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Sample records for antihydrogen formation dynamics

  1. Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.

  2. Formation of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Testera, G; Bonomi, G; Boscolo, I; Brambilla, N; Brusa, R S; Byakov, V M; Cabaret, L; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Castelli, F; Cialdi, S; de Combarieu, M; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Djourelov, N; Doser, M; Drobychev, G; Dupasquier, A; Fabris, D; Ferragut, R; Ferrari, G; Fischer, A; Fontana, A; Forget, P; Formaro, L; Lunardon, M; Gervasini, A; Giammarchi, M G; Gninenko, S N; Gribakin, G; Heyne, R; Hogan, S D; Kellerbauer, A G; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Manuzio, G; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Merkt, F; Moretto, S; Morhard, C; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pari, P; Petracek, V; Prevedelli, M; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Quasso, F; Rohne, O; Pesente, S; Rotondi, A; Stapnes, S; Sillou, D; Stepanov, S V; Stroke, Hinko Henry; Tino, G; Vairo, Antonio; Viesti, G; Walters, H; Warring, U; Zavatarelli, S; Zenoni, A; Zvezhinskij, D S

    2008-01-01

    The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

  3. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with highenergy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature’s fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 1014 for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational be...

  4. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  5. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  6. Alpha Antihydrogen Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Cesar, C L; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wilding, D; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-01

    ALPHA is an experiment at CERN, whose ultimate goal is to perform a precise test of CPT symmetry with trapped antihydrogen atoms. After reviewing the motivations, we discuss our recent progress toward the initial goal of stable trapping of antihydrogen, with some emphasis on particle detection techniques.

  7. Detection of Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Hydomako, Richard Allan

    The ALPHA experiment is an international effort to produce, trap, and perform precision spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen (the bound state of a positron and an antiproton). Based at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN, the ALPHA experiment has recently magnetically confined antihydrogen atoms for the first time. A crucial element in the observation of trapped antihydrogen is ALPHA’s silicon vertexing detector. This detector contains sixty silicon modules arranged in three concentric layers, and is able to determine the three-dimensional location of the annihilation of an antihydrogen atom by reconstructing the trajectories of the produced annihilation products. This dissertation focuses mainly on the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the software algorithms used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks are presented along with the routines used to estimate the annihilation location from the convergence of the identified tracks. It is shown...

  8. Confinement of antihydrogen for 1000 seconds

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kemp, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, made entirely of antiparticles, is believed to be stable, and it is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. We have recently demonstrated trapping of antihydrogen atoms by releasing them after a confinement time of 172 ms. A critical question for future studies is: how long can anti-atoms be trapped? Here we report the observation of anti-atom confinement for 1000 s, extending our earlier results by nearly four orders of magnitude. Our calculations indicate that most of the trapped anti-atoms reach the ground state. Further, we report the first measurement of the energy distribution of trapped antihydrogen which, coupled with detailed comparisons with simulations, provides a key tool for the systematic investigation of trapping dynamics. These advances open up a range of experimental possibilities, including precision studies of CPT symmetry and ...

  9. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gerber, S; Tietje, I C; Allkofer, Y R; Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Testera, G; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Merkt, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Fesel, J V; Nesteruk, K P; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  10. Antiparticle sources for antihydrogen production and trapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, M.; Bruun Andresen, Gorm; Ashkezari, M. D.;

    2011-01-01

    Sources of positrons and antiprotons that are currently used for the formation of antihydrogen with low kinetic energies are reviewed, mostly in the context of the ALPHA collaboration and its predecessor ATHENA. The experiments were undertaken at the Antiproton Decelerator facility, which...

  11. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Bray, Crystal C; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayano, Ryugo S; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  12. ERC supports antihydrogen research

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    As part of a Europe-wide effort to promote high-level research, the European Research Council (ERC) has awarded a €2.14 million grant to ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst, which will further the collaboration’s study of the antihydrogen spectrum. The grant will be used to purchase laser spectroscopy equipment for the new ALPHA-2 set-up.   ALPHA Spokesperson, Jeffrey Hangst, in front of the new ALPHA-2 set-up. The incorporation of lasers into ALPHA-2 will allow the team to take precise measurements of trapped antihydrogen. Among the new equipment financed by the grant will be a high-precision laser and stabilisation system to study the transition from the ground state to the first excited state in antihydrogen. As this spectral line is very well known in hydrogen, its study in antihydrogen will provide essential data for matter/antimatter symmetry investigations. “The grant has come at a perfect time for us,” says Jeffrey Hangst. “We wil...

  13. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, Glenn Delfosse, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e+e/sp- pair creation near a nucleus with the e+ being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  14. Towards Antihydrogen Confinement with the ALPHA Antihydrogen Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2006-01-01

    ALPHA is an international project that has recently begun experimentation at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms with the ultimate goal of precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  15. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  16. Antihydrogen makes a fleeting debut

    CERN Multimedia

    Goss Levi, B

    1996-01-01

    The generation of antihydrogens by merging positrons and antiprotons at the CERN laboratory lasted only for 37 ns before they were destroyed by electrons in the detector. There was insufficient time for comparing the antimatter with hydrogen.

  17. Towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, J [CERN-EP/APE, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Fendel, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Herrmann, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Koenig, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pahl, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pittner, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schatz, B [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Haensch, T W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2003-02-14

    Cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap will open up a fascinating field of very precise CPT tests by ultrahigh-resolution laser spectroscopy. Equally exciting is the prospect for experiments on the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. For both types of experiment it is of great importance to have antihydrogen as cold as possible. Laser cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1S-2P transition at Lyman-{alpha} (121.56 nm). The highest cooling efficiency, lowest temperature, and best magnetic sublevel selectivity is expected for continuous coherent radiation. We present an account of the first source for continuous coherent radiation at Lyman-{alpha} and discuss possible applications in experiments with antihydrogen.

  18. Antihydrogen Production and Precision Experiments The ATHENA Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Filippini, V

    2002-01-01

    The ATHENA (AnTiHydrogEN Apparatus) experiment has the goal of producing slow antihydrogen atoms and comparing their physical properties to those of hydrogen. For example, the measurement of the 1S-2S transition offers the possibility for comparing hydrogen and antihydrogen to a precision of 1 part in 10$^{15}$, owing to the long lifetime of the metastable 2S state (122 msec). This would be the most precise test of CPT invariance in the lepton and baryon sector. The first phase of the experiment, which has been installed and commissioned at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - is devoted to the study of antihydrogen production. For this purpose, about 10$^{5}$ antiprotons (p=100 MeV/c ) are trapped and cooled to milli-eV energies. Independently, about 10$^{8}$ low energy positrons per minute are collected in the positron accumulator, using a Na-22 source (2 GBq). Formation of antihydrogen will take place in the recombination region, where the antiproton cloud is made to interact with the dense positron plasma tr...

  19. Laser excitation of Antihydrogen in ALPHA

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Animation of how a trapped antihydrogen atom is excited by two photons from the 1S to the 2S state in antihydrogen, and further photo-ionised by a third foton. The first part of the movie shows how antihydrogen is made and captured in a magnetic minimum trap.

  20. The ALPHA Experiment a Cold Antihydrogen Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D; Gomberoff, K; Grote, D P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jenkins, M; Jørgensen, L V; Madsen, N; Miranda, D; Nolan, P; Ochanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Posada, L G C; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Telle, H H; Vay, J L; Wurtele, J; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-01-01

    The ALPHA experiment aims to trap antihydrogen as the next crucial step towards a precise CPT test, by a spectroscopic comparison of antihydrogen with hydrogen. The experiment will retain the salient techniques developed by the ATHENA collaboration during the previous phase of antihydrogen experiments at the antiproton decelerator (AD) at CERN. The collaboration has identified the key problems in adding a neutral antiatom trap to the previously developed experimental configuration. The solutions identified by ALPHA are described in this paper.

  1. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Fujiwara, M C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  2. ATHENA: an actual antihydrogen annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This is an image of an actual matter-antimatter annihilation due to an atom of antihydrogen in the ATHENA experiment, located on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN since 2001. The antiproton produces four charged pions (yellow) whose positions are given by silicon microstrips (pink) before depositing energy in CsI crystals (yellow cubes). The positron also annihilates to produce back-to-back gamma rays (red).

  3. Tests of fundamental symmetries with trapped antihydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Chris Ørum

    2016-01-01

    Antihydrogen is the simplest pure antimatter atomic system, and it allows for direct tests of CPT symmetry as well as the weak equivalence principle. Furthermore the study of antihydrogen may provide clues to the matter- antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe - one of the major unanswered ...

  4. ATRAP on the road to cold antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The ATRAP collaboration has succeeded in slowing down antiprotons with positrons, the two ingredients of antihydrogen atoms. This is an important step towards capturing and studying antihydrogen. Members of the ATRAP Collaboration with the apparatus that first demonstrated positron cooling. It was in extremis. Last December, during the six short hours of beam remaining to them, ATRAP researchers achieved their initial goal. For the first time, positrons were used to cool antiprotons. To what end, you may ask? The answer is much simpler than the process: physicists think that this is the most effective means of observing antihydrogen. Recall that an antihydrogen atom is composed of an antiproton and a positron. The first atoms of antihydrogen were produced five years ago at LEAR. But their small number and the brevity of their existence made it impossible to study them in depth. However, to understand the subtle nuances between matter and antimatter, which would explain the imbalance in nature between the tw...

  5. Production of antihydrogen via double charge exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muellers, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition of antihydrogen confined in a neutral atom trap and comparison with the equivalent spectral line in hydrogen will provide an accurate test of CPT symmetry and the first one in a mixed baryon-lepton system. Also, with neutral antihydrogen atoms, the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter can be tested unperturbed by the much stronger Coulomb forces. Antihydrogen is regularly produced at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator by three-body-recombination (TBR) of one antiproton and two positrons. The method requires injecting antiprotons into a cloud of positrons, which raises the average temperature of the antihydrogen atoms produced way above the typical 0.5 K trap depths of neutral atom traps. Therefore only very few antihydrogen atoms can be confined at a time. Precision measurements, like laser spectroscopy, will greatly benefit from larger numbers of simultaneously trapped antihydrogen atoms. Therefore, the ATRAP collaboration developed a different production method that has the potential to create much larger numbers of cold, trappable antihydrogen atoms. Positrons and antiprotons are stored and cooled in a Penning trap in close proximity. Laser excited cesium atoms collide with the positrons, forming Rydberg positronium, a bound state of an electron and a positron. The positronium atoms are no longer confined by the electric potentials of the Penning trap and some drift into the neighboring cloud of antiprotons where, in a second charge exchange collision, they form antihydrogen. The antiprotons remain at rest during the entire process, so much larger numbers of trappable antihydrogen atoms can be produced. Laser excitation is necessary to increase the efficiency of the process since the cross sections for charge-exchange collisions scale with the fourth power of the principal quantum number n. This method, named double charge-exchange, was demonstrated by ATRAP in 2004. Since then, ATRAP constructed a new

  6. Whispering Gallery States of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Voronin, A Yu; Reynaud, S

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the motion of an antihydrogen atom ($\\bar{H}$) near a curved material surface. We predict existence of $\\bar{H}$ atom long-living quasistationary states, localized near the surface due to quantum reflection from the Casimir-Polder/van der Waals potential. Such states are an atom-wave analog of the whispering gallery modes, known in acoustics, optics and neutron physics. We argue that the whispering gallery states of $\\bar{H}$ atoms could be regarded as a full analog of recently predicted gravitational states of $\\bar{H}$, where the centrifugal potential plays a role of the linear gravitational potential.

  7. Towards Antihydrogen Trapping and Spectroscopy at ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Eoin; Ashkezari, Mohammad D; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Bray, Crystal C; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayano, Ruyugo S; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopy of antihydrogen has the potential to yield high-precision tests of the CPT theorem and shed light on the matter-antimatter imbalance in the Universe. The ALPHA antihydrogen trap at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator aims to prepare a sample of antihydrogen atoms confined in an octupole-based Ioffe trap and to measure the frequency of several atomic transitions. We describe our techniques to directly measure the antiproton temperature and a new technique to cool them to below 10 K. We also show how our unique position-sensitive annihilation detector provides us with a highly sensitive method of identifying antiproton annihilations and effectively rejecting the cosmic-ray background.

  8. Getting to grips with antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, the ALPHA Collaboration announced that they had successfully managed to trap and hold atoms of antimatter for 1000 seconds. Last week they announced that their success in changing the internal state of antihydrogen and made the first ever measurement of its spectrum. The Collaboration is now installing an all-new experimental set-up – ALPHA-2 – and shows no signs of slowing down its investigations into the anti-world.   The ALPHA experiment hall. Newspapers and magazines around the world described the recent ALPHA announcement as the first step towards explaining why antimatter and matter did not cancel each other out in the first instances of creation, that is, why our universe of matter exists. Understanding the behaviour of matter and antimatter can help scientists solve this conundrum. With this in mind, the ALPHA collaboration has begun the study of the antihydrogen spectrum. So far, the Collaboration has been focused on proving that they can alter the ...

  9. The ASACUSA CUSP: an antihydrogen experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Ulmer, S. [RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit (Japan); Murtagh, D. J.; Gorp, S. Van [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory (Japan); Nagata, Y. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Diermaier, M. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); Federmann, S. [CERN (Switzerland); Leali, M. [Università di Brescia & Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l’Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Malbrunot, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Mascagna, V. [Università di Brescia & Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l’Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Massiczek, O. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); Michishio, K. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Mizutani, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Mohri, A. [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Sciences (Japan); Nagahama, H.; Ohtsuka, M. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Radics, B. [RIKEN, Atomic Physics Laboratory (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter (Japan); Sauerzopf, C.; Suzuki, K. [Boltzmangasse 3, Stefan Meyer Institut für Subatomare Physik (Austria); and others

    2015-11-15

    In order to test CPT symmetry between antihydrogen and its counterpart hydrogen, the ASACUSA collaboration plans to perform high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen atom in-flight. We have developed an apparatus (“cusp trap”) which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and multiple ring electrodes. For the preparation of slow antiprotons and positrons, Penning-Malmberg type traps were utilized. The spectrometer line was positioned downstream of the cusp trap. At the end of the beamline, an antihydrogen beam detector was located, which comprises an inorganic Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) single-crystal scintillator housed in a vacuum duct and surrounding plastic scintillators. A significant fraction of antihydrogen atoms flowing out the cusp trap were detected.

  10. Physics: Optical transition seen in antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of antimatter systems might cast light on why the Universe is dominated by matter. The observation of a transition in an antihydrogen atom heralds the next wave of high-precision antimatter studies. See Letter p.506

  11. AEgIS antihydrogen production trap

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    During technical stop 2017 the AEgIS experiment was open for upgrades and maintenance. We had the opportunity to take some 360 images from inside and see where antiprotons are ¨trapped¨ and anti-Hydrogen produced.

  12. Progress towards microwave spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision comparisons of hyperfine intervals in atomic hydrogen and antihydrogen are expected to yield experimental tests of the CPT theorem. The CERN-based ALPHA collaboration has initiated a program of study focused on microwave spectroscopy of trapped ground-state antihydrogen atoms. This paper outlines some of the proposed experiments, and summarizes measurements that characterize microwave fields that have been injected into the ALPHA apparatus.

  13. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, M3J 1P3 Ontario (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, V5A 1S6 British Columbia (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Little, A.; So, C.; Zhmoginov, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, SA2 8PP Swansea (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Daresbury Laboratory, Cockcroft Institute, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941 (Brazil); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Isaac, C. A.; Madsen, N.; Napoli, S. C.; Shields, C. R. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, SA2 8PP Swansea (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2013-04-15

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms are commonly produced by mixing antiprotons and positrons stored in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap, which was achieved in ALPHA by an autoresonant excitation of the antiprotons, injecting them into the positron plasma. In this work, a hybrid numerical model is developed to simulate antiproton and positron dynamics during the mixing process. The simulation is benchmarked against other numerical and analytic models, as well as experimental measurements. The autoresonant injection scheme and an alternative scheme are compared numerically over a range of plasma parameters which can be reached in current and upcoming antihydrogen experiments, and the latter scheme is seen to offer significant improvement in trapping yield as the number of available antiprotons increases.

  14. Trapped Antihydrogen in Its Ground State

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D W; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Mullers, A; Walz, J

    2012-01-01

    Antihydrogen atoms are confined in an Ioffe trap for 15 to 1000 seconds -- long enough to ensure that they reach their ground state. Though reproducibility challenges remain in making large numbers of cold antiprotons and positrons interact, 5 +/- 1 simultaneously-confined ground state atoms are produced and observed on average, substantially more than previously reported. Increases in the number of simultaneously trapped antithydrogen atoms H are critical if laser-cooling of trapped antihydrogen is to be demonstrated, and spectroscopic studies at interesting levels of precision are to be carried out.

  15. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  16. Cold Antihydrogen for Precise Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gabrielse, G S; Walz, J; Tan, J; Oelert, W; George, M C; Grzonka, D J; Kossick, M; Storry, C H; Hessels, E A; Sefzick, T

    2002-01-01

    %AD-2 %title\\\\ \\\\The Antihydrogen TRAP Collaboration (ATRAP) seeks to do precise laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen. Comparisons of antihydrogen and hydrogen atoms should provide the most stringent test of CPT invariance involving baryons and leptons. ATRAP is an expansion of the TRAP collaboration that developed the techniques to take CERN antiprotons from an energy of 6 MeV (momentum 100 MeV/c) all the way down to thermal equilibrium at 4 K for storage. This storage energy is lower than realized previously by more than ten orders of magnitude. The TRAP techniques include slowing, capturing, electron cooling and stacking of antiprotons. ATRAP and other collaborations will use antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD). This new facility makes sense for such experiments because we showed that antiprotons can be accumulated in a trap at much lower expense than was required in the earlier CERN AC-AA-LEAR complex. In the closest approach yet to the production of cold antihydrogen, collaboration members wer...

  17. Antihydrogen atoms may have been drifters

    CERN Multimedia

    Reich, Eugenie Samuel

    2003-01-01

    "It is a mystery of cosmic proportions: why is the universe filled with matter and not antimatter? Physicists hoping to find the answer have been left scratching their heads this week by an analysis which claims that some antihydrogen atoms created last year may not be normal antiatoms after all. Instead, they may sit on the blurry line between atoms and plasma" (1 page)

  18. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  19. Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lai, W; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  20. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  1. Current progress in laser cooling of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Luschevskaya, E V

    2014-01-01

    We talk about laser cooling methods of $\\bar{H} (H)$ and experimental achievements in this area. The Lyman-$\\alpha$ transition $1S\\rightarrow 2P$ is the most suitable one for this purpose due to small lifetime of $2P$ state and insignificant ionization losses at this wavelength. However the pulsed and continuous laser sources of Lyman-$\\alpha$ wavelength do not have enough power for fast cooling. The absence of powefull sources of Lyman-$\\alpha$ irradiation is a technical problem associated with the complexity of four-wave mixing scheme used for irradiation generation. Another problem of $\\bar{H} (H)$ laser cooling is large recoil energy which prevents cooling to submiliKelvin range by simple methods. The alternative way could be in use of other spectral transitions in (anti)hydrogen, new laser cooling methods or even other cooling schemes such as boofer or sympathetic cooling. In this paper we also discuss the applicability of sympathetic cooling for the antihydrogen case. The exploration of antihydrogen and...

  2. The effect of an anti-hydrogen bond on Fermi resonance:A Raman spectroscopic study of the Fermi doublet v1-v12 of liquid pyridine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Dong-Fei; Gao Shu-Qin; Sun Cheng-Lin; Li Zuo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The effects of an anti-hydrogen bond on the v1-v12 Fermi resonance (FR) of pyridine are experimentally investigated by using Raman scattering spectroscopy.Three systems,pyridine/water,pyridine/formamide,and pyridine/carbon tetrachloride,provide varying degrees of strength for the diluent-pyridine anti-hydrogen bond complex.Water forms a stronger anti-hydrogen bond with pyridine than with formamide,and in the case of adding non-polar solvent carbon tetrachloride,which is neither a hydrogen bond donor nor an acceptor and incapable of forming a hydrogen bond with pyridine,the intermolecular distance of pyridine will increase and the interaction of pyridine molecules will reduce.The dilution studies are performed on the three systems.Comparing with the values of the Fermi coupling coefficient W of the ring breathing mode v1 and triangle mode v12 of pyridine at different volume concentrations,which are calculated according to the Bertran equations,in three systems,we find that the solution with the strongest anti-hydrogen bond,water,shows the fastest change in thev1-v12 Fermi coupling coefficient W with the volume concentration varying,followed by the formamide and carbon tetrachloride solutions.These results suggest that the stronger anti-hydrogen bond-forming effect will cause a greater reduction in the strength of the v1-v12 FR of pyridine.According to the mechanism of the formation of an anti-hydrogen bond in the complexes and the FR theory,a qualitative explanation for the anti-hydrogen bond effect in reducing the strength of the v1 - v12 FR of pyridine is given.

  3. Cold antihydrogen: a new frontier in fundamental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N

    2010-01-01

    The year 2002 heralded a breakthrough in antimatter research when the first low energy antihydrogen atoms were produced. Antimatter has inspired both science and fiction writers for many years, but detailed studies have until now eluded science. Antimatter is notoriously difficult to study as it does not readily occur in nature, even though our current understanding of the laws of physics have us expecting that it should make up half of the universe. The pursuit of cold antihydrogen is driven by a desire to solve this profound mystery. This paper will motivate the current effort to make cold antihydrogen, explain how antihydrogen is currently made, and how and why we are attempting to trap it. It will also discuss what kind of measurements are planned to gain new insights into the unexplained asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the universe.

  4. Cold antihydrogen: a new frontier in fundamental physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Niels

    2010-08-13

    The year 2002 heralded a breakthrough in antimatter research when the first low energy antihydrogen atoms were produced. Antimatter has inspired both science and fiction writers for many years, but detailed studies have until now eluded science. Antimatter is notoriously difficult to study as it does not readily occur in nature, even though our current understanding of the laws of physics have us expecting that it should make up half of the universe. The pursuit of cold antihydrogen is driven by a desire to solve this profound mystery. This paper will motivate the current effort to make cold antihydrogen, explain how antihydrogen is currently made, and how and why we are attempting to trap it. It will also discuss what kind of measurements are planned to gain new insights into the unexplained asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the universe.

  5. Alternative method for reconstruction of antihydrogen annihilation vertices

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Andresen , G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    The ALPHA experiment, located at CERN, aims to compare the properties of antihydrogen atoms with those of hydrogen atoms. The neutral antihydrogen atoms are trapped using an octupole magnetic trap. The trap region is surrounded by a three layered silicon detector used to reconstruct the antiproton annihilation vertices. This paper describes a method we have devised that can be used for reconstructing annihilation vertices with a good resolution and is more efficient than the standard method currently used for the same purpose.

  6. CERN experiment provides first glimpse inside cold antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The ATRAP experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has detected and measured large numbers of cold antihydrogen atoms. Relying on ionization of the cold antiatoms when they pass through a strong electric field gradient, the ATRAP measurement provides the first glimpse inside an antiatom, and the first information about the physics of antihydrogen. The results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  7. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia.

  8. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Chaves

    Full Text Available Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia.

  9. Antimatter Plasmas in a Multipole Trap for Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Telle, H H; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated storage of plasmas of the charged constituents of the antihydrogen atom, antiprotons and positrons, in a Penning trap surrounded by a minimum-B magnetic trap designed for holding neutral antiatoms. The neutral trap comprises a superconducting octupole and two superconducting, solenoidal mirror coils. We have measured the storage lifetimes of antiproton and positron plasmas in the combined Penning-neutral trap, and compared these to lifetimes without the neutral trap fields. The magnetic well depth was 0.6 T, deep enough to trap ground state antihydrogen atoms of up to about 0.4 K in temperature. We have demonstrated that both particle species can be stored for times long enough to permit antihydrogen production and trapping studies.

  10. Antihydrogen physics: gravitation and spectroscopy in AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Ferragut, R; Stroke, H H; Dassa, L; Rohne, O; Hogan, S D; Cialdi, S; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Formaro, L; Sandaker, H; Testera, G; Stepanov, S V; Folegati, P; Morhard, C; Warring, U; Prelz, F; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Consolati, G; Ferrari, G; Lagomarsino, V; Krasnicky, D; Drobychev, G; Giammarchi, M G; Heyne, R; Zenoni, A; Castelli, F; Mariazzi, S; Cabaret, L; Fischer, A; Boscolo, I; Sillou, D; Villa, F; Perini, D; Djourelov, N; Zavatarelli, S; Oberthaler, M K; Manuzio, G; Carraro, C; Matveev, V A; Jorgensen, L V; Nedelec, P; Prevedelli, M; Comparat, D; Dupasquier, A; Turbabin, A V; Zvezhinskij, D S; Fontana, A; Kellerbauer, A; Canali, C; Dudarev, A; Petracek, V; Riccardi, C; Nebbia, G; Gninenko, S N; Brusa, R S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Calloni, A; Doser, M; Byakov, V M; Quasso, F; Trezzi, D

    2011-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter experiment: gravity, interferometry, spectroscopy) is an experiment approved by CERN with the goal of studying antihydrogen physics. In AEgIS, antihydrogen will be produced by charge exchange reactions of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms excited in a Rydberg state (n > 20). In the first phase of the experiment, controlled acceleration by an electric field gradient (Stark effect) and subsequent measurement of free fall in a Moire deflectometer will allow a test of the weak equivalence principle. In a second phase, the antihydrogen will be slowed, confined, and laser-cooled to perform CPT studies and detailed spectroscopy. In the present work, after a general description of the experiment, the present status of advancement will be reviewed, with special attention to the production and excitation of positronium atoms.

  11. Antihydrogen annihilation reconstruction with the ALPHA silicon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D.R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Hayano, R S; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2012-01-01

    The ALPHA experiment has succeeded in trapping antihydrogen, a major milestone on the road to spectroscopic comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen. An annihilation vertex detector, which determines the time and position of antiproton annihilations, has been central to this achievement. This detector, an array of double-sided silicon microstrip detector modules arranged in three concentric cylindrical tiers, is sensitive to the passage of charged particles resulting from antiproton annihilation. This article describes the method used to reconstruct the annihilation location and to distinguish the annihilation signal from the cosmic ray background. Recent experimental results using this detector are outlined.

  12. Quantum Reflection of Antihydrogen in the GBAR Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Gabriel; Lambrecht, Astrid; Nesvizhevsky, Valery; Reynaud, Serge; Voronin, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    In the GBAR experiment, cold antihydrogen atoms will be left to fall on an annihilation plate with the aim of measuring the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Here, we study the quantum reflection of these antiatoms due to the Casimir-Polder potential above the plate. We give realistic estimates of the potential and quantum reflection amplitudes, taking into account the specificities of antihydrogen and the optical properties of the plate. We find that quantum reflection is enhanced for weaker potentials, for example above thin slabs, graphene and nanoporous media.

  13. Observation of Hyperfine Transitions in Trapped Ground-State Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Olin, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the first observation of stimulated magnetic resonance transitions between the hyperfine levels of trapped ground state atomic antihydrogen, confirming its presence in the ALPHA apparatus. Our observations show that these transitions are consistent with the values in hydrogen to within 4~parts~in~$10^3$. Simulations of the trapped antiatoms in a microwave field are consistent with our measurements.

  14. European scientists produce - and measure - atoms of antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    Koppel, N

    2002-01-01

    "Scientists working on an experiment called ATRAP at the European Particle Physics Laboratory, or CERN, said Tuesday that they were able to register the creation of antihydrogen atoms at the moment when they were destroyed again. The results are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  15. An experimental limit on the charge of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Tharp, T D; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Vendeiro, Z; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I; Charman, A E

    2014-01-01

    The properties of antihydrogen are expected to be identical to those of hydrogen, and any differences would constitute a profound challenge to the fundamental theories of physics. The most commonly discussed antiatom-based tests of these theories are searches for antihydrogen-hydrogen spectral differences (tests of CPT (charge-parity-time) invariance) or gravitational differences (tests of the weak equivalence principle). Here we, the ALPHA Collaboration, report a different and somewhat unusual test of CPT and of quantum anomaly cancellation. A retrospective analysis of the influence of electric fields on antihydrogen atoms released from the ALPHA trap finds a mean axial deflection of 4.1±3.4 mm for an average axial electric field of 0.51 V mm−1. Combined with extensive numerical modelling, this measurement leads to a bound on the charge Qe of antihydrogen of Q=(−1.3±1.1±0.4) × 10−8. Here, e is the unit charge, and the errors are from statistics and systematic effects.

  16. Extrasolar planets formation, detection and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    This latest, up-to-date resource for research on extrasolar planets covers formation, dynamics, atmospheres and detection. After a look at the formation of giant planets, the book goes on to discuss the formation and dynamics of planets in resonances, planets in double stars, atmospheres and habitable zones, detection via spectra and transits, and the history and prospects of ESPs as well as satellite projects.Edited by a renowned expert in solar system dynamics with chapters written by the leading experts in the method described -- from the US and Europe -- this is an ideal textbook for g

  17. Production of relativistic antihydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Charles T.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    1994-04-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms, the bound state (p¯e+), can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton that passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus of charge Z will create e+e- pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound rather than a continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is calculated to be ~4Z2 pb for antiproton momenta above 6 GeV/c. The gas target of Fermilab Accumulator experiment E760 has already produced ~34 unobserved antihydrogen atoms, and a sample of ~760 is expected in 1995 from the successive experiment E835. No other source of antihydrogen exists. A simple method for detecting relativistic antihydrogen is proposed and a method outlined of measuring the antihydrogen Lamb shift to ~1%.

  18. Design of a Radial TPC for Antihydrogen Gravity Measurement with ALPHA-g

    CERN Document Server

    Capra, Andrea; Bishop, Daryl; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Freeman, Skyler; Gill, David; Grant, Matthew; Henderson, Robert; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Lu, Philip; Menary, Scott; Olchanski, Konstantin; Retiere, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational interaction of antimatter and matter has never been directly probed. ALPHA-g is a novel experiment that aims to perform the first measurement of the antihydrogen gravitational mass. A fundamental requirement for this new apparatus is a position sensitive particle detector around the antihydrogen trap which provides information about antihydrogen annihilation location. The proposed detector is a radial Time Projection Chamber, or \\textit{rTPC}, whose concept is being developed at TRIUMF. A simulation of the detector and the development of the reconstruction software, used to determine the antihydrogen annihilation point, is presented alongside with the expected performance of the rTPC.

  19. Dynamic formation control for autonomous underwater vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕雪峰; 古锋; 宋琛; 胡晓琳; 潘毅

    2014-01-01

    Path planning and formation structure forming are two of the most important problems for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to collaborate with each other. In this work, a dynamic formation model was proposed, in which several algorithms were developed for the complex underwater environment. Dimension changeable particle swarm algorithm was used to find an optimized path by dynamically adjusting the number and the distribution of the path nodes. Position relationship based obstacle avoidance algorithm was designed to detour along the edges of obstacles. Virtual potential point based formation-keeping algorithm was employed by incorporating dynamic strategies which were decided by the current states of the formation. The virtual potential point was used to keep the formation structure when the AUV or the formation was deviated. Simulation results show that an optimal path can be dynamically planned with fewer path nodes and smaller fitness, even with a concave obstacle. It has been also proven that different formation-keeping strategies can be adaptively selected and the formation can change its structure in a narrow area and restore back after passing the obstacle.

  20. A semiconductor laser system for the production of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Mullers, A; Kolbe, D; Diehl, T; Koglbauer, A; Sattler, M; Stappel, M; Steinborn, R; Walz, J; Gabrielse, G; Kalra, R; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R P; Richerme, P; Fitzakerley, D W; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W

    2012-01-01

    Laser-controlled charge exchange is a promising method for producing cold antihydrogen. Caesium atoms in Rydberg states collide with positrons and create positronium. These positronium atoms then interact with antiprotons, forming antihydrogen. Laser excitation of the caesium atoms is essential to increase the cross section of the charge-exchange collisions. This method was demonstrated in 2004 by the ATRAP collaboration by using an available copper vapour laser. For a second generation of charge-exchange experiments we have designed a new semiconductor laser system that features several improvements compared to the copper vapour laser. We describe this new laser system and show the results from the excitation of caesium atoms to Rydberg states within the strong magnetic fields in the ATRAP apparatus.

  1. Emulsion detectors for the antihydrogen detection in AEgIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistillo, C., E-mail: ciro.pistillo@cern.ch [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (Switzerland); Aghion, S. [Politecnico of Milano (Italy); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (Switzerland); Belov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Heidelberg University, Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics (Germany); Bremer, J. [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Brusa, R. S. [University of Trento, Department of Physics (Italy); Cabaret, L. [University of Paris-Sud, Laboratory Aim Cotton, CNRS (France); Caccia, M. [INFN Milano (Italy); Caravita, R. [University of Genova, Department of Physics (Italy); Castelli, F. [INFN Milano (Italy); Cerchiari, G. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Chlouba, K. [Czech Technical University (Czech Republic); Cialdi, S. [INFN Milano (Italy); Comparat, D. [University of Paris-Sud, Laboratory Aim Cotton, CNRS (France); Consolati, G. [Politecnico of Milano (Italy); Demetrio, A. [Heidelberg University, Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics (Germany); and others

    2015-08-15

    The AEgIS experiment at CERN aims to perform the first direct measurement of gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter by measuring the deviation of a cold antihydrogen beam in the Earth gravitational field. The design of the experiment has been recently updated to include emulsion films as position sensitive detector. The submicrometric position accuracy of emulsions leads indeed to a significant improvement of the experimental sensitivity. We present results of preliminary tests and discuss perspectives for the final measurement.

  2. ALPHA experiment : limit on the charge of antihydrogen atom

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists due to its apparent absence in the observable universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter should have appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Stan- dard Model offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half of the universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms1–4 of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter.

  3. Dynamics of sheet nacre formation in bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Marthe; Meibom, Anders; Gèze, Marc; Bourrat, Xavier; Angellier, Martine; Lopez, Evelyne

    2009-03-01

    Formation of nacre (mother-of-pearl) is a biomineralization process of fundamental scientific as well as industrial importance. However, the dynamics of the formation process is still not understood. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and high spatial resolution ion microprobe depth-profiling to image the full three-dimensional distribution of organic materials around individual tablets in the top-most layer of forming nacre in bivalves. Nacre formation proceeds by lateral, symmetric growth of individual tablets mediated by a growth-ring rich in organics, in which aragonite crystallizes from amorphous precursors. The pivotal role in nacre formation played by the growth-ring structure documented in this study adds further complexity to a highly dynamical biomineralization process.

  4. Strong Equivalence, Lorentz and CPT Violation, Anti-Hydrogen Spectroscopy and Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, G M

    2004-01-01

    The strong equivalence principle, local Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry are fundamental ingredients of the quantum field theories used to describe elementary particle physics. Nevertheless, each may be violated by simple modifications to the dynamics while apparently preserving the essential fundamental structure of quantum field theory itself. In this paper, we analyse the construction of strong equivalence, Lorentz and CPT violating Lagrangians for QED and review and propose some experimental tests in the fields of astrophysical polarimetry and precision atomic spectroscopy. In particular, modifications of the Maxwell action predict a birefringent rotation of the direction of linearly polarised radiation from synchrotron emission which may be studied using radio galaxies or, potentially, gamma-ray bursts. In the Dirac sector, changes in atomic energy levels are predicted which may be probed in precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen atoms, notably in the Doppler-free, two-photon $1s-2s$ and...

  5. Spectroscopy Apparatus for the Measurement of The Hyperfine Structure of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Malbrunot, C; Diermaier, M; Dilaver, N; Friedreich, S; Kolbinger, B; Lehner, S; Lundmark, R; Massiczek, O; Radics, B; Sauerzopf, C; Simon, M; Widmann, E; Wolf, M; Wunschek, B; Zmeskal, J

    2014-01-01

    The ASACUSA CUSP collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN is planning to measure the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using an atomic spectroscopy beamline. We describe here the latest developments on the spectroscopy apparatus developed to be coupled to the antihydrogen production setup (CUSP).

  6. Experimental and computational study of the injection of antiprotons into a positron plasma for antihydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M.D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of synthesizing and trapping antihydrogen is to study the validity of charge-parity-time symmetry through precision spectroscopy on the anti-atoms, but the trapping yield achieved in recent experiments must be significantly improved before this can be realized. Antihydrogen atoms...

  7. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Gomberoff, K; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  8. The dynamics of group formation among leeches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eBisson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Leeches exploring a new environment continuously meet each other and merge in temporary groups. After 2-3 hours, leeches become attracted to each other eventually forming a large and stable group. When their number is reduced, leeches remain solitary, behaving independently. Group formation is facilitated by body injection of serotonin (5-HT and the level of endogenous 5-HT is elevated in leeches forming a large group. In contrast, intravenous injection of 5-HT antagonists prevented injected leeches from joining a large group of conspecifics. When sensilla near the head were ablated or the supraesophageal ganglion disconnected, leeches remained solitary, but explored the environment swimming and crawling. These results suggest that group formation is initiated by a release of 5-HT triggered by sensilla stimulation and its dynamics can be explained by the establishment of a reinforcement dynamics, as observed during human group formation. As 5-HT affects social interactions also in humans, group formation in leeches and humans share a similar dynamics and hormonal control.

  9. Antihydrogen Production in $ \\bar{p} $ Z - interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS210 \\\\ \\\\ The production of the antihydrogen atom $ \\bar {H}^0 \\equiv \\bar{p}e $ as the simplest atomic bound state of antimatter has been studied. Nine $ \\bar {H}^0 $ have been observed.\\\\ \\\\ The production of $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is predominantly mediated by the two-photon mechanism in the antiproton-nucleus interaction. In principle $ \\bar {H}^0 $ is well suited for investigations of fundamental CPT violation studies under different forces, however, in the present experiment we concentrated on the production of this antimatter object, since so far it never had been observed.

  10. Status Report: A Detector for Measuring the Ground State Hyperfine Splitting of Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kolbinger, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN aims to measure the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen. A Rabi-like spectrometer line has been built for this purpose. A detector for counting antihydrogen is located at the end of the beam line. This contribution will focus on the tracking detector, whose challenging task it is to discriminate between background events and antiproton annihilations originating from antihydrogen atoms which are produced only in small amounts.

  11. In-beam measurement of the hydrogen hypernine splitting - towards antihydrogen spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Diermaier, M.; Kolbinger, B.; Malbrunot, C.; Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M.C.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E.

    2016-01-01

    Antihydrogen, the lightest atom consisting purely of antimatter, is an ideal laboratory to study the CPT symmetry by comparison to hydrogen. With respect to absolute precision, transitions within the ground-state hyperfine structure (GS-HFS) are most appealing by virtue of their small energy separation. ASACUSA proposed employing a beam of cold antihydrogen atoms in a Rabi-type experiment to determine the GS-HFS in a field-free region. Here we present a measurement of the zero-field hydrogen GS-HFS using the spectroscopy apparatus of ASACUSA's antihydrogen experiment. The measured value of $\

  12. Spacecraft formation flying: Dynamics, control and navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfriend, Kyle Terry; Vadali, Srinivas Rao; Gurfil, Pini; How, Jonathan; Breger, Louis S.

    2009-12-01

    Space agencies are now realizing that much of what has previously been achieved using hugely complex and costly single platform projects - large unmanned and manned satellites (including the present International Space Station) - can be replaced by a number of smaller satellites networked together. The key challenge of this approach, namely ensuring the proper formation flying of multiple craft, is the topic of this second volume in Elsevier's Astrodynamics Series, Spacecraft Formation Flying: Dynamics, control and navigation. In this unique text, authors Alfriend et al. provide a coherent discussion of spacecraft relative motion, both in the unperturbed and perturbed settings, explain the main control approaches for regulating relative satellite dynamics, using both impulsive and continuous maneuvers, and present the main constituents required for relative navigation. The early chapters provide a foundation upon which later discussions are built, making this a complete, standalone offering. Intended for graduate students, professors and academic researchers in the fields of aerospace and mechanical engineering, mathematics, astronomy and astrophysics, Spacecraft Formation Flying is a technical yet accessible, forward-thinking guide to this critical area of astrodynamics.

  13. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  14. The dynamics of travertine terrace formation

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, O; Jamtveit, B; Dysthe, Dag K.; Hammer, Oyvind; Jamtveit, Bjorn

    2006-01-01

    Travertine (limestone) terraces are common in caves, springs and rivers worldwide, and represent one of the most striking examples of geological pattern formation on the Earth's surface. The terraces form over a wide range of scales, from millimeters to tens of meters. Their origin has been poorly understood, but most likely involves a coupling between the precipitation rate and hydrodynamics. Microbial activity may also play a role. Here we present a minimal model based on shallow water flow and an empirical positive correlation between the flow velocity and precipitation rate. The resulting selforganizing pattern formation process displays rich and unusual dynamics, consistent with field observations. Terraces coarsen with time, fold into lobes and migrate downstream with differential rates, resulting in striking patterns. This model, in which topography grows rather than erodes in response to rapid flow, produces patterns that are completely different from those generated by flow driven erosion.

  15. Dynamical Models of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lunine, Jonathan I; Raymond, Sean N; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Quinn, Thomas; Graps, Amara

    2009-01-01

    We review the problem of the formation of terrestrial planets, with particular emphasis on the interaction of dynamical and geochemical models. The lifetime of gas around stars in the process of formation is limited to a few million years based on astronomical observations, while isotopic dating of meteorites and the Earth-Moon system suggest that perhaps 50-100 million years were required for the assembly of the Earth. Therefore, much of the growth of the terrestrial planets in our own system is presumed to have taken place under largely gas-free conditions, and the physics of terrestrial planet formation is dominated by gravitational interactions and collisions. The earliest phase of terrestrial-planet formation involve the growth of km-sized or larger planetesimals from dust grains, followed by the accumulations of these planetesimals into ~100 lunar- to Mars-mass bodies that are initially gravitationally isolated from one-another in a swarm of smaller planetesimals, but eventually grow to the point of sig...

  16. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties.

  17. Electron plasmas as a diagnostic tool for hyperfine spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, T.; Thompson, R. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Amole, C.; Capra, A.; Menary, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Fajans, J.; Little, A.; So, C.; Wurtele, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester, UK and The Cockcroft Institute, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Rasmussen, C. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cesar, C. L.; Silveira, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Charlton, M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-03-19

    Long term magnetic confinement of antihydrogen atoms has recently been demonstrated by the ALPHA collaboration at CERN, opening the door to a range of experimental possibilities. Of particular interest is a measurement of the antihydrogen spectrum. A precise comparison of the spectrum of antihydrogen with that of hydrogen would be an excellent test of CPT symmetry. One prime candidate for precision CPT tests is the ground-state hyperfine transition; measured in hydrogen to a precision of nearly one part in 10{sup 12}. Effective execution of such an experiment with trapped antihydrogen requires precise knowledge of the magnetic environment. Here we present a solution that uses an electron plasma confined in the antihydrogen trapping region. The cyclotron resonance of the electron plasma is probed with microwaves at the cyclotron frequency and the subsequent heating of the electron plasma is measured through the plasma quadrupole mode frequency. Using this method, the minimum magnetic field of the neutral trap can be determined to within 4 parts in 10{sup 4}. This technique was used extensively in the recent demonstration of resonant interaction with the hyperfine levels of trapped antihydrogen atoms.

  18. In-beam measurement of the hydrogen hypernine splitting - towards antihydrogen spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Diermaier, Martin; The Asacusa AD-3 collaboration; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Simon, Martin Christian; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Antihydrogen, the lightest atom consisting purely of antimatter, is an ideal laboratory to study the CPT symmetry by comparison to hydrogen. With respect to absolute precision, transitions within the ground-state hyperfine structure (GS-HFS) are most appealing by virtue of their small energy separation. ASACUSA proposed employing a beam of cold antihydrogen atoms in a Rabi-type experiment to determine the GS-HFS in a field-free region. Here we present a measurement of the zero-field hydrogen GS-HFS using the spectroscopy apparatus of ASACUSA' s antihydrogen experiment. The measured value of nu_HF=1 420 405 748.4(3.4)(1.6) Hz with a relative precision of 2.7 × 10(−9) constitutes the most precise determination of this quantity in a beam and verifies the developed spectroscopy methods for the antihydrogen HFS experiment to the ppb level. Together with the recently presented observation of antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m downstream of the production region, the prerequisites for a measurement with antihydrogen are no...

  19. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, G.; Debu, P.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free-fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms (). The precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of the vertical velocities of , which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and we show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration of could be pushed below under realistic experimental conditions.

  20. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Gabriel; Lambrecht, Astrid; Nesvizhevsky, Valery; Reynaud, Serge; Voronin, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms ($\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$). Precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration $\\overline{g}$ of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ could be pushed below $10^{-3}$ under realistic experimental conditions.

  1. One-electron quantum cyclotron (and implications for cold antihydrogen)

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Odom, B; D'Urso, B

    2001-01-01

    Quantum jumps between Fock states of a one-electron oscillator reveal the quantum limit of a cyclotron accelerator. The states live for seconds when spontaneous emission is inhibited by a factor of 140 within a cylindrical Penning trap cavity. Averaged over hours the oscillator is in thermal equilibrium with black-body photons in the cavity. At 80 mK, quantum jumps occur only when resonant microwave photons are introduced into the cavity, opening a route to improved measurements of the magnetic moments of the electron and positron. The temperature demonstrated is about 60 times lower than the 4.2 K temperature at which charged elementary particles were previously stored. Implications for the production of cold antihydrogen are discussed. (21 refs).

  2. Event Normalization Through Dynamic Log Format Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Meinel

    2014-01-01

    The analytical and monitoring capabilities of central event re-positories, such as log servers and intrusion detection sys-tems, are limited by the amount of structured information ex-tracted from the events they receive. Diverse networks and ap-plications log their events in many different formats, and this makes it difficult to identify the type of logs being received by the central repository. The way events are logged by IT systems is problematic for developers of host-based intrusion-detection systems (specifically, host-based systems), develop-ers of security-information systems, and developers of event-management systems. These problems preclude the develop-ment of more accurate, intrusive security solutions that obtain results from data included in the logs being processed. We propose a new method for dynamically normalizing events into a unified super-event that is loosely based on the Common Event Expression standard developed by Mitre Corporation. We explain how our solution can normalize seemingly unrelat-ed events into a single, unified format.

  3. Antihydrogen synthesis in a double-CUSP trap towards test of the CPT-symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radics, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Kuroda, N.; Murtagh, D. J.; Nagata, Y.; Tajima, M.; Van Gorp, S.; Abo, Y.; Dupre, P.; Higashi, Y.; Kaga, C.; Leali, M.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.; Breuker, H.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Rizzini, E. Lodi; Matsuda, Y.; Ulmer, S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the ASACUSA-CUSP experiment at CERN is to produce a cold, polarised antihydrogen beam and perform a high precision measurement of the ground-state hyperfine transition frequency of the antihydrogen atom and compare it with that of the hydrogen atom using the same spectroscopic beam line. Towards this goal a significant step was successfully accomplished: synthesised antihydrogen atoms have been produced in a CUSP magnetic configuration and detected at the end of our spectrometer beam line in 2012 [1]. During a long shut down at CERN the ASACUSA-CUSP experiment had been renewed by introducing a new double-CUSP magnetic configuration and a new semi-cylindrical tracking detector (AMT) [2], and by improving the transport feature of low energy antiproton beams. The new tracking detector monitors the antihydrogen synthesis during the mixing cycle of antiprotons and positrons. In this work the latest results and improvements of the antihydrogen synthesis will be presented including highlights from the last beam time.

  4. Experimental limit on the ratio of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan; Charman, Andrew; Zhmoginov, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    Physicists have long wondered if the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. While there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist, i.e., that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. By searching for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap, we have determined that we can reject ratios of the gravitational mass to the inertial mass of antihydrogen greater than about 100 at a statistical significance level of 5%. A similar search places somewhat lower limits on a negative gravitational mass, i.e., on antigravity.

  5. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Collaboration; Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.; Charman, A. E.

    2013-04-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5% worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regime.

  6. An experimental test of the weak equivalence principle for antihydrogen at the future FLAIR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaum, Klaus; Raizen, Mark G.; Quint, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    We present new experimental ideas to investigate the gravitational interaction of antihydrogen. The experiment can first be performed in an off-line mirror measurement on hydrogen atoms, as a testing ground for our methods, before the implementation with antihydrogen atoms. A beam of hydrogen atoms is formed by launching a cold beam of protons through a cloud of trapped electrons in a nested Penning trap arrangement. In the next step, the atoms are stopped in a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils — so-called atomic coilgun. The stopped atoms are confined in a magnetic quadrupole trap and cooled by single-photon laser cooling. We intend to employ the method of Raman interferometry to study the gravitational interaction of atomic hydrogen — and later on antihydrogen at the FLAIR facility — with high sensitivity.

  7. Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Kurchaninov, L; Jonsell, S; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilated. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly-identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antipr...

  8. Description and first application of a new technique to measure the gravitational mass of antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Charman, A E; Menary, S; Capra, A; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Fajans, J; Ashkezari, M D; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A I

    2013-01-01

    Physicists have long wondered whether the gravitational interactions between matter and antimatter might be different from those between matter and itself. Although there are many indirect indications that no such differences exist and that the weak equivalence principle holds, there have been no direct, free-fall style, experimental tests of gravity on antimatter. Here we describe a novel direct test methodology; we search for a propensity for antihydrogen atoms to fall downward when released from the ALPHA antihydrogen trap. In the absence of systematic errors, we can reject ratios of the gravitational to inertial mass of antihydrogen >75 at a statistical significance level of 5%; worst-case systematic errors increase the minimum rejection ratio to 110. A similar search places somewhat tighter bounds on a negative gravitational mass, that is, on antigravity. This methodology, coupled with ongoing experimental improvements, should allow us to bound the ratio within the more interesting near equivalence regim...

  9. Why We Already Know that Antihydrogen is Almost Certainly NOT Going to Fall "Up"

    CERN Document Server

    Menary, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The ALPHA collaboration (of which I am a member) has made great strides recently in trapping antihydrogen and starting down the path of making spectroscopic measurements. The primary goal of the experiment is to test CPT invariance but there is also interest in testing another fundamental issue -- the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter (the so-called question of "antigravity"). As well as the other antihydrogen trapping experiments -- ASACUSA and ATRAP -- there is also a new experiment in the Antiproton Decelerator hall at CERN called AEGIS which is dedicated to testing the gravitional interaction between antihydrogen and the Earth. It has been claimed in the literature that there "is no compelling evidence or theoretical reason to rule out such a difference (i.e., between $g$ and $\\bar{g}$) at the 1% level." I argue in this short paper that bending of light by the sun provides a more stringent limit than this.

  10. An improved limit on the charge of antihydrogen from stochastic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Charman, A. E.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, L. T.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Antimatter continues to intrigue physicists because of its apparent absence in the observable Universe. Current theory requires that matter and antimatter appeared in equal quantities after the Big Bang, but the Standard Model of particle physics offers no quantitative explanation for the apparent disappearance of half the Universe. It has recently become possible to study trapped atoms- of antihydrogen to search for possible, as yet unobserved, differences in the physical behaviour of matter and antimatter. Here we consider the charge neutrality of the antihydrogen atom. By applying stochastic acceleration to trapped antihydrogen atoms, we determine an experimental bound on the antihydrogen charge, Qe, of |Q| < 0.71 parts per billion (one standard deviation), in which e is the elementary charge. This bound is a factor of 20 less than that determined from the best previous measurement of the antihydrogen charge. The electrical charge of atoms and molecules of normal matter is known to be no greater than about 10-21e for a diverse range of species including H2, He and SF6. Charge-parity-time symmetry and quantum anomaly cancellation demand that the charge of antihydrogen be similarly small. Thus, our measurement constitutes an improved limit and a test of fundamental aspects of the Standard Model. If we assume charge superposition and use the best measured value of the antiproton charge, then we can place a new limit on the positron charge anomaly (the relative difference between the positron and elementary charge) of about one part per billion (one standard deviation), a 25-fold reduction compared to the current best measurement.

  11. Boundedness of Formation Configuration for Nonlinear Three-body Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peng; SONG Yongduan

    2011-01-01

    The configuration boundedness of the three-body model dynamics is studied for Sun-Earth formation flying missions. The three-body formation flying model is built up with considering the lunar gravitational acceleration and solar radiation pressure. Because traditional linearized dynamics based method has relatively lower accuracy, a modified nonlinear formation configuration analysis method is proposed in this paper. Comparative studies are carried out from three aspects, i.e., natural formation configuration with arbitrary departure time, initialization time and formation configuration boundedness, and specific initialization time for bounded formation configuration. Simulations demonstrate the differences between the two schemes,and indicate that the nonlinear dynamic method reduces the error caused by the model linearization and disturbance approximation, and thus provides higher accuracy for boundedness analysis, which is of value to initial parameters selection for natural three-body formation flying.

  12. Dynamics of lane formation in driven binary complex plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutterlin, K. R.; Wysocki, A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Rath, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; W. J. Goedheer,; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Morfill, G. E.; Lowen, H.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation proces

  13. Resonance states in the hydrogen-antihydrogen system from a nonadiabatic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeby, Henrik; Piszczatowski, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    The quantum-mechanical four-body problem for the hydrogen-antihydrogen system has been solved by means of the variational implementation of the coupled-arrangement channel method. Wave functions have been formed using the Gaussian expansion method (GEM) in Jacobi coordinates; they explicitly include components corresponding to the rearrangement from hydrogen and antihydrogen (H + \\bar{{{H}}}) into protonium and positronium (Pn + Ps). We analyze the solutions belonging to the discretized spectrum of the four-body eigenvalue problem, searching for resonance states at energies just below the H-\\bar{{{H}}} dissociation energy threshold by means of the stabilization method and complex scaling.

  14. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the formation of spherical lipidic vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, E Hernandez; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-01

    We propose a free energy expression accounting for the formation of spherical vesicles from planar lipidic membranes and derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution describing the dynamics of vesicle formation. We found that formation may occur as an activated process for small membranes and as a transport process for sufficiently large membranes. We give explicit expressions for the transition rates and the characteristic time of vesicle formation in terms of the relevant physical parameters.

  15. First step in the process of calculating the cross section for muonic antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Maher, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    The end goal of the project is to measure the charge radius of the antiproton with muons. However a necessary step first is to calculate cross section of Muonium and antiprotons in the production of antihydrogen to determine the feasibility of such an experiment.

  16. Geneva University: On our way to anti-hydrogen at rest

    CERN Multimedia

    Geneva University

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium On our way to anti-hydrogen at rest Prof. Walter Oelert, Research Center Jülich, Germany Trapped cold atoms of anti-hydrogen are optimal for testing possible CPT violations in comparison of spectral lines and gravitational effects on matter and anti-matter. For this reason it is mandatory to optimize the properties of the clouds of anti-protons and positrons used to produce the anti-hydrogen atoms. The ATRAP-collaboration at CERNs AD did perform such experiments by studying the temperature of these clouds and their stability at different conditions. Though detailed tests have been performed to verify the trapping of anti-hydrogen atoms in a magnetic gradient field no statistically significant signal was detected yet. Re...

  17. Towards Measuring the Ground State Hyperfine Splitting of Antihydrogen -- A Progress Report

    CERN Document Server

    Sauerzopf, C; Dupré, P.; Higashi, Y.; Kaga, C.; Kolbinger, B.; Leali, M.; Lehner, S.; Rizzini, E.Lodi; Malbrunot, C.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Murtagh, D.J.; Nagata, Y.; Radics, B.; Simon, M.C.; Suzuki, K.; Tajima, M.; Ulmer, S.; Vamosi, S.; van Gorp, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Breuker, H.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kuroda, N.; Matsuda, Y.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful commissioning and testing of a dedicated field-ioniser chamber for measuring principal quantum number distributions in antihydrogen as part of the ASACUSA hyperfine spectroscopy apparatus. The new chamber is combined with a beam normalisation detector that consists of plastic scintillators and a retractable passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector.

  18. Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    emerge solely as a result of bound- ary layer dynamics. Furthermore these experiments produced an unexpected result; namely, the simulated secondary...10.1029/ 2011GL047015. Bell, M. M., and M. T. Montgomery, 2008: Observed structure, evolution, and potential intensity of category 5 Hurricane Isabel

  19. Dynamics of Perceived Parenting and Identity Formation in Late Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, Wim; Goossens, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Identity formation is a dynamic process of person-context interactions, and part of this context are parents, even in late adolescence. Several theories on parent-adolescent relationships share the idea that parents influence the process of identity formation. However, up to now, empirical evidence, particularly longitudinal evidence for this link…

  20. Production of relativistic anti-hydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture and measurement of the Lamb shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, C. T.; Brodsky, S. J.; Schmidt, I.

    1992-09-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms - the bound state (bar-p)e(+) - can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton which passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus will create e(+)e(-) pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound instead of continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is roughly 1 Z(exp 2) pb for antiproton momenta above 6 GeV/c. A sample of 200 antihydrogen atoms in a low-emittance, neutral beam will be made in 1994 as an accidental byproduct of Fermilab experiment E760. We describe a simple experiment, Fermilab Proposal P862, which can detect this beam, and outline how a sample of a few 10(exp 4) atoms can be used to measure the antihydrogen Lamb shift to 1 percent.

  1. Production of relativistic antihydrogen atoms by pair production with positron capture and measurement of the Lamb shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Charles T.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    1993-12-01

    A beam of relativistic antihydrogen atoms — the bound state (bar pe+) — can be created by circulating the beam of an antiproton storage ring through an internal gas target. An antiproton which passes through the Coulomb field of a nucleus will create e+e- pairs, and antihydrogen will form when a positron is created in a bound instead of continuum state about the antiproton. The cross section for this process is roughly 3 Z 2 pb for antiproton momenta about 6 GeV/ c. A sample of 600 antihydrogen atoms in a low-emittance, neutral beam will be made in 1995 as an accidental byproduct of Fermilab experiment E760. We describe a simple experiment, Fermilab Proposal P862, which can detect this beam, and outline how a sample of a few-104 atoms can be used to measure the antihydrogen Lamb shift to 1 %.

  2. Quasi-satellite dynamics in formation flight

    CERN Document Server

    Mikkola, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The quasi-satellite (QS) phenomenon makes two celestial bodies to fly near each other (Mikkola et al. 2006) and that effect can be used also to make artificial satellites move in tandem. We consider formation flight of two or three satellites in low eccentricity near Earth orbits. With the help of weak ion thrusters it is possible to accomplish tandem flight. With ion thrusters it is also possible to mimic many kinds of mutual force laws between the satellites. We found that both a constant repulsive force or an attractive force that decreases with the distance are able to preserve the formation in which the eccentricities cause the actual relative motion and the weak thrusters keep the mean longitude difference small. Initial values are important for the formation flight but very exact adjustment of orbital elements is not important. Simplicity is one of our goals in this study and this result is achieved at least in the way that, when constant force thrusters are used, the satellites only need to detect the...

  3. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Protein Filament Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Cohen, Samuel I A; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-01-22

    We establish the Hamiltonian structure of the rate equations describing the formation of protein filaments. We then show that this formalism provides a unified view of the behavior of a range of biological self-assembling systems as diverse as actin, prions, and amyloidogenic polypeptides. We further demonstrate that the time-translation symmetry of the resulting Hamiltonian leads to previously unsuggested conservation laws that connect the number and mass concentrations of fibrils and allow linear growth phenomena to be equated with autocatalytic growth processes. We finally show how these results reveal simple rate laws that provide the basis for interpreting experimental data in terms of specific mechanisms controlling the proliferation of fibrils.

  4. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... have been employed in the present report to monitor time-dependent physical and chemical properties in aqueous solution during the chemical synthesis. Chemical synthesis of AuNPs is a reduction process accompanied by release of ions and protons, and formation of solid particles. Dynamic information......]- to form Au atoms during the early stage of the synthesis process. pH- and conductivity-dynamics point further clearly to formation of coating layers on AuNPs and adsorbate exchange between MES and starch. © 2013 American Chemical Society....

  5. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-07-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  6. Des atomes d'antihydrogene produits en quantites substantielles au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sevestre, G

    2002-01-01

    "Des quantites relativement substantielles d'atomes d'antihydrogene a basse temperature ont ete produites cet ete au Laboratoire europeen de physique des particules, le CERN a Geneve, ouvrant la voie a une etude approfondie de cette antimatiere qui pourrait remettre en cause les theories actuelles, a annonce mercredi sur le site Internet de la revue Nature une equipe internationale de chercheurs" (1 page).

  7. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Teck-Ghee; Wong Cheuk-Yin; Wang Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H-H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6a.u. and a barrier rising at r<~ 5a.u.

  8. Dynamical formation of cataclysmic variables in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment. Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate, and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, Ncv, and the stellar encounter rate, Γ. The results of our simulations show a correlation between Ncv and Γ, as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by the dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off stars, although this trend is stronger for CVs formed from primordial binaries undergoing exchange encounters, which include a population of more massive CVs absent in the group of CVs formed from binaries not suffering any component exchange.

  9. Dynamical Formation of Cataclysmic Variables in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jongsuk; Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters is likely to be affected by the cluster internal dynamics and the stellar interactions in the cluster dense environment.Several observational studies have revealed a correlation between the number of X-ray sources and the stellar encounter rate and provided evidence of the role of dynamics in the formation of X-ray binaries. We have performed a survey of Monte-Carlo simulations aimed at exploring the connection between the dynamics and formation of cataclysmic variables (CVs) and the origin of the observed correlation between the number of these objects, $N_{\\rm cv}$, and the stellar encounter rate, $\\Gamma$.The results of our simulations show a correlation between $N_{\\rm cv}$ and $\\Gamma$ as found in observational data, illustrate the essential role played by dynamics, and shed light on the dynamical history behind this correlation. CVs in our simulations are more centrally concentrated than single stars with masses close to those of turn-off...

  10. Memory formation: from network structure to neural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Sarah; Wang, Jane X; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Berke, Joshua D; Zochowski, Michal

    2010-05-13

    Understanding the neural correlates of brain function is an extremely challenging task, since any cognitive process is distributed over a complex and evolving network of neurons that comprise the brain. In order to quantify observed changes in neuronal dynamics during hippocampal memory formation, we present metrics designed to detect directional interactions and the formation of functional neuronal ensembles. We apply these metrics to both experimental and model-derived data in an attempt to link anatomical network changes with observed changes in neuronal dynamics during hippocampal memory formation processes. We show that the developed model provides a consistent explanation of the anatomical network modifications that underlie the activity changes observed in the experimental data.

  11. Satellite formation flying relative dynamics, formation design, fuel optimal maneuvers and formation maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Danwei; Poh, Eng Kee

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically describes the concepts and principles for multi-satellite relative motion, passive and near passive formation designs, trajectory planning and control for fuel optimal formation maneuvers, and formation flying maintenance control design. As such, it provides a sound foundation for researchers and engineers in this field to develop further theories and pursue their implementations. Though satellite formation flying is widely considered to be a major advance in space technology, there are few systematic treatments of the topic in the literature. Addressing that gap, the book offers a valuable resource for academics, researchers, postgraduate students and practitioners in the field of satellite science and engineering.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  13. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-05

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics.

  14. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re<<1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this letter, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such "viscous liquid" state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand an external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions.

  15. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.

    2013-03-21

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers\\' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Ice Formation on Kaolinite: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even via state-of-the-art experimental techniques. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long timescales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaol...

  17. Detection of antihydrogen with a Si- mu -strip and CsI-crystal detector at cryogenic temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Regenfus, C

    2001-01-01

    ATHENA, one of 3 experiments at the new low energy antiproton facility at CERN (AD), is designed for testing fundamental physic principles (CPT, Gravitation) to a high degree of precision by comparing cold antihydrogen to hydrogen. To monitor the production of the antihydrogen atoms and their spectroscopic response, a new detector dedicated for the endproducts of antihydrogen annihilations was developed. To meet the requirements of low temperature operation (77 K) in a high magnetic field, compact size, low power consumption and high granularity, a combination of two layers of each 16 double sided Si- mu -strip modules (16 cm long) was chosen, surrounded by 192 pure-CsI crystals (each approximately= 4 cm/sup 3/), which are read by UV sensitive photo diodes. The frontend electronics (working point 77 K), realised in VLSI CMOS technique, features a self triggering capability of independent sub modules.

  18. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  19. Ice formation on kaolinite: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Tribello, Gareth A.; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as important technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even if state-of-the-art experimental techniques are used. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long time scales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaolinite proceeds exclusively via the formation of the hexagonal ice polytype. The critical nucleus size is two times smaller than that obtained for homogeneous nucleation at the same supercooling. Previous findings suggested that the flexibility of the kaolinite surface can alter the time scale for ice nucleation within molecular dynamics simulations. However, we here demonstrate that equally flexible (or non flexible) kaolinite surfaces can lead to very different outcomes in terms of ice formation, according to whether or not the surface relaxation of the clay is taken into account. We show that very small structural changes upon relaxation dramatically alter the ability of kaolinite to provide a template for the formation of a hexagonal overlayer of water molecules at the water-kaolinite interface, and that this relaxation therefore determines the nucleation ability of this mineral.

  20. Oligomer formation within secondary organic aerosol: equilibrium and dynamic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Trump

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a model based on the volatility basis set to consider the potential influence of oligomer content on volatility-driven SOA yields. The implications for aerosol evaporation studies, including dilution, chamber thermo-equilibration, and thermodenuder studies are also considered. A simplified description of oligomer formation reproduces essentially all of the broad classes of equilibrium and dynamical observations related to SOA formation and evaporation: significant oligomer content may be consistent with mass yields that increase with organic aerosol mass concentration; reversible oligomerization can explain the hysteresis between the rate of SOA formation and its evaporation rate upon dilution; and the model is consistent with both chamber thermo-equilibration studies and thermodenuder studies of SOA evaporation.

  1. A Dynamical Study of the Formation of Peculiar Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, T. K.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Un estudlo de la formaci6n de diferentes tipos de galaxias peculiares (interactuantes) es conducido en base de la dina'mioa de la colisi6n lievando a su formaci6n usando la aproximaci6n impulsiva. Los resultados indican la existencia de una relaci6n caracteristica en base del camblo de la energia interna durante la colisi6n, cual determina el tipo de la galaxia peculiar formado. La relacion es analisada y valores criticos del camblo de Ia energia interna, ilevando a la interacci6n entre galaxias de varias intensidades y la formaci6n consecuente de varios tipos de sistemas peculiares es discutido. ABSTRACT. A study of the formation of different types of peculiar (interacting) galaxies is conducted based on the dynamics of the collision leading to their formation, using the impulsive approximation. Results indicate the existance of a characteristic relationship, based on the internal energy changes during the collision, governing the type of peculiar galaxy formed. The relationship is analysed and critical values of internal energy changes, leading to galaxy interaction of varying intensities and consequent formation of different types of peculiar galaxies is discussed. Key words: GALAXIES-DYNAMICS -- GALAXIES-FORMATION

  2. Dynamically Multivalued Self-Organisation and Probabilistic Structure Formation Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilyuk, A P

    2004-01-01

    The unreduced, universally nonperturbative analysis of arbitrary many-body interaction process reveals the irreducible, purely dynamic source of randomness. It leads to the universal definition of real system complexity (physics/9806002), where the internally chaotic self-organisation emerges as a limiting case of complex interaction dynamics (physics/0211071). It extends also the concept of "self-organised criticality" and corresponds to formation of distinct enough (but always internally chaotic) structures occurring if the system is far from characteristic frequency resonances. Transition to the opposite limiting regime of multivalued interaction dynamics, that of uniform (global) chaos, takes place around the main frequency resonance(s), which provides the absolutely universal criterion of global chaos onset, applicable to any kind of system, as well as the new, extended interpretation of the phenomenon of resonance itself. As a result, one obtains the causally complete description of world structure emer...

  3. The formation and dynamical evolution of young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed a variety of young star clusters, including embedded systems, young massive clusters, and associations. We study the formation and dynamical evolution of these clusters using a combination of simulations and theoretical models. Our simulations start with a turbulent molecular cloud that collapses under its own gravity. The stars are assumed to form in the densest regions in the collapsing cloud after an initial free-fall times of the molecular cloud. The dynamical evolution of these stellar distributions are continued by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The molecular clouds typical for the Milky Way Galaxy tend to form embedded clusters which evolve to resemble open clusters. The associations were initially considerably more clumpy, but lost their irregularity in about a dynamical time scale due to the relaxation process. The densest molecular clouds, which are absent in the Milky Way but are typical in starburst galaxies, form massive young star clusters. They indeed ar...

  4. Prospects of In-Flight Hyperfine Spectroscopy of (Anti)Hydrogen for Tests of CPT Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen promises one of the most sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The ASACUSA collaboration is pursuing a measurement of this splitting in a Rabi-type experiment using a polarized beam from a CUSP magnet at the Antiproton Decelerator of CERN. With the initial intention of characterizing the Rabi apparatus, a polarized source of cold hydrogen was built and the $\\sigma_1$ transition of hydrogen was measured to a few ppb precision. A measurement of the $\\pi_1$ transition is being prepared. The availability of this beam opens the possibility to perform first measurements of some coefficients within the nonminimal Standard-Model Extension.

  5. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  6. Pattern formation and coexistence domains for a nonlocal population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    da Cunha, J A R; Oliveira, F A

    2011-01-01

    In this communication we propose a most general equation to study pattern formation for one-species population and their limit domains in systems of length L. To accomplish this we include non-locality in the growth and competition terms where the integral kernels are now depend on characteristic length parameters alpha and beta. Therefore, we derived a parameter space (alpha,beta) where it is possible to analyze a coexistence curve alpha*=alpha*(\\beta) which delimits domains for the existence (or not) of pattern formation in population dynamics systems. We show that this curve has an analogy with coexistence curve in classical thermodynamics and critical phenomena physics. We have successfully compared this model with experimental data for diffusion of Escherichia coli populations.

  7. Finite size effects in the dynamics of opinion formation

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, R; Tessone, Claudio J.; Toral, Raul

    2006-01-01

    For some models of relevance in the social sciences we review some examples in which system size plays an important role in the final outcome of the dynamics. We discuss the conditions under which changes of behavior can appear only when the number of agents in the model takes a finite value. Those changes of behavior can be related to the apparent phase transitions that appear in some physical models. We show examples in the Galam's model of opinion transmission and the Axelrod's model of culture formation stressing the role that the network of interactions has on the main results of both models. Finally, we present the phenomenon of system-size stochastic resonance by which a forcing signal (identified as an advertising agent) is optimally amplified by a population of the right (intermediate) size. Our work stresses the role that the system size has in the dynamics of social systems and the inappropriateness of taking the thermodynamic limit for these systems.

  8. Dynamic Cell Formation based on Multi-objective Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhu Jia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multi-objective model is proposed to address the dynamic cellular manufacturing (DCM formation problem. This model considers four conflicting objectives: relocation cost, machine utilization, material handling cost and maintenance cost. The model also considers the situation that some machines could be shared by more than one cell at the same period. A genetic algorithm is applied to get the solution of this mathematical model. Three numerical examples are simulated to evaluate the validity of this model.  

  9. Nonlinear dynamic theory for photorefractive phase hologram formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. M.; Shah, R. R.; Rabson, T. A.; Tittle, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic theory is developed for the formation of photorefractive volume phase holograms. A feedback mechanism existing between the photogenerated field and free-electron density, treated explicitly, yields the growth and saturation of the space-charge field in a time scale characterized by the coupling strength between them. The expression for the field reduces in the short-time limit to previous theories and approaches in the long-time limit the internal or photovoltaic field. Additionally, the phase of the space charge field is shown to be time-dependent.

  10. Building better oscillators using nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M C Cross; Eyal Kenig; John-Mark A Allen

    2015-03-01

    Frequency and time references play an essential role in modern technology and in living systems. The precision of self-sustained oscillations is limited by the effects of noise, which becomes evermore important as the sizes of the devices become smaller. In this paper, we review our recent theoretical results on using nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation to reduce the effects of noise and improve the frequency precision of oscillators, with particular reference to ongoing experiments on oscillators based on nanomechanical resonators. We discuss using resonator nonlinearity, novel oscillator architectures and the synchronization of arrays of oscillators, to improve the frequency precision.

  11. Mechanical compaction directly modulates the dynamics of bile canaliculi formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Toh, Yi-Chin; Li, Qiushi; Nugraha, Bramasta; Zheng, Baixue; Lu, Thong Beng; Gao, Yi; Ng, Mary Mah Lee; Yu, Hanry

    2013-02-01

    Homeostatic pressure-driven compaction is a ubiquitous mechanical force in multicellular organisms and is proposed to be important in the maintenance of multicellular tissue integrity and function. Previous cell-free biochemical models have demonstrated that there are cross-talks between compaction forces and tissue structural functions, such as cell-cell adhesion. However, its involvement in physiological tissue function has yet to be directly demonstrated. Here, we use the bile canaliculus (BC) as a physiological example of a multicellular functional structure in the liver, and employ a novel 3D microfluidic hepatocyte culture system to provide an unprecedented opportunity to experimentally modulate the compaction states of primary hepatocyte aggregates in a 3D physiological-mimicking environment. Mechanical compaction alters the physical attributes of the hepatocyte aggregates, including cell shape, cell packing density and cell-cell contact area, but does not impair the hepatocytes' remodeling and functional capabilities. Characterization of structural and functional polarity shows that BC formation in compact hepatocyte aggregates is accelerated to as early as 12 hours post-seeding; whereas non-compact control requires 48 hours for functional BC formation. Further dynamic immunofluorescence imaging and gene expression profiling reveal that compaction accelerated BC formation is accompanied by changes in actin cytoskeleton remodeling dynamics and transcriptional levels of hepatic nuclear factor 4α and Annexin A2. Our report not only provides a novel strategy of modeling BC formation for in vitro hepatology research, but also shows a first instance that homeostatic pressure-driven compaction force is directly coupled to the higher-order multicellular functions.

  12. A new application of emulsions to measure the gravitational force on antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Ariga, T; Braccini, S; Canali, C; Ereditato, A; Kawada, J; Kimura, M; Kreslo, I; Pistillo, C; Scampoli, P; Storey, J W

    2013-01-01

    We propose to build and operate a detector based on the emulsion film technology for the measurement of the gravitational acceleration on antimatter, to be performed by the AEgIS experiment (AD6) at CERN. The goal of AEgIS is to test the weak equivalence principle with a precision of 1% on the gravitational acceleration g by measuring the position of the annihilation vertex antihydrogen atoms after their free fall in a horizontal vacuum pipe. With the emulsion technology developed at the University of Bern we propose to improve the performance of AEgIS by exploiting the superior position resolution of emulsion films over other particle detectors. The idea is to use a new type of emulsion films, especially developed for applications in vacuum, to yield a spatial resolution of the order of one micron in the measurement of the sag of the antihydrogen atoms in the gravitational field. This is an order of magnitude better than what was planned in the original AEgIS proposal.

  13. The Formation and Dynamics of Super-Earth Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Super-Earths, objects slightly larger than Earth and slightly smaller than Uranus, have found a special place in exoplanetary science. As a new class of planetary bodies, these objects have challenged models of planet formation at both ends of the spectrum and have triggered a great deal of research on the composition and interior dynamics of rocky planets in connection to their masses and radii. Being relatively easier to detect than an Earth-sized planet at 1 AU around a G star, super-Earths have become the focus of worldwide observational campaigns to search for habitable planets. With a range of masses that allows these objects to retain moderate atmospheres and perhaps even plate tectonics, super-Earths may be habitable if they maintain long-term orbits in the habitable zones of their host stars. Given that in the past two years a few such potentially habitable super-Earths have in fact been discovered, it is necessary to develop a deep understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of these obje...

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the primary ferrofluid aggregate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanygin, B.M., E-mail: b.m.tanygin@gmail.com [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, 4G, Acad. Glushkov Ave., Kyiv UA-03127 (Ukraine); Kovalenko, V.F.; Petrychuk, M.V.; Dzyan, S.A. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, 4G, Acad. Glushkov Ave., Kyiv UA-03127 (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Investigations of the phase transitions and self-organization in the magnetic aggregates are of the fundamental and applied interest. The long-range ordering structures described in the Tomanek's systematization (M. Yoon, and D. Tomanek, 2010 ) are not yet obtained in the direct molecular dynamics simulations. The resulted structures usually are the linear chains or circles, or, else, amorphous (liquid) formations. In the present work, it was shown, that the thermodynamically equilibrium primary ferrofluid aggregate has either the long-range ordered or liquid phase. Due to the unknown steric layer force and other model idealizations, the clear experimental verification of the real equilibrium phase is still required. The predicted long-range ordered (crystallized) phase produces the faceting shape of the primary ferrofluid aggregate, which can be recognized experimentally. The medical (antiviral) application of the crystallized aggregates has been suggested. Dynamic formation of all observed ferrofluid nanostructures conforms to the Tomanek's systematization. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary ferrofluid aggregate has either the long-range ordered or liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulation of ferrofluid nanostructures conforms to the Tomanek's systematization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range ordered phase produces the faceting shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The medical (antiviral) application is possible.

  15. Dynamics of exciplex formation in rare gas media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Lorenzo, German, E-mail: grojas37@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica General y Matematicas, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus [Departamento de Fisica General y Matematicas, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba); Alberti, Sebastian Fernandez [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pena 180, Bernal B1876BXD (Argentina)

    2009-07-30

    A hopping-surface algorithm has been used to simulate the dynamics induced in rare gas matrices due to the photoexcitation ({sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 1}) of atomic mercury embedded in them. Especially, the study of the dynamics of an exciplex formation in a model system consisting of solid xenon doped with atomic mercury. The process starts upon the photoexcitation of the Hg atom to its {sup 3}P{sub 1} electronic excited state. Diatomics-in-Molecule approach has been used for constructing the adiabatic potential surfaces. In all trajectories we show that a triatomic Xe-Hg{sup *}-Xe complex is formed, but in two conformations: bent and linear. The mechanisms leading to the formation of one or the other are identified. Mainly, are noted the thermal fluctuations of the Hg impurity and the shape of the potential surfaces. Furthermore, we show that non-radiative intrastate relaxation occurs via a conical intersection between the excited state surfaces. The simulated spectra are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 μm with an average of 51 μm and a median of 26 μm. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production.

  17. PSEUDOBULGE FORMATION AS A DYNAMICAL RATHER THAN A SECULAR PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in 'Eris', a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky-Way-like massive late-type spiral in an cold dark matter universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass M{sub vir} {approx_equal} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, a photometric stellar mass M{sub *} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers, both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolved from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift due to tidal interactions with satellites, was destroyed by minor mergers at z {approx} 3, re-formed shortly after, and weakened again following a steady gas inflow at z {approx}< 1. The gradual dissolution of the bar ensued at z {approx} 1 and continues until the present without increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner regions. In this scenario, the pseudobulge is not a separate component from the inner disk in terms of formation path; rather, it is the first step in the inside-out formation of the baryonic disk, in agreement with the fact that pseudobulges of massive spiral galaxies typically have a dominant old stellar population. If our simulations do indeed reproduce the formation mechanisms of massive spirals, then the progenitors of late-type galaxies should have strong bars and small photometric pseudobulges at high redshift.

  18. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter H.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ˜10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we offer the contrasting view that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core-accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by super-Earth-type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ˜100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems’ lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  19. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we propose that in contrast with this picture, a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by Super-Earth type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory composition material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ~100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring p...

  20. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  1. A dynamic model for tumour growth and metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Volker; Schumacher, Udo

    2012-07-05

    A simple and fast computational model to describe the dynamics of tumour growth and metastasis formation is presented. The model is based on the calculation of successive generations of tumour cells and enables one to describe biologically important entities like tumour volume, time point of 1st metastatic growth or number of metastatic colonies at a given time. The model entirely relies on the chronology of these successive events of the metastatic cascade. The simulation calculations were performed for two embedded growth models to describe the Gompertzian like growth behaviour of tumours. The initial training of the models was carried out using an analytical solution for the size distribution of metastases of a hepatocellular carcinoma. We then show the applicability of our models to clinical data from the Munich Cancer Registry. Growth and dissemination characteristics of metastatic cells originating from cells in the primary breast cancer can be modelled thus showing its ability to perform systematic analyses relevant for clinical breast cancer research and treatment. In particular, our calculations show that generally metastases formation has already been initiated before the primary can be detected clinically.

  2. Gravity effects on thick brane formation from scalar field dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, Alexander A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, V.A. Fock Department of Theoretical Physics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Universitat de Barcelona, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Barcelona (Spain); Andrianov, Vladimir A.; Novikov, Oleg O. [Saint-Petersburg State University, V.A. Fock Department of Theoretical Physics, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The formation of a thick brane in five-dimensional space-time is investigated when warp geometries of AdS{sub 5} type are induced by scalar matter dynamics and triggered by a thin-brane defect. The scalar matter is taken to consist of two fields with O(2) symmetric self-interaction and with manifest O(2) symmetry breaking by terms quadratic in fields. One of them serves as a thick brane formation mode around a kink background and another one is of a Higgs-field type which may develop a classical background as well. Scalar matter interacts with gravity in the minimal form and gravity effects on (quasi)localized scalar fluctuations are calculated with usage of gauge invariant variables suitable for perturbation expansion. The calculations are performed in the vicinity of the critical point of spontaneous breaking of the combined parity symmetry where a non-trivial v.e.v. of the Higgs-type scalar field is generated. The non-perturbative discontinuous gravitational effects in the mass spectrum of light localized scalar states are studied in the presence of a thin-brane defect. The thin brane with negative tension happens to be the most curious case when the singular barriers form a potential well with two infinitely tall walls and the discrete spectrum of localized states arises completely isolated from the bulk. (orig.)

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of CO2 Formation in Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Arasa, Carina; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2013-01-01

    CO2 ice is one of the most abundant components in ice-coated interstellar ices besides H2O and CO, but the most favorable path to CO2 ice is still unclear. Molecular dynamics calculations on the ultraviolet photodissociation of different kinds of CO-H2O ice systems have been performed at 10 K in order to demonstrate that the reaction between CO and an OH molecule resulting from H2O photodissociation through the first excited state is a possible route to form CO2 ice. However, our calculations, which take into account different ice surface models, suggest that there is another product with a higher formation probability ((3.00+-0.07)x10-2), which is the HOCO complex, whereas the formation of CO2 has a probability of only (3.6+-0.7)x10-4. The initial location of the CO is key to obtain reaction and form CO2: the CO needs to be located deep into the ice. The HOCO complex becomes trapped in the cold ice surface in the trans-HOCO minimum because it quickly loses its internal energy to the surrounding ice, preventi...

  4. Star formation in isolated AMIGA galaxies: dynamical influence of bars

    CERN Document Server

    Verley, S; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Bergond, G; Leon, S

    2007-01-01

    Star formation depends strongly both on the local environment of galaxies, and on the internal dynamics of the interstellar medium. To disentangle the two effects, we obtained, in the framework of the AMIGA project, Ha and Gunn r photometric data for more than 200 spiral galaxies lying in very low-density regions of the local Universe. We characterise the Ha emission, tracing current star formation, of the 45 largest and less inclined galaxies observed for which we estimate the torques between the gas and the bulk of the optical matter. We could subsequently study the Ha morphological aspect of these isolated spiral galaxies. Using Fourier analysis, we focus on the modes of the spiral arms and also on the strength of the bars, computing the torques between the gas and newly formed stars (Ha) and the bulk of the optical matter (Gunn r). We interpret the various bar/spiral morphologies observed in terms of the secular evolution experienced by galaxies in isolation. We also classify the different spatial distrib...

  5. Dynamics of alliance formation and the egalitarian revolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Gavrilets

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arguably the most influential force in human history is the formation of social coalitions and alliances (i.e., long-lasting coalitions and their impact on individual power. Understanding the dynamics of alliance formation and its consequences for biological, social, and cultural evolution is a formidable theoretical challenge. In most great ape species, coalitions occur at individual and group levels and among both kin and non-kin. Nonetheless, ape societies remain essentially hierarchical, and coalitions rarely weaken social inequality. In contrast, human hunter-gatherers show a remarkable tendency to egalitarianism, and human coalitions and alliances occur not only among individuals and groups, but also among groups of groups. These observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of human coalitions can only be understood in the context of social networks and cognitive evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we develop a stochastic model describing the emergence of networks of allies resulting from within-group competition for status or mates between individuals utilizing dyadic information. The model shows that alliances often emerge in a phase transition-like fashion if the group size, awareness, aggressiveness, and persuasiveness of individuals are large and the decay rate of individual affinities is small. With cultural inheritance of social networks, a single leveling alliance including all group members can emerge in several generations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a simple and flexible theoretical approach for studying the dynamics of alliance emergence applicable where game-theoretic methods are not practical. Our approach is both scalable and expandable. It is scalable in that it can be generalized to larger groups, or groups of groups. It is expandable in that it allows for inclusion of additional factors such as behavioral, genetic, social, and cultural features. Our results suggest that a rapid

  6. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, J D; Lau, E L; Pérez-Mercader, J; Nieto, Michael Martin; Goldman, T; Anderson, John D; Lau, Eunice L; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We know that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when we try to combine these theories, we must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem and the anomalous spacecraft data which we announce here. This all has led some ``intrepid" theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more ``daring" experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  7. Observation of the 1S–2S transition in trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M.; Alves, B. X. R.; Baker, C. J.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carruth, C.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Cohen, S.; Collister, R.; Eriksson, S.; Evans, A.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Ishida, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Jones, S. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Mathers, M.; Maxwell, D.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Michan, J. M.; Momose, T.; Munich, J. J.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sacramento, R. L.; Sameed, M.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Stracka, S.; Stutter, G.; So, C.; Tharp, T. D.; Thompson, J. E.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The spectrum of the hydrogen atom has played a central part in fundamental physics over the past 200 years. Historical examples of its importance include the wavelength measurements of absorption lines in the solar spectrum by Fraunhofer, the identification of transition lines by Balmer, Lyman and others, the empirical description of allowed wavelengths by Rydberg, the quantum model of Bohr, the capability of quantum electrodynamics to precisely predict transition frequencies, and modern measurements of the 1S–2S transition by Hänsch to a precision of a few parts in 1015. Recent technological advances have allowed us to focus on antihydrogen—the antimatter equivalent of hydrogen. The Standard Model predicts that there should have been equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the primordial Universe after the Big Bang, but today’s Universe is observed to consist almost entirely of ordinary matter. This motivates the study of antimatter, to see if there is a small asymmetry in the laws of physics that govern the two types of matter. In particular, the CPT (charge conjugation, parity reversal and time reversal) theorem, a cornerstone of the Standard Model, requires that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Here we report the observation of the 1S–2S transition in magnetically trapped atoms of antihydrogen. We determine that the frequency of the transition, which is driven by two photons from a laser at 243 nanometres, is consistent with that expected for hydrogen in the same environment. This laser excitation of a quantum state of an atom of antimatter represents the most precise measurement performed on an anti-atom. Our result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of about 2 × 10‑10.

  8. Star Formation and Cloud Dynamics in the Galactic Bar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolls, Volker

    The Inner Galaxy (IG) that is the Galactic Bar Region (GBR) and the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) including the Galactic Center (GC) are, despite being the sites of dramatic processes and unique sources, still only incompletely understood. Detailed new datasets from the Herschel Space Observatory can be systematically combined with older archival material to enable a new and more complete analysis of the region, its large-scale dynamics, its unusual giant molecular clouds, and the likely influences of its bar and its supermassive black hole. Such a study is both timely and important: the region has affected the structure and evolution of the galaxy; its individual sources are opportunities to examine star formation (for example) under extreme conditions; the processes feeding the CMZ and, subsequently, its black hole are important; and not least, it is a nearby template for the inner regions of other galaxies. The Herschel Space Observatory has provided us with exciting new datasets including full FIR photometric maps and highand low-resolution far-infrared/submillimeter spectra of key sources and lines of the locations of dynamical importance. All these datasets are publicly available from the Herschel Science Archive. Our experienced team has already developed preliminary models, and we propose a thorough investigation to combine the Herschel datasets with Spitzer and WISE datasets. We will supplement them with ground-based observations in cases when it will improve the results. We will then analyze the data and use the results to refine the models and improve our understanding of this key region. Our specific goal is to characterize and model the 3 giant high-velocity molecular cloud clumps in the Galaxy Bar Region (GBR) in detail and to combine the conclusions to produce an improved model of the IG. We have seven tasks: (1) identify all smaller scale gas and dust cores using archival Herschel FIR photometric observations and obtain their physical characteristics

  9. Violent Relaxation, Dynamical Instabilities and the Formation of Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, L. A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN: El problema de la formaci6n de galaxias elfpticas por medjo de colapso gravitacional sin disipaci6n de energfa es estudiado usando un gran numero de simulaciones numericas. Se muestra que este tipo de colapsos, partiendo de condiciones iniciales frfas donde la energfa cinetica inicial representa s6lo un 5%, 0 , de a potencial inicial, produce sistemas relajados de forma triaxial muy similares a las galaxias elfpticas reales en sus formas y perfiles de densidad en proyecci6i . La forina triaxial resulta de la acci6n de una inestabilidad dinamica que aparece en sistemas 'inicos dominados por movimientos radiales, mientras que el perfil de densidad final Cs debido al llamado relajamiento violento que tiende a producir una distribuci6n en espacio fase unica. Estos dos fen6menos tienden a borrar los detalles particulares sobre las condiciones iniciales y dan lugar a una evoluci6n convergente hacia sistemas realistas, esto innecesario el uso de condiciones iniciales especiales (excepto por Ia condici6i de que estas deben ser frfas). Las condiciones iniciales frfas producen los movimientos radiales y fluctuaciones de la energfa potencial requeridos por ambos fen6menos. ABSTRACT: The problem of formation of elliptical galaxies via dissipationless collapse is studied using a large set of numerical simulations. It is shown that dissipationless collapses from cold initial conditions, where the total initial kinetic energy is less than 5% ofthe initial potential energy, lead to relaxed triaxial systems ery similar to real elliptical galaxies ii projected shape and density profiles. The triaxial shape is due to the of a dynamical instability that appears on systems dominated by radial orbits, while final density profile is due to violent relaxation that tends to produce a unique distribution iii space. These two phenomena erase memory of the initial prodtice a convergent evolution toward realistic systems, thus making unnecessary use o[special initial conditions (other

  10. Dynamics of Drop Formation in an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz; Basaran

    1999-05-01

    The effect of an electric field on the formation of a drop of an inviscid, perfectly conducting liquid from a capillary which protrudes from the top plate of a parallel-plate capacitor into a surrounding dynamically inactive, insulating gas is studied computationally. This free boundary problem which is comprised of the surface Bernoulli equation for the transient drop shape and the Laplace equation for the velocity potential inside the drop and the electrostatic potential outside the drop is solved by a method of lines incorporating the finite element method for spatial discretization. The finite element algorithm employed relies on judicious use of remeshing and element addition to a two-region adaptive mesh to accommodate large domain deformations, and allows the computations to proceed until the thickness of the neck connecting an about to form drop to the rest of the liquid in the capillary is less than 0.1% of the capillary radius. The accuracy of the computations is demonstrated by showing that in the absence of an electric field predictions made with the new algorithm are in excellent agreement with boundary integral calculations (Schulkes, R. M. S. M. J. Fluid Mech. 278, 83 (1994)) and experimental measurements on water drops (Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. Phys. Fluids 7(6), 1184 (1995)). In the presence of an electric field, the algorithm predicts that as the strength of the applied field increases, the mode of drop formation changes from simple dripping to jetting to so-called microdripping, in accordance with experimental observations (Cloupeau, M., and Prunet-Foch, B. J. Aerosol Sci. 25(6), 1021 (1994); Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. J. Fluid Mech. 326, 239 (1996)). Computational predictions of the primary drop volume and drop length at breakup are reported over a wide range of values of the ratios of electrical, gravitational, and inertial forces to surface tension force. In contrast to previously mentioned cases where both the flow rate in the tube

  11. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  12. Extracellular matrix proteins and the dynamics of dentin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, William T; Brunn, Jan C; Qin, Chunlin; McKee, Marc D

    2002-01-01

    Dentinogenesis involves controlled reactions that result in conversion of unmineralized predentin to dentin when apatite crystals are formed. This process is dynamic: Maturation events occur within predentin beginning at the proximal layer and progressing to the predentin-dentin (PD) border. One type of controlled reaction is the proteolytic processing of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) to dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), by cleavage of at least three highly conserved peptide bonds. We postulate that this processing event represents an activation step, resulting in release of DPP, which is active in its effects on formation and growth of apatite crystals. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DPM1), present as a processed fragment (57-kD protein) in bone, is seen in dentin on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as one intact protein of 150-200 kD. Anti-57-kD antibodies elicit immunoreactivity in bone, dentin, and cellular cementum. In bone, the reactivity is associated with osteocytes and their cell processes. Similarly, dentin shows reactivity in odontoblasts, predentin, and the odontoblast processes. In summary, the processing of large sialic acid-rich proteins into smaller fragments may be an important part of the controlled conversion of predentin to dentin and osteoid to bone.

  13. Pseudobulge Formation as a Dynamical Rather than a Secular Process

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, Javiera; Carollo, Marcella; Madau, Piero

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in "Eris", a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky Way-like massive late-type spiral in a cold dark matter (LCDM) universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass Mvir=8x10^11 Msun, a photometric stellar mass M*=3.2x10^10 Msun, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolves from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift, was destroyed by minor mergers at z~3, reformed shortly after, and weakened again ...

  14. Annihilation detector for an in-beam spectroscopy apparatus to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens; Capon, Aaron A.; Diermaier, Martin; Fleck, Markus; Kolbinger, Bernadette; Malbrunot, Chloé; Massiczek, Oswald; Simon, Martin C.; Vamosi, Stefan; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard

    2017-02-01

    The matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe today still lacks a quantitative explanation. One possible mechanism that could contribute to the observed imbalance is a violation of the combined Charge-, Parity- and Time symmetries (CPT). A test of CPT symmetry using anti-atoms is being carried out by the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator using a low temperature beam of antihydrogen-the most simple atomic system built only of antiparticles. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, antihydrogen is produced in very small quantities in a laboratory framework. A detector for in-beam measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen has to be able to detect very low signal rates within high background. To fulfil this challenging task, a two layer barrel hodoscope detector was developed. It is built of plastic scintillators with double sided readout via Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The SiPM readout is done using novel, compact and cost efficient electronics that incorporate power supply, amplifier and discriminator on a single board. This contribution will evaluate the performance of the new hodoscope detector.

  15. Star Formation in the LMC: Gravitational Instability and Dynamical Triggering

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Y H; Yang, C C

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for triggered star formation is difficult to establish because energy feedback from massive stars tend to erase the interstellar conditions that led to the star formation. Young stellar objects (YSOs) mark sites of {\\it current} star formation whose ambient conditions have not been significantly altered. Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) effectively reveal massive YSOs. The inventory of massive YSOs, in conjunction with surveys of interstellar medium, allows us to examine the conditions for star formation: spontaneous or triggered. We examine the relationship between star formation and gravitational instability on a global scale, and we present evidence of triggered star formation on local scales in the LMC.

  16. Formation and Dynamical Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William F.

    2015-08-01

    Asteroids are critical to our desire to unravel the origin of the Solar System because they supply unique, relatively pristine snapshots of the environment in which the Earth formed and evolved. This is due to the fact that, although the asteroids and Earth have followed very different evolutionary pathways, they all formed from the same set of physical processes and share a common ancestry. The asteroid belt presents a particular challenge to understanding terrestrial planet formation because of its small mass. Models of the protoplanetary disk suggest the region between 2-3 AU should contain roughly 3 Earth masses, while less than 0.001 of an Earth mass is actually found there.A long-standing explanation for the asteroid belt's small mass is that it is due to the gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn. Some have suggested protoplanets grew there before they were dynamically removed from the asteroid belt by resonances with the gas giants. This left the asteroid belt dynamically excited (which is observed) and heavily depleted in mass. More recently, however, detailed models have shown that this process produces an asteroid belt that is inconsistent with observations.Two recent models propose new ways to match asteroid belt constraints. The first, the so-called ‘Grand Tack’ scenario, uses the results of hydrodynamic simulations to show that Jupiter (and Saturn) migrated both inward and outward across the asteroid belt while interacting with the protoplanetary gas disk. The Grand Tack not only reproduces the mass and mixture of spectral types in the asteroid belt, but it also truncates the planetesimal disk from which the terrestrial planets form, potentially explaining why Mars is less massive than Earth. In a second scenario, planetesimals that form directly from cm- to meter-sized objects, known as “pebbles”, are rapidly converted to 100 to 1000 km asteroid-like object that subsequently grow by accreting even more pebbles. Pebble accretion models

  17. GVE-Based Dynamics and Control for Formation Flying Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Louis; How, Jonathan P.

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying is an enabling technology for many future space missions. This paper presents extensions to the equations of relative motion expressed in Keplerian orbital elements, including new initialization techniques for general formation configurations. A new linear time-varying form of the equations of relative motion is developed from Gauss Variational Equations and used in a model predictive controller. The linearizing assumptions for these equations are shown to be consistent with typical formation flying scenarios. Several linear, convex initialization techniques are presented, as well as a general, decentralized method for coordinating a tetrahedral formation using differential orbital elements. Control methods are validated using a commercial numerical propagator.

  18. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  19. Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Ioana M; den Otter, Wouter K; Briels, Wim J

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  20. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  1. Professor Walter Oelert, leader of the team which created the first atoms of antihydrogen at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) in January 1996

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    Antiparticles were predicted in the work of Paul Dirac in the 1920's, since when physicists have identified all the necessary antiparticle constituents of an antiparticle atom - antielectrons (positrons), antiprotons and antineutrons. However, an antihydrogen atom wasn't produced until the PS210 experiment at CERN in 1995. PS210 used the LEAR accelerator, which was then nearing the end of its lifetime, so everything in the experiment had to work first time. After installing the equipment in spring 1995, the experiment took place in the autumn, in two hour periods over 4 weeks. The experiment team collided energetic antiprotons from LEAR with a heavy element, a challenge for them as well as the LEAR operators. Proving that antihydrogen atoms had been formed required several more weeks of data analysis, but the announcement that nine antihydrogen atoms had been produced came on 4 January 1996.

  2. Research on framework for formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xian-song; XU Hong-gen; ZHANG Ming-jun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a practical framework is proposed to keep formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment. The approach is a viable solution to solve formation problem. The approach allows online planning of the formation paths using a Dijkstra's search algorithm based on the current sensor data. The formation is allowed to be dynamically changed in order to avoid obstacles in the environment. A controller is designed to keep the robots in their planned trajectories. It is shown that the approach is effec In this paper a practical framework is proposed to keep formation control of multiple underwater robots in a dynamic environment. The approach is a viable solution to solve formation problem.

  3. Dynamic Transition and Pattern Formation in Taylor Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian MA; Shouhong WANG

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to study both dynamic and structural transitions of the Taylor-Couette flow,by using the dynamic transition theory and geometric theory of incompressible flows developed recently by the authors.In particular,it is shown that as the Taylor number crosses the critical number,the system undergoes either a continuous or a jump dynamic transition,dictated by the sign of a computable,nondimensional parameter R.In addition,it is also shown that the new transition states have the Taylor vortex type of flow structure,which is structurally stable.

  4. Dynamics of formation of ferromanganese nodules in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Ghosh, A.K.

    list some of the essential requirements for the formation of nodules including the availability of nucleating materials, presence of metals in water column and sediment, favourable tectonic and physiographic features, helpful acoustically transparent...

  5. Dynamic behavior of a social model for opinion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordogna, Clelia M.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2007-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of a social group influenced by both a strong leader and the mass media, which is modeled according to the social impact theory, is studied under two situations: (i) The strong leader changes his/her state of opinion periodically while the mass media are not considered. In this case, the leader is capable of driving the group between a dynamically ordered state with a weak leader-group coupling (high-frequency regime) and a dynamically disordered state where the group follows the opinion of the leader (low-frequency regime). (ii) The mass-media change periodically their message and have to compete with a strong leader that keeps his/her state of opinion unchanged. In this case, the mass media require an amplitude threshold in order to overcome the influence of the leader and drive the system into a dynamically disordered state. The dynamic behavior characteristic of the studied social opinion model shares many features of physical systems that are relevant in the fields of statistical mechanics and condensed matter.

  6. Dynamics and gravitational wave signature of collapsar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C D; Reisswig, C; Schnetter, E; O'Connor, E; Sperhake, U; Löffler, F; Diener, P; Abdikamalov, E; Hawke, I; Burrows, A

    2011-04-22

    We perform 3+1 general relativistic simulations of rotating core collapse in the context of the collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts. We employ a realistic progenitor, rotation based on results of stellar evolution calculations, and a simplified equation of state. Our simulations track self-consistently collapse, bounce, the postbounce phase, black hole formation, and the subsequent early hyperaccretion phase. We extract gravitational waves from the spacetime curvature and identify a unique gravitational wave signature associated with the early phase of collapsar formation.

  7. A Broad Dynamical Model for Pattern Formation by Lateral Inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Arcak, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Many patterning events in multi-cellular organisms rely on cell-to-cell contact signaling, such as the Notch pathway in metazoans. A particularly interesting phenomenon in this form of communication is lateral inhibition where a cell that adopts a particular fate inhibits its immediate neighbors from doing the same. Dynamical models are of great interest for understanding the circuit topologies involved in lateral inhibition and for predicting the associated patterns. Several simplified models have been employed for Notch signalling pathways in the literature. The objective of this paper is to present an abstract dynamical model that captures the essential features of lateral inhibition and to demonstrate with dynamical systems techniques that these features indeed lead to patterning.

  8. Dynamical Formation of the GW150914 Binary Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Carl L; Chatterjee, Sourav; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility that GW150914, the binary black hole merger recently detected by Advanced LIGO, was formed by gravitational interactions in the core of a dense star cluster. Using models of globular clusters with detailed $N$-body dynamics and stellar evolution, we show that a typical cluster with a mass of $3\\times10^5M_{\\odot}$ to $6\\times10^5M_{\\odot}$ is optimal for forming GW150914-like binary black holes that will merge in the local universe. We identify the most likely dynamical processes for forming GW150914 in such a cluster, and we show that the detection of GW150914 is consistent with the masses and merger rates expected for binary black hole mergers from globular clusters. Our results show that dynamical processes provide a significant and well-understood pathway for forming binary black hole mergers in the local universe. Understanding the contribution of dynamics to the binary black hole merger problem is a critical step in unlocking the full potential of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  9. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilie, I.M.; Otter, den W.K.; Briels, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assem

  10. Flexible Virtual Structure Consideration in Dynamic Modeling of Mobile Robots Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kamel, A. Essghaier; Beji, L.; Lerbet, J.; Abichou, A.

    2009-03-01

    In cooperative mobile robotics, we look for formation keeping and maintenance of a geometric configuration during movement. As a solution to these problems, the concept of a virtual structure is considered. Based on this idea, we have developed an efficient flexible virtual structure, describing the dynamic model of n vehicles in formation and where the whole formation is kept dependant. Notes that, for 2D and 3D space navigation, only a rigid virtual structure was proposed in the literature. Further, the problem was limited to a kinematic behavior of the structure. Hence, the flexible virtual structure in dynamic modeling of mobile robots formation presented in this paper, gives more capabilities to the formation to avoid obstacles in hostile environment while keeping formation and avoiding inter-agent collision.

  11. A demographic approach to firm dynamics: formation of new firms and survival of old ones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, P.; Geenhuizen, van M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces a new approach to firm dynamics, named demography of firms. It is the study of demographic events in a population of firms. Thepaper argues that withina demographic approach, attention should be paid to a broad range of firm dynamics, including both new firm formation and survi

  12. Trajectory Dynamics of Gas Molecules and Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Llanos, Pedro J; Hintz, Gerald R

    2013-01-01

    The probability distribution of the velocity of gas molecules in a closed container is described by the kinetic theory of gases. When molecules collide or impact the walls of a container, they exchange energy and momentum in accordance with Newton's laws of motion. Between collisions, the trajectory of individual molecules is a straight line, neglecting gravity. During the formation of a galaxy, the stars are constrained to a region of space and exchange energy and momentum in a manner similar to molecules. In this paper, an exact model of an ideal gas is derived and analyzed to determine the probability distribution of the molecular velocities, which are then compared with the probability distribution of velocities associated with stars during galaxy formation.

  13. Opinion Formation and the Collective Dynamics of Risk Perception

    CERN Document Server

    Moussaid, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    The formation of collective opinion is a complex phenomenon that results from the combined effects of mass media exposure and social influence between individuals. The present work introduces a model of opinion formation specifically designed to address risk judgments, such as attitudes towards climate change, terrorist threats, or children vaccination. The model assumes that people collect risk information from the media environment and exchange them locally with other individuals. Even though individuals are initially exposed to the same sample of information, the model predicts the emergence of opinion polarization and clustering. In particular, numerical simulations highlight two crucial factors that determine the collective outcome: the propensity of individuals to search for independent information, and the strength of social influence. This work provides a quantitative framework to anticipate and manage how the public responds to a given risk, and could help understanding the systemic amplification of ...

  14. Dynamics of fingering convection II: The formation of thermohaline staircases

    CERN Document Server

    Stellmach, S; Garaud, P; Brummell, N; Radko, T

    2010-01-01

    Regions of the ocean's thermocline unstable to salt fingering are often observed to host thermohaline staircases, stacks of deep well-mixed convective layers separated by thin stably-stratified interfaces. Decades after their discovery, however, their origin remains controversial. In this paper we use 3D direct numerical simulations to shed light on the problem. We study the evolution of an analogous double-diffusive system, starting from an initial statistically homogeneous fingering state and find that it spontaneously transforms into a layered state. By analysing our results in the light of the mean-field theory developed in Paper I, a clear picture of the sequence of events resulting in the staircase formation emerges. A collective instability of homogeneous fingering convection first excites a field of gravity waves, with a well-defined vertical wavelength. However, the waves saturate early through regular but localized breaking events, and are not directly responsible for the formation of the staircase....

  15. Departures from Axisymmetric Balance Dynamics during Secondary Eyewall Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    arguments, based mostly on linearized Ekman theory, to propose a feedback mechanism for secondary eye- wall formation that involves a local enhancement of...the radial vorticity gradient, frictional updraft, and con- vection. The hypothesized feedback, based primarily on linear Ekman balance reasoning, has...largely to a vertical column within an annular region about 15 km wide, centered around 40 km and sloping outward. The mean heating rate maximum exhibits a

  16. Langevin dynamics for the chiral transition and DCC formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroff, Daniel; Fraga, Eduardo S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IF/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The theory of the strong interactions allows for the formation of metastable exotic configurations of the vacuum. Such metastable states can, in principle, be produced in high-energy heavy ion collisions taking place in accelerators like the LHC and in cosmic rays in the atmosphere. In this work, we consider disoriented chiral condensates (DCC), treating them through an effective field theory - the linear-sigma model couple to quarks - and consider possible consequences for ultra-energetic cosmic ray observations performed by the Pierre Auger observatory. After a high-energy collision, the state of the system can be chirally rotated from its true vacuum orientation. Later, this disoriented state (DCC) will relax into the ordinary vacuum configuration, emitting pions. This leads to an asymmetry between charged and neutral pions. This is especially interesting in the context of cosmic rays, where the primary collision in the atmosphere presents favorable conditions for the formation of DCCs. Such exotics might be related to the Centauro and Anti-Centauro events observed by Lattes and collaborators in high-energy cosmic rays experiments. We consider the possibility of DCC formation during a first-order chiral transition, studying the order parameter evolution in a Langevin description. We analyse the DCC influence on the typical time scales of transition and also calculate the pion production rate. (author)

  17. NGC6240: Merger-Induced Star Formation & Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, H; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J; Hicks, E K S; Sturm, E; Naab, T; Johansson, P H; Karl, S J; Max, C E; Medling, A; van der Werf, P P

    2010-01-01

    We present spatially resolved integral field spectroscopic K-band data at a resolution of 0.13" (60pc) and interferometric CO(2-1) line observations of the prototypical merging system NGC6240. Despite the clear rotational signature, the stellar kinematics in the two nuclei are dominated by dispersion. We use Jeans modelling to derive the masses and the mass-to-light ratios of the nuclei. Combining the luminosities with the spatially resolved Br-gamma equivalent width shows that only 1/3 of the K-band continuum from the nuclei is associated with the most recent star forming episode; and that less than 30% of the system's bolometric luminosity and only 9% of its stellar mass is due to this starburst. The star formation properties, calculated from typical merger star formation histories, demonstrate the impact of different assumptions about the star formation history. The properties of the nuclei, and the existence of a prominent old stellar population, indicate that the nuclei are remnants of the progenitor gal...

  18. On the Interface Formation Model for Dynamic Triple Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the theory of Y. Shikhmurzaev on forming interfaces as a continuum thermodynamical model for dynamic triple lines. We start with the derivation of the balances for mass, momentum, energy and entropy in a three-phase fluid system with full interfacial physics, including a brief review of the relevant transport theorems on interfaces and triple lines. Employing the entropy principle in the form given in [Bothe & Dreyer, Acta Mechanica, doi:10.1007/s00707-014-1275-1] but extended to this more general case, we arrive at the entropy production and perform a linear closure, except for a nonlinear closure for the sorption processes. Specialized to the isothermal case, we obtain a thermodynamically consistent mathematical model for dynamic triple lines and show that the total available energy is a strict Lyapunov function for this system.

  19. Particle Transport along Magnetic Null Lines as Sputter or Antihydrogen Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, R. A.; Ordonez, C. A.

    Particle transport along null magnetic lines is investigated using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations and described as a traveling wave and through diffusion equations. A magnetic null line is defined as a one-dimensional region where the magnetic field magnitude is zero. This region may take any shape in three-dimensional space. The field used in the simulations is generated by two infinite wires of negligible thickness carrying identical current and separated by a small distance. Thus, an infinite magnetic null line exists directly between the wires. The particle trajectories are simulated by solving the equations of motion for each simulated particle of a mono- energetic set. Each is considered individually, with all trajectories starting from the same position along the null line. Each trajectory is simulated until it reaches a specified distance from the initial point or a maximum time elapses. The simulation is repeated using a full set for multiple endpoints and maximum times for ten different amounts of current in the wires. Each current value is selected so that no particles can travel more than seven times the distance between the wires from the null line. The fraction of particles that reach the endpoint in a given time is calculated and used to describe particle transport parallel to the null line. The results are given in normalized, dimensionless units and their possible applications as an antihydrogen source and use in ultra-high purity sputter are discussed. The results are used to find the conditions necessary to obtain a steady and uniform particle flux suitable for ultra-high purity sputter, assuming that plasma is generated near the null line.

  20. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Claus C Hilgetag

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to...

  1. Microtubule Dynamicity Is More Important than Stability in Memory Formation: an In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarod, Deyhim; Eskandari-Sedighi, Ghazaleh; Pazhoohi, Farid; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Khajeloo, Mojtaba; Riazi, Gholam Hossein

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that microtubule (MT) activity and dynamics can have huge impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory formation. This is mainly due to various functions of MTs in neurons; MTs are involved in dendritic spine formation, axonal transportation, neuronal polarity, and receptor trafficking. Recent studies from our group and other labs have suggested the possible role of brain MT dynamicity and activity in memory; however, there is a need for more detailed studies regarding this aspect. In this study, we have tried to evaluate the importance of microtubule dynamicity rather than stability in memory formation in vivo. In order to investigate the role of MT stability in memory formation, we treated mice with paclitaxel-a classic microtubule-stabilizing agent. We then studied the behavior of treated animals using Morris water maze (MWM) test. To measure the effect of injected paclitaxel on MT polymerization kinetics, we conducted polymerization assays on brain extracts of the same paclitaxel-treated animals. Our results show that paclitaxel treatment affects animals' memory in a negative way and treated animals behave poorly in MWM compared to control group. In addition, our kinetics studies show that MT stability is significantly increased in brain extracts from paclitaxel-treated mice, but MT dynamics is reduced. Thus, we suggest that dynamicity is a very important feature of MT protein structures, and regarding memory formation, dynamicity is more important than stability and high activity.

  2. Dynamics of optically excited tungsten and silicon for ripples formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Chen; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-03-01

    We measured the dielectric constant of optically excited silicon and tungsten using a dual-angle femtosecond reflectivity pump-probe technique. The energy deposition in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is then investigated by simulating the laser pulse interaction with an initially random distributed rough surface using 3D-Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, with the measured dielectric constant as a material input. We found in the FDTD simulation periodic energy deposition patterns both perpendicular and parallel to the laser polarization. The origin of them are discussed for originally plasmonic and non-plasmonic material.

  3. Global Format for Conservative Time Integration in Nonlinear Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    -frequency parts of the response. The energy conservation property is developed in two steps. First a fourth-order representation of the internal energy increment is obtained in terms of the mean value of the associated internal forces and an additional term containing the increment of the tangent stiffness matrix....... In the present paper a conservative time integration algorithm is developed in a format using only the internal forces and the associated tangent stiffness at the specific time integration points. Thus, the procedure is computationally very similar to a collocation method, consisting of a series of nonlinear...

  4. Dynamics of polymer film formation during spin coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouhamad, Y.; Clarke, N.; Jones, R. A. L.; Geoghegan, M., E-mail: geoghegan@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Mokarian-Tabari, P. [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry and the Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-09-28

    Standard models explaining the spin coating of polymer solutions generally fail to describe the early stages of film formation, when hydrodynamic forces control the solution behavior. Using in situ light scattering alongside theoretical and semi-empirical models, it is shown that inertial forces (which initially cause a vertical gradient in the radial solvent velocity within the film) play a significant role in the rate of thinning of the solution. The development of thickness as a function of time of a solute-free liquid (toluene) and a blend of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) cast from toluene were fitted to different models as a function of toluene partial pressure. In the case of the formation of the polymer blend film, a concentration-dependent (Huggins) viscosity formula was used to account for changes in viscosity during spin coating. A semi-empirical model is introduced, which permits calculation of the solvent evaporation rate and the temporal evolution of the solute volume fraction and solution viscosity.

  5. Adaptive RBFNN Formation Control of Multi-mobile Robots with Actuator Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan-dong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of formation control and trajectory tracking for multiple nonholonomic mobile robots with actuator and formation dynamics. An adaptive neural-network (NN control strategy that integrated kinematic controller with input voltages controller of actuator was proposed. A control law was designed by backstepping technique based on separation-bearing formation control structure of leader-follower. The radial basis function neural network (RBFNN was adopted to achieve on-line estimation for the dynamics nonlinear uncertain part for follower and leader robots. The adaptive robust controller was adopted to compensate modeling errors of NN. This strategy not only overcomed all kinds of uncertainties of mobile robots, but also ensured the desired trajectory tracking of robot formation in the case of maintaining formation. The stability and convergence of the control system were proved by using the Lyapunov theory. The simulation results showed the effectiveness of this proposed method.

  6. CONSENSUS FORMATION OF TWO-LEVEL OPINION DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yilun SHANG

    2014-01-01

    Opinion dynamics have received significant attention in recent years. This pa-per proposes a bounded confidence opinion model for a group of agents with two different confidence levels. Each agent in the population is endowed with a confidence interval around her opinion with radius αd or (1-α)d, where α ∈ (0, 1/2] represents the differentiation of confidence levels. We analytically derived the critical confidence bound dc =1/(4α) for the two-level opinion dynamics on Z. A single opinion cluster is formed with probability 1 above this critical value regardless of the ratio p of agents with high/low confidence. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate our theoretical results. Noticed is a clear impact of p on the collective behavior: more agents with high confidence lead to harder agreement. It is also experimentally revealed that the sharpness of the threshold dc increases with αbut does not depend on p.

  7. Centralized Dynamics and Control of Novel Orbiting Formations of Tethered Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    acting as leader of the tethered formation. An application of this problem arises when a distributed sensor array formed by a chain of tethered data-gathering vehicles is being commanded to reconfigure from a remote location by the formation leader. Another application is in radar mapping where multiple free-flying vehicles synthesize multiple apertures with the main tethered vehicle for increased coverage. In this way, a centralized control architecture distributes the information flow among the members of the sensor array. Defining an orbiting formation as an ensemble of orbiting spacecraft performing a cooperative task, we point out that, until now, only spacecraft modeled as rigid bodies have been analyzed in the literature of orbiting formations and constellations. After the formation is in place, one may identify what is known as the virtual truss, i.e. the connection between the elements of the formation, which provides structural rigidity on account of the information flow between them. Our problem is different than conventional formation dynamics problems in that the presence of a tethered spacecraft within the formation demands an investigation of the dynamics coupling between spacecraft caused by tether viscoelasticity. The dynamics model takes into account the orbital and spacecraft dynamics of each vehicle. The control architecture features a separated spacecraft, which has visibility to the entire group of tethered vehicles. This vehicle is the leader of the formation, and ensures that the spacecraft on the tether remain connected and move according to a pre-specified program. The control system design consists of a proportional-derivative feedback plus acceleration feedforward. This ensures that modeling errors are compensated appropriately, and that the commanded slew is tracked accurately. The leader is also where the centralized estimator is located. This estimator continuously updates the state of the formation and estimates inter

  8. Distributed Consensus-Based Robust Adaptive Formation Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots with Partial Known Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the distributed consensus-based robust adaptive formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots with partially known dynamics. Firstly, multirobot formation control problem has been converted into a state consensus problem. Secondly, the practical control strategies, which incorporate the distributed kinematic controllers and the robust adaptive torque controllers, are designed for solving the formation control problem. Thirdly, the specified reference trajectory for the geometric centroid of the formation is assumed as the trajectory of a virtual leader, whose information is available to only a subset of the followers. Finally, numerical results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approaches.

  9. Dynamic approaches of mixed species biofilm formation using modern technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Kim; Linossier, Isabelle; Fay, Fabienne; Yong, Julius; Abd Wahid, Effendy; Hadjiev, Dimitre; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2012-07-01

    Bacteria and diatoms exist in sessile communities and develop as biofilm on all surfaces in aqueous environments. The interaction between these microorganisms in biofilm was investigated with a bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas sp. (strain 3J6) and two benthic diatoms Amphora coffeaeformis and Cylindrotheca closterium. Each biofilm was grown for 22 days. Images from the confocal microscopy show a difference of adhesion between Pseudoalteromonas 3J6 and diatoms. Indeed, a stronger adhesion is found with C. closterium suggesting cohabitation between Pseudoalteromonas 3J6 and C. closterium compared at an adaptation for bacteria and A. coffeaeformis. The cellular attachment and the growth evolution in biofilm formation depend on each species of diatoms in the biofilm. Behaviour of microalgae in presence of bacteria demonstrates the complexity of the marine biofilm.

  10. Social Influence and the Collective Dynamics of Opinion Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Moussaid, Mehdi; Analytis, Pantelis P; Neth, Hansjoerg

    2013-01-01

    Social influence is the process by which individuals adapt their opinion, revise their beliefs, or change their behavior as a result of social interactions with other people. In our strongly interconnected society, social influence plays a prominent role in many self-organized phenomena such as herding in cultural markets, the spread of ideas and innovations, and the amplification of fears during epidemics. Yet, the mechanisms of opinion formation remain poorly understood, and existing physics-based models lack systematic empirical validation. Here, we report two controlled experiments showing how participants answering factual questions revise their initial judgments after being exposed to the opinion and confidence level of others. Based on the observation of 59 experimental subjects exposed to peer-opinion for 15 different items, we draw an influence map that describes the strength of peer influence during interactions. A simple process model derived from our observations demonstrates how opinions in a gro...

  11. Dynamics of cluster formation in driven magnetic colloids dispersed on a monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Sebastian; Stark, Holger; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-05-15

    We report computer simulation results on the cluster formation of dipolar colloidal particles driven by a rotating external field in a quasi-two-dimensional setup. We focus on the interplay between permanent dipolar and hydrodynamic interactions and its influence on the dynamic behavior of the particles. This includes their individual as well as their collective motion. To investigate these characteristics, we employ Brownian dynamics simulations of a finite system with and without hydrodynamic interactions. Our results indicate that hydrodynamic interactions have a profound impact on the dynamic behavior of the clusters and the dynamics of the clustering process.

  12. Dynamic star formation in the massive DR21 filament

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, N; Bontemps, S; Motte, F; Simon, R; Hennebelle, P; Federrath, C; Klessen, R

    2010-01-01

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is not clear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or in an equilibrium state, supported by turbulence. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we expect to find observational signatures that allow to discriminate between the two views. We use molecular line data from our 13CO 1-0, CS 2-1, and N2H+ 1-0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and high-angular resolution observations of CO, CS, HCO+, N2H+, and H2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of highest column-density, i.e. dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of ...

  13. Dynamical Evidence for a Late Formation of Saturn's Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija; Nesvorný, David

    2016-01-01

    We explore the past evolution of Saturn's moons using direct numerical integrations. We find that the past Tethys-Dione 3:2 orbital resonance predicted in standard models likely did not occur, implying that the system is less evolved than previously thought. On the other hand, the orbital inclinations of Tethys, Dione and Rhea suggest that the system did cross the Dione-Rhea 5:3 resonance, which is closely followed by a Tethys-Dione secular resonance. A clear implication is that either the moons are significantly younger than the planet, or that their tidal evolution must be extremely slow (Q > 80,000). As an extremely slow-evolving system is incompatible with intense tidal heating of Enceladus, we conclude that the moons interior to Titan are not primordial, and we present a plausible scenario for the system's recent formation. We propose that the mid-sized moons re-accreted from a disk about 100 Myr ago, during which time Titan acquired its significant orbital eccentricity. We speculate that this disk has f...

  14. Dynamical Formation of Close Binary Systems in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pooley, D; Anderson, S F; Baumgardt, H; Filippenko, A V; Gaensler, B M; Homer, L; Hut, P; Kaspi, V M; Margon, B; McMillan, S; Zwart, S P; Van der Klis, M; Verbunt, F

    2003-01-01

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual short-period binary systems or their offspring, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs; neutron stars accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions), cataclysmic variables (CVs; white dwarfs accreting matter from stellar companions), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs; rotating neutron stars with spin periods of a few ms). Although there has been little direct evidence, the overabundance of these objects in globular clusters has been attributed by numerous authors to the high densities in the cores, which leads to an increase in the formation rate of exotic binary systems through close stellar encounters. Many such close binary systems emit X-radiation at low luminosities (L_x < 10^{34} erg/s) and are being found in large numbers through observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Here we present conclusive observational evidence for a link between the number of close binaries observed in X-rays in a globul...

  15. Dynamics and structure formation in thin polymer melt films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Herminghaus, Stephan [Max-Planck-Institut for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Neto, Chiara [Department of Applied Mathematics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Schlagowski, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Podzimek, Daniel [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Konrad, Renate [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Mantz, Hubert [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Jacobs, Karin [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2005-03-09

    The stability of thin liquid coatings plays a fundamental role in everyday life. We studied the stability conditions of thin (3 to 300 nm) liquid polymer films on various substrates. The key role is played by the effective interface potential {phi} of the system air/film/substrate, which determines the dewetting scenario in case the film is not stable. We describe in this study how to distinguish a spinodal dewetting scenario from heterogeneous and homogeneous dewetting by analysing the emerging structures of the film surface by e.g. Minkowski measures. We also include line tension studies of tiny droplets, showing that the long-range part of {phi} does affect the drop profile, but only very close to the three phase boundary line. The dynamic properties of the films are characterized via various experimental methods: the form of the dewetting front, for example, was recorded by scanning probe microscopy and gives insight into the boundary condition between the liquid and the substrate. We further report experiments probing the viscosity and the glass transition temperature of nm-thick films using e.g. ellipsometry. Here we find that even short-chained polymer melts exhibit a significant reduction of the glass transition temperature as the film thickness is reduced below 100 nm.

  16. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  17. Dynamics of the current filament formation and its steady-state characteristics in chalcogenide based PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoslovskiy, Nikita; Tsendin, Konstantin

    2017-03-01

    In the phase-change memory (PCM) crystallization occurs in the high-current filament which forms during switching to the conductive state. In the present paper we conduct a numerical modeling of the current filament formation dynamics in thin chalcogenide films using an electronic-thermal model based on negative-U centers tunnel ionization and Joule heating. The key role of inhomogeneities in the filament formation process is shown. Steady-state filament parameters were obtained from the analysis of the stationary heat conduction equation. The filament formation dynamics and the steady-state filament radius and temperature could be controlled by material parameters and contact resistance. Consequently it is possible to control the size of the region wherein crystallization occurs. A good agreement with numerous experimental data leads to the conclusion that thermal effects play a significant role in CGS conduction and high-current filament formation while switching.

  18. Process Dynamics and Fractal Analysis of New Phase Formation in Thermal Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang J; Shen Z.W; Shen Z. Q

    2001-01-01

    Boiling and fouling are taken as typical examples of new phase formation process to be analyzed and discussed in this paper. The process dynamics of nucleate boiling is analyzed and its mechanism is discussed from the view point of self-organization. Fouling, which is a more complicated phenomenon of new phase formation, involves series of underlying processes. The morphology and fractal analysis of fouling on low-energy surface and that with fouling inhibitors are studied and discussed. It is suggested that considering the process dynamics, fractal analysis and self-organization, a new avenue of research should be found.

  19. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, N.; /Saclay; Csengeri, T.; /Saclay; Bontemps, S.; /OASU, Floirac; Motte, F.; /Saclay; Simon, R.; /Cologne U.; Hennebelle, P.; /Paris Observ.; Federrath, C.; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows

  20. Designing a Robust Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Controller for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseok Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust nonlinear dynamic inversion (RNDI control technique is proposed to keep the relative position of spacecrafts while formation flying. The proposed RNDI control method is based on nonlinear dynamic inversion (NDI. NDI is nonlinear control method that replaces the original dynamics into the user-selected desired dynamics. Because NDI removes nonlinearities in the model by inverting the original dynamics directly, it also eliminates the need of designing suitable controllers for each equilibrium point; that is, NDI works as self-scheduled controller. Removing the original model also provides advantages of ease to satisfy the specific requirements by simply handling desired dynamics. Therefore, NDI is simple and has many similarities to classical control. In real applications, however, it is difficult to achieve perfect cancellation of the original dynamics due to uncertainties that lead to performance degradation and even make the system unstable. This paper proposes robustness assurance method for NDI. The proposed RNDI is designed by combining NDI and sliding mode control (SMC. SMC is inherently robust using high-speed switching inputs. This paper verifies similarities of NDI and SMC, firstly. And then RNDI control method is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by simulations applied to spacecraft formation flying problem.

  1. Variational calculations for the hydrogen-antihydrogen system with a mass-scaled Born-Oppenheimer potential

    CERN Document Server

    Stegeby, Henrik; Karlsson, Hans O; Lindh, Roland; Froelich, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The problem of proton-antiproton motion in the ${\\rm H}$--${\\rm \\bar{H}}$ system is investigated by means of the variational method. We introduce a modified nuclear interaction through mass-scaling of the Born-Oppenheimer potential. This improved treatment of the interaction includes the nondivergent part of the otherwise divergent adiabatic correction and shows the correct threshold behavior. Using this potential we calculate the vibrational energy levels with angular momentum 0 and 1 and the corresponding nuclear wave functions, as well as the S-wave scattering length. We obtain a full set of all bound states together with a large number of discretized continuum states that might be utilized in variational four-body calculations. The results of our calculations gives an indication of resonance states in the hydrogen-antihydrogen system.

  2. Hydrogen spectroscopy with a Lamb-shift polarimeter. An alternative approach towards anti-hydrogen spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westig, M.P. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Univ. zu Koln (Germany); Westig, M.P.; Engels, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtytchiants, M.; Rathmann, F.; Schug, G.; Stroher, H. [Institut fur Kernphysik and Julich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Julich (Germany); Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtytchiants, M.; Vasilyev, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Paetz gen Schieck, H. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Univ. zu Koln (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    A Lamb-shift polarimeter, which has been built for a fast determination of the polarization of protons and deuterons of an atomic-beam source and which is frequently used in the ANKE experiment at COSY-Juelich, is shown to be an excellent device for atomic-spectroscopy measurements of metastable hydrogen isotopes. It is demonstrated that magnetic and electric dipole transitions in hydrogen can be measured as a function of the external magnetic field, giving access to the full Breit-Rabi diagram for the 2{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} and the 2{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} states. This will allow the study of hyperfine structure, g factors and the classical Lamb shift. Although the data are not yet competitive with state-of-the-art measurements, the potential of the method is enormous, including a possible application to anti-hydrogen spectroscopy. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen Spectroscopy with a Lamb-shift Polarimeter - An Alternative Approach Towards Anti-Hydrogen Spectroscopy Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Westig, M P; Grigoryev, K; Mikirtytchiants, M; Rathmann, F; Schieck, H Paetz gen; Schug, G; Vasilyev, A; Ströher, H; 10.1140/epjd/e2010-00016-9

    2011-01-01

    A Lamb-shift polarimeter, which has been built for a fast determination of the polarization of protons and deuterons of an atomic-beam source and which is frequently used in the ANKE experiment at COSY-J\\"ulich, is shown to be an excellent device for atomic-spectroscopy measurements of metastable hydrogen isotopes. It is demonstrated that magnetic and electric dipole transitions in hydrogen can be measured as a function of the external magnetic field, giving access to the full Breit-Rabi diagram for the $2^2S_{1/2}$ and the $2^2P_{1/2}$ states. This will allow the study of hyperfine structure, $g$ factors and the classical Lamb shift. Although the data are not yet competitive with state-of-the-art measurements, the potential of the method is enormous, including a possible application to anti-hydrogen spectroscopy.

  4. Dust formation and dynamic in magnetized and non-magnetized microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, Karim; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled

    2016-09-01

    Dusty plasmas studies are conducted for several decades to answer to various issues from microelectronic, nanotechnology, astrophysics and thermonuclear fusion devices. These studies are usually conducted in RF discharges at low pressure in which the major physics concerning dust formation mechanisms and dynamic is now well known. In our case, we focus on dust formation and dynamic in (i) microwave plasma under typical pressure conditions of RF discharges (50 Pa) and (ii) in magnetized (ECR: Electron Cyclotron Resonance) microwave plasma under very low pressure condition (0.1 to 1 Pa). The aim of this study is not only for fundamental purpose but also for respond to some issues concerning dust in fusion devices. Thus, we investigate the dust formation mechanisms and dynamic using laser extinction method and laser light scattering imaging coupling with SEM imaging in hydrocarbon plasma and with PVD system with using tungsten target (according to fusion device). We observed that dust formation occurs even if the very low pressure conditions are generally not suitable for nucleation growth in gas phase (the influence of the magnetic field will be discussed). We will also discuss about the particular dust dynamic behavior in microwave discharge in comparison with RF discharge.

  5. Formation Control of Mobile Agents with Second-order Nonlinear Dynamics in Unknown Environments Containing Obstacles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Jie; Cao, Ming; Zhou, Ning

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the formation control problem of multiple mobile agents with second-order nonlinear dynamics in complex environments containing multiple obstacles. By employing the null-space-based behavioral (NSB) control architecture, a novel fast terminal sliding mode based adaptive contr

  6. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  7. The Romulus Cosmological Simulations: A Physical Approach to the Formation, Dynamics and Accretion Models of SMBHs

    CERN Document Server

    Tremmel, Michael; Governato, Fabio; Volonteri, Marta; Quinn, Tom; Pontzen, Andrew; Anderson, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel implementation of supermassive black hole (SMBH) formation, dynamics, and accretion in the massively parallel tree+SPH code, ChaNGa. This approach improves the modeling of SMBHs in fully cosmological simulations, allowing for a more detailed analysis of SMBH-galaxy co-evolution throughout cosmic time. Our scheme includes novel, physically motivated models for SMBH formation, dynamics and sinking timescales within galaxies, and SMBH accretion of rotationally supported gas. The sub-grid parameters that regulate star formation (SF) and feedback from SMBHs and SNe are optimized against a comprehensive set of z = 0 galaxy scaling relations using a novel, multi-dimensional parameter search. We have incorporated our new SMBH implementation and parameter optimization onto a new set of high resolution, large-scale cosmological simulations called Romulus. We present initial results from our flagship simulation, Romulus25, showing that our SMBH model results in SF efficiency, SMBH masses, and global c...

  8. Formation dynamics of FeN thin films on Cu(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the structural and magnetic properties of thin films of FeN we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of their formation on Cu(100) substrates. The iron nitride layers exhibit a p4gm(2 × 2) reconstruction and order ferromagnetically in agreement with experiment. We establish the dynamics and time scale of the film formation as a function of the film thickness. The process is split in two phases: formation of almost flat FeN layers and optimization of the distance to the substrate. Our calculated magnetic moments are 1.67 μ B, 2.14 μ B, and 2.21 μ B for one, two, and three monolayers of iron nitride. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quick and inexpensive paraffin-embedding method for dynamic bone formation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Amy; Irwin, Regina; Miller, Josselyn; Horan, Daniel J.; Robling, Alexander G.; McCabe, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a straightforward method that uses paraffin-embedded bone for undemineralized thin sectioning, which is amenable to subsequent dynamic bone formation measurements. Bone has stiffer material properties than paraffin, and therefore has hereforto usually been embedded in plastic blocks, cured and sectioned with a tungsten carbide knife to obtain mineralized bone sections for dynamic bone formation measures. This process is expensive and requires special equipment, experienced personnel, and time for the plastic to penetrate the bone and cure. Our method utilizes a novel way to prepare mineralized bone that increases its compliance so that it can be embedded and easily section in paraffin blocks. The approach is simple, quick, and costs less than 10% of the price for plastic embedded bone sections. While not effective for static bone measures, this method allows dynamic bone analyses to be readily performed in laboratories worldwide which might not otherwise have access to traditional (plastic) equipment and expertise. PMID:28198415

  10. DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF CAVITY FOR COMPOSED THERMAL HYPERELASTIC SPHERES IN NON-UNIFORM TEMPERATURE FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Dynamical formation and growth of cavity in a sphere composed of two incompressible thermal-hyperelastic Gent-Thomas materials were discussed under the case of a non-uniform temperature field and the surface dead loading. The mathematical model was first presented based on the dynamical theory of finite deformations. An exact differential relation between the void radius and surface load was obtained by using the variable transformation method. By numerical computation, critical loads and cavitation growth curves were obtained for different temperatures. The influence of the temperature and material parameters of the composed sphere on the void formation and growth was considered and compared with those for static analysis. The results show that the cavity occurs suddenly with a finite radius and its evolvement with time displays a non-linear periodic vibration and that the critical load decreases with the increase of temperature and also the dynamical critical load is lower than the static critical load under the same conditions.

  11. Dynamic WTA optimization model of air defense operation of warships' formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jinjun; Cong Rong; Xiong Jiguang

    2006-01-01

    WTA (weapon-target allocation) of air defense operation is a very complicated problem and current models focus on static and restricted WTA problem mostly. Based on the dynamic characteristics of air defense operational command and decision of warships' formation, a dynamic WTA model is established. Simulation results show that switch fire and repetition fire of anti-air weapon systems affect the result of the air defense operation remarkably and the dynamic model is more satisfying than static ones. Related results are gained based on the analysis of the simulation results and the results are accordant with the intuitionistic tactical judgment. The model is some reference for the research of air defense C3I system of warships' formation.

  12. Complex dynamics of osteoclast formation and death in long-term cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Akchurin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoclasts, cells responsible for bone resorption, contribute to the development of degenerative, metabolic and neoplastic bone diseases, which are often characterized by persistent changes in bone microenvironment. We aimed to investigate the dynamics of osteoclast formation and death in cultures that considerably exceeded the length of standard protocol and to design a mathematical model describing osteoclastogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RAW 264.7 monocytic cells fuse to form multinucleated osteoclasts upon treatment with pro-resorptive cytokine RANKL. We have found that in long-term experiments (15-26 days, the dynamics of changes in osteoclast numbers was remarkably complex and qualitatively variable in different experiments. Whereas 19 of 46 experiments exhibited single peak of osteoclast formation, in 27 experiments we observed development of successive waves of osteoclast formation and death. Periodic changes in osteoclast numbers were confirmed in long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow cells treated with M-CSF and RANKL. Because the dynamics of changes in osteoclast numbers was found to be largely independent of monocytes, a two-species model of ordinary differential equations describing the changes in osteoclasts and monocytes was ineffective in recapitulating the oscillations in osteoclast numbers. Following experimental observation that medium collected from mature osteoclasts inhibited osteoclastogenesis in fresh cultures, we introduced a third variable, factor f, to describe osteoclast-derived inhibitor. This model allowed us to simulate the oscillatory changes in osteoclasts, which were coupled to oscillatory changes in the factor f, whereas monocytes changed exponentially. Importantly, to achieve the experimentally observed oscillations with increasing amplitude, we also had to assume that osteoclast presence stimulates osteoclast formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies the critical

  13. Formation Dynamics and Quantitative Prediction of Hydrocarbons of the Superpressure System in the Dongying Sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Fenggui; HAO Xuefeng; LIU Qing; ZHUO Qingong; ZHANG Shouchun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the theory of formation dynamics of oil/gas pools, the Dongying sag can be divided into three dynamic systems regarding the accumulation of oil and gas: the superpressure closed system,the semi-closed system and the normal pressure open system. Based on the analysis of genesis of superpressure in the superpressure closed system and the rule of hydrocarbon expulsion,it is found that hydrocarbon generation is related to superpressure, which is the main driving factor of hydrocarbon migration. Micro fractures formed by superpressure are the main channels for hydrocarbon migration. There are three dynamic patterns for hydrocarbon expulsion: free water drainage, hydrocarbon accumulation and drainage through micro fissures. In the superpressure closed system, the oil-driving-water process and oil/gas accumulation were completed in lithologic traps by way of such two dynamic patterns as episodic evolution of superpressure systems and episodic pressure release of faults. The oil-bearing capacity of lithologic traps is intimately related to reservoir-forming dynamic force. Quantitative evaluation of dynamic conditions for pool formation can effectively predict the oil-bearing capability of traps.

  14. Formation and dynamics of van der Waals molecules in buffer-gas traps

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, Nathan; Zhang, Peng; Kłos, Jacek; Forrey, Robert C; Au, Yat Shan; Sadeghpour, H R; Dalgarno, A; Doyle, John M; Walker, Thad G

    2011-01-01

    We show that weakly bound He-containing van der Waals molecules can be produced and magnetically trapped in buffer-gas cooling experiments, and provide a general model for the formation and dynamics of these molecules. Our analysis shows that, at typical experimental parameters, thermodynamics favors the formation of van der Waals complexes composed of a helium atom bound to most open-shell atoms and molecules, and that complex formation occurs quickly enough to ensure chemical equilibrium. For molecular pairs composed of a He atom and an S-state atom, the molecular spin is stable during formation, dissociation, and collisions, and thus these molecules can be magnetically trapped. Collisional spin relaxations are too slow to affect trap lifetimes. However, helium-3-containing complexes can change spin due to adiabatic crossings between trapped and untrapped Zeeman states, mediated by the anisotropic hyperfine interaction, causing trap loss. We provide a detailed model for Ag3He molecules, using ab initio calc...

  15. Dynamics of Semantic and Word-Formation Subsystems of the Russian Language: Historical Dynamics of the Word Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ivanovna Dmitrieva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides comprehensive justification of the principles and methods of the synchronic and diachronic research of word-formation subsystems of the Russian language. The authors also study the ways of analyzing historical dynamics of word family as the main macro-unit of word-formation system. In the field of analysis there is a family of words with the stem 'ход-' (the meaning of 'motion', word-formation of which is investigated in different periods of the Russian literary language. Significance of motion-verbs in the process of forming a language picture of the world determined the character and the structure of this word family as one of the biggest in the history of the Russian language. In the article a structural and semantic dynamics of the word family 'ход-' is depicted. The results of the study show that in the ancient period the prefixes of verbal derivatives were formed, which became the apex-branched derivational paradigms existing in modern Russian. The old Russian period of language development is characterized by the appearance of words with connotative meaning (with suffixes -ishk-, -ichn-, as well as the words with possessive semantics (with suffixes –ev-, -sk-. In this period the verbs with the postfix -cz also supplement the analyzed word family. The period of formation of the National Russian language was marked by the loss of a large number of abstract nouns and the appearance of neologisms from some old Russian abstract nouns. The studied family in the modern Russian language is characterized by the following processes: the appearance of terms, the active semantic derivation, the weakening of word-formation variability, the semantic differentiation of duplicate units, the development of subsystem of words with connotative meanings, and the preservation of derivatives in all functional styles.

  16. Population synthesis of planet formation using a torque formula with dynamic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Population synthesis studies into planet formation have suggested that distributions consistent with observations can only be reproduced if the actual Type I migration timescale is at least an order of magnitude longer than that deduced from linear theories. Although past studies considered the effect of the Type I migration of protoplanetary embryos, in most cases they used a conventional formula based on static torques in isothermal disks, and employed a reduction factor to account for uncertainty in the mechanism details. However, in addition to static torques, a migrating planet experiences dynamic torques that are proportional to the migration rate. These dynamic torques can impact on planet migration and predicted planetary populations. In this study, we derived a new torque formula for Type I migration by taking into account dynamic corrections. This formula was used to perform population synthesis simulations with and without the effect of dynamic torques. In many cases, inward migration was slowed si...

  17. Molecular dynamics in computational materials sciences: From the study of nanostructure formation to the design of fluorescent dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irle, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    On overview is given over the use of approximate density functional theory as basis for performing direct molecular dynamics simulations on ground and excited states. In the case of nanostructure formation, we discuss the relationship between fullerene, nanotube, and graphene formation. In the case of fluorescent molecules, we elucidate the importance of excited state dynamics for fluorescent properties.

  18. Robust optimization of a mathematical model to design a dynamic cell formation problem considering labor utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeinezhad, Moghadaseh; Kia, Reza; Shahnazari-Shahrezaei, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    Cell formation (CF) problem is one of the most important decision problems in designing a cellular manufacturing system includes grouping machines into machine cells and parts into part families. Several factors should be considered in a cell formation problem. In this work, robust optimization of a mathematical model of a dynamic cell formation problem integrating CF, production planning and worker assignment is implemented with uncertain scenario-based data. The robust approach is used to reduce the effects of fluctuations of the uncertain parameters with regards to all possible future scenarios. In this research, miscellaneous cost parameters of the cell formation and demand fluctuations are subject to uncertainty and a mixed-integer nonlinear programming model is developed to formulate the related robust dynamic cell formation problem. The objective function seeks to minimize total costs including machine constant, machine procurement, machine relocation, machine operation, inter-cell and intra-cell movement, overtime, shifting labors between cells and inventory holding. Finally, a case study is carried out to display the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed model. The tradeoff between solution robustness and model robustness is also analyzed in the obtained results.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of organohalide perovskite precursors: solvent effects in the formation of perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Sevillano, Juan José; Ahmad, Shahzada; Calero, Sofía; Anta, Juan A

    2015-09-21

    The stability and desirable crystal formation of organohalide perovskite semiconductors is of utmost relevance to ensure the success of perovskites in photovoltaic technology. Herein we have simulated the dynamics of ionic precursors toward the formation of embryonic organohalide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 units in the presence of solvent molecules using Molecular Dynamics. The calculations involved, a variable amount of Pb(2+), I(-), and CH3NH3(+) ionic precursors in water, pentane and a mixture of these two solvents. Suitable force fields for solvents and precursors have been tested and used to carry out the simulations. Radial distribution functions and mean square displacements confirm the formation of basic perovskite crystalline units in pure pentane - taken as a simple and archetypal organic solvent. In contrast, simulations in water confirm the stability of the solvated ionic precursors, which prevents their aggregation to form the perovskite compound. We have found that in the case of a water/pentane binary solvent, a relatively small amount of water did not hinder the perovskite formation. Thus, our findings suggest that the cause of the poor stability of perovskite films in the presence of moisture is a chemical reaction, rather than the polar nature of the solvents. Based on the results, a set of force-field parameters to study from first principles perovskite formation and stability, also in the solid phase, is proposed.

  20. Game Design Document Format For Video Games With Passive Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratama Wirya Atmaja

    2016-07-01

    satisfaction of its players is the primary mean to measure its quality. One important element of player’s satisfaction is a proper difficulty level, which is neither too easy nor too hard. The current state-of-the-art way to implement it is with Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment (DDA, which allows the difficulty level of a video game to be adjusted at run-time. Currently, the most popular type of DDA is the passive one. Meanwhile, Game Design Document (GDD is an important artefact in the development process of a video game software, and there is still no GDD format that supports the design of passive DDA mechanism. The aim of this research was to find a new GDD format that supports the mechanism. We modified a general purpose GDD format by adding new parts for designing passive DDA mechanism. We tested the usefulness of the modified format in a testing process involving developers and players. The developers developed video games using the modified GDD format and the general purpose one. Their development processes were observed and evaluated to know if there were any difficulties. The resulting video games were played by the players to find which are better in terms of passive DDA mechanism. The result of developer testing showed that the modified format is better than the general purpose one. The result of player testing showed that the video games made with the modified format are better than their counterparts, albeit by an insignificant margin. Based on the results, we declare that the modified GDD format is successful.Keywords: Video game, requirement engineering, game design document, dynamic difficulty adjustment, software development.

  1. Formation of carbon nanoscrolls from graphene sheet: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Yang, Houbo

    2016-12-01

    In recent year, carbon nanoscrolls have attracted intensive attention both in theory and experiments for their unique and excellent fundamental properties and the wide range of potential applications. In this paper, the fabrication of carbon nanoscrolls using graphene and carbon nanotubes has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) method. The formation mechanism of carbon nanoscrolls has been presented convincing explanations. Furthermore, the position and number of carbon nanotubes also influence the formation of carbon nanoscrolls. Our theoretical results will provide researchers a powerful guide and helpful assistance in designing better targeted programs in experiments.

  2. Dynamical studies of the Mersa Matruh Gyre: intense meander and ring formation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnaraghi, Maryam

    A study of the dynamics of the Mersa Matruh Gyre and the Mid-Mediterranean Jet flow system in the southwestern Levantine basin is presented. Data-driven simulations in the Levantine basin, using an eddy-resolving quasigeostrophic model initialized with two quasi-synoptic hydrographic data sets, reveal intense mesoscale meander and ring formation events involving the Mid-Mediterranean Jet, the Mersa Matruh Gyre and the Rhodes Gyre. The dynamics of these events are quantified via local energy and vorticity budget analyses. The dominant processes are investigated and compared with previously studied events in the Gulf Stream Ring and Meander region.

  3. Self-organised formation of nanotubes from graphene ribbons. A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fülep, Dávid; Zsoldos, Ibolya; László, István

    2016-10-01

    The conditions for self-organised formations of carbon nanotubes from two parallel graphene ribbons were studied in a density functional adjusted tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. We have found that the seemingly trivial process is significantly limited by the thermal motion of the carbon atoms. There are further difficulties as well, primarily the unfavourable position of the atoms at the edges of the zigzag graphene ribbons. In repeated molecular dynamics runs we analysed the conditions of perfect coalescences, the influence of the substrate and the impact of the zigzag graphene ribbon positions. We have obtained that contrary to the abovementioned unfavourable conditions perfect nanotube production can be obtained using substrates. As the positioning of the substrate can be made with piezoelectric devices, this can significantly help the experimental realisation of the nanotube formation as well.

  4. Dynamical entanglement formation and dissipation effects in two double quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Pulido, L D [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Rojas, F [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)

    2006-11-01

    We study the static and dynamic formation of entanglement in charge states of a two double quantum dot array with two mobile electrons under the effect of an external driving field. We include dissipation via contact with a phonon bath. By using the density matrix formalism and an open quantum system approach, we describe the dynamical behaviour of the charge distribution (polarization), concurrence (measure of the degree of entanglement) and Bell state probabilities (two qubit states with maximum entanglement) of such a system, including the role of dot asymmetry and temperature effects. Our results show that it is possible to obtain entangled states as well as a most probable Bell state, which can be controlled by the driving field. We also evaluate how the entanglement formation based on charge states deteriorates as the temperature or asymmetry increases.

  5. Habit Formation in Natural Cheese Consumption An Approach Based on Dynamic Demand Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WAKABAYASHI, Katsufumi

    2010-01-01

    In expectation of growing cheese consumption, natural cheese production is being increased to reduce surplus milk and create high added value in raw milk. Other studies found positive trends in cheese consumption. However, those studies neither clarified recent trends, nor distinguished natural cheese from processed cheese. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structure of natural cheese consumption, focusing on habit formation. We test structural changes in cheese demand using dynamic...

  6. He cluster dynamics in W in the presence of cluster induced formation of He traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of He clusters in tungsten, which takes into account He trap generation associated with the growth of He clusters, is presented. Application of this model to the formation of the layer of nano-bubbles underneath of the surface of thick He irradiated sample, before surface morphology starts to change, gives very good agreement with currently available experimental data. The role of thermophoresis in a long-term evolution of nano-bubble containing structures is discussed.

  7. DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF CAVITY IN TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC HYPER-ELASTIC SPHERES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任九生; 程昌钧

    2003-01-01

    The cavity formation in a radial transversely isotropic hyper-elastic sphere of an incompressible Ogden material, subjected to a suddenly applied uniform radial tensile boundary deadload, is studied following the theory of finite deformation dynamics. A cavity forms at the center of the sphere when the tensile load is greater than its critical value. It is proved that the evolution of the cavity radius with time follows that of nonlinear periodic oscillations.

  8. Changing Dynamics of Cross-Border Intimate Partnership Formations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    Intimate partnership formations across the borders at various levels challenge stereotypes and lead to enhanced social diversity but are understudied in Scandinavia. Our workshop presents and discusses these phenomena through research, practice and policy issues from Denmark and Finland within in...... interdisciplinary framework. It explores processes related to "us and them" redefinitions and minority-majority relations through focus on motivations,identity, life course,gender,family dynamics especially intergenerational conflicts, diaspora and policy effects.  ...

  9. Formation and dynamics of van der Waals molecules in buffer-gas traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahms, Nathan; Tscherbul, Timur V; Zhang, Peng; Kłos, Jacek; Forrey, Robert C; Au, Yat Shan; Sadeghpour, H R; Dalgarno, A; Doyle, John M; Walker, Thad G

    2011-11-14

    We show that weakly bound He-containing van der Waals molecules can be produced and magnetically trapped in buffer-gas cooling experiments, and provide a general model for the formation and dynamics of these molecules. Our analysis shows that, at typical experimental parameters, thermodynamics favors the formation of van der Waals complexes composed of a helium atom bound to most open-shell atoms and molecules, and that complex formation occurs quickly enough to ensure chemical equilibrium. For molecular pairs composed of a He atom and an S-state atom, the molecular spin is stable during formation, dissociation, and collisions, and thus these molecules can be magnetically trapped. Collisional spin relaxation is too slow to affect trap lifetimes. However, (3)He-containing complexes can change spin due to adiabatic crossings between trapped and untrapped Zeeman states, mediated by the anisotropic hyperfine interaction, causing trap loss. We provide a detailed model for Ag(3)He molecules, using ab initio calculation of Ag-He interaction potentials and spin interactions, quantum scattering theory, and direct Monte Carlo simulations to describe formation and spin relaxation in this system. The calculated rate of spin-change agrees quantitatively with experimental observations, providing indirect evidence for molecular formation in buffer-gas-cooled magnetic traps. Finally, we discuss the possibilities for spectroscopic detection of these complexes, including a calculation of expected spectra for Ag(3)He, and report on our spectroscopic search for Ag(3)He, which produced a null result.

  10. Dynamic organization of actin cytoskeleton during the polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xia; Zl Huijun; SUN Yina; REN Haiyun

    2004-01-01

    The formation of the polarity of pollen protoplast and the dynamics of actin cytoskeleton were observed by non-fixation, Alexa-Phalloidin probing and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results showed that the protoplast obtained from stored pollen contained numerous crystalline fusiform bodies to constitute a storage form of actin. When dormant pollen was hydrated, the actin cytoskeleton forms a fine network spreading uniformly in the protoplast. In the process of polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplast, actin filaments marshaled slowly to the brim, and then formed multilayer continuous actin filament bundles surrounding the cortical of the protoplast. When the protoplast was exposed to actin filament-disrupting drugs, such as Latrunculin A and Cytochalasin D, continuously arranged actin bundles were disturbed and in this condition, the protoplast could not germinate. But when exposed to actin filament stabiling drug-phalliodin, the dynamics of actin filaments in the protoplasts behaved normally and the protoplasts could germinate normally. These results were also confirmed by the pharmacology experiments on pollen grains. And when Latrunculin A or Cytochalasin D was washed off, the ratio of pollen germination was resumed partly. All the results above show that the dynamic organization of the actin cytoskeleton are critical in the cell polarity formation and germination of pollen protoplast, and that the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton is mainly due to the rearrangement of actin filament arrays.

  11. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls. PMID:27025405

  12. Dynamics of biofilm formation in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    determinations. The biofilm grew at a rate of 0.030±0.002 day−1 reaching quasi-stationary state at 2.6×106 cells/cm2 after approximately 200 days. The low substrate level in the bulk phase (AOC at approximately 6 g ac-C/l) most likely caused the relatively slow biofilm formation rate observed. During......The dynamics of biofilm formation in non-chlorinated groundwater-based drinking water was studied in a model distribution system. The formation of biofilm was closely monitored for a period of 522 days by total bacterial counts (AODC), heterotrophic plate counts (R2A media), and ATP content...... the maturation of the biofilm, the bacterial community changed properties in terms of cell-specific ATP content and culturability of the bacteria....

  13. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-08-15

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated.

  14. The Dynamics of Fullerene Structure Formation Order out of Chaos Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    1999-01-01

    C60 molecules form spontaneously during vaporization of carbon associated with intense heating and turbulence such as in electrical arcs or flames. Self-organization of fluctuations in the highly turbulent (chaotic) atomized carbon vapor appears to result in the formation of the stable structure of C60 and therefore may be visualized as order out of chaos phenomenon. The geometry of C60, namely, the self-similar quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern implies long-range spatiotemporal correlations. Such non-local connections in space and time are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and is recently identified as signatures of self-organized criticality . A cell dynamical system model for turbulent fluid flows developed by the author is summarized and it is shown that the observed quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern is a signature of quantum-like mechanics governing flow dynamics.

  15. Dynamical Stability of Imaged Planetary Systems in Formation: Application to HL Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Tamayo, Daniel; Menou, Kristen; Rein, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    We present a general and simple framework for understanding the dynamical stability of planets embedded in a protoplanetary nebula over typical disk lifetimes, and provide estimates for the maximum allowable planetary masses. We collect these easily evaluated dynamical constraints into a workflow that can help guide the design and interpretation of new observational campaigns and numerical simulations of gap opening in such systems. We argue that the locations of resonances should be significantly shifted from integer period ratios in massive disks like HL Tau, and that theoretical uncertainties in the exact shift, together with observational errors, imply a large uncertainty in the dynamical state and stability in such disks. This renders our results largely insensitive to an improved determination of the gaps' orbital radii, and presents an important barrier to using systems like HL Tau as a proxy for the initial conditions following planet formation. An important observational avenue to breaking this degen...

  16. Quantifying Thermal Disorder in Metal–Organic Frameworks: Lattice Dynamics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hybrid Formate Perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid organic–inorganic materials are mechanically soft, leading to large thermoelastic effects which can affect properties such as electronic structure and ferroelectric ordering. Here we use a combination of ab initio lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics to study the finite temperature behavior of the hydrazinium and guanidinium formate perovskites, [NH2NH3][Zn(CHO2)3] and [C(NH2)3][Zn(CHO2)3]. Thermal displacement parameters and ellipsoids computed from the phonons and from molecular dynamics trajectories are found to be in good agreement. The hydrazinium compound is ferroelectric at low temperatures, with a calculated spontaneous polarization of 2.6 μC cm–2, but the thermal movement of the cation leads to variations in the instantaneous polarization and eventually breakdown of the ferroelectric order. Contrary to this the guanidinium cation is found to be stationary at all temperatures; however, the movement of the cage atoms leads to variations in the electronic structure and a renormalization in the bandgap from 6.29 eV at 0 K to an average of 5.96 eV at 300 K. We conclude that accounting for temperature is necessary for quantitative modeling of the physical properties of metal–organic frameworks. PMID:28298951

  17. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows - the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the \\'hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting\\', is discovered where the influence of the capillary\\'s radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where excellent agreement is obtained. Practical recommendations on the spatial resolution required by the numerical scheme for a given set of non-dimensional similarity parameters are provided, and a comparison to asymptotic results available in limiting cases confirms that the code is converging to the correct solution. The appendix gives a user-friendly step-by-step guide specifying the entire implementation and allowing the reader to easily reproduce all presented results, including the benchmark calculations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Finite Element Simulation of Dynamic Wetting Flows as an Interface Formation Process

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James

    2012-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows -the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the `hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting', is discovered where the influence of the capillary's radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where...

  19. Energy approach to rivalry dynamics, soliton stability, and pattern formation in neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxley, P. N.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    Hopfield’s Lyapunov function is used to view the stability and topology of equilibria in neuronal networks for visual rivalry and pattern formation. For two neural populations with reciprocal inhibition and slow adaptation, the dynamics of neural activity is found to include a pair of limit cycles: one for oscillations between states where one population has high activity and the other has low activity, as in rivalry, and one for oscillations between states where both populations have the same activity. Hopfield’s Lyapunov function is used to find the dynamical mechanism for oscillations and the basin of attraction of each limit cycle. For a spatially continuous population with lateral inhibition, stable equilibria are found for local regions of high activity (solitons) and for bound states of two or more solitons. Bound states become stable when moving two solitons together minimizes the Lyapunov function, a result of decreasing activity in regions between peaks of high activity when the firing rate is described by a sigmoid function. Lowering the barrier to soliton formation leads to a pattern-forming instability, and a nonlinear solution to the dynamical equations is found to be given by a soliton lattice, which is completely characterized by the soliton width and the spacing between neighboring solitons. Fluctuations due to noise create lattice vacancies analogous to point defects in crystals, leading to activity which is spatially inhomogeneous.

  20. Generalized additive models reveal the intrinsic complexity of wood formation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Kiessé, Tristan Senga; Hartmann, Felix P; Barbeito, Ignacio; Fournier, Meriem

    2013-04-01

    The intra-annual dynamics of wood formation, which involves the passage of newly produced cells through three successive differentiation phases (division, enlargement, and wall thickening) to reach the final functional mature state, has traditionally been described in conifers as three delayed bell-shaped curves followed by an S-shaped curve. Here the classical view represented by the 'Gompertz function (GF) approach' was challenged using two novel approaches based on parametric generalized linear models (GLMs) and 'data-driven' generalized additive models (GAMs). These three approaches (GFs, GLMs, and GAMs) were used to describe seasonal changes in cell numbers in each of the xylem differentiation phases and to calculate the timing of cell development in three conifer species [Picea abies (L.), Pinus sylvestris L., and Abies alba Mill.]. GAMs outperformed GFs and GLMs in describing intra-annual wood formation dynamics, showing two left-skewed bell-shaped curves for division and enlargement, and a right-skewed bimodal curve for thickening. Cell residence times progressively decreased through the season for enlargement, whilst increasing late but rapidly for thickening. These patterns match changes in cell anatomical features within a tree ring, which allows the separation of earlywood and latewood into two distinct cell populations. A novel statistical approach is presented which renews our understanding of xylogenesis, a dynamic biological process in which the rate of cell production interplays with cell residence times in each developmental phase to create complex seasonal patterns.

  1. Dynamical Formation of Low-mass Merging Black Hole Binaries like GW151226

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-02-01

    Using numerical models for star clusters spanning a wide range in ages and metallicities (Z) we study the masses of binary black holes (BBHs) produced dynamically and merging in the local universe (z ≲ 0.2). After taking into account cosmological constraints on star formation rate and metallicity evolution, which realistically relate merger delay times obtained from models with merger redshifts, we show here for the first time that while old, metal-poor globular clusters can naturally produce merging BBHs with heavier components, as observed in GW150914, lower-mass BBHs like GW151226 are easily formed dynamically in younger, higher-metallicity clusters. More specifically, we show that the mass of GW151226 is well within 1σ of the mass distribution obtained from our models for clusters with Z/Z⊙ ≳ 0.5. Indeed, dynamical formation of a system like GW151226 likely requires a cluster that is younger and has a higher metallicity than typical Galactic globular clusters. The LVT151012 system, if real, could have been created in any cluster with Z/Z⊙ ≲ 0.25. On the other hand, GW150914 is more massive (beyond 1σ) than typical BBHs from even the lowest-metallicity (Z/Z⊙ = 0.005) clusters we consider, but is within 2σ of the intrinsic mass distribution from our cluster models with Z/Z⊙ ≲ 0.05 of course, detection biases also push the observed distributions toward higher masses.

  2. Efficient transfer of positrons from a buffer-gas-cooled accumulator into an orthogonally oriented superconducting solenoid for antihydrogen studies

    CERN Document Server

    Comeau, D; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Gabrielse, G; Kalra, R; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Mullers, A; Walz, J

    2012-01-01

    Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap used in antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9 m long magnetic guide that connects the central field lines of the 0.15 T field in the positron accumulator to the central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15 degrees upward bend and a 105 degrees downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the positron accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. A 7 m long 5 cm diameter stainless-steel tube and a 20 mm long, 1.5 mm diamet...

  3. Ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation via laser double pulses excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guangqing; Wu, Yanmin; Uddin, Noor; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Bian, Hao; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    The ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation on gold film via ultrafast laser double pulses excitation is theoretically investigated by numerical simulations. The non-equilibrium thermal modulations with respect to the electron and phonon energy transfers within gold film is proposed for predicting the nano-ripples formation. It is revealed that the nano-ripples contrast on gold film surface can be well controlled via tuning the pulse energy ratio, pulse separation and pulse exchange of ultrafast laser double-pulse. It is attributed to the tunable energy transfer routes between the electron thermal diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling via tuning double pulses parameters. The study provides theoretical basis for producing high-contrast ripples for a wide range application in the fields such as high-absorptive solar cells, surface friction devices and super-hydrophobic surface.

  4. Discrete dynamic system oriented on the formation of prebiotic dipeptides from Rode's experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This work attempts to rationalize the possible prebiotic profile of the first dipeptides of about 4 billion years ago based on a computational discrete dynamic system that uses the final yields of the dipeptides obtained in Rode's experiments of salt-induced peptide formation (Rode et al., 1999, Peptides 20: 773-786). The system built a prebiotic scenario that allowed us to observe that (i) the primordial peptide generation was strongly affected by the abundances of the amino acid monomers, (ii) small variations in the concentration of the monomers have almost no effect on the final distribution pattern of the dipeptides and (iii) the most plausible chemical reaction of prebiotic peptide bond formation can be linked to Rode's hypothesis of a salt-induced scenario. The results of our computational simulations were related to former simulations of the Miller, and Fox & Harada experiments on amino acid monomer and oligomer generation, respectively, offering additional information to our approach.

  5. Formation and Dynamics of Vortex Structures in Pure and Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Collisionless Electron Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2013-01-01

    The comparative analysis of the results of experimental investigations of the processes of formation, interaction and dynamics of vortex structures in pure electron and gas-discharge electron nonneutral plasmas taking place for the period of time much less than the electron-neutral collision time has been given. The general processes of formation and behavior of vortex structures in these two plasmas were considered. The phenomena, taking place only in one of these plasmas were also considered. It is shown that the existing difference in behavior of vortex structures is caused by different initial states of nonneutral electron plasmas. The role of vortex structures in the processes taking place in nonneutral electron plasma is discussed.

  6. Structure, dynamics and evolution of disk galaxies in a hierarchical formation scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Firmani, C

    1999-01-01

    Using galaxy evolutionary models in a hierarchical formation scenario, we predict the structure, dynamics and evolution of disk galaxies in a LCDM universe. Our models include star formation and hydrodynamics of the ISM. We find that the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) in the I and H bands is an imprint of the mass-velocity relation of the cosmological dark halos. The scatter of the TFR originates mainly from the scatter in the dark halo structure and, to a minor extension, from the dispersion of the primordial spin parameter lambda. Our models allow us to explain why low and high surface brightness galaxies have the same TFR. The disk gas fractions predicted agree with the observations. The disks formed within the growing halos have nearly exponential surface brightness and flat rotation curves. Towards high redshifts, the zero-point of the TFR in the H band increases while in the B-band it slightly decreases.

  7. Spacecraft Formation Control: Managing Line-of-Sight Drift Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sammer. Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    In a quest to improve space-based observational capability, an increasing number of investigators are proposing missions with precision formation flying architectures. Typical missions include the Micro- Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), Stellar Imager (SI), and the New Worlds Observer (NWO). Missions designed to explore targets in deep-space generally require holding a formation configuration fixed in inertial space during science observation. Analysis in this paper is specifically aimed at the NWO architecture, characterizing the natural drift of the line-of-sight and the separation range for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) libration point. Analysis employs a linear form of the relative dynamics associated with an n-body gravity field. The study is designed to identify favorable observation directions, characterized by minimal line-of-sight drift, along the mission timeline.

  8. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  9. UAV formation control design with obstacle avoidance in dynamic three-dimensional environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai; Xia, Yuanqing; Huang, Kaoli

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the artificial potential field method combined with rotational vectors for a general problem of multi-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems tracking a moving target in dynamic three-dimensional environment. An attractive potential field is generated between the leader and the target. It drives the leader to track the target based on the relative position of them. The other UAVs in the formation are controlled to follow the leader by the attractive control force. The repulsive force affects among the UAVs to avoid collisions and distribute the UAVs evenly on the spherical surface whose center is the leader-UAV. Specific orders or positions of the UAVs are not required. The trajectories of avoidance obstacle can be obtained through two kinds of potential field with rotation vectors. Every UAV can choose the optimal trajectory to avoid the obstacle and reconfigure the formation after passing the obstacle. Simulations study on UAV are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  10. Connecting Gas Dynamics and Star Formation Histories in Nearby Galaxies: The VLA-ANGST Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Juergen; Dalcanton, Julianne; Walter, Fabian; Stilp, Adrienne; Koribalski, Baerbel; West, Andrew; Warren, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, HST revolutionized the field of star formation in nearby galaxies. Due to its high angular resolution it has now become possible to construct star formation histories of individual stellar populations on scales of a few arcseconds spanning a range of up to ~600 Myr. This method will be applied to the ANGST galaxies, a large HST volume limited survey to map galaxies up to distances of 3.5-4.0 Mpc (excluding the Local Group). The ANGST sample is currently followed--up by high, ~6'' resolution VLA observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (HI) in the context of VLA-ANGST, an approved Large VLA Project. The VLA resolution is well matched to that of the spatially resolved star formation history maps. The combination of ANGST and VLA-ANGST data will provide a new, promising approach to study essential fields of galaxy evolution such as the triggering of star formation, the feedback of massive stars into the interstellar medium, and the structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium.

  11. Molecular dynamics modeling of defect formation in many-layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephani, Kelly A., E-mail: ksteph@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to examine lattice defect formation in a hexagonal boron nitride lattice by high-energy xenon ion impact. This work seeks to characterize the production of defects which occur under ion irradiation. Lattice defect formation is first examined in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride. Energetic xenon ions over a range of 10 eV–10 keV are used to randomly impact the central lattice at an angle of 90° (orthogonal to the lattice basal plane). The resulting defects are analyzed for 5000 ion impacts, and results are reported for average single and double vacancy formation per impact. A similar study is conducted for a many-layer hexagonal boron nitride lattice, to assess the influence of additional layers in the formation of point defects as a function of incident ion energy. Ion impacts at both 90° and 45° are examined. The defects formed in the top layer of the many-layer lattice are qualitatively similar to the single layer results, but the presence of the bulk lattice is found to reduce the single vacancy probability in the top-most layer. Point defects are prominent in the lattice sub-layers with increasing ion energy. Orthogonal ion impacts are found to cause the most damage, as measured by the number of vacancy defects produced; the number of vacancies increases linearly with energy, while the number of defects in the oblique impact configuration reaches an asymptotic limit with increasing energy.

  12. Solution X-ray scattering (S/WAXS) and structure formation in protein dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nasedkin, Alexandr; Niemi, Antti J; Peng, Xubiao

    2016-01-01

    We propose to develop mean field theory in combination with Glauber algorithm, to model and interpret protein dynamics and structure formation in small to wide angle x-ray scattering (S/WAXS) experiments. We develop the methodology by analysing the Engrailed homeodomain protein as an example. We demonstrate how to interpret S/WAXS data with a good precision and over an extended temperature range. We explain experimentally observed phenomena in terms of protein phase structure, and we make predictions for future experiments how the scattering data behaves at different ambient temperature values. We conclude that a combination of mean field theory with Glauber algorithm has the potential to develop into a highly accurate, computationally effective and predictive tool for analysing S/WAXS data. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained previously in an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation.

  13. Deracemization of Axially Chiral Nicotinamides by Dynamic Salt Formation with Enantiopure Dibenzoyltartaric Acid (DBTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitoshi Yagishita

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic atroposelective resolution of chiral salts derived from oily racemic nicotinamides and enantiopure dibenzoyltartaric acid (DBTA was achieved by crystallization. The absolute structures of the axial chiral nicotinamides were determined by X-ray structural analysis. The chirality could be controlled by the selection of enantiopure DBTA as a chiral auxiliary. The axial chirality generated by dynamic salt formation was retained for a long period after dissolving the chiral salt in solution even after removal of the chiral acid. The rate of racemization of nicotinamides could be controlled based on the temperature and solvent properties, and that of the salts was prolonged compared to free nicotinamides, as the molecular structure of the pyridinium ion in the salts was different from that of acid-free nicotinamides.

  14. The Structure, Dynamics and Star Formation Rate of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rio, Nicola; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues on the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC, and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the ISM density, estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content...

  15. DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF CAVITY IN A COMPOSED HYPER-ELASTIC SPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任九生; 程昌钧

    2004-01-01

    The dynamical formation of cavity in a hyper-elastic sphere composed of two materials with the incompressible strain energy function, subjected to a suddenly applied uniform radial tensile boundary dead-load, was studied following the theory of finite deformation dynamics. Besides a trivial solution corresponding to the homogeneous static state, a cavity forms at the center of the sphere when the tensile load is larger than its critical value. An exact differential relation between the cavity radius and the tensile land was obtained. It is proved that the evolution of cavity radius with time displays nonlinear periodic oscillations. The phase diagram for oscillation, the maximum amplitude, the approximate period and the critical load were all discussed.

  16. Integral characteristics: a key to understanding structure formation in stochastic dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyatskin, Valery I, E-mail: klyatskin@yandex.ru

    2011-05-31

    Some general problems concerning the stochastic approach are discussed in relation to parametrically excited stochastic dynamic systems described by partial differential equations. Such problems arise in hydrodynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, and astro, plasma, and radio physics and share the feature that the statistical characteristics of their solutions (moments, correlation and spectral functions, and so on) increasing exponentially with time, whereas some solution implementations lead to the formation of random structures with probability one as a result of clustering. The goal of this paper is to use the ideas of stochastic topography to find conditions under which such structures arise. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. Formation of bound states in expanded metal studied via path integral molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P. A.; Oh, Ki-Dong

    2004-03-01

    The usefulness of the restricted path integral molecular dynamics method for the study of strongly correlated electrons is demonstrated by studying the formation of bound electronic states in a half-filled expanded three-dimensional hydrogenoid body-centred cubic lattice at finite temperature. Starting from a metallic state with one-component plasma character, we find that bound electrons form upon expansion of the lattice. The bound electrons are spatially localized with their centre for the motion of gyration located at ionic positions. The number of bound electrons increases monotonically with decreasing density.

  18. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, Ingo; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel; Marks, Michael [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (HISKP), Universität Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-02-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation.

  19. Do dynamic effects play a significant role in enzymatic catalysis? A theoretical analysis of formate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Maite; Oliva, Mónica; Castillo, Raquel; Moliner, Vicente; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2010-10-04

    A theoretical study of the protein dynamic effects on the hydride transfer between the formate anion and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (FDH), is presented in this paper. The analysis of free downhill molecular dynamic trajectories, performed in the enzyme and compared with the reaction in aqueous solution, has allowed the study of the dynamic coupling between the reacting fragments and the protein or the solvent water molecules, as well as an estimation of the dynamic effect contribution to the catalytic effect from calculation of the transmission coefficient in the enzyme and in solution. The obtained transmission coefficients for the enzyme and in solution were 0.46±0.04 and 0.20±0.03, respectively. These values represent a contribution to catalysis of 0.5 kcal mol(-1), which, although small, is not negligible keeping in mind the low efficiency of FDH. The analysis of the reactive trajectories also reveals how the relative movements of some amino acids, mainly His332 and Arg284, precede and promote the chemical reaction. In spite of these movements, the time-dependent evolution of the electric field created by the enzyme on the key atoms of the reaction reveals a permanent field, which reduces the work required to reach the transition state, with a concomitant polarization of the cofactor. Finally, application of Grote-Hynes theory has allowed the identification of the modes responsible for the substrate-environment coupling, showing how some protein motions take place simultaneously with the reaction. Thus, the equilibrium approach would provide, in this case, an overestimation of the catalyzed rate constant.

  20. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  1. Controlled and uncontrolled motion in the circular, restricted three-body problem: Dynamically natural spacecraft formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilio, Ralph Ramos

    Spacecraft formation flying involves operating multiple spacecraft in a pre-determined geometrical shape such that the configuration yields both individual and system benefits. One example is an over-flight of the same spatial position by spacecraft in geocentric orbit with the intent to create a complementary data set of remotely sensed observables. Another example is controlling to a high degree of accuracy the distance between spacecraft in heliocentric orbit to create a virtual, large-diameter interferometer telescope. Although Keplerian orbits provide the basic framework for general and precision spacecraft formation flying they also present limitations. Spacecraft are generally constrained to operate only in circular and elliptical orbits, parabolic paths, or hyperbolic trajectories around celestial bodies. Applying continuation methods and bifurcation theory techniques to the circular, restricted three-body problem - where stable and unstable periodic orbits exist around equilibrium points - creates an environment that is more orbit rich. After surmounting a similar challenge with test particles in the circular, restricted three-vortex problem in fluid mechanics as a proof-of-concept, it was shown that spacecraft traveling in uncontrolled motion along separate and distinct planar or three-dimensional periodic orbits could be placed in controlled motion, i.e. a controller is enabled and later disabled at precisely the proper positions, to have them phase-locked on a single periodic orbit. Although it was possible to use this controller in a resonant frequency/orbit approach to establish a formation, it was clearly shown that a separate controller could be used in conjunction with the first to expedite the formation establishment process. Creation of these dynamically natural spacecraft formations or multi-spacecraft platforms will enable the 'loiter, synchronize/coordinate, and observe' approach for future engineering and scientific missions where flexibility

  2. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics in brominated aluminum corroles: Energy relaxation and triplet formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stensitzki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We combined femtosecond (fs VIS pump–IR probe spectroscopy with fs VIS pump–supercontinuum probe spectroscopy to characterize the photoreaction of the hexacoordinated Al(tpfc-Br8(py2 in a comprehensive way. Upon fs excitation at ∼400 nm in the Soret band, the excitation energy relaxes with a time constant of (250 ± 80 fs to the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. This is evident from the rise time of the stimulated emission signal in the visible spectral range. On the same time scale, narrowing of broad infrared signals in the C=C stretching region around 1500 cm−1 is observed. Energy redistribution processes are visible in the vibrational and electronic dynamics with time constants between ∼2 ps and ∼20 ps. Triplet formation is detected with a time constant of (95 ± 3 ps. This is tracked by the complete loss of stimulated emission. Electronic transition of the emerging triplet absorption band overlaps considerably with the singlet excited state absorption. In contrast, two well separated vibrational marker bands for triplet formation were identified at 1477 cm−1 and at 1508 cm−1. These marker bands allow a precise identification of triplet dynamics in corrole systems.

  3. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN defined within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-01-01

    With in the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), the compound nucleus fusion/ formation probability PCN is defined for the first time, and its variation with CN excitation energy E* and fissility parameter χ is studied. In DCM, the (total) fusion cross section σfusion is sum of the compound nucleus (CN) and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay processes, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of the evaporation residues (ER) and fusion-fission (ff), including the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs), each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance channel nuclei. The calculations are presented for six different target-projectile combinations of CN mass A~100 to superheavy, at various different center-of-mass energies with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it. Interesting results are that the PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN <1 or ≪1 due to the nCN conribution, depending strongly on both E* and χ.

  4. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN defined within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Sahila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With in the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM, the compound nucleus fusion/ formation probability PCN is defined for the first time, and its variation with CN excitation energy E* and fissility parameter χ is studied. In DCM, the (total fusion cross section σfusion is sum of the compound nucleus (CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN decay processes, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of the evaporation residues (ER and fusion-fission (ff, including the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2 in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf process where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance channel nuclei. The calculations are presented for six different target-projectile combinations of CN mass A~100 to superheavy, at various different center-of-mass energies with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it. Interesting results are that the PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCN <1 or ≪1 due to the nCN conribution, depending strongly on both E* and χ.

  5. Dark-ages Reionization & Galaxy Formation Simulation I: The dynamical lives of high redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Gregory B; Mutch, Simon J; Power, Chris; Duffy, Alan R; Geil, Paul M; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) program and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation program upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programs is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z=35 to z=5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from "universal" behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (~20%) of galactic halos are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: i) halo...

  6. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning–Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Keller, J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning–Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ is close to zero.

  7. A genetic algorithm for a bi-objective mathematical model for dynamic virtual cell formation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradgholi, Mostafa; Paydar, Mohammad Mahdi; Mahdavi, Iraj; Jouzdani, Javid

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, with the increasing pressure of the competitive business environment and demand for diverse products, manufacturers are force to seek for solutions that reduce production costs and rise product quality. Cellular manufacturing system (CMS), as a means to this end, has been a point of attraction to both researchers and practitioners. Limitations of cell formation problem (CFP), as one of important topics in CMS, have led to the introduction of virtual CMS (VCMS). This research addresses a bi-objective dynamic virtual cell formation problem (DVCFP) with the objective of finding the optimal formation of cells, considering the material handling costs, fixed machine installation costs and variable production costs of machines and workforce. Furthermore, we consider different skills on different machines in workforce assignment in a multi-period planning horizon. The bi-objective model is transformed to a single-objective fuzzy goal programming model and to show its performance; numerical examples are solved using the LINGO software. In addition, genetic algorithm (GA) is customized to tackle large-scale instances of the problems to show the performance of the solution method.

  8. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  9. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  10. POLYMER NETWORKS BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION:FORMATION, THERMAL, STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-liang Wu; Ting Li; Erik Nies

    2013-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation method is presented and used in the study of the formation of polymer networks.We study the formation of networks representing the methylene repeating units as united atoms.The network formation is accomplished by cross-linking polymer chains with dedicated functional end groups.The simulations reveal that during the cross-linking process,initially branched molecules are formed before the gel point; approaching the gel point,larger branched entities are formed through integration of smaller branched molecules,and at the gel point a network spanning the simulation box is obtained; beyond the gel point the network continues to grow through the addition of the remaining molecules of the sol phase onto the gel (the network); the final completion of the reaction occurs by intra-network connection of dangling ends onto unsaturated cross-linkers.The conformational properties of the strands in the undeformed network are found to be very similar with the conformational properties of the chains before cross-linking.The uniaxial deformation of the formed networks is investigated and the modulus determined from the stress-strain curves shows reciprocal scaling with the precursor chain length for networks formed from sufficiently large precursor chains (N≥ 20).

  11. The Formation of Uranus and Neptune in Solid-Rich Feeding Zones: Connecting Chemistry and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E

    2009-01-01

    The core accretion theory of planet formation has at least two fundamental problems explaining the origins of Uranus and Neptune: (1) dynamical times in the trans-Saturnian solar nebula are so long that core growth can take > 15 Myr, and (2) the onset of runaway gas accretion that begins when cores reach 10 Earth masses necessitates a sudden gas accretion cutoff just as the ice giant cores reach critical mass. Both problems may be resolved by allowing the ice giants to migrate outward after their formation in solid-rich feeding zones with planetesimal surface densities well above the minimum-mass solar nebula. We present new simulations of the formation of Uranus and Neptune in the solid-rich disk of Dodson-Robinson et al. (2009) using the initial semimajor axis distribution of the Nice model (Gomes et al. 2005; Morbidelli et al. 2005; Tsiganis et al. 2005), with one ice giant forming at 12 AU and the other at 15 AU. The innermost ice giant reaches its present mass after 3.8-4.0 Myr and the outermost after 5....

  12. Molecular dynamics of single-particle impacts predicts phase diagrams for large scale pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Scott A; Samela, Juha; Bukonte, Laura; Backman, Marie; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Madi, Charbel S; Brenner, Michael P; Aziz, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Energetic particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothening, self-organized nanoscale pattern formation or degradation of the structural integrity of nuclear reactor components. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms governing the selection among these outcomes has been elusive. Here we predict the mechanism governing the transition from pattern formation to flatness using only parameter-free molecular dynamics simulations of single-ion impacts as input into a multiscale analysis, obtaining good agreement with experiment. Our results overturn the paradigm attributing these phenomena to the removal of target atoms via sputter erosion: the mechanism dominating both stability and instability is the impact-induced redistribution of target atoms that are not sputtered away, with erosive effects being essentially irrelevant. We discuss the potential implications for the formation of a mysterious nanoscale topography, leading to surface degradation, of tungsten plasma-facing fusion reactor walls. Consideration of impact-induced redistribution processes may lead to a new design criterion for stability under irradiation.

  13. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo hybrid simulation for fuzzy tungsten nanostructure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A. M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.; Tamura, T.; Kobayashi, R.; Hattori, T.; Ogata, S.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yajima, M.; Noiri, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Saito, S.; Takamura, S.; Murashima, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-07-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten divertor walls, the formation process of the fuzzy tungsten nanostructure induced by exposure to the helium plasma was studied. In the present paper, the fuzzy nanostructure's formation has been successfully reproduced by the new hybrid simulation method in which the deformation of the tungsten material due to pressure of the helium bubbles was simulated by the molecular dynamics and the diffusion of the helium atoms was simulated by the random walk based on the Monte Carlo method. By the simulation results, the surface height of the fuzzy nanostructure increased only when helium retention was under the steady state. It was proven that the growth of the fuzzy nanostructure was brought about by bursting of the helium bubbles. Moreover, we suggest the following key formation mechanisms of the fuzzy nanostructure: (1) lifting in which the surface lifted up by the helium bubble changes into a convexity, (2) bursting by which the region of the helium bubble changes into a concavity, and (3) the difference of the probability of helium retention by which the helium bubbles tend to appear under the concavity. Consequently, the convex-concave surface structure was enhanced and grew to create the fuzzy nanostructure.

  14. New Worlds Observer Formation Control Design Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission is designed for the direct detection and characterization of extrasolar planets. The NWO mission concept employs a two spacecraft leader-follower formation on a trajectory around the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) Libration Point. The leader spacecraft is baselined as a 4 meter optical telescope. The follower, Starshade spacecraft, is designed to suppress light from a central body star permitting direct detection of a surrounding exoplanetary system. The current design requires a nominal leader-follower separation range of 72 Megameters. NWO poses many challenges including formation control. NWO cycles between three principal control modes during the nominal mission timeline: science (fine pointing), realignment and transition. This paper examines formation control strategies in the context of dynamics of relative motion for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2)libration point. The paper presents an overview of the equations of relative motion followed by a discussion of each of the control modes. Discussion and analysis characterize control strategies for each of the mission control modes, including requirements, implementation challenges and project fuel budgets.

  15. The dynamical masses, densities, and star formation scaling relations of Lyα galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Richardson, Mark L. A.; McLinden, Emily M. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fynbo, Johan P. U. [DARK Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Tilvi, Vithal S., E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyα galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, for nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. We use these measurements to study Lyα galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. We also fit stellar population models to our sample and use them to place the Lyα sample on a stellar mass versus line width relation. The Lyα galaxies generally follow the same scaling relation as star-forming galaxies at lower redshift, although, lower stellar mass fits are also acceptable in ∼1/3 of the Lyα galaxies. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyα galaxies have unusually active star formation for their gas mass surface density. This behavior is consistent with what is observed in starburst galaxies, despite the typically smaller masses and sizes of the Lyα galaxy population. Finally, we examine the mass densities of these galaxies and show that their future evolution likely requires dissipational ('wet') merging. In short, we find that Lyα galaxies are low-mass cousins of larger starbursts.

  16. Equilibrium configurations of the tethered three-body formation system and their nonlinear dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Xu; Jian-Min Zhu; Tian Tan; Shi-Jie Xu

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers nonlinear dynamics of tethered three-body formation system with their centre of mass staying on a circular orbit around the Earth,and applies the theory of space manifold dynamics to deal with the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of the equilibrium configurations of the system.Compared with the classical circular restricted three body system,sixteen equilibrium configurations are obtained globally from the geometry of pseudo-potential energy surface,four of which were omitted in the previous research.The periodic Lyapunov orbits and their invariant manifolds near the hyperbolic equilibria are presented,and an iteration procedure for identifying Lyapunov orbit is proposed based on the differential correction algorithm.The non-transversal intersections between invariant manifolds are addressed to generate homoclinic and heteroclinic trajectories between the Lyapunov orbits.(3,3)-and (2,1)-heteroclinic trajectories from the neighborhood of one collinear equilibrium to that of another one,and (3,6)-and (2,1)-homoclinic trajectories from and to the neighborhood of the same equilibrium,are obtained based on the Poincaré mapping technique.

  17. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  18. The formation of Uranus and Neptune in solid-rich feeding zones: Connecting chemistry and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The core accretion theory of planet formation has at least two fundamental problems explaining the origins of Uranus and Neptune: (1) dynamical times in the trans-saturnian solar nebula are so long that core growth can take >15 Myr and (2) the onset of runaway gas accretion that begins when cores reach ˜10 M⊕ necessitates a sudden gas accretion cutoff just as Uranus and Neptune's cores reach critical mass. Both problems may be resolved by allowing the ice giants to migrate outward after their formation in solid-rich feeding zones with planetesimal surface densities well above the minimum-mass solar nebula. We present new simulations of the formation of Uranus and Neptune in the solid-rich disk of Dodson-Robinson et al. (Dodson-Robinson, S.E., Willacy, K., Bodenheimer, P., Turner, N.J., Beichman, C.A. [2009]. Icarus 200, 672-693) using the initial semimajor axis distribution of the Nice model (Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A. [2005]. Nature 435, 466-469; Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R. [2005]. Nature 435, 462-465; Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F. [2005]. Nature 435, 459-461), with one ice giant forming at 12 AU and the other at 15 AU. The innermost ice giant reaches its present mass after 3.8-4.0 Myr and the outermost after 5.3-6 Myr, a considerable time decrease from previous one-dimensional simulations (e.g. Pollack, J.B., Hubickyj, O., Bodenheimer, P., Lissauer, J.J., Podolak, M., Greenzweig, Y. [1996]. Icarus 124, 62-85). The core masses stay subcritical, eliminating the need for a sudden gas accretion cutoff. Our calculated carbon mass fractions of 22% are in excellent agreement with the ice giant interior models of Podolak et al. (Podolak, M., Weizman, A., Marley, M. [1995]. Planet. Space Sci. 43, 1517-1522) and Marley et al. (Marley, M.S., Gómez, P., Podolak, M. [1995]. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 23349-23354). Based on the requirement that the ice giant-forming planetesimals contain >10% mass

  19. Synaptic scaling enables dynamically distinct short- and long-term memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tetzlaff

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory storage in the brain relies on mechanisms acting on time scales from minutes, for long-term synaptic potentiation, to days, for memory consolidation. During such processes, neural circuits distinguish synapses relevant for forming a long-term storage, which are consolidated, from synapses of short-term storage, which fade. How time scale integration and synaptic differentiation is simultaneously achieved remains unclear. Here we show that synaptic scaling - a slow process usually associated with the maintenance of activity homeostasis - combined with synaptic plasticity may simultaneously achieve both, thereby providing a natural separation of short- from long-term storage. The interaction between plasticity and scaling provides also an explanation for an established paradox where memory consolidation critically depends on the exact order of learning and recall. These results indicate that scaling may be fundamental for stabilizing memories, providing a dynamic link between early and late memory formation processes.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayer Induced by Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiyama, Ken-ichiro; Kodama, Tetsuya; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2006-05-01

    Water molecule penetration into a bilayer hydrophobic region with a shock wave impulse has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations [Koshiyama et al., AIP Conference Proceedings, 754, 104-106, (2005)]. Here we report results of simulation of spontaneous water pore formation in a bilayer that contains water molecules in the hydrophobic region in an initial state. The bilayers of 128 DPPC lipid and 3655 water molecules with insertion of 392, 784, and 1176 water molecules in the hydrophobic region are simulated. A water pore is spontaneously formed when 1176 water molecules exist in the hydrophobic region. The water pore diameter is estimated to be c.a. 1.9 nm, which is three times larger than that of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) used in cancer treatment.

  1. Observation of bubble formation in water during microwave irradiation by dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Munenaga, Takuya; Nakata, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    A microwave reactor was designed for in situ observation of nano- and micro-bubbles, and size profiles during and after irradiation were measured with respect to irradiation power and time. Bubble formation in water during irradiation was observed even at temperatures below the boiling point of water. The maximum size strongly depended on radiation power and time, even at a given temperature. Nano-particles in the dispersion medium were found to play an important role in achieving more stable nucleation of bubbles around particles, and stable size distributions were obtained from clear autocorrelation by a dynamic light scattering system. Moreover, a combination of microwave induction heating and the addition of nano-particles to the dispersion medium can prevent heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on the cell wall. Quantitative nano-bubble size profiles obtained by in situ observation provide useful information regarding microwave-based industrial processes for nano-particle production.

  2. Global format for energy-momentum based time integration in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    A global format is developed for momentum and energy consistent time integration of second‐order dynamic systems with general nonlinear stiffness. The algorithm is formulated by integrating the state‐space equations of motion over the time increment. The internal force is first represented...... in fourth‐order form consisting of the end‐point mean value plus a term containing the stiffness matrix increment. This form gives energy conservation for systems with internal energy as a quartic function of the displacement components. This representation is then extended to general energy conservation...... of mean value products at the element level or explicit use of a geometric stiffness matrix. An optional monotonic algorithmic damping, increasing with response frequency, is developed in terms of a single damping parameter. In the solution procedure, the velocity is eliminated and the nonlinear...

  3. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel.

  4. Metamorphic sole formation, emplacement and blueschist overprint: early obduction dynamics witnessed by W. Turkey ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunder, Alexis; Agard, Philippe; Chopin, Christian; Soret, Mathieu; Okay, Aral; Whitechurch, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Western Turkey, with a >200 km long-belt of unmetamorphosed ophiolite overlying continental lithosphere is one or even the largest obducted ophiolite on Earth and therefore a key example to study obduction and early subduction dynamics. All Western Turkish ophiolite fragments are considered as part of the same Neotethyan branch resulting of a long-lived continental subduction (or underthrusting). Synchronous (ca. ~ 93 Ma) metamorphic sole formation and preservation at the base of most of the Turkish ophiolite fragments support this single event and place a strong constraint on the age of subduction initiation. Metamorphic soles are indeed generally considered to have formed during the early and hot subduction zone at 25 ± 10 km depths and welded to the overriding oceanic lithosphere. In Western Turkey however (as for most places worldwide) a systematic study of the pressure-temperature conditions with modern thermobarometric tools is generally lacking, and fundamental mechanisms of formation or accretion to the upper plate are poorly (if at all) constrained. We herein reappraise Western Turkish metamorphic soles focusing on the following points and issues: (i) detailed structures of metamorphic sole and other subduction derived units, petrological evolution and refined pressure-temperature conditions; peak pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole were estimated using garnet, clinopyroxene, amphibole and plagioclase as the peak paragenesis at 10.5 ± 2 kbar and 800 ± 50°C based on pseudosections using the Theriak/Domino package (ii) the rather unique (and enigmatic) blueschist facies overprint found in places was investigated in terms of structural position and pressure-temperature conditions. Conditions of overprint were estimated around 12 kbar and 425 °C from the presence of glaucophane, lawsonite, jadeite and garnet overgrowing the amphibolite-facies assemblage. This field-based study provides clues to mechanisms of metamorphic sole underplating

  5. Sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene in a slit supersonic expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Agarwal, Jay; Allen, Wesley D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-02-21

    Infrared spectroscopy and formation dynamics of triacetylene are investigated in a slit jet supersonic discharge and probed with sub-Doppler resolution (≈60 MHz) on the fundamental antisymmetric CH stretch mode (ν5). The triacetylene is generated in the throat of the discharge by sequential attack of ethynyl radical with acetyelene and diacetylene: (i) HCCH → HCC + H, (ii) HCC + HCCH → HCCCCH + H, (iii) HCC + HCCCCH → HCCCCCCH + H, cooled rapidly in the slit expansion to 15 K, and probed by near shot-noise-limited absorption sensitivity with a tunable difference-frequency infrared laser. The combination of jet cooled temperatures (Trot = 15 K) and low spectral congestion permits (i) analysis of rotationally avoided crossings in the ν5 band ascribed to Coriolis interactions, as well as (ii) first detection of ν5 Π-Π hot band progressions built on the ν12 sym CC bend and definitively assigned via state-of-the-art ab initio vibration-rotation interaction parameters (αi), which make for interesting comparison with recent spectroscopic studies of Doney et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 316, 54 (2015)]. The combined data provide direct evidence for significantly non-equilibrium populations in the CC bending manifold, dynamically consistent with a strongly bent radical intermediate and transition states for forming triacetylene product. The presence of intense triacetylene signals under cold, low density slit jet conditions provides support for (i) barrierless addition of HCC with HCCCCH and (ii) a high quantum yield for HCCCCCCH formation. Complete basis set calculations for energetics [CCSD(T)-f12/VnZ-f12, n = 2,3] and frequencies [CCSD(T)-f12/VdZ-f12] are presented for both radical intermediate and transition state species, predicting collision stabilization in the slit jet expansion to be competitive with unimolecular decomposition with increasing polyyne chain length.

  6. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  7. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network: Dynamics, Fluxes, Stability, Succession and Landscape Formation in Cold Climate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2016-04-01

    There is a wide range of high-latitude and high-altitude cold climate landscapes in Europe, covering a significant proportion of the total land surface area. This spectrum of defined cold climate landscapes represents a variety of stages of deglaciation history and landscape formation. We can find landscapes at different levels of postglacial stabilization which is providing the opportunity to study the interactions between geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic systems at the land surface. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network (2004-) bridges across the geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic sciences in order to analyze the complex dynamics of stabilization, succession and landscape formation during and after ice retreat and under ongoing human influences. The network provides a multidisciplinary forum where researchers come together. In addition, it is linking a number of networks, working groups and programs and creates an umbrella network and a forum for sharing knowledge. The scientific focus of this network is also relevant for different end users, including risk and vulnerability assessment, sustainable land use, land management and conservation. In addition, key questions related to Global Change like, e.g., hazards, permafrost degradation and loss of biodiversity are discussed.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation and pattern recognition in the rabbit olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Bill

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model of the process of pattern recognition in the first olfactory sensory cortex of the rabbit is presented. It explains the formation and alteration of spatial patterns in neural activity observed experimentally during classical Pavlovian conditioning. On each inspiration of the animal, a surge of receptor input enters the olfactory bulb. EEG activity recorded at the surface of the bulb undergoes a transition from a low amplitude background state of temporal disorder to coherent oscillation. There is a distinctive spatial pattern of rms amplitude in this oscillation which changes reliably to a second pattern during each successful recognition by the animal of a conditioned stimulus odor. When a new odor is paired as conditioned stimulus, these patterns are replaced by new patterns that stabilize as the animal adapts to the new environment. I will argue that a unification of the theories of pattern formation and associative memory is required to account for these observations. This is achieved in a model of the bulb as a discrete excitable medium with spatially inhomogeneous coupling expressed by a connection matrix. The theory of multiple Hopf bifurcations is employed to find coupled equations for the amplitudes of competing unstable oscillatory modes. These may be created in the system by proper coupling and selectively evoked by specific classes of inputs. This allows a view of limit cycle attractors as “stored” fixed points of a gradient vector field and thereby recovers the more familiar dynamical systems picture of associative memory.

  9. The role of reconsolidation and the dynamic process of long-term memory formation and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Alberini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the processes of memory formation and storage are exquisitely dynamic. Elucidating the nature and temporal evolution of the biological changes that accompany encoding, storage and retrieval is key to understand memory formation. For explicit or medial temporal lobe-dependent memories that form after a discrete event and are stored for a long time, the physical changes underlying the encoding and processing of the information (memory trace or engram remain in a fragile state for some time. However, over time, the new memory becomes increasingly resistant to disruption until it is consolidated. Retrieval or reactivation of an apparently consolidated memory can render the memory labile again, and reconsolidation is the process that occurs to mediate its restabilization. Reconsolidation also evolves with the age of the memory: Young memories are sensitive to postreactivation disruption, but older memories are more resistant. Why does a memory become labile again if it is retrieved or reactivated? Here I suggest that the main function of reconsolidation is to contribute to the lingering consolidation process and mediate memory strengthening. I also discuss the literature and results regarding the influence of the passage of time on the reconsolidation of memory. These points have important implications for the use of reconsolidation in therapeutic settings.

  10. Strain-Mediated Interfacial Dynamics during Au–PbS Core–Shell Nanostructure Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Kai-Yang

    2016-05-23

    An understanding of the hierarchical nanostructure formation is of significant importance for the design of advanced functional materials. Here, we report the in situ study of lead sulfide (PbS) growth on gold (Au) nanorod seeds using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By tracking the formation dynamics of Au-PbS core-shell nanoparticles, we found the preferential heterogeneous nucleation of PbS on the ends of a Au nanorod prior to the development of a complete PdS shell. During PbS shell growth, drastic sulfidation of Au nanorod was observed, leading to large volume shrinkage (up to 50%) of the initial Au nanorod seed. We also captured intriguing wavy interfacial behavior, which can be explained by our DFT calculation results that the local strain gradient at the core-shell interface facilitates the mass transport and mediates reversible phase transitions of Au ↔ Au2S during the PbS shell growth. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  11. The role of loop stacking in the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mosayebi, Majid; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation using oxDNA, a nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of DNA. In particular, we explore the effects of the loop stacking interactions and non-native base pairing on the hairpin closing times. We find a non-monotonic variation of the hairpin closing time with temperature, in agreement with the experimental work of Wallace et al. [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 5584-5589]. The hairpin closing process involves the formation of an initial nucleus of one or two bonds between the stems followed by a rapid zippering of the stem. At high temperatures, typically above the hairpin melting temperature, an effective negative activation enthalpy is observed because the nucleus has a lower enthalpy than the open state. By contrast, at low temperatures, the activation enthalpy becomes positive mainly due to the increasing energetic cost of bending a loop that becomes increasingly highly stacked as the temperature decreases. We show that stacking must be very strong to induc...

  12. Overflow dynamics and bottom water formation in the western Ross Sea: Influence of tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Danilov, S.; Hellmer, H. H.; SchröTer, J.

    2010-10-01

    The tidal impact on overflow dynamics and bottom water production in the western Ross Sea is studied with the Finite Element Ocean Model, which allows embedding a mesh with 0.5 km resolution in a coarse resolution (30 km) setup without nesting. The simulated overflow properties inside and downstream of the western Ross Sea are described. The overflow exhibits pronounced variability at both daily and spring-neap tidal time scales in the western Ross Sea. Tides increase mixing over both the outer shelf and upper slope there. Plume jets are shaped by tidal currents at a bathymetric bend west of the Drygalski Trough mouth, descending rapidly and supplying the bottom water. A fraction of shelf water remains over the shelf and propagates westward from the Ross Sea, but it does not contribute significantly to bottom water formation because of energetic mixing over the upper slope. Compared to a simulation without tidal forcing, tides (with the major K1 and O1 constituents) increase the outflow rate over the continental slope off Cape Adare by about 70%. A set of sensitivity experiments show that the rate of bottom water production is not a monotonic function of the tidal currents amplitude. Tidal forcing with intermediate strength leads to the most efficient bottom water formation.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Permeation of Bisphenol A and Pore Formation in a Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Junlang; Zhou, Guoquan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Can; Wang, Xiaogang

    2016-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is particularly considered as one of the most suspicious endocrine disruptors. Exposure to BPA may bring about possible human toxicities, such as cancerous tumors, birth defects and neoteny. One of the key issues to understand its toxicities is how BPA enters cells. In this paper, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions between BPA and a phospholipid membrane (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC bilayer). The simulation results show that BPA can easily enter the membrane from the aqueous phase. With the increasing concentrations of BPA in the membrane, BPA tends to aggregate and form into cluster. Meanwhile, several DPPC lipids are pulled out from each leaflet and adsorbed on the cluster surface, leading to pore formation. Detailed observations indicate that the lipid extraction results mainly from the dispersion interactions between BPA cluster and lipid tails, as well as weak electrostatic attractions between lipid headgroups and the two hydroxyl groups on BPA. The lipid extraction and pore formation may cause cell membrane damage and are of great importance to uncover BPA’s cytotoxicity.

  14. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: a Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, Eve C; Leroy, Adam K

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for regulation of galactic star formation rates Sigma_SFR in disk galaxies, in which ISM heating by stellar UV plays a key role. By requiring simultaneous thermal and (vertical) dynamical equilibrium in the diffuse gas, and star formation at a rate proportional to the mass of the self-gravitating component, we obtain a prediction for Sigma_SFR as a function of the total gaseous surface density Sigma and the density of stars + dark matter, rho_sd. The physical basis of this relationship is that thermal pressure in the diffuse ISM, which is proportional to the UV heating rate and therefore to Sigma_SFR, must adjust to match the midplane pressure set by the vertical gravitational field. Our model applies to regions where Sigma < 100 Msun/pc^2. In low-Sigma_SFR (outer-galaxy) regions where diffuse gas dominates, the theory predicts Sigma_SFR \\propto Sigma (rho_sd)^1/2. The decrease of thermal equilibrium pressure when Sigma_SFR is low implies, consistent with observations, that star formatio...

  15. Coupled Attitude and Orbit Dynamics and Control in Formation Flying Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Mason, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Formation flying systems can range from global constellations offering extended service coverage to clusters of highly coordinated vehicles that perform distributed sensing. Recently, the use of groups of micro-satellites in the areas of near Earth explorations, deep space explorations, and military applications has received considerable attention by researchers and practitioners. To date, most proposed control strategies are based on linear models (e.g., Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations) or nonlinear models that are restricted to circular reference orbits. Also, all models in the literature are uncoupled between relative position and relative attitude. In this paper, a generalized dynamic model is proposed. The reference orbit is not restricted to the circular case. In this formulation, the leader or follower satellite can be in either a circular or an elliptic orbit. In addition to maintaining a specified relative position, the satellites are also required to maintain specified relative attitudes. Thus the model presented couples vehicle attitude and orbit requirements. Orbit perturbations are also included. In particular, the J(sub 2) effects are accounted in the model. Finally, a sliding mode controller is developed and used to control the relative attitude of the formation and the simulation results are presented.

  16. Diversity in cell motility reveals the dynamic nature of the formation of zebrafish taste sensory organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulika, Marina; Kaushik, Anna-Lila; Mathieu, Benjamin; Lourenço, Raquel; Komisarczuk, Anna Z; Romano, Sebastian Alejo; Jouary, Adrien; Lardennois, Alicia; Tissot, Nicolas; Okada, Shinji; Abe, Keiko; Becker, Thomas S; Kapsimali, Marika

    2016-06-01

    Taste buds are sensory organs in jawed vertebrates, composed of distinct cell types that detect and transduce specific taste qualities. Taste bud cells differentiate from oropharyngeal epithelial progenitors, which are localized mainly in proximity to the forming organs. Despite recent progress in elucidating the molecular interactions required for taste bud cell development and function, the cell behavior underlying the organ assembly is poorly defined. Here, we used time-lapse imaging to observe the formation of taste buds in live zebrafish larvae. We found that tg(fgf8a.dr17)-expressing cells form taste buds and get rearranged within the forming organs. In addition, differentiating cells move from the epithelium to the forming organs and can be displaced between developing organs. During organ formation, tg(fgf8a.dr17) and type II taste bud cells are displaced in random, directed or confined mode relative to the taste bud they join or by which they are maintained. Finally, ascl1a activity in the 5-HT/type III cell is required to direct and maintain tg(fgf8a.dr17)-expressing cells into the taste bud. We propose that diversity in displacement modes of differentiating cells acts as a key mechanism for the highly dynamic process of taste bud assembly.

  17. Star formation properties and dynamics of Luminous Infrared Galaxies with adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, Petri; Ryder, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Near infrared adaptive optics observations are crucial to be able to interpret kinematic and dynamical data and study star formation properties within the often extremely dusty interacting luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs). NIR AO data are also needed to find supernovae in their bright and dusty central regions and to fully characterize the young stellar clusters found in these kinds of systems. We have used AO in the K-band to survey a sample of LIRGs at 0.1 arcsec (30 to 100 pc) resolution. The data are merged with SALT and AAT spectroscopic follow-up and HST and Spitzer archival imaging. The first AO detected SNe are reported as well as details of the first studied LIRGs. One LIRG showed an unexpected third component in the interaction, which moreover turned out to host the most active star formation. Another target showed evidence in the NIR of a very rare case of leading spiral arms, rotating in the same direction as the arms open.

  18. Sensitivity study of fluid dynamic effects on nitric oxide formation in CFB combustion of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, S.; Kilpinen, P.; Konttinen, J. [Abo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland); Leckner, B.; Armand, L.E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    The type of fuel and operating conditions in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) can vary widely. Potential fuels include coals, biofuels and wastes. The use of biofuels as an energy source has stimulated much interest around the world, but the nitric oxide (NO) emissions from CFB combustion of wood is of the same order of magnitude as from combustion of coal with high N content. This paper presents a newly developed 1.5D numerical model that examines the formation of NO and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions in a CFBC under varying operating conditions and different fuel types. A comprehensive kinetic scheme was used for the homogeneous chemistry and a single particle model for char combustion. Gas mixing and release of volatiles were the fluid dynamic factors that were examined for wood combustion under normal air staging conditions. The formation of high NO emissions from wood burning was found to depend greatly on the pattern of volatile releases as well as the mixing of secondary air and gas. Nitric oxide was found to form higher in the riser during wood combustion compared to coal combustion. The large amount of char at the bottom of the bed is an important source of nitric oxide. 14 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  19. A Fuzzy Programming approach for formation of Virtual Cells under dynamic and uncertain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Jayachitra,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by principles and advantages of the group technology (GT philosophy, part family formation for a virtual Cellular Manufacturing System (VCMS using Fuzzy logic is designed for dynamic and uncertain conditions. In real manufacturing systems, the input parameters such as part demand and the capacity are fuzzy in nature. In such cases, the fluctuations in part demand and the availability of manufacturing facilities in each period can be regarded as fuzzy. In a dynamic environment, the planning horizon can be divided into smaller time periods where each period and/or each part has different product mix and demand. A mathematical model for virtual cellular manufacturing system as binary-integer programming is proposed to minimize the total costs consisting of fixed machine costs, variable costs of all machines and the logical group movement costs. To verify the behavior of the proposed model, a comprehensive example is solved by a branch- and-bound (B&B method with the LINGO 12.0 software and the virtual cells(VC are formed by defuzzification using maximizing decision level λ (lambda-cut and the computational results are reported and compared with simulated annealing algorithm and rank order clustering algorithm .

  20. Mechanism underlying formation of SSC in optical glass due to dynamic impact of single diamond scratch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 赵航; 张飞虎; 张元晶; 张勇

    2015-01-01

    During the grinding of optical glass, the abrasion directly affects the morphology and depth of subsurface cracks(SSC). The effect of dynamic impact of grinding abrasives on optical glass is an important issue in the field of optics manufacturing. In this work, a single diamond scratch was used to grind optical glass, and grinding parameters were collaboratively controlled to ensure that the cutting layer remained constant. A dynamometer was used to record the duration of the impact process, and the cross-section of the test piece was polished for scanning electron microscopy(SEM) to determine the depth of the SSCs. The experimental results show that as wheel speed increases, SSC depth tends to decrease. When the wheel speed gradually increases from 500 r/min to 2500 r/min, the probability distribution curve for the maximum SSC depth shifts downward by around 80 μm. The effect of the dynamic impact of single diamond scratch is found to be an important cause of SSC formation in optical glass during grinding, i.e., the faster the grinding, the shallower the SSCs.

  1. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  2. Function and Dynamics of Tetraspanins during Antigen Recognition and Immunological Synapse Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eRocha-Perugini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs are specialized membrane platforms driven by protein-protein interactions that integrate membrane receptors and adhesion molecules. Tetraspanins participate in antigen recognition and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs through the organization of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their downstream induced-signaling, as well as the regulation of MHC-II-peptide trafficking. T lymphocyte activation is triggered upon specific recognition of antigens present on the APC surface during immunological synapse (IS formation. This dynamic process is characterized by a defined spatial organization involving the compartmentalization of receptors and adhesion molecules in specialized membrane domains that are connected to the underlying cytoskeleton and signaling molecules. Tetraspanins contribute to the spatial organization and maturation of the IS by controlling receptor clustering and local accumulation of adhesion receptors and integrins, their downstream signaling and linkage to the actin cytoskeleton. This review offers a perspective on the important role of TEMs in the regulation of antigen recognition and presentation, and in the dynamics of IS architectural organization.

  3. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells.

  4. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund, E-mail: gamunoz2f@uc.cl, E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  5. Mechanism underlying formation of SSC in optical glass due to dynamic impact of single diamond scratch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 赵航; 张飞虎; 张元晶; 张勇

    2015-01-01

    During the grinding of optical glass, the abrasion directly affects the morphology and depth of subsurface cracks (SSC). The effect of dynamic impact of grinding abrasives on optical glass is an important issue in the field of optics manufacturing. In this work, a single diamond scratch was used to grind optical glass, and grinding parameters were collaboratively controlled to ensure that the cutting layer remained constant. A dynamometer was used to record the duration of the impact process, and the cross-section of the test piece was polished for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the depth of the SSCs. The experimental results show that as wheel speed increases, SSC depth tends to decrease. When the wheel speed gradually increases from 500 r/min to 2500 r/min, the probability distribution curve for the maximum SSC depth shifts downward by around 80 µm. The effect of the dynamic impact of single diamond scratch is found to be an important cause of SSC formation in optical glass during grinding, i.e., the faster the grinding, the shallower the SSCs.

  6. The impact of turbulence and phytoplankton dynamics on foam formation, seawater viscosity and chlorophyll concentration in the eastern English Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Kesaulya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The space-time dynamics of chlorophyll a concentration and seawater excess viscosity has been investigated in the hydrographically contrasting inshore and offshore water masses of the eastern English Channel. This was done during the phytoplankton spring bloom dominated by Phaeocystis globosa before and after the very large-scale formation of foam induced by an increase in wind-driven turbulence and the related wave breakings. The results suggest that the dynamics of chlorophyll a concentration and seawater excess viscosity are differentially controlled by the formation of foam through the intensity of the spring bloom and wind-generated turbulence.

  7. IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, 10-14 March 2013, Fukuoka, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2014-06-01

    This special issue of Fluid Dynamics Research contains the first of a two-part publication of the papers presented at the IUTAM Symposium on Vortex Dynamics: Formation, Structure and Function, held at the Centennial Hall, Kyushu University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan, during the week of 10-14 March 2013. Vortices are ubiquitous structures in fluid mechanics spanning the range of scales from nanofluidics and microfluidics to geophysical and astrophysical flows. Vortices are the key to understanding many different phenomena. As a result, the subject of vortex dynamics continues to evolve and to constantly find new applications in biology, biotechnology, industrial and environmental problems. Vortices can be created by the separation of a flow from the surface of a body or at a density interface, and evolve into coherent structures. Once formed, a vortex acquires a function, depending on its individual structure. In this way, for example, insects gain lift and fish gain thrust. Surprisingly, despite the long history of vortex dynamics, only recently has knowledge about formation, structure and function of vortices been combined to yield new perspectives in the subject, thereby helping to solve outstanding problems brought about by modern advances in computer technology and improved experimental techniques. This symposium is a continuation, five years on, of the IUTAM Symposium '50 Years of Vortex Dynamics', Lyngby, Denmark that took place between 12-16 October 2008, organized by the late Professor Hassan Aref. Originally, Professor Aref was a member of the International Scientific Committee of this symposium and offered his enthusiasm and great expertise, to support its organization. To our shock, he suddenly passed away on 9 September 2011. Furthermore, Professor Slava Meleshko, a leading scientist of fluid and solid mechanics and an intimate friend of Professor Aref, was expected to make an eminent contribution to the symposium. Soon after this sad loss

  8. Dynamics of Mantle Circulation Associated with Slab Window Formation: Insights from 3D Laboratory Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Faccenna, C.; Martinod, J.

    2009-12-01

    Slab window can form either by the intersection of a spreading ridge with a subduction zone or because of internal deformation of the slab that leads to its disruption. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. We performed laboratory models of a two-layer linear viscous slab (silicone putty)-upper mantle (glucose syrup) system to quantitatively investigate the pattern of mantle circulation within the slab window (using Feature Tracking image analysis technique) and its influence on the kinematics of the system. Two different geometries have been tested considering a window located (a) at slab edges or (b) within the slab. Kinematic consequences of slab window have been explored to understand the dynamics of the mantle-slab interaction. Configuration (a) implies a reduction of the slab width (W) during subduction and is characterized by toroidal fluxes around the slab edges. The abrupt opening of lateral slab windows produces an acceleration of the trench retreat and subduction velocity, such as 40% for a three-fold width reduction. We interpret this behavior as mostly due to the decrease in the toroidal flow inside subduction windows, scaling with W2. Configuration (b) has been designed to explore the pattern of mantle flow within the window in the case of a laterally constrained subduction system. Slab window, which had a width (Ww) fixed to 15 % of the slab width, opened in the trench-perpendicular direction. It produced the formation of two toroidal mantle cells, centered on the slab midpoint and laterally growing as the slab window enlarged. Particles extruded through the slab window did not mix with particles located in the mantle wedge, the boundary between both reaching distances from the trench up to 3×Ww in the trench-perpendicular direction, and up to 1.5×Ww from the window edge in

  9. Role of the temperature dynamics in formation of nanopatterns upon single femtosecond laser pulses on gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Levy, Yoann; Gurevich, Svetlana V.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the role of two-temperature heating dynamics for formation of periodic structures on metal surfaces exposed to single ultrashort laser pulses.The results of two-temperature model (TTM) two-dimensional simulations are presented on the irradiation of gold by a single 800-nm femtosecond laser pulse the intensity of which is modulated in order to reproduce an initial electron temperature perturbation, which can arise from incoming and scattered surface wave interference. The growing (unstable) modes of the lattice temperature distribution along the surface may be significant in the laser induced periodic surface structures formation. After the end of the laser pulse and before the complete coupling between lattice and electrons occurs, the evolution of the amplitude of the subsequent modulation in the lattice temperature reveals different tendencies depending on the spatial period of the initial modulation. This instabilitylike behavior is shown to arise due to the perturbation of the electronic temperature which relaxes slower for bigger spatial periods and thus imparts more significant modulations to the lattice temperature. Small spatial periods of the order of 100 nm and smaller experience stabilization and fast decay from the more efficient lateral heat diffusion which facilitates the relaxation of the electronic temperature amplitude due to in-depth diffusion. An analytical instability analysis of a simplified version of the TTM set of equations supports the lattice temperature modulation behavior obtained in the simulations and reveals that in-depth diffusion length is a determining parameter in the dispersion relation of unstable modes. Finally, it is discussed how the change in optical properties can intensify the modulation-related effects.

  10. Dynamic coupling of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Picker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation.

  11. On the dynamic nature of the prolate solar chromosphere: jet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.; Koutchmy, S.; Vilinga, J.

    2007-03-01

    Context: In "cool" spectral lines, the smoothed upper edge of the solar chromosphere is prolate in the South-North direction at the epoch of minimum solar activity and nearly spherically symmetric at the maximum phase. We attribute the effect to the dynamical nature of the upper chromosphere, which consists of a large number of small jet-like structures ascending into the corona. We could not resolve the source region of an individual jetlet, although similar but larger structures are visible, especially in EUV coronal lines. Aims: We consider the problem of the formation of an individual jet above the limb, assuming that a large number of jet-like events is responsible for the prolate solar upper chromosphere. We then assume that spicules, being the cool part of the phenomenon, behave similarly, and we will mainly concentrate the analysis on the magnetic origin of the event. Methods: Image processing is used to reveal the displacement of magnetic field tubes filled with coronal plasma and jet formation due to field aligned motion above the null point created in the corona by the emerging magnetic bipole. Results: The growth of the bipole leads to a reconnection of the field lines and to a specific plasma motion in the vicinity of the null point that results in a plasma flow along the spine line of the 3D null. We assume that similar but smaller processes could happen very often at a smaller scale in the chromosphere, near emerging magnetic ephemeral regions, forming numerous jetlets in the upper chromosphere. As the field aligned motion is guided by the magnetic field, at the epoch of low activity the large-scale structure of the polar magnetic field and the one of the quiet equatorial region is sufficiently different to explain the prolateness of the chromosphere.

  12. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T., E-mail: tctm3@cam.ac.uk; Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J., E-mail: tpjk2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-07

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  13. Vortex formation in coalescence of droplets with a reservoir using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; Bonaccurso, Elmar; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2016-10-01

    The flow patterns generated by the coalescence of aqueous ethanol droplets with a water reservoir are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The influence of surface tension gradient, which leads to the spreading of the droplet along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir, is studied by changing the ethanol concentration of the droplet. The internal circulation (vortex strength) of the droplet and the reservoir are analyzed separately. Simulation results reveal the formation of swirling flows within the droplet at early times when the radius of the coalescence neck due to the capillary forces increases rapidly with time. The vortex strength is found to be higher at lower concentrations of ethanol (higher liquid-vapor surface tension of the droplet), where the driving force for the contact line movement (capillary force) is stronger. The circulation diminishes by moving the center of mass of the droplet toward the reservoir. The lower surface tension of the droplet compared to the reservoir leads to surface tension gradient driven flow, which transports the droplet molecules along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir. Such a flow motion results in the generation of convective flows in the underlying water, which forms swirling flows within the reservoir. Therefore, the vortex strength of the reservoir is higher at higher ethanol concentrations of the droplet. The reservoir circulation decays to zero as soon as the ethanol concentration becomes homogeneous along the interface of the pool. The time evolution of circulation within the droplet and the reservoir are correlated with the center of mass motion of the droplet toward the surface, the time variation of the precursor film radius and the dynamic surface tension of the reservoir.

  14. Effects of Dynamic Changes in Ultrasound Attenuation and Blood Perfusion on Lesion Formation of Multiple focus Pattern during Ultrasound Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chen-xi; BAI Jing-feng; CHEN Ya-zhu

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear finite-element program was developed to simulate the dynamic evolution of coagulation in tissue considering temperature and thermal-dose dependence of the ultrasound attenuation and blood perfusion rate.The effects of these dynamic parameters on the lesion formation were investigated in the particular case of ultrasound hepatic ablation with bi-focus intensity pattern.The results of simulations were compared that incorporate dynamic changes of ultrasound attenuation and perfusion and results that neglect these effects.The result shows that thermal-dose-dependent ultrasound attenuation is the dominating factor in the full dynamic model.If the dynamic ultrasound attenuation is ignored, a relatively significant underestimation of the temperature rise appears in the focal plane and the region next to the focal plane, resulting in an underestimation in predicting diameter of coagulation.Higher heating intensity leads to greater underestimation.

  15. Understanding the dynamics of the inductive plasma formation and its application to create doublet shaped plasma in the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Joyeeta; Coda, Stefano; Duval, Basil Paul; Galperti, Cristian; Moret, Jean-Marc; Reimerdes, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of the plasma formation in TCV are revisited with the goal of improving reliability and developing new scenarios such as the creation of doublet configurations. A database for the plasma formation scenarios in TCV reveals that 15% of the attempts to form a plasma fail during the burn-through phase. Plasma formation dynamics are greatly affected by the difference between programmed and obtained plasma current ramp rates that can lead to oscillations in IP when the IP feedback control is activated. This mismatch in IP also propagates into the radial position control. Failed burn-throughs occur when the Ohmic heating power is insufficient either since IP rises too slow or due to a combined effect of the IP feedback oscillations and a regularly occurring MHD instability. Several strategies to improve the present plasma formation scenario have been implemented. Based on the improved understanding of the plasma formation dynamics, a strategy has been developed to create and control a doublet configuration by merging of two droplet-shaped plasma requiring simultaneous breakdown at two locations.

  16. Massive Galaxies at High-z: Assembly Patterns, Structure & Dynamics in the Fast Phase of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Oñorbe, J; Domínguez-Tenreiro, R; Knebe, A; Serna, A

    2011-01-01

    Relaxed, massive galactic objects have been identified at redshifts z = 4;5; and 6 in hydrodynamical simulations run in a large cosmological volume. This allowed us to analyze the assembly patterns of the high mass end of the galaxy distribution at these high zs, by focusing on their structural and dynamical properties. Our simulations indicate that massive objects at high redshift already follow certain scaling relations. These relations define virial planes at the halo scale, whereas at the galactic scale they define intrinsic dynamical planes that are, however, tilted relative to the virial plane. Therefore, we predict that massive galaxies must lie on fundamental planes from their formation. We briefly discuss the physical origin of the tilt in terms the physical processes underlying massive galaxy formation at high z, in the context of a two-phase galaxy formation scenario. Specifically, we have found that it lies on the different behavior of the gravitationally heated gas as compared with cold gas previ...

  17. Lane Formation Dynamics of Oppositely Self-Driven Binary Particles: Effects of Density and Finite System Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kosuke; Kim, Kang

    2017-04-01

    We examined the lane formation dynamics of oppositely self-driven binary particles by molecular dynamics simulations of a two-dimensional system. Our study comprehensively revealed the effects of the density and system size on the lane formation. The phase diagram distinguishing the no-lane and lane states was systematically determined for various combinations of the anisotropic friction coefficient and the desired velocity. A peculiar clustered structure was observed when the lane was destroyed by considerably increasing the desired velocity. A strong system size effect was demonstrated by the relationship between the temporal and spatial scales of the lane structure. This system size effect can be attributed to an analogy with the driven lattice gas. The transport efficiency was characterized from the scaling relation in terms of the degree of lane formation and the interface thickness between different lanes.

  18. Dynamic O-GlcNAc modification regulates CREB-mediated gene expression and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexach, Jessica E; Clark, Peter M; Mason, Daniel E; Neve, Rachael L; Peters, Eric C; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2012-01-22

    The transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB) is a key regulator of many neuronal processes, including brain development, circadian rhythm and long-term memory. Studies of CREB have focused on its phosphorylation, although the diversity of CREB functions in the brain suggests additional forms of regulation. Here we expand on a chemoenzymatic strategy for quantifying glycosylation stoichiometries to characterize the functional roles of CREB glycosylation in neurons. We show that CREB is dynamically modified with an O-linked β-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine sugar in response to neuronal activity and that glycosylation represses CREB-dependent transcription by impairing its association with CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC; also known as transducer of regulated CREB activity). Blocking glycosylation of CREB alters cellular function and behavioral plasticity, enhancing both axonal and dendritic growth and long-term memory consolidation. Our findings demonstrate a new role for O-glycosylation in memory formation and provide a mechanistic understanding of how glycosylation contributes to critical neuronal functions. Moreover, we identify a previously unknown mechanism for the regulation of activity-dependent gene expression, neural development and memory.

  19. Towards New Insights in the Sterol/Amphotericin Nanochannels Formation: A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Khaoula; Balme, Sébastien; Janot, Jean-Marc; Picaud, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a well-known polyene which self-organizes into membrane cell in order to cause the cell death. Its specific action towards fungal cell is not fully understood but was proved to become from sterol composition. The mechanism was shown experimentally to require the formation of stable sterol/polyene couples which could then organize in a nanochannel. This would allow the leakage of ions responsible for the death of fungal cells, only. In this present study, we investigate the arrangement of AmB/sterols in biological membrane using molecular dynamic simulations in order to understand the role of the sterol structure on the antifungal action of the polyene. We show in particular that the nanochannels tend to close up when cell was composed with cholesterol (animal cell) due to strong interaction between amphotericin and sterol. On the other side, with ergosterol (fungal cell) the largest interactions between amphotericin and lipid membrane lead to the appearance of large hole that could favor the important leakage of ions and thus, the fungal cell death. This work appears as a good complement in the extensive studies linked to the understanding of the antifungal molecules in membrane cells.

  20. The Last Stages of Terrestrial Planet Formation: Dynamical Friction and the Late Veneer

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting, Hilke E; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the cleanup of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities of the terrestrial planets after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M_Earth of chondritic material was delivered as `late veneer' by planetesimals to the terrestrial planets after the end of giant impacts. Here we combine these two independent lines of evidence for a leftover population of planetesimals and show that: 1) A residual planetesimal population containing 0.01 M_Earth is able to damp the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets after giant impacts to their observed values. 2) At the same time, this planetesimal population can account for the observed relative amounts of late veneer added to the Earth, Moon and Mars provided that the majority of ...

  1. Computational issues in chemo-dynamical modelling of the formation and evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Yves; Nichols, Matthew; Bonvin, Vivien; Jablonka, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Chemo-dynamical N-body simulations are an essential tool for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. As the number of observationally determined stellar abundances continues to climb, these simulations are able to provide new constraints on the early star formaton history and chemical evolution inside both the Milky Way and Local Group dwarf galaxies. Here, we aim to reproduce the low $\\alpha$-element scatter observed in metal-poor stars. We first demonstrate that as stellar particles inside simulations drop below a mass threshold, increases in the resolution produce an unacceptably large scatter as one particle is no longer a good approximation of an entire stellar population. This threshold occurs at around $10^3\\,\\rm{M_\\odot}$, a mass limit easily reached in current (and future) simulations. By simulating the Sextans and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies we show that this increase in scatter at high resolutions arises from stochastic supernovae explosions. In order to reduce this scatter down...

  2. Formation and Collapse of Quiescent Cloud Cores Induced by Dynamic Compressions

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Gilberto C; Shadmehri, Mohsen; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of the formation, evolution and gravitational collapse of isothermal molecular cloud cores induced by generic turbulent compressions in spherical geometry. A compressive wave is set up in a constant sub-Jeans density distribution. As the wave travels through the simulation grid, a shock-bounded layer is formed. The inner shock of this layer reaches and bounces off the center, leaving behind a central core with an initial almost uniform density distribution, surrounded by an envelope consisting of the material in the shock-bounded shell, with a power-law density profile with index close to -2 even in non-collapsing cases. The resulting density structure resembles a quiescent core of radius < 0.1 pc, with a Bonnor-Ebert-like (BE-like) profile, although it has significant dynamical differences: it is initially non-self-gravitating and confined by the ram pressure of the infalling material, and consequently, growing continuously in mass and size. With the appropi...

  3. Function and dynamics of slam in furrow formation in early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sreemukta; Laupsien, Philip; Wenzl, Christian; Yan, Shuling; Großhans, Jörg

    2014-02-15

    The Drosophila embryo undergoes a developmental transition in the blastoderm stage switching from syncytial to cellular development. The cleavage furrow, which encloses nuclei into cells, is a prominent morphological feature of this transition. It is not clear how the pattern of the furrow array is defined and how zygotic genes trigger the formation and invagination of interphase furrows. A key to these questions is provided by the gene slam, which has been previously implicated in controlling furrow invagination. Here we investigate the null phenotype of slam, the dynamics of Slam protein, and its control by the recycling endosome. We find that slam is essential for furrow invagination during cellularisation and together with nullo, for specification of the furrow. During cellularisation, Slam marks first the furrow, which is derived from the metaphase furrow of the previous mitosis. Slightly later, Slam accumulates at new furrows between daughter cells early in interphase. Slam is stably associated with the furrow canal except for the onset of cellularisation as revealed by FRAP experiments. Restriction of Slam to the furrow canal and Slam mobility during cellularisation is controlled by the recycling endosome and centrosomes. We propose a three step model. The retracting metaphase furrow leaves an initial mark. This mark and the border between corresponding daughter nuclei are refined by vesicular transport away from pericentrosomal recycling endosome towards the margins of the somatic buds. Following the onset of zygotic gene expression, Slam and Nullo together stabilise this mark and Slam triggers invagination of the cleavage furrow.

  4. Insights into pulverized rock formation from dynamic rupture models of earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2017-02-01

    Pulverized rocks (PR) are extremely incohesive and highly fractured rocks found within the damage zones of several large strike-slip faults around the world. They maintain their crystal structure, show little evidence of shearing or chemical alteration, and are believed to be produced by strong tensile forces. Several mechanisms for pulverization have been proposed based on simple qualitative analyses or laboratory experiments under simplified loading conditions. Numerical modelling, however, can offer new insights into what is needed to produce PR and likely conditions of formation. We perform dynamic rupture simulations of different earthquakes, varying the magnitude, the slip distribution, and the rupture speed (supershear and subshear), while measuring the stresses produced away from the fault. To contextualize our results, a basic threshold of 10 MPa is set as the tensile strength of the rock mass and recordings are made of where, when, and by how much this threshold is exceeded for each earthquake type. Guided by field observations, we discern that a large (>Mw 7.1) subshear earthquake along a bimaterial fault produces a pulverized rock distribution most consistent with observations. The damage is asymmetric with the majority on the stiffer side of the fault extending out for several hundred metres. Within this zone there is a large and sudden volumetric expansion in all directions as the rupture passes. We propose that such an extreme tensile stress state, repeated for every earthquake, eventually produces the PR seen in the field.

  5. Oort Cloud and Scattered Disc formation during a late dynamical instability in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Brasser, R

    2013-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems of the dynamical evolution of the outer solar system concerns the observed population ratio between the Oort Cloud (OC) and the Scattered Disc (SD): observations suggest that this ratio lies between 100 and 1000 but simulations that produce these two reservoirs simultaneously consistently yield a value of the order of 10. Here we stress that the populations in the OC and SD are inferred from the observed fluxes of new Long Period Comets (LPCs) and Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), brighter than some reference total magnitude. However, the population ratio estimated in the simulations of formation of the SD and OC refers to objects bigger than a given size. There are multiple indications that LPCs are intrinsically brighter than JFCs, i.e. an LPC is smaller than a JFC with the same total absolute magnitude. When taking this into account we revise the SD/JFC population ratio from our simulations relative to Duncan and Levison (1997), and then deduce from the observations that the siz...

  6. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  7. Kinetic thin current sheets: their formation in relation to magnetotail mesoscale turbulent dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kropotkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet (PS features nonlinear structures on two totally different scales. There are very thin current sheets (CS on kinetic scale of the ion gyroradius. And there are intense plasma flow and magnetic field variations on mesoscales (a few earth radii; those are interpreted as mostly 2-D MHD turbulence. On the other hand, the specific nature of slow large scale magnetotail evolution leads to large differences in the PS properties and those of the lobe plasma. As a result, while fast reconnection bursts in the tail provide quasi-stationary fast mesoscale reconfigurations in the lobes, they cannot however be accompanied by restructuring of CS on the same fast time scale. Violations of force balance in the PS are thus generated. Simulation using a hybrid code and starting with such imbalance, provides an evidence of very thin kinetic CS structures formation, embedded into the much thicker PS. The momentum balance gets locally restored by means of ion acceleration up to the Alfvénic velocity. The process provides an effective mechanism for transformation of magnetic energy accumulated in the magnetotail, into energy of plasma flows. The fast flows may drive turbulence on shorter spatial scales. In their turn, these motions may serve as an origin for new neutral line generation, and reconnection. Application to substorm phenomenology is discussed.

  8. A Dynamical Model for Gas Flows, Star Formation, and Nuclear Winds in Galactic Centres

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz., Mark R; Crocker, Roland M

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation, and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally-unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inward to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at $\\sim 100$ pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting $\\sim 5-10$ Myr occurring at $\\sim 20-40$ Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with ...

  9. Dynamic formation of zeolite synthesized from fly ash by alkaline hydrothermal conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, Jiangli; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Hang; Zhu, Jun; He, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to characterize the dynamic formation of zeolite synthesized from fly ash (ZFA) and to identify the zeolitization mechanisms during a 160-h-long hydrothermal alkaline conversion at 95°C by using fly ash (FA) samples collected from four typical thermoelectric power plants in China, with the purpose of improving ZFA quality. The process of synthesizing ZFA can be fundamentally divided into five stages: induction stage (0-0.5 h), accelerating dissolution stage (0.5-12 h), nucleation and/or crystallization stage (12-24 h), crystal growth stage (24-72 h) and crystal transformation stage (72-160 h). The crystal growth stage determined the quality of zeolite crystallization, coupled with functions of re-assembling the silicon-aluminium tetrahedral network and developing submicro- and/or nanometer microstructure. A 48-h-long hydrothermal conversion generated ZFAs that had a greater specific surface area (26.0-89.4 times) and cation exchange capacity (29.6-71.0 times) than FA, which successfully sequestrated 41-95% of ammonium and 75-98% of phosphate from swine manure. However, over-reaction resulted in more stable hydroxysodalite and/or sodalite, surface agglomeration and cracking, and energy wasting. This work suggests that the reuse of recycled synthesis materials should occur during the fourth step (24-72 h).

  10. Aerosol dynamics simulations on the connection of sulphuric acid and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a series of simulations with an aerosol dynamics box model to study the connection between new particle formation and sulphuric acid concentration. For nucleation either activation mechanism with a linear dependence on the sulphuric acid concentration or ternary H2O-H2SO4-NH3 nucleation was assumed. We investigated the factors that affect the sulphuric acid dependence during the early stages of particle growth, and tried to find conditions which would yield the linear dependence between the particle number concentration at 3–6 nm and sulphuric acid, as observed in field experiments. The simulations showed that the correlation with sulphuric acid may change during the growth from nucleation size to 3–6 nm size range, the main reason being the size dependent growth rate between 1 and 3 nm. In addition, the assumed size for the nucleated clusters had a crucial impact on the sulphuric acid dependence at 3 nm. The simulations yielded a linear dependence between the particle number concentration at 3 nm and sulphuric acid, when a low saturation vapour pressure for the condensable organic vapour was assumed, or when nucleation took place at ~2 nm instead of ~1 nm. Comparison of results with activation and ternary nucleation showed that ternary nucleation cannot explain the experimentally observed linear or square dependence on sulphuric acid.

  11. Modelling plastic deformation in BCC metals: Dynamic recovery and cell formation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo-Nava, E.I. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pembroke Street, CB2 3QZ, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2 2628 CD, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J., E-mail: pejr2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pembroke Street, CB2 3QZ, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    A recently developed model for describing plasticity in FCC metals (E.I., Galindo-Nava, P.E.J., Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, Mater. Sci. Eng. A 543 (2012) 110-116; E.I. Galindo-Nava, P.E.J. Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, Acta Mater. 60 (2012) 4370-4378) has now been applied to BCC. The core of the theory is the thermostatistical description of dislocation annihilation paths, which determines the dynamic recovery rate of the material. Input to this is the energy for the formation, migration and ordering of dislocation paths; the latter term corresponds to the statistical entropy which features strongly on the solution. The distinctions between FCC and BCC stem primarily from the possible directions and planes for dislocation slip and cross-slip, as well as from the presence of the kink-pair mechanism for dislocation migration in BCC, which are incorporated to the mathematical formulation of the model. The theory is unique in describing the stress-strain response for pure iron, molybdenum, tantalum, vanadium and tungsten employing physical parameters as input; the description is made for wide ranges of temperature and strain rate. Additionally, succinct equations to predict dislocation cell size variation with strain, strain rate and temperature are provided and validated for pure iron.

  12. Formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of large-scale magnetic structures in the ionosphere of Venus are examined. It is shown that such structures must be the result of steady state convection of interplanetary field lines into the ionosphere by the small amount of solar wind plasma (less than or approximately equal to 1-5 percent) absorbed by the planetary atmosphere below the ionopause, rather than isolated remnants of large fields persisting for long periods without connection to the solar wind induced current and convection pattern. In particular, it is demonstrated that the magnetic diffusion of such structures would result in their dissipation with time scales of 1-10 min, if they were not steady state structures in convective and diffusive equilibriuim. It is shown that the equations governing the diffusion of these magnetic structures are similar to those governing diffusion of a gas out of an enclosed chamber with a porous wall, and a simple analog is illustrated. The application of these results to magnetic fields of astrophysical plasmas is discussed.

  13. Improved efficacy of ethyl formate against stored grain insects by combination with carbon dioxide in a 'dynamic' application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritos, Victoria S; Damcevski, Katherine A; Dojchinov, Greg

    2006-04-01

    Ethyl formate is being evaluated as a fumigant for stored grain as it is a potential alternative to the ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide and to phosphine, which is under pressure owing to the development of strong resistance in stored grain insects. However, use of ethyl formate faces significant challenges, such as poor penetration through grain, significant losses to grain sorption, high concentrations of fumigant required to control insects, and flammability risks, which have limited its further development. In this study it was found that the combination of carbon dioxide (5-20%) with ethyl formate significantly enhanced efficacy of the fumigant against external living stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica F., and the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst). Dynamic application of ethyl formate and carbon dioxide mixture (100 mg litre-1 ethyl formate, 20% CO2) pumped through a model silo containing wheat (50 kg) for one gas exchange was also investigated. A flow rate of 6 litres min-1 gave a relatively even distribution of fumigant throughout the grain column and similar mortality levels among cultures of S. oryzae and T. castaneum placed at three positions, the top, middle and bottom of the column. Mortality of 99.8% of mixed stage cultures of T. castaneum and 95.1% of S. oryzae was achieved in 3 h exposures to 111 and 185 mg ethyl formate h litre-1 respectively applied by the dynamic method. It is concluded that the combination of carbon dioxide with ethyl formate and dynamic application enhances distribution and efficacy of the fumigant against stored grain insects.

  14. The Last Stages of Terrestrial Planet Formation: Dynamical Friction and the Late Veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Warren, Paul H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2012-06-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation consists of the clean-up of residual planetesimals after the giant impact phase. Dynamically, a residual planetesimal population is needed to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets to circular and coplanar orbits after the giant impact stage. Geochemically, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundance patterns inferred for the terrestrial planets and the Moon suggest that a total of about 0.01 M⊕ of chondritic material was delivered as "late veneer" by planetesimals to the terrestrial planets after the end of giant impacts. Here, we combine these two independent lines of evidence for a leftover population of planetesimals and show that: (1) a residual population of small planetesimals containing 0.01 M⊕ is able to damp the high eccentricities and inclinations of the terrestrial planets after giant impacts to their observed values. (2) At the same time, this planetesimal population can account for the observed relative amounts of late veneer added to the Earth, Moon, and Mars provided that the majority of the accreted late veneer was delivered by small planetesimals with radii <~ 10 m. These small planetesimal sizes are required to ensure efficient damping of the planetesimal's velocity dispersion by mutual collisions, which in turn ensures sufficiently low relative velocities between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals such that the planets' accretion cross sections are significantly enhanced by gravitational focusing above their geometric values. Specifically, we find that, in the limit that the relative velocity between the terrestrial planets and the planetesimals is significantly less than the terrestrial planets' escape velocities, gravitational focusing yields a mass accretion ratio of Earth/Mars ~(ρ⊕/ρmars)(R⊕/Rmars)4 ~ 17, which agrees well with the mass accretion ratio inferred from HSEs of 12-23. For the Earth-Moon system, we find a mass accretion ratio of

  15. Impact of drought on the temporal dynamics of wood formation in Pinus sylvestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas; Strobl, Stefan; Veit, Barbara; Oberhuber, Walter

    2010-04-01

    We determined the temporal dynamics of cambial activity and xylem cell differentiation of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) within a dry inner Alpine valley (750 m a.s.l., Tyrol, Austria), where radial growth is strongly limited by drought in spring. Repeated micro-sampling of the developing tree ring of mature trees was carried out during two contrasting years at two study plots that differ in soil water availability (xeric and dry-mesic sites). In 2007, when air temperature at the beginning of the growing season in April exceeded the long-term mean by 6.4 degrees C, cambial cell division started in early April at both study plots. A delayed onset of cambial activity of c. 2 weeks was found in 2008, when average climate conditions prevailed in spring, indicating that resumption of cambial cell division after winter dormancy is temperature controlled. Cambial cell division consistently ended about the end of June/early July in both study years. Radial enlargement of tracheids started almost 3 weeks earlier in 2007 compared with 2008 at both study plots. At the xeric site, the maximum rate of tracheid production in 2007 and 2008 was reached in early and mid-May, respectively, and c. 2 weeks later at the dry-mesic site. Since in both study years more favorable growing conditions (i.e., an increase in soil water content) were recorded during summer, we suggest a strong sink competition for carbohydrates to mycorrhizal root and shoot growth. Wood formation stopped c. 4 weeks earlier at the xeric compared with the dry-mesic site in both years, indicating a strong influence of drought stress on cell differentiation. This is supported by radial widths of earlywood cells, which were found to be significantly narrower at the xeric than at the dry-mesic site (P analyses during the two growing seasons revealed that, although spatial variability in the dynamics and duration of cell differentiation processes in P. sylvestris exposed to drought is strongly influenced by water

  16. Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation simulation - I. The dynamical lives of high-redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gregory B.; Angel, Paul W.; Mutch, Simon J.; Power, Chris; Duffy, Alan R.; Geil, Paul M.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, Stuart B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) programme and Tiamat, the collisionless N-body simulation programme upon which DRAGONS is built. The primary trait distinguishing Tiamat from other large simulation programme is its density of outputs at high redshift (100 from z = 35 to z = 5; roughly one every 10 Myr) enabling the construction of very accurate merger trees at an epoch when galaxy formation is rapid and mergers extremely frequent. We find that the friends-of-friends halo mass function agrees well with the prediction of Watson et al. at high masses, but deviates at low masses, perhaps due to our use of a different halo finder or perhaps indicating a break from `universal' behaviour. We then analyse the dynamical evolution of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization finding that only a small fraction (˜20 per cent) of galactic haloes are relaxed. We illustrate this using standard relaxation metrics to establish two dynamical recovery time-scales: (i) haloes need ˜1.5 dynamical times following formation, and (ii) ˜2 dynamical times following a major (3:1) or minor (10:1) merger to be relaxed. This is remarkably consistent across a wide mass range. Lastly, we use a phase-space halo finder to illustrate that major mergers drive long-lived massive phase-space structures which take many dynamical times to dissipate. This can yield significant differences in the inferred mass build-up of galactic haloes and we suggest that care must be taken to ensure a physically meaningful match between the galaxy formation physics of semi-analytic models and the halo finders supplying their input.

  17. Dynamic-stochastic modeling of snow cover formation on the European territory of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Gelfan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic-stochastic model, which combines a deterministic model of snow cover formation with a stochastic weather generator, has been developed. The deterministic snow model describes temporal change of the snow depth, content of ice and liquid water, snow density, snowmelt, sublimation, re-freezing of melt water, and snow metamorphism. The model has been calibrated and validated against the long-term data of snow measurements over the territory of the European Russia. The model showed good performance in simulating time series of the snow water equivalent and snow depth. The developed weather generator (NEsted Weather Generator, NewGen includes nested generators of annual, monthly and daily time series of weather variables (namely, precipitation, air temperature, and air humidity. The parameters of the NewGen have been adjusted through calibration against the long-term meteorological data in the European Russia. A disaggregation procedure has been proposed for transforming parameters of the annual weather generator into the parameters of the monthly one and, subsequently, into the parameters of the daily generator. Multi-year time series of the simulated daily weather variables have been used as an input to the snow model. Probability properties of the snow cover, such as snow water equivalent and snow depth for return periods of 25 and 100 years, have been estimated against the observed data, showing good correlation coefficients. The described model has been applied to different landscapes of European Russia, from steppe to taiga regions, to show the robustness of the proposed technique.

  18. Formations of Bacteria-like Textures by dynamic reactions in Meteorite and Syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.

    2009-05-01

    fixings on iron plates at author's laboratory [4]. 5. Summary 1) Spherule- chained texture with Fe, Ni and Cl has been obtained at the fusion crust of the Kuga iron meteorite found in Japan. 2) As the Kuga iron meteorite is different with the Martian meteorite ALH84001 with composition and formation steps, bacteria-like texture of the Kuga meteorite is first significant example to form fossil-like texture by dynamic reaction of materials in the Solar System. Acknowledgements Author thanks to Dr. T. Kato, Yamaguchi University, for interpretation on bacteria-like texture. References: [1] Miura Y.(2008) 5th AOGS (Asia- Oceania Geosciences Society) Annual Meet. (Busan, Korea), CD#PS07- ST31-A22. [2] Miura Y.(2008). Meteoritics & Planetary Science (USA), 43-7, #5203. [3] McKay D.S. et al. (1996): Science, 273, 924-930. [4]Miura Y. (2009): 6th AGOS (submitted )

  19. Quantum statistics in the spin-lattice dynamics simulation of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Contributions from the vibrational thermodynamics of phonons and magnons in the dynamic simulations of thermally activated atomic processes in crystalline materials were considered within the framework of classical statistics in conventional studies. The neglect of quantum effects produces the wrong lattice and spin dynamics and erroneous activation characteristics, sometimes leading to the incorrect results. In this paper, we consider the formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron over a large temperature range from 10 K to 1400 K, across the ferro/paramagnetic phase boundary. Entropies and enthalpies of migration and formation are calculated using quantum heat baths based on a Bose-Einstein statistical description of thermal excitations in terms of phonons and magnons. Corrections due to the use of classical heat baths are evaluated and discussed.

  20. Dynamical Analysis of a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor with the Formation of Biofilms for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen López Buriticá

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the dynamics of a system that models the formation of biofilms in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR when it is utilized for wastewater treatment. The growth rate of the microorganisms is modeled using two different kinetics, Monod and Haldane kinetics, with the goal of studying the influence of each in the system. The equilibrium points are identified through a stability analysis, and the bifurcations found are characterized.

  1. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Chuan Hsiao; Tsung-Lin Yang

    2016-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal...

  2. Formation and dynamics of vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate with a moving impenetrable disk-shaped potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Ping; Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Xie, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-10-01

    We consider a quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate with a moving impenetrable disk-shaped potential. By performing direct numerical simulations, we investigate the formation and dynamics of the vortices in the wake as a function of the moving velocity and the radius of the potential. For moderate moving velocity, we observe the formation of a bound vortex pair in the wake of the potential. Its shedding period and associated patterns depend on the radius of the potential, showing V-shaped, periodic, or complex wakes. More interestingly, at high velocity both the vortex pair and vortex dipole can be formed simultaneously. Furthermore, the activation time for vortex formation is investigated for different velocities. We also give an experimental protocol to observe these phenomena in future experiments.

  3. Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements During Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Soko; Ida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar discs and planets beyond the Solar System. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the Solar System. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disc as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disc. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial plan...

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation of sp3 hybridized bonds in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon deposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yasuo; Horiguchi, Seishi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    The formation process of sp3 hybridized carbon networks (i.e., diamondlike structures) in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been studied with the use of molecular-dynamics simulations. The processes simulated in this study are injections of hydrocarbon (CH3 and CH) beams into amorphous carbon (a-C) substrates. It has been shown that diamondlike sp3 structures are formed predominantly at a subsurface level when the beam energy is relatively high, as in the "subplantation" process for hydrogen-free DLC deposition. However, for hydrogenated DLC deposition, the presence of abundant hydrogen at subsurface levels, together with thermal spikes caused by energetic ion injections, substantially enhances the formation of carbon-to-carbon sp3 bonds. Therefore, the sp3 bond formation process for hydrogenated DLC films essentially differs from that for hydrogen-free DLC films.

  5. Dynamics of plasma formation and permanent structural transformation in ZBLAN excited by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Hong, Jong Wook

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved dynamics of plasma formation and bulk refractive-index modification in fluoride glass (ZBLAN) excited by a tightly focused femtosecond (130 fs) Ti:sapphire laser ( λp=790 nm) was observed in situ. The femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe measurement with perpendicularly linear polarized beams was used to study the dynamics of both plasma formation and induced permanent structural transformation with refractive-index change. In the refractive-index domain, the lifetime of induced plasma formation is ˜35 ps and structural transition time for forming the refractive-index change is ˜80 ps. In the optical damage domain, however, the lifetime of induced plasma formation is ˜40 ps and structural transition time for forming the optical damage is ˜140 ps. We found that the process of refractive-index bulk modification is significantly different from that of optical cracks. From the diffraction efficiency of Kogelnik's coupled mode theory, the maximum value of refractive-index change (Δ n) was estimated to be 1.3×10 -2. By the scanning of fluoride glass on the optical X-Y-Z stages, the fabrication of internal grating with refractive-index modification was demonstrated in fluoride glass using tightly focused femtosecond laser.

  6. Influence of external white noise on the formation of Tsallis' velocity distribution function: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri Kadijani, M.; Abbasi, H.

    2016-09-01

    Dynamics of a dust layer suspending in a plasma and interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is considered. In the small affinity limit, the influence of an external white noise on the formation of Tsallis' velocity distribution function is studied through molecular dynamics simulation. The characteristic length of the noise is much smaller than the system size that causes a number of subsystems (islands) to be formed with the size similar to the noise one. The external noise leads to the temperature fluctuation in each island. Therefore, a stochastic formalism based on a Langevin equation for the fluctuating temperature is presented. The approach provides a dynamical reason how a fluctuating temperature takes a system to a unique class of quasi-equilibrium states. In particular, the dependence of the model systems on the noise parameters is explained. The non-extensive parameter is obtained through which the small affinity limit can be defined.

  7. Dynamics of Green AuNP Formation and Their Application in Core-Shell Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    The formation of gold nanoparticles in our optimized synthesis is achieved through reduction of tetrachloroauric acid in 2 - (N - morpholino)ethanesulphonic acid (MES) buffered glucose and stabilization by starch at room temperature. The formation has been followed by measuring the electrochemical...

  8. Late-Stage Reservoir Formation Effect and Its Dynamic Mechanisms in Complex Superimposed Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Dejiang; PANG Xiongqi; KUANG Jun; LUO Xiaorong; PANG Hong; LEI Lei

    2010-01-01

    Complex superimposed basins exhibit multi-stage tectonic events and multi-stage reservoir formation; hydrocarbon reservoirs formed in the early stage have generally late-stage genesis characteristics after undergoing adjustment,reconstruction and destruction of later-stage multiple tectonic events.In this paper,this phenomenon is called the late-stage reservoir formation effect.The late-stage reservoir formation effect is a basic feature of oil and gas-forming reservoirs in complex superimposed basins,revealing not only multi-stage character,relevance and complexity of oil and gas-forming reservoirs in superimposed basins but also the importance of late-stage reservoir formation.Late-stage reservoir formation is not a basic feature of off and gas forming reservoir in superimposed basins.Multi-stage reservoir formation only characterizes one aspect of oil and gas-forming reservoir in superimposed basins and does not represent fully the complexity of oil and gas-forming reservoir in superimposed basins.We suggest using"late-stage reservoir formation effect"to replace the"late-stage reservoir formation"concept to guide the exploration of complex reservoirs in superimposed basins.Under current geologic conditions,the late-stage reservoir formation effect is represented mainly by four basic forms:phase transformation,scale reconstruction,component variation and trap adjustment.The late-stage reservoir formation effect is produced by two kinds of geologic processes:first,the off and gas retention function of various geologic thresholds(hydrocarbon expulsion threshold,hydrocarbon migration threshold,and hydrocarbon accumulating threshold)causes the actual time of oil and gas reservoir formation to be later than the time of generation of large amounts of hydrocarbon in a conventional sense,producing the late-stage reservoir formation effect; second,multiple types of tectonic events(continuously strong reconstruction,early-stage strong reconstruction,middle-stage strong

  9. 一种编队控制的动态调整与规划方法%A Dynamic Regulation and Scheduling Scheme for Formation Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈余庆; 庄严; 王伟

    2007-01-01

    This article is concerned with cooperative control problems in formation of mobile robots under the nonholonomic constraints that certain geometrical constraints are imposed on multiple mobile robots throughout their travel. For this purpose, a new method of motion control for formation is presented, which is based on the dynamic regulation and scheduling scheme. It is attractive for its adaptability to the formation structure and desired trajectory. The quality of formation keeping can be evaluated by the instantaneous errors of formation offset and spacing distance. Some kinematics laws are developed to regulate and maintain the formation shape. Simulation results and data analysis show the validity of the proposed approach for a group of robots.

  10. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.;

    2011-01-01

    vertical profile of particle number concentration does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by the biosphere. The simulation of aerosol concentration within......We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the simulated...

  11. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.;

    2010-01-01

    profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere. Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric......We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical...

  12. Development of a new molecular dynamics method for tribochemical reaction and its application to formation dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yusuke; Onodera, Tasuku; Suzuki, Ai; Sahnoun, Riadh; Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Shin-yoshi, Takatoshi; Nishino, Noriaki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-09-01

    Recently we have developed a novel molecular dynamics program NEW-RYUDO-CR, which can deal with chemical reactions. The developed method has been applied to the study of tribochemical reaction dynamics of MoS 2 tribofilm on iron surface. The initially amorphous MoS 2 layer self-organized its structure as result of the tribochemical reactions and formed layered MoS 2 tribofilm. The friction coefficient significantly decreased as the MoS 2 tribofilm was formed. Besides, sliding was observed between sulfur layers of MoS 2 tribofilms which occurred due to repulsive Coulombic interaction forces between sulfur atoms. This indicates that the formation of the layered MoS 2 tribofilm is important to achieve better lubrication properties.

  13. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  14. Curvature Perturbation and Domain Wall Formation with Pseudo Scaling Scalar Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological dynamics of scalar field with a monomial potential $\\phi^{n}$ with a general background equation of state is revisited. It is known that if $n$ is smaller than a critical value, the scalar field exhibits a coherent oscillation and if $n$ is larger it obeys a scaling solution without oscillation. We study in detail the case where $n$ is equal to the critical value, and find a peculiar scalar dynamics which is neither oscillating nor scaling solution, and we call it a pseudo scaling solution. We also discuss cosmological implications of a pseudo scaling scalar dynamics, such as the curvature perturbation and the domain wall problem.

  15. Localization and dynamics of amylose-lipophilic molecules inclusion complex formation in starch granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Mura, Andrea; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion complex formation between lipophilic dye molecules and amylose polymers in starch granules is investigated using laser spectroscopy and microscopy. By combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with spatial resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we are able to discriminate

  16. Robust Optimization Approach for Design for a Dynamic Cell Formation Considering Labor Utilization: Bi-objective Mathematical Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiwa Farughi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, robust optimization of a bi-objective mathematical model in a dynamic cell formation problem considering labor utilization with uncertain data is carried out. The robust approach is used to reduce the effects of fluctuations of the uncertain parameters with regards to all the possible future scenarios. In this research, cost parameters of the cell formation and demand fluctuations are subject to uncertainty and a mixed-integer programming (MIP model is developed to formulate the related robust dynamic cell formation problem. Then the problem is transformed into a bi-objective linear one. The first objective function seeks to minimize relevant costs of the problem including machine procurement and relocation costs, machine variable cost, inter-cell movement and intra-cell movement costs, overtime cost and labor shifting cost between cells, machine maintenance cost, inventory, holding part cost. The second objective function seeks to minimize total man-hour deviations between cells or indeed labor utilization of the modeled.

  17. The Influence of Surface Morphology of Dense Ca-P Ceramics on Apatite Formation in Dynamic SBF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the effect of surface morphology of dense phosphate calcium (Ca-P) ceramics upon the formation of bone-like apatite in static or dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF). Dense and sandblasted calcium phosphate ceramics were immersed into dynamic SBF flowing at normal physiological speed of body fluid of skeletal muscle.The changes were characterized using SEM, XPS, IR and XRD. Changes can be observed after the sandblasted surface of dense calcium phosphate ceramics had been immersed in SBF for 14 days. XPS analysis results showed that the flake-like structure was composed of Ca, P, C, O; IR analysis result of surface structure of samples showed that there were specific peaks for CO2-3; XRD results indicated the decrease in crystallinity and the increase in amorphous structure. The rough surface was advantageous for the formation of bone-like apatite. Increasing the Ca2+, HPO2-4 concentration of SBF could also enhance the bone like apatite formation. All the results demonstrated that local concentration is a key factor affecting nucleation.

  18. Development and application of laser techniques for studying fuel dynamics and NO formation in engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Oeivind

    2000-11-01

    In this work a number of laser techniques have been applied in new ways for combustion diagnostics in engines. The applications cover small two-stroke engines, ordinary spark ignition (SI) engines, direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, and heavy-duty diesel truck engines. In an investigation of unmodified two-stroke engines running at high engine speed, it has been shown that cycle-resolved laser diagnostics are applicable to real-world engines. The emission of unburned fuel was detected at the exhaust port with successful discrimination against other unburned hydrocarbons. Although a few problems remain to be solved in order to get quantitative concentration data, valuable information can nonetheless be attained using this technique. The technique would benefit from the use of a non-fluorescing lubricant, as that would decrease the background fluorescence. Laser-based techniques also provide a useful tool for studying the fuel dynamics inside the cylinder. In the development of DISI engines it is of particular importance to acquire knowledge about the distribution of fuel around the spark plug. Numerical computer codes are often used as design tools in these applications. Laser techniques are capable of yielding instantaneous multi-point concentration information with high spatial and temporal resolution, making them ideal both for validation of CFD simulations and for testing designs. The feasibility of using laser diagnostics in the development of DISI engines has been shown. Future research should be aimed at simplifying the procedure for quantifying the data, since a fairly simple and reliable technique would be an important asset for the industry. In a more fundamental study, it has been shown that it is possible to simultaneously detect a substance in both liquid and vapour phase. Water was used in the study since it is easily produced in both phases. Liquid drops were detected using spontaneous Raman scattering, whereas the vapour surrounding them

  19. Development and application of laser techniques for studying fuel dynamics and NO formation in engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Oeivind

    2000-11-01

    In this work a number of laser techniques have been applied in new ways for combustion diagnostics in engines. The applications cover small two-stroke engines, ordinary spark ignition (SI) engines, direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, and heavy-duty diesel truck engines. In an investigation of unmodified two-stroke engines running at high engine speed, it has been shown that cycle-resolved laser diagnostics are applicable to real-world engines. The emission of unburned fuel was detected at the exhaust port with successful discrimination against other unburned hydrocarbons. Although a few problems remain to be solved in order to get quantitative concentration data, valuable information can nonetheless be attained using this technique. The technique would benefit from the use of a non-fluorescing lubricant, as that would decrease the background fluorescence. Laser-based techniques also provide a useful tool for studying the fuel dynamics inside the cylinder. In the development of DISI engines it is of particular importance to acquire knowledge about the distribution of fuel around the spark plug. Numerical computer codes are often used as design tools in these applications. Laser techniques are capable of yielding instantaneous multi-point concentration information with high spatial and temporal resolution, making them ideal both for validation of CFD simulations and for testing designs. The feasibility of using laser diagnostics in the development of DISI engines has been shown. Future research should be aimed at simplifying the procedure for quantifying the data, since a fairly simple and reliable technique would be an important asset for the industry. In a more fundamental study, it has been shown that it is possible to simultaneously detect a substance in both liquid and vapour phase. Water was used in the study since it is easily produced in both phases. Liquid drops were detected using spontaneous Raman scattering, whereas the vapour surrounding them

  20. Living on the edge: contrasted wood-formation dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edurne eMartinez Del Castillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e. in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for Pinus sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for Pinus sylvestris.

  1. Dynamical Models for the Formation of Elephant Trunks in H II Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The formation of pillars of dense gas at the boundaries of H II Regions is investigated with hydrodynamical numerical simulations including ionising radiation from a point source. We show that shadowing of ionising radiation by an inhomogeneous density field is capable of forming so-called elephant trunks (pillars of dense gas as in e.g. M16) without the assistance of self-gravity, or of ionisation front and cooling instabilities. A large simulation of a density field containing randomly generated clumps of gas is shown to naturally generate elephant trunks with certain clump configurations. These configurations are simulated in isolation and analysed in detail to show the formation mechanism and determine possible observational signatures. Pillars formed by the shadowing mechanism are shown to have rather different velocity profiles depending on the initial gas configuration, but asymmetries mean that the profiles also vary significantly with perspective, limiting their ability to discriminate between format...

  2. BIOGENIC INFLUENCES ON THE FORMATION AND LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF COHESIVE SEDIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joern V. PROCHNOW; C. SCHWEIM; Juergen KOENGETER

    2001-01-01

    Biogenic stabilization processes that result in the formation of biofilms and interparticle-networks can significantly alter the transport characteristics of finegrained sediment layers. The increase in the threshold of sediment motion can amount to up to several hundred percent. While planctic organisms are involved in the formation of depositing flocs and the early stages of consolidation, the secondary consolidation is controlled by microbial breakdown processes, leading to changes in the mechanical properties of cohesive sediments. While the primary stage of consolidation is completed in days, the secondary processes can last for decades. A preliminary series of erosion tests in an annular flume revealed demonstrated the biogenic impact in the early stages of sediment formation. Surrogate materials were used to simulate the governing properties of natural soft sediments.

  3. Mechanisms of pit formation at strained crystalline Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) interfaces: Molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Srivastava, Deepak; Owens, Eli T.; Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Anderson, Jonas T.; Burky, Melissa R.; Ducatman, Samuel C.; Gripper, Adam M.; Guffey, Eric J.; Ramos, Fernando Serrano

    2006-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of the crystalline silicon-silicon nitride interfaces are performed to investigate the mechanical failure mechanisms at the interfaces under external strain. At 8% applied tensile strain, parallel to the interface, regular crack initiation and propagation in silicon nitride and dislocation emission and propagation in silicon are observed. At larger 16% strain, however, the formation of a pit similar to that in experiments with lattice-mismatched systems is observed. The simulation results suggest the primary mechanism of pit formation is interaction of a local compressional pinch of the film at the interface with the close proximity to the arrival of a dislocation at the interface in the highly strained silicon.

  4. Dynamic Neural Network-Based Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Fault Detection and Isolation for Formation Flying of Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, A.; Khorasani, K.

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a dynamic neural network-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme for the Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) that are used in the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) of satellites that are tasked to perform a formation flying mission. By using data collected from the relative attitudes of the formation flying satellites our proposed "High Level" FDI scheme can detect the pair of thrusters which is faulty, however fault isolation cannot be accomplished. Based on the "High Level" FDI scheme and the DNN-based "Low Level" FDI scheme developed earlier by the authors, an "Integrated" DNN-based FDI scheme is then proposed. To demonstrate the FDI capabilities of the proposed schemes various fault scenarios are simulated.

  5. 5D imaging via light sheet microscopy reveals cell dynamics during the eye-antenna disc primordium formation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu Shan; Ku, Hui Yu; Tsai, Yun Chi; Chang, Chin Hao; Pao, Sih Hua; Sun, Y. Henry; Chiou, Arthur

    2017-03-01

    5D images of engrailed (en) and eye gone (eyg) gene expressions during the course of the eye-antenna disc primordium (EADP) formation of Drosophila embryos from embryonic stages 13 through 16 were recorded via light sheet microscopy and analyzed to reveal the cell dynamics involved in the development of the EADP. Detailed analysis of the time-lapsed images revealed the process of EADP formation and its invagination trajectory, which involved an inversion of the EADP anterior-posterior axis relative to the body. Furthermore, analysis of the en-expression pattern in the EADP provided strong evidence that the EADP is derived from one of the en-expressing head segments.

  6. Massive Clusters in the Inner Regions of NGC 1365: Cluster Formation and Gas Dynamics in Galactic Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Alloin, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Cluster formation and gas dynamics in the central regions of barred galaxies are not well understood. This paper reviews the environment of three 10^7 Msun clusters near the inner Lindblad resonance of the barred spiral NGC 1365. The morphology, mass, and flow of HI and CO gas in the spiral and barred regions are examined for evidence of the location and mechanism of cluster formation. The accretion rate is compared with the star formation rate to infer the lifetime of the starburst. The gas appears to move from inside corotation in the spiral region to looping filaments in the interbar region at a rate of ~6 Msun/yr before impacting the bar dustlane somewhere along its length. The gas in this dustlane moves inward, growing in flux as a result of the accretion to ~40 Msun/yr near the ILR. This inner rate exceeds the current nuclear star formation rate by a factor of 4, suggesting continued buildup of nuclear mass for another ~0.5 Gyr. The bar may be only 1-2 Gyr old. Extrapolating the bar flow back in time, w...

  7. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: Numerical Tests of the Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C

    2011-01-01

    We use vertically-resolved numerical hydrodynamic simulations to study star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic disks. We focus on outer disk regions where diffuse HI dominates, with gas surface densities Sigma_SFR=3-20 Msun/kpc^2/yr and star-plus-dark matter volume densities rho_sd=0.003-0.5 Msun/pc^3. Star formation occurs in very dense, cold, self-gravitating clouds. Turbulence, driven by momentum feedback from supernova events, destroys bound clouds and puffs up the disk vertically. Time-dependent radiative heating (FUV) offsets gas cooling. We use our simulations to test a new theory for self-regulated star formation. Consistent with this theory, the disks evolve to a state of vertical dynamical equilibrium and thermal equilibrium with both warm and cold phases. The range of star formation surface densities and midplane thermal pressures is Sigma_SFR ~ 0.0001 - 0.01 Msun/kpc^2/yr and P_th/k_B ~ 100 -10000 cm^-3 K. In agreement with observations, turbulent velocity dispersions are ~7 k...

  8. High Performance Simulations of Accretion Disk Dynamics and Jet Formations Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Watson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We investigate jet formation in black-hole systems using 3-D General Relativistic Particle-In-Cell (GRPIC) and 3-D GRMHD simulations. GRPIC simulations, which allow charge separations in a collisionless plasma, do not need to invoke the frozen condition as in GRMHD simulations. 3-D GRPIC simulations show that jets are launched from Kerr black holes as in 3-D GRMHD simulations, but jet formation in the two cases may not be identical. Comparative study of black hole systems with GRPIC and GRMHD simulations with the inclusion of radiate transfer will further clarify the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disk-jet systems.

  9. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algwari, Q. Th. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Electronic Department, College of Electronics Engineering, Mosul University, Mosul 41002 (Iraq); O' Connell, D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  10. Spontaneous formation of dynamical patterns with fractal fronts in the cyclic lattice Lotka-Volterra model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A; Tsekouras, G A

    2003-05-01

    Dynamical patterns, in the form of consecutive moving stripes or rings, are shown to develop spontaneously in the cyclic lattice Lotka-Volterra model, when realized on square lattice, at the reaction limited regime. Each stripe consists of different particles (species) and the borderlines between consecutive stripes are fractal. The interface width w between the different species scales as w(L,t) approximately L(alpha)f(t/L(z)), where L is the linear size of the interface, t is the time, and alpha and z are the static and dynamical critical exponents, respectively. The critical exponents were computed as alpha=0.49+/-0.03 and z=1.53+/-0.13 and the propagating fronts show dynamical characteristics similar to those of the Eden growth models.

  11. A possible formation mechanism of double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dianrong; Luo, Chenglin; Dai, Yafei; Zhu, Xingfeng

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based on an empirical potential were performed to study the interaction of graphene nanoribbons and the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The results indicated that a piece of graphene nanoribbon can form a tube structure inside or outside single-walled carbon nanotubes spontaneously under certain condition. Based on this kind of spontaneous phenomenon, we proposed a new possible formation mechanism of double walled carbon nanotube and multi-walled carbon nanotube, and suggested the possibility of controlling the structure of double-walled carbon nanotube and/or multi-walled carbon nanotube.

  12. Dynamic modeling and scaling of nanostructure formation in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2003-05-01

    We numerically studied the dynamical formation process and the scaling of the nanostructures in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction of thin polymer films. Our studies show that the period of the self-assembled pillars depends on the ratio between the surface tension force and the electrostatic force. The viscosity of the polymer has no effect on the final pillar shape. When the feature width of the mold is comparable to or smaller than the most unstable disturbance wavelength of the system, the initially self-assembled pillars will merge to form a self-constructed mesa.

  13. Dynamics and roles of phragmoplast microfilaments in cell plate formation during cytokinesis of tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; ZHANG WenJie; BALUSKA Frantisek; MENZEL Diedrik; REN HaiYun

    2009-01-01

    The phragmoplast is a special apparatus that functions in establishing a cell plate in dividing plant cells.It is known that microfilaments (MFs) are involved in constituting phragmoplast structure, but the dynamic distribution and role of phragmoplast MFs are far from being understood. In this study, the precise structure and dynamics of MFs during the initiation and the late lateral expansion of the phragmoplast were observed by using a tobacco BY-2 cell line stably expressing the microfilament reporter construct GFP-f ABD2. Three-dimensional imaging showed that the phragmoplast MFs were initiated by two populations of MFs emerging between the reconstituting daughter nuclei at anaphase, which migrated to the mid-zone and gave rise to two layers of microfilament arrays. FM4-64 stained vesicles accumulated and fused with the cell plate between the two populations of MFs. The two layers of microfilament arrays of phragmoplast with ends overlapped always surrounded the centrifugally expanding cell plate. Partial disruption of MFs at metaphase by low concentration of latrunculin B resulted in the inhibition of the cell plate consolidation and the blockage of cell plate lateral expansion,whereas high concentration of latrunculin B restrained the progression of the cell cycle. Treating the cell after the initiation of phragmoplast led to the cease of the expansion of the cell plate. Our observations provide new insights into the precise structure and dynamics of phragmoplast MFs during cytokinesis and suggest that dynamic phragmoplast MFs are important in cell plate formation.

  14. Towards the understanding of structure formation and dynamics in bio-nano systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a number of key structure formation processes involving the well known biomolecular and nano objects such as fullerenes, nanotubes, polypeptides, proteins and DNA molecules. We formulate the problems, describe the main experimental observations and theoretical adva...

  15. Kinetics of linear rouleaux formation studied by visual monitoring of red cell dynamic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshtein, G; Wajnblum, D; Yedgar, S

    2000-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules may form aggregates, normally in rouleaux formations, which are dispersed with increasing blood flow. Experimental observations have suggested that the spontaneous aggregation process involves the formation of linear rouleaux (FLR) followed by formation of branched rouleaux networks. Theoretical models for the spontaneous rouleaux formation were formulated, taking into consideration that FLR may involve both "polymerization," i.e., interaction between two single RBCs (e + e) and the addition of a single RBC to the end of an existing rouleau (e + r), as well as "condensation" between two rouleaux by end-to-end addition (r + r). The present study was undertaken to experimentally examine the theoretical models and their assumptions, by visual monitoring of the spontaneous FLR (from singly dispersed RBC) in plasma, in a narrow gap flow chamber. The results validate the theoretical model, showing that FLR involves both polymerization and condensation, and that the kinetic constants for the above three types of intercellular interactions are the same, i.e., k(ee) = k(er) = k(rr) = k, and for all tested hematocrits (0.625-6%) k < 0.13 +/- 0.03 s(-1).

  16. Dynamics of coalescence and spreading of liquid polymeric particles during coating formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyaev, V. L.; Galimov, E. R.; Galimova, N. Ya; Gimranov, I. R.; Siraev, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Processes of agglutination, coalescence and spreading of polymeric powder particles during coating formation are considered using methods of mathematical modeling. The relationships to evaluate time of particles agglutination, velocity of coalescence and spreading of material on the surface of a treated body are given. Recommendations on intensification of the given technological stages are presented.

  17. Investigating the Dynamics of Formative Assessment: Relationships between Teacher Knowledge, Assessment Practice and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joan; Osmundson, Ellen; Dai, Yunyun; Ringstaff, Cathy; Timms, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study of elementary school science examines questions central to policy, practice and research on formative assessment: What is the quality of teachers' content-pedagogical and assessment knowledge? What is the relationship between teacher knowledge and assessment practice? What is the relationship between teacher knowledge,…

  18. Hybrid methods in planetesimal dynamics: Formation of protoplanetary systems and the mill condition

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Spurzem, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The formation and evolution of protoplanetary discs remains a challenge from both a theoretical and numerical standpoint. In this work we first perform a series of tests of our new hybrid algorithm presented in Glaschke, Amaro-Seoane and Spurzem 2011 (henceforth Paper I) that combines the advantages of high accuracy of direct-summation N-body methods with a statistical description for the planetesimal disc based on Fokker-Planck techniques. We then address the formation of planets, with a focus on the formation of protoplanets out of planetesimals. We find that the evolution of the system is driven by encounters as well as direct collisions and requires a careful modelling of the evolution of the velocity dispersion and the size distribution over a large range of sizes. The simulations show no termination of the protoplanetary accretion due to gap formation, since the distribution of the planetesimals is only subjected to small fluctuations. We also show that these features are weakly correlated with the posi...

  19. Fluid dynamics at a pinch: droplet and bubble formation in microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, van Willem

    2011-01-01

    The formation of microscopically small droplets and bubbles with an accurately controlled and narrow size distribution is crucial in a wide variety of products and applications. For example, in medical applications such as diagnostic ultrasound imaging, targeted drug delivery, and drug inhalation th

  20. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron, E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e {sub p} in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  1. Formation of Surface Nanobubbles and the Universality of Their Contact Angles: A Molecular Dynamics Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, J.H.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Lohse, D.

    2012-01-01

    We study surface nanobubbles using molecular dynamics simulation of ternary (gas, liquid, solid) systems of Lennard-Jones fluids. They form for a sufficiently low gas solubility in the liquid, i.e., for a large relative gas concentration. For a strong enough gas-solid attraction, the surface nanobub

  2. The Dynamical Masses, Densities, and Star Formation Scaling Relations of Lyman Alpha Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rhoads, James E; Finkelstein, Steven L; Fynbo, Johan P U; McLinden, Emily M; Richardson, Mark L A; Tilvi, Vithal S

    2013-01-01

    We present the first dynamical mass measurements for Lyman alpha galaxies at high redshift, based on velocity dispersion measurements from rest-frame optical emission lines and size measurements from HST imaging, for a sample of nine galaxies drawn from four surveys. These measurements enable us to study the nature of Lyman alpha galaxies in the context of galaxy scaling relations. The resulting dynamical masses range from 1e9 to 1e10 solar masses. We also fit stellar population models to our sample, and use them to plot the Lyman alpha sample on a stellar mass vs. line width relation. Overall, the Lyman alpha galaxies follow well the scaling relation established by observing star forming galaxies at lower redshift (and without regard for Lyman alpha emission), though in 1/3 of the Lyman alpha galaxies, lower-mass fits are also acceptable. In all cases, the dynamical masses agree with established stellarmass-linewidth relation. Using the dynamical masses as an upper limit on gas mass, we show that Lyman alpha...

  3. Cluster formation restricts dynamic nuclear polarization of xenon in solid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Pourfathi, M.; Kara, H.

    2012-01-01

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 1.5 K and 5 T, Xe-129 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a homogeneous xenon/1-propanol/trityl-radical solid mixture exhibit a single peak, broadened by H-1 neighbors. A second peak appears upon annealing for several hours at 125 K. Its...

  4. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Han, Wei [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Schulten, Klaus, E-mail: kschulte@ks.uiuc.edu [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  5. Sizable dynamics in small pores: CO2 location and motion in the α-Mg formate metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuanjun; Lucier, Bryan E G; Zhang, Yue; Ren, Pengju; Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Yining

    2017-02-22

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption and storage; however, many details regarding CO2 dynamics and specific adsorption site locations within MOFs remain unknown, restricting the practical uses of MOFs for CO2 capture. The intriguing α-magnesium formate (α-Mg3(HCOO)6) MOF can adsorb CO2 and features a small pore size. Using an intertwined approach of (13)C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization SSNMR, and computational molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, new physical insights and a rich variety of information have been uncovered regarding CO2 adsorption in this MOF, including the surprising suggestion that CO2 motion is restricted at elevated temperatures. Guest CO2 molecules undergo a combined localized rotational wobbling and non-localized twofold jumping between adsorption sites. MD simulations and SSNMR experiments accurately locate the CO2 adsorption sites; the mechanism behind CO2 adsorption is the distant interaction between the hydrogen atom of the MOF formate linker and a guest CO2 oxygen atom, which are ca. 3.2 Å apart.

  6. Formation Dynamics of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Following Two-Step Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay B; Milot, Rebecca L; Wright, Adam D; Herz, Laura M; Johnston, Michael B

    2016-01-07

    Hybrid metal-halide perovskites have emerged as a leading class of semiconductors for optoelectronic devices because of their desirable material properties and versatile fabrication methods. However, little is known about the chemical transformations that occur in the initial stages of perovskite crystal formation. Here we follow the real-time formation dynamics of MAPbI3 from a bilayer of lead iodide (PbI2) and methylammonium iodide (MAI) deposited through a two-step thermal evaporation process. By lowering the substrate temperature during deposition, we are able to initially inhibit intermixing of the two layers. We subsequently use infrared and visible light transmission, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence lifetime measurements to reveal the room-temperature transformations that occur in vacuum and ambient air, as MAI diffuses into the PbI2 lattice to form MAPbI3. In vacuum, the transformation to MAPbI3 is incomplete as unreacted MAI is retained in the film. However, exposure to moist air allows for conversion of the unreacted MAI to MAPbI3, demonstrating that moisture is essential in making MAI more mobile and thus aiding perovskite crystallization. These dynamic processes are reflected in the observed charge-carrier lifetimes, which strongly fluctuate during periods of large ion migration but steadily increase with improving crystallinity.

  7. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Bergman, Andrew; Zhang, Qiucen; Bortz, David; Austin, Robert

    2014-04-01

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress.

  8. Dynamics of the Tidal Fields and Formation of Star Clusters in Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, Florent

    2010-01-01

    In interacting galaxies, strong tidal forces disturb the global morphology of the progenitors and give birth to the long stellar, gaseous and dusty tails often observed. In addition to this destructive effect, tidal forces can morph into a transient, protective setting called compressive mode. Such modes then shelter the matter in their midst by increasing its gravitational binding energy. This thesis focuses on the study of this poorly known regime by quantifying its properties thanks to numerical and analytical tools applied to a spectacular merging system of two galaxies, commonly known as the Antennae galaxies. N-body simulations of this pair yield compressive modes in the regions where observations reveal a burst of star formation. Furthermore, characteristic time- and energy scales of these modes match well those of self-gravitating substructures such as star clusters and tidal dwarf galaxies. These results suggest that the compressive modes of tidal fields plays an important role in the formation and e...

  9. Leader Follower Formation Control of Ground Vehicles Using Dynamic Pixel Count and Inverse Perspective Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.Vaitheeswarana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with leader-follower formations of non-holonomic mobile robots, introducing a formation control strategy based on pixel counts using a commercial grade electro optics camera. Localization of the leader for motions along line of sight as well as the obliquely inclined directions are considered based on pixel variation of the images by referencing to two arbitrarily designated positions in the image frames. Based on an established relationship between the displacement of the camera movement along the viewing direction and the difference in pixel counts between reference points in the images, the range and the angle estimate between the follower camera and the leader is calculated. The Inverse Perspective Transform is used to account for non linear relationship between the height of vehicle in a forward facing image and its distance from the camera. The formulation is validated with experiments.

  10. Meteoritical and dynamical constraints on the growth mechanisms and formation times of asteroids and Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, E R D

    2006-01-01

    Peak temperatures inside meteorite parent bodies are closely linked to accretion times. Most iron meteorites come from bodies that accreted 3-5 Myr after CAIs formed. This precludes formation of Jupiter via a gravitational instability <1 Myr after the solar nebula formed, and strongly favors core accretion. Shocks formed by gravitational instabilities in the disk, proto-Jupiter, or by planetary embryos may have produced some chondrules. The minimum lifetime for the solar nebula of 3-5 Myr inferred from CAI and chondrule ages may exceed the median 3 Myr lifetime for protoplanetary disks, but is well within the total 1-10 Myr range. Shorter formation times for extrasolar planets may help to explain why their orbits are unlike those of solar giant planets.

  11. Observational Evidence of Dynamic Star Formation Rate in Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Eve J; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Star formation on galactic scales is known to be a slow process, but whether it is slow on smaller scales is uncertain. We cross-correlate 5469 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a new all-sky catalog with 256 star forming complexes (SFCs) to build a sample of 191 SFC-GMC complexes---collections of multiple clouds each matched to 191 SFCs. The total mass in stars harbored by these clouds is inferred from WMAP free-free fluxes. We measure the GMC mass, the virial parameter, the star formation efficiency $\\epsilon$ and the star formation rate per free-fall time $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$. Both $\\epsilon$ and $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ range over 3--4 orders of magnitude. We find that 68.3% of the clouds fall within $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon}=0.79\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ and $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.91\\pm0.22\\,{\\rm dex}$ about the median. Compared to these observed scatters, a simple model with a time independent $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ that depends on the host GMC properties predicts $\\sigma_{\\log\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}}=0.24$. Allowi...

  12. A statistical state dynamics based theory for the formation and equilibration of Saturn's North Polar Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F

    2016-01-01

    Coherent jets containing most of the kinetic energy of the flow are a common feature in observations of atmospheric turbulence. In the gaseous planets these jets are maintained by incoherent turbulence excited by small scale convection. Large scale coherent waves are sometimes observed to coexist with the jets; a prominent example being Saturns hexagonal north polar jet (NPJ). Observations of the large scale jet/wave coexistence regime raises the question of identifying the mechanism responsible for forming and maintaining this turbulent state. The coherent planetary scale component of the turbulence arises and is maintained by interaction with the incoherent small-scale turbulence component. It follows that theoretical understanding of the dynamics of the jet/wave/turbulence coexistence regime is facilitated by employing a statistical state dynamics (SSD) model in which the interaction between coherent and incoherent components is explicitly represented. In this work a second order closure implementation of ...

  13. Pulsed laser ablation in liquids: Impact of the bubble dynamics on particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Stefan; Schönfeld, Patrick; Wagener, Philipp; Letzel, Alexander; Ibrahimkutty, Shyjumon; Gökce, Bilal; Barcikowski, Stephan; Menzel, Andreas; Dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Plech, Anton

    2017-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) is a multiscale process, involving multiple mutually interacting phenomena. In order to synthesize nanoparticles with well-defined properties it is important to understand the dynamics of the underlying structure evolution. We use visible-light stroboscopic imaging and X-ray radiography to investigate the dynamics occurring during PLAL of silver and gold on a macroscopic scale, whilst X-ray small angle scattering is utilized to deepen the understanding on particle genesis. By comparing our results with earlier reports we can elucidate the role of the cavitation bubble. We find that symmetry breaking at the liquid-solid interface is a critical factor for bubble motion and that the bubble motion acts on the particle distribution as confinement and retraction force to create secondary agglomerates.

  14. Structural dynamics associated with intermediate formation in an archetypal conformational disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Segu, Lakshmi; Cabrita, Lisa D; Lévy, Géraldine R; Kirkpatrick, John; Roussel, Benoit D; Patschull, Anathe O M; Barrett, Tracey E; Ekeowa, Ugo I; Kerr, Richard; Waudby, Christopher A; Kalsheker, Noor; Hill, Marian; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Lomas, David A; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-03-07

    In conformational diseases, native protein conformers convert to pathological intermediates that polymerize. Structural characterization of these key intermediates is challenging. They are unstable and minimally populated in dynamic equilibria that may be perturbed by many analytical techniques. We have characterized a forme fruste deficiency variant of α(1)-antitrypsin (Lys154Asn) that forms polymers recapitulating the conformer-specific neo-epitope observed in polymers that form in vivo. Lys154Asn α(1)-antitrypsin populates an intermediate ensemble along the polymerization pathway at physiological temperatures. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to report the structural and dynamic changes associated with this. Our data highlight an interaction network likely to regulate conformational change and do not support the recent contention that the disease-relevant intermediate is substantially unfolded. Conformational disease intermediates may best be defined using powerful but minimally perturbing techniques, mild disease mutants, and physiological conditions.

  15. Large-Scale Structure Formation with Massive Neutrinos and Dynamical Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhye, Amol; Pope, Adrian; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Finkel, Hal; Frontiere, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Over the next decade, cosmological measurements of the large-scale structure of the Universe will be sensitive to the combined effects of dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. The matter power spectrum is a key repository of this information. We extend higher-order perturbative methods for computing the power spectrum to investigate these effects over quasi-linear scales. Through comparison with N-body simulations we establish the regime of validity of a Time-Renormalization Group (Time-RG) perturbative treatment that includes dynamical dark energy and massive neutrinos. We also quantify the accuracy of Standard (SPT), Renormalized (RPT) and Lagrangian Resummation (LPT) perturbation theories without massive neutrinos. We find that an approximation that neglects neutrino clustering as a source for matter clustering predicts the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak position to 0.25% accuracy for redshifts 1 < z < 3, justifying the use of Lagrangian perturbation theory for BAO reconstruction in up...

  16. Dynamical formation & scattering of hierarchical triples: Cross sections, Kozai-Lidov oscillations, and collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Antognini, Joseph M O

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical scattering of binaries and triple systems of stars, planets, and compact objects may produce highly inclined triple systems subject to Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations, potentially leading to collisions, mergers, Type Ia supernovae, and other phenomena. We present the results of more than 400 million gravitational scattering experiments of binary-binary, triple-single, and triple-binary scattering. We compute the cross sections for all possible outcomes and explore their dependencies on incoming velocity, mass, semi-major axis, and eccentricity, including analytic fits and discussion of the velocity dependence. For the production of new triple systems by scattering we find that compact triples are preferred, with ratios of outer to inner semi-major axes of ~few--100, flat or quasi-thermal eccentricity distributions, and flat distributions in cosine of the mutual inclination. Dynamically formed triples are thus subject to strong KL oscillations, the "eccentric Kozai mechanism," and non-secular effects. ...

  17. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces-from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or "homophily").

  18. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces—from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or “homophily”).

  19. Interactions between DNA and histones- a dynamic process of nucleosome formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 王鹏业; 窦硕星; 童培庆

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic process of interactions between a DNA chain and a histone octamer by numerical simulations. It is found that DNA indeed may wrap around the histone octaner about two turns as in the actual situations. The simulation shows that the interaction potential between DNA and histone is a key factor for the wrapping of DNA, and the temperature is also an important parameter in the process.

  20. Galaxies as simple dynamical systems: observational data disfavor dark matter and stochastic star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Galaxies are observed to be simple systems but the standard model of cosmology (SMoC) implies a haphazard merger history driven by dynamical friction on dark matter halos. The SMoC is tested here with the results that the dual dwarf galaxy theorem is in contradiction to the data if the SMoC is true, and the action of dynamical friction is not evident in the galaxy population. A consistency test for this conclusion comes from the significantly anisotropic distributions of satellite galaxies which orbit in the same direction around their hosting galaxies in disk-like structures which cannot be derived from dark-matter models. The implication for fundamental physics is that exotic dark matter particles do not exist and that consequently effective gravitational physics on the scales of galaxies and beyond ought to be non-Newtonian/non-Einsteinian. The data imply that scale-invariant dynamics, as discovered by Milgrom, is an excellent description of galaxies in the weak-field regime. Observations of ste...

  1. Dynamical evolution of active detached binaries on log Jo - log M diagram and contact binary formation

    CERN Document Server

    Eker, Z; Bilir, S; Karatas, Y

    2006-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (Jo), systemic mass (M) and orbital period (P) distributions of chromospherically active binaries (CAB) and W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) systems were investigated. The diagrams of log Jo - log P, log M - log P and log Jo-log M were formed from 119 CAB and 102 W UMa stars. The log Jo-log M diagram is found to be most meaningful in demonstrating dynamical evolution of binary star orbits. A slightly curved borderline (contact border) separating the detached and the contact systems was discovered on the log Jo - log M diagram. Since orbital size (a) and period (P) of binaries are determined by their current Jo, M and mass ratio q, the rates of orbital angular momentum loss (dlog Jo/dt) and mass loss (dlog M/dt) are primary parameters to determine the direction and the speed of the dynamical evolution. A detached system becomes a contact system if its own dynamical evolution enables it to pass the contact border on the log Jo - log M diagram. Evolution of q for a mass loosing detached system is...

  2. Evidences on Secular Dynamical Evolution of Detached Active Binary Orbits and Contact Binary Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Eker, Z; Bilir, S; Karatas, Y

    2006-01-01

    Evidence of secular dynamical evolution for detached active binary orbits are presented. First order decreasing rates of orbital angular momentum (OAM), systemic mass ($M=M_{1}+M_{2}$) and orbital period of detached active binaries have been determined as $\\dot J/J = 3.48 \\times 10^{-10}$yr$^{-1}$, $\\dot M/M = 1.30 \\times 10^{-10}$yr$^{-1}$ and $\\dot P/P = 3.96\\times 10^{-10}$yr$^{-1}$ from the kinematical ages of 62 field detached systems. The ratio of $d \\log J/ d \\log M = 2.68$ implies that either there are mechanisms which amplify AM loss $\\delta=2.68$ times with respect to isotropic AM loss of hypothetical isotropic winds or there exist external causes contributing AM loss in order to produce this mean rate of decrease for orbital periods. Various decreasing rates of OAM ($d \\log J / dt$) and systemic mass ($d \\log M/ dt$) determine various speeds of dynamical evolutions towards a contact configuration. According to average dynamical evolution with $\\delta = 2.68$, the fraction of 10, 22 and 39 per cent ...

  3. Formation and Dynamical Evolution of the Neptune Trojans - the Influence of the Initial Solar System Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Lykawka, P S; Jones, B W; Mukai, T

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamical stability of pre-formed Neptune Trojans under the gravitational influence of the four giant planets in compact planetary architectures, over 10 Myr. In our modelling, the initial orbital locations of Uranus and Neptune (aN) were varied to produce systems in which those planets moved on non-resonant orbits, or in which they lay in their mutual 1:2, 2:3 and 3:4 mean-motion resonances (MMRs). In total, 420 simulations were carried out, examining 42 different architectures, with a total of 840000 particles across all runs. In the non-resonant cases, the Trojans suffered only moderate levels of dynamical erosion, with the most compact systems (those with aN less than or equal 18 AU) losing around 50% of their Trojans by the end of the integrations. In the 2:3 and 3:4 MMR scenarios, however, dynamical erosion was much higher with depletion rates typically greater than 66% and total depletion in the most compact systems. The 1:2 resonant scenarios featured disruption on lev...

  4. Gas dynamics in tidal dwarf galaxies: disc formation at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, F; Brinks, E; Bournaud, F; McGaugh, S S; Lisenfeld, U; Weilbacher, P M; Boquien, M; Revaz, Y; Braine, J; Koribalski, B S; Belles, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) are recycled objects that form within the collisional debris of interacting/merging galaxies. They are expected to be devoid of non-baryonic dark matter, since they can form only from dissipative material ejected from the discs of the progenitor galaxies. We investigate the gas dynamics in a sample of six bona-fide TDGs around three interacting and post-interacting systems: NGC 4694, NGC 5291, and NGC 7252 ("Atoms for Peace"). For NGC 4694 and NGC 5291 we analyse existing HI data from the Very Large Array (VLA), while for NGC 7252 we present new HI observations from the Jansky VLA together with long-slit and integral-field optical spectroscopy. For all six TDGs, the HI emission can be described by rotating disc models. These HI discs, however, have undergone less than a full rotation since the time of the interaction/merger event, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that these discs are in equilibrium, the inferred dynamical masses are consis...

  5. Inhibitory synapse dynamics: coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic mobility and the major contribution of recycled vesicles to new synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Frederick A; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-07-20

    Dynamics of GABAergic synaptic components have been studied previously over milliseconds to minutes, revealing mobility of postsynaptic scaffolds and receptors. Here we image inhibitory synapses containing fluorescently tagged postsynaptic scaffold Gephyrin, together with presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) or postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor γ2 subunit (GABA(A)Rγ2), over seconds to days in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, revealing modes of inhibitory synapse formation and remodeling. Entire synapses were mobile, translocating rapidly within a confined region and exhibiting greater nonstochastic motion over multihour periods. Presynaptic and postsynaptic components moved in unison, maintaining close apposition while translocating distances of several micrometers. An observed flux in the density of synaptic puncta partially resulted from the apparent merging and splitting of preexisting clusters. De novo formation of inhibitory synapses was observed, marked by the appearance of stably apposed Gephyrin and VGAT clusters at sites previously lacking either component. Coclustering of GABA(A)Rγ2 supports the identification of such new clusters as synapses. Nascent synapse formation occurred by gradual accumulation of components over several hours, with VGAT clustering preceding that of Gephyrin and GABA(A)Rγ2. Comparing VGAT labeling by active uptake of a luminal domain antibody with post hoc immunocytochemistry indicated that recycling vesicles from preexisting boutons significantly contribute to vesicle pools at the majority of new inhibitory synapses. Although new synapses formed primarily on dendrite shafts, some also formed on dendritic protrusions, without apparent interconversion. Altogether, the long-term imaging of GABAergic presynaptic and postsynaptic components reveals complex dynamics and perpetual remodeling with implications for mechanisms of assembly and synaptic integration.

  6. Temporal dynamic of wood formation in Pinus cembra along the alpine treeline ecotone and the effect of climate variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas; Baumgartner, Daniel; Zimmermann, Jolanda; Oberhuber, Walter

    2009-06-01

    We determined the temporal dynamic of cambial activity and xylem development of stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) throughout the treeline ecotone. Repeated micro-sampling of the developing tree ring was carried out during the growing seasons 2006 and 2007 at the timberline (1950 m a.s.l.), treeline (2110 m a.s.l.) and within the krummholz belt (2180 m a.s.l.) and the influence of climate variables on intra-annual wood formation was determined.At the beginning of both growing seasons, highest numbers of cambial and enlarging cells were observed at the treeline. Soil temperatures at time of initiation of cambial activity were c. 1.5 °C higher at treeline (open canopy) compared to timberline (closed canopy), suggesting that a threshold root-zone temperature is involved in triggering onset of above ground stem growth.The rate of xylem cell production determined in two weekly intervals during June through August 2006-2007 was significantly correlated with air temperature (temperature sums expressed as degree-days and mean daily maximum temperature) at the timberline only. Lack of significant relationships between tracheid production and temperature variables at the treeline and within the krummholz belt support past dendroclimatological studies that more extreme environmental conditions (e.g., wind exposure, frost desiccation, late frost) increasingly control tree growth above timberline.Results of this study revealed that spatial and temporal (i.e. year-to-year) variability in timing and dynamic of wood formation of Pinus cembra is strongly influenced by local site factors within the treeline ecotone and the dynamics of seasonal temperature variation, respectively.

  7. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Conroy, Charlie

    2017-02-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to the gas, in neutral turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains (>100 Å) under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar metal abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars can form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. We argue that the metal abundances of these “promoted” stars may contain interesting signatures as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced and/or fluctuate almost independently. Remarkably, the otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well fit by standard IMF-averaged core-collapse SNe yields if we allow for fluctuating local dust-to-gas ratios. We also show that the observed log-normal distribution of enhancements in these species agrees with our simulations. Moreover, we confirm that Mg and Si are correlated in these stars the abundance ratios are similar to those in local silicate grains. Meanwhile [Mg/Ca], predicted to be nearly invariant from pure SNe yields, shows very large enhancements and variations up to factors of ≳100 as expected in the dust-promoted model, preferentially in the [C/Fe]-enhanced metal-poor stars. Together, this suggests that (1) dust exists in second-generation star formation, (2) local dust-to-gas ratio fluctuations occur in protogalaxies and can be important for star formation, and (3) the light element abundances of these stars may be affected by the local chemistry of dust where they formed, rather than directly tracing nucleosynthesis from earlier

  8. Insights into the formation and dynamics of coignimbrite plumes from one-dimensional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwell, S. L.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.

    2016-06-01

    Coignimbrite plumes provide a common and effective mechanism by which large volumes of fine-grained ash are injected into the atmosphere. Nevertheless, controls on formation of these plumes as a function of eruptive conditions are still poorly constrained. Herein, two 1-D axysymmetric steady state models were coupled, the first describing the parent pyroclastic density current and the second describing plume rise. Global sensitivity analysis is applied to investigate controls on coignimbrite plume formation and describe coignimbrite source and the maximum plume height attained. For a range of initial mass flow rates between 108 and 1010 kg/s, modeled liftoff distance (the distance at which neutral buoyancy is attained), assuming radial supercritical flow, is controlled by the initial flow radius, gas mass fraction, flow thickness, and temperature. The predicted decrease in median grain size between flow initiation and plume liftoff is negligible. Calculated initial plume vertical velocities, assuming uniform liftoff velocity over the pyroclastic density current invasion area, are much greater (several tens of m/s) than those previously used in modeling coignimbrite plumes (1 m/s). Such velocities are inconsistent with the fine grain size of particles lofted into coignimbrite plumes, highlighting an unavailability of large clasts, possibly due to particle segregation within the flow, prior to plume formation. Source radius and initial vertical velocity have the largest effect on maximum plume height, closely followed by initial temperature. Modeled plume heights are between 25 and 47 km, comparable with Plinian eruption columns, highlighting the potential of such events for distributing fine-grained ash over significant areas.

  9. Formation and dynamics of nano-particles in a stratified spherical glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhapov, S. Z.; Fedoseev, A. V.; Sukhinin, G. I.; Novopashin, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of clouds of dust nano-particles in a spherical dc glow discharge in ethanol was observed. Nano-particles were formed in a process of coagulation of ethanol dissociation products in a plasma of gas discharge. During the process the particles were captured into clouds in the electric potential wells of the strong striations of a spherical discharge. Periodically, the cloud of nano-particles experienced some sudden instability (explosion), and started to move to the cathode at high velocity. It was proved that the velocity of the particle clouds was an exponentially decaying function of time as in the case of dissipative dust solitary waves.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of defect formation in GaN cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Nord, J D; Keinonen, J; Albe, K

    2003-01-01

    Simulations of irradiation effects in compound semiconductors require interatomic potentials which describe not only the compound phases, but also the pure constituents and defects. We discuss a systematic approach based on the analytic bond-order scheme for constructing such potentials and give an example for GaN. Finally, this potential is employed for simulations of defect formation in GaN by ion irradiation for recoils in the 200 eV to 10 keV energy range. Results on the total damage production are presented and compared with other semiconductors and experiments.

  11. Dynamics and control of spacecraft formation flying and constellation station keeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaodong

    2005-11-01

    Formation flying and constellation station keeping, the innovative concept of distributing the functionality of monolithic satellites among less expensive, smaller, cooperative satellites, enables faster ground track repeats, provides higher degrees of system redundancy and, in the end, reduces the cost of the whole mission. However, the practical implementation of this concept is associated with the need to tightly design, measure, control and maintain the formation or relative distance, phasing and orientations among the participating satellites. Implementing, maintaining, and reconfiguring the cluster of satellites is so critical and complex, that it would be a big burden on the traditional ground-based orbital determination, navigation and command systems, and it also may impose stringent requirements on current control systems in terms of the energy consumption, precision, and the overall budget. The research work in this dissertation addresses the problems in two parts: the first part, which discusses mainly how to design the relative orbits for formation flying and constellation station keeping; and the second part, which is about the exploitation of possible control algorithms for maintaining the formation and constellation. Orbits are investigated for which there are no relative secular precessions or drifts due to the Earth's perturbations between the spacecraft. In this case the energy consumption could be largely decreased. A general method is introduced to establish the relationship between a given orbit relative to a reference orbit. By analyzing a set of differential equations, relationships between the orbit design and all possible relative secular drifts due to perturbations in the Earth's gravitational field, can be derived. Mathematical singularities encountered at specific orbital inclination angles, such as polar inclinations, are discussed. By using the general approach, a solution for polar inclinations is found. Two solution sets are found

  12. Star formation in infrared dark clouds: Self-gravity and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Peretto, Nicolas; Louvet, Fabien; Fuller, Gary A; Traficante, Alessio; Duarte-Cabral, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The role played by gravity in the transfer of interstellar matter from molecular cloud scales to protostellar scales is still highly debated. Only detailed studies on the kinematics of large samples of star-forming clouds will settle the issue. We present new IRAM 30m observations of a sample of 27 infrared dark clouds covering a large range of sizes, masses, and aspect ratios. Preliminary results suggest that gravity is regulating the dynamical evolution of these clouds on a couple of parsec scales.

  13. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    as well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth...... bacteria depended on phytoplankton growth and aggregation dynamics. The community composition of especially attached bacteria significantly differed between the 2 algal cultures. Our study suggests that phytoplankton aggregation and vertical fluxes are closely linked to interactions between the marine...... phytoplankton and the ambient microbial community...

  14. Formation of H̅ in p̅-Ps collisions embedded in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnavelu, Kuru; Ghoshal, Arijit; Nayek, Sujay; Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, Mohd Zahurin Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Screening effects of plasmas on the formation of antihydrogen (H̅) in an arbitrary s-state from the ground state of the positronium atom (Ps) by antiproton (p̅) impact have been studied within the framework of charge-conjugation and time-reversal invariance. Two types of plasma environments have been considered, namely weakly coupled plasma and dense quantum plasma. For weakly coupled plasma, the interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel screening model, whereas for dense quantum plasma, interactions among the charged particles in plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Effects of plasma screening on the antihydrogen formation cross section have been studied in the energy range 15-400 keV of incident antiproton. For the free atomic case, our results agree well with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  15. A Test of Star Formation Laws in Disk Galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Leroy, Adam K

    2014-01-01

    We use observed radial profiles of mass surface densities of total, $\\Sigma_g$, & molecular, $\\Sigma_{\\rm H2}$, gas, rotation velocity & star formation rate (SFR) surface density, $\\Sigma_{\\rm sfr}$, of the molecular-rich ($\\Sigma_{\\rm H2}\\ge\\Sigma_{\\rm HI}/2$) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation laws: a Kennicutt-Schmidt law, $\\Sigma_{\\rm sfr}=A_g\\Sigma_{g,2}^{1.5}$; a Constant Molecular law, $\\Sigma_{\\rm sfr}=A_{\\rm H2}\\Sigma_{\\rm H2,2}$; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz & McKee (KM05) and Krumholz et al. (KMT09), a Gas-$\\Omega$ law, $\\Sigma_{\\rm sfr}=B_\\Omega\\Sigma_g\\Omega$; and a shear-driven GMC Collision law, $\\Sigma_{\\rm sfr}=B_{\\rm CC}\\Sigma_g\\Omega(1-0.7\\beta)$, where $\\beta\\equiv d {\\rm ln} v_{\\rm circ}/d {\\rm ln} r$. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4 - 1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors rang...

  16. Dynamical formation of a hairy black hole in a cavity from the decay of unstable solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis-Gual, Nicolas; Font, José A; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Recent numerical relativity simulations within the Einstein--Maxwell--(charged-)Klein-Gordon (EMcKG) system have shown that the non-linear evolution of a superradiantly unstable Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole (BH) enclosed in a cavity, leads to the formation of a BH with scalar hair. Perturbative evidence for the stability of such hairy BHs has been independently established, confirming they are the true endpoints of the superradiant instability. The same EMcKG system admits also charged scalar soliton-type solutions, which can be either stable or unstable. Using numerical relativity techniques, we provide evidence that the time evolution of some of these $\\textit{unstable}$ solitons leads, again, to the formation of a hairy BH. In some other cases, unstable solitons evolve into a (bald) Reissner-Nordstr\\"om BH. These results establish that the system admits two distinct channels to form hairy BHs at the threshold of superradiance: growing hair from an unstable (bald) BH, or growing a horizon from an unstabl...

  17. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Aguilar

    Full Text Available The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  18. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  19. Regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is an important organ responsible for regulating tear synthesis and secretion. The major work of lacrimal gland (LG) is to lubricate the ocular surface and maintain the health of eyes. Functional deterioration of the lacrimal gland happens because of aging, diseases, or therapeutic complications, but without effective treatments till now. The LG originates from the epithelium of ocular surface and develops by branching morphogenesis. To regenerate functional LGs, it is required to explore the way of recapitulating and facilitating the organ to establish the intricate and ramified structure. In this study, we proposed an approach using chitosan biomaterials to create a biomimetic environment beneficial to the branching structure formation of developing LG. The morphogenetic effect of chitosan was specific and optimized to promote LG branching. With chitosan, increase in temporal expression and local concentration of endogenous HGF-related molecules creates an environment around the emerging tip of LG epithelia. By efficiently enhancing downstream signaling of HGF pathways, the cellular activities and behaviors were activated to contribute to LG branching morphogenesis. The morphogenetic effect of chitosan was abolished by either ligand or receptor deprivation, or inhibition of downstream signaling transduction. Our results elucidated the underlying mechanism accounting for chitosan morphogenetic effects on LG, and also proposed promising approaches with chitosan to assist tissue structure formation of the LG.

  20. Vortex formation and dynamics in two-dimensional driven-dissipative condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, F.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the real-time evolution of lattice bosons in two spatial dimensions whose dynamics is governed by a Markovian quantum master equation. We employ the Wigner-Weyl phase space quantization and derive the functional integral for open quantum many-body systems that determines the time evolution of the Wigner function. Using the truncated Wigner approximation, in which quantum fluctuations are only taken into account in the initial state whereas the dynamics is governed by classical evolution equations, we study the buildup of long-range correlations due to the action of non-Hermitean quantum jump operators that constitute a mechanism for dissipative cooling. Starting from an initially disordered state corresponding to a vortex condensate, the dissipative process results in the annihilation of vortex-antivortex pairs and the establishment of quasi-long-range order at late times. We observe that a finite vortex density survives the cooling process, which disagrees with the analytically constructed vortex-free Bose-Einstein condensate at asymptotic times. This indicates that quantum fluctuations beyond the truncated Wigner approximation need to be included to fully capture the physics of dissipative Bose-Einstein condensation.

  1. The Effects of Communication Burstiness on Consensus Formation and Tipping Points in Social Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Doyle, Casey; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2016-01-01

    Current models for opinion dynamics typically utilize a Poisson process for speaker selection, making the waiting time between events exponentially distributed. Human interaction tends to be a more bursty process, though, having higher probabilities of either extremely short waiting times or long periods of silence rather than the relative regularity of Poisson selection. To quantify the effects this difference may have on the dynamics of social models, we place in competition two groups exhibiting different speakers waiting-time distributions. These competitions are implemented in the binary Naming Game and in the voter model, showing that the relevant aspect of the waiting-time distribution is the density of the head rather than that of the tail. In fact, we show that even with identical mean waiting times, a group with a higher density of short waiting times is favored in competition over the group with a less bursty distribution. This effect remains in the presence of nodes holding a single opinion that n...

  2. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Marielle [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Neurosciences, Laboratory of Cellular and Tissular Biology, Liege (Belgium); Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Di Valentin, Emmanuel [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Viral Vectors Platform, Liege (Belgium); Bontems, Sébastien [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine, E-mail: csadzot@ulg.ac.be [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  3. Dynamic Modelling Reveals 'Hotspots' on the Pathway to Enzyme-Substrate Complex Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane E Gordon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS catalyzes the first committed step in the diaminopimelate pathway of bacteria, yielding amino acids required for cell wall and protein biosyntheses. The essentiality of the enzyme to bacteria, coupled with its absence in humans, validates DHDPS as an antibacterial drug target. Conventional drug design efforts have thus far been unsuccessful in identifying potent DHDPS inhibitors. Here, we make use of contemporary molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models to explore the interactions between DHDPS from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its cognate substrate, pyruvate. Our simulations recover the crystallographic DHDPS-pyruvate complex without a priori knowledge of the final bound structure. The highly conserved residue Arg140 was found to have a pivotal role in coordinating the entry of pyruvate into the active site from bulk solvent, consistent with previous kinetic reports, indicating an indirect role for the residue in DHDPS catalysis. A metastable binding intermediate characterized by multiple points of intermolecular interaction between pyruvate and key DHDPS residue Arg140 was found to be a highly conserved feature of the binding trajectory when comparing alternative binding pathways. By means of umbrella sampling we show that these binding intermediates are thermodynamically metastable, consistent with both the available experimental data and the substrate binding model presented in this study. Our results provide insight into an important enzyme-substrate interaction in atomistic detail that offers the potential to be exploited for the discovery of more effective DHDPS inhibitors and, in a broader sense, dynamic protein-drug interactions.

  4. Are the Formation and Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars the Result of Dust Dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    Large dust grains can fluctuate dramatically in their local density, relative to gas, in neutral, turbulent disks. Small, high-redshift galaxies (before reionization) represent ideal environments for this process. We show via simple arguments and simulations that order-of-magnitude fluctuations are expected in local abundances of large grains under these conditions. This can have important consequences for star formation and stellar abundances in extremely metal-poor stars. Low-mass stars could form in dust-enhanced regions almost immediately after some dust forms, even if the galaxy-average metallicity is too low for fragmentation to occur. The abundances of these 'promoted' stars may contain interesting signatures, as the CNO abundances (concentrated in large carbonaceous grains and ices) and Mg and Si (in large silicate grains) can be enhanced or fluctuate independently. Remarkably, otherwise puzzling abundance patterns of some metal-poor stars can be well-fit by standard core-collapse SNe yields, if we al...

  5. Formation of lightning in terms of opinion dynamics in three dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, C

    2006-01-01

    Formation of a lightning within a cloud, between clouds and towards the earth is studied as an application of sociophysics. The three dimensional society is sky or cloud, which has members as electrically charged clouds (in sky) or patches (in cloud). Members interact with the neighboring ones and all are convinced to average their charges (opinion). Yet, big external drives (mass media) as winds and turbulences may load new charges or may force the present ones to accumulate temporally at a site. For a lightning towards the earth, similarly charged clouds in sky (patches carrying big charges in a cloud) are expected to come close to each other. In all, discharging process is nothing, but what is called lightning.

  6. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

  7. Planet formation in binaries: dynamics of planetesimals perturbed by the eccentric protoplanetary disk and the secondary

    CERN Document Server

    Silsbee, Kedron

    2013-01-01

    Detections of planets in eccentric, close (separations of ~20 AU) binary systems such as \\alpha Cen or \\gamma Cep provide an important test of planet formation theories. Gravitational perturbations from the companion are expected to excite high planetesimal eccentricities resulting in destruction, rather than growth, of objects with sizes of up to several hundred km in collisions of similar-size bodies. It was recently suggested that gravity of a massive axisymmetric gaseous disk in which planetesimals are embedded drives rapid precession of their orbits, suppressing eccentricity excitation. However, disks in binaries are themselves expected to be eccentric, leading to additional planetesimal excitation. Here we develop secular theory of eccentricity evolution for planetesimals perturbed by the gravity of an elliptical protoplanetary disk (neglecting gas drag) and the companion. For the first time we derive an expression for the disturbing function due to an eccentric disk, which can be used for a variety of ...

  8. Dynamics of Crystal Formation in the Greenland NorthGRIP Ice Core

    CERN Document Server

    Mathiesen, J; Jensen, M H; Levinsen, M; Olesen, P; Dahl-Jensen, D; Svensson, A; Mathiesen, Joachim; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Levinsen, Mogens; Olesen, Poul; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Svensson, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The North Greenland Ice Core Project (NorthGRIP) provides paleoclimatic information back to at least 115 kyr before present [Dahl-Jensen et al., 2002]. Each year, precipitation on the ice sheet covers it with a new layer of snow, which gradually transforms into ice crystals as the layer sinks into the ice sheet. The size distribution of ice crystals has been measured at selected depths in the upper 880 m of the NorthGRIP ice core [Svensson et al., 2003b], which cover a time span of 5300 years. The distributions change with time toward a universal curve, indicating a common underlying physical process in the formation of crystals. We identify this process as an interplay between fragmentation of the crystals and diffusion of their grain boundaries. The process is described by a two-parameter differential equation to which we obtain the exact solution. The solution is in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed distributions.

  9. From dynamic expression patterns to boundary formation in the presomitic mesoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik B Tiedemann

    Full Text Available The segmentation of the vertebrate body is laid down during early embryogenesis. The formation of signaling gradients, the periodic expression of genes of the Notch-, Fgf- and Wnt-pathways and their interplay in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM precedes the rhythmic budding of nascent somites at its anterior end, which later develops into epithelialized structures, the somites. Although many in silico models describing partial aspects of somitogenesis already exist, simulations of a complete causal chain from gene expression in the growth zone via the interaction of multiple cells to segmentation are rare. Here, we present an enhanced gene regulatory network (GRN for mice in a simulation program that models the growing PSM by many virtual cells and integrates WNT3A and FGF8 gradient formation, periodic gene expression and Delta/Notch signaling. Assuming Hes7 as core of the somitogenesis clock and LFNG as modulator, we postulate a negative feedback of HES7 on Dll1 leading to an oscillating Dll1 expression as seen in vivo. Furthermore, we are able to simulate the experimentally observed wave of activated NOTCH (NICD as a result of the interactions in the GRN. We esteem our model as robust for a wide range of parameter values with the Hes7 mRNA and protein decays exerting a strong influence on the core oscillator. Moreover, our model predicts interference between Hes1 and HES7 oscillators when their intrinsic frequencies differ. In conclusion, we have built a comprehensive model of somitogenesis with HES7 as core oscillator that is able to reproduce many experimentally observed data in mice.

  10. Coupled dynamics of mobility and pattern formation in optional public goods games

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Shi, Yong-Dong; Qiu, Tian

    2012-01-01

    In a static environment, optional participation and cooperator agglomeration are found to be beneficial for the occurrence and maintenance of cooperation. In the optional public goods game, the rock-scissors-paper cycles of different strategies yield the oscillatory persistence of cooperation but not different levels of stable cooperation. In this paper, by incorporating population density and individual mobility into the spatial optional public goods game, we study the coevolutionary dynamics of strategy updating and benefit-seeking movement. With low population density and slow movement, an optimal level of cooperation is easy to be reached. Both the increase of population density and the speed-up of free-floating of competing agents will lead to the decrease of cooperation. A log-log relation between the levels of cooperation and the free-floating probability is found. Theoretical analysis indicates that the decrease of cooperator frequency in the present model should result from the increase of the intera...

  11. Dislocation formation and twinning from the crack tip in Ni3Al: molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Hong-Xian; Wang Chong-Yu; Yu Tao; Du Jun-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of low-temperature deformation in a fracture process of L12Ni3Al is studied by molecular dynamic simulations. Owing to the unstable stacking energy, the [011] superdislocation is dissociated into partial dislocations separated by a stacking fault. The simulation results show that when the crack speed is larger than a critical speed, the Shockley partial dislocations will break forth from both the crack tip and the vicinity of the crack tip; subsequently the super intrinsic stacking faults are formed in adjacent {111} planes, meanwhile the super extrinsic stacking faults and twinning also occur. Our simulation results suggcst that at low temperatures the ductile fracture in L12Ni3Al is accompanied by twinning, which is produced by super-intrinsic stacking faults formed in adjacent {111} planes.

  12. Thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and dynamical formation of Bose-Einstein Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    We report recent progress on understanding the thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma during the early stage in a heavy ion collision. The initially high overpopulation in the pre-equilibrium gluonic matter (``glasma'') is shown to play a crucial role. The strongly interacting nature (and thus fast evolution) naturally arises as an {\\em emergent property} of this pre-equilibrium matter where the intrinsic coupling is weak but the highly occupied gluon states coherently amplify the scattering. A possible transient Bose-Einstein Condensate is argued to form dynamically on a rather general ground. We develop the kinetic approach for describing this highly overpopulated system and find approximate scaling solutions as well as numerically study the onset of condensation. Finally we discuss possible phenomenological implications.

  13. Bulge formation and necking in a polymer tube under dynamic expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Britta; Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Bulging and necking in long thin polymer tubes subjected to increasing internal pressure are analysed numerically. The polymer is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation and the calculations are carried out using a dynamic finite element program. Two types...... of imposed loading are prescribed: (i) a pressure that increases linearly with time and (ii) a change in enclosed volume that increases linearly with time. For both loading conditions, an axisymmetric bulge develops on the tube followed by necking in the bulge. The necks propagate in both the circumferential...... and the axial directions. Multiple necks form at locations given by the thin points associated with the wave number of the prescribed initial thickness imperfection. When a change in enclosed volume is prescribed, the pressure reaches a maximum, decreases and then stays approximately constant. One neck...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of {beta}-sheet formation in self-assembled peptide amphiphile fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, One-Sun; Liu Yamei; Schatz, George C., E-mail: schatz@chem.northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The influence of amino acid sequence on the secondary structure of peptide amphiphile (PAs) cylindrical micelles and fibers that are self-assembled in solution is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations for two choices of PAs were performed, starting with structures that have the correct overall shape, but which restructure considerably during the simulation, with one fiber being composed of valine rich PAs and the other of alanine rich PAs. Self-assembly is similar in both simulations, with stable fibers (diameter is 7.7-8 nm) obtained after 40 ns. We find that the valine rich PA fiber has a higher {beta}-sheet population than the alanine rich fiber, and that the number of hydrogen bonds is higher. This behavior of the valine rich fiber is consistent with experimental measurements of higher stiffness, and it shows that stiffness can be varied while still maintaining self-assembly.

  15. Dynamics of ordering processes in annealed dilute systems: Island formation, vacancies at domain boundaries, and compactification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Peter Jivan; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1990-01-01

    with couplings leading to twofold-degenerate as well as fourfold-degenerate ordering. The models are quenched into a phase-separation region, which makes it possible for both types of ordering to observe the following scenario of ordering processes: (i) early-time nucleation and growth of ordered domains, (ii...... and compactification via coalescence. The domain-size distribution function, which is approximately log-normal, is shown to obey dynamical scaling over a substantial time range for both types of ordering. The growth for the pure systems is found to be described by a power law with the classical growth exponent n=1....... The results of the model study are relevant for the interpretation of experiments on ordering in impure systems and off-stochiometric alloys, grain growth in radiation-damaged materials, and may also shed light on aspects of sintering processes. The finding of a crossover from an algebraic growth law...

  16. Melt front propagation in dielectrics upon femtosecond laser irradiation: Formation dynamics of a heat-affected layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Several studies in dielectrics have reported the presence of a thin heat-affected layer underneath the ablation crater produced by femtosecond laser irradiation. In this work, we present a time-resolved microscopy technique that is capable of monitoring the formation dynamics of this layer and apply it to the study of a phosphate glass exposed to single pulses below the ablation threshold. A few nanoseconds after laser excitation, a melt front interface can be detected, which propagates into the bulk, gradually slowing down its speed. By means of image analysis combined with optical modeling, we are able to determine the temporal evolution of the layer thickness and its refractive index. Initially, a strong transient decrease in the refractive index is observed, which partially recovers afterwards. The layer resolidifies after approximately 1 μs after excitation, featuring a maximum thickness of several hundreds of nanometers.

  17. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  18. Compound nucleus formation probability PCN determined within the dynamical cluster-decay model for various "hot" fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Chopra, Sahila; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-08-01

    The compound nucleus (CN) fusion/formation probability PCN is defined and its detailed variations with the CN excitation energy E*, center-of-mass energy Ec .m., fissility parameter χ, CN mass number ACN, and Coulomb interaction parameter Z1Z2 are studied for the first time within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). The model is a nonstatistical description of the decay of a CN to all possible processes. The (total) fusion cross section σfusion is the sum of the CN and noncompound nucleus (nCN) decay cross sections, each calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process. The CN cross section σCN is constituted of evaporation residues and fusion-fission, including intermediate-mass fragments, each calculated for all contributing decay fragments (A1, A2) in terms of their formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P. The nCN cross section σnCN is determined as the quasi-fission (qf) process, where P0=1 and P is calculated for the entrance-channel nuclei. The DCM, with effects of deformations and orientations of nuclei included in it, is used to study the PCN for about a dozen "hot" fusion reactions forming a CN of mass number A ˜100 to superheavy nuclei and for various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting results are that PCN=1 for complete fusion, but PCNPCN≪1 due to the nCN contribution, depending strongly on different parameters of the entrance-channel reaction but found to be independent of the nuclear interaction potentials used.

  19. Surface films of short fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon diblocks studied by molecular dynamics simulations: Spontaneous formation of elongated hemimicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Angel; Prieto, Gerardo; Ruso, Juan M; Verdes, Pedro V; Sarmiento, Félix

    2009-01-15

    Using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) it has been recently demonstrated that linear fluorocarbon-hydrocarbon diblocks (FnHm) self-assemble in water/air interfaces forming elongated and circular hemimicelles. Those structures have been observed for diblocks with at least eight fluorinated carbons. Based on the lack of a collapse pressure for F6H16, and due to the fact that no stable surface pressure values are reached under compression, it has been concluded that these molecules do not form stable monolayers. It has been also suggested that F6H16 and shorter diblocks desorb from the water surface under compression. It is not easy to accept that a significant concentration of so hydrophobic molecules can be stable in aqueous solution even when the employed experimental techniques were not able to clearly detect a well defined structure on the interface. In the present work the adsorption and arrangement of F6H16 and F6H10 at the water surface are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a function of the available area per molecule. Starting from a random mixture, the spontaneous formation of elongated hemimicelles is observed for both systems when the area per molecule is higher than approximately 50 A(2). For intermediate areas two pseudo-phases, one rich in hydrocarbons and the other with higher fluorocarbon concentration, are formed. For the systems with less than approximately 30 A(2) available per molecule the formation of multilayers is observed. This is the first time that the dynamics and structure of perfluoroalkane (PFA) films, and in particular of hemimicelles on a liquid surface, are observed and characterized at atomic level.

  20. Formation and dynamics of Skyrmions in B20-type chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Naoya

    2012-02-01

    The topological stable spin texture called a Skyrmion, in which the directions of the spins wrap a sphere, has been attracting much attention as an arena for unconventional magneto-transport effects. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies identify the formation of two-dimensional triangular Skyrmion lattice in B20-type transition-metal monosilicides, such as MnSiootnotetextS. M"uhlbauer et al., Science 323, 915 (2009). and Fe1-xCoxSi.ootnotetextW. M"unzer et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 041203 (2010). In addition, novel transport properties due to its topological spin arrangement, namely the topological Hall effectootnotetextA. Neubauer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 186602 (2009). and the current-induced rotation of the Skyrmion latticeootnotetextF. Joneitz et al., Science 330, 1648 (2010). are observed in MnSi. We have provided crucial evidence of the existence of Skyrmions in B20-type compounds by direct real-space observation using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM)ootnotetextX. Z. Yu et al., Nautre 465, 901 (2010).^,ootnotetextX. Z. Yu et al., Nautre Materials 10, 106 (2011). and also found a large topological Hall effect in much wider temperature region in MnGe than other B20-type magnets.ootnotetextN. Kanazawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 156603 (2011). TEM observation reveals the detailed information on nucleation and fusion processes and topological defects besides the perfect hexagonal arrangement of Skyrmions. Furthermore, we have found that the Skyrmion lattice state is quite stabilized in a thin-plate formed sample with its thickness smaller than the skyrmion lattice constant. The orders of magnitude larger topological Hall effect in MnGe indicates the high-density Skyrmion crystal formation and distinguishable large responses in some novel electromagnetic phenomena. In addition, we have fabricated B20-type thin films where Skyrmions are more stabilized and applied electric current is more easily controlled than in bulk samples. This work

  1. Modular and dynamic approaches to the formation of single-chain polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten, Bryan Tyler

    The methodology towards the creation of nanoscale polymeric objects by way of the folding of single polymer chains has been enjoying success in the field of polymer chemistry and materials science. By synthesizing polymer chains with built in functionality either through functional side groups, or direct incorporation into the polymer backbone, polymer chemists are able to fold single polymer chains onto themselves through a broad range of covalent and non-covalent interactions in dilute solution. These compact, nano-sized objects can now be used in a wide arrange of functions and applications. The aim of this dissertation is to provide first, a comprehensive overview of the recent advances and success enjoyed by this field and second, to showcase some of the various routes towards the dynamic and modular creation of these single-chain polymer nanoparticles (SCNPs). Chapter 2 of this work discusses the use of dynamic covalent cross-linking chemistry via reversible disulfide bridges in the folding and unfolding of SCNPs. Through the use of triple detection size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) it was shown through changes in retention time, a phenomena indicative of hydrodynamic volume, a polymer was being folded into compact SCNPs and then unfolded and refolded via redox chemistry. Chapter 3 explores the design of polymers that had various different cross-linkable moieties incorporated into the monomer side units. By having cross-linkable moieties that can undergo different chemical cross-linking reactions (i.e thiol-yne click reactions, epoxide ring-opening reactions, activated esters), a modular approach towards the folding and subsequent functionalization of SCNPs is created. Looking to design a system with a greater degree of control over the modular functionality, chapter 4 investigates the use of norbornene imide monomers containing pentafluorophenyl activated esters with varying methylene spacer unites between the polymerizable olefin and the activated ester

  2. Dynamic Crystallization Experiments Using Conventional and Solar Furnace Techniques--implications For The Formation of Refractory Forsterite In Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, A.; Sauerborn, M.; Klerner, S.; Palme, H.; Neumann, A.; Seboldt, W.

    A distinct generation of forsteritic olivine (Mg2SiO4) grains (RF) with unusually high concentrations of refractory components including CaO (0.7 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.4 wt.%), V, Sc, and REEs occurs in unequilibrated chondrites, including ordinary, carbonaceous, and the highly oxidized Rumurutiites. Contents of siderophile elements like FeO (1 wt.%), Ni, or Mn are extremly low in RF. It is inferred that formation of RF pre-dates the formation of chondrules and matrix as well as formation of the different types of parent bodies (CCs, OCs, oxidized R-chondrites). Hence, RF can help us to better understand the processes in the early stage of the solar system in the time between formation of CAIs and Si,Mg-chondrules. However, formation of RF is not well understood. Crystallization of RF in chon- drules requires chondrule melts with ca. 20 wt.% CaO. Most chondrules have typically <4 wt.% CaO (max. ca. 10 wt.% CaO). We have conducted dynamic crystallization experiments using a conventional furnace (1.5...1000 K·min-1) and the DLR solar furnace (approx. 100000 K·min-1) in order to test if rapid cooling of a chondrule- like melt would produce high CaO in RF. We demostrate that Ca-partitioning between olivine and silicate melt is only weakly influenced by rapid cooling even at extremly high cooling rates in the range of 105 K·min-1 as obtained in the solar furnace ex- periments. At a bulk composition of the starting melt of 7.5 wt.% CaO, no deviation from equilibrium fractionation was observed (T/t = 1.5 . . . 105 K·min-1). At a ol/melt bulk content of 17.5 wt.% CaO, in increase in DCa of approximately 10...20% was observed. Chondrules with CaO contents in the range of 10 wt.% (upper limit of CaO in chondrules) thus cannot be regarded to be the host of RF. Hence, there must have been an early generation of extremly CaO-rich chondrules (20 wt.% CaO). Alternatively, RF may have formed by other processes, e. g. direct condensation from the solar nebula.

  3. Caustic-based approach to understanding bunching dynamics and current spike formation in particle bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, T. K.; Paganin, D. M.; Dowd, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    Current modulations, current spikes, and current horns, are observed in a range of accelerator physics applications including strong bunch compression in Free Electron Lasers and linear colliders, trains of microbunching for terahertz radiation, microbunching instability and many others. This paper considers the fundamental mechanism that drives intense current modulations in dispersive regions, beyond the common explanation of nonlinear and higher-order effects. Under certain conditions, neighboring electron trajectories merge to form caustics, and often result in characteristic current spikes. Caustic lines and surfaces are regions of maximum electron density, and are witnessed in accelerator physics as folds in phase space of accelerated bunches. We identify the caustic phenomenon resulting in cusplike current profiles and derive an expression which describes the conditions needed for particle-bunch caustic formation in dispersive regions. The caustic expression not only reveals the conditions necessary for caustics to form but also where in longitudinal space the caustics will form. Particle-tracking simulations are used to verify these findings. We discuss the broader implications of this work including how to utilize the caustic expression for manipulation of the longitudinal phase space to achieve a desired current profile shape.

  4. Cyst Formation, Development of Alexandrium tamarense from Yangtse River Estuary and Its Relation to Bloom Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUHai-Feng; LANDong-Zhao; FANGQi; WANGZong-Ling

    2004-01-01

    The toxic dinoflagellate—Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech, formed resting cysts in f/2 media with low nitrate concentrations. Among the concentrations tested, f/20 NO3- was the most effective to induction with an encystment percentage of 2.0 in batch culture. About 73.2% and 17.6% of cysts were produced on 8 and 9 d after transferring. Newly formed cysts developed accumulation body 3d later and kept forming mucilaginous substance, which might help their dispersal and survival. The mandatory dormancy period of resting cysts was 15 and 10d when stored at 15 and 20℃ respectively. The cysts could germinate without temperature change, with germination of 75.6% 20d after formation at 20℃. The Alexandrium cyst density in the surface sediment of DG-26 station reached above 25 cysts/g in May and November of 2002, and dropped to 4.5 and 0.9 cysts/g in August of 2002 and February of 2003, suggesting that Alexandrium cysts might have germinated in spring and autumn 2002. Cysts produced during the bloom returned to water column soon, whatever the season and water temperature were. The cyst density in the surface sediment at DG-26 station in May, 2003 was only 3.3 cysts/g and the cysts were newly formed. In the Yangtse River estuary, the inoculum size was not a major factor to determine the outbreak of A.tamarense bloom.

  5. Polyglutamine expansion accelerates the dynamics of ataxin-1 and does not result in aggregate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde A Krol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyglutamine expansion disorders are caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the disease related protein, leading to severe neurodegeneration. All polyQ disorders are hallmarked by the presence of intracellular aggregates containing the expanded protein in affected neurons. The polyQ disorder SpinoCerebellar Ataxia 1 (SCA1 is caused by a polyQ-expansion in the ataxin-1 protein, which is thought to lead to nuclear aggregates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using advanced live cell fluorescence microscopy and a filter retardation assay we show that nuclear accumulations formed by polyQ-expanded ataxin-1 do not resemble aggregates of other polyQ-expanded proteins. Instead of being static, insoluble aggregates, nuclear accumulations formed by the polyQ-expanded ataxin-1 showed enhanced intracellular kinetics as compared to wild-type ataxin-1. During mitosis, ataxin-1 accumulations redistributed equally among daughter cells, in contrast to polyQ aggregates. Interestingly, polyQ expansion did not affect the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of ataxin-1 as proposed before. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that polyQ expansion does not necessarily lead to aggregate formation, and that the enhanced kinetics may affect the nuclear function of ataxin-1. The unexpected findings for a polyQ-expanded protein and their consequences for ongoing SCA1 research are discussed.

  6. Dynamic Sumoylation of a Conserved Transcription Corepressor Prevents Persistent Inclusion Formation during Hyperosmotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeser, Michelle L.; Amen, Triana; Nadel, Cory M.; Bradley, Amanda I.; Reed, Benjamin J.; Jones, Ramon D.; Gopalan, Janani; Kaganovich, Daniel; Gardner, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells are often exposed to physical or chemical stresses that can damage the structures of essential biomolecules. Stress-induced cellular damage can become deleterious if not managed appropriately. Rapid and adaptive responses to stresses are therefore crucial for cell survival. In eukaryotic cells, different stresses trigger post-translational modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO. However, the specific regulatory roles of sumoylation in each stress response are not well understood. Here, we examined the sumoylation events that occur in budding yeast after exposure to hyperosmotic stress. We discovered by proteomic and biochemical analyses that hyperosmotic stress incurs the rapid and transient sumoylation of Cyc8 and Tup1, which together form a conserved transcription corepressor complex that regulates hundreds of genes. Gene expression and cell biological analyses revealed that sumoylation of each protein directs distinct outcomes. In particular, we discovered that Cyc8 sumoylation prevents the persistence of hyperosmotic stress-induced Cyc8-Tup1 inclusions, which involves a glutamine-rich prion domain in Cyc8. We propose that sumoylation protects against persistent inclusion formation during hyperosmotic stress, allowing optimal transcriptional function of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex. PMID:26800527

  7. Rotational Dynamics and Star Formation in the Nearby Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5238

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, John M; Teich, Yaron G; Ball, Catherine; Banovetz, John; Brock, Annika; Eisner, Brian A; Fitzgibbon, Kathleen; Miazzo, Masao; Nizami, Asra; Reilly, Bridget; Ruvolo, Elizabeth; Singer, Quinton

    2016-01-01

    We present new HI spectral line images of the nearby low-mass galaxy NGC 5238, acquired with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Located at a distance of 4.51+/-0.04 Mpc, NGC 5238 is an actively star-forming galaxy with widespread H-alpha and UV continuum emission. The source is included in many ongoing and recent nearby galaxy surveys, but until this work the spatially resolved qualities of its neutral interstellar medium have remained unstudied. Our HI images resolve the disk on physical scales of ~400 pc, allowing us to undertake a detailed comparative study of the gaseous and stellar components. The HI disk is asymmetric in the outer regions, and the areas of high HI mass surface density display a crescent-shaped morphology that is slightly offset from the center of the stellar populations. The HI column density exceeds 10^21 cm^-2 in much of the disk. We quantify the degree of co-spatiality of dense HI gas and sites of ongoing star formation as traced by far-UV and H-alpha emission. The neutral ga...

  8. Simulating Marine New Particle Formation and Growth Using the M7 Modal Aerosol Dynamics Modal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran Monahan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A modal atmospheric aerosol model (M7 is evaluated in terms of predicting marine new particle formation and growth. Simulations were carried out for three different nucleation schemes involving (1 kinetic self-nucleation of OIO (2 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 and (3 nucleation via OIO activation by H2SO4 plus condensation of a low-volatility organic vapour. Peak OIO and H2SO4 vapour concentrations were both limited to 6×106 molecules cm-3 at noontime while the peak organic vapour concentration was limited to 12×106 molecules cm-3. All simulations produced significant concentrations of new particles in the Aitken mode. From a base case particle concentration of 222 cm-3 at radii >15 nm, increases in concentrations to 366 cm-3 were predicted from the OIO-OIO case, 722 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case, and 1584 cm-3 for the OIO-H2SO4 case with additional condensing organic vapours. The results indicate that open ocean new particle production is feasible for clean conditions; however, new particle production becomes most significant when an additional condensable organic vapour is available to grow the newly formed particles to larger sizes. Comparison to sectional model for a typical case study demonstrated good agreement and the validity of using the modal model.

  9. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I).A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame suggests a merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~ 10' NW to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h=19.0 are newly selected as member candidates. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged samp...

  10. Relative dynamics and control of spacecraft formations subject to lorentz force perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia; Shoaib, Muhammad

    A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to a perturbative Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft’s orbit. We develop Lorentz force as a function of the orbital elements. The orbital perturbations of a charged spacecraft by Lorentz force in the Earth’s magnetic field are investigated using the Gauss variation of the Lagrange planetary Equations. The Earth’s magnetic field is modeled as a tilted dipole. The perturbations in the orbital elements depend on the value of the charge to mass ratio (q/m). The dynamical model of relative motion developed leads to approximate analytical solutions for the motion of a charged spacecraft subject to Lorentz force. The chief spacecraft’s reference orbit is taken to be either circular or elliptical. The deputy spacecraft is capable of accumulating electrostatic charge. The numerical results show that Lorentz force can be used to change the in-track position and plane orbit of the spacecraft. The numerical analysis shows that the target trajectory of the Lorentz spacecraft can be reached by varying the ratio (q/m) in different Low Earth Orbits.

  11. Electroless formation of silver nanoaggregates: An experimental and molecular dynamics approach

    KAUST Repository

    Gentile, Francesco T.

    2014-02-20

    The ability to manipulate matter to create non-conventional structures is one of the key issues of material science. The understanding of assembling mechanism at the nanoscale allows us to engineer new nanomaterials, with physical properties intimately depending on their structure.This paper describes new strategies to obtain and characterise metal nanostructures via the combination of a top-down method, such as electron beam lithography, and a bottom-up technique, such as the chemical electroless deposition. We realised silver nanoparticle aggregates within well-defined patterned holes created by electron beam lithography on silicon substrates. The quality characteristics of the nanoaggregates were verified by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging. Moreover, we compared the experimental findings to molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles growth. We observed a very high dependence of the structure characteristics on the pattern nanowell aspect ratio. We found that high-quality metal nanostructures may be obtained in patterns with well aspect ratio close to one, corresponding to a maximum diameter of 50 nm, a limit above which the fabricated structures become less regular and discontinuous. When regular shapes and sizes are necessary, as in nanophotonics, these results suggest the pattern characteristics to obtain isolated, uniform and reproducible metal nanospheres. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Dynamical charge and pseudospin currents in graphene and possible Cooper pair formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawetz, K.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the quantum kinetic equations for systems with SU(2) structure, regularization-free density and pseudospin currents are calculated in graphene realized as the infinite-mass limit of electrons with quadratic dispersion and a proper spin-orbit coupling. Correspondingly the currents possess no quasiparticle part but only anomalous parts. The intraband and interband conductivities are discussed with respect to magnetic fields and magnetic domain puddles. It is found that the magnetic field and mean field of domains can be represented by an effective Zeeman field. For large Zeeman fields the dynamical conductivities become independent of the density and are universal in this sense. The different limits of vanishing density, relaxation, frequency, and Zeeman field are not interchangeable. The optical conductivity agrees well with the experimental values using screened impurity scattering and an effective Zeeman field. The universal value of Hall conductivity is shown to be modified due to the Zeeman field. The pseudospin current reveals an anomaly since a quasiparticle part appears though it vanishes for particle currents. The density and pseudospin response functions to an external electric field are calculated and the dielectric function is discussed with respect to collective excitations. A frequency and wave-vector range is identified where the dielectric function changes sign and the repulsive Coulomb potential becomes effectively attractive allowing Cooper pairing.

  13. Code interoperability and standard data formats in quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics: The Q5/D5Cost data model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elda; Evangelisti, Stefano; Laganà, Antonio; Monari, Antonio; Rampino, Sergio; Verdicchio, Marco; Baldridge, Kim K; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Borini, Stefano; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Angeli, Celestino; Kallay, Peter; Lüthi, Hans P; Ruud, Kenneth; Sanchez-Marin, José; Scemama, Anthony; Szalay, Peter G; Tajti, Attila

    2014-03-30

    Code interoperability and the search for domain-specific standard data formats represent critical issues in many areas of computational science. The advent of novel computing infrastructures such as computational grids and clouds make these issues even more urgent. The design and implementation of a common data format for quantum chemistry (QC) and quantum dynamics (QD) computer programs is discussed with reference to the research performed in the course of two Collaboration in Science and Technology Actions. The specific data models adopted, Q5Cost and D5Cost, are shown to work for a number of interoperating codes, regardless of the type and amount of information (small or large datasets) to be exchanged. The codes are either interfaced directly, or transfer data by means of wrappers; both types of data exchange are supported by the Q5/D5Cost library. Further, the exchange of data between QC and QD codes is addressed. As a proof of concept, the H + H2 reaction is discussed. The proposed scheme is shown to provide an excellent basis for cooperative code development, even across domain boundaries. Moreover, the scheme presented is found to be useful also as a production tool in the grid distributed computing environment.

  14. Secular dynamics of multiplanet systems: implications for the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via high-eccentricity migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.; Antonini, Fabio; Lithwick, Yoram; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets that reside very closely to their host star, within ˜0.1 au. Their formation is not well understood. It is generally believed that they cannot have formed in situ, implying that some form of migration must have occurred after their initial formation. We study the production of HJs through secular evolution in multiplanet systems with three to five planets. In this variant of high-e migration, the eccentricity of the orbit of the innermost planet is excited on secular time-scales, triggering orbital migration due to tidal dissipation. We use a secular dynamics code and carry out a population synthesis study. We find that HJs are only produced if the viscous time-scale is short (≈0.014 yr). In contrast, in up to ≈0.3 of systems, the innermost planet is tidally disrupted. The orbital period distribution is peaked around 5 d, consistent with observations. The median HJ mass is 1 MJ with a maximum of ≈2 MJ, similar to observed HJs. Approximately 0.1 of the HJs have retrograde orbits with respect to the stellar spin. We do not find a significant population of warm Jupiters in our simulations, i.e. planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 au.

  15. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-02-01

    The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal gland branching morphogenesis. Chitosan biomaterials promoted lacrimal gland branching with a dose-dependent effect. It helped in vivo binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) related molecules in the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary of emerging epithelial branches. When mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) inhibitors applied, the chitosan effects reduced. Nonetheless, the ratios of MAPK and Akt/PKB phosphorylation were still greater in the chitosan group than the control. The data demonstrated here confirm the essential role of HGF-signaling in chitosan-promoted structure formation of the lacrimal gland.

  16. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Chuan Hsiao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal gland branching morphogenesis. Chitosan biomaterials promoted lacrimal gland branching with a dose-dependent effect. It helped in vivo binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF related molecules in the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary of emerging epithelial branches. When mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK or protein kinase B (Akt/PKB inhibitors applied, the chitosan effects reduced. Nonetheless, the ratios of MAPK and Akt/PKB phosphorylation were still greater in the chitosan group than the control. The data demonstrated here confirm the essential role of HGF-signaling in chitosan-promoted structure formation of the lacrimal gland.

  17. In-situ assessment of biofilm formation in submerged membrane system using optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2016-09-09

    This paper introduces a novel approach to study the biofouling development on gravity driven submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR). The on-line monitoring of biofilm formation on a flat sheet membrane was conducted non-destructively using optical coherence tomography (OCT), allowing the in-situ investigation of the biofilm structure for 43 d. The OCT enabled to obtain a time-lapse of biofilm development on the membrane under the continuous operation. Acquired real-time information on the biofilm structure related to the change in the flux profile confirming the successful monitoring of the dynamic evolution of the biofouling layer. Four different phases were observed linking the permeate flux with the change of biofilm morphology. In particular, a stable flux of 2.1±0.1 L/m2 h was achieved with the achievement of steady biofilm morphology after 30 d of operation. Biofilm descriptors, such as thickness, biofilm area, macro-porosity and roughness (absolute and relative), were calculated for each OCT acquired scans. Interestingly, relative roughness was correlated with the flux decrease. Furthermore, the precise biofilm morphology obtained from the OCT scans was used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to better understand the role of biofilm structure on the filtration mechanism. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Bubble dynamics in metal nanoparticle formation by laser ablation in liquid studied through high-speed laser stroboscopic videography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Rie; Nguyen, Thao T.P.; Sugiura, Takahiro; Ito, Yoshiro, E-mail: itoy@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Observations at 1 μs interval were carried out for laser ablation in water. • Laser-induced shock wave and cavitation bubble are dynamically observed. • Jet-like shadows are observed during LAL in water after multiple-pulse irradiation. • Cloudlike-shadow moving away from the irradiated copper surface was observed. - Abstract: Laser ablation in liquid (LAL) is utilized in many applications, such as the fabrication of nanoparticles, laser cleaning and laser peening. We have developed a high-speed laser stroboscopic videography system that enables observations at intervals of 1 μs. Using this imaging system, we investigated the dynamics of cavitation bubbles induced by LAL to elucidate the timing and location of nanoparticle formation and dispersion into the surrounding liquid. The initial bubble demonstrated a well-defined, smooth boundary during its growth and shrinkage. Although previous studies have reported the ejection of particles at the boundary of the bubble, this was not observed in our images. Intermixing between the gas phase of the bubble and the surrounding liquid occurred when the first bubble collapsed. Jet-like shadows were recorded during LAL in water after multiple-pulse irradiation, but were not observed in freshly filled water that had not yet been irradiated. These shadows disappeared within 10 μs and are postulated to be micro-bubbles induced by interactions between nanoparticles suspended in the water and the incoming laser beam.

  19. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE DELIVERY OF ATMOPHILE ELEMENTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Soko [School of Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics, University of Dundee, DD1 4HN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: s.matsumura@dundee.ac.uk [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-10

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively.

  20. A Study on the Dynamic Mechanism of the Formation of Mesoscale Vortex in Col Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yongqiang; WANG Yuan; HUANG Hong

    2012-01-01

    The mesoscale vortex associated with a mesoscale low-level jet (mLLJ) usually causes heavy rainfall in the col field.The col field is defined as a region between two highs and two lows,with the isobaric surface similar to a col.Using a two-dimensional shallow water model,the meso-β scale vortex couplets (MβVCs)induced by eight types of mesoscale wind perturbations in an ideal col field were numerically simulated.With the sizes of ~100 km,the MβVCs induced by northerly perturbation (NP) and southerly perturbation (SP)moved toward the col point.The sizes of MβVCs induced by southwesterly perturbation (SWP),southeasterly perturbation (SEP),northwesterly perturbation (NWP),and northeasterly perturbation (NEP) were relatively small for the perturbations moving toward dilatation axis.The MβVC induced by easterly perturbation (EP) and westerly perturbation (WP) could not develop because they quickly moved away from the col point,before the circulation could form.The size of the circulation was determined by the distance between the vortex and the col point.The closer to the col point the vortex was,the larger the size of vortex.The comparisons of maximum vorticity and vorticity root mean square error (RMSE) of the NP,the SWP,and the WP show that the maximum vorticity and the vorticity RMSE of the NP decreased slower than other perturbations.Therefore,the weak environment of the col field favors the maintenance of vorticity and the formation of vortex.When a mesoscalc vortex forms near the col point or moves toward the col point,it may maintain a quasi-stationary state in the stable col field.

  1. Formation dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced phase objects in transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermillod-Blondin, A.; Rosenfeld, A.; Stoian, R.; Audouard, E.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers offer the possibility to structure the bulk of transparent materials on a microscale. As a result, the optical properties of the irradiated material are locally modified in a permanent fashion. Depending on the irradiation parameters, different types of laser-induced phase objects can be expected, from uniform voxels (that can exhibit higher or lower refractive index than the bulk) to self-organized nanoplanes. We study the physical mechanisms that lead to material restructuring, with a particular emphasis on events taking place on a sub picosecond to a microsecond timescale following laser excitation. Those timescales are particularly interesting as they correspond to the temporal distances between two consecutive laser pulses when performing multiple pulse irradiation: burst microprocessing usually involves picosecond separation times and high repetition rate systems operate in the MHz range. We employ a time-resolved microscopy technique based on a phase-contrast microscope setup extended into a pump-probe scheme. This methods enables a dynamic observation of the complex refractive index in the interaction region with a time resolution better than 300 fs. In optical transmission mode, the transient absorption coefficient can be measured for different illumination wavelengths (400 nm and 800 nm). The phase-contrast mode provides qualitative information about the real part of the transient refractive index. Based on the study of those transient optical properties, we observe the onset and relaxation of the laser-generated plasma into different channels such as defect creation, sample heating, and shockwave generation. The majority of our experiments were carried out with amorphous silica, but our method can be applied to the study of all transparent media.

  2. Formation and Dynamics of Waves in a Cortical Model of Cholinergic Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Roach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a regulator of neural excitability and one of the neurochemical substrates of sleep. Amongst the cellular effects induced by cholinergic modulation are a reduction in spike-frequency adaptation (SFA and a shift in the phase response curve (PRC. We demonstrate in a biophysical model how changes in neural excitability and network structure interact to create three distinct functional regimes: localized asynchronous, traveling asynchronous, and traveling synchronous. Our results qualitatively match those observed experimentally. Cortical activity during slow wave sleep (SWS differs from that during REM sleep or waking states. During SWS there are traveling patterns of activity in the cortex; in other states stationary patterns occur. Our model is a network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons with a M-current regulated by ACh. Regulation of ACh level can account for dynamical changes between functional regimes. Reduction of the magnitude of this current recreates the reduction in SFA the shift from a type 2 to a type 1 PRC observed in the presence of ACh. When SFA is minimal (in waking or REM sleep state, high ACh patterns of activity are localized and easily pinned by network inhomogeneities. When SFA is present (decreasing ACh, traveling waves of activity naturally arise. A further decrease in ACh leads to a high degree of synchrony within traveling waves. We also show that the level of ACh determines how sensitive network activity is to synaptic heterogeneity. These regimes may have a profound functional significance as stationary patterns may play a role in the proper encoding of external input as memory and traveling waves could lead to synaptic regularization, giving unique insights into the role and significance of ACh in determining patterns of cortical activity and functional differences arising from the patterns.

  3. Eberhard Widmann (Stefan Meyer Institute, Vienna) and Silke Federmann (Ph.D. Student from Vienna in the CERN-Austrian Ph.D. program) together with a microwave cavity developed by Silke at CERN. The cavity will be used for the first time to look for spin-flip transitions of antihydrogen atoms later this year.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Eberhard Widmann (Stefan Meyer Institute, Vienna) and Silke Federmann (Ph.D. Student from Vienna in the CERN-Austrian Ph.D. program) together with a microwave cavity developed by Silke at CERN. The cavity will be used for the first time to look for spin-flip transitions of antihydrogen atoms later this year.

  4. Modeling wood dynamics, jam formation, and sediment storage in a gravel-bed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, B. C.; Hassan, M. A.; Davidson, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In small and intermediate sized streams, the interaction between wood and bed material transport often determines the nature of the physical habitat, which in turn influences the health of the stream's ecosystem. We present a stochastic model that can be used to simulate the effects on physical habitat of forest fires, climate change, and other environmental disturbances that alter wood recruitment. The model predicts large wood (LW) loads in a stream as well as the volume of sediment stored by the wood; while it is parameterized to describe gravel bed streams similar to a well-studied field prototype, Fishtrap Creek, British Columbia, it can be calibrated to other systems as well. In the model, LW pieces are produced and modified over time as a result of random tree-fall, LW breakage, LW movement, and piece interaction to form LW jams. Each LW piece traps a portion of the annual bed material transport entering the reach and releases the stored sediment when the LW piece is entrained and moved. The equations governing sediment storage are based on a set of flume experiments also scaled to the field prototype. The model predicts wood loads ranging from 70 m3/ha to more than 300 m3/ha, with a mean value of 178 m3/ha: both the range and the mean value are consistent with field data from streams with similar riparian forest types and climate. The model also predicts an LW jam spacing that is consistent with field data. Furthermore, our modeling results demonstrate that the high spatial and temporal variability in sediment storage, sediment transport, and channel morphology associated with LW-dominated streams occurs only when LW pieces interact and form jams. Model runs that do not include jam formation are much less variable. These results suggest that river restoration efforts using engineered LW pieces that are fixed in place and not permitted to interact will be less successful at restoring the geomorphic processes responsible for producing diverse, productive

  5. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment pl...

  6. Bacterial selection during the formation of early-stage aerobic granules in wastewater treatment systems operated under wash-out dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment pl...

  7. The growth of disks and bulges during hierarchical galaxy formation. II: metallicity, stellar populations and dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tonini, Chiara; Wyithe, J Stuart B; Croton, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the stellar populations of model galaxies, using the new semi-analytic model presented in Tonini et al. (2016a). This new model follows the angular momentum evolution of gas and stars, providing the base for a new star formation recipe, and treatment of the effects of mergers that depends on the central galaxy dynamical structure. We find that the new recipes have the effect of boosting the efficiency of the baryonic cycle in producing and recycling metals, as well as preventing minor mergers from diluting the metallicity of bulges and ellipticals. The model reproduces the stellar mass - stellar metallicity relation for galaxies above 1e10 solar masses, including Brightest Cluster Galaxies. Model disks, galaxies dominated by instability-driven components, and merger-driven objects each stem from different evolutionary channels. These model galaxies therefore occupy different loci in the galaxy mass - size relation, which we find to be in accord with the Atlas 3D classification...

  8. Presynaptically released Cbln1 induces dynamic axonal structural changes by interacting with GluD2 during cerebellar synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Miura, Eriko; Matsuda, Keiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Okabe, Shigeo

    2012-11-08

    Differentiation of pre- and postsynaptic sites is coordinated by reciprocal interaction across synaptic clefts. At parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses, dendritic spines are autonomously formed without PF influence. However, little is known about how presynaptic structural changes are induced and how they lead to differentiation of mature synapses. Here, we show that Cbln1 released from PFs induces dynamic structural changes in PFs by a mechanism that depends on postsynaptic glutamate receptor delta2 (GluD2) and presynaptic neurexin (Nrx). Time-lapse imaging in organotypic culture and ultrastructural analyses in vivo revealed that Nrx-Cbln1-GluD2 signaling induces PF protrusions that often formed circular structures and encapsulated PC spines. Such structural changes in PFs were associated with the accumulation of synaptic vesicles and GluD2, leading to formation of mature synapses. Thus, PF protrusions triggered by Nrx-Cbln1-GluD2 signaling may promote bidirectional maturation of PF-PC synapses by a positive feedback mechanism.

  9. Exploration of fluid dynamic indicators/causative factors in the formation of tower structures in staphylococci bacteria bio-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Derek, Moormeier; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria form biofilms with distinct structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the body. As such, staph infections represent one of the greatest threats to post-surgery patients. It has been found that flow conditions play a significant role in the developmental and dispersal activity of a biofilm. The coupling between the growing biofilm and surrounding flow, however, is not well understood. Indeed, little is know why bacteria form tower structures under certain conditions but not in a predictable way. μ-PTV measurements were made in a microchannel to try to identify fluid dynamic indicators for the formation of towers in biofilm growth. Preliminary experiments indicated changes in the near wall flow up to five hours before a tower formed. The reason for that is the target of this investigation. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were cultured in the Bioflux Fluxion channel and subjected to a steady shear rate of 0.5 dynes. In addition to μ-PTV measurement, nuclease production and cell number density counts were observed prior to and during tower development. These were compared against measurements made under the same nominal flow conditions where a tower did not form.

  10. Dynamic changes in neurexins' alternative splicing: role of Rho-associated protein kinases and relevance to memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Rozic

    Full Text Available The three neurexins genes (NRXN1/2/3 encode polymorphic synaptic membrane proteins that are involved in cognitive functioning. Neurexins' selectivity of function is presumably conferred through differential use of 2 promoters and 5 alternative splicing sites (SS#1/2/3/4/5. In day-old rat brain neurons grown in culture, activation (depolarization induces reversible, calcium dependent, repression of NRXN2α SS#3 insert. The effects of depolarization on NRXN1/2/3α splicing and biochemical pathways mediating them were further studied in these neurons. NRXN1/2/3α splicing in the course of memory formation in vivo was also explored, using fear conditioning paradigm in rats in which the animals were trained to associate an aversive stimulus (electrical shock with a neutral context (a tone, resulting in the expression of fear responses to the neutral context.In the cultured neurons depolarization induced, beside NRXN2α SS#3, repression of SS#3 and SS#4 exons in NRXN3α but not NRXN1α. The repressions were mediated by the calcium/protein kinase C/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK pathway. Fear conditioning induced significant and transient repressions of the NRXN1/2/3α SS#4 exons in the rat hippocampus. ROCK inhibition prior to training attenuated the behavioral fear response, the NRXN1/2/3α splicing repressions and subsequent recovery and the levels of excitatory (PSD95 and inhibitory (gephyrin synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. No such effects were observed in the prefrontal cortex. Significant correlations existed between the fear response and hippocampal NRXN3α and NRXN2α SS#4 inserts as well as PSD95 protein levels. Hippocampal NRXN1α SS#4 insert and gephyrin levels did not correlate with the behavioral response but were negatively correlated with each other.These results show for the first time dynamic, experience related changes in NRXN1/2/3α alternative splicing in the rat brain and a role for ROCK in them. Specific neurexins

  11. How primordial is the structure of comet 67P?. Combined collisional and dynamical models suggest a late formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzi, M.; Benz, W.; Toliou, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Brasser, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. There is an active debate about whether the properties of comets as observed today are primordial or, alternatively, if they are a result of collisional evolution or other processes. Aims: We investigate the effects of collisions on a comet with a structure like 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). We develop scaling laws for the critical specific impact energies Qreshape required for a significant shape alteration. These are then used in simulations of the combined dynamical and collisional evolution of comets in order to study the survival probability of a primordially formed object with a shape like 67P. Although the focus of this work is on a structure of this kind, the analysis is also performed for more generic bi-lobe shapes, for which we define the critical specific energy Qbil. The simulation outcomes are also analyzed in terms of impact heating and the evolution of the porosity. Methods: The effects of impacts on comet 67P are studied using a state-of-the-art smooth particle hydrodynamics shock physics code. In the 3D simulations, a publicly available shape model of 67P is applied and a range of impact conditions and material properties are investigated. The resulting critical specific impact energy Qreshape (as well as Qbil for generic bi-lobe shapes) defines a minimal projectile size which is used to compute the number of shape-changing collisions in a set of dynamical simulations. These simulations follow the dispersion of the trans-Neptunian disk during the giant planet instability, the formation of a scattered disk, and produce 87 objects that penetrate into the inner solar system with orbits consistent with the observed JFC population. The collisional evolution before the giant planet instability is not considered here. Hence, our study is conservative in its estimation of the number of collisions. Results: We find that in any scenario considered here, comet 67P would have experienced a significant number of shape-changing collisions, if it

  12. Formation, characterization, and flow dynamics of nanostructure modified sensitive and selective gas sensors based on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Serdar

    Nanopore covered microporous silicon interfaces have been formed via an electrochemical etch for gas sensor applications. Rapid reversible and sensitive gas sensors have been fabricated. Both top-down and bottom-up approaches are utilized in the process. A nano-pore coated micro-porous silicon surface is modified selectively for sub-ppm detection of NH3, PH3 , NO, H2S, SO2. The selective depositions include electrolessly generated SnO2, CuxO, Au xO, NiO, and nanoparticles such as TiO2, MgO doped TiO 2, Al2O3, and ZrO2. Flow dynamics are analyzed via numerical simulations and response data. An array of sensors is formed to analyze mixed gas response. A general coating selection method for chemical sensors is established via an extrapolation on the inverse of the Hard-Soft Acid-Base concept. In Chapter 1, the current state of the porous silicon gas sensor research is reviewed. Since metal oxide thin films, and, recently, nanowires are dominantly used for sensing application, the general properties of metal oxides are also discussed in this chapter. This chapter is concluded with a discussion about commercial gas sensors and the advantages of using porous silicon as a sensing material. The PS review discussed at the beginning of this chapter is an overview of the following publication: (1) "The Potential of Porous Silicon Gas Sensors", Serdar Ozdemir, James L. Gole, Current Opinion in Solid State and Materials Science, 11, 92-100 (2007). In Chapter 2, porous silicon formation is explained in detail. Interesting results of various silicon anodization experiments are discussed. In the second part of this chapter, the microfabrication process of porous silicon conductometric gas sensors and gas testing set up are briefly introduced. In chapter 3, metal oxide nanoparticle/nanocluster formation and characterization experiments via SEM and XPS analysis are discussed. Chapter 4 is an overview of the test results for various concentrations NH3, NO, NO2 and PH3. The

  13. Investigating and Modeling the Thermo-dynamic Impact of Electrolyte Solutions of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate on Prevention of the Formation of Methane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manteghian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Devising methods to prevent hydrate formation is of the important issues in natural gas industry. Since a great deal of money is annually spent on using hydrate inhibitors, identification of new inhibitors with higher degrees of efficacy is economically justifiable. Bearing in mind the significant role of hydrate inhibitors in prevention of natural gas pipelines’ getting blocked, the present study attempts to investigate two compounds of NaCl and Na2SO4 as inhibitors of hydrate methane’s formation so as to respond to “what is the inhibitive thermo-dynamic impact of electrolyte compounds of NaCl and Na2SO4 on the formation of methane hydrate?” To do so, this study not only measures the equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate formation in the presence of electrolyte solutions of NaCl and Na2SO4 and compares the results obtained with the state lacking such inhibitors, but it also assesses the regression and mathematical modeling are utilized within a basic virtual environment in order to propose a model for prediction of thermo-dynamic equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate formation.

  14. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K; Persson, Kristin A

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg(2+) → Mg(+)), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI(-) exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg(+). In contrast, BH4(-) and BF4(-) are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  15. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  16. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Sëma

    2015-05-14

    Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software is publicly

  17. Intragastric formation and modulation of N-nitrosodimethylamine in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model under human physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Zeilmaker, M.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Havenaar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposure to carcinogenic N-alkylnitrosamines can occur exogenously via food consumption or endogenously by formation of these compounds through nitrosation of amine precursors. Information on the intragastric formation of NDMA from complex mixtures of precursors and inhibitors in humans is not

  18. A model for landscape development in terms of shoreline displacement, sediment dynamics, lake formation, and lake choke-up processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brydsten, Lars [Umeaa University, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    This project expands on the study 'A mathematical model for lake ontogeny in terms of filling with sediments and macrophyte vegetation' published in SKB TR-04-09. As the title suggests, this older model focuses on lakes (existing and future lakes). This newer study extends the model to examine progress of terrestrial objects such as mires or arable land. Furthermore, this newer model could simulate progress of the areas close to the objects. These areas are divided according to their watershed boundaries. If two or more objects are situated along the same brook, the lower situated area is defined as its catchments minus the catchments of the closest higher situated object. The model encourages the study of an object situated in the sea from the time of deglaciation (c. 10,000 BP) to the time for the object due to positive shore displacement is situated on land or that a lake object has progressed to a wetland, however not longer than 18,000 AP. The model focuses on the object and its location in 100-year steps. The model is written in VisualBasic and is divided into two modules, a marine module and a lake module. The marine module deals with shoreline displacement, erosion and accumulation of postglacial fine-grained sediments and erosion of glacial clay. Inputs to the marine module are a digital elevation model (DEM), a digital map showing the extension of the objects and a marine quaternary map. The two maps are in raster formats with exactly the same formats (extension and cell sizes) as the DEM. For each time step the water depths at each pixel are calculated using a shore displacement equation. Next, the water depth changes due to sediment dynamics are calculated using the following rules; accumulation of fine-grained sediments are allowed if the pixel is situated within a future lake object; erosion of fine-grained sediment is allowed if the pixel is not within a future lake object and the marine quaternary map shows occurrence of postglacial

  19. A model for landscape development in terms of shoreline displacement, sediment dynamics, lake formation, and lake choke-up processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brydsten, Lars [Umeaa University, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    This project expands on the study 'A mathematical model for lake ontogeny in terms of filling with sediments and macrophyte vegetation' published in SKB TR-04-09. As the title suggests, this older model focuses on lakes (existing and future lakes). This newer study extends the model to examine progress of terrestrial objects such as mires or arable land. Furthermore, this newer model could simulate progress of the areas close to the objects. These areas are divided according to their watershed boundaries. If two or more objects are situated along the same brook, the lower situated area is defined as its catchments minus the catchments of the closest higher situated object. The model encourages the study of an object situated in the sea from the time of deglaciation (c. 10,000 BP) to the time for the object due to positive shore displacement is situated on land or that a lake object has progressed to a wetland, however not longer than 18,000 AP. The model focuses on the object and its location in 100-year steps. The model is written in VisualBasic and is divided into two modules, a marine module and a lake module. The marine module deals with shoreline displacement, erosion and accumulation of postglacial fine-grained sediments and erosion of glacial clay. Inputs to the marine module are a digital elevation model (DEM), a digital map showing the extension of the objects and a marine quaternary map. The two maps are in raster formats with exactly the same formats (extension and cell sizes) as the DEM. For each time step the water depths at each pixel are calculated using a shore displacement equation. Next, the water depth changes due to sediment dynamics are calculated using the following rules; accumulation of fine-grained sediments are allowed if the pixel is situated within a future lake object; erosion of fine-grained sediment is allowed if the pixel is not within a future lake object and the marine quaternary map shows occurrence of postglacial

  20. Putting the brakes on antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Researchers at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva have now made the first slow-moving atoms of antimatter. By studying them, scientists may more closely compare matter and antimatter and possibly explain the latter's glaring absence" (1/2 page).

  1. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  2. EF-Tu dynamics during pre-translocation complex formation: EF-Tu·GDP exits the ribosome via two different pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Chunlai; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Knudsen, Charlotte R; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2015-10-30

    The G-protein EF-Tu, which undergoes a major conformational change when EF-Tu·GTP is converted to EF-Tu·GDP, forms part of an aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) that accelerates the binding of aa-tRNA to the ribosome during peptide elongation. Such binding, placing a portion of EF-Tu in contact with the GTPase Associated Center (GAC), is followed by GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and results in formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Although tRNA movement through the ribosome during PRE complex formation has been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of EF-Tu interaction with either the ribosome or aa-tRNA. Here we examine these dynamics, utilizing ensemble and single molecule assays employing fluorescent labeled derivatives of EF-Tu, tRNA, and the ribosome to measure changes in either FRET efficiency or fluorescence intensity during PRE complex formation. Our results indicate that ribosome-bound EF-Tu separates from the GAC prior to its full separation from aa-tRNA, and suggest that EF-Tu·GDP dissociates from the ribosome by two different pathways. These pathways correspond to either reversible EF-Tu·GDP dissociation from the ribosome prior to the major conformational change in EF-Tu that follows GTP hydrolysis, or irreversible dissociation after or concomitant with this conformational change.

  3. Dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon femtosecond two-color double-pulse irradiation of metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und –prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Bonse, J., E-mail: joern.bonse@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und –prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LIPSS formation on Fused Silica, Silicon, and Titanium is studied upon parallel and cross-polarized two-color (400 and 800 nm) double-fs-pulse irradiation. • LIPSS orientation on Fused Silica follows the polarization of the first pulse. • LIPSS formation on Silicon and Titanium can be explained by a plasmonic model. - Abstract: In order to address the dynamics and physical mechanisms of LIPSS formation for three different classes of materials (metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics), two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on Titanium, Silicon and Fused Silica. For that purpose a Mach–Zehnder interferometer generated polarization controlled (parallel or cross-polarized) double-pulse sequences at 400 nm and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds. Multiple of these two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample surfaces. The fluence of each individual pulse (400 nm and 800 nm) was always kept below its respective ablation threshold and only the joint action of both pulses lead to the formation of LIPSS. Their resulting characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The periods along with the LIPSS orientation allow a clear identification of the pulse which dominates the energy coupling to the material. For strong absorbing materials (Silicon, Titanium), a wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism can explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. In contrast, for dielectrics (Fused Silica) the first pulse always dominates the energy deposition and LIPSS orientation, supporting a non-plasmonic formation scenario. For all materials, these two-color experiments confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition stage for LIPSS formation.

  4. Dynamic mineral clouds on HD 189733b I. 3D RHD with kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, G; Helling, Ch; Bognar, K; Woitke, P

    2016-01-01

    3D modelling of cloud formation in atmospheres of extrasolar planets coupled to the atmospheric radiative, hydrodynamic and thermo-chemical properties has long been an open challenge. We present a 3D radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) atmosphere model of HD 189733b fully coupled to a kinetic, microphysical mineral cloud formation model. We include the feedback effects of cloud advection and settling, gas phase element advection and depletion/replenishment and include the radiative effects of cloud and gas opacity. The 3D Navier-Stokes equations are solved consistently with a two-stream radiative transfer scheme coupled with the cloud moment conservation equations. We model the cloud particles as a mix of mineral materials which change in size and composition as they travel through atmospheric thermo-chemical environments. The local cloud properties such as number density, grain size and material composition are time-dependently calculated. Gas phase element depletion as a result of cloud formation are calculated an...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation, growth and bursting of bubbles in tungsten exposed to high fluxes of low energy deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shengguang, E-mail: sgliu@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dai, Shuyu; Sang, Chaofeng [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Sun, Jizhong, E-mail: jsun@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Stirner, Thomas [University of Applied Sciences Deggendorf, Edlmairstr. 6+8, D-94469 Deggendorf (Germany); Wang, Dezhen [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to investigate the formation, growth and bursting of bubbles in tungsten exposed to the irradiation of an extremely high deuterium flux. It is found that the bubbles form in the region near the location of the implanted ion distribution peaks, and that the effect of the substrate temperature on the bubble formation depth is negligible; it is also found that the percentage of deuterium that is found in D{sub 2} molecules increases as the bubble grows, and that the evolution of the bubble’s internal pressure is strongly associated with the properties of its surrounding structure. The simulations display the development of a dome-shaped structure at the tungsten surface during the bubble growth. The merging of two deuterium bubbles is also observed. The present simulations also show that the bubble bursts by generating a partially opened lid, which has already been observed in previous independent experiments.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation, growth and bursting of bubbles in tungsten exposed to high fluxes of low energy deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengguang; Dai, Shuyu; Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Stirner, Thomas; Wang, Dezhen

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to investigate the formation, growth and bursting of bubbles in tungsten exposed to the irradiation of an extremely high deuterium flux. It is found that the bubbles form in the region near the location of the implanted ion distribution peaks, and that the effect of the substrate temperature on the bubble formation depth is negligible; it is also found that the percentage of deuterium that is found in D2 molecules increases as the bubble grows, and that the evolution of the bubble's internal pressure is strongly associated with the properties of its surrounding structure. The simulations display the development of a dome-shaped structure at the tungsten surface during the bubble growth. The merging of two deuterium bubbles is also observed. The present simulations also show that the bubble bursts by generating a partially opened lid, which has already been observed in previous independent experiments.

  7. Kiloparsec-Scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies II. Structure and Dynamics of Filaments and Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, Michael J; Van Loo, Sven

    2014-01-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating dense gas in a galactic disk, exploring scales ranging from 1 kpc down to $\\sim 0.1$~pc. Our primary goal is to understand how dense filaments form in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). These structures, often observed as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) in the Galactic plane, are thought to be the precursors to massive stars and star clusters, so their formation may be the rate limiting step controlling global star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Our study follows on from Van Loo et al. (2013, Paper I), which carried out simulations to 0.5~pc resolution and examined global aspects of the formation of dense gas clumps and the resulting star formation rate. Here, using our higher resolution, we examine the detailed structural, kinematic and dynamical properties of dense filaments and clumps, including mass surface density ($\\Sigma$) probability distribution functions, filament mass per unit length and its disper...

  8. Dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon femtosecond two-color double-pulse irradiation of metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2016-06-01

    In order to address the dynamics and physical mechanisms of LIPSS formation for three different classes of materials (metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics), two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on Titanium, Silicon and Fused Silica. For that purpose a Mach-Zehnder interferometer generated polarization controlled (parallel or cross-polarized) double-pulse sequences at 400 nm and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds. Multiple of these two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample surfaces. The fluence of each individual pulse (400 nm and 800 nm) was always kept below its respective ablation threshold and only the joint action of both pulses lead to the formation of LIPSS. Their resulting characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The periods along with the LIPSS orientation allow a clear identification of the pulse which dominates the energy coupling to the material. For strong absorbing materials (Silicon, Titanium), a wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism can explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. In contrast, for dielectrics (Fused Silica) the first pulse always dominates the energy deposition and LIPSS orientation, supporting a non-plasmonic formation scenario. For all materials, these two-color experiments confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition stage for LIPSS formation.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the combustion process, emission formation and the flow field in an in-direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barzegar Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the combustion process and emission formation in the Lister 8.1 I.D.I Diesel engine have been investigated using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code. The utilized model includes detailed spray atomization, mixture formation and distribution model which enable modeling the combustion process in spray/wall and spray/swirl interactions along with flow configurations. The analysis considers both part load and full load states. The global properties are presented separately resolved for the swirl chamber (pre-chamber and the main chamber. The results of model verify the fact that the equal amount of the fuel is burned in the main and pre-chamber at full load state while at part load the majority of the fuel is burned in the main chamber. Also, it is shown that the adherence of fuel spray on the pre-chamber walls is due to formation of a stagnation zone which prevents quick spray evaporation and plays an important role in the increase of soot mass fractions at this zone at full load conditions. The simulation results, such as the mean in-cylinder pressure, heat release rate and exhaust emissions are compared with the experimental data and show good agreement. This work also demonstrates the usefulness of multidimensional modeling for complex chamber geometries, such as in I.D.I Diesel engines, to gain more insight into the flow field, combustion process and emission formation.

  10. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF FILLED AND EMPTY CAGE-LIKE WATER CLUSTERS IN LIQUID WATER AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE TO GAS HYDRATE FORMATION MECHANISMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Guangjun; ZHANG Yigang; ZHAO Yajuan

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to observe the evolutions of 512 and 51262 cage-like water clusters filled with or without a methane molecule immersed in bulk liquid water at 250 K and 230 K. The lifetimes of these clusters are calculated according to their Lindemann index δ (t) using the criteria of δ≥0.07. For both the filled and empty clusters, we find the dynamics of bulk water determines the lifetimes of cage-like water clusters, and that the lifetime of 512 62 cage-like cluster is the same as that of 512 cage-like cluster. Although the methane molecule indeed makes the filled cage-like cluster more stable than the empty one, the empty cage-like cluster still has chance to be long-lived compared with the filled clusters. These observations support the labile cluster hypothesis on the formation mechanisms of gas hydrates.

  11. A visualization of threading dislocations formation and dynamics in mosaic growth of GaN-based light emitting diode epitaxial layers on (0001) sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravadgar, P.; Horng, R. H.; Ou, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    A clear visualization of the origin and characteristics of threading dislocations (TDs) of GaN-based light emitting diode epitaxial layers on (0001) sapphire substrates have been carried out. Special experimental set up and chemical etchant along with field emission scanning electron microscopy are employed to study the dynamics of GaN TDs at different growth stages. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis visualized the formation of edge TDs is arising from extension of coalescences at boundaries of different tilting-twining nucleation grains "mosaic growth." Etch pits as representatives of edge TDs are in agreement with previous theoretical models and analyses of TDs core position and characteristics.

  12. A dynamical formation control approach based on artificial moments%一种基于人工力矩的动态队形控制方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐望宝; 陈雪波

    2009-01-01

    First, the optimal correspondence of distance is defined for robots' corresponding vertexes. For its determi-nation, we give an elimination method, including the model, the principle and the steps of operation. Next, two new types of artificial moments are defined, based on which the robots' motion controllers are designed to make robots avoid various obstacles and keep in a desired formation. Thus, a general approach for dynamical formation control is developed which not only makes robots dynamically realize the desired formations, but also minimizes the time for the process of formation by optimizing robots' corresponding vertexes. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.%本文首先定义了距离最优对应.给出了求距离最优对应的方法一淘汰法的模型、原理和详细步骤.从而得到了一种确定各机器人对应节点的较优准则.然后为了使机器人在运动过程中,既能避开各种障碍,又能最终得到目标队形,定义了两种新人工力矩.并基于人工力矩为各种机器人分别设计了运动控制器.最后基于上述成果.提出了一种一般性的动态队形控制方法.该方法不但能动态地控制机器人队形,且由于优化了机器人的对应节点,所以优化了队形的形成时间.仿真结果表明该方法是可行且有效的.

  13. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  14. Chromatin dynamics during cell cycle mediate conversion of DNA damage into chromatid breaks and affect formation of chromosomal aberrations: Biological and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I.; Hatzi, Vasiliki I. [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece); Donta-Bakoyianni, Catherine [Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, University of Athens Dental School, Athens (Greece); Pantelias, Gabriel E., E-mail: gabriel@ipta.demokritos.gr [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , 15310 Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Athens (Greece)

    2011-06-03

    The formation of diverse chromosomal aberrations following irradiation and the variability in radiosensitivity at different cell-cycle stages remain a long standing controversy, probably because most of the studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved using simple DNA substrates. Yet, recognition, processing and repair of DNA damage occur within the nucleoprotein complex of chromatin which is dynamic in nature, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding. The present work reviews experimental work designed to investigate the impact of chromatin dynamics and chromosome conformation changes during cell-cycle in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Using conventional cytogenetics and premature chromosome condensation to visualize interphase chromatin, the data presented support the hypothesis that chromatin dynamic changes during cell-cycle are important determinants in the conversion of sub-microscopic DNA lesions into chromatid breaks. Consequently, the type and yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at a given cell-cycle-stage depends on the combined effect of DNA repair processes and chromatin dynamics, which is cell-cycle-regulated and subject to up- or down-regulation following radiation exposure or genetic alterations. This new hypothesis is used to explain the variability in radiosensitivity observed at various cell-cycle-stages, among mutant cells and cells of different origin, or among different individuals, and to revisit unresolved issues and unanswered questions. In addition, it is used to better understand hypersensitivity of AT cells and to provide an improved predictive G2-assay for evaluating radiosensitivity at individual level. Finally, experimental data at single cell level obtained using hybrid cells suggest that the proposed hypothesis applies only to the irradiated component of the hybrid.

  15. The ATLAS3D Project - XXVIII. Dynamically-driven star formation suppression in early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Timothy A; Crocker, Alison F; Bureau, Martin; Blitz, Leo; Alatalo, Katherine; Emsellem, Eric; Naab, Thorsten; Bayet, Estelle; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) in the early-type galaxies (ETGs) of the ATLAS3D sample, based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 22um and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-ultraviolet emission. We combine these with gas masses estimated from 12CO and HI data in order to investigate the star formation efficiency (SFE) in a larger sample of ETGs than previously available. We first recalibrate (based on WISE data) the relation between old stellar populations (traced at Ks-band) and 22um luminosity, allowing us to remove the contribution of 22um emission from circumstellar dust. We then go on to investigate the position of ETGs on the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation. Molecular gas-rich ETGs have comparable star formation surface densities to normal spiral galaxy centres, but they lie systematically offset from the KS relation, having lower star formation efficiencies by a factor of ~2.5 (in agreement with other authors). This effect is driven by galaxies where a substantia...

  16. Formation and removal of apical vapor lock during syringe irrigation : a combined experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Kastrinakis, E.; Lambrianidis, T.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim(i) To evaluate the effect of needle type and insertion depth, root canal size and irrigant flow rate on the entrapment of air bubbles in the apical part of a root canal (apical vapor lock) during syringe irrigation using experiments and a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model, (ii) to investi

  17. Formation and removal of apical vapor lock during syringe irrigation: a combined experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Kastrinakis, E.; Lambrianidis, T.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim (i) To evaluate the effect of needle type and insertion depth, root canal size and irrigant flow rate on the entrapment of air bubbles in the apical part of a root canal (apical vapor lock) during syringe irrigation using experiments and a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model, (ii) to invest

  18. Continuum dynamics of the formation, migration and dissociation of self-locked dislocation structures on parallel slip planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yichao; Niu, Xiaohua; Xiang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    In continuum models of dislocations, proper formulations of short-range elastic interactions of dislocations are crucial for capturing various types of dislocation patterns formed in crystalline materials. In this article, the continuum dynamics of straight dislocations distributed on two parallel slip planes is modelled through upscaling the underlying discrete dislocation dynamics. Two continuum velocity field quantities are introduced to facilitate the discrete-to-continuum transition. The first one is the local migration velocity of dislocation ensembles which is found fully independent of the short-range dislocation correlations. The second one is the decoupling velocity of dislocation pairs controlled by a threshold stress value, which is proposed to be the effective flow stress for single slip systems. Compared to the almost ubiquitously adopted Taylor relationship, the derived flow stress formula exhibits two features that are more consistent with the underlying discrete dislocation dynamics: (i) the flow stress increases with the in-plane component of the dislocation density only up to a certain value, hence the derived formula admits a minimum inter-dislocation distance within slip planes; (ii) the flow stress smoothly transits to zero when all dislocations become geometrically necessary dislocations. A regime under which inhomogeneities in dislocation density grow is identified, and is further validated through comparison with discrete dislocation dynamical simulation results. Based on the findings in this article and in our previous works, a general strategy for incorporating short-range dislocation correlations into continuum models of dislocations is proposed.

  19. Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates from Seawater in Consolidated Sand: Mimicking Methane Hydrate Dynamics beneath the Seafloor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad B. Kerkar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Methane hydrate formation and dissociation kinetics were investigated in seawater-saturated consolidated Ottawa sand-pack under sub-seafloor conditions to study the influence of effective pressure on formation and dissociation kinetics. To simulate a sub-seafloor environment, the pore-pressure was varied relative to confining pressure in successive experiments. Hydrate formation was achieved by methane charging followed by sediment cooling. The formation of hydrates was delayed with increasing degree of consolidation. Hydrate dissociation by step-wise depressurization was instantaneous, emanating preferentially from the interior of the sand-pack. Pressure drops during dissociation and in situ temperature controlled the degree of endothermic cooling within sediments. In a closed system, the post-depressurization dissociation was succeeded by thermally induced dissociation and pressure-temperature conditions followed theoretical methane-seawater equilibrium conditions and exhibited excess pore pressure governed by the pore diameter. These post-depressurization equilibrium values for the methane hydrates in seawater saturated consolidated sand-pack were used to estimate the enthalpy of dissociation of 55.83 ± 1.41 kJ/mol. These values were found to be lower than those reported in earlier literature for bulk hydrates from seawater (58.84 kJ/mol and pure water (62.61 kJ/mol due to excess pore pressure generated within confined sediment system under investigation. However, these observations could be significant in the case of hydrate dissociation in a subseafloor environment where dissociation due to depressurization could result in an instantaneous methane release followed by slow thermally induced dissociation. The excess pore pressure generated during hydrate dissociation could be higher within fine-grained sediments with faults and barriers present in subseafloor settings which could cause shifting in geological layers.

  20. Transcript Accumulation Dynamics of Phenylpropanoid Pathway Genes in the Maturing Xylem and Phloem of Picea abies during Latewood Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Emiliani; Maria Laura Traversi; Monica Anichini; Guido Giachi; Aiessio Giovannelli

    2011-01-01

    In temperate regions,latewood is produced when cambial activity declines with the approach of autumnal dormancy.The understanding of the temporal (cambium activity vs dormancy) and spatial (phloem,cambial region,maturing xylem) regulation of key genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway during latewood formation represents a crucial step towards providing new insights into the molecular basis of xylogenesis.In this study,the temporal pattern of transcript accumulation of 12 phenylpropanoid genes (PAL1,C4H3I5,C4H4,4CL3,4CL4,HCT1,C3H3,CCoAOMT1,COMT2,COMT5,CCR2) was analyzed in maturing xylem and phloem of Picea abies during latewood formation.Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed a well-defined RNA accumulation pattern of genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway during latewood formation.Differences in the RNA accumulation patterns were detected between the different tissue types analyzed.The results obtained here demonstrated that the molecular processes involved in monolignol biosynthesis are not restricted to the cambial activity timeframe but continued after the end of cambium cell proliferation.Furthermore,since it has been shown that lignification of maturing xylem takes place in late autumn,we argue on the basis of our data that phloem could play a key role in the monolignol biosynthesis process.