cosmological constant problem(s). In many explicit constructions, such as Einstein-Aether or Gravitational Aether theories, K-essence, Cuscuton theory, Shape Dynamics, or (non-projectable) Horava-Lifshitz gravity, the low energy theory contains a fluid (which defines a preferred frame) with superluminal or incompressible excitations. We study here the formation of black holes in the presence of such a fluid. In particular, we focus on the incompressible limit of the fluid (or Constant Mean Curvature foliation) in the space-time of a spherically collapsing shell within an asymptotically cosmological space-time. In this case, ignoring the fluid back reaction, we can analytically show that an observer inside 3/4 of the Schwarzschild radius cannot send a signal outside, after a stage in collapse, even using signals ...

  4. Computational issues in chemo-dynamical modelling of the formation and evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Yves; Nichols, Matthew; Bonvin, Vivien; Jablonka, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Chemo-dynamical N-body simulations are an essential tool for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. As the number of observationally determined stellar abundances continues to climb, these simulations are able to provide new constraints on the early star formaton history and chemical evolution inside both the Milky Way and Local Group dwarf galaxies. Here, we aim to reproduce the low $\\alpha$-element scatter observed in metal-poor stars. We first demonstrate that as stellar particles inside simulations drop below a mass threshold, increases in the resolution produce an unacceptably large scatter as one particle is no longer a good approximation of an entire stellar population. This threshold occurs at around $10^3\\,\\rm{M_\\odot}$, a mass limit easily reached in current (and future) simulations. By simulating the Sextans and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies we show that this increase in scatter at high resolutions arises from stochastic supernovae explosions. In order to reduce this scatter down...

  5. Computational issues in chemo-dynamical modelling of the formation and evolution of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revaz, Yves; Arnaudon, Alexis; Nichols, Matthew; Bonvin, Vivien; Jablonka, Pascale

    2016-04-01

    Chemo-dynamical N-body simulations are an essential tool for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. As the number of observationally determined stellar abundances continues to climb, these simulations are able to provide new constraints on the early star formaton history and chemical evolution inside both the Milky Way and Local Group dwarf galaxies. Here, we aim to reproduce the low α-element scatter observed in metal-poor stars. We first demonstrate that as stellar particles inside simulations drop below a mass threshold, increases in the resolution produce an unacceptably large scatter as one particle is no longer a good approximation of an entire stellar population. This threshold occurs at around 103M⊙, a mass limit easily reached in current (and future) simulations. By simulating the Sextans and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies we show that this increase in scatter at high resolutions arises from stochastic supernovae explosions. In order to reduce this scatter down to the observed value, we show the necessity of introducing a metal mixing scheme into particle-based simulations. The impact of the method used to inject the metals into the surrounding gas is also discussed. We finally summarise the best approach for accurately reproducing the scatter in simulations of both Local Group dwarf galaxies and in the Milky Way.

  6. Localization and dynamics of amylose-lipophilic molecules inclusion complex formation in starch granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J J; Mura, Andrea; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-03-28

    Inclusion complex formation between lipophilic dye molecules and amylose polymers in starch granules is investigated using laser spectroscopy and microscopy. By combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with spatial resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we are able to discriminate the presence of amylose in the peripheral region of regular and waxy granules from potato and corn starch, associating a clear optical fingerprint with the interaction between starch granules and lipophilic dye molecules. We show in particular that in the case of regular starch the polar head of the lipophilic dye molecules remains outside the amylose helix experiencing a water-based environment. The measurements performed on samples that have been extensively washed provide a strong proof of the specific interaction between lipid dye molecules and amylose chains in regular starch. These measurements also confirm the tendency of longer amylopectin chains, located in the hilum of waxy starch granules, to form inclusion complexes with ligands. Through real-time recording of CLSM micrographs, within a time frame of tens of seconds, we measured the dynamics of occurrence of the inclusion process between lipids and amylose located at the periphery of starch granules. PMID:25715960

  7. Kinetic thin current sheets: their formation in relation to magnetotail mesoscale turbulent dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kropotkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet (PS features nonlinear structures on two totally different scales. There are very thin current sheets (CS on kinetic scale of the ion gyroradius. And there are intense plasma flow and magnetic field variations on mesoscales (a few earth radii; those are interpreted as mostly 2-D MHD turbulence. On the other hand, the specific nature of slow large scale magnetotail evolution leads to large differences in the PS properties and those of the lobe plasma. As a result, while fast reconnection bursts in the tail provide quasi-stationary fast mesoscale reconfigurations in the lobes, they cannot however be accompanied by restructuring of CS on the same fast time scale. Violations of force balance in the PS are thus generated. Simulation using a hybrid code and starting with such imbalance, provides an evidence of very thin kinetic CS structures formation, embedded into the much thicker PS. The momentum balance gets locally restored by means of ion acceleration up to the Alfvénic velocity. The process provides an effective mechanism for transformation of magnetic energy accumulated in the magnetotail, into energy of plasma flows. The fast flows may drive turbulence on shorter spatial scales. In their turn, these motions may serve as an origin for new neutral line generation, and reconnection. Application to substorm phenomenology is discussed.

  8. Orbital Parameters of Binary Radio Pulsars : Revealing Their Structure, Formation, Evolution and Dynamic History

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2010-01-01

    Orbital parameters of binary radio pulsars reveal the history of the pulsars' formation and evolution including dynamic interactions with other objects. Advanced technology has enabled us to determine these orbital parameters accurately in most of the cases. Determination of post-Keplerian parameters of double neutron star binaries (especially of the double pulsar) provide clean tests of GTR and in the future may lead us to constrain the dense matter EoS. For binary pulsars with MS or WD companions, knowledge about the values of the orbital parameters as well as of the spin periods and the masses of the pulsars and the companions might be useful to understand the evolutionary history of the systems. As accreting neutron star binaries lead to orbit circularization due to the tidal coupling during accretion, their descendants i.e. binary MSPs are expected to be in circular orbits. On the other hand, dense stellar environments inside globular clusters (GCs) cause different types of interactions of single stars w...

  9. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yépez, L. D.; Carrillo, J. L.; Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J. M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena.

  10. Dynamical thermalization and vortex formation in stirred two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T. M.; Ballagh, R. J.; Bradley, A. S.; Blakie, P. B.; Gardiner, C. W.

    2008-12-01

    We present a quantum-mechanical treatment of the mechanical stirring of Bose-Einstein condensates using classical field techniques. In our approach the condensate and excited modes are described using a Hamiltonian classical field method in which the atom number and (rotating frame) energy are strictly conserved. We simulate a T=0 quasi-two-dimensional condensate perturbed by a rotating anisotropic trapping potential. Vacuum fluctuations in the initial state provide an irreducible mechanism for breaking the initial symmetries of the condensate and seeding the subsequent dynamical instability. Highly turbulent motion develops and we quantify the emergence of a rotating thermal component that provides the dissipation necessary for the nucleation and motional damping of vortices in the condensate. Vortex lattice formation is not observed, rather the vortices assemble into a spatially disordered vortex liquid state. We discuss methods we have developed to identify the condensate in the presence of an irregular distribution of vortices, determine the thermodynamic parameters of the thermal component, and extract damping rates from the classical field trajectories.

  11. Dynamics of DNA-protein complex formation in rat liver during induction by phenobarbital and triphenyldioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustylnyak, V O; Zacharova, L Yu; Gulyaeva, L F; Lyakhovich, V V; Slynko, N M

    2004-10-01

    CYP2B gene expression in liver of rats treated with phenobarbital and triphenyldioxane at early stage of induction (40 min-18 h) was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and RT-PCR. During first 6 h after induction, differences in the dynamics of formation of DNA-protein complexes were shown for each inducer. Later (18 h after induction), the intensity pattern of these complexes became the same for both phenobarbital and triphenyldioxane treated animals. This suggests the existence of specific signaling for each inducer only in early stages of CYP2B activation. Increase in nuclear protein (possible transcription factor) binding to Barbie-box regulatory sequence of CYP2B genes was accompanied by their increased expression. Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time that early stages of induction (40 min and 3 h after administration of phenobarbital and triphenyldioxane, respectively) are accompanied by activation of nuclear proteins that can bind to Barbie-box element of CYP2B. Although various chemical inducers cause distinct activation of such binding, this process involves activation of gene transcription. PMID:15527410

  12. A Dynamical Model for Gas Flows, Star Formation, and Nuclear Winds in Galactic Centres

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz., Mark R; Crocker, Roland M

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation, and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally-unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inward to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at $\\sim 100$ pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting $\\sim 5-10$ Myr occurring at $\\sim 20-40$ Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with ...

  13. Experimental investigation of compact toroid formation, dynamics, and plasma loss in a field reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of an experimental investigation of compact toroid formation, dynamics, and plasma loss in a 50-cm-long field reversed theta pinch are presented. A combination of radio frequency incipient ionization coupled with fast ringing theta discharges was used to trap a uniform 0.92 kG magnetic bias field in a deuterium gas over a 20 to 200 mtorr fill pressure range in a 9-cm diameter discharge tube. A reversed 4.54 kJ crowbarred discharge with a rise time of 3.4 μs was used to form compact toroids exhibiting lifetimes up to 60 μs. A diamagnetic loop, magnetic loop, magnetic probes, pressure probes, spectroscopy, photodiodes, and photography were used as diagnostics to investigate preionization, bias field generation, and trapping, stable lifetime characteristics, and eventual compact toroid destruction. Separatrix radius electron temperature, and electron density as a function of time and pressure are calculated from experimental data. Symmetry and rotational stability are illustrated over the lifetime of the compact toroids. Results indicate that like the Russian experiments but unlike the results at Los Alamos, compact toroids formed in the Penn State machine were limited in life by the decay characteristics of the applied magnetic field and not by the n = 2 rotational instability

  14. A preliminary investigation of dislocation cell structure formation in metals using continuum dislocation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, S. X.; El-Azab, A.

    2015-08-01

    A continuum dislocation dynamics model capable of capturing the cellular arrangements of dislocations in deformed crystals is presented. A small strain formulation of the model is given, followed by sample results of stress-strain behaviour, dislocation density evolution, dislocation cell pattern, lattice rotation, and geometrically necessary dislocation density and strain energy density distributions. An important finding of the current work is that dislocations form patterns under all circumstances due to their long range interactions. It is found, however, that the famous cell structure pattern forms when cross slip is activated. It is also found that cells are 3D sub-regions surrounded by dislocations walls in all directions, and they form, disappear, and reappear as a result of the motion of cell walls and formation of new walls by cross slip. It is further found that the average cell size is connected with the applied resolved shear stress according to the similitude principle observed in related experiments. The importance of these results is briefly discussed in the context of recrystallization.

  15. Aerosol dynamics simulations on the connection of sulphuric acid and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a series of simulations with an aerosol dynamics box model to study the connection between new particle formation and sulphuric acid concentration. For nucleation either activation mechanism with a linear dependence on the sulphuric acid concentration or ternary H2O-H2SO4-NH3 nucleation was assumed. We investigated the factors that affect the sulphuric acid dependence during the early stages of particle growth, and tried to find conditions which would yield the linear dependence between the particle number concentration at 3–6 nm and sulphuric acid, as observed in field experiments. The simulations showed that the correlation with sulphuric acid may change during the growth from nucleation size to 3–6 nm size range, the main reason being the size dependent growth rate between 1 and 3 nm. In addition, the assumed size for the nucleated clusters had a crucial impact on the sulphuric acid dependence at 3 nm. The simulations yielded a linear dependence between the particle number concentration at 3 nm and sulphuric acid, when a low saturation vapour pressure for the condensable organic vapour was assumed, or when nucleation took place at ~2 nm instead of ~1 nm. Comparison of results with activation and ternary nucleation showed that ternary nucleation cannot explain the experimentally observed linear or square dependence on sulphuric acid.

  16. Stellar dynamics in young clusters: the formation of massive runaways and very massive runaway mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbeveren, D; Van Bever, J; Mennekens, N

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper we combine an N-body code that simulates the dynamics of young dense stellar systems with a massive star evolution handler that accounts in a realistic way for the effects of stellar wind mass loss. We discuss two topics: 1. The formation and the evolution of very massive stars (with a mass >120 Mo) is followed in detail. These very massive stars are formed in the cluster core as a consequence of the successive (physical) collison of 10-20 most massive stars of the cluster (the process is known as runaway merging). The further evolution is governed by stellar wind mass loss during core hydrogen burning and during core helium burning (the WR phase of very massive stars). Our simulations reveal that as a consequence of runaway merging in clusters with solar and supersolar values, massive black holes can be formed but with a maximum mass of 70 Mo. In small metallicity clusters however, it cannot be excluded that the runaway merging process is responsible for pair instability supernovae or fo...

  17. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  18. Large-Scale Gas Dynamics in the Adhesion Model: Implications for Massive Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez-Tenreiro, R; Martínez-Serrano, F; Serna, A

    2010-01-01

    The mass assembly and star formation histories of massive galaxies identified at low redshift z in different cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, have been studied through a detailed follow-up backwards in time of their constituent mass elements (sampled by particles) of different types. Then, the configurations they depict at progressively higher zs have been analysed. The analyses show that these histories share common generic patterns, irrespective of particular circumstances. In any case, the results we have found are different depending on the particle type. The most outstanding differences follow. We have found that by z ~ 3.5 - 6, mass elements identified as stellar particles at z=0 exhibit a gaseous cosmic-web-like morphology with scales of ~ 1 physical Mpc, where the densest mass elements have already turned into stars by z ~ 6. These settings are in fact the densest pieces of the cosmic web, where no hot particles show up, and dynamically organized as a hierarchy of flow convergence regions, tha...

  19. Laser-induced UV photodissociation of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane: dynamics of OH and Br formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ankur; Kawade, Monali; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D

    2011-01-28

    Photoexcitation of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane (BNP) at 248 and 193 nm generates OH, Br, and NO(2) among other products. The OH fragment is detected by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, and its translational and internal state distributions (vibration, rotation, spin-orbit, and Λ-doubling components) are probed. At both 248 and 193 nm, the OH fragment is produced translationally hot with the energy of 10.8 and 17.2 kcal∕mol, respectively. It is produced vibrationally cold (v" = 0) at 248 nm, and excited (v" = 1) at 193 nm with a vibrational temperature of 1870 ± 150 K. It is also generated with rotational excitation, rotational populations of OH(v" = 0) being characterized by a temperature of 550 ± 50 and 925 ± 100 K at 248 and 193 nm excitation of BNP, respectively. The spin-orbit components of OH(X(2)Π) are not in equilibrium on excitation at 193 nm, but the Λ-doublets are almost in equilibrium, implying no preference for its π lobe with respect to the plane of rotation. The NO(2) product is produced electronically excited, as detected by measuring UV-visible fluorescence, at 193 nm and mostly in the ground electronic state at 248 nm. The Br product is detected employing resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometer for better understanding of the dynamics of dissociation. The forward convolution analysis of the experimental data has provided translational energy distributions and anisotropy parameters for both Br((2)P(3∕2)) and Br∗((2)P(1∕2)). The average translational energies for the Br and Br∗ channels are 5.0 ± 1.0 and 6.0 ± 1.5 kcal∕mol. No recoil anisotropies were observed for these products. Most plausible mechanisms of OH and Br formation are discussed based on both the experimental and the theoretical results. Results suggest that the electronically excited BNP molecules at 248 and 234 nm relax to the ground state, and subsequently dissociate to produce OH and Br through different channels. The

  20. Role of ionospheric effects and plasma sheet dynamics in the formation of auroral arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Manju; Rankin, R.

    2001-01-01

    At the ionospheric level, the substorm onset (expansion phase) is marked by the initial brightening and subsequent breakup of a pre-existing auroral arc. According to the field line resonance (FLR) wave model, the substorm-related auroral arc is caused by the field-aligned current carried by FLRs. The FLRs are standing shear Alfvén wave structures that are excited along the dipole/quasi-dipole lines of the geomagnetic field. The FLRs (that can cause auroral arc) thread from the Earthward edge of the plasma sheet and link the auroral arc to the plasma sheet region of 6-15 R_E. The region is associated with magnetic fluctuations that result from the nonlinear wave-wave interactions of the cross-field current-instability. The instability (excited at the substorm onset) disrupts the cross-tail current which is built up during the growth phase of the substorms and results in magnetic fluctuations. The diversion of the current to polar regions can lead to auroral arc intensification. The current FLR model is based on the amplitude equations that describe the nonlinear space-time evolution of FLRs in the presence of ponderomotive forces exerted by large amplitude FLRs (excited during substorms). The present work will modify the FLR wave model to include the effects arising from magnetic fluctuations that result from current disruption near the plasma sheet (6-15 R_E). The nonlinear evolution of FLRs is coupled with the dynamics of plasma sheet through a momentum exchange term (resulting from magnetic fluctuations due to current disruption) in the generalized Ohm's law. The resulting amplitude equations including the effects arising from magnetic fluctuations can be used to study the structure of the auroral arcs formed during substorms. We have also studied the role of feedback mechanism (in a dipole geometry of the geomagnetic field) in the formation of the discrete auroral arc observed on the nightside magnetosphere. The present nonlinear dispersive model (NDM) is

  1. THE LAST STAGES OF TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION: DYNAMICAL FRICTION AND THE LATE VENEER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Warren, Paul H. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Yin Qingzhu, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [UCD, Department of Geology, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the clean-up of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets to circular and coplanar orbits after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M{sub Circled-Plus} of chondritic material was delivered as 'late veneer' by planetesimals to the terrestrial planets after the end of giant impacts. Here, we combine these two independent lines of evidence for a leftover population of planetesimals and show that: (1) a residual population of small planetesimals containing 0.01 M{sub Circled-Plus} is able to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets after giant impacts to their observed values. (2) At the same time, this planetesimal population can account for the observed relative amounts of late veneer added to the Earth, Moon, and Mars provided that the majority of the accreted late veneer was delivered by small planetesimals with radii {approx}< 10 m. These small planetesimal sizes are required to ensure efficient damping of the planetesimal's velocity dispersion by mutual collisions, which in turn ensures sufficiently low relative velocities between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals such that the planets' accretion cross sections are significantly enhanced by gravitational focusing above their geometric values. Specifically, we find that, in the limit that the relative velocity between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals is significantly less than the terrestrial planets' escape velocities, gravitational focusing yields a mass accretion ratio of Earth/Mars {approx}({rho}{sub Circled-Plus }/{rho}{sub mars})(R{sub Circled-Plus }/R{sub mars}){sup 4} {approx} 17, which

  2. Dynamic interaction of an eccentric multipole cylindrical radiator suspended in a fluid-filled borehole within a poroelastic formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyyed M.Hasheminejad; Amir K.Miri

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic radiation and the dynamic field induced by a cylindrical source of infinite extent, undergoing angularly periodic and axially-dependent harmonic surface vibrations, while eccentrically suspended in a fluid-filled cylindrical cavity embedded within a fluid-saturated porous elastic formation, are analyzed in an exact manner. This con-figuration, which is a realistic idealization of an acoustic logging tool suspended in a fluid-filled borehole within a permeable surrounding formation, is of practical importance with a multitude of possible applications in seismo-acoustics.The formulation utilizes the novel features of Biot dynamic theory of poroelasticity along with the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions to obtain a closed-form series solution. The basic dynamic field quantities such as the resistive and the reactive components of the modal acoustic radiation impedance load on the source in addition to the radial and transverse stresses induced in the surround-ing formation by an eccentric pulsating/oscillating cylinder in a water-filled borehole within a water-saturated Ridge-field sandstone medium are evaluated and discussed. Special attention is paid to the effects of source eccentricity,excitation frequency, and mode of surface oscillations on the modal impedance values and the dynamic stresses. Limiting cases are considered and good agreements with available solutions are obtained.

  3. Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation simulation - I. The dynamical lives of high-redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gregory B.; Angel, Paul W.; Mutch, Simon J.; Power, Chris; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, Stuart B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) programme and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation programme upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programme is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z = 35 to z = 5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from `universal' behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (˜20 per cent) of galactic haloes are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: (i) haloes need ˜1.5 dynamical times following formation, and (ii) ˜2 dynamical times following a major (3:1) or minor (10:1) merger to be relaxed. This is remarkably consistent across a wide mass range. Lastly, we use a phase-space halo finder to illustrate that major mergers drive long-lived massive phase-space structures which take many dynamical times to dissipate. This can yield significant differences in the inferred mass build-up of galactic haloes and we suggest that care must be taken to ensure a physically meaningful match between the galaxy formation physics of semi-analytic models and the halo finders supplying their input.

  4. Kinetics of linear rouleaux formation studied by visual monitoring of red cell dynamic organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Barshtein, G; Wajnblum, D; Yedgar, S

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules may form aggregates, normally in rouleaux formations, which are dispersed with increasing blood flow. Experimental observations have suggested that the spontaneous aggregation process involves the formation of linear rouleaux (FLR) followed by formation of branched rouleaux networks. Theoretical models for the spontaneous rouleaux formation were formulated, taking into consideration that FLR may involve both "po...

  5. Influence of nitric laser (ultraviolet) on dynamics of adhesion formation in peritoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of adhesion formation in peritoneums after ultraviolet laser irradiation was carried out by morphological methods. It was revealed that ultraviolet laser irradiation prevents the adhesion formation, because this laser decreases the rate of the proliferation of mesotheliomas. This phenomenon may be used for the prophylaxis of adhesions formation. (author)

  6. The influence of dynamical structural relaxation of point defect clusters on void formation in irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the neutron-irradiation experiment with a temperature controlled capsule at JMTR, residual-gas-free copper was irradiated at 200 C and 300 C together with as-received copper. The fluences were 5 x 1018 n/cm2 (the low fluence) to 1 x 1020 n/cm2 (the high fluence). TEM observation of the irradiated specimens showed that interstitial clusters form a colony at the low fluence which develops into a dislocation structure at the high fluence. Between the colonies only vacancy clusters in the form of voids and stacking fault tetrahedra (sft) were observed. There are no effects of residual gas atoms on the formation of voids at the low fluence although the effects become appreciable at the high fluence. The number of vacancies which are accumulated in a void is 350 times larger than that in a sft at the low fluence. The number density of voids decreased with increasing neutron fluence while the number density of sft increased. The voids form uniformly in copper irradiated to the low fluence while they were observed along dislocations at the high fluence. Computer simulations by molecular dynamics show that small interstitial clusters relax to a bundle of left angle 110 right angle crowdions and move long distances in response to small strain fields. Interstitial clusters move along a left angle 110 right angle direction and can switch to other left angle 110 right angle directions, and form groups of clusters. At high temperature, a dense colony of the clusters forms and develops into a dislocation structure. It is shown that small vacancy clusters relax to movable structures at high temperature. (orig.)

  7. Aerosol dynamics simulations on the connection of sulphuric acid and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a series of simulations with an aerosol dynamics box model to study the connection between new particle formation and sulphuric acid concentration. For nucleation either activation mechanism with a linear dependence on the sulphuric acid concentration, kinetic mechanism with a squared dependence on the sulphuric acid concentration or ternary H2O-H2SO4-NH3 nucleation was assumed. The aim was to study the factors that affect the sulphuric acid dependence during the early stages of particle growth, and specifically to find conditions which would yield the linear dependence between the particle number concentration at 3–6 nm and sulphuric acid, as observed in field experiments. The simulations showed that the correlation with sulphuric acid may change during the growth from nucleation size to 3–6 nm size range, the main reason being the size dependent growth rate between 1 and 3 nm. In addition, the assumed size for the nucleated clusters had a crucial impact on the sulphuric acid dependence at 3 nm. A linear dependence between the particle number concentration at 3 nm and sulphuric acid was achieved, when activation nucleation mechanism was used with a low saturation vapour pressure for the condensable organic vapour, or with nucleation taking place at ~2 nm instead of ~1 nm. Simulations with activation, kinetic and ternary nucleation showed that ternary nucleation reproduces too steep dependence on sulphuric acid as compared to the linear or square dependence observed in field measurements.

  8. Formation and near-field dynamics of a wing tip vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhal, Lavi Rizki

    2001-12-01

    The search for a more efficient method to destroy aircraft trailing vortices requires a good understanding of the early development of the vortices. For that purpose, an experimental investigation has been conducted to study the formation and near-field dynamics of a wing tip vortex. Two versions of the Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) technique were used in the studies. Planar DPIV was used to obtain velocity fields adjacent to the wing surface. Stereoscopic DPIV, which allows instantaneous measurements of all three components of velocity within a planar slice, was used to measure velocity fields behind the wing. The trailing vortex was produced by a rectangular half-wing model with an NACA 0012 profile. All measurements were made at Reynolds number, based on chord length, of 9040. The present study has found that the wing sheds multiple vortices. A structure that closely resembles a wing tip vortex is first observed on the suction side of the wing near the tip at the mid-chord section of the wing. At the trailing edge of the wing, a smaller vortex with an opposite sense of rotation is observed next to the tip vortex. In addition to the two vortices, two vortex layers with opposite sense of rotation, one on the pressure side and one on the suction side, are apparent at the trailing edge. Farther downstream, most of the vorticity in the vortex layer, with the same sense of rotation as the tip vortex, rolls up into the wing tip vortex. The vortices, with opposite sense of rotation, break up into smaller vortices which orbit around the tip vortex. At least one relatively strong satellite vortex appears in some of the instantaneous fields. The studies found that the interaction of the tip vortex and satellite vortices give rise to the unsteady motion of the wing tip vortex. In addition, the studies also examined the effects of the boundary layer and the tip geometry to the strength and motion of the trailing vortex.

  9. Dynamic-stochastic modeling of snow cover formation on the European territory of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Gelfan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic-stochastic model, which combines a deterministic model of snow cover formation with a stochastic weather generator, has been developed. The deterministic snow model describes temporal change of the snow depth, content of ice and liquid water, snow density, snowmelt, sublimation, re-freezing of melt water, and snow metamorphism. The model has been calibrated and validated against the long-term data of snow measurements over the territory of the European Russia. The model showed good performance in simulating time series of the snow water equivalent and snow depth. The developed weather generator (NEsted Weather Generator, NewGen includes nested generators of annual, monthly and daily time series of weather variables (namely, precipitation, air temperature, and air humidity. The parameters of the NewGen have been adjusted through calibration against the long-term meteorological data in the European Russia. A disaggregation procedure has been proposed for transforming parameters of the annual weather generator into the parameters of the monthly one and, subsequently, into the parameters of the daily generator. Multi-year time series of the simulated daily weather variables have been used as an input to the snow model. Probability properties of the snow cover, such as snow water equivalent and snow depth for return periods of 25 and 100 years, have been estimated against the observed data, showing good correlation coefficients. The described model has been applied to different landscapes of European Russia, from steppe to taiga regions, to show the robustness of the proposed technique.

  10. PLANET FORMATION IN BINARIES: DYNAMICS OF PLANETESIMALS PERTURBED BY THE ECCENTRIC PROTOPLANETARY DISK AND THE SECONDARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silsbee, Kedron; Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: ksilsbee@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    Detections of planets in eccentric, close (separations of ∼20 AU) binary systems such as α Cen or γ Cep provide an important test of planet formation theories. Gravitational perturbations from the companion are expected to excite high planetesimal eccentricities, resulting in destruction rather than growth of objects with sizes of up to several hundred kilometers in collisions of similar-sized bodies. It was recently suggested that the gravity of a massive axisymmetric gaseous disk in which planetesimals are embedded drives rapid precession of their orbits, suppressing eccentricity excitation. However, disks in binaries are themselves expected to be eccentric, leading to additional planetesimal excitation. Here we develop a secular theory of eccentricity evolution for planetesimals perturbed by the gravity of an elliptical protoplanetary disk (neglecting gas drag) and the companion. For the first time, we derive an expression for the disturbing function due to an eccentric disk, which can be used for a variety of other astrophysical problems. We obtain explicit analytical solutions for planetesimal eccentricity evolution neglecting gas drag and delineate four different regimes of dynamical excitation. We show that in systems with massive (≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}) disks, planetesimal eccentricity is usually determined by the gravity of the eccentric disk alone, and is comparable to the disk eccentricity. As a result, the latter imposes a lower limit on collisional velocities of solids, making their growth problematic. In the absence of gas drag, this fragmentation barrier can be alleviated if the gaseous disk rapidly precesses or if its own self-gravity is efficient at lowering disk eccentricity.

  11. Star formation across cosmic time and its influence on galactic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that ten billion years ago, galaxies formed their stars at rates up to twenty times higher than now. As stars are formed from cold molecular gas, a high star formation rate means a significant gas supply, and galaxies near the peak epoch of star formation are indeed much more gas-rich than nearby galaxies. Is the decline of the star formation rate mostly driven by the diminishing cold gas reservoir, or are the star formation processes also qualitatively different earlier in the history of the Universe? Ten billion years ago, young galaxies were clumpy and prone to violent gravitational instabilities, which may have contributed to their high star formation rate. Stars indeed form within giant, gravitationally-bound molecular clouds. But the earliest phases of star formation are still poorly understood. Some scenarii suggest the importance of interstellar filamentary structures as a first step towards core and star formation. How would their filamentary geometry affect pre-stellar cores? Feedback mechanisms related to stellar evolution also play an important role in regulating star formation, for example through powerful stellar winds and supernovae explosions which expel some of the gas and can even disturb the dark matter distribution in which each galaxy is assumed to be embedded. This PhD work focuses on three perspectives: (i) star formation near the peak epoch of star formation as seen from observations at sub-galactic scales; (ii) the formation of pre-stellar cores within the filamentary structures of the interstellar medium; and (iii) the effect of feedback processes resulting from star formation and evolution on the dark matter distribution.

  12. Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements During Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Soko; Ida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar discs and planets beyond the Solar System. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the Solar System. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disc as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disc. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial plan...

  13. Learning to read as the formation of a dynamic system: Evidence for dynamic stability in phonological recoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ClaireMarieFletcher-Flinn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two aspects of dynamic systems approaches that are pertinent to developmental models of reading are the emergence of a system with self-organizing characteristics, and its evolution over time to a stable state that is not easily modified or perturbed. The effects of dynamic stability may be seen in the differences obtained in the processing of print by beginner readers taught by different approaches to reading (phonics and text-centred, and more long-term effects on adults, consistent with these differences. However, there is little direct evidence collected over time for the same participants. In this study, lexicalized (implicit phonological processing, and explicit phonological and letter-sound skills are further examined in a precocious reader whose early development at 3 and 5 years has been extensively described (Cognition, 2000; 2004. At ages 10 and 14 years, comparisons were made with these earlier reports and skilled adult readers, using the same tasks for evidence of changes in reading processes. The results showed that along with an increase of reading accuracy and speed, her pattern of lexicalized phonological responses for reading did not change over time. Neither did her pattern of explicit phonological and letter-sound skills, aspects of which were inferior to her lexicalized phonological processing, and word reading. These results suggest dynamic stability of the word reading system. The early emergence of this system with minimal explicit skill development calls into question developmental reading theories that require such skills for learning to read. Currently, only the Knowledge Sources theory of reading acquisition can account for such findings. Consideration of these aspects of dynamic systems raise theoretical issues that could result in a paradigm shift with regard to best practice and intervention.

  14. Late-Stage Reservoir Formation Effect and Its Dynamic Mechanisms in Complex Superimposed Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Dejiang; PANG Xiongqi; KUANG Jun; LUO Xiaorong; PANG Hong; LEI Lei

    2010-01-01

    Complex superimposed basins exhibit multi-stage tectonic events and multi-stage reservoir formation; hydrocarbon reservoirs formed in the early stage have generally late-stage genesis characteristics after undergoing adjustment,reconstruction and destruction of later-stage multiple tectonic events.In this paper,this phenomenon is called the late-stage reservoir formation effect.The late-stage reservoir formation effect is a basic feature of oil and gas-forming reservoirs in complex superimposed basins,revealing not only multi-stage character,relevance and complexity of oil and gas-forming reservoirs in superimposed basins but also the importance of late-stage reservoir formation.Late-stage reservoir formation is not a basic feature of off and gas forming reservoir in superimposed basins.Multi-stage reservoir formation only characterizes one aspect of oil and gas-forming reservoir in superimposed basins and does not represent fully the complexity of oil and gas-forming reservoir in superimposed basins.We suggest using"late-stage reservoir formation effect"to replace the"late-stage reservoir formation"concept to guide the exploration of complex reservoirs in superimposed basins.Under current geologic conditions,the late-stage reservoir formation effect is represented mainly by four basic forms:phase transformation,scale reconstruction,component variation and trap adjustment.The late-stage reservoir formation effect is produced by two kinds of geologic processes:first,the off and gas retention function of various geologic thresholds(hydrocarbon expulsion threshold,hydrocarbon migration threshold,and hydrocarbon accumulating threshold)causes the actual time of oil and gas reservoir formation to be later than the time of generation of large amounts of hydrocarbon in a conventional sense,producing the late-stage reservoir formation effect; second,multiple types of tectonic events(continuously strong reconstruction,early-stage strong reconstruction,middle-stage strong

  15. A Nonverbal Phoneme Deletion Task Administered in a Dynamic Assessment Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Sandra Laing; Fargo, Jamison; Foley, Beth; Olszewski, Abbie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the project was to design a nonverbal dynamic assessment of phoneme deletion that may prove useful with individuals who demonstrate complex communication needs (CCN) and are unable to communicate using natural speech or who present with moderate-severe speech impairments. Method: A nonverbal dynamic assessment of phoneme…

  16. REGULATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES IN MULTIPHASE GALACTIC DISKS: NUMERICAL TESTS OF THE THERMAL/DYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use vertically resolved numerical hydrodynamic simulations to study star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic disks. We focus on outer-disk regions where diffuse H I dominates, with gas surface densities Σ = 3-20 M☉ pc–2 and star-plus-dark matter volume densities ρsd = 0.003-0.5 M☉ pc–3. Star formation occurs in very dense, self-gravitating clouds that form by mergers of smaller cold cloudlets. Turbulence, driven by momentum feedback from supernova events, destroys bound clouds and puffs up the disk vertically. Time-dependent radiative heating (FUV from recent star formation) offsets gas cooling. We use our simulations to test a new theory for self-regulated star formation. Consistent with this theory, the disks evolve to a state of vertical dynamical equilibrium and thermal equilibrium with both warm and cold phases. The range of star formation surface densities and midplane thermal pressures is ΣSFR ∼ 10–4 to 10–2 M☉ kpc–2 yr–1 and Pth/kB ∼ 102 to 104 cm–3 K. In agreement with observations, turbulent velocity dispersions are ∼7 km s–1 and the ratio of the total (effective) to thermal pressure is Ptot/Pth ∼ 4-5, across this whole range (provided shielding is similar to the solar neighborhood). We show that ΣSFR is not well correlated with Σ alone, but rather with Σ√(ρsd), because the vertical gravity from stars and dark matter dominates in outer disks. We also find that ΣSFR has a strong, nearly linear correlation with Ptot, which itself is within ∼13% of the dynamical equilibrium estimate Ptot,DE. The quantitative relationships we find between ΣSFR and the turbulent and thermal pressures show that star formation is highly efficient for energy and momentum production, in contrast to the low efficiency of mass consumption. Star formation rates adjust until the ISM's energy and momentum losses are replenished by feedback within a dynamical time.

  17. Development of a new molecular dynamics method for tribochemical reaction and its application to formation dynamics of MoS2 tribofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we have developed a novel molecular dynamics program NEW-RYUDO-CR, which can deal with chemical reactions. The developed method has been applied to the study of tribochemical reaction dynamics of MoS2 tribofilm on iron surface. The initially amorphous MoS2 layer self-organized its structure as result of the tribochemical reactions and formed layered MoS2 tribofilm. The friction coefficient significantly decreased as the MoS2 tribofilm was formed. Besides, sliding was observed between sulfur layers of MoS2 tribofilms which occurred due to repulsive Coulombic interaction forces between sulfur atoms. This indicates that the formation of the layered MoS2 tribofilm is important to achieve better lubrication properties

  18. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  19. Localization and dynamics of amylose-lipophilic molecules inclusion complex formation in starch granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Mura, Andrea; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion complex formation between lipophilic dye molecules and amylose polymers in starch granules is investigated using laser spectroscopy and microscopy. By combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with spatial resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we are able to discriminate

  20. Formation of the Widest Binaries from Dynamical Unfolding of Triple Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    The formation of very wide binaries, such as the alpha Cen system with Proxima (also known as alpha Centauri C) separated from alpha Centauri (which itself is a close binary A/B) by 15000 AU, challenges current theories of star formation, because their separation can exceed the typical size of a collapsing cloud core. Various hypotheses have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the suggestion that ultra-wide binaries result from the dissolution of a star cluster - when a cluster ...

  1. Dynamics of Green AuNP Formation and Their Application in Core-Shell Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The formation of gold nanoparticles in our optimized synthesis is achieved through reduction of tetrachloroauric acid in 2 - (N - morpholino)ethanesulphonic acid (MES) buffered glucose and stabilization by starch at room temperature. The formation has been followed by measuring the electrochemical potential, conductivity, pH, turbidity, UV - Vis extinction , core size and hydrodynamic diameter . The synthesized AuNPs have been employed as core particles in advanced core - shell structures wit...

  2. Changing Dynamics of Cross-Border Intimate Partnership Formations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    interdisciplinary framework. It explores processes related to "us and them" redefinitions and minority-majority relations through focus on motivations,identity, life course,gender,family dynamics especially intergenerational conflicts, diaspora and policy effects.  ...

  3. An aerosol dynamics model for simulating particle formation and growth in a mixed flow chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Vesterinen, M.; Korhonen, H.; Joutsensaari, J.; P. Yli-Pirilä; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we model the aerosol size distribution dynamics in a mixed flow chamber in which new particles are formed via nucleation and subsequent condensation of oxidation products of VOCs emitted from Norway spruce seedlings. The microphysical processes included in the model are nucleation, condensation, deposition and coagulation. The aerosol dynamics in the chamber is a competition between aerosol growth and scavenging/deposition whi...

  4. Vague-to-crisp dynamics of percept formation modeled as operant (selectionist) process

    OpenAIRE

    Ilin, Roman; Jun ZHANG; Perlovsky, Leonid; Kozma, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We model the vague-to-crisp dynamics of forming percepts in the brain by combining two methodologies: dynamic logic (DL) and operant learning process. Forming percepts upon the presentation of visual inputs is likened to model selection based on sampled evidence. Our framework utilizes the DL in selecting the correct “percept” among competing ones, but uses an intrinsic reward mechanism to allow stochastic online update in lieu of performing the optimization step of the DL framework. We discu...

  5. Dynamics of weed populations: spatial patter formation and implications for control.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallinga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling studies were carried out to analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of annual weed populations and to identify the key factors that determine the long-term herbicide use of weed control programmes. Three different weed control programmes were studied.In the first weed control programme, herbicides are applied to the whole field only if the weed density exceeds a threshold value, otherwise there is no control at all. The dynamics of a weed population subjected to such a 'threshold control p...

  6. The Influence of Surface Morphology of Dense Ca-P Ceramics on Apatite Formation in Dynamic SBF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the effect of surface morphology of dense phosphate calcium (Ca-P) ceramics upon the formation of bone-like apatite in static or dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF). Dense and sandblasted calcium phosphate ceramics were immersed into dynamic SBF flowing at normal physiological speed of body fluid of skeletal muscle.The changes were characterized using SEM, XPS, IR and XRD. Changes can be observed after the sandblasted surface of dense calcium phosphate ceramics had been immersed in SBF for 14 days. XPS analysis results showed that the flake-like structure was composed of Ca, P, C, O; IR analysis result of surface structure of samples showed that there were specific peaks for CO2-3; XRD results indicated the decrease in crystallinity and the increase in amorphous structure. The rough surface was advantageous for the formation of bone-like apatite. Increasing the Ca2+, HPO2-4 concentration of SBF could also enhance the bone like apatite formation. All the results demonstrated that local concentration is a key factor affecting nucleation.

  7. Development and application of laser techniques for studying fuel dynamics and NO formation in engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Oeivind

    2000-11-01

    In this work a number of laser techniques have been applied in new ways for combustion diagnostics in engines. The applications cover small two-stroke engines, ordinary spark ignition (SI) engines, direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, and heavy-duty diesel truck engines. In an investigation of unmodified two-stroke engines running at high engine speed, it has been shown that cycle-resolved laser diagnostics are applicable to real-world engines. The emission of unburned fuel was detected at the exhaust port with successful discrimination against other unburned hydrocarbons. Although a few problems remain to be solved in order to get quantitative concentration data, valuable information can nonetheless be attained using this technique. The technique would benefit from the use of a non-fluorescing lubricant, as that would decrease the background fluorescence. Laser-based techniques also provide a useful tool for studying the fuel dynamics inside the cylinder. In the development of DISI engines it is of particular importance to acquire knowledge about the distribution of fuel around the spark plug. Numerical computer codes are often used as design tools in these applications. Laser techniques are capable of yielding instantaneous multi-point concentration information with high spatial and temporal resolution, making them ideal both for validation of CFD simulations and for testing designs. The feasibility of using laser diagnostics in the development of DISI engines has been shown. Future research should be aimed at simplifying the procedure for quantifying the data, since a fairly simple and reliable technique would be an important asset for the industry. In a more fundamental study, it has been shown that it is possible to simultaneously detect a substance in both liquid and vapour phase. Water was used in the study since it is easily produced in both phases. Liquid drops were detected using spontaneous Raman scattering, whereas the vapour surrounding them

  8. Dynamical arrest, percolation, gelation, and glass formation in model nanoparticle dispersions with thermoreversible adhesive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Aaron P R; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Kim, Jung M; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-01-24

    We report an experimental study of the dynamical arrest transition for a model system consisting of octadecyl coated silica suspended in n-tetradecane from dilute to concentrated conditions spanning the state diagram. The dispersion's interparticle potential is tuned by temperature affecting the brush conformation leading to a thermoreversible model system. The critical temperature for dynamical arrest, T*, is determined as a function of dispersion volume fraction by small-amplitude dynamic oscillatory shear rheology. We corroborate this transition temperature by measuring a power-law decay of the autocorrelation function and a loss of ergodicity via fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering. The structure at T* is measured using small-angle neutron scattering. The scattering intensity is fit to extract the interparticle pair-potential using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Percus-Yevick closure approximation, assuming a square-well interaction potential with a short-range interaction (1% of particle diameter). (1) The strength of attraction is characterized using the Baxter temperature (2) and mapped onto the adhesive hard sphere state diagram. The experiments show a continuous dynamical arrest transition line that follows the predicted dynamical percolation line until ϕ ≈ 0.41 where it subtends the predictions toward the mode coupling theory attractive-driven glass line. An alternative analysis of the phase transition through the reduced second virial coefficient B(2)* shows a change in the functional dependence of B(2)* on particle concentration around ϕ ≈ 0.36. We propose this signifies the location of a gel-to-glass transition. The results presented herein differ from those observed for depletion flocculated dispersion of micrometer-sized particles in polymer solutions, where dynamical arrest is a consequence of multicomponent phase separation, suggesting dynamical arrest is sensitive to the physical mechanism of attraction. PMID:22148874

  9. GA Based Test Case Generation Approach for Formation of Efficient Set of Dynamic Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohapatra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Automated test case generation is an efficient approach for software testing. Slicing of program provides ease to testability and enhances debugging capacity. To generate the dynamic slice, slicing criterionis required in which the input data parameter is the essential component. Most of the research work focuses on deriving the input by random consideration but it simply takes a longest period of time to generate slices that provides the path coverage of Unit Under Test (UUT. This paper generates the optimal test cases by using Genetic Algorithm (GA and Control Flow Graph (CFG, these test cases cover all the independent path present in the CFG. The optimal test cases are supplied as input component of the dynamic slicing criteria. So the dynamic slice criteria that use these optimal test cases as the input generates the efficient dynamic slice set that is helpful in efficient testing and efficient debugging. Here two approaches, first the dynamic slice using node marking and the second by using relevant sets are discussed according to optimal test cases as input component.

  10. Living on the edge: contrasted wood-formation dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edurne eMartinez Del Castillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e. in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for Pinus sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for Pinus sylvestris.

  11. Dynamical Models for the Formation of Elephant Trunks in H II Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The formation of pillars of dense gas at the boundaries of H II Regions is investigated with hydrodynamical numerical simulations including ionising radiation from a point source. We show that shadowing of ionising radiation by an inhomogeneous density field is capable of forming so-called elephant trunks (pillars of dense gas as in e.g. M16) without the assistance of self-gravity, or of ionisation front and cooling instabilities. A large simulation of a density field containing randomly generated clumps of gas is shown to naturally generate elephant trunks with certain clump configurations. These configurations are simulated in isolation and analysed in detail to show the formation mechanism and determine possible observational signatures. Pillars formed by the shadowing mechanism are shown to have rather different velocity profiles depending on the initial gas configuration, but asymmetries mean that the profiles also vary significantly with perspective, limiting their ability to discriminate between format...

  12. Dynamics of LiNbO/sub 3/ optical waveguide formation by CO/sub 2/ laser annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In comparison with conventional heating in a furnace, surface heating with 10.6 μm radiation from a CO/sub 2/ laser can reduce by an order of magnitude the time required for formation of optical waveguides by diffusion of Ti into LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals. Waveguides formed this way have similar properties to those produced by other methods. To elucidate the dynamics of waveguide formation by laser heating, the authors investigated the temperature distribution in X-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ plates during the titanium oxide indiffusion process. The temperature distribution was determined from a combination of thermocouple, narrow-band infrared probe, optical pyrometer, and surface melting observations. For a nominal (pyrometer) temperature of 1000 C, the surface temperature does not exceed 1090 C

  13. A dynamic-ecological model of identity formation and conflict among bisexually-behaving African-American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick A

    2008-10-01

    Understanding how ethnic, sexual, and masculine (ESM) identities form and possibly conflict among African-American men may be important to consider in explaining bisexual behavior in this population. It is proposed that the bisexual behavior among African-American who are primarily sexually attracted to other men may be a function of conflicting ESM identities. Comprehensively understanding the formation and conflict of ESM identities requires an examination of individuals, social contexts, and interactions between individuals and contexts. The current article presents a dynamic-ecological model of identity formation and conflict among ethnic minority men who have sex with men and uses the model to demonstrate how bisexual behavior among African-American men may be examined. PMID:18546068

  14. Dynamics of the tidal fields and formation of star clusters in galaxy mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In interacting galaxies, strong tidal forces disturb the global morphology of the progenitors and give birth to the long stellar, gaseous and dusty tails often observed. In addition to this destructive effect, tidal forces can morph into a transient, protective setting called compressive mode. Such modes then shelter the matter in their midst by increasing its gravitational binding energy. This thesis focuses on the study of this poorly known regime by quantifying its properties thanks to numerical and analytical tools applied to a spectacular merging system of two galaxies, commonly known as the Antennae galaxies. N-body simulations of this pair yield compressive modes in the regions where observations reveal a burst of star formation. Furthermore, characteristic time- and energy scales of these modes match well those of self-gravitating substructures such as star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. Comparisons with star formation rates derived from hydrodynamical runs confirm the correlation between the location of compressive modes and sites where star formation is likely to show enhanced activity. Altogether, these results suggest that the compressive modes of tidal fields plays an important role in the formation and evolution of young clusters, at least in a statistical sense, over a lapse of ∼10 million years. Preliminary results from simulations of stellar associations highlight the importance of embedding the clusters in the evolving background galaxies to account precisely for their morphology and internal evolution. These conclusions have been extended to numerous configurations of interacting galaxies and remain robust to a variation of the main parameters that characterize a merger. We report however a clear anti-correlation between the importance of the compressive mode and the distance between the galaxies. Further studies including hydrodynamics are now underway and will help pin down the exact role of the compressive mode on the formation and later

  15. Massive Clusters in the Inner Regions of NGC 1365: Cluster Formation and Gas Dynamics in Galactic Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Alloin, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Cluster formation and gas dynamics in the central regions of barred galaxies are not well understood. This paper reviews the environment of three 10^7 Msun clusters near the inner Lindblad resonance of the barred spiral NGC 1365. The morphology, mass, and flow of HI and CO gas in the spiral and barred regions are examined for evidence of the location and mechanism of cluster formation. The accretion rate is compared with the star formation rate to infer the lifetime of the starburst. The gas appears to move from inside corotation in the spiral region to looping filaments in the interbar region at a rate of ~6 Msun/yr before impacting the bar dustlane somewhere along its length. The gas in this dustlane moves inward, growing in flux as a result of the accretion to ~40 Msun/yr near the ILR. This inner rate exceeds the current nuclear star formation rate by a factor of 4, suggesting continued buildup of nuclear mass for another ~0.5 Gyr. The bar may be only 1-2 Gyr old. Extrapolating the bar flow back in time, w...

  16. High Performance Simulations of Accretion Disk Dynamics and Jet Formations Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Watson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We investigate jet formation in black-hole systems using 3-D General Relativistic Particle-In-Cell (GRPIC) and 3-D GRMHD simulations. GRPIC simulations, which allow charge separations in a collisionless plasma, do not need to invoke the frozen condition as in GRMHD simulations. 3-D GRPIC simulations show that jets are launched from Kerr black holes as in 3-D GRMHD simulations, but jet formation in the two cases may not be identical. Comparative study of black hole systems with GRPIC and GRMHD simulations with the inclusion of radiate transfer will further clarify the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disk-jet systems.

  17. Connecting gas dynamics and star formation histories in nearby galaxies: the VLA—ANGST survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Juergen; Skillman, Evan; Dalcanton, Julianne; Walter, Fabian; Stilp, Adrienne; Koribalski, Baerbel; West, Andrew; Warren, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, HST revolutionized the field of star formation in nearby galaxies. Due to its high angular resolution it has now become possible to construct star formation histories of individual stellar populations on scales of a few arcseconds spanning a range of up to ~600 Myr. This method will be applied to the ANGST galaxies, a large HST volume limited survey to map galaxies up to distances of 3.5-4.0 Mpc (excluding the Local Group). The ANGST sample is currently followed--up by high, ...

  18. Characterization and Dynamics of Aggresome Formation by a Cytosolic Gfp-Chimera✪

    OpenAIRE

    García-Mata, Rafael; Bebök, Zsuzsa; Sorscher, Eric J.; Sztul, Elizabeth S

    1999-01-01

    Formation of a novel structure, the aggresome, has been proposed to represent a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins (Johnston, J.A., C.L. Ward, and R.R. Kopito. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 143:1883–1898; Wigley, W.C., R.P. Fabunmi, M.G. Lee, C.R. Marino, S. Muallem, G.N. DeMartino, and P.J. Thomas. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:481–490). To test the generality of this finding and characterize aspects of aggresome composition and its formation, we investigated the effects of over...

  19. Compatibility of localized wave packets and unrestricted single particle dynamics for cluster formation in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-symmetrized molecular dynamics with quantum branching is generalized so as to allow finite time duration of the unrestricted coherent mean field propagation which is followed by the decoherence into wave packets. In this new model, the wave packet shrinking by the mean field propagation is respected as well as the diffusion, so that it predicts a one-body dynamics similar to that in mean field models. The shrinking effect is expected to change the diffusion property of nucleons in nuclear matter and the global one-body dynamics. The central 129Xe + Sn collisions at 50 MeV/nucleon are calculated by the models with and without shrinking, and it is shown that the inclusion of the wave packet shrinking has a large effect on the multifragmentation in a big expanding system with a moderate expansion velocity. (author)

  20. Dynamics of ordering processes in annealed dilute systems: Island formation, vacancies at domain boundaries, and compactification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Peter Jivan; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of the ordering processes in two-dimensional lattice models with annealed vacancies and nonconserved order parameter is studied as a function of temperature and vacancy concentration by means of Monte Carlo temperature-quenching simulations. The models are Ising antiferromagnets with...... ordering in thin films of Cu3Au alloys with extra Cu.......The dynamics of the ordering processes in two-dimensional lattice models with annealed vacancies and nonconserved order parameter is studied as a function of temperature and vacancy concentration by means of Monte Carlo temperature-quenching simulations. The models are Ising antiferromagnets with...... compactification via coalescence. The domain-size distribution function, which is approximately log-normal, is shown to obey dynamical scaling over a substantial time range for both types of ordering. The growth for the pure systems is found to be described by a power law with the classical growth exponent n=1...

  1. Dynamical phase transitions and pattern formation induced by a pulse pumping of excitons to a system near a thermodynamic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazovskii, Serguei; Kirova, Natasha

    2016-08-01

    We suggest a phenomenological theory of dynamical phase transitions and the subsequent spaciotemporal evolution induced by a short optical pulse in a system which is already prone to a thermodynamic instability. We address the case of pumping to excitons whose density contributes additively to the thermodynamic order parameter like for charge-transfer excitons in electronic charge-ordering transitions. To describe both thermodynamic and dynamical effects on equal footing, we adopt for the phase transition a view of the "excitonic insulator" (EI) and suggest a formation of the macroscopic quantum state for the pumped excitons. The double nature of the ensemble of excitons leads to an intricate time evolution: the dynamical transition between number-preserved and phase-locked regimes, macroscopic quantum oscillations from interference between the Bose condensate of excitons, and the ground state of the EI. Modeling for an extended sample shows also stratification in domains of low and high densities which evolve through local dynamical phase transitions and a sequence of domain merges.

  2. Dynamics and roles of phragmoplast microfilaments in cell plate formation during cytokinesis of tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; ZHANG WenJie; BALUSKA Frantisek; MENZEL Diedrik; REN HaiYun

    2009-01-01

    The phragmoplast is a special apparatus that functions in establishing a cell plate in dividing plant cells.It is known that microfilaments (MFs) are involved in constituting phragmoplast structure, but the dynamic distribution and role of phragmoplast MFs are far from being understood. In this study, the precise structure and dynamics of MFs during the initiation and the late lateral expansion of the phragmoplast were observed by using a tobacco BY-2 cell line stably expressing the microfilament reporter construct GFP-f ABD2. Three-dimensional imaging showed that the phragmoplast MFs were initiated by two populations of MFs emerging between the reconstituting daughter nuclei at anaphase, which migrated to the mid-zone and gave rise to two layers of microfilament arrays. FM4-64 stained vesicles accumulated and fused with the cell plate between the two populations of MFs. The two layers of microfilament arrays of phragmoplast with ends overlapped always surrounded the centrifugally expanding cell plate. Partial disruption of MFs at metaphase by low concentration of latrunculin B resulted in the inhibition of the cell plate consolidation and the blockage of cell plate lateral expansion,whereas high concentration of latrunculin B restrained the progression of the cell cycle. Treating the cell after the initiation of phragmoplast led to the cease of the expansion of the cell plate. Our observations provide new insights into the precise structure and dynamics of phragmoplast MFs during cytokinesis and suggest that dynamic phragmoplast MFs are important in cell plate formation.

  3. Modulational instability and pattern formation in the model of DNA dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the analytical and numerical investigation of modulational instability in discrete nonlinear chains, taking the Peyrard-Bishop model of DNA dynamics as an example. It is shown that the original difference differential equation for the DNA dynamics can be reduced to the discrete complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. We derive the modulational instability criterion in this case. Numerical simulations show the validity of the analytical approach with the generation of wave packets provided that the wave number falls in the instability domain. We also show that, modulational instability leads to spontaneous localization of energy in DNA molecule. (author)

  4. Near soliton dynamics and singularity formation for L2 critical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This survey reviews the state of the art concerning singularity formation for two canonical dispersive problems: the L2 critical non-linear Schrödinger equation and the L2 critical generalized KdV equation. In particular, the currently very topical question of classifying flows with initial data near a soliton is addressed. Bibliography: 72 titles

  5. Near soliton dynamics and singularity formation for $L^2$ critical problems

    OpenAIRE

    Martel , Yvan; Merle, Frank; Raphael, Pierre; Szeftel, Jeremie

    2014-01-01

    This survey reviews the state of the art concerning the singularity formation for two canonical dispersive problems: the mass critical non linear Schr\\"odinger equation and the mass critical generalized KdV equation. In particular, we address the question of the classification of the flow for initial data near the soliton.

  6. Dynamics of biofilm formation in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik;

    2002-01-01

    determinations. The biofilm grew at a rate of 0.030±0.002 day−1 reaching quasi-stationary state at 2.6×106 cells/cm2 after approximately 200 days. The low substrate level in the bulk phase (AOC at approximately 6 g ac-C/l) most likely caused the relatively slow biofilm formation rate observed. During...

  7. Investigating the Dynamics of Formative Assessment: Relationships between Teacher Knowledge, Assessment Practice and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joan; Osmundson, Ellen; Dai, Yunyun; Ringstaff, Cathy; Timms, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study of elementary school science examines questions central to policy, practice and research on formative assessment: What is the quality of teachers' content-pedagogical and assessment knowledge? What is the relationship between teacher knowledge and assessment practice? What is the relationship between teacher knowledge,…

  8. Kinetics of linear rouleaux formation studied by visual monitoring of red cell dynamic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshtein, G; Wajnblum, D; Yedgar, S

    2000-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules may form aggregates, normally in rouleaux formations, which are dispersed with increasing blood flow. Experimental observations have suggested that the spontaneous aggregation process involves the formation of linear rouleaux (FLR) followed by formation of branched rouleaux networks. Theoretical models for the spontaneous rouleaux formation were formulated, taking into consideration that FLR may involve both "polymerization," i.e., interaction between two single RBCs (e + e) and the addition of a single RBC to the end of an existing rouleau (e + r), as well as "condensation" between two rouleaux by end-to-end addition (r + r). The present study was undertaken to experimentally examine the theoretical models and their assumptions, by visual monitoring of the spontaneous FLR (from singly dispersed RBC) in plasma, in a narrow gap flow chamber. The results validate the theoretical model, showing that FLR involves both polymerization and condensation, and that the kinetic constants for the above three types of intercellular interactions are the same, i.e., k(ee) = k(er) = k(rr) = k, and for all tested hematocrits (0.625-6%) k < 0.13 +/- 0.03 s(-1). PMID:10777743

  9. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e p in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries

  10. Multicompartment lipid cubic nanoparticles with high protein upload: millisecond dynamics of formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelov, Borislav; Angelova, A.; Filippov, Sergey K.; Drechsler, M.; Štěpánek, Petr; Lesieur, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2014), s. 5216-5226. ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : lipid- protein nanoassembly * dynamic membrane curvature * amphiphile nanoarchitectonics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.881, year: 2014

  11. Cluster formation restricts dynamic nuclear polarization of xenon in solid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Pourfathi, M.; Kara, H.;

    2012-01-01

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 1.5 K and 5 T, Xe-129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a homogeneous xenon/1-propanol/trityl-radical solid mixture exhibit a single peak, broadened by H-1 neighbors. A second peak appears upon annealing for several hours at 125 K. Its...

  12. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron, E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e {sub p} in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  13. Modeling Networks and Dynamics in Complex Systems: from Nano-Composites to Opinion Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng

    Complex networks are ubiquitous in systems of physical, biological, social or technological origin. Components in those systems range from as large as cities in power grids, to as small as molecules in metabolic networks. Since the dawn of network science, significant attention has focused on the implications of dynamics in establishing network structure and the impact of structural properties on dynamics on those networks. The first part of the thesis follows this direction, studying the network formed by conductive nanorods in nano-materials, and focuses on the electrical response of the composite to the structure change of the network. New scaling laws for the shear-induced anisotropic percolation are introduced and a robust exponential tail of the current distribution across the network is identified. These results are relevant especially to "active" composite materials where materials are exposed to mechanical loading and strain deformations. However, in many real-world networks the evolution of the network topology is tied to the states of the vertices and vice versa. Networks that exhibit such a feedback are called adaptive or coevolutionary networks. The second part of the thesis examines two closely related variants of a simple, abstract model for coevolution of a network and the opinions of its members. As a representative model for adaptive networks, it displays the feature of self-organization of the system into a stable configuration due to the interplay between the network topology and the dynamics on the network. This simple model yields interesting dynamics and the slight change in the rewiring strategy results in qualitatively different behaviors of the system. In conclusion, the dissertation aims to develop new network models and tools which enable insights into the structure and dynamics of various systems, and seeks to advance network algorithms which provide approaches to coherently articulated questions in real-world complex systems such as

  14. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and 3J(HNHCα)-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation

  15. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Han, Wei [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Schulten, Klaus, E-mail: kschulte@ks.uiuc.edu [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  16. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress. (paper)

  17. Ichnology of the Miocene Güneyce Formation (Southwest Turkey): Oxygenation and Sedimentation Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Jan Kresten; GÖRMÜŞ, MUHİTTİN; KANBUR, KUBİLAY UYSAL & SÜVEYLA

    2012-01-01

    The Güneyce Formation is well exposed in the Lake District of southwestern Turkey. It was deposited in the early Miocene in the Neotethys ocean and contains a large variety of trace fossils. The following ichnotaxa were recognized: Chondrites intricatus, C. targionii, ?Cosmorhaphe isp., Helminthopsis isp., Helminthorhaphe flexuosa, Lorenzinia isp., Naviculichnium marginatum, ?Nereites isp., Ophiomorpha rudis, ?Phycosiphon incertum, Planolites beverleyensis, cf. Rhizocorallium isp. and Thalass...

  18. Formation of lightning in terms of opinion dynamics in three dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2006-01-01

    Formation of a lightning within a cloud, between clouds and towards the earth is studied as an application of sociophysics. The three dimensional society is sky or cloud, which has members as electrically charged clouds (in sky) or patches (in cloud). Members interact with the neighboring ones and all are convinced to average their charges (opinion). Yet, big external drives (mass media) as winds and turbulences may load new charges or may force the present ones to accumulate temporally at a ...

  19. Observational Evidence of Dynamic Star Formation Rate in Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Eve J; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Star formation on galactic scales is known to be a slow process, but whether it is slow on smaller scales is uncertain. We cross-correlate 5469 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a new all-sky catalog with 256 star forming complexes (SFCs) to build a sample of 191 SFC-GMC complexes---collections of multiple clouds each matched to 191 SFCs. The total mass in stars harbored by these clouds is inferred from WMAP free-free fluxes. We measure the GMC mass, the virial parameter, the star formation efficiency $\\epsilon$ and the star formation rate per free-fall time $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$. Both $\\epsilon$ and $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ range over 3--4 orders of magnitude. We find that 68.3% of the clouds fall within $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon}=0.79\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ and $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.91\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ about the median. Compared to these observed scatters, a simple model with a time independent $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ that depends on the host GMC properties predicts $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.24$. Allowi...

  20. Large-Scale Structure Formation with Massive Neutrinos and Dynamical Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhye, Amol; Pope, Adrian; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Finkel, Hal; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Over the next decade, cosmological measurements of the large-scale structure of the Universe will be sensitive to the combined effects of dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. The matter power spectrum is a key repository of this information. We extend higher-order perturbative methods for computing the power spectrum to investigate these effects over quasi-linear scales. Through comparison with N-body simulations we establish the regime of validity of a Time-Renormalization Group (Time-RG) perturbative treatment that includes dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. We also quantify the accuracy of Standard (SPT), Renormalized (RPT) and Lagrangian Resummation (LPT) perturbation theories without massive neutrinos. We find that an approximation that neglects neutrino clustering as a source for matter clustering predicts the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak position to 0.25% accuracy for redshifts 1 < z < 3, justifying the use of Lagrangian perturbation theory for BAO reconstruction in up...

  1. Dynamical formation & scattering of hierarchical triples: Cross sections, Kozai-Lidov oscillations, and collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Antognini, Joseph M O

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical scattering of binaries and triple systems of stars, planets, and compact objects may produce highly inclined triple systems subject to Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations, potentially leading to collisions, mergers, Type Ia supernovae, and other phenomena. We present the results of more than 400 million gravitational scattering experiments of binary-binary, triple-single, and triple-binary scattering. We compute the cross sections for all possible outcomes and explore their dependencies on incoming velocity, mass, semi-major axis, and eccentricity, including analytic fits and discussion of the velocity dependence. For the production of new triple systems by scattering we find that compact triples are preferred, with ratios of outer to inner semi-major axes of ~few--100, flat or quasi-thermal eccentricity distributions, and flat distributions in cosine of the mutual inclination. Dynamically formed triples are thus subject to strong KL oscillations, the "eccentric Kozai mechanism," and non-secular effects. ...

  2. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces—from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or “homophily”).

  3. Monitoring intra-annual dynamics of wood formation with microcores and dendrometers in Picea abies at two different altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, Claudia; Palombo, Caterina; Tognetti, Roberto; La Porta, Nicola; Anichini, Monica; Giovannelli, Alessio; Emiliani, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal analyses of cambial cell production and day-by-day stem radial increment can help to elucidate how climate modulates wood formation in conifers. Intra-annual dynamics of wood formation were determined with microcores and dendrometers and related to climatic signals in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). The seasonal dynamics of these processes were observed at two sites of different altitude, Savignano (650 m a.s.l.) and Lavazè (1800 m a.s.l.) in the Italian Alps. Seasonal dynamics of cambial activity were found to be site specific, indicating that the phenology of cambial cell production is highly variable and plastic with altitude. There was a site-specific trend in the number of cells in the wall thickening phase, with the maximum cell production in early July (DOY 186) at Savignano and in mid-July (DOY 200) at Lavazè. The formation of mature cells showed similar trends at the two sites, although different numbers of cells and timing of cell differentiation were visible in the model shapes; at the end of ring formation in 2010, the number of cells was four times higher at Savignano (106.5 cells) than at Lavazè (26.5 cells). At low altitudes, microcores and dendrometers described the radial growth patterns comparably, though the dendrometer function underlined the higher upper asymptote of maximum growth in comparison with the cell production function. In contrast, at high altitude, these functions exhibited different trends. The best model was obtained by fitting functions of the Gompertz model to the experimental data. By combining radial growth and cambial activity indices we defined a model system able to synchronize these processes. Processes of adaptation of the pattern of xylogenesis occurred, enabling P. abies to occupy sites with contrasting climatic conditions. The use of daily climatic variables in combination with plant functional traits obtained by sensors and/or destructive sampling could provide a suitable tool to better

  4. HULIS in nanoaerosol clusters; investigations of surface tension and aggregate formation using molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hede

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nuclei act as cores for water vapor condensation, and their composition and chemical properties may enhance or depress the ability for droplet growth. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to show that humic-like substances of larger systems (8.6 nm in diameter mimic experimental data well referring to reduction of surface tension. The structural properties examined show the ability for the humic-like substances to aggregate inside the nanoaerosol clusters.

  5. Migrants trafficking and individual strategies: the formation of dynamic channels in international migration

    OpenAIRE

    JOÃO PEIXOTO

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a discussion of the current modalities of migrants trafficking will be made, taking into account the vast expression that it acquires and its extremely dynamic character. The main empirical base is a recent research project carried out in Portugal, which considered both labour and sex-ual exploitation related flows. The underlying claim is that it is the conjunction of individual aspirations for migration, stringent migration policies and organised intermediary agents that lead...

  6. Large-Scale Structure Formation with Massive Neutrinos and Dynamical Dark Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhye, Amol; Biswas, Rahul; Pope, Adrian; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Finkel, Hal; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Over the next decade, cosmological measurements of the large-scale structure of the Universe will be sensitive to the combined effects of dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. The matter power spectrum is a key repository of this information. We extend higher-order perturbative methods for computing the power spectrum to investigate these effects over quasi-linear scales. Through comparison with N-body simulations we establish the regime of validity of a Time-Renormalization Group (Tim...

  7. Modeling Household Formation and Housing Demand in Denmark using the Dynamic Microsimulation Model SMILE

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Zangenberg Hansen; Peter Stephensen

    2013-01-01

    We utilize the newly developed dynamic microsimulation model SMILE (Simulation Model for Individual Lifecycle Evaluation) to make a long-term forecast of detailed housing demand both in terms of key aggregate figures and compositional features of future Danish housing demand. SMILE simulates the life course of the full Danish population with respect to three main types of events: demographic, socioeconomic, and housing-related events. Demographic events include ageing, births, deaths, migrati...

  8. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by common team dynamic

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces -- from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths, through to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age-groups and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for thes...

  9. Dynamical formation and scattering of hierarchical triples: cross-sections, Kozai-Lidov oscillations, and collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, Joseph M. O.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamical scattering of binaries and triple systems of stars, planets, and compact objects may produce highly inclined triple systems subject to Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations, potentially leading to collisions, mergers, Type Ia supernovae, and other phenomena. We present the results of more than 400 million gravitational scattering experiments of binary-binary, triple-single, and triple-binary scattering. We compute the cross-sections for all possible outcomes and explore their dependences on incoming velocity, mass, semimajor axis, and eccentricity, including analytic fits and discussion of the velocity dependence. For the production of new triple systems by scattering we find that compact triples are preferred, with ratios of outer to inner semimajor axes of ˜few-100, flat or quasi-thermal eccentricity distributions, and flat distributions in cosine of the mutual inclination. Dynamically formed triples are thus subject to strong KL oscillations, the `eccentric Kozai mechanism', and non-secular effects. For single and binary flyby encounters with triple systems, we compute the cumulative cross-section for changes to the mutual inclination, eccentricity, and semimajor axis ratio. We apply these results to scattering events in the field, open clusters, and globular clusters, and explore the implications for Type Ia supernovae via collisions and mergers, stellar collisions, and the lifetime and dynamical isolation of triple systems undergoing KL oscillations. An appendix provides an analysis of the velocity dependence of the collision cross-section in binary-single scattering.

  10. Gas dynamics in tidal dwarf galaxies: disc formation at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, F; Brinks, E; Bournaud, F; McGaugh, S S; Lisenfeld, U; Weilbacher, P M; Boquien, M; Revaz, Y; Braine, J; Koribalski, B S; Belles, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) are recycled objects that form within the collisional debris of interacting/merging galaxies. They are expected to be devoid of non-baryonic dark matter, since they can form only from dissipative material ejected from the discs of the progenitor galaxies. We investigate the gas dynamics in a sample of six bona-fide TDGs around three interacting and post-interacting systems: NGC 4694, NGC 5291, and NGC 7252 ("Atoms for Peace"). For NGC 4694 and NGC 5291 we analyse existing HI data from the Very Large Array (VLA), while for NGC 7252 we present new HI observations from the Jansky VLA together with long-slit and integral-field optical spectroscopy. For all six TDGs, the HI emission can be described by rotating disc models. These HI discs, however, have undergone less than a full rotation since the time of the interaction/merger event, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that these discs are in equilibrium, the inferred dynamical masses are consis...

  11. Dynamics of formation of low-angle tilt boundaries in metals and alloys at high loading rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkin, M. Yu.; Rzhavtsev, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    A computer model has been developed in which the process of formation of low-angle tilt boundaries and fragmentation of initial subgrains during shock loading of metals and alloys is clearly demonstrated by the of two-dimensional discrete dislocation-disclination dynamics method. The formation and evolution of such grains proceeds under the action of an external stress and the stress field of grain boundary disclinations distributed on the subgrain boundaries. With the D16 aluminum alloy as an example, three cases of fragmented structures formed in accordance with the initial configuration of the disclination ensemble have been considered for a dipole, quadrupole, and arbitrary octupole of wedge disclinations. It has been shown that, in all these cases, the formation of a stable fragmented structure requires a stress of ~0.5 GPa and time of 10 ns. The main results of computer simulation (the finite form of a fragmented structure, typical level of applied stress, and small fragmentation time) agree well with known experimental results on shock compression of the D16 aluminum alloy.

  12. The mechanism of the initial step of germanosilicate formation in solution: a first-principles molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thuat T; Rozanska, Xavier; Delbecq, Françoise; Tuel, Alain; Sautet, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The condensation reactions between Ge(OH)4 and Si(OH)4 units in solution are studied to understand the mechanism and stable species during the initial steps of the formation process of Ge containing zeolites under basic conditions. The free energy of formation of (OH)3Ge-O-Ge-(OH)2O(-), (OH)3Si-O-Si-(OH)2O(-), (OH)3Ge-O-Si-(OH)2O(-) and (OH)3Si-O-Ge-(OH)2O(-) dimers is calculated with ab initio molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration, including an explicit description of the water solvent molecules. Calculations show that the attack of the conjugated base (Ge(OH)3O(-) and Si(OH)3O(-)) proceeds with a smaller barrier at the Ge center. In addition, the formation of the pure germanate dimer is more favorable than that of the germano-silicate structure. These results explain the experimental observation of Ge-Ge and Si-Ge dimer species in solutions, with a few Si-Si ones. PMID:27172391

  13. Insights into the formation and dynamics of coignimbrite plumes from one-dimensional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwell, S. L.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.

    2016-06-01

    Coignimbrite plumes provide a common and effective mechanism by which large volumes of fine-grained ash are injected into the atmosphere. Nevertheless, controls on formation of these plumes as a function of eruptive conditions are still poorly constrained. Herein, two 1-D axysymmetric steady state models were coupled, the first describing the parent pyroclastic density current and the second describing plume rise. Global sensitivity analysis is applied to investigate controls on coignimbrite plume formation and describe coignimbrite source and the maximum plume height attained. For a range of initial mass flow rates between 108 and 1010 kg/s, modeled liftoff distance (the distance at which neutral buoyancy is attained), assuming radial supercritical flow, is controlled by the initial flow radius, gas mass fraction, flow thickness, and temperature. The predicted decrease in median grain size between flow initiation and plume liftoff is negligible. Calculated initial plume vertical velocities, assuming uniform liftoff velocity over the pyroclastic density current invasion area, are much greater (several tens of m/s) than those previously used in modeling coignimbrite plumes (1 m/s). Such velocities are inconsistent with the fine grain size of particles lofted into coignimbrite plumes, highlighting an unavailability of large clasts, possibly due to particle segregation within the flow, prior to plume formation. Source radius and initial vertical velocity have the largest effect on maximum plume height, closely followed by initial temperature. Modeled plume heights are between 25 and 47 km, comparable with Plinian eruption columns, highlighting the potential of such events for distributing fine-grained ash over significant areas.

  14. Coupling discharge and gas dynamics in streamer-less spark formation in supercritical N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Ashutosh; Hundsdorfer, Willem; Ebert, Ute

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional cylindrically symmetric model is developed to study the streamer-less spark formation in a short gap on the timescale of ion motion. It incorporates the coupling between the electric discharge and the gas through the heat generated by the discharge and the consecutive gas expansion. The model is employed to study electrical breakdown in supercritical N2. We present the simulation results of gas heating by the electrical discharge and the effect of gas expansion on the electrical discharge.

  15. Charge Formation, Recombination, and Sweep-Out Dynamics in Organic Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Sarah R.; Banerji, Natalie; Leong, Wei Lin; Heeger, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a critical discussion of the various physical processes occurring in organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on recent experimental results. The investigations span from photoexcitation to charge separation, recombination, and sweep-out to the electrodes. Exciton formation and relaxation in poly[N-9?-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) and poly-3(hexylthiophene) (P3HT) are discussed based on a fluorescen...

  16. Formation mechanism and relay dynamics of Cooper pairs in high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoshei, I.V. (Khar' kovskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR))

    1989-05-01

    A theoretical model is proposed whereby oxygen in the lattice of high-temperature superconductors has the form of a regular oxide ion, O(2-), a diatomic diamagnetic peroxide ion, O2(2-), free dissolved molecular oxygen, and virtual O2(-). The two electrons of O2(2-) form a bonded exciton pair with two Cu(2+) holes. The dynamic interaction of the pairs occurs in accordance with the relay mechanism in the chain O2(2-) - O2(0). The motion within the chain leads to the motion of the correlated pair of holes in the valence zone, resulting in a superconducting current state. 18 refs.

  17. Dynamics of Magnesite Formation at Low Temperature and High pCO2 in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafoku, Odeta; Dixon, David A; Rosso, Kevin M; Schaef, Herbert T; Bowden, Mark E; Arey, Bruce W; Felmy, Andrew R

    2015-09-01

    Magnesite precipitation from aqueous solution, despite conditions of supersaturation, is kinetically hindered at low temperatures for reasons that remain poorly understood. The present study examines the products of Mg(OH)2 reaction in solutions saturated with supercritical CO2 at high pressures (90 and 110 atm) and low temperatures (35 and 50 °C). Solids characterization combined with in situ solution analysis reveal that the first reaction products are the hydrated carbonates hydromagnesite and nesquehonite, appearing simultaneously with brucite dissolution. Magnesite is not observed until it comprises a minor product at 7 days reaction at 50 °C. Complete transition to magnesite as the sole product at 35 °C (135 days) and at a faster rate at 50 °C (56 days) occurs as the hydrated carbonates slowly dissolve under the slightly acidic conditions generated at high pCO2. Such a reaction progression at high pCO2 suggests that over long term the hydrated Mg-carbonates functioned as intermediates in magnesite formation. These findings highlight the importance of developing a better understanding of the processes expected to occur during CO2 storage. They also support the importance of integrating magnesite as an equilibrium phase in reactive transport calculations of the effects of CO2 sequestration on geological formations at long time scale. PMID:26200317

  18. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Aguilar

    Full Text Available The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  19. Dynamic Modelling Reveals 'Hotspots' on the Pathway to Enzyme-Substrate Complex Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane E Gordon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS catalyzes the first committed step in the diaminopimelate pathway of bacteria, yielding amino acids required for cell wall and protein biosyntheses. The essentiality of the enzyme to bacteria, coupled with its absence in humans, validates DHDPS as an antibacterial drug target. Conventional drug design efforts have thus far been unsuccessful in identifying potent DHDPS inhibitors. Here, we make use of contemporary molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models to explore the interactions between DHDPS from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its cognate substrate, pyruvate. Our simulations recover the crystallographic DHDPS-pyruvate complex without a priori knowledge of the final bound structure. The highly conserved residue Arg140 was found to have a pivotal role in coordinating the entry of pyruvate into the active site from bulk solvent, consistent with previous kinetic reports, indicating an indirect role for the residue in DHDPS catalysis. A metastable binding intermediate characterized by multiple points of intermolecular interaction between pyruvate and key DHDPS residue Arg140 was found to be a highly conserved feature of the binding trajectory when comparing alternative binding pathways. By means of umbrella sampling we show that these binding intermediates are thermodynamically metastable, consistent with both the available experimental data and the substrate binding model presented in this study. Our results provide insight into an important enzyme-substrate interaction in atomistic detail that offers the potential to be exploited for the discovery of more effective DHDPS inhibitors and, in a broader sense, dynamic protein-drug interactions.

  20. Large-scale structure formation with massive neutrinos and dynamical dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Amol; Biswas, Rahul; Pope, Adrian; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Finkel, Hal; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Over the next decade, cosmological measurements of the large-scale structure of the Universe will be sensitive to the combined effects of dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. The matter power spectrum is a key repository of this information. We extend higher-order perturbative methods for computing the power spectrum to investigate these effects over quasilinear scales. Through comparison with N-body simulations, we establish the regime of validity of a time-renormalization group perturbative treatment that includes dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. We also quantify the accuracy of standard, renormalized and Lagrangian resummation (LPT) perturbation theories without massive neutrinos. We find that an approximation that neglects neutrino clustering as a source for nonlinear matter clustering predicts the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak position to 0.25% accuracy for redshifts 1≤z≤3, justifying the use of LPT for BAO reconstruction in upcoming surveys. We release a modified version of the public Copter code which includes the additional physics discussed in the paper.

  1. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Marielle [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Neurosciences, Laboratory of Cellular and Tissular Biology, Liege (Belgium); Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Di Valentin, Emmanuel [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Viral Vectors Platform, Liege (Belgium); Bontems, Sébastien [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine, E-mail: csadzot@ulg.ac.be [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  2. Carrier Formation Dynamics of Organic Photovoltaics as Investigated by Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei Yonezawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bulk heterojunction (BHJ based on a donor (D polymer and an acceptor (A fullerene derivative is a promising organic photovoltaics (OPV. In order to improve the incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE of the BHJ solar cell, a comprehensive understanding of the ultrafast dynamics of excited species, such as singlet exciton (D*, interfacial charge-transfer (CT state, and carrier (D+, is indispensable. Here, we performed femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of two prototypical BHJ blend films: poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT/[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM blend film and poly(9,9′-dioctylfluorene-co-bithiophene (F8T2/[6,6]-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM blend film. We decomposed differential absorption spectra into fast, slow, and constant components via two-exponential fitting at respective probe photon energies. The decomposition procedure clearly distinguished photoinduced absorptions (PIAs due to D*, CT, and D+. Based on these assignments, we will compare the charge dynamics between the F8T2/PC70BM and P3HT/PCBM blend films.

  3. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures

  4. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures

  5. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  6. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to gas, in neutral, turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars could form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms, even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. The abundances of these 'promoted' stars may contain interesting signatures, as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced or fluctuate independently. Remarkably, otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well-fit by standard core-collapse SNe yields, if we al...

  7. Asymmetric distribution of gas in the large magellanic cloud and dynamical condition for globular cluster formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly asymmetric distributions of HI and CO gases in LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) are reproduced by taking into account hydrodynamical collision between LMC and SMC (Small Magellanic cloud) 0.15 to 0.2 Gyr ago. Two-valued rotation curves in HI gas are due, respectively, to gas clouds accelerated by collision and to those escaped therefrom. It is also concluded that a large-scale noncircular motion of >50 to 100 km s-1 and a resultant compression of >104 (solar mass) in mass-scale are necessary conditions for globular cluster formation from interstellar gas. This process seems to be independent of the chemical abundance of heavy elements in the range -2.0<[Fe/H]<0. (author)

  8. Formation of lightning in terms of opinion dynamics in three dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, C

    2006-01-01

    Formation of a lightning within a cloud, between clouds and towards the earth is studied as an application of sociophysics. The three dimensional society is sky or cloud, which has members as electrically charged clouds (in sky) or patches (in cloud). Members interact with the neighboring ones and all are convinced to average their charges (opinion). Yet, big external drives (mass media) as winds and turbulences may load new charges or may force the present ones to accumulate temporally at a site. For a lightning towards the earth, similarly charged clouds in sky (patches carrying big charges in a cloud) are expected to come close to each other. In all, discharging process is nothing, but what is called lightning.

  9. Dynamics of electron-capture-to-continuum (ECC) formation in slow ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afaneh, F [Physics Department, The Hashemite University, PO Box 150459, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Schmidt, L Ph H [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Schoeffler, M [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Stiebing, K E [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Al-Jundi, J [Physics Department, The Hashemite University, PO Box 150459, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Schmidt-Boecking, H [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Doerner, R [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-05-28

    The zero-degree ejected-electron spectrum for protons incident on He at 25 keV is examined experimentally using the COLTRIMS technique. The momentum distribution of the emitted electrons for the transfer ionization (TI) reaction channel is measured in coincidence with the momentum vectors of the recoil ion and the scattered projectile. The momentum distribution of the electrons emitted around zero degree in the forward direction for the TI reaction channel shows two prominent structures: the electron-capture-to-the-continuum (ECC) peak and the saddle-point peak. From the measured fully differential electron emission cross sections with respect to the scattering plane we can deduce that the main ECC formation mechanism is electron promotion via quasimolecular orbitals.

  10. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Rabhi

    Full Text Available Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source.

  11. From dynamic expression patterns to boundary formation in the presomitic mesoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik B Tiedemann

    Full Text Available The segmentation of the vertebrate body is laid down during early embryogenesis. The formation of signaling gradients, the periodic expression of genes of the Notch-, Fgf- and Wnt-pathways and their interplay in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM precedes the rhythmic budding of nascent somites at its anterior end, which later develops into epithelialized structures, the somites. Although many in silico models describing partial aspects of somitogenesis already exist, simulations of a complete causal chain from gene expression in the growth zone via the interaction of multiple cells to segmentation are rare. Here, we present an enhanced gene regulatory network (GRN for mice in a simulation program that models the growing PSM by many virtual cells and integrates WNT3A and FGF8 gradient formation, periodic gene expression and Delta/Notch signaling. Assuming Hes7 as core of the somitogenesis clock and LFNG as modulator, we postulate a negative feedback of HES7 on Dll1 leading to an oscillating Dll1 expression as seen in vivo. Furthermore, we are able to simulate the experimentally observed wave of activated NOTCH (NICD as a result of the interactions in the GRN. We esteem our model as robust for a wide range of parameter values with the Hes7 mRNA and protein decays exerting a strong influence on the core oscillator. Moreover, our model predicts interference between Hes1 and HES7 oscillators when their intrinsic frequencies differ. In conclusion, we have built a comprehensive model of somitogenesis with HES7 as core oscillator that is able to reproduce many experimentally observed data in mice.

  12. Thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and dynamical formation of Bose-Einstein Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    We report recent progress on understanding the thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma during the early stage in a heavy ion collision. The initially high overpopulation in the pre-equilibrium gluonic matter (``glasma'') is shown to play a crucial role. The strongly interacting nature (and thus fast evolution) naturally arises as an {\\em emergent property} of this pre-equilibrium matter where the intrinsic coupling is weak but the highly occupied gluon states coherently amplify the scattering. A possible transient Bose-Einstein Condensate is argued to form dynamically on a rather general ground. We develop the kinetic approach for describing this highly overpopulated system and find approximate scaling solutions as well as numerically study the onset of condensation. Finally we discuss possible phenomenological implications.

  13. Dynamical aspects of particle emission in binary dissipative collisions -effects on hot-nuclei formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of charged-particle emission in heavy-ion reactions have been studied in the framework of the semiclassical Landau-Vlasov approach for the 40Ar + 27Al collisions at 65 MeV/u. The reaction mechanism is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. After an abundant prompt emission coming from the overlapping region between the target and the projectile, two excited nuclei, the quasi-target and the quasi-projectile, emerge from the collision. To shed some light on the role played by dynamical effects, light-charged particle observables, which are currently used as an experimental signature a of hot equilibrated nucleus, have been carefully investigated. (K.A.)

  14. The effect of simultaneous size reduction and transient network formation on the dynamics of microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhani, Masoud; Sharifi, Soheil; Marti, Othmar

    2012-09-01

    We studied a mixture of C12E5 microemulsion with an end-capped hydrophobically modified polymer (C12-PEO-C12). The end-capped polymer adsorbed on the core of the microemulsion, changed the bending properties of the interface and connected two nearby droplets. The core size and width of the structure factor of the microemulsion decreased upon adding the end-capped polymer. For all polymer concentrations, two relaxational modes corresponding to different diffusion coefficients were observed. The fast and slow diffusion coefficients showed a repulsive and an attractive interaction, respectively. The results of both small-angle x-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering suggested that fast relaxation is affected by size reduction and increasing the repulsive interaction between droplets.

  15. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.;

    2006-01-01

    bacteria depended on phytoplankton growth and aggregation dynamics. The community composition of especially attached bacteria significantly differed between the 2 algal cultures. Our study suggests that phytoplankton aggregation and vertical fluxes are closely linked to interactions between the marine...... well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth and...... aggregation was studied by amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show that the presence of bacteria was a prerequisite for aggregation of T. weissflogii but not of Navicula sp. Occurrences of distinct populations of free-living and attached...

  16. Geometrical shock dynamics, formation of singularities and topological bifurcations of converging shock fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suramlishvili, Nugzar; Eggers, Jens; Fontelos, Marco

    2014-11-01

    We are concerned with singularities of the shock fronts of converging perturbed shock waves. Our considerations are based on Whitham's theory of geometrical shock dynamics. The recently developed method of local analysis is applied in order to determine generic singularities. In this case the solutions of partial differential equations describing the geometry of the shock fronts are presented as families of smooth maps with state variables and the set of control parameters dependent on Mach number, time and initial conditions. The space of control parameters of the singularities is analysed, the unfoldings describing the deformations of the canonical germs of shock front singularities are found and corresponding bifurcation diagrams are constructed. Research is supported by the Leverhulme Trust, Grant Number RPG-2012-568.

  17. Rotating Shallow Water Dynamics: Extra Invariant and the Formation of Zonal Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Balk, Alexander M; Weichman, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    We show that rotating shallow water dynamics possesses an approximate (adiabatic-type) positive quadratic invariant, which exists not only at mid-latitudes (where its analogue in the quasigeostrophic equation has been previously investigated), but near the equator as well (where the quasigeostrophic equation is inapplicable). Deriving the extra invariant, we find "small denominators" of two kinds: (1) due to the triad resonances (as in the case of the quasigeostrophic equation) and (2) due to the equatorial limit, when the Rossby radius of deformation becomes infinite. We show that the "small denominators" of both kinds can be canceled. The presence of the extra invariant can lead to the generation of zonal jets. We find that this tendency should be especially pronounced near the equator. Similar invariant occurs in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and can lead to the emergence of zonal flows.

  18. Molecular Dynamics of Film Formation of Metal Tetra sulfonated Phthalocyanine and Poly Amidoamine Demanders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed molecular dynamics computer simulations to elucidate the behavior and properties of the metal tetra sulfonated phthalocyanine molecule and the poly(amidoamine) dendrimers in self-assembly depositions, respectively, on poly(allylamine hydrochloride) polymer and on film formed by metal tetra sulfonated phthalocyanine with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). Important physical properties of phthalocyanines were obtained such as the kinetic energy and temperature in situ. By the semiempirical model, we also obtained the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the film formed by cobalt tetra sulfonated phthalocyanine deposited on poly(allylamine hydrochloride). We performed a study with poly(amidoamine) dendrimers on their deposition time on metal tetra sulfonated phthalocyanine, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) film, and we show the relationship of deposition time with the electrical charge and molecular mass of phthalocyanines. The deposition times of the dendrimers, as a function of their mass, were also elucidated.

  19. Thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and dynamical formation of Bose-Einstein Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report recent progress on understanding the thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma during the early stage in a heavy ion collision. The initially high overpopulation in the pre-equilibrium gluonic matter (glasma) is shown to play a crucial role. The strongly interacting nature (and thus fast evolution) naturally arises as an emergent property of this pre-equilibrium matter where the intrinsic coupling is weak but the highly occupied gluon states coherently amplify the scattering. A possible transient Bose-Einstein Condensate is argued to form dynamically on a rather general ground. We develop the kinetic approach for describing this highly overpopulated system and find approximate scaling solutions as well as numerically study the onset of condensation. Finally we also discuss possible phenomenological implications.

  20. Formation and Dynamics of a Schrödinger-Cat State in Continuous Quantum Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Chapline, G; Gurvitz, S A; Hammel, P C; Pelekhov, D V; Suter, A; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2001-01-01

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) as an example of a truly continuous measurement in quantum mechanics. This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a quasi-classical cantilever, modeled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical region of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schr\\"odinger equation, without any artificial assumptions. Computer simulations of the spin-cantilever dynamics, where the spin is continuously rotated by means of cyclic adiabatic inversion, show that the cantilever evolves into a Schr\\"odinger-cat state: the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks that quasi-periodically appear and vanish. For a many-spin system our equations reduce to the classical equations ...

  1. Coupled dynamics of mobility and pattern formation in optional public goods games

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Shi, Yong-Dong; Qiu, Tian

    2012-01-01

    In a static environment, optional participation and cooperator agglomeration are found to be beneficial for the occurrence and maintenance of cooperation. In the optional public goods game, the rock-scissors-paper cycles of different strategies yield the oscillatory persistence of cooperation but not different levels of stable cooperation. In this paper, by incorporating population density and individual mobility into the spatial optional public goods game, we study the coevolutionary dynamics of strategy updating and benefit-seeking movement. With low population density and slow movement, an optimal level of cooperation is easy to be reached. Both the increase of population density and the speed-up of free-floating of competing agents will lead to the decrease of cooperation. A log-log relation between the levels of cooperation and the free-floating probability is found. Theoretical analysis indicates that the decrease of cooperator frequency in the present model should result from the increase of the intera...

  2. Dynamics of the formation of ion-beam plasma in a drift space with positive potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of enhancing gas compensation of an intense ion beam under introduction of positive potential into a drift space of the latter are studied. It is ascertained that there are two specific stages of ion-beam plasma evolution. These stages manifest themselves in a two-step shape of beam current density pulses, capacitive probe signals, etc. Comparative step values depend nontrivially on the physical parameters of the system and its past history. It is also shown that instant radial distributions of slow ions turn out to be nonmonotonous with absolute maximum which drifts as pressure grows towards periphery, and probe characteristics are significantly deformed due to the presence of fast space-isotropized electrons of secondary emission. Consideration on physical mechanisms of the observed phenomena and quantitative estimations which explain qualitatively the experimental results are proposed

  3. NF-kB directs dynamic super enhancer formation in inflammation and atherogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gabriel; Federation, Alexander; Paranal, Ronald M.; Bair, Steven; Newton, Gail; Lichtman, Andrew; Kung, Andrew; Yang, Tianlun; Wang, Hong; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Croce, Kevin; Bradner, James E.; Plutzky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Proinflammatory stimuli elicit rapid transcriptional responses via transduced signals to master regulatory transcription factors. To explore the role of chromatin-dependent signal transduction in the atherogenic inflammatory response, we characterized the dynamics, structure and function of regulatory elements in the activated endothelial cell epigenome. Stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha prompted a dramatic and rapid global redistribution of chromatin activators to massive de novo clustered enhancer domains. Inflammatory super enhancers formed by NF-κB accumulate at the expense of immediately decommissioned, basal endothelial super enhancers, despite persistent histone hyperacetylation. Mass action of enhancer factor redistribution causes momentous swings in transcriptional initiation and elongation. A chemical genetic approach reveals a requirement for BET bromodomains in communicating enhancer remodeling to RNA polymerase and orchestrating the transition to the inflammatory cell state, demonstrated in activated endothelium and macrophages. BET bromodomain inhibition abrogates super enhancer mediated inflammatory transcription, atherogenic endothelial responses and atherosclerosis in vivo. PMID:25263595

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of {beta}-sheet formation in self-assembled peptide amphiphile fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, One-Sun; Liu Yamei; Schatz, George C., E-mail: schatz@chem.northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The influence of amino acid sequence on the secondary structure of peptide amphiphile (PAs) cylindrical micelles and fibers that are self-assembled in solution is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations for two choices of PAs were performed, starting with structures that have the correct overall shape, but which restructure considerably during the simulation, with one fiber being composed of valine rich PAs and the other of alanine rich PAs. Self-assembly is similar in both simulations, with stable fibers (diameter is 7.7-8 nm) obtained after 40 ns. We find that the valine rich PA fiber has a higher {beta}-sheet population than the alanine rich fiber, and that the number of hydrogen bonds is higher. This behavior of the valine rich fiber is consistent with experimental measurements of higher stiffness, and it shows that stiffness can be varied while still maintaining self-assembly.

  5. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: The role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.; Stewart, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes.

  6. Quantum dot formation and dynamic scaling behavior of SnO2 nanocrystals induced by pulsed delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. W.; Lai, J. K. L.; Shek, C. H.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dot formation and dynamic scaling behavior of SnO2 nanocrystals in coalescence regime for growth by pulsed-laser deposition is explored experimentally and theoretically, and the same is compared with that for continuous vapor deposition such as molecular-beam epitaxy. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, unusual quantum dots of SnO2 nanocrystals are studied. We present kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations for pulsed-laser deposition in the submonolayer regime and give a description of the island distance versus pulse intensity. We found that the scaling exponent for pulsed-laser deposition is 1.28±0.03, which is significantly lower as compared to that for molecular-beam epitaxy (1.62±0.03). Theoretical simulations reveal that this attractive difference can be pursued to the large fraction of multiple droplet coalescence under pulsed vapor delivery.

  7. Dynamics of peat accumulation and marl flat formation in a calcareous fen, midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, J.J.; Ketterling, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    The age and sequence of peat accumulation were investigated at a calcareous fen in northeastern Illinois, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify the processes that form and sustain marl flats, which are areas of marl or tufa substrate within the fen that contain numerous rare plant species. Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and radiocarbon evidence was used to establish the processes and chronology of peat accumulation and erosion adjacent to each marl flat. The age of the base of the peat deposit varies greatly throughout the fen, ranging from 14,679 calibrated years before present (cal. years BP) to nearly modern, indicating that colonization of the sand and gravel substrate by peat occurred throughout the period from the Late Pleistocene to present. Adjacent to one marl flat, trends in basal peat age and thickness show that peat accumulation has progressed laterally inward from both sides, suggesting that the marl flat has been infilling with peat progressively by accumulation at the margins since at least 5,370 cal. years BP or longer. A second marl flat in the fen is surrounded by older, thick peat of differing ages on either edge and is bounded by fresh scarps, indicating that the marl flat currently is expanding laterally by erosion into the preexisting peat blanket. These two examples suggest a continuously repeating process, where erosion of the accumulated peat blanket forms a marl flat, which is later covered by peat accumulation. Trends in basal peat age elsewhere in the fen suggest that other marl flats may have existed in the past that have been completely infilled with peat. This study suggests that marl flat formation is a natural process that has been occurring for millennia, continuously creating habitat for the rare plant species that occupy marl flats. There is no evidence that the marl flats at this site are indicative of anthropogenic disturbance, so that management options for these areas are limited to maintaining the quality and quantity

  8. Step dynamics and oxide formation during CO oxidation over a vicinal Pd surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Zhang, Chu; Merte, Lindsay Richard; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-07-27

    In an attempt to bridge the material and pressure gaps - two major challenges for an atomic scale understanding of heterogeneous catalysis - we employed high-energy surface X-ray diffraction as a tool to study the Pd(553) surface in situ under changing reaction conditions during CO oxidation. The diffraction patterns recorded under CO rich reaction conditions are characteristic for the metallic state of the surface. In an environment with low excess of O2 over the reaction stoichiometry, the surface seems to accommodate oxygen atoms along the steps forming one or several subsequent adsorbate structures and rapidly transforms into a combination of (332), (111) and (331) facets likely providing the room for the formation of a surface oxide. For the case of large excess of O2, the diffraction data show the presence of a multilayer PdO with the [101] crystallographic direction parallel to the [111] and the [331] directions of the substrate. The reconstructions in O2 excess are to a large extent similar to those previously reported for pure O2 exposures by Westerström et al. [R. Westerström et al., Phys. Rev. B: Condens. Matter Mater. Phys., 2007, 76, 155410]. PMID:26805438

  9. Simulating Marine New Particle Formation and Growth Using the M7 Modal Aerosol Dynamics Modal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran Monahan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A modal atmospheric aerosol model (M7 is evaluated in terms of predicting marine new particle formation and growth. Simulations were carried out for three different nucleation schemes involving (1 kinetic self-nucleation of OIO (2 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 and (3 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 plus condensation of a low-volatility organic vapour. Peak OIO and H2SO4 vapour concentrations were both limited to 6×106 molecules cm-3 at noontime while the peak organic vapour concentration was limited to 12×106 molecules cm-3. All simulations produced significant concentrations of new particles in the Aitken mode. From a base case particle concentration of 222 cm-3 at radii >15 nm, increases in concentrations to 366 cm-3 were predicted from the OIO-OIO case, 722 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case, and 1584 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case with additional condensing organic vapours. The results indicate that open ocean new particle production is feasible for clean conditions; however, new particle production becomes most significant when an additional condensable organic vapour is available to grow the newly formed particles to larger sizes. Comparison to sectional model for a typical case study demonstrated good agreement and the validity of using the modal model.

  10. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I).A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame suggests a merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~ 10' NW to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h=19.0 are newly selected as member candidates. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged samp...

  11. Intra-day and regime-switching dynamics in electricity price formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the complex, non-linear effects of spot price drivers in wholesale electricity markets: their intra-day dynamics and transient irregularities. The context is the UK market, after the reforms introduced in March 2001, analysed with an original set of price drivers reflecting economic, technical, strategic, risk, behavioural and market design effects. Models are estimated separately as daily time-series of the 48 half-hourly trading periods. All coefficients exhibit substantial intra-day variation, relating to the heterogeneity of operating plants and market design aspects. This reveals a market responding to economic fundamentals and plant operating properties, with learning and emergent financial characteristics, as well as some strategic manipulation of capacity, most effectively exercised by the more flexible plants. Using regime-switching parameters, the effects of capacity margin and inter-day capacity adjustment are elucidated, suggesting rent-seeking behaviour, despite the relatively low prices at the time. Overall, high-frequency, aggregate fundamental price models can usefully uncover critical aspects of market performance, evolution and agent behaviour. (author)

  12. Line Profiles of Cores within Clusters: II Signatures of Dynamical Collapse during High Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rowan J; Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S; Bonnell, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Observations of atomic or molecular lines can provide important information about the physical state of star forming regions. In order to investigate the line profiles from dynamical collapsing massive star forming regions (MSFRs), we model the emission from hydrodynamic simulations of a collapsing cloud in the absence of outflows. By performing radiative transfer calculations, we compute the optically thick HCO+ and optically thin N2H+ line profiles from two collapsing regions at different epochs. Due to large-scale collapse, the MSFRs have large velocity gradients, reaching up to 20 km/s/pc across the central core. The optically thin lines typically contain multiple velocity components resulting from the superposition of numerous density peaks along the line-of-sight. The optically thick lines are only marginally shifted to the blue side of the optically thin line profiles, and frequently do not have a central depression in their profiles due to self-absorption. As the regions evolve the lines become bright...

  13. Electroless formation of silver nanoaggregates: An experimental and molecular dynamics approach

    KAUST Repository

    Gentile, Francesco T.

    2014-02-20

    The ability to manipulate matter to create non-conventional structures is one of the key issues of material science. The understanding of assembling mechanism at the nanoscale allows us to engineer new nanomaterials, with physical properties intimately depending on their structure.This paper describes new strategies to obtain and characterise metal nanostructures via the combination of a top-down method, such as electron beam lithography, and a bottom-up technique, such as the chemical electroless deposition. We realised silver nanoparticle aggregates within well-defined patterned holes created by electron beam lithography on silicon substrates. The quality characteristics of the nanoaggregates were verified by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging. Moreover, we compared the experimental findings to molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles growth. We observed a very high dependence of the structure characteristics on the pattern nanowell aspect ratio. We found that high-quality metal nanostructures may be obtained in patterns with well aspect ratio close to one, corresponding to a maximum diameter of 50 nm, a limit above which the fabricated structures become less regular and discontinuous. When regular shapes and sizes are necessary, as in nanophotonics, these results suggest the pattern characteristics to obtain isolated, uniform and reproducible metal nanospheres. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  14. Secular dynamics of multiplanet systems: implications for the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via high-eccentricity migration

    CERN Document Server

    Hamers, Adrian S; Lithwick, Yoram; Perets, Hagai B; Zwart, Simon F Portegies

    2016-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets that reside very closely to their host star, within $\\sim 0.1\\,\\mathrm{AU}$. Their formation is not well understood. It is generally believed that they cannot have formed in situ, implying that some form of migration must have occurred after their initial formation. We study the production of HJs through secular evolution in multiplanet systems with three to five planets. In this variant of high-$e$ migration, the eccentricity of the orbit of the innermost planet is excited on secular time-scales, triggering orbital migration due to tidal dissipation. We use a secular dynamics code and carry out a population synthesis study. We find that HJs are only produced if the viscous time-scale is short ($\\approx 0.014$ yr). In contrast, in up to $\\approx 0.3$ of systems, the innermost planet is tidally disrupted. The orbital period distribution is peaked around 5 d, consistent with observations. The median HJ mass is $1\\,M_\\mathrm{J}$ with a maximum of $\\approx 2 \\, M_\\mathr...

  15. Formation of nanopore in a suspended graphene sheet with argon cluster bombardment: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of a nanopore in a suspended graphene sheet using an argon gas beam was simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) method. The Lennard-Jones (LJ) two-body potential and Tersoff–Brenner empirical potential energy function are applied in the MD simulations for different interactions between particles. The simulation results demonstrated that the incident energy and cluster size played a crucial role in the collisions. Simulation results for the Ar55–graphene collisions show that the Ar55 cluster bounces back when the incident energy is less than 11 eV/atom, the argon cluster penetrates when the incident energy is greater than 14 eV/atom. The two threshold incident energies, i.e., threshold incident energy of defect formation in graphene and threshold energy of penetration argon cluster were observed in the simulation. The threshold energies were found to have relatively weak negative power law dependence on the cluster size. The number of sputtered carbon atoms is obtained as a function of the kinetic energy of the cluster

  16. Bubble dynamics in metal nanoparticle formation by laser ablation in liquid studied through high-speed laser stroboscopic videography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Rie; Nguyen, Thao T.P.; Sugiura, Takahiro; Ito, Yoshiro, E-mail: itoy@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Observations at 1 μs interval were carried out for laser ablation in water. • Laser-induced shock wave and cavitation bubble are dynamically observed. • Jet-like shadows are observed during LAL in water after multiple-pulse irradiation. • Cloudlike-shadow moving away from the irradiated copper surface was observed. - Abstract: Laser ablation in liquid (LAL) is utilized in many applications, such as the fabrication of nanoparticles, laser cleaning and laser peening. We have developed a high-speed laser stroboscopic videography system that enables observations at intervals of 1 μs. Using this imaging system, we investigated the dynamics of cavitation bubbles induced by LAL to elucidate the timing and location of nanoparticle formation and dispersion into the surrounding liquid. The initial bubble demonstrated a well-defined, smooth boundary during its growth and shrinkage. Although previous studies have reported the ejection of particles at the boundary of the bubble, this was not observed in our images. Intermixing between the gas phase of the bubble and the surrounding liquid occurred when the first bubble collapsed. Jet-like shadows were recorded during LAL in water after multiple-pulse irradiation, but were not observed in freshly filled water that had not yet been irradiated. These shadows disappeared within 10 μs and are postulated to be micro-bubbles induced by interactions between nanoparticles suspended in the water and the incoming laser beam.

  17. Bubble dynamics in metal nanoparticle formation by laser ablation in liquid studied through high-speed laser stroboscopic videography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Observations at 1 μs interval were carried out for laser ablation in water. • Laser-induced shock wave and cavitation bubble are dynamically observed. • Jet-like shadows are observed during LAL in water after multiple-pulse irradiation. • Cloudlike-shadow moving away from the irradiated copper surface was observed. - Abstract: Laser ablation in liquid (LAL) is utilized in many applications, such as the fabrication of nanoparticles, laser cleaning and laser peening. We have developed a high-speed laser stroboscopic videography system that enables observations at intervals of 1 μs. Using this imaging system, we investigated the dynamics of cavitation bubbles induced by LAL to elucidate the timing and location of nanoparticle formation and dispersion into the surrounding liquid. The initial bubble demonstrated a well-defined, smooth boundary during its growth and shrinkage. Although previous studies have reported the ejection of particles at the boundary of the bubble, this was not observed in our images. Intermixing between the gas phase of the bubble and the surrounding liquid occurred when the first bubble collapsed. Jet-like shadows were recorded during LAL in water after multiple-pulse irradiation, but were not observed in freshly filled water that had not yet been irradiated. These shadows disappeared within 10 μs and are postulated to be micro-bubbles induced by interactions between nanoparticles suspended in the water and the incoming laser beam

  18. Dynamic processes in the lithosphere leading to extension, rifting and basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The similarity of ages of extensional core complexes, co-genetic basin formation, and kinematically compatible movements along large strike-slip faults in western North America to ages of comparable events within the Himalayas-Alps orogenic belt leads to the speculation that strain related to changes in Pacific (PAC)-North America(NA) plate motions may be recorded on a global scale affecting the coupled plates and extending eastward across Eurasia. The contemporaneous global deformation reflects abrupt changes in PAC-NA plate motions in response to coupling following convergence of buoyant oceanic lithosphere, commonly part of a spreading center, which impedes subduction and leads to collision followed by coupling when the buoyant lithosphere binds against the base of the overriding continental plate. Critical coupling of a sufficiently long ridge segment leads to "capture", after which the former movements of the newly coupled plates are integrated abruptly and changed from previous directions. In western North America, episodes of capture of the NA plate by the (PAC) plate are recorded by break-up unconformities (ca. 55, 35, and 17 Ma) and basins commonly within extensional domains distinguished by age and direction of tectonic transport (Eocene [~55-42 Ma], ca. 285o, Oligocene [~35-20 Ma], 240o, Miocene [17-0 Ma], ca. 280o). The transport directions record the integration of the southwesterly motion of NA , related to mantle convection, and the northwesterly motion of PAC, driven by slab pull. Following each coupling event, PAC moves westward dragging: 1) the formerly subducting Farallon slab, 2) the coupled, formerly overriding, NA plate, and 3) Eurasia (EA), with it. In response to the strong extension that is imposed upon rocks within domains encompassed by the PAC-NA coupled region, and along the southern margin of Eurasia, brittle deformation, accommodated by normal and strike-slip faults, and formation of contemporaneous basins, takes place. Core

  19. Formation and Dynamics of Waves in a Cortical Model of Cholinergic Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Roach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a regulator of neural excitability and one of the neurochemical substrates of sleep. Amongst the cellular effects induced by cholinergic modulation are a reduction in spike-frequency adaptation (SFA and a shift in the phase response curve (PRC. We demonstrate in a biophysical model how changes in neural excitability and network structure interact to create three distinct functional regimes: localized asynchronous, traveling asynchronous, and traveling synchronous. Our results qualitatively match those observed experimentally. Cortical activity during slow wave sleep (SWS differs from that during REM sleep or waking states. During SWS there are traveling patterns of activity in the cortex; in other states stationary patterns occur. Our model is a network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons with a M-current regulated by ACh. Regulation of ACh level can account for dynamical changes between functional regimes. Reduction of the magnitude of this current recreates the reduction in SFA the shift from a type 2 to a type 1 PRC observed in the presence of ACh. When SFA is minimal (in waking or REM sleep state, high ACh patterns of activity are localized and easily pinned by network inhomogeneities. When SFA is present (decreasing ACh, traveling waves of activity naturally arise. A further decrease in ACh leads to a high degree of synchrony within traveling waves. We also show that the level of ACh determines how sensitive network activity is to synaptic heterogeneity. These regimes may have a profound functional significance as stationary patterns may play a role in the proper encoding of external input as memory and traveling waves could lead to synaptic regularization, giving unique insights into the role and significance of ACh in determining patterns of cortical activity and functional differences arising from the patterns.

  20. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  1. Accessory corpora lutea formation in pregnant Hokkaido sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) investigated by examination of ovarian dynamics and steroid hormone concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    YANAGAWA, Yojiro; Matsuura, Yukiko; Suzuki, Masatsugu; SAGA, Shin-ichi; OKUYAMA, Hideto; FUKUI, Daisuke; BANDO, Gen; NAGANO, Masashi; Katagiri, Seiji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; TSUBOTA, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Generally, sika deer conceive a single fetus, but approximately 80% of pregnant females have two corpora lutea (CLs). The function of the accessory CL (ACL) is unknown; moreover, the process of ACL formation is unclear, and understanding this is necessary to know its role. To elucidate the process of ACL formation, the ovarian dynamics of six adult Hokkaido sika deer females were examined ultrasonographically together with peripheral estradiol-17β and progesterone concentrations. ACLs formed ...

  2. Formation of H̅ in p̅-Ps collisions embedded in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnavelu, Kuru; Ghoshal, Arijit; Nayek, Sujay; Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, Mohd Zahurin Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Screening effects of plasmas on the formation of antihydrogen (H̅) in an arbitrary s-state from the ground state of the positronium atom (Ps) by antiproton (p̅) impact have been studied within the framework of charge-conjugation and time-reversal invariance. Two types of plasma environments have been considered, namely weakly coupled plasma and dense quantum plasma. For weakly coupled plasma, the interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel screening model, whereas for dense quantum plasma, interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Effects of plasma screening on the antihydrogen formation cross section have been studied in the energy range 15-400 keV of incident antiproton. For the free atomic case, our results agree well with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  3. REDSHIFT 6.4 HOST GALAXIES OF 108 SOLAR MASS BLACK HOLES: LOW STAR FORMATION RATE AND DYNAMICAL MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of rest-frame far-infrared continuum and [C II] line emission in two z = 6.4 quasars with black hole masses of ≈108 M☉. CFHQS J0210–0456 is detected in the continuum with a 1.2 mm flux of 120 ± 35 μJy, whereas CFHQS J2329–0301 is undetected at a similar noise level. J2329–0301 has a star formation rate limit of ☉ yr–1, considerably below the typical value at all redshifts for this bolometric luminosity. Through comparison with hydro simulations, we speculate that this quasar is observed at a relatively rare phase where quasar feedback has effectively shut down star formation in the host galaxy. [C II] emission is also detected only in J0210–0456. The ratio of [C II] to far-infrared luminosity is similar to that of low-redshift galaxies of comparable luminosity, suggesting that the previous finding of an offset in the relationships between this ratio and far-infrared luminosity at low and high redshifts may be partially due to a selection effect due to the limited sensitivity of previous continuum data. The [C II] line of J0210–0456 is relatively narrow (FWHM = 189 ± 18 km s–1), indicating a dynamical mass substantially lower than expected from the local black hole-velocity dispersion correlation. The [C II] line is marginally resolved at 0.''7 resolution with the blue and red wings spatially offset by 0.''5 (3 kpc) and a smooth velocity gradient of 100 km s–1 across a scale of 6 kpc, possibly due to the rotation of a galaxy-wide disk. These observations are consistent with the idea that stellar mass growth lags black hole accretion for quasars at this epoch with respect to more recent times.

  4. [Dynamic tissue organizational view of the formation of functional immune system and medical perspectives of its research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Péter

    2007-02-25

    Advances in molecular biological procedures, bioinformatics and transgenic technology and their rapidly broadening use have led to an immense increase of data concerning the cells comprising the immune system at molecular level. This new knowledge is mostly relevant to the hemopoietic components of structured lymphoid tissues, while similar research efforts aimed at investigating the non-hemopoietic stromal parts have until recently been rather neglected. However, the results of recent investigations have established the importance of tissue differentiation and functional maturation of these latter components within the lymphoid organs during the embryonic development for achieving the individual's immunological competence, as manifested in various forms of immune responses. Research performed on murine embryos have revealed the origin and developmental pathways of these less investigated stromal components, identified the molecular participants involved in their interactions with lymphoid cells, and determined the anatomic location of lymphoid-stromal domains and the sequence of interactions between the two tissue partners. In addition to the obvious theoretical importance of the above events, their resemblance to the occurrence of certain pathological conditions with inflammatory origin has also become apparent, where the course of the disease is characterized by the formation of "tertiary lymphoid tissue" in the affected organ. A more detailed understanding of the dependence of hemopoietic cells on their stromal environment in the lymphoid tissues may offer support for establishing a more efficient causal therapy for chronic inflammations. The purpose of the present account is to report these developmental events, and to emphasize the importance of the stromal development and functional dynamics during the interpretation of immune functions and place them at least as important a diagnostic and therapeutic target as the current clinical evaluation hitherto mainly

  5. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD (∼ +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT (∼ -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  6. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  7. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padilla-Longoria Pablo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Results Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. Conclusion The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage

  8. Exploration of fluid dynamic indicators/causative factors in the formation of tower structures in staphylococci bacteria bio-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Derek, Moormeier; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria form biofilms with distinct structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the body. As such, staph infections represent one of the greatest threats to post-surgery patients. It has been found that flow conditions play a significant role in the developmental and dispersal activity of a biofilm. The coupling between the growing biofilm and surrounding flow, however, is not well understood. Indeed, little is know why bacteria form tower structures under certain conditions but not in a predictable way. μ-PTV measurements were made in a microchannel to try to identify fluid dynamic indicators for the formation of towers in biofilm growth. Preliminary experiments indicated changes in the near wall flow up to five hours before a tower formed. The reason for that is the target of this investigation. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were cultured in the Bioflux Fluxion channel and subjected to a steady shear rate of 0.5 dynes. In addition to μ-PTV measurement, nuclease production and cell number density counts were observed prior to and during tower development. These were compared against measurements made under the same nominal flow conditions where a tower did not form.

  9. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. II: metallicity, stellar populations and dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tonini, Chiara; Wyithe, J Stuart B; Croton, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the stellar populations of model galaxies, using the new semi-analytic model presented in Tonini et al. (2016a). This new model follows the angular momentum evolution of gas and stars, providing the base for a new star formation recipe, and treatment of the effects of mergers that depends on the central galaxy dynamical structure. We find that the new recipes have the effect of boosting the efficiency of the baryonic cycle in producing and recycling metals, as well as preventing minor mergers from diluting the metallicity of bulges and ellipticals. The model reproduces the stellar mass - stellar metallicity relation for galaxies above 1e10 solar masses, including Brightest Cluster Galaxies. Model disks, galaxies dominated by instability-driven components, and merger-driven objects each stem from different evolutionary channels. These model galaxies therefore occupy different loci in the galaxy mass - size relation, which we find to be in accord with the Atlas 3D classification...

  10. Membrane permeability during pressure ulcer formation: A computational model of dynamic competition between cytoskeletal damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, N Suhas; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-05-24

    Pressure ulcers are debilitating wounds that arise frequently in people who have lost mobility. Mechanical stress, oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury are potential sources of damage during pressure ulcer formation, but cross-talk between these sources has rarely been investigated. In vitro experiments with mechanically-induced cell damage previously demonstrated that non-lethal amounts of static cell deformation could induce myoblast membrane permeabilization. Permeabilization, in turn, has the potential to induce oxidative stress via leakage of calcium, myoglobin or alarmins. In this work, we constructed a hypothetical causal network of cellular-scale effects resulting from deformation and permeabilization, and we investigated the theoretical sensitivity of cell death toward various parameters and pathways of the model. Simulations showed that the survival/death outcome was particularly sensitive to the speed of membrane repair. The outcome was also sensitive to whether oxidative stress could decrease the speed of membrane repair. Finally, using the assumption that apoptosis and necrosis would have opposite effects on membrane leakage in dying cells, we showed that promoting apoptosis might under certain conditions have the paradoxical effect of decreasing, rather than increasing, total cell death. Our work illustrates that apoptosis may have hidden benefits at preventing spatial spread of death. More broadly, our work shows the importance of membrane repair dynamics and highlights the need for experiments to measure the effects of ischemia, apoptosis induction, and other co-occurring sources of cell stress toward the speed of membrane repair. PMID:26772800

  11. Bond formation and slow heterogeneous dynamics in adhesive spheres with long-ranged repulsion: quantitative test of mode coupling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, O; Puertas, A M; Sperl, M; Baschnagel, J; Fuchs, M

    2007-09-01

    A colloidal system of spheres interacting with both a deep and narrow attractive potential and a shallow long-ranged barrier exhibits a prepeak in the static structure factor. This peak can be related to an additional mesoscopic length scale of clusters and/or voids in the system. Simulation studies of this system have revealed that it vitrifies upon increasing the attraction into a gel-like solid at intermediate densities. The dynamics at the mesoscopic length scale corresponding to the prepeak represents the slowest mode in the system. Using mode coupling theory with all input directly taken from simulations, we reveal the mechanism for glassy arrest in the system at 40% packing fraction. The effects of the low-q peak and of polydispersity are considered in detail. We demonstrate that the local formation of physical bonds is the process whose slowing down causes arrest. It remains largely unaffected by the large-scale heterogeneities, and sets the clock for the slow cluster mode. Results from mode-coupling theory without adjustable parameters agree semiquantitatively with the local density correlators but overestimate the lifetime of the mesoscopic structure (voids). PMID:17930244

  12. μCT-Based, In Vivo Dynamic Bone Histomorphometry Allows 3D Evaluation of the Early Responses of Bone Resorption and Formation to PTH and Alendronate Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, Chantal M. J.; Altman, Allison R.; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Tribble, Mary Beth; Li, Connie; Chandra, Abhishek; Qin, Ling; Liu, X. Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Current osteoporosis treatments improve bone mass by increasing net bone formation: anti-resorptive drugs such as bisphosphonates block osteoclast activity, while anabolic agents such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) increase bone remodeling, with a greater effect on formation. Although these drugs are widely used, their role in modulating formation and resorption is not fully understood, due in part to technical limitations in the ability to longitudinally assess bone remodeling. Importantly, it is not known whether or not PTH-induced bone formation is independent of resorption, resulting in controversy over the effectiveness of combination therapies that use both PTH and an anti-resorptive. In this study, we developed a μCT-based, in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry technique for rat tibiae, and applied this method to longitudinally track changes in bone resorption and formation as a result of treatment with alendronate (ALN), PTH, or combination therapy of both PTH and ALN (PTH+ALN). Correlations between our μCT-based measures of bone formation and measures of bone formation based on calcein-labeled histology (r = 0.72 - 0.83) confirm the accuracy of this method. Bone remodeling parameters measured through μCT-based in vivo dynamic bone histomorphometry indicate an increased rate of bone formation in rats treated with PTH and PTH+ALN, together with a decrease in bone resorption measures in rats treated with ALN and PTH+ALN. These results were further supported by traditional histology-based measurements, suggesting that PTH was able to induce bone formation while bone resorption was suppressed. PMID:25554598

  13. Eberhard Widmann (Stefan Meyer Institute, Vienna) and Silke Federmann (Ph.D. Student from Vienna in the CERN-Austrian Ph.D. program) together with a microwave cavity developed by Silke at CERN. The cavity will be used for the first time to look for spin-flip transitions of antihydrogen atoms later this year.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Eberhard Widmann (Stefan Meyer Institute, Vienna) and Silke Federmann (Ph.D. Student from Vienna in the CERN-Austrian Ph.D. program) together with a microwave cavity developed by Silke at CERN. The cavity will be used for the first time to look for spin-flip transitions of antihydrogen atoms later this year.

  14. Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    1999-01-01

    The currently discussed theories of bulge formation are reviewed, including the primordial scenario, where bulges form rapidly and then accrete disks, the secular scenario, where bulges are formed by dynamical evolution of disks through bars and galaxy interactions, and some combinations of both, where formation of bulges and disks are more continuous and interleaved. The various scenarios make specific predictions about the relative masses, angular momenta, colours, metallicities of bulges relative to disks, and the bulge-to-disk ratio as a function of time. Dynamical processes relevant to the formation of bulges (bar instabilities, mergers) are described and tested against observed statistics. Current data suggest a dynamical feedback from gravitational instabilities in bulge and disk formation. It is very difficult to discriminate between the various scenarios from surveys at z=0 only, and observations at high redshift are presently the best hope for large progress.

  15. Nanovoid formation and mechanics: a comparison of poly(dicyclopentadiene) and epoxy networks from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M; Knorr, Daniel B; Andzelm, Jan W; Lenhart, Joseph L; Sirk, Timothy W

    2016-05-11

    Protective equipment in civilian and military applications requires the use of polymer materials that are both stiff and tough over a wide range of strain rates. However, typical structural materials, like tightly cross-linked epoxies, are very brittle. Recent experiments demonstrated that cross-linked poly(dicyclopentadiene) (pDCPD) networks can circumvent this trade-off by providing structural properties such as a high glass transition temperature and glassy modulus, while simultaneously exhibiting excellent toughness and high-rate impact resistance. The greater performance of pDCPD was attributed to more facile plastic deformation and nano-scale void formation, but the chemical and structural mechanisms underlying this response were not clear. Here, we use atomistic molecular dynamics to compare the molecular- and chain-level properties of pDCPD and epoxy networks undergoing high strain rate deformation. We quantify the tensile modulus and yield strength of the networks as well as the prevalence and characteristics of nanovoids that form during deformation. Networks of similar molecular weight between cross-links are compared. Two key molecular-level properties are identified - monomer flexibility and polar chemistry - that influence the behavior of the networks. Increasing monomer flexibility reduces the modulus and yield strength, while strong non-covalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonds) that accompany polar moieties provide higher modulus and yield strength. The lack of strong non-covalent interactions in pDCPD was found to account for its lower modulus and yield strength compared to the epoxies. We examine the molecular-level properties of nanovoids, such as shape, alignment, and local stress distribution, as well as the local chemical environment, finding that nanovoid formation and growth are increased by the monomer rigidity but decreased by polar chemistry. As a result, the pDCPD network, which has a stiff chain backbone with nonpolar alkane

  16. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGH-DENSITY CORE IN TAURUS: DYNAMICAL GAS INTERACTION AT THE POSSIBLE SITE OF A MULTIPLE STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starless dense cores eventually collapse dynamically, forming protostars inside them, and the physical properties of the cores determine the nature of the forming protostars. We report ALMA observations of dust continuum emission and molecular rotational lines toward MC27 or L1521F, which is considered to be very close to the first protostellar core phase. We found a few starless high-density cores, one of which has a very high density of ∼107 cm–3, within a region of several hundred AU around a very low-luminosity protostar detected by Spitzer. A very compact bipolar outflow with a dynamical timescale of a few hundred years was found toward the protostar. The molecular line observation shows several cores with an arc-like structure, possibly due to the dynamical gas interaction. These complex structures revealed in the present observations suggest that the initial condition of star formation is highly dynamical in nature, which is considered to be a key factor in understanding fundamental issues of star formation such as the formation of multiple stars and the origin of the initial mass function of stars

  17. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as particle size measurement and (B) uncertainty regarding the variety of (not-necessarily coseismic) physico-chemical processes that may contribute to the observed grain size reduction. Here we study the micromechanics and energy budget of dynamic rock fragmentation under impulsive compressive loads using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite and Westerly Granite coupled with microstructural observations and BET surface area measurements of post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  18. Investigating and Modeling the Thermo-dynamic Impact of Electrolyte Solutions of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate on Prevention of the Formation of Methane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manteghian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Devising methods to prevent hydrate formation is of the important issues in natural gas industry. Since a great deal of money is annually spent on using hydrate inhibitors, identification of new inhibitors with higher degrees of efficacy is economically justifiable. Bearing in mind the significant role of hydrate inhibitors in prevention of natural gas pipelines’ getting blocked, the present study attempts to investigate two compounds of NaCl and Na2SO4 as inhibitors of hydrate methane’s formation so as to respond to “what is the inhibitive thermo-dynamic impact of electrolyte compounds of NaCl and Na2SO4 on the formation of methane hydrate?” To do so, this study not only measures the equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate formation in the presence of electrolyte solutions of NaCl and Na2SO4 and compares the results obtained with the state lacking such inhibitors, but it also assesses the regression and mathematical modeling are utilized within a basic virtual environment in order to propose a model for prediction of thermo-dynamic equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate formation.

  19. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohuui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K.; Persson, Kristin A.

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg2+ -> Mg+), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg+. In contrast, BH4 and BF4 are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  20. Preferential formation of 13C- 18O bonds in carbonate minerals, estimated using first-principles lattice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Eiler, John M.

    2006-05-01

    Equilibrium constants for internal isotopic exchange reactions of the type: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca13C16O3↔Ca13C18O16O2+Ca12C16O3 for individual CO 32- groups in the carbonate minerals calcite (CaCO 3), aragonite (CaCO 3), dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2), magnesite (MgCO 3), witherite (BaCO 3), and nahcolite (NaHCO 3) are calculated using first-principles lattice dynamics. Calculations rely on density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) with norm-conserving planewave pseudopotentials to determine the vibrational frequencies of isotopically substituted crystals. Our results predict an ˜0.4‰ excess of 13C18O16O22- groups in all studied carbonate minerals at room-temperature equilibrium, relative to what would be expected in a stochastic mixture of carbonate isotopologues with the same bulk 13C/ 12C, 18O/ 16O, and 17O/ 16O ratios. The amount of excess 13C18O16O22- decreases with increasing temperature of equilibration, from 0.5‰ at 0 °C to <0.1‰ at 300 °C, suggesting that measurements of multiply substituted isotopologues of carbonate could be used to infer temperatures of ancient carbonate mineral precipitation and alteration events, even where the δ 18O of coexisting fluids is uncertain. The predicted temperature sensitivity of the equilibrium constant is ˜0.003‰/°C at 25 °C. Estimated equilibrium constants for the formation of 13C18O16O22- are remarkably uniform for the variety of minerals studied, suggesting that temperature calibrations will also be applicable to carbonate minerals not studied here without greatly compromising accuracy. A related equilibrium constant for the reaction: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca12C17O16O2↔Ca12C18O17O16O+Ca12C16O3 in calcite indicates formation of 0.1‰ excess 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- at 25 °C. In a conventional phosphoric acid reaction of carbonate to form CO 2 for mass-spectrometric analysis, molecules derived from 13C18O16O22- dominate (˜96%) the mass 47 signal, and 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- contributes most of the remainder (3%). This suggests