WorldWideScience

Sample records for antigens

  1. Histocompatibility antigen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common in certain autoimmune diseases . For example, HLA-B27 antigen is found in many people (but not ... More Ankylosing spondylitis Autoimmune disorders Bone marrow transplant HLA-B27 antigen Kidney transplant Reactive arthritis Update Date 2/ ...

  2. Murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den; Joosten, L.A.B.; Lent, P.L.E.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Antigen induced arthritis is a unilateral T-cell driven model caused by direct injection of an antigen into the knee joint of a FCA preimmunized animal. The chronicity is determined by antigen retention in avascular structures of the joint through charge mediated binding or antibody mediated trappin

  3. Carcino-Embryonic Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour marker analysis has increased our understanding of the presence of tumours in the body. Carcino-embryonic antigen, CEA, is one of the best studied tumour markers and has proved an ideal diagnostic adjuvant. It has helped in quantifying the amount of disease present in a patient and thence to make accurate prognosis on the various diagnosed ailments. At UCH, it is observed that there is an increase in cancer related ailments and therefore the need for early diagnosis is more compelling in our environment to mitigate future cost of managing advanced manifestation

  4. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  5. Human leucocyte antigens in tympanosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, G; Acar, A; Turgay, M; Calgüner, M

    1997-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between certain HLA antigens and tympanosclerosis. The serum concentrations of HLA antigens were measured by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique in patients with tympanosclerosis and compared with a healthy control group. The serum levels of HLA-B35 and -DR3 were significantly higher in the patients with tympanosclerosis. This result suggests that certain types of HLA antigens may play an important role as an indicator or mediator in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:9088683

  6. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  7. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  8. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  9. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  10. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  11. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    /testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...

  12. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  13. Genome Scale Identification of Treponema pallidum Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    McKevitt, Matthew; Brinkman, Mary Beth; McLoughlin, Melanie; Perez, Carla; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Antibody responses for 882 of the 1,039 proteins in the proteome of Treponema pallidum were examined. Sera collected from infected rabbits were used to systematically identify 106 antigenic proteins, including 22 previously identified antigens and 84 novel antigens. Additionally, sera collected from rabbits throughout the course of infection demonstrated a progression in the breadth and intensity of humoral immunoreactivity against a representative panel of T. pallidum antigens.

  14. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  15. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Michaela; Duffy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite that causes most malaria-associated morbidity and mortality in humans with over 500,000 deaths annually. The disease symptoms are associated with repeated cycles of invasion and asexual multiplication inside red blood cells of the parasite. Partial, non-sterile immunity to P. falciparum malaria develops only after repeated infections and continuous exposure. The successful evasion of the human immune system relies on the large repertoire of antigenically diverse parasite proteins displayed on the red blood cell surface and on the merozoite membrane where they are exposed to the human immune system. Expression switching of these polymorphic proteins between asexual parasite generations provides an efficient mechanism to adapt to the changing environment in the host and to maintain chronic infection. This chapter discusses antigenic diversity and variation in the malaria parasite and our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that direct the expression of these proteins. PMID:26537377

  16. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  17. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  18. Antigen Incorporation on Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Entrala Emilio; Sbihi Younes; Sánchez-Moreno Manuel; Mascaró Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are the infective stages responsible for transmission and survival of the organism in the environment. In the present work we show that the oocyst wall, far from being a static structure, is able to incorporate antigens by a mechanism involving vesicle fusion with the wall, and the incorporation of the antigen to the outer oocyst wall. Using immunoelectron microscopy we show that the antigen recognized by a monoclonal antibody used for diagnosis of cryptosporidi...

  19. Histocompatibility antigens in coal miners with pneumoconiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Soutar, C A; Coutts, I.; Parkes, W R; Dodi, I. A.; Gauld, S; Castro, J E; Turner-Warwick, M

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five histocompatibility antigens have been measured in 100 coal miners with pneumoconiosis attending a pneumoconiosis medical panel and the results compared with a panel of 200 normal volunteers not exposed to dust. Chest radiographs were read independently by three readers according to the ILO U/C classification. On a combined score, 40 men were thought to have simple pneumoconiosis and 60 men complicated pneumoconiosis. The number of antigens tested and associations between antigens ...

  20. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Cai

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses and reference antisera (antibodies. Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS. In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses, we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  1. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  2. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination agains

  3. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  4. Further characterization of filarial antigens by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Dissanayake, S.; Galahitiyawa, S. C.; Ismail, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of an antigen isolated from sera of Wuchereria bancrofti-infected patients and Setaria digitata antigen SD2-4 is reported. Both antigens showed carbohydrate (glycoprotein) staining. The W. bancrofti antigen had an apparent relative molecular mass of 35 000 while the S. digitata antigen SD2-4 migrated at the marker dye position on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SDS treatment of these antigens did not abolish the precipita...

  5. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens. PMID:26676305

  6. Antigen incorporation on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entrala Emilio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are the infective stages responsible for transmission and survival of the organism in the environment. In the present work we show that the oocyst wall, far from being a static structure, is able to incorporate antigens by a mechanism involving vesicle fusion with the wall, and the incorporation of the antigen to the outer oocyst wall. Using immunoelectron microscopy we show that the antigen recognized by a monoclonal antibody used for diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis (Merifluor®, Meridian Diagnostic Inc. could be found associated with vesicles in the space between the sporozoites and the oocysts wall, and incorporated to the outer oocyst wall by an unknown mechanism.

  7. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... PSA testing is an important tool for detecting prostate cancer, but it is not foolproof. Other conditions can cause a rise in PSA, including: A larger prostate ...

  8. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  9. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  10. Characterization of an antigenically distinct porcine rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, J C; Clarke, I. N.; McCrae, M A

    1982-01-01

    A porcine virus with rotavirus morphology, which was antigenically unrelated to previously described rotaviruses, is described. Particles with an outer capsid layer measured 75 nm and those lacking the outer layer were 63 nm in diameter. Particles which resembled cores were also identified. The virus was shown to be antigenically distinct from other rotaviruses as judged by immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy, and it failed to protect piglets from challenge with porcine rotaviru...

  11. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  12. Tresyl-based conjugation of protein antigen to lipid nanoparticles increases antigen immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-11-30

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  13. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  14. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. PMID:26872546

  15. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbase-DeLima, M; Pereira-Santos, A; Sesso, R; Temin, J; Aragão, E S; Ajzen, H

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin) with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P < 0.05). In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease. PMID:9698788

  16. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  17. Properties of glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts in antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, William; Smith, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Presentation of antigen to T cells represents one of the central events in the engagement of the immune system toward the defense of the host against pathogens. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms by which antigen presentation occurs is critical toward our understanding the properties of host defense against foreign antigen, as well as insight into other features of the immune system, such as autoimmune disease. The entire antigen-presentation event is complex, and many features of it remain poorly understood. However, recent studies have provided evidence showing that glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts are important for efficient antigen presentation; the studies suggest that one such function of rafts is trafficking of antigen-MHC II complexes to the presentation site on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. Here, we present a critical discussion of rafts and their proposed functions in antigen presentation. Emerging topics of rafts and antigen presentation that warrant further investigation are also highlighted.

  18. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  19. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  20. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  1. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  2. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  3. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  4. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    OpenAIRE

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A. P.; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment.

  5. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  6. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  7. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  8. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Katzelnick (Leah); J.M. Fonville (Judith); G.D. Gromowski (Gregory D.); J.B. Arriaga (Jose Bustos); A. Green (Angela); S.L. James (Sarah ); L. Lau (Louis); M. Montoya (Magelda); C. Wang (Chunling); L.A. Van Blargan (Laura A.); C.A. Russell (Colin); H.M. Thu (Hlaing Myat); T.C. Pierson (Theodore C.); P. Buchy (Philippe); J.G. Aaskov (John G.); J.L. Muñoz-Jordán (Jorge L.); N. Vasilakis (Nikos); R.V. Gibbons (Robert V.); R.B. Tesh (Robert B.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Durbin (Anna); C.P. Simmons (Cameron P.); E.C. Holmes (Edward C.); E. Harris (Eva); S.S. Whitehead (Stephen S.); D.R. Smith (Derek Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution.We scharacterized antigenic diversity

  9. Comparison of E and NS1 antigens capture ELISA to detect dengue viral antigens from mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day-Yu Chao

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: With the future potential of antigen capture ELISA to be used in the resource deprived regions, the study showed that E-ELISA has similar sensitivity and antigen stability as NS1 Ag kit to complement the current established virological surveillance in human. The improvement of the sensitivity in detecting DENV-3/4 will be needed to incorporate this method into routine mosquito surveillance system.

  10. [Identification of serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuegui; He, Lifang; Yuan, Shishan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To isolate and identify serological antigens in the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by the combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technology. Methods The serum IgG of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Muscle larvaes were isolated from the infected muscle, and then purified and cultured to collect excretory-secretory antigens. Serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens were isolated by co-immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by Western blotting. Moreover, the protein bands in New Zealand rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis were identified by mass spectrometric technology. Results Indirect ELISA showed that the titer of serum antibody of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was 1:6400. The rabbit serum IgG was effectively isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. A total of four clear protein bands of the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis were obtained by electrophoresis. Among them, three clear protein bands with relative molecular mass (Mr) being 40 kDa, 50 kDa and 83 kDa were recognized by the rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis but not recognized by the normal rabbit sera. The obtained four protein molecules were confirmed as serine protease, specific serine protease of muscle larvae, 43 kDa secreted glycoprotein and 53 kDa excretory-secretory antigen. Conclusion Four proteins were obtained from the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technique analysis, which provided new sources and insights for the diagnosis and vaccine candidates of Trichinellosis. PMID:27126943

  11. A prospective study of serum tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigens 50 and 242, tissue polypeptide antigen and tissue polypeptide specific antigen in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with special reference to multivariate diagnostic score.

    OpenAIRE

    Pasanen, P. A.; Eskelinen, M.; Partanen, K.; Pikkarainen, P; Penttilä, I.; Alhava, E

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess by a stepwise multivariate discriminant analysis the value of four current serum tumour markers - carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 50 and CA 242 and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) - and a new serum tumour marker, tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The serum values were measured in a prospective series of patients with jaundice, with unjaundiced cholestasis and with a suspicion of chro...

  12. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  13. Antigenic community between Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria glabrata: on the search of candidate antigens for vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chacón

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously confirmed the presence of common antigens between Schistosoma mansoni and its vector, Biomphalaria glabrata. Cross-reactive antigens may be important as possible candidates for vaccine and diagnosis of schistosomiasis. Sera from outbred mice immunized with a soluble Biomphalaria glabrata antigen (SBgA of non-infected B. glabrata snails recognized molecules of SBgA itself and S. mansoni AWA by Western blot. Recognition of several molecules of the SBgA were inhibited by pre-incubation with AWA (16, 30, 36, 60 and 155 kDa. The only specific molecule of AWA, inhibited by SBgA, was a 120 kDa protein. In order to determine which epitopes of SBgA were glycoproteins, the antigen was treated with sodium metaperiodate and compared with non-treated antigen. Molecules of 140, 60 and 24 kDa in the SBgA appear to be glycoproteins. Possible protective effects of the SBgA were evaluated immunizing outbred mice in two different experiments using Freund's Adjuvant. In the first one (12 mice/group, we obtained a significant level of protection (46% in the total worm load, with a high variability in worm recovery. In the second experiment (22 mice/group, no significant protection was observed, neither in worm load nor in egg production per female. Our results suggest that SBgA constitutes a rich source of candidate antigens for diagnosis and prophylactic studies.

  14. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866... Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. (a) Identification. A Plasmodium species antigen detection assay... malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  15. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Daemen, T.; Helfrich, W.; Boezen, H. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Melief, Cornelis; Nijman, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce a tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of antigen-specific ac

  16. Immunity to intracellular Salmonella depends on surface-associated antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somedutta Barat

    Full Text Available Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens.

  17. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  18. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  19. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However, the...... barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce this...... complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  20. Radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of tests using radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological surveys was studied, with particular attention to the likely availability of facilities and personnel in the tropics and arctics, where measurements may be disturbed by climatic influences. The methodology required was to be simple, rapid and suitable for examining large numbers of sera, as for epidemological surveys. In the introduction, limitations of labelled antigen tests are discussed, the choice of radionuclide and measurement methods, test procedures and evaluation of results. Collection, preservation and shipment of speciments (serum, faeces, cerebrospinal fluid, sputum, etc.) are described. Experiments with bacteria and bacterial toxins (Enterobacteriaceae, vibrios, staphylococci, meningococci, etc.), with protozoa and metazoa (Entamoeba hystolytica, Schistosoma mansoni, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodia and other parasites), with viruses (vaccinia, adeno-, polio-, and influenza viruses, etc.), and with fungi are discussed

  1. A competitive-inhibiton radioimmunoassay for influenza virus envelope antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-antibody competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay for influenza virus envelope antigens is described. A viral antigen preparation from influenza A virus recombinant MRC11 [antigenically identical to A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2)] consisting of haemagglutinin and neuraminidase was labelled with radioiodine. Rabbit antisera were allowed to react with the labelled antigen and the resultant antigen-antibody complexes were precipitated with the appropriate antiglobulin. The competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay very sensitively elucidated differences even among closely related influenza virus strains. Attempts have been made to eliminate neuraminidase from radioimmunoprecipitation to obtain a competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay system for haemagglutinin alone. (author)

  2. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  3. Yeast retrotransposon particles as antigen delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsman, A J; Burns, N R; Layton, G T; Adams, S E

    1995-05-31

    The development of technologies to produce recombinant proteins for use in the pharmaceutical industry has made substantial advances, in particular in the area of generating antigens containing multiple copies of important immunological regions. One such antigen-carrier system is based on the ability of a protein encoded by the yeast retrotransposon, Ty, to self-assemble into virus-like particles. Ty-fusion proteins retain this ability to form particles, and a range of hybrid VLPs carrying a variety of heterologous antigens have been produced and shown to induce potent immune responses. In particular, hybrid VLPs carrying the core protein p24 of HIV (p24-VLPs) have been shown to induce antibody and T-cell proliferative responses in both experimental animals and human volunteers, and immunization of rabbits with VLPs carrying the principal neutralizing determinant of HIV (V3-VLPs) resulted in the induction of neutralizing antibody responses and T-cell proliferation. Further studies with V3-VLPs have shown that this particulate antigen stimulates enhanced V3-specific lymphoproliferative responses as compared to whole recombinant gp120 or to V3 peptide conjugated to albumin. The V3-VLPs also induce potent CTL responses following immunization of mice in the absence of adjuvant. These responses are MHC class I restricted and are mediated by CD8-positive cells. These observations therefore demonstrate that hybrid Ty-VLPs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses against HIV and suggest that these immunogens may be important in combatting AIDS and other infections. PMID:7625653

  4. Antigenicity of low molecular weight surfactant species.

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, D. S.; Merritt, T A; Makunike, C.; Hallman, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors tested the antigenicity of human lung surfactant isolated from amniotic fluid. Mice and rabbits were immunized. Rabbit polyclonal antisera to these surfactant preparations were absorbed with normal human plasma proteins. Polyclonal antisera reacted with both high molecular weight (35 kd) surfactant apoprotein and to lower molecular weight species, both 18 kd and 9 kd. Mice were used to generate monoclonal antibodies to surfactant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay was used to iden...

  5. Rationalisation of Legionella Urinary Antigen Testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Breda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Legionnaires’ is a severe pneumonia, the diagnosis of which can be confirmed by a positive Legionella Urinary Antigen (LUA) test. The British Thoracic Society has specific guidelines for its use. Incorrect LUA test requests can result in false-positive results while accumulating costs. Aims and Objectives: The aim is the rationalisation of LUA testing. The first objective is to educate clinicians on indications for testing reducing unnecessary orders. The second is to develop...

  6. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobac ter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. Methods: Serum soluble antigen of H. p ylor i was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H. pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test ( RUT ), histo logi c examination and serology. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive pred ictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46%, 91.07%, 91.67% a nd 76.12 %, respectively. The prevalence rate of serum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergoing endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT met hods ( P>0.05 ). Conclusions: The detection of serum H. pylori solub le antigen( HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate, and convenie nt, not affected by the memorizing reaction of serum antibody; is more sensitive , m ore specific and suitable for clinical diagnosis, and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H. pylori as well as for detection in children and pre gnant women.

  7. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective:to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection.Methods:Serum soluble antigen of H.pylori was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H.pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test(RUT).histologic examination and serology,Results:The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46% ,91.07%,91.67% and 76.12%,respectively.The prevalence rate of werum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergong endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT methods(P>0.05).Conclusions:The detection of serum H.pylori soluble antigen(HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate,and convenient,not affected by the memorizing raction of serum antibody;is more sensitive,more specific and suitable for dinical diagriosis,and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H.pylori as well as for detection in children and pregnant women.

  8. Conformational dynamics and antigenicity in the disordered malaria antigen merozoite surface protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A MacRaild

    Full Text Available Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2 of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27 using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design.

  9. Conformational Dynamics and Antigenicity in the Disordered Malaria Antigen Merozoite Surface Protein 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Dean; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Nováček, Jiří; Žídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design. PMID:25742002

  10. Modulation of antigenicity of mycelial antigens during developmental cycle of Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, G; Kumar, A; Singh, A; Garg, G K

    2000-05-01

    Indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed using polyclonal antibodies against soluble cytoplasmic (SCA) and insoluble cell wall antigens (ICWA) for monitoring modulation of mycelial antigens during growth cycle of T. indica. With SCA, continuous decrease in ELISA reactivity was observed in maturing fungus cultures, suggesting that SCA were expressed predominantly during early vegetative phase and their decreasing role was apparent as the fungus matures possibly towards sporogenous mycelium. In case of ICWA, the reaction profile showed an increase up to exponential phase of growth probably due to increase in the cell division and branching of mycelium. But later, ICWA antibody reactivity was decreased which may be due to conversion of mycelial phase to sporogenous phase, a quiescent stage of growth. Characterization of changes in antigenic configuration during developmental cycle of Tilletia indica by these antibodies could prove to be useful in identification of developmentally related and virulence marker(s).

  11. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis. PMID:26342828

  12. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  13. Raman spectroscopy of HIV-1 antigen and antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Hu, Ningjie; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Yu, Qigui; Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Raman spectra of anti-HIV-1 antibody, HIV-1 antigen (p24), and HIV-1 antibody-antigen complex have been measured in near-infrared and UV regions: 785 nm; 830 nm; and 244 nm laser excitations. The spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen was excited with an infrared laser and contains numerous Raman peaks. The most prominent peaks are broad bands at 1343, 1449, 1609 and 1655 cm-1, which are characteristic of the Raman spectra of biological cells. The UV Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen has a completely different structure. It has two strong peaks at 1613 cm-1 and 1173 cm-1. The peak at 1613 cm-1 is associated with vibrations of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Try). The second strongest peak at 1173 cm-1 is associated with the vibration of Tyr. The Raman peak pattern of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex is very similar to that of the HIV-1 antigen. The only difference is that the peak at 1007 cm-1 of the Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex is slightly enhanced compared to that of the HIV-1 antigen. This indicates that the peaks of the HIV-1 antigen dominate the Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex.

  14. Protamine-based nanoparticles as new antigen delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Peleteiro Olmedo, Mercedes; González-Fernández, África; Alonso Fernández, María José; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2015-11-01

    The use of biodegradable nanoparticles as antigen delivery vehicles is an attractive approach to overcome the problems associated with the use of Alum-based classical adjuvants. Herein we report, the design and development of protamine-based nanoparticles as novel antigen delivery systems, using recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen as a model viral antigen. The nanoparticles, composed of protamine and a polysaccharide (hyaluronic acid or alginate), were obtained using a mild ionic cross-linking technique. The size and surface charge of the nanoparticles could be modulated by adjusting the ratio of the components. Prototypes with optimal physicochemical characteristics and satisfactory colloidal stability were selected for the assessment of their antigen loading capacity, antigen stability during storage and in vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept studies. In vitro studies showed that antigen-loaded nanoparticles induced the secretion of cytokines by macrophages more efficiently than the antigen in solution, thus indicating a potential adjuvant effect of the nanoparticles. Finally, in vivo studies showed the capacity of these systems to trigger efficient immune responses against the hepatitis B antigen following intramuscular administration, suggesting the potential interest of protamine-polysaccharide nanoparticles as antigen delivery systems.

  15. Human leukocyte antigen-DO regulates surface presentation of human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted antigens on B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A.N.; Meijden, E.D. van der; Honders, M.W.; Pont, M.J.; Goeman, J.J.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Griffioen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hematological malignancies often express surface HLA class II, making them attractive targets for CD4+ T cell therapy. We previously demonstrated that HLA class II ligands can be divided into DM-resistant and DM-sensitive antigens. In contrast to presentation of DM-resistant antigens, presentation o

  16. Enhancing the recognition of tumor associated antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Irvine, Kari R.; Minev, Boris R.; Taggarse, Akash S.; McFariand, Barbra J.; Wang, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Activated CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) can directly recognize malignant cells because processed fragments of tumor associated antigens (TAA), 8-10 amino acids in length and complexed with MHC class I molecules, are displayed on tumor cell surfaces. Tumor cells have been genetically modified in a variety of ways in efforts to enhance the immune recognition of TAA. An alternative strategy is the expression of TAA in recombinant or synthetic form. This has been made possible by the recent cloning of TAA...

  17. Antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized with mouse antiserum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurose,Masao

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Marked IgE-mediated histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse antiserum occurs in the presence of added Ca++ and phosphatidylserine (PS, although a considerable degree of antigen-induced histamine release which may utilize intracellular or cell-bound calcium is also observed. The decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ of the sensitized cells stimulated by antigen in Ca++-free medium in the presence of PS is relatively slow, and maximum release is produced by Ca++ added 1 min after antigen. Histamine release also occurs when Ca++ is added after PS in the absence of antigen to the sensitized cells suspended in Ca++-free medium. Unlike the antigen-induced release, the intensity of this non-antigen-induced release varies depending on both mast-cell and antiserum pools. A heat-labile factor(s, which is different from antigen-specific IgE antibody and is also contained in normal mouse serum, is involved in this reaction. In the antigen-nondependent (PS + Ca++-induced release, no decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ is observed after PS addition. Both the antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced release are completed fairly rapidly and are dependent of temperature, pH and energy.

  18. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in major salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Thorn, J;

    1994-01-01

    , on the other hand, expressed A, H, and inconstantly sialosyl-T, Tn, and sialosyl-Tn antigens in major salivary glands, whereas serous cells of minor (labial) salivary glands expressed H exclusively, Tn and sialosyl-T antigens inconstantly, but never sialosyl-Tn and A antigens. The difference may be related...... to a more simple cytodifferentiation of serous cells of minor (labial) salivary glands as compared with major salivary glands. Duct cells in major salivary glands expressed A, H, and inconstantly T, sialosyl-T, and Tn antigens, whereas minor (labial) salivary glands ducts exclusively expressed H, T...... and sialosyl-T antigens, differences that may be related to dissimilarities in the duct system. Myoepithelial cells and basal cells exclusively expressed T and sialosyl-T antigens, which may prove useful in studies of salivary gland tumors, since these cells are known to play a key role in the histological...

  19. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...... carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue...

  20. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  1. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    OpenAIRE

    Craig T. Vollert; Moree, Wilna J; Steven Gregory; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more...

  2. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, B.; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response ...

  3. Novel selective inhibitors of aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Saveanu, Loredana; Stratikos, Efstratios; Vourloumis, Dionisios

    2013-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases, ERAP1 and ERAP2, as well as Insulin regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) play key roles in antigen processing, and have recently emerged as biologically important targets for manipulation of antigen presentation. Taking advantage of the available structural and substrate-selectivity data for these enzymes, we have rationally designed a new series of inhibitors that display low micromolar activity. The selectivity profile for these three highly homologous aminopeptidases provides a promising avenue for modulating intracellular antigen processing. PMID:23916253

  4. Characterization of Ewing sarcoma associated cancer/testis antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlendorf, Dorothea E.; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from tumors of the Ewing family (EFT) is still poor. Immunotherapy strategies are pursued and EFT-specific antigens have to be identified as targets for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Due to the lack of expression of cancer/testis antigens (CTA) in normal tissues, these antigens are partially able to induce immune responses in cancer patients. Therefore, they are promising targets for immunotherapy. EFT are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements involv...

  5. Pneumocystis carinii antigen detection in rat serum and lung lavage.

    OpenAIRE

    McNabb, S J; Graves, D C; Kosanke, S.D.; Moyer, M J; Ivey, M H

    1988-01-01

    We developed a modified double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detected relatively low concentrations of known Pneumocystis carinii antigen added to buffer or rat sera. Artificial immunization-derived polyclonal rabbit anti-P. carinii antibody was used on the solid phase to capture the antigen. Infection-derived (after P. carinii pneumonia) polyclonal rat anti-P. carinii antibody or a mixture of five murine monoclonal antibodies was used as the antigen detecto...

  6. Antigen epitope of Helicobacter pylorivacuolating cytotoxin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Li Liu; Shu-Qin Li; Chun-Jie Liu; Hao-Xia Tao; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct and select antigen epitopes of vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) for nontoxic VacA vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection.METHODS: Eleven VacA epitopes were predicted according to VacA antigenic bioinformatics. Three candidates of VacA epitope were constructed through different combined epitopes. The candidate was linked with E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) by a linker of 7 amino acids, and cloned into plasmid pQE-60 in which fusion LTB-VacA epitope was efficiently expressed. To test the antigencity of the candidate, 6 BALB/c mice were treated with the fusion LTB-VacA epitope through intraperitoneal injection. To explore the ability of inhibiting the toxicity of VacA, cantiserum against the candidate was used to counteract VacA that induced HeLa cells to produce cell vacuoles in vitro.RESULTS: Serum IgG against the candidate was induced in the BALB/c mice. In vitro, the three antisera against the candidate efficiently counteracted the toxicity of VacA, and decreased the number of cell vacuoles by 14.17%, 20.20%and 30.41% respectively.CONCLUSION: Two of the three candidates, LZ-VacA1and LZ-VacA2, can be used to further study the mechanism of vacuolating toxicity of VacA, and to construct nontoxic VacA vaccine against H pylori infection.

  7. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto N. Peón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage and canids (in its adult stage that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models.

  8. [Mucose associated lymphoid tissue. Antigen presenting cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzardo-Baptista, Mario J; Luzardo, José Rafael

    2013-12-01

    We studied samples of normal and abnormal human mucosae, including oral tissue and uterine cervix, using electron microscopy. Special attention was given to the functions and mechanisms of defense carried out by the epithelial (EC) and dendritic cells (DC). Activated epithelial cells posses the capacity to uptake and process antigens, in order to present them, subsequently, to the dendritic cells. The structures and elements of the cells intervening on this function are: micropinocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes, phagosomes, clathrin-covered vesicles, dense granules covered by a unit membrane, granules with onion likes leaves, microbodies, and dense granules with acid phosphatase activity. When they first arrive within the epithelial layers, the DC are clear with long cytoplasmic projections, which later become short, and the density of their cytoplasm increases. They possess mycropinocytic vesicles, some clathrine-covered vesicles, lysososmes and Birbeck granules. At this moment, they are known as Langerhans cells. EC and DC present many surface folds rich in micropynocytic vesicles. Between EC and DC there are many contacts (close junctions or tight junctions), through which antigens, phagocitized and processed by the EC, are given to the DC. These cells join them to major histocompatibility complex molecules or to other molecules with similar functions (CD1). Then the Langerhans cells travel to the lymphatic node to activate T cells and continue the immunologic task. So, in this way, both the EC and the DC are a link between the natural and the acquired immunological mechanisms. PMID:24502183

  9. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats. PMID:18182256

  10. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold Thölking

    Full Text Available ABO-incompatible (ABOi renal transplantation (RTx from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared.10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group. The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups.Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82, the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172. Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively, with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient.Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future.

  11. Breed differences in the frequency of bovine lymphocyte antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stear, M J; Brown, S C; Dimmock, C K; Dufty, J H; Hetzel, D J; Mackie, J T; Nicholas, F W; Tierney, T J; Wetherall, J D

    1987-01-01

    Lymphocytes from 1,564 cattle of 18 breeds and cross-bred groups in Australia were tested for major histocompatibility system class 1 antigens. Gene frequencies were calculated for the Angus, Belmont Red, Brahman, Hereford and Holstein-Friesian breeds. There were substantial differences among these breeds in antigen and gene frequency. There were striking differences among all 18 breeds in the presence or absence of certain antigens. Two antigens, CA13 and CA36, were strongly associated in Hereford cattle but occurred independently of each other in the other breeds. PMID:3273412

  12. Identification of protective antigens for vaccination against systemic salmonellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eBumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50-200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing.

  13. Cancer-germline antigen vaccines and epigenetic enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Burns, Jorge; Ditzel, Henrik Jorn

    2010-01-01

    can be achieved using epigenetic modifiers. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: We provide an overview of the potential of CG antigens as targets for cancer immunotherapy, including advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the current state of development of CG antigen vaccines, and the potential...... synergistic effect of combining CG antigen immunotherapeutic strategies with epigenetic modifiers. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: The reader will gain an overview of the past, present and future role of CG antigens in cancer immunotherapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Chemoimmunotherapy using epigenetic drugs and CG...

  14. СAPSULAR ANTIGEN OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kadnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a zoonosis caused by gram-negative bacteria Yersinia pestis, which, as a rule, is transmitted to humans from septicemic rodents by the bites of infected fleas. This microbe killed more people than all of the wars in the human history. Y. pestis circulation in the natural plague foci is ensured by the whole number of pathogenicity factors with differing functional orientation. This review is devoted to one of them, Y. pestis capsular antigen (F1 or Caf1. The history of its discovery and studying of its genetic control, biosynthesis, isolation and purification, and physicochemical properties are reviewed. Its roles in plague pathogenesis and its application as a main component of plague vaccines are also discussed. Y. pestis capsule under light microscopy is visually amorphous, while high-resolution electron microscopy displays the structure formed from separate fimbria-like cords up to 200 nm long, diverging from the bacterial surface in different directions. At 37°C Y. pestis produce 800–1000 times more capsular antigen than at 28°C. Genes coding for 17.6-kD Caf1 protein, which contains 170 amino acids, are located in caf1 operon of pFra plasmid. Analysis of caf1 operon nucleotide sequence testified its close phylogenetic relationship with the gene clusters coding for pilus adhesins that were secreted with the help of chaperone/usher systems in enterobacteria including six additional adhesins in Y. pestis. Y. pestis multiplication within macrophages is the obligatory stage of plague pathogenesis, and the plague pathogen virulence correlates not with resistance to phagocyte ingesting but with bacterial ability to survive and multiply within phagolysosomes of phagocytes due to neutralization of antibacterial functions of eukaryotic cells. The capsule formed out of the Caf1 aggregates protects Y. pestis from ingestion by naïve host’s phagocytes and prevents from initiation of the alternative pathway of the complement system

  15. Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Recognize Epitopes of Protective Antigen following Vaccination with an Anthrax Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Laughlin, Elsa M.; Miller, Joseph D.; James, Eddie; Fillos, Dimitri; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Mittler, Robert S.; Akondy, Rama; Kwok, William; Ahmed, Rafi; Nepom, Gerald,

    2007-01-01

    Detection of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is facilitated by the use of fluorescently labeled soluble peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimers which mirror the antigen specificity of T-cell receptor recognition. We have used soluble peptide-MHC class II tetramers containing peptides from the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis to detect circulating T cells in peripheral blood of subjects vaccinated with an anthrax vaccine. PA-specific HLA class II-restricted T lympho...

  16. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L;

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic ...

  17. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  18. A Role For Mitochondria In Antigen Processing And Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Lc; Cervantes-Silva, Mp; Ontiveros-Dotor, E; López-Villegas, Eo; Sánchez-García, Fj

    2014-09-23

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signaling process. However, the role of mitochondria in antigen presenting cells during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing, and -presentation process. Here we show that HEL-loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APCs, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1-2 h following antigen exposure thus suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analyzed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC-peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes that endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48-62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taking together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APCs mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC-T immune synapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  20. Pneumocystis carinii from pigs and humans are antigenically distinct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C B; Settnes, Osvald Peter; Bille-Hansen, Vivi;

    1996-01-01

    The antigens of Pneumocystis carinii cysts isolated from pigs and humans were compared by the Western immunoblotting technique. Convalescent pig serum reacted with two antigens (approximately 78 kDa and 32.5 kDa) of porcine P. carinii cysts, whereas convalescent serum from humans did not react wi...

  1. Protein antigen adsorption to the DDA/TDB liposomal adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamborg, Mette; Jorgensen, Lene; Bojsen, Anders Riber;

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvant-antigen interactions is important for the future design of efficient and safe subunit vaccines, but remains an analytical challenge. We studied the interactions between three model protein antigens and the clinically tested cationic liposomal adjuvant composed...

  2. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements. A 2.5 ml sample of completed antigen shall be diluted with 2.5 ml of buffer solution formulated... with 9 CFR 114.8. If phenol is used, a direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution... tested against the antigens diluted 1:4 in buffer solution formulated in the same manner as the...

  3. Expression and immunoactivity of chimeric particulate antigens of receptor binding site-core antigen of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jie Yang; Ning-Shao Xia; Min Chen; Tong Cheng; Shui-Zhen He; Shao-Wei Li; Bao-Quan Guan; Zi-Heng Zhu; Ying Gu; Jun Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To improve the immunogenicity of receptor binding site of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on preS1 antigen using HBV core antigen as an immuno-carrier.METHODS: One to 6 tandem copies of HBV preS1 (21-47)fragment were inserted into HBcAg at the sites of aa 78 and 82, and expressed in E. coli. ELISA, Western blot and animal immunization were used to analyze the antigenicity and immmunogenicity of purified particulate antigens. The ability to capture HBV by antibodies elicited by chimeric partides was detected with immuno-capture PCR.RESULTS: Recombinant antigens CⅠ, CⅡ, CⅢ carrying 1-3 copies of HBV preS1 (21-47) individually could form viruslike particles (VLPs), similar to HBcAg in morphology. But recombinant antigens carrying 4-6 copies of HBV preS1 (21-47) were poorly expressed in E.coli. Chimeric antigens were lacking of immunoreactivity with anti-HBc monoclonal antibodies (McAbs), but still reserved good immunoreactivity with anti-HBe McAbs. CⅠ, CⅡ, CⅢ could strongly react with anti-preS1 McAb, suggesting that preS1 (21-47) fragment was well exposed on the surface of chimeric VLPs. Three chimeric VLP antigens (CⅠ, CⅡ and CⅢ) could stimulate mice to produce high-level antibody responses, and their immunogenicity was stronger than non-particulate antigen 21-47*6, containing 6 copies of preS1 (21-47). Mouse antibodies to CⅠ, CⅡ and CⅢ were able to capture HBV virions in immuno-capture PCR assay in vitro.CONCLUSION: Chimeric particulate antigens of receptor binding site-core antigen of HBV can elicit strong antibody responses to preS1. They have a potential to be developed into prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines against HBV infection.

  4. A Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Secreting Adenocarcinoma Arising in Tailgut Cyst : Clinical Implications of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Nam Kyu; Lim, Beom Jin; Kang, Sang Ook; Sohn, Ju Hyuk; Roh, Jae Kyung; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Sung Ai; Park, Se Eun

    2005-01-01

    Tailgut cysts (TGCs) are rare congenital cysts that occur in the retrorectal or presacral spaces. Although most tailgut cysts have been reported as benign, there have been at least 9 cases associated with malignant change. We report herein on an unusual case of a 40-year-old woman with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing adenocarcinoma arising within a TGC who underwent surgical resection and local radiation therapy. Despite the complete resection, metastatic adenocarcinoma developed f...

  5. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  6. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  7. Methods for examination of antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To choose and establish the methods for examination of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin in order to offer the reference for evaluating the antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin against human. Methods: Antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin was examined for hypersensitivity, cell-mediated immunity reaction, humoral immunity reaction and cross-reaction of antigen. Results: The rabbit and guinea pig did not give rise to hypersensitivity. In immunized rabbits, the level of serum total IgG was normal, but the level of serum specific IgG was high. The examination of B lymphocytes showed that there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in comparison with control. Cross-reaction of antigen proved that bovine hemoglobin had cross-reaction with human hemoglobin. Suggesting that they may be homologous, the level of the serum specific antibody is high in the immunized animal. According to the immunology theories, the polymerized hemoglobin has antigenicity. (authors)

  8. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky;

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled...... with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential....... Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds...

  9. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  10. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  11. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development.This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation, in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera.Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes.

  12. Case of rhesus antigen weak D type 4.2. (DAR category detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Golovkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serological methods of Rhesus antigens identification in humans cannot identify D-antigen variants. In this article the serological characteristics of Rhesus antigen D weak type 4.2. (Category DAR are described.

  13. Comparison of antigen-specific T-cell responses of tuberculosis patients using complex or single antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, A S; Amoudy, H A; Wiker, H G;

    1998-01-01

    We have screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from tuberculosis (TB) patients for proliferative reactivity and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion against a panel of purified recombinant (r) and natural (n) culture filtrate (rESAT-6, nMPT59, nMPT64 and nMPB70) and somatic-derived (r....... tuberculosis, MT-CF and M. bovis BCG. We also observed that most of the high responders to complex antigens recognized all of the antigens tested (covariation), demonstrating that the repertoire of human T-cell specificities induced by natural infection is directed towards several unrelated culture filtrate...... as well as somatic-derived protein antigens. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that the cellular immune response in humans is directed against several important target antigens of M. tuberculosis and that some antigens, such as ESAT-6, are recognized by a high number of individuals...

  14. Recognition of antigen-specific B-cell receptors from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients by synthetic antigen surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Morimoto, Jumpei; Peng, Haiyong; Aquino, Claudio; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-12-18

    In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a single neoplastic antigen-specific B cell accumulates and overgrows other B cells, leading to immune deficiency. CLL is often treated with drugs that ablate all B cells, leading to further weakening of humoral immunity, and a more focused therapeutic strategy capable of targeting only the pathogenic B cells would represent a significant advance. One approach to this would be to develop synthetic surrogates of the CLL antigens allowing differentiation of the CLL cells and healthy B cells in a patient. Here, we describe nonpeptidic molecules capable of targeting antigen-specific B cell receptors with good affinity and selectivity using a combinatorial library screen. We demonstrate that our hit compounds act as synthetic antigen surrogates and recognize CLL cells and not healthy B cells. Additionally, we argue that the technology we developed can be used to identify other classes of antigen surrogates.

  15. Expression of an antigen homologous to the human CO17-1A/GA733 colon cancer antigen in animal tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaloudik, J; Basak, S.; Nesbit, M.; Speicher, D W; Wunner, W H; Miller, E.; Ernst-Grotkowski, C.; Kennedy, R; Bergsagel, L. P.; Koido, T.; Herlyn, D

    1997-01-01

    The CO17-1A/GA733 antigen is associated with human carcinomas and some normal epithelial tissues. This antigen has shown promise as a target in approaches to passive and active immunotherapy of colorectal cancer. The relevance of animal models for studies of immunotherapy targeting this antigen in patients is dependent on the expression of the antigen on normal animal tissues. Immunohistoperoxidase staining with polyclonal rabbit antibodies to the human antigen revealed the human homologue on...

  16. Antigenic variation with a twist--the Borrelia story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Steven J

    2006-06-01

    A common mechanism of immune evasion in pathogenic bacteria and protozoa is antigenic variation, in which genetic or epigenetic changes result in rapid, sequential shifts in a surface-exposed antigen. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Dai et al. provide the most complete description to date of the vlp/vsp antigenic variation system of the relapsing fever spirochaete, Borrelia hermsii. This elaborate, plasmid-encoded system involves an expression site that can acquire either variable large protein (vlp) or variable small protein (vsp) surface lipoprotein genes from 59 different archival copies. The archival vlp and vsp genes are arranged in clusters on at least five different plasmids. Gene conversion occurs through recombination events at upstream homology sequences (UHS) found in each gene copy, and at downstream homology sequences (DHS) found periodically among the vlp/vsp archival genes. Previous studies have shown that antigenic variation in relapsing fever Borrelia not only permits the evasion of host antibody responses, but can also result in changes in neurotropism and other pathogenic properties. The vlsE antigenic variation locus of Lyme disease spirochaetes, although similar in sequence to the relapsing fever vlp genes, has evolved a completely different antigenic variation mechanism involving segmental recombination from a contiguous array of vls silent cassettes. These two systems thus appear to represent divergence from a common precursor followed by functional convergence to create two distinct antigenic variation processes. PMID:16796669

  17. A 2-Step Laemmli and Antigen Retrieval Method Improves Immunodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalia, Carla R; Gendusa, Rossella; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Detection by immunohistochemistry of antigens relies on reproducibly optimal preanalytical and analytical variables such as fixation conditions, antigen retrieval (AR), and the resolutive power of the detection system. There is a need to improve immunodetection on routinely fixed and embedded material, particularly for scarcely represented but relevant antigens. We devised a 2-step method and applied it to a panel of antigens of common use for diagnosis, prognosis, individualized therapy use, or research. The first step consists of a 10 minutes. Incubation at 95°C with a modified Laemmli extraction buffer. This was followed by a traditional AR method. Detection of the vast majority of antigens was improved over a simple AR with preservation of tissue integrity, as shown by quantitative image analysis. The mechanism underlying the improved detection may be controlled denaturation followed by heat-mediated retrieval, a method we dubbed "antigen relaxing" and which will improve routine detection of scarce antigens in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. PMID:26067142

  18. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  19. Soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens contain carbohydrate moieties important for immune reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Theander, T G; Jensen, J B;

    1987-01-01

    The importance of carbohydrate moieties for the antigenicity of purified soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens from the asexual blood stage was tested. Digestion of the soluble antigens with alpha-D-galactosidase clearly affected the ability of the antigen to react with malaria-immune sera from ....... The results might have important implications for the strategy of developing a malaria vaccine.......The importance of carbohydrate moieties for the antigenicity of purified soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens from the asexual blood stage was tested. Digestion of the soluble antigens with alpha-D-galactosidase clearly affected the ability of the antigen to react with malaria-immune sera from...

  20. Microglial MHC antigen expression after ischemic and kainic acid lesions of the adult rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finsen, B.R.; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Diemer, Nils Henrik;

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte common antigen, macrophages, blood-brain barrier, neural degeneration, fascia dentata, neuropathology......Leukocyte common antigen, macrophages, blood-brain barrier, neural degeneration, fascia dentata, neuropathology...

  1. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  2. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  3. Radiolabelled parasite antigens as tools for diagnosis and identification of protective antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabelling specific compartments and molecules of parasites provides a valuable tool for establishing parasite antigen-host response systems with utility and/or importance in protection, diagnosis and pathology. The combined immunological, biochemical and molecular biological expertise currently available forms a sufficient basis for a relatively logical and effective programme directed towards the ultimate eradication of tropical diseases. The organization of carefully selected and clinically well characterized sera and patients, representing the range of commonly occurring parasitic infections, would be of great practical value in the pursuance of this goal. (author)

  4. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Keith R Miller; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Russell J Mumper

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-wate...

  5. Aspergillus antigen testing in bone marrow transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, E; Oliver, D.; Johnson, E.; Foot, A.; D. Marks; Warnock, D.

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To assess the clinical usefulness of a commercial aspergillus antigen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in bone marrow transplant recipients, and to compare it with a commercial latex agglutination (LA) test.

  6. The Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus Containing Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Antigen 12, containing a phosphonyl peptide hapten with free C-terminal carboxylic group, was synthesized by 11 reaction steps. The design of the hapten was based on the transition state of peptide hydrolysis catalyzed by carboxypeptidase A.

  7. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    which represent secondary gene products. They are synthesized in a stepwise fashion from a precursor by the action of different glycosyltransferases. In non-keratinized oral mucosa, a sequential elongation of the carbohydrates is associated with differentiation of epithelial cells, resulting...... in expression of precursors on basal cells and A/B antigens on spinous cells. Reduction or complete deletion of A/B antigen expression in oral carcinomas has been reported, a phenotypic change that is correlated with invasive and metastatic potential of the tumours and with the mortality rates of the patients....... Disappearance of the antigens is ascribed to the absence of A or B transferase gene expression. Several studies have shown that loss of A and B antigen expression is associated with increased cell motility, invasion in matrigel, and tumourigenecity in syngenic animals. In vivo studies of human oral wound...

  8. Immune activation by casein dietary antigens in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severance, E.G.; Dupont, D.; Dickerson, F.B.; Stallings, C.R.; Origoni, A.E.; Krivogorsky, B.; Yang, S.; Haasnoot, W.; Yolken, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammation and other immune processes are increasingly linked to psychiatric diseases. Antigenic triggers specific to bipolar disorder are not yet defined. We tested whether antibodies to bovine milk caseins were associated with bipolar disorder, and whether patients recognized differe

  9. Control of T cell antigen reactivity via programmed TCR downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Alena M; Xiong, Huizhong; Leiner, Ingrid M; Sušac, Bože; Glickman, Michael S; Pamer, Eric G; van Heijst, Jeroen W J

    2016-04-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is unique in that its affinity for ligand is unknown before encounter and can vary by orders of magnitude. How the immune system regulates individual T cells that display very different reactivity to antigen remains unclear. Here we found that activated CD4(+) T cells, at the peak of clonal expansion, persistently downregulated their TCR expression in proportion to the strength of the initial antigen recognition. This programmed response increased the threshold for cytokine production and recall proliferation in a clone-specific manner and ultimately excluded clones with the highest antigen reactivity. Thus, programmed downregulation of TCR expression represents a negative feedback mechanism for constraining T cell effector function with a suitable time delay to thereby allow pathogen control while avoiding excess inflammatory damage. PMID:26901151

  10. Fragrance - The Commonest Antigen Testing Positive In Chronic Hand Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit Alok; Srinivas C R; Balachandran C; Shenoi S D

    1995-01-01

    Fifty cases of chronic hand dermatitis were patch tested with standard series using antigens from Chemotechnique. Cases with positive reaction to fragrance mix were tested with fragrance series. Results are reported here.

  11. Fragrance - The Commonest Antigen Testing Positive In Chronic Hand Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixit Alok

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty cases of chronic hand dermatitis were patch tested with standard series using antigens from Chemotechnique. Cases with positive reaction to fragrance mix were tested with fragrance series. Results are reported here.

  12. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  13. Use of Recombinant Antigens for the Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laín

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive candidiasis is a frequent and often fatal complication in immunocompromised and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis remains difficult due to the lack of specific clinical symptoms and a definitive diagnostic method. The detection of antibodies against different Candida antigens may help in the diagnosis. However, the methods traditionally used for the detection of antibodies have been based on crude antigenic fungal extracts, which usually show low-reproducibility and cross-reactivity problems. The development of molecular biology techniques has allowed the production of recombinant antigens which may help to solve these problems. In this review we will discuss the usefulness of recombinant antigens in the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis antigen in female genital tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrinath S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases of female genital tract infection were investigated for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen. Endocervical swabs obtained were subjected to antigen detection by enzyme immunoassay. Rabbit antiserum to chlamydial lipopolysaccharide was used in a card test. Anti rabbit immunoglobulin G conjugated to alkaline phosphatase with a chromogenic substrate 5 bromo-4 chloro-3-indolyl phosphate and nitro blue tetrazolium were used for the enzymatic reaction. Chlamydial antigen could be detected in four out of thirty samples (13.3%. In contrast direct immunofluorescence detected 5 cases (16.6%. Although less sensitive, enzyme immunoassay can be used as a rapid diagnostic tool in detecting Chlamydia trachomatis antigen in genital infections.

  15. Instability of induction cooker (electromagnetic stove) antigen retrieval in immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Zheng, Xiang-Yi

    2012-03-01

    An induction cooker is a modern electric cooker that takes electromagnetic induction principle to heat. As it has high efficiency, no open flame, and is safe and convenient, more and more laboratories use it as an antigen retrieval heating tool in immunohistochemistry. We found that there was still some instability with the induction cooker, because with certain antigens the power change influenced the results of immunohistochemistry staining, showing weaker staining intensity or decreased number of positive cells, but which were not entirely negative. For some antigens, it had no influence on results. The instability of this heating tool for antigen retrieval was caused partly by negligent operators, and which may influence the experimental results and the pathologic diagnosis.

  16. Antigenic Challenge in the Etiology of Autoimmune Disease in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Mary A M Rogers; Levine, Deborah A.; Blumberg, Neil; Fisher, Gwenith G.; Kabeto, Mohammed; Kenneth M. Langa

    2011-01-01

    Infection has long been implicated as a trigger for autoimmune disease. Other antigenic challenges include receipt of allogeneic tissue or blood resulting in immunomodulation. We investigated antigenic challenges as possible risk factors for autoimmune disease in women using the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study, linked to Medicare files, years 1991–2007. The prevalence of autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease,...

  17. Immunogenicity of transgenic plant-derived hepatitis B surface antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Thanavala, Y; Yang, Y. F.; Lyons, P; Mason, H S; Arntzen, C

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the Children's Vaccine Initiative is to encourage the discovery of technology that will make vaccines more readily available to developing countries. Our strategy has been to genetically engineer plants so that they can be used as inexpensive alternatives to fermentation systems for production of subunit antigens. In this paper we report on the immunological response elicited in vivo by using recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg) purified from transgenic tobacco leaves...

  18. Typing of murine cell-surface antigens by cellular radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-labelled Protein A was used for detecting antigen-antibody complexes on gultaraldehyde fixed cells attached to microtiter plates. This method is rapid, sensitive and specific for revealing H-2 private and public specificities as well as Ia and Lyt antigens. As plates may be kept for months, several reactivities can be tested in one step on a large panel rendering a regular supply of animals unnecessary. (Auth.)

  19. Modeling Influenza Antigenic Shift and Drift with LEGO Bricks

    OpenAIRE

    Boriana Marintcheva

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of antigenic shift and drift could be found in almost every microbiology and virology syllabus, usually taught in the context of Influenza virus biology. They are central to understanding viral diversity and evolution and have direct application to anti-flu vaccine design and effectiveness. To aid student understanding of the concepts, I have developed an exercise to visualize the mechanistic aspects of antigenic shift and drift using LEGO bricks. This hands-on/minds-on exercise ...

  20. Antibody avidity in swine lymphocyte antigen-defined miniature pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Appleyard, G D; Mallard, B A; Kennedy, B. W.; Wilkie, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    Antibody avidity to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was measured by thiocyanate ion elution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in swine lymphocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs. Serum antibody avidity was evaluated on day 14 and 30 after primary (day 0) and secondary (day 14) immunizations in eight to ten week old miniature pigs previously typed for swine lymphocyte antigen genotype. The effect of SLA genotype, litter, and gender on anti-HEWL antibody avidity was determined by lea...

  1. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Łukasik; Kazimiera Waśniowska

    2016-01-01

    Duffy (Fy) blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1) and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B ...

  2. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier eUrra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain proteins are detected in the CSF and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory mediators, and danger signals can exit the brain through several efflux routes. They can reach the blood after leaking out of the damaged blood-brain barrier or following the drainage of interstitial fluid to the dural venous sinus, or reach the cervical lymph nodes through the nasal lymphatics following CSF drainage along the arachnoid sheaths of nerves across the nasal submucosa. The route and mode of access of brain antigens to lymphoid tissue could influence the type of response. Central and peripheral tolerance prevents autoimmunity, but the actual mechanisms of tolerance to brain antigens released into the periphery in the presence of inflammation, danger signals, and APCs, are not fully characterized. Stroke does not systematically trigger autoimmunity, but under certain circumstances, such as pronounced systemic inflammation or infection, autoreactive T cells could escape the tolerance controls. Further investigation is needed to elucidate whether antigen-specific immune events could underlie neurological complications impairing stroke outcome.

  3. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-3

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda R Bitencourt; Elaine C Vicentin; Jimenez, Maria C.; Ricardo Ricci; Leite, Juliana A.; Fabio T Costa; Luis C Ferreira; Bruce Russell; François Nosten; Laurent Rénia; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2013-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP)-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3) as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated...

  4. Partial purification of protective antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    The purification of antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, through their ability to provoke cellular proliferation of immune cells and through their recognition by antibodies, led to an antigenic preparation which was extracted from adult worms and which contained only two proteins (MW 14 and 43 Kd). Mice which were vaccinated by the oral route after the entrapment of these two proteins in liposomes were strongly protected.

  5. Prevalence of Weak D Antigen In Western Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Sadaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discovery of Rh antigens in 1939 by Landsteiner and Weiner was the revolutionary stage in blood banking. Of these antigens, D, which decides Rh positivity or negativity, is the most antigenic. A problem is encountered when an individual has a weakened expression of D (Du, i.e., fewer numbers of D antigens on red cell membrane. Aims and Objectives: To know the prevalence of weak D in Indian population because incidence varies in different population. To determine the risk of alloimmunization among Rh D negative patients who receives the blood of weak D positive donors. Material and Methods: Rh grouping of 38,962 donors who came to The Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from 1st January 2013 to 30th September 2014 was done using the DIAGAST (Automated Grouping. The samples that tested negative for D antigen were further analysed for weak D (Du by indirect antiglobulin test using blend of Ig G and Ig M Anti D. This was done using Column agglutination method in ID card (gel card. Results: The total number of donors studied was 38,962. Out of these 3360(8.6% were tested Rh D negative. All Rh D negative donors were tested for weak D (Du. 22 (0.056% of total donors and 0.65% of Rh negative donors turned out to be weak D (Du positive. Conclusion: The prevalence of weak D (Du in Western Indian population is 0.056 %, So the risk of alloimmunization in our setting due to weak D (Du antigen is marginal. But, testing of weak D antigen is necessary in blood bank because weak D antigen is immunogenic and can produce alloimmunization if transfused to Rh D negative subjects.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  7. Antigenic distinctiveness, heterogeneity, and relationships of Methanothrix spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1987-01-01

    A detailed immunologic analysis of Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon (the type species of the genus), Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1, and Methanothrix concilii GP6 was performed. A variety of poly- and monoclonal antibody probes for a comprehensive panel of reference organisms were used to determine immunogenicity, antigenicity, and relationships. The three organisms are antigenically distinct but interrelated, forming an immunologically cohesive group, weakly related to methanosarcinae. A prom...

  8. Fibroblasts as Efficient Antigen-Presenting Cells in Lymphoid Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundig, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Martin F.; Dipaolo, Claudio; Simard, John J. L.; Battegay, Manuel; Lother, Heinz; Gessner, Andre; Kuhlcke, Klaus; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1995-06-01

    Only so-called "professional" antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of hematopoietic origin are believed capable of inducing T lymphocyte responses. However, fibroblasts transfected with viral proteins directly induced antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo, without involvement of host APCs. Fibroblasts induced T cells only in the milieu of lymphoid organs. Thus, antigen localization affects self-nonself discrimination and cell-based vaccine strategies.

  9. Duality of β-glucan microparticles: antigen carrier and immunostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baert K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kim Baert,1 Bruno G De Geest,2 Henri De Greve,3,4 Eric Cox,1,* Bert Devriendt1,* 1Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Ghent, Belgium; 3Structural Biology Research Centre, VIB, Brussels, Belgium; 4Structural Biology Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Designing efficient recombinant mucosal vaccines against enteric diseases is still a major challenge. Mucosal delivery of recombinant vaccines requires encapsulation in potent immunostimulatory particles to induce an efficient immune response. This paper evaluates the capacity of β-glucan microparticles (GPs as antigen vehicles and characterizes their immune-stimulatory effects. The relevant infectious antigen FedF was chosen to be loaded inside the microparticles. The incorporation of FedF inside the particles was highly efficient (roughly 85% and occurred without antigen degradation. In addition, these GPs have immunostimulatory effects as well, demonstrated by the strong reactive oxygen species (ROS production by porcine neutrophils upon their recognition. Although antigen-loaded GPs still induce ROS production, antigen loading decreases this production by neutrophils for reasons yet unknown. However, these antigen-loaded GPs are still able to bind their specific β-glucan receptor, demonstrated by blocking complement receptor 3, which is the major β-glucan receptor on porcine neutrophils. The dual character of these particles is confirmed by a T-cell proliferation assay. FedF-loaded particles induce a significantly higher FedF-specific T-cell proliferation than soluble FedF. Taken together, these results show that GPs are efficient antigen carriers with immune-stimulatory properties. Keywords: β-glucan microparticles, FedF, antigen delivery vehicle, immunostimulants

  10. Nonprostatic sources of prostate-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandis, E P; Yu, H

    1997-05-01

    The name prostate-specific antigen has been given to a protein that now is known not to be prostate-specific; however, prostatic tissue does produces extremely high levels of PSA and secrets it into the seminal plasma. Seminal plasma contains about 1 million micrograms/L of PSA and is the richest source of PSA reported. The biologic fluid with the second highest PSA concentration, however, is nipple aspirate fluid from the female breast (up to about 5000 micrograms/L), and the third is milk from lactating women (up to 300 micrograms/L). Male serum PSA is usually less than 4 micrograms/L. In nonprostatic tissues, PSA exists mainly in its free molecular form, but PSA-ACT complex is also present in most of the fluids that contain PSA, such as breast secretions and amniotic fluid. The gene expression and protein production of PSA in nonprostatic tissues are under the regulation of steroid hormones via their receptors. Androgens, glucocorticoids, and progestins up-regulate the PSA gene expression, resulting in an increase of protein production. Estrogen by itself seems to have no effect on PSA regulation, but it can impair PSA production induced by androgen. It remains unknown whether PSA is enzymatically active and what is the physiologic role of PSA in nonprostatic tissues. It is speculated that PSA may be involved in the regulation of growth factors. Measuring PSA in breast cancer cytosol, breast-nipple aspirate fluid, and female serum may have potential clinical utilities, including breast cancer prognosis, breast cancer risk assessment, and evaluation of androgen excess. Further studies are needed to identify the exact function and regulation of PSA in nonprostatic tissues and to explore the clinical application of this protein. PMID:9126224

  11. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway.

  12. Levels of estrogen, carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen of breast in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted during the period from february 2004 to July 2004; with the objective of measuring the levels of estrogen (E2), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen of breast (CA-15.3) so as to facilitate the early diagnosis of breast cancer and determine the involvement of these parameters as risk factors for breast cancer. Ninety blood samples were collected from Sudanese females, divided into two groups; control group and patient groups. The patients group was sixty Sudanese females visiting the Radio Isotope Center, Khartoum (RICK) and they were confirmed as breast cancer patient by histopathology. The levels of the above mentioned parameters were determined by using radioimmunoassay technique. The results showed that, no significant (p=0.05) difference between the levels of the estrogen in patients compared to the control, on the other hand there was non significant (p>0.05) elevation in CEA levels in the patients with breast cancer compared to the control. The level of CA15.3 was significantly (p<0.0001) higher in the breast cancer patients compared to the control.(Author)

  13. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  14. Genetic analysis of a Treponema phagedenis locus encoding antigenic lipoproteins with potential for antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mamoona; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Loftsdottir, Heidur; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo; Zuerner, Richard; Rosander, Anna

    2016-06-30

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a painful and debilitating claw disease in cattle. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The occurrence of Treponema phagedenis in DD lesions, especially near the interface of healthy and diseased tissue, suggests that this species contributes to the development and/or progression of the lesions. In this study we characterized a genetic locus in T. phagedenis that contains coding regions for three antigenic proteins, PrrA, VpsA, and VpsB. Comparative analysis of homologous loci from fifteen strains suggests that prrA may be transposed into or out of this locus. Alterations in the copy number of TA repeats within the putative promoter region may regulate VpsA/B expression. The vpsA and prrA genes occur in allelic variants in different T. phagedenis isolates and may provide one explanation for the antigenic variation observed in T. phagedenis DD isolates. PMID:27259832

  15. Demonstration of two distinct antigenic determinants on hepatitis B e antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, M.; Nomura, M.; Gotanda, T.; Sano, T.; Tachibana, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Takahashi, K.; Toyama, S.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mice were immunized against hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) isolated from sera of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Their spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma (NS-1) cells, and 5 clones of hybridoma cells secreting antibody against HBeAg (anti-HBe) were isolated. For the production of anti-HBe in large scale, cells were cultivated both in vitro and in the peritoneal cavity of ascitic mice. Although monoclonal antibodies produced by these clones showed a strong reactivity of anti-HBe in hemagglutination tests, individual monoclonal anti-HBe did not reveal any precipitin line in immunodiffusion. When 2 of the 5 monoclonal antibodies were mixed together, however, some combinations showed a precipitin line against HBeAg, whereas others did not. Utilizing solid-phase radioimmunoassay involving a number of combinations of monoclonal antibodies used for solid-phase and radiolabeling, the 5 antibodies were classified into 2 groups. Three of the anti-HBe antibodies were found to be directed to 1 determinant of HBeAg (determinant a); the remaining 2 to the other determinant (determinant b). Determinants a and b were detected on HBeAg in the serum, as well as on the polypeptide of 19,000 daltons (P19) derived from the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal anti-HBe antibodies with different specificities may provide useful tools in delineating the antigenic structure of HBeAg and also in evaluating immune responses of the host directed to its subdeterminants.

  16. Urine antigen detection for the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Yesenia; Rodriguez, Silvia; García, Hector H; Brandt, Jef; Van Hul, Anke; Silva, Maria; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Portocarrero, Mylagritos; Melendez, D Paolo; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of seizures and epilepsy. Diagnosis is based on brain imaging, supported by immunodiagnosis in serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Lumbar puncture is invasive and painful. Blood sampling is slightly painful and poorly accepted. Urine antigen detection has been used for other parasites and tried in NCC with suboptimal performance. We used a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to detect Taenia solium antigens in urine from 87 Peruvian neurocysticercosis patients (viable cysts, N = 34; subarachnoid cysticercosis, N = 10; degenerating parasites, N = 7; calcified lesions, N = 36) and 32 volunteers from a non-endemic area of Peru. Overall sensitivity of urine antigen detection for viable parasites was 92%, which decreased to 62.5% in patients with a single cyst. Most patients (30/36, 83%) with only calcified cysticercosis were urine antigen negative. Antigen levels in paired serum/urine samples (evaluated in 19 patients) were strongly correlated. Non-invasive urine testing for T. solium antigens provides a useful alternative for NCC diagnosis.

  17. Determination of Diagnostic Antigens in Cattle Amphistomiasis Using Western Blotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Halajian

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Mixed infection with amphistomes seems common in native cattle of Iran. The aim of this study was to determine diagnostic antigens in cattle mixed amphistomiasis."nMethods: Specific antigens of Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Gastrothylax crumenifer and Paramphisto­mum cervi (mixed infection, the most common species, were collected from cattle was deter­mined. Adult trematodes were collected from the rumen of naturally infected cattle at meat inspec­tion. After their homogenization and centrifugation, somatic antigens were prepared and ana­lyzed by SDS-PAGE. Specific antigens were determinated by western blot with homologous and heterolo­gous sera. SDS-PAGE of whole worms extract was performed at different concentrations and subse­quent gels staining. Immunoblotting analysis using sera from cattle naturally infected with am­phistomes, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola spp. and hydatid cyst was performed."nResults: Electrophorese analysis of somatic antigens revealed the presence of 10 and 21 protein bands at 4 µgr/ml and 8 µgr/ml with molecular weights ranging from 25-120 and 25-150 kDa, respectively. The best result was taken at 8 mg/ml concentration. Although western blot of these proteins demon­strate 5 major antigenic polypeptides ranging from 50 to 100 kDa which were recognized by serum of cat­tle naturally infected with mixed amphistomes.

  18. Double-antibody radioimmunoassay for factor VIII-related antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plasma protein required for the support of ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation was isolated from antihemophilic factor concentrate and radiolabeled with 125I. A double-antibody radioimmunoassay was developed, with use of specific rabbit anti-VIII related antigen serum and goat anti-rabbit globulin. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and technically simple to perform. Values obtained in normal subjects ranged from 0.65 to 1.53 units, similar to our normal range for VIII coagulant activity (0.67 to 1.43 units). However, normal or increased values of VIII-related antigen were observed in VIII coagulant-deficient hemophiliacs. Also, concentrations of VIII-related antigen significantly exceeded coagulant concentrations in several patients with liver disease or disseminated intravascular coagulation, or both. Of a broad selection of congenital coagulation disorders examined, only patients with von Willebrand's disease had decreased VIII-related antigen concentrations, and these corresponded to the lowered concentration of ristocetin cofactor in the patients. In three transfused patients, VIII-related antigen values correlated with the concentration of the cofactor. Our results suggest that the radioimmunoassay of VIII-related antigen is a simple and valuable adjunct in the study of patients with clotting abnormalities

  19. A "new" primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) defined DP-antigen associated with a private HLA--DR antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Jakobsen, B K; Platz, P;

    1980-01-01

    We have recently described a "new" private HLA-DR antigen, DR"LTM", which has a frequency of approximately 0.6% in Danes. Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells directed towards DR"LTM"-associated determinants were generated in vitro by haplotype primings in two unrelated families with DR...... total agreement between the results obtained by HLA-DR typing with the antiserum "LTM" and by PLT-typing with these two haplotype primed PLT-cells. None of the DP"LTM"-positive individuals carried more than one of the antigens HLA-Dw/-DRw/DP1-8 and the local specificity D/DP"H". Accordingly, this "new......" PLT-defined antigen, DP"LTM", most probably belongs to the series of HLA-D/DR-associated DP-antigens previously described....

  20. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  1. Distribution of primed T cells and antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells following intranasal immunization in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Ciabattini

    Full Text Available Priming of T cells is a key event in vaccination, since it bears a decisive influence on the type and magnitude of the immune response. T-cell priming after mucosal immunization via the nasal route was studied by investigating the distribution of antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells (APCs and primed antigen-specific T cells. Nasal immunization studies were conducted using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant. Trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells was analyzed in vivo after adoptive transfer of OVA-specific transgenic T cells in the presence or absence of fingolimod, a drug that causes lymphocytes sequestration within lymph nodes. Antigen-loaded APCs were observed in mediastinal lymph nodes, draining the respiratory tract, but not in distal lymph nodes. Antigen-specific proliferating T cells were first observed within draining lymph nodes, and later in distal iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes and in the spleen. The presence at distal sites was due to migration of locally primed T cells as shown by fingolimod treatment that caused a drastic reduction of proliferated T cells in non-draining lymph nodes and an accumulation of extensively divided T cells within draining lymph nodes. Homing of nasally primed T cells in distal iliac lymph nodes was CD62L-dependent, while entry into mesenteric lymph nodes depended on both CD62L and α4β7, as shown by in vivo antibody-mediated inhibition of T-cell trafficking. These data, elucidating the trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells to non-draining peripheral and mucosa-associated lymph nodes following nasal immunization, provide relevant insights for the design of vaccination strategies based on mucosal priming.

  2. The role of FcRn in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi eBaker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are unique molecules capable of simultaneously recognizing a diverse array of antigens and themselves being recognized by a broad array of receptors. The abundance specifically of the IgG subclass and the variety of signaling receptors to which it binds render this an important immunomodulatory molecule. In addition to the classical Fcγ receptors (FcγR which bind IgG at the cell surface, the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn is a lifelong resident of the endolysosomal system of most hematopoietic cells where it determines the intracellular fate of both IgG and IgG-containing immune complexes (IgG IC. Crosslinking of FcRn by multivalent IgG IC within antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC initiates specific mechanisms which result in trafficking of the antigen-bearing IgG IC into compartments from which the antigen can successfully be processed into peptide epitopes compatible with loading onto both MHC class I and II molecules. In turn, this enables the synchronous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against the cognate antigen, thereby bridging the gap between the humoral and cellular branches of the adaptive immune response. Critically, FcRn-driven T cell priming is efficient at very low doses of antigen due to the exquisite sensitivity of the IgG-mediated antigen delivery system through which it operates. FcRn-mediated antigen presentation has important consequences in tissue compartments replete with IgG and serves not only to determine homeostatic immune activation at a variety of sites but also to induce inflammatory responses upon exposure to antigens perceived as foreign. Therapeutically targeting the pathway by which FcRn enables T cell activation in response to IgG IC is thus a highly attractive prospect not only for the treatment of diseases that are driven by immune complexes but also for manipulating local immune responses against defined antigens such as those present during infections and

  3. The distribution of blood group antigens in experimentally produced carcinomas of rat palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibel, J; Philipsen, H P; Fisker, A V;

    1986-01-01

    It has been shown previously that rat oral epithelia express antigens cross-reacting with antibodies against human blood group antigen B and its structural precursor, the H antigen (Type 2 chain). In the present study we investigated the expression of these antigens in malignant changes in the rat....... The blood group antigen staining pattern in experimentally produced verrucous carcinomas showed an almost normal blood group antigen expression. This may have diagnostic significance. Localized areas of hyperplastic palatal epithelium with slight dysplasia revealed loss of H antigen and the presence of B...

  4. Class II-targeted antigen is superior to CD40-targeted antigen at stimulating humoral responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frleta, D; Demian, D; Wade, W F

    2001-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of using monoclonal antibodies to target antigen (avidin) to different surface molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC). In particular, we targeted CD40 to test whether the "adjuvant" properties of CD40 signaling combined with targeted antigen would result in enhanced serologic responses. We targeted avidin to class II as a positive control and to CD11c as a negative control. These surface proteins represent an ensemble of surface molecules that signal upon ligation and that are expressed on professional APC, in particular dendritic cells (DC). We observed that targeting class II molecules on APC was superior to targeting CD40, or CD11c. However, CD40 and CD11c could function as targets for antigen bound monoclonal antibodies under certain conditions. Interestingly, inclusion of anti-CD40 mAb with the targeting anti-class II-targeted antigens negatively affects humoral response, suggesting that CD40 signaling under certain conditions may suppress processing and/or presentation of targeted antigen. PMID:11360928

  5. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domina

    Full Text Available There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  6. Original encounter with antigen determines antigen-presenting cell imprinting of the quality of the immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Abadie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining a certain multi-functionality of cellular immunity for the control of infectious diseases is a burning question in immunology and in vaccine design. Early events, including antigen shuttling to secondary lymphoid organs and recruitment of innate immune cells for adaptive immune response, determine host responsiveness to antigens. However, the sequence of these events and their impact on the quality of the immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we chose to study Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA which is now replacing live Smallpox vaccines and is proposed as an attenuated vector for vaccination strategies against infectious diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed in vivo mechanisms triggered following intradermal (i.d. and intramuscular (i.m. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA administration. We demonstrated significant differences in the antigen shuttling to lymphoid organs by macrophages (MPhis, myeloid dendritic cells (DCs, and neutrophils (PMNs. MVA i.d. administration resulted in better antigen distribution and more sustained antigen-presenting cells (APCs recruitment into draining lymph nodes than with i.m. administration. These APCs, which comprise both DCs and MPhis, were differentially involved in T cell priming and shaped remarkably the quality of cytokine-producing virus-specific T cells according to the entry route of MVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study improves our understanding of the mechanisms of antigen delivery and their consequences on the quality of immune responses and provides new insights for vaccine development.

  7. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  8. Comparison of antigen-specific T-cell responses of tuberculosis patients using complex or single antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, A S; Amoudy, H A; Wiker, H G;

    1998-01-01

    We have screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from tuberculosis (TB) patients for proliferative reactivity and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion against a panel of purified recombinant (r) and natural (n) culture filtrate (rESAT-6, nMPT59, nMPT64 and nMPB70) and somatic-derived (r......GroES, rPstS, rGroEL and rDnaK) antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The responses of PBMC to these defined antigens were compared with the corresponding results obtained with complex antigens, such as whole-cell M. tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate (MT-CF) and cell wall antigens, as well...... as the vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). In addition, M. tuberculosis and MT-CF-induced T-cell lines were tested in the same assays against the panel of purified and complex antigens. The compiled data from PBMC and T-cell lines tested for antigen-induced proliferation and IFN...

  9. Immunization of rabbits with nematode Ascaris lumbricoides antigens induces antibodies cross-reactive to house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takuya; Khan, Al Fazal; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akemi; Fukutomi, Yuma; Takai, Toshiro; Zaman, Khalequz; Yunus, Md; Takeuchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    There are controversial reports on the relationship between helminthic infection and allergic diseases. Although IgE cross-reactivity between nematode Ascaris antigens and house dust-mite allergens in allergic patients have been reported, whether Ascaris or the mite is the primary sensitizer remains unknown. Here we found that immunization of naïve animals with Ascaris lumbricoides (Al) antigens induced production of antibodies cross-reactive to mite antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Sera from Bangladeshi children showed IgE reactivity to Ascaris and mite extracts. IgG from rabbits immunized with Al extract exhibited reactivity to Df antigens. Treatment of the anti-Al antibody with Df antigen-coupled beads eliminated the reactivity to Df antigens. In immunoblot analysis, an approximately 100-kDa Df band was the most reactive to anti-Al IgG. The present study is the first step towards the establishment of animal models to study the relationship between Ascaris infection and mite-induced allergic diseases.

  10. Comparison of Excretory-Secretory and Somatic Antigens of Ornithobilharzia turkestanicum in Agar Gel Diffusion Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Miranzadeh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ornithobilharziosis as one of the parasitic infections may give rise to serious economic problems in animal husbandry. The Aim of the study was to prepare and compare the somatic and excretory-secretory (ES antigens of O. tur­kestanicum in gel diffusion test. Methods: Excretory-secretory (ES and somatic antigens of Ornithobilharzia turkestanicum were prepared from collected worms from mesentric blood vessels of infected sheep. The laboratory bred rabbits were immunized with antigens and then antisera were prepared. The reaction of antigens and antisera was observed in gel diffusion test. Results: ES antigens of this species showed positive reaction with antisera raised against ES and also somatic antigens. Somatic antigens also showed positive reaction with antisera raised against somatic and also ES antigens. Conclusion: The antigenicity of O. turkestanicum ES and somatic antigens is the same in gel diffusion test.

  11. Identification of antigenic proteins of the nosocomial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hoppe

    Full Text Available The continuous expansion of nosocomial infections around the globe has become a precarious situation. Key challenges include mounting dissemination of multiple resistances to antibiotics, the easy transmission and the growing mortality rates of hospital-acquired bacterial diseases. Thus, new ways to rapidly detect these infections are vital. Consequently, researchers around the globe pursue innovative approaches for point-of-care devices. In many cases the specific interaction of an antigen and a corresponding antibody is pivotal. However, the knowledge about suitable antigens is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify novel antigens as specific diagnostic markers. Additionally, these proteins might be aptly used for the generation of vaccines to improve current treatment options. Hence, a cDNA-based expression library was constructed and screened via microarrays to detect novel antigens of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a prominent agent of nosocomial infections well-known for its extensive antibiotics resistance, especially by extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL. After screening 1536 clones, 14 previously unknown immunogenic proteins were identified. Subsequently, each protein was expressed in full-length and its immunodominant character examined by ELISA and microarray analyses. Consequently, six proteins were selected for epitope mapping and three thereof possessed linear epitopes. After specificity analysis, homology survey and 3d structural modelling, one epitope sequence GAVVALSTTFA of KPN_00363, an ion channel protein, was identified harboring specificity for K. pneumoniae. The remaining epitopes showed ambiguous results regarding the specificity for K. pneumoniae. The approach adopted herein has been successfully utilized to discover novel antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica antigens before. Now, we have transferred this knowledge to the key nosocomial agent, K. pneumoniae. By identifying several novel antigens

  12. The Impacts of Helicobacter Pylori Antigen Positivity on Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Erkol Ižnal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to clarify the impacts of H. pylori infection on disease activity and clinical findings of AS. Material and Method: Forty-eight patients with AS were included in this study. The demographic data including age, sex, durations of the disease and medication of the patients were recorded. The laboratory analysis comprised Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP and H. pylori antigen determination in gaita. The disease activity, functional disability and clinical status were assessed using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional index (BASFI and The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI respectively. We divided patients according to H. pylori antigen positivity in gaita as H. pylori positive and negative patients.Results: The mean age of patients was 41.9 11.8. CRP levels were slightly but not significantly higher in patients with positive H. pylori antigen compared to those in patients without H. pylori antigen in gaita (p=0.08. There was no significant difference in terms of ESR levels, BASDAI, BASFI and BASMI scores in patients with positive H. pylori antigen compared to those in patients with negative H. pylori antigen in gaita (p-values were >0.05 for all. In regression model BASDAI score was found to have no relationship with H. pylori antigen positivity, ESR and CRP levels (p-values were >0.05 for all. Discussion: H. pylori seemed to have probable impacts on the disease activity of AS. Studies with greater patient population and longer follow-up periods are warranted to enlighten this issue.

  13. O-antigen modulates infection-induced pain states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    Full Text Available The molecular initiators of infection-associated pain are not understood. We recently found that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC elicited acute pelvic pain in murine urinary tract infection (UTI. UTI pain was due to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS and its receptor, TLR4, but pain was not correlated with inflammation. LPS is known to drive inflammation by interactions between the acylated lipid A component and TLR4, but the function of the O-antigen polysaccharide in host responses is unknown. Here, we examined the role of O-antigen in pain using cutaneous hypersensitivity (allodynia to quantify pelvic pain behavior and using sacral spinal cord excitability to quantify central nervous system manifestations in murine UTI. A UPEC mutant defective for O-antigen biosynthesis induced chronic allodynia that persisted long after clearance of transient infections, but wild type UPEC evoked only acute pain. E. coli strains lacking O-antigen gene clusters had a chronic pain phenotype, and expressing cloned O-antigen gene clusters altered the pain phenotype in a predictable manner. Chronic allodynia was abrogated in TLR4-deficient mice, but inflammatory responses in wild type mice were similar among E. coli strains spanning a wide range of pain phenotypes, suggesting that O-antigen modulates pain independent of inflammation. Spinal cords of mice with chronic allodynia exhibited increased spontaneous firing and compromised short-term depression, consistent with centralized pain. Taken together, these findings suggest that O-antigen functions as a rheostat to modulate LPS-associated pain. These observations have implications for an infectious etiology of chronic pain and evolutionary modification of pathogens to alter host behaviors.

  14. Identification of Antigenic Proteins of the Nosocomial Pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F.; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The continuous expansion of nosocomial infections around the globe has become a precarious situation. Key challenges include mounting dissemination of multiple resistances to antibiotics, the easy transmission and the growing mortality rates of hospital-acquired bacterial diseases. Thus, new ways to rapidly detect these infections are vital. Consequently, researchers around the globe pursue innovative approaches for point-of-care devices. In many cases the specific interaction of an antigen and a corresponding antibody is pivotal. However, the knowledge about suitable antigens is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify novel antigens as specific diagnostic markers. Additionally, these proteins might be aptly used for the generation of vaccines to improve current treatment options. Hence, a cDNA-based expression library was constructed and screened via microarrays to detect novel antigens of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a prominent agent of nosocomial infections well-known for its extensive antibiotics resistance, especially by extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). After screening 1536 clones, 14 previously unknown immunogenic proteins were identified. Subsequently, each protein was expressed in full-length and its immunodominant character examined by ELISA and microarray analyses. Consequently, six proteins were selected for epitope mapping and three thereof possessed linear epitopes. After specificity analysis, homology survey and 3d structural modelling, one epitope sequence GAVVALSTTFA of KPN_00363, an ion channel protein, was identified harboring specificity for K. pneumoniae. The remaining epitopes showed ambiguous results regarding the specificity for K. pneumoniae. The approach adopted herein has been successfully utilized to discover novel antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella enterica antigens before. Now, we have transferred this knowledge to the key nosocomial agent, K. pneumoniae. By identifying several novel antigens and their linear

  15. Advances in identification and application of tumor antigen inducing anti-cancer responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor antigen is one of the important bases of tumor immunotherapy[1]. With the discovery of novel tumor antigens, interest in specific immunotherapy for treatment of malignancies has increased substantially. Nowadays more and more scientists paid close attention to various tumor antigens with their roles or/and applications in anti-cancer immune responses, immune tolerance, tumor markers, tumor immunotherapy and so on. Here we discussed the classification of tumor antigens and summarized the technologies of identification and application of tumor antigens.

  16. A rapid radioimmunoassay for determination of tumor antigens with reference to carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel experimental procedure for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by a solid phase microradioimmunoassay has been developed. Goat anti-CEA antibodies were immobilized by coupling to cyanogen bromide activated filter paper discs. The inhibition of binding of radioiodinated CEA to the discs was proportional to the amount of unlabelled CEA present in the test sample. The experimental procedure involved two steps: (i) the test material containing unlabelled CEA was allowed to react with the antibody coated discs at 37 deg C for 2 hrs., and (ii) a standard amount of 125I-CEA was added to the reaction mixture and incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C or room temperature. The discs were then washed 4 times and the radioactivity of each disc was determined. The sensitivity of the test in its present state of development was 2.5 ng/ml. (author)

  17. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutz, M.; Giquel, B.; Hu, Q.; Abuknesha, R.; Uematsu, S.; Akira, S.; Nestle, F.O.; Diebold, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC) by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is par

  18. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  19. A new antigen retrieval technique for human brain tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Alelú-Paz

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times.

  20. Production of Trichophyton mentagrophytes antigens and their characterization in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Venturini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The participation of dermatophytic antigens in the host-parasite balance is still poorly understood. One of the difficulties encountered by researchers is the lack of dominant and specific antigens that can be used in such studies. In order to contribute to a better understanding of this aspect of infection, the present study identifies antigen fractions obtained from exoantigen and cytoplasmic extracts of Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of 13 proteins in the exoantigen extract, whose molecular weight ranged from 12.5 to 90 kDa. The cytoplasmic extract contained 18 protein fractions ranging from 11 to 110 kDa. Immunoblotting showed the presence of immunodominant antigens against IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. This affinity was observed in three proteins of the exoantigen extract and in three proteins of the cytoplasmic extract, with respective molecular weights of 33, 39 and 59, and 40, 55 and 82 kDa. These results are promising, especially when considering that these extracts contain antigenically distinct protein fractions which, once determined, may contribute to a better understanding of dermatophytoses, and may thus help in the development of alternative strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  1. Pericyte antigens in angiomyolipoma and PEComa family tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Asatrian, Greg; Barnhill, Raymond; Lugassy, Claire; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2015-08-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are an uncommon family of soft tissue tumors with dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. Although PEComa family tumors commonly demonstrate a perivascular growth pattern, pericyte antigen expression has not yet been examined among this unique tumor group. Previously, we demonstrated that a subset of perivascular soft tissue tumors exhibit a striking pericytic immunophenotype, with diffuse expression of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Here, we describe the presence of pericyte antigens across a diverse group of PEComa family tumors (n = 19 specimens). Results showed that pericyte antigens differed extensively by histological appearance. Typical angiomyolipoma (AML) specimens showed variable expression of pericyte antigens among both perivascular and myoid-appearing cells. In contrast, AML specimens with a predominant spindled morphology showed diffuse expression of pericyte markers, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. AML samples with predominant epithelioid morphology showed a marked reduction in or the absence of immunoreactivity for pericyte markers. Lymphangiomyoma samples showed more variable and partial pericyte marker expression. In summary, pericyte antigen expression is variable among PEComa family tumors and largely varies by tumor morphology. Pericytic marker expression in PEComa may represent a true pericytic cell of origin, or alternatively aberrant pericyte marker adoption. Markers of pericytic differentiation may be of future diagnostic utility for the evaluation of mesenchymal tumors, or identify actionable signaling pathways for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26123600

  2. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, JS Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12217.001 PMID:27113719

  3. Prediction of antigenic determinants of trichosanthin by molecular modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEYONGNING; ZONGXIANGXIA; 等

    1996-01-01

    The antigenic determinants of trichosanthin were predicted by molecular modeling.First,the threedimensional structure model of the antigen-binding fragment of anti-trichosanthin immunoglobulin E was built on the basis of its amino-acid sequence and the known three-dimensional structure of an antibody with similar sequence.Secondly,the preferable antigen-antibody interactions were obtained based on the known three-dimensional structure of trichosanthin and of the hypervariable regions of anti-trichosanthin immunoglobulin E.Two regions in the molecular surface of trichosanthin were found to form extensive interactions with the hypervariable regions of the antibody and have been predicted to be the possible antigenic determinants:one is composed of two polypeptide segments,Ile201-Glu210 and Ile225-Asp229,which are close to each other in the three-dimensional structure;and the other is the segment Lys173-Thr178.The former region seems to be the more reasonable antigenic determinant than the latter one.

  4. Reassessing target antigens for adoptive T cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy can target and kill widespread malignant cells thereby inducing durable clinical responses in melanoma and selected other malignances. However, many commonly targeted tumor antigens are also expressed by healthy tissues, and T cells do not distinguish between benign and malignant tissues if both express the target antigen. As such, autoimmune toxicity from T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissue has limited the development and adoption of this otherwise promising type of cancer therapy. A review of the unique biology of T-cell therapy and of recent clinical experience compels a reassessment of target antigens that traditionally have been viewed from the perspective of weaker immunotherapeutic modalities. In selecting target antigens for adoptive T-cell therapy, expression by tumors and not by essential healthy tissues is of paramount importance. The risk of autoimmune adverse events can be further mitigated by generating antigen receptors using strategies that reduce the chance of cross-reactivity against epitopes in unintended targets. In general, a circumspect approach to target selection and thoughtful preclinical and clinical studies are pivotal to the ongoing advancement of these promising treatments. PMID:24142051

  5. Successive Administration of Streptococcus Type 5 Group A Antigens and S. typhimurium Antigenic Complex Corrects Elevation of Serum Cytokine Concentration and Number of Bone Marrow Stromal Pluripotent Cells in CBA Mice Induced by Each Antigen Separately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorskaya, Yu F; Danilova, T A; Grabko, V I; Nesterenko, V G

    2015-12-01

    Administration of bacterial antigens to CBA mice induced an increase in serum concentration of virtually all cytokines with a peak in 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens and in 7 h after administration of streptococcus antigens. In 20 h, cytokine concentrations returned to the control level or were slightly below it. In 4 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, we observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, GM-CSF, IL-12, and TNF-α, in comparison with injection S. typhimurium antigens alone and IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF, and TNF-α in comparison with injection of streptococcus antigens alone; the concentrations of IL-2 and IFN-γ, in contrast, increased by 1.5 times in this case. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens, the number of multipotential stromal cells (MSC) in the bone marrow and their cloning efficiency (ECF-MSC) increased by 4.8 and 4.4 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, while after administration of streptococcus antigens by 2.6 and 2.4 times, respectively. In 20 h after administration of S. typhimurium antigens preceded 3 h before by administration of streptococcus antigens, these parameters increased by 3.2 and 2.9 times, respectively, in comparison with the control, i.e. the observed increase in the level of MSC count and ECF-MSC is more consistent with the response of the stromal tissue to streptococcus antigens. Thus, successive administration of two bacterial antigens corrected both serum cytokine profiles and MSC response to administration of each antigen separately, which indicates changeability of the stromal tissue in response to changes in the immune response.

  6. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    The liver tissues of man and certain animals (dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, etc.) yield, upon alcoholic extraction, various substances which may be divided by their physical and chemical properties into several groups. While many substances are present in the alcoholic extract, the ones possessing antigenic properties are comparatively few. The latter are responsible for the antigenic properties exhibited by the whole alcoholic extract. The substances extracted with alcohol were fractionated into the following four groups. (a) Substances Insoluble in Ether and Hot Alcohol.-These are chiefly proteins and salts. The proteins are probably the minute particles of larger molecules held in apparent suspension in alcohol until all other substances are removed. The water extracted from the tissues and admixed with alcohol is also an essential factor in extracting these particles in an alcoholic solution. The salts present are the usual physiological constituents of the liver, notably, sodium chloride. The quantity of these substances extracted with alcohol varies greatly with different specimens. Biologically considered, they are neither markedly hemolytic nor anticomplementary and possess no antigenic property for the Wassermann reaction. It is important, however, to note that the proteins bind complement when mixed with certain active human sera. For this reason a preparation of antigen containing this group of substances is unsuitable for use in combination with an active serum, and should, therefore, be rejected. (b) Substances Insoluble in Ether and Soluble in Hot Alcohol.-This group contains soaps, cleavage products of proteins, and small amounts of the bile salts. Soaps and bile salts are very strongly hemolytic and are absolutely unfit for use as antigen. Moreover, their antigenic properties are very slight. It is best to eliminate this group of substances from the preparation of antigen. The quantity of the substances of this group extracted from different specimens

  7. Development of the Artificial Antigens for the Organophosphorus Insecticide chlorpyrifos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guo-nian; WU Gang; WU Hui-ming

    2004-01-01

    This study reported that the hapten of the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos,O,Odiethyl-O-[3,5-dichloro-6-(2-carboxyethyl)thio-2-pyridyl]phosphorothioate(named AR) was synthesized by using technical grade chlorpyrifos reacted with 3-marcapropanoic acid in hot alkaline solution.The hapten was conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the modified active ester method to form artificial immune antigen.The ratio of AR:BSA was 39:1.The artificial coating antigen for chlorpyrifos was synthesized by conjugating AR to ovalbumin (OVA) with the mixed-anhydride method,and the ratio was 13:1.The anti-chlorpyrifos polyclonal antibodies were obtained by using the artificial immune antigen (AR-BSA) to immune in the rabbits.

  8. MHC Class Ⅰ Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barry Flutter; Bin Gao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅰ molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class Ⅰ molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class Ⅰ complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class Ⅰ expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class Ⅰ presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  9. MHC Class I Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BarryFlutter; BinGao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class I molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class I complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class I expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class I presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  10. Characterization of oligosaccharides from an antigenic mannan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M; Davies, M J; Bailey, D; Gradwell, M J; Smestad-Paulsen, B; Wold, J K; Barnes, R M; Hounsell, E F

    1998-08-01

    Mannans of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been implicated as containing the allergens to which bakers and brewers are sensitive and also the antigen recognized by patients with Crohn's disease. A fraction of S. cerevisiae mannan, Sc500, having high affinity for antibodies in Crohn's patients has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy followed by fragmentation using alkaline elimination, partial acid hydrolysis and acetolysis. The released oligosaccharides were separated by gel filtration on a Biogel P4 column and analyzed by fluorescence labeling, HPLC and methylation analysis. The relationship between structure and antigen activity was measured by competitive ELISA. The antigenic activity of the original high molecular weight mannan could be ascribed to terminal Manalpha1-->3Manalpha1-->2 sequences which are rarely found in human glycoproteins but were over-represented in Sc500 compared to other yeast mannans.

  11. A neuronal antigen in the brains of Alzheimer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolozin, B L; Pruchnicki, A; Dickson, D W; Davies, P

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody was prepared against pooled homogenates of brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. This antibody recognizes an antigen present in much higher concentration in certain brain regions of Alzheimer patients than in normal brain. The antigen appears to be a protein present in neurons involved in the formation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and in some morphologically normal neurons in sections from Alzheimer brains. Partial purification and Western blot analysis revealed the antigen from Alzheimer brain to be a single protein with a molecular weight of 68,000. Application of the same purification procedure to normal brain tissue results in the detection of small amounts of a protein of lower molecular weight. PMID:3083509

  12. COTA (colon-ovarian tumor antigen). An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, K D; Fenoglio-Preiser, C M; Berry, C O; Zamora, P O; Ram, M D; Fulks, R M; Rhodes, B A

    1986-07-01

    A goat anti-serum was prepared against mucinous ovarian cyst fluid and absorbed with normal colon and a variety of normal tissues until the only residual immunoreactivity was directed against colon cancer and ovarian tumor mucin. The set of antigenic determinants defined by this anti-serum has been called COTA, standing for colon-ovarian-tumor-antigen. This highly absorbed anti-serum (anti-COTA) was used for immunohistochemical staining of 42 different tissues in parallel with staining with a goat anti-CEA, which was also highly absorbed. The results suggest that COTA is a highly sensitive and specific antigen for colon carcinoma and may have potential for the early detection of malignant changes predictive of cancer of the colon.

  13. Artificial Loading of ASC Specks with Cytosolic Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Can Sahillioğlu

    Full Text Available Inflammasome complexes form upon interaction of Nod Like Receptor (NLR proteins with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAPMS inside the cytosol. Stimulation of a subset of inflammasome receptors including NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 triggers formation of the micrometer-sized spherical supramolecular complex called the ASC speck. The ASC speck is thought to be the platform of inflammasome activity, but the reason why a supramolecular complex is preferred against oligomeric platforms remains elusive. We observed that a set of cytosolic proteins, including the model antigen ovalbumin, tend to co-aggregate on the ASC speck. We suggest that co-aggregation of antigenic proteins on the ASC speck during intracellular infection might be instrumental in antigen presentation.

  14. Delayed type hypersensitivity to allogeneic mouse epidermal cell antigens, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low dose of ultraviolet B radiation impairs the effectiveness of epidermal cell antigens. We studied the effect of ultraviolet B radiation on the delayed type hypersensitivity induced by allogeneic epidermal cell antigen. The delayed type hypersensitivity response was assayed by footpad swelling in mice. When epidermal cells were exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (660 J/m2), their ability to induce T cells of delayed type hypersensitivity activation was markedly inhibited in any combination of recipient mice and allogeneic epidermal cells. The effect of ultraviolet B radiation on epidermal cells was observed before immunization and challenge. Ultraviolet B treated epidermal cells did not induce suppressor T cells in mice. These results indicate that ultraviolet B radiation destroys the antigenicity of epidermal cells. (author)

  15. Internalization and presentation of myelin antigens by the brain endothelium guides antigen-specific T cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kamermans, Alwin; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van het Hof, Bert; Wierts, Laura; O'Toole, Tom; Boeve, Daniël; Verstege, Marleen; van der Pol, Susanne MA; van Kooyk, Yvette; de Vries, Helga E; Unger, Wendy WJ

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells across the brain endothelium, an essential step in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), is suggested to be an antigen-specific process, yet which cells provide this signal is unknown. Here we provide direct evidence that under inflammatory conditions, brain endothelial cells (BECs) stimulate the migration of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells by acting as non-professional antigen presenting cells through the processing and presentation of myelin-derived antigens in MHC-II. Inflamed BECs internalized myelin, which was routed to endo-lysosomal compartment for processing in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, myelin/MHC-II complexes on inflamed BECs stimulated the trans-endothelial migration of myelin-reactive Th1 and Th17 2D2 cells, while control antigen loaded BECs did not stimulate T-cell migration. Furthermore, blocking the interaction between myelin/MHC-II complexes and myelin-reactive T-cells prevented T-cell transmigration. These results demonstrate that endothelial cells derived from the brain are capable of enhancing antigen-specific T cell recruitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13149.001 PMID:27336724

  16. Cross-reactive Legionella antigens and the antibody response during infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G; Pearlman, E;

    1991-01-01

    In order to define cross-reactive Legionella antigens suitable for diagnostic purposes, we investigated sonicate antigens from two Legionella species, including two serogroups of L. pneumophila. The antigens were reacted with heterologous and homologous rabbit antisera in Western blot. Sera from...... seven patients with culture-verified L. pneumophila infection and nine patients with serologically confirmed L. micdadei infection were also investigated for reactivity with the corresponding antigens. Among the cross-reactive Legionella antigens defined, non-specific reactivity in patients' sera...... with the 58-kDa common antigen (CA) was noted. Specific reactions were observed with the Legionella flagellum antigen and with the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) protein; with both antigens, however, the reactive sera were too few to suggest the use of a single antigen in a diagnostic test....

  17. [Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasik, Ewa; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2016-01-01

    Duffy (Fy) blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1) and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fy(a) and Fy(b), encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fy(a) and Fy(b) antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fy(a) and/or Fy(b) on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-), Fy(a-b+) and Fy(a+b+), identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-), frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fy(b) antigen. Fy(x) antigen differs from the native Fy(b) by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally. PMID:26943312

  18. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Łukasik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duffy (Fy blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1 and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fya and Fyb antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fya and/or Fyb on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-, Fy(a-b+ and Fy(a+b+, identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-, frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fyb antigen. Fyx antigen differs from the native Fyb by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally. Tytuł główny Tak

  19. Antigenic properties of avian hepatitis E virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-10-22

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the main causative agent of big liver and spleen disease and hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens, and is genetically and antigenically related to mammalian HEVs. HEV capsid protein contains immunodominant epitopes and induces a protective humoral immune response. A better understanding of the antigenic composition of this protein is critically important for the development of effective vaccine and sensitive and specific serological assays. To date, six linear antigenic domains (I-VI) have been characterized in avian HEV capsid protein and analyzed for their applications in the serological diagnosis and vaccine design. Domains I and V induce strong immune response in chickens and are common to avian, human, and swine HEVs, indicating that the shared epitopes hampering differential diagnosis of avian HEV infection. Domains III and IV are not immunodominant and elicit a weak immune response. Domain VI, located in the N-terminal region of the capsid protein, can also trigger an intense immune response, but the anti-domain VI antibodies are transient. The protection analysis showed that the truncated capsid protein containing the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues expressed by the bacterial system can provide protective immunity against avian HEV infection in chickens. However, the synthetic peptides incorporating the different linear antigenic domains (I-VI) and epitopes are non-protective. The antigenic composition of avian HEV capsid protein is altogether complex. To develop an effective vaccine and accurate serological diagnostic methods, more conformational antigenic domains or epitopes are to be characterized in detail. PMID:26340899

  20. Relationship between Asthma and Allergic Antigens in Rural Houses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUEn-Chun; LIZhng-Min; 等

    1993-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most frequent and common diseases in China.It seriously threatens the health of the population.It is evident that mites present in rural houses may serve as an allergic antigen.In our survey,we have found several kindos of mites in farmers' houses in the northeastern part of China which have very close relation with asthmatic diseases.Investigations in rural houses further proved that the cause of asthma is certainly related with the allergic antigen of mites.The methods of prevention and contorl of mites are enumerated.

  1. Identification of a Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Kodelja, Vitam; Lucas, Kurt; Barnert, Sabine; Kleist, Sabine von; Thompson, John A.; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The existence of a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like gene family in rat has been demonstrated through isolation and sequencing of the N- terminal domain exons of presumably five discrete genes (rnCGM1-5). This finding will allow for the first time the study of functional and clinical aspects of the tumor marker CEA and related antigens in an animal model. Sequence comparison with the corresponding regions of members of the human CEA gene family revealed a relatively low similarity at the am...

  2. Serum levels of fetal antigen 1 in extreme nutritional States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andries, Alin; Niemeier, Andreas; Støving, Rene K;

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Recent data suggest that fetal antigen (FA1) is linked to disorders of body weight. Thus, we measured FA1 serum levels in two extreme nutritional states of morbid obesity (MO) and anorexia nervosa (AN) and monitored its response to weight changes. Design. FA1 and insulin serum concentr......Objective. Recent data suggest that fetal antigen (FA1) is linked to disorders of body weight. Thus, we measured FA1 serum levels in two extreme nutritional states of morbid obesity (MO) and anorexia nervosa (AN) and monitored its response to weight changes. Design. FA1 and insulin serum...

  3. Cloning of a species-specific antigen of Mycobacterium bovis.

    OpenAIRE

    Radford, A J; Duffield, B J; Plackett, P

    1988-01-01

    A DNA library from a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis was constructed in the expression vector lambda gt11, and the library was probed with antisera to M. bovis. Clones expressing M. bovis antigens were isolated and characterized by using M. bovis-specific monoclonal antibodies that recognize a 22,000-molecular-weight protein (MPB70). MPB70 is a major protein antigen of the vaccine strain of M. bovis BCG and of virulent M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. Of 32 clones ...

  4. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H.; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M.

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decrease...

  5. Mite antigen and allergen contents of house dust samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii,Akira

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available The house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigen and allergen contents were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with enzyme-labelled anti-human IgE and anti-mite rabbit IgG antibodies. Antigen content was high in dust samples from homes of patients with allergy but not in samples from homes of patients with Kawasaki disease or of normal control subjects. Allergen content was high in dust samples from homes of Kawasaki disease patients. However, the values overlapped, and we considered these differences to be of little ecological significance, although the assay method itself is useful.

  6. Induction of Autoimmunity to Brain Antigens by Developmental Mercury Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yubin; Gao, Donghong; Bolivar, Valerie J.; Lawrence, David A.

    2010-01-01

    A.SW mice, which are known to be prone to mercury (Hg)-induced immune nephritis, were assessed for their ability to develop autoimmunity to brain antigens after developmental exposure to Hg. Maternal drinking water containing subclinical doses of 1.25μM methyl Hg (MeHg) or 50μM Hg chloride (HgCl2) were used to evaluate developmental (exposure from gestational day 8 to postnatal day 21) induction of immune responses to brain antigens. Only HgCl2 induced autoantibody production; the HgCl2-expos...

  7. State of the Art in Tumor Antigen and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Chames

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of tumor immunology has resulted in multiple approaches for the treatment of cancer. However, a gap between research of new tumors markers and development of immunotherapy has been established and very few markers exist that can be used for treatment. The challenge is now to discover new targets for active and passive immunotherapy. This review aims at describing recent advances in biomarkers and tumor antigen discovery in terms of antigen nature and localization, and is highlighting the most recent approaches used for their discovery including “omics” technology.

  8. State of the Art in Tumor Antigen and Biomarker Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.chames@inserm.fr [INSERM U624, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-06-09

    Our knowledge of tumor immunology has resulted in multiple approaches for the treatment of cancer. However, a gap between research of new tumors markers and development of immunotherapy has been established and very few markers exist that can be used for treatment. The challenge is now to discover new targets for active and passive immunotherapy. This review aims at describing recent advances in biomarkers and tumor antigen discovery in terms of antigen nature and localization, and is highlighting the most recent approaches used for their discovery including “omics” technology.

  9. Regulation of antigen presentation by acidic pH

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The effect of pH on functional association of peptide antigens with APC membranes was investigated by using aldehyde-fixed B cells and class II- restricted T cell hybridomas to assess antigen/MHC complex formation. The results indicated that the rate and extent of functional peptide binding was markedly increased at pH 5.0 as compared with pH 7.3. The pH dependence of binding was preserved after pretreatment of fixed APC with pH 5.0 buffer, suggesting that pH had a direct effect on the intera...

  10. HLA-DP antigens in patients with alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, N; Georgsen, J;

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of HLA-DP antigens were studied in 41 patients with alopecia areata (AA) and 188 ethnically matched controls. An increase of DR4 and possibly DR5 in 24 of these patients has previously been reported. HLA-DP typing for DPw1 through w6 and the local specificity, CDP HEI, was perfor......The distribution of HLA-DP antigens were studied in 41 patients with alopecia areata (AA) and 188 ethnically matched controls. An increase of DR4 and possibly DR5 in 24 of these patients has previously been reported. HLA-DP typing for DPw1 through w6 and the local specificity, CDP HEI...

  11. HLA ANTIGENS AND VOGT-KOYANAGI- HARADA'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Thirty patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Haradas disease were typed for HLA-A and HLA-B antigenic determinants by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA-B22 antigen showed an increased frequency of 43.3% in the patient group(relative risk=8.69; exact P<0.0001; corrected P<0.0025) compared with normal control group(frequency=7.69%). This association suggests that immunogenetic factor may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada's disease.

  12. Blood group antigen distribution in Lao blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keokhamphoui, C; Urwijitaroon, Y; Kongphaly, D; Thammavong, T

    2012-01-01

    Blood group antigens can be distributed differently within different nationalities. Therefore, information about the prevalence of blood group antigens in the Lao population will be useful for providing better blood transfusion services in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of blood group antigens in Lao blood donors. Blood samples from 464 Lao national volunteer blood donors were typed for antigens in various blood group systems including ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, Lewis, Duffy, Kidd, and Diego. The results show similar antigen prevalence to that among Northeast Thais for ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, and Duffy systems. In the ABO system, 0 was the highest at 37.72 percent,followed by 35.56 percent B, 19.83 percent A1, 6.47 percent A1B,and 0.43 percent A2B. The common phenotypes were D+C+E-ce+at 60.43 percent, M+N-S-s+ at 46.55 percent, Fy(a+b-) at 80.82 percent, Jk(a+b+) at 39.44 percent, and kk at 99.72 percent.Interestingly, Le(a-b-) was found at 50.43 percent, which was significantly higher than previous reports in Thais and Taiwanese.The P1 antigen was found in only 18.97 percent, which is much lower than in Whites and Blacks. Rare phenotypes were Fy(a-b+)and Jk(a-b-), found at 0.22 percent and 4.31 percent, respectively.In terms of negative antigens the study shows 0.22 percent Fy(a-), 35.34 percent Jk(a-), 29.53 percent Jk(b-), 3.04 percent C-, 2.39 percent e-, and 5.17 percent M-. The high prevalence of C, e, and Fy" and immunogenicity of these antigens may induce alloimmunization in transfusion-dependent patients, creating difficulties providing blood from Lao donors. The information obtained from this study will be useful for improving transfusion therapy in the country, especially for estimation of the availability of compatible blood for patients who have produced antibodies. PMID:23421543

  13. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  14. Immune complexes that contain HIV antigens activate peripheral blood T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolevskaya, L B; Shmagel, K V; Saidakova, E V; Shmagel, N G; Chereshnev, V A

    2016-07-01

    Uninfected donor T cells were treated in vitro by model immune complexes that contained either HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens. Unlike HCV antigen-containing complexes, the immune complexes that contained HIV antigens have been shown to activate peripheral blood T cells of uninfected donors under in vitro conditions. Both the antiviral antibodies and HIV antigen were involved in the activation process. The unique properties of the immune complexes formed by HIV antigens and antiviral antibodies are believed to result from the virus-specific antibody properties and molecular conformation of the antigen-antibody complex. PMID:27595830

  15. Unpolarized release of vaccinia virus and HIV antigen by colchicine treatment enhances intranasal HIV antigen expression and mucosal humoral responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available The induction of a strong mucosal immune response is essential to building successful HIV vaccines. Highly attenuated recombinant HIV vaccinia virus can be administered mucosally, but even high doses of immunization have been found unable to induce strong mucosal antibody responses. In order to solve this problem, we studied the interactions of recombinant HIV vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (rVTT-gagpol in mucosal epithelial cells (specifically Caco-2 cell layers and in BALB/c mice. We evaluated the impact of this virus on HIV antigen delivery and specific immune responses. The results demonstrated that rVTT-gagpol was able to infect Caco-2 cell layers and both the nasal and lung epithelia in BALB/c mice. The progeny viruses and expressed p24 were released mainly from apical surfaces. In BALB/c mice, the infection was limited to the respiratory system and was not observed in the blood. This showed that polarized distribution limited antigen delivery into the whole body and thus limited immune response. To see if this could be improved upon, we stimulated unpolarized budding of the virus and HIV antigens by treating both Caco-2 cells and BALB/c mice with colchicine. We found that, in BALB/c mice, the degree of infection and antigen expression in the epithelia went up. As a result, specific immune responses increased correspondingly. Together, these data suggest that polarized budding limits antigen delivery and immune responses, but unpolarized distribution can increase antigen expression and delivery and thus enhance specific immune responses. This conclusion can be used to optimize mucosal HIV vaccine strategies.

  16. Identification of a highly antigenic linear B cell epitope within Plasmodium vivax apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Lacerda Bueno

    Full Text Available Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1 is considered to be a major candidate antigen for a malaria vaccine. Previous immunoepidemiological studies of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1 have shown a higher prevalence of specific antibodies to domain II (DII of AMA-1. In the present study, we confirmed that specific antibody responses from naturally infected individuals were highly reactive to both full-length AMA-1 and DII. Also, we demonstrated a strong association between AMA-1 and DII IgG and IgG subclass responses. We analyzed the primary sequence of PvAMA-1 for B cell linear epitopes co-occurring with intrinsically unstructured/disordered regions (IURs. The B cell epitope comprising the amino acid sequence 290-307 of PvAMA-1 (SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK, with the highest prediction scores, was identified in domain II and further selected for chemical synthesis and immunological testing. The antigenicity of the synthetic peptide was identified by serological analysis using sera from P. vivax-infected individuals who were knowingly reactive to the PvAMA-1 ectodomain only, domain II only, or reactive to both antigens. Although the synthetic peptide was recognized by all serum samples specific to domain II, serum with reactivity only to the full-length protein presented 58.3% positivity. Moreover, IgG reactivity against PvAMA-1 and domain II after depletion of specific synthetic peptide antibodies was reduced by 18% and 33% (P = 0.0001 for both, respectively. These results suggest that the linear epitope SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK is highly antigenic during natural human infections and is an important antigenic region of the domain II of PvAMA-1, suggesting its possible future use in pre-clinical studies.

  17. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  18. A carcinoembryonic antigen-secreting adenocarcinoma arising in tailgut cyst: clinical implications of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Nam Kyu; Lim, Beom Jin; Kang, Sang Ook; Sohn, Ju Hyuk; Roh, Jae Kyung; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Sung Ai; Park, Se Eun

    2005-08-31

    Tailgut cysts (TGCs) are rare congenital cysts that occur in the retrorectal or presacral spaces. Although most tailgut cysts have been reported as benign, there have been at least 9 cases associated with malignant change. We report herein on an unusual case of a 40-year-old woman with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing adenocarcinoma arising within a TGC who underwent surgical resection and local radiation therapy. Despite the complete resection, metastatic adenocarcinoma developed five months after surgery. CEA-producing adenocarcinoma from a TGC is extremely rare and only two cases, including this case, have been reported in the English medical literature. Besides CEA, the serum levels of CA 19-9 became markedly elevated in this patient. Given that the serum CEA level decreased to the normal range after complete resection of tumor and that the tumor recurrence was associated with a rebound of the CEA serum level, our case shows that serial measurements of serum CEA can be used for treatment planning and for assessing the patient's treatment response for this rare disease. PMID:16127782

  19. Examination of Serum Class I Antigen in Allograft Recipient Rats : Origin and control of serum class I antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Sumimoto, Ryo; Fukuda, Yasuhiko; Shinomiya, Takahisa; Asahara, Toshimasa; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1998-01-01

    We examined the appearance of DA type (RT1Aa) class I antigen in the serum of rats that had received isogeneic or allogeneic liver grafts (DA into DA, DA into LEW, PVG into DA, PVG into F1 hybrid (DAxPVG). Recipient LEW rats were given either one injection of the anti-CD8 mAb, OX-8, following thymectomy or anti-CD4 mAb (cocktail of OX-35 and OX-38) following thymectomy 3 days prior to liver grafting. We also tested the serum RT1Aa antigen titer of F1 (DAxPVG) recipients after PVG spleen trans...

  20. Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Blood Samples Positive for Antibodies to Core Antigen and Negative for Surface Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, C.; León, G.; Loureiro, C. L.; Uzcátegui, N.; Liprandi, F.; Pujol, F. H.

    1999-01-01

    Anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative plasma samples from blood donors were tested by nested PCR. DNA positivity was more significantly associated with high levels of anti-HBcAg than with low levels of anti-HBsAg antibodies. Analysis of a dilution of anti-HBcAg antibodies might result in a more rational exclusion of anti-HBcAg-positive HBsAg-negative samples, reducing the number of donations discarded and enabling more countries to incorporate anti-HBcAg testing. PMID:10473534

  1. Phosphorylation of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grässer, F A; Göttel, S; Haiss, P;

    1992-01-01

    A major in vivo phosphorylation site of the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) was found to be localized at the C-terminus of the protein. In vitro phosphorylation studies using casein kinase 1 (CK-1) and casein kinase 2 (CK-2) revealed that EBNA-2 is a substrate for CK-2, but not for CK...

  2. The Prognostic, Diagnostic, and Therapeutic Potential of Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn

    Tumor antigens are a group of proteins recognized by the cells of immune system. Specifically, they are recognized in tumor cells where they are present in larger than usual amounts, or are physiochemically altered to a degree at which they no longer resemble native human proteins. Their presence...

  3. Tumor antigens as proteogenomic biomarkers in invasive ductal carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Winther, Ole;

    2014-01-01

    found to be perturbed. Conclusion: Tumor antigens are a group of proteins recognized by the cells of the immune system. Specifically, they are recognized in tumor cells where they are present in larger than usual amounts, or are physiochemically altered to a degree at which they no longer resemble...

  4. ANTIGEN MG7 IN GASTRIC CANCER AND GASTRIC PRECANCEROUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭冬丽; 宁佩芳; 袁媛

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the dynamic change and its diagnostic significance of MG7 expression in the process of gastric cancer development. Methods: The expression level of antigen MG7 was determined by immunohistochemistry method in 406 cases of gastric mucosa. The classification of intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa was determined by histochemistry method in 82 cases. Results: The positive rate of MG7 expression in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of gastric mucosa and gastric cancer were increased gradually (P<0.01). The positive rate of MG7 expression in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer were increased on sequence (P<0.01). The positive rate of antigen MG7 expression in type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa had significant difference,compared with that in type Ⅰ an Ⅱ intestinal metaplasia (P<0.05). Conclusion: MG7 antigen had close relationship with gastric cancer. Type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and dysplasia should be followed up in order to improve the early detection of gastric cancer. MG7 antigen had great clinical value in the dynamic follow-up of gastric precursors.

  5. Cocktail of Theileria equi antigens for detecting infection in equines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimaa; Abd; El-Salam; El-Sayed; Mohamed; Abdo; Rizk; Mohamed; Alaa; Terkawi; Ahmed; Mousa; El; Said; El; Shirbini; El; Said; Gehad; Elsayed; Mohamed; Fouda; Naoaki; Yokoyama; Ikuo; Igarashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To use two diagnostic antigens belonging to the frequently associated in Theileria domain,Theileria equi(T.equi)protein 82(Te 82)and T.equi 104 k Da microneme-rhoptry antigen precursor(Te 43),to diagnose T.equi infection in horses as compared with equi merozoite antigen-2(EMA-2).Methods:In the current study,we applied a cocktail-ELISA containing two antigens(EMA-2+Te 82)to diagnose T.equi infection either in experimentally infected horses or in field infection.Results:Our findings have revealed that a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 provided a more practical and sensitive diagnostic candidate for diagnosing T.equi infection in horses as compared with Te 82 or Te 43 alone.Conclusions:The ELISA technique using a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 offers a practical and sensitive diagnostic tool for diagnosing T.equi infection in horses and using of this promising cocktail formula will be applicable for epidemiological surveys and will help control the infection in horses.

  6. Cocktail of Theileria equi antigens for detecting infection in equines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimaa Abd El-Salam El-Sayed; Mohamed Abdo Rizk; Mohamed Alaa Terkawi; Ahmed Mousa; El Said El Shirbini El Said; Gehad Elsayed; Mohamed Fouda; Naoaki Yokoyama; Ikuo Igarashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To use two diagnostic antigens belonging to the frequently associated in Theileria domain, Theileria equi (T. equi) protein 82 (Te 82) and T. equi 104 kDa microneme-rhoptry antigen precursor (Te 43), to diagnose T. equi infection in horses as compared with equi merozoite antigen-2 (EMA-2). Methods: In the current study, we applied a cocktail-ELISA containing two antigens (EMA-2+Te 82) to diagnose T. equi infection either in experimentally infected horses or in field infection. Results: Our findings have revealed that a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 provided a more practical and sensitive diagnostic candidate for diagnosing T. equi infection in horses as compared with Te 82 or Te 43 alone. Conclusions: The ELISA technique using a cocktail formula of EMA-2+Te 82 offers a practical and sensitive diagnostic tool for diagnosing T. equi infection in horses and using of this promising cocktail formula will be applicable for epidemiological surveys and will help control the infection in horses.

  7. Chitosan-based delivery systems for protein therapeutics and antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, M.; Mastrobattista, E.; Jiskoot, W.; Hennink, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic peptides/proteins and protein-based antigens are chemically and structurally labile compounds, which are almost exclusively administered by parenteral injections. Recently, non-invasive mucosal routes have attracted interest for administration of these biotherapeutics. Chitosan-based del

  8. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni candidate antigens for diagnosis of schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardenia Braz Figueiredo Carvalho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a more sensitive diagnostic test for schistosomiasis is needed to overcome the limitations of the use of stool examination in low endemic areas. Using parasite antigens in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a promising strategy, however a more rational selection of parasite antigens is necessary. In this study we performed in silico analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome, using SchistoDB database and bioinformatic tools for screening immunogenic antigens. Based on evidence of expression in all parasite life stage within the definitive host, extracellular or plasmatic membrane localization, low similarity to human and other helminthic proteins and presence of predicted B cell epitopes, six candidates were selected: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored 200 kDa protein, two putative cytochrome oxidase subunits, two expressed proteins and one hypothetical protein. The recognition in unidimensional and bidimensional Western blot of protein with similar molecular weight and isoelectric point to the selected antigens by sera from S. mansoni infected mice indicate a good correlation between these two approaches in selecting immunogenic proteins.

  9. Association of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis with Histo-blood Group Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, E; Dwibedi, B; Kar, S K; Pandey, R M

    2016-07-01

    Association of rotavirus gastroenteritis with histo-blood group antigens in children younger than 5 years admitted with diarrhea (n=389) was studied. Distribution of blood groups in rotavirus positive (n=96) and rotavirus negative (n=51) diarrhea gastroenteritis cases did not show any susceptibility to any blood group; blood group O seemed to be protective. PMID:27508550

  10. An accurate radioimmunoassay of human growth hormone with separation on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of free antigen, antigen-antibody complex and damaged labelled antigen. Further study of damaged labelled antigen to obtain long-lasting labelled products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a radioimmunoassay that would be sufficiently accurate and precise to provide a suitable means of determining human growth hormone (hGH) in both extracts and physiological fluids for specific research purposes rather than for routine clinical assays where the labelled products could be used as long as possible. The only technique found that could satisfy these requirements was polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), though in some respects it is more laborious than other techniques. By introducing some modifications to the original method of Davis it was possible, with 11-cm tubes, to separate the free, the antibody-bound, and the damaged labelled antigen on the same gel. The method, being able to detect separately and independently these three components and to give a better control of the analytically dangerous ''damaged'' antigens, furnished accurate and reproducible curves. An example of a determination is the one on KABI-Crescormon which compares the results obtained with the present technique with those presented by another laboratory. Thanks to this method, the labelled antigen could be used for up to one month, after which re-purification on Sephadex enabled the same labelled product to be used profitably for two more months. Parallel to this work, a study has been performed on the various components originating in this so-called process of ''damaging'', and particular importance has been given to a more precise knowledge of the amount of antigen, in terms of mass, present in an assay. (author)

  11. Classification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens by immunoelectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lányi, B; Adám, M M; Szentmihályi, A

    1975-05-01

    Heated saline extracts of 89 strains, and (1) supernates of phenol-water extracts (L1 fractions), (2) purified lipopolysaccharide, (3) trichloracetic-acid (TCA) extracts, and (4) sodium-hydroxide extracts of 23 strains representing all Pseudomonas aeruginosa O antigens were subjected electrophoresis. Precipitation lines obtained with homologous and heterologous antisera were evaluated by electrodensitometric measurement. The characteristics of the immunoelectrophoretic groups established were as follows. Group I: two lines running at different rates towards the anode; three subgroups on the basis of the behaviour of alkali-treated antigens. Group II: triple line at the starting well, alkali sensitive. Group III: triple line at the starting well, alkali resistant; two subgroups according to reactivity or non-reactivity of L1 fractions. Group IV: triple line on the cathode side, alkali resistant, L1 fraction non-reactive. Group V: single line on the anode side, alkali sensitive, L1 fraction and TCA extract non-reactive. O antigens identified by agglutination corresponded closely with the immunoelectrophoretic pattern: strains with identical O antigens or sharing major somatic components fell, with one exception, into the same immunoelectrophoretic group. PMID:806687

  12. The antigen specific composition of melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of tumor associated antigens has been characterized, but only a minor fraction of these are recognized by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes of melanoma, although these have shown the ability to recognize tumor and provide tumor regression upon adoptive transfer. Thus the peptide...... recognition of the majority of the CD8 tumor infiltrating lymphocytes remains to be identified....

  13. The Many Faces of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is an immunological paradox, where fetal antigens encoded by polymorphic genes inherited from the father do not provoke a maternal immune response. The fetus is not rejected as it would be theorized according to principles of tissue transplantation. A major contribution to fetal tolerance...

  14. Antigen retrieval in formaldehyde-fixed human brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, P; Uylings, HBM; Suurmeijer, AJH

    1998-01-01

    Microwave-stimulated antigen retrieval has become a widely accepted method in both pathology and research laboratories. Since the introduction of the method in 1991, many groups have tried to optimize and standardize it. This review describes the present state of the art. A standard method for micro

  15. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  16. Brug af undersøgelse for prostataspecifikt antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukai, Thomas; Bro, Flemming; Pedersen, Knud Venborg;

    2010-01-01

    Introduktion: Cancer prostatae (CP) er den hyppigste kræftform blandt danske mænd, og incidensen er stigende. CP er ofte asymptomatisk, hvilket vanskeliggør klinisk diagnosticering. I udredningen for CP kan man benytte en prøve for prostataspecifikt antigen (PSA)-niveau. Dansk Urologisk Selskab har...

  17. Proteomic selection of immunodiagnostic antigens for Trypanosoma congolense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Fleming

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT presents a severe problem for agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by several trypanosome species and current means of diagnosis are expensive and impractical for field use. Our aim was to discover antigens for the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma congolense, one of the main causative agents of AAT. We took a proteomic approach to identify potential immunodiagnostic parasite protein antigens. One hundred and thirteen proteins were identified which were selectively recognized by infected cattle sera. These were assessed for likelihood of recombinant protein expression in E. coli and fifteen were successfully expressed and assessed for their immunodiagnostic potential by ELISA using pooled pre- and post-infection cattle sera. Three proteins, members of the invariant surface glycoprotein (ISG family, performed favorably and were then assessed using individual cattle sera. One antigen, Tc38630, evaluated blind with 77 randomized cattle sera in an ELISA assay gave sensitivity and specificity performances of 87.2% and 97.4%, respectively. Cattle immunoreactivity to this antigen diminished significantly following drug-cure, a feature helpful for monitoring the efficacy of drug treatment.

  18. New tumor-associated antigen SC6 in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Min-Pei; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Xu, Jian-Hua; Wang, Di; Li, Hong-Yu; Cui, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Ren, Li-Nan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the concentration of a new antigen SC6 (SC6-Ag) recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb) in patients with pancreatic cancer and other malignant or benign diseases and to understand whether SC6-Ag has any clinical significance in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from other gastrointestinal diseases.

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  20. Antigenic and genomic homogeneity of successive Mycoplasma hominis isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Thorsen, P; Møller, B;

    1998-01-01

    Sixty Mycoplasma hominis isolates were obtained from the cervices of pregnant women and from the ears or pharynges of their newborn babies. The isolates were examined by SDS-PAGE and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Antigenic and genomic profiles were obtained for 16 series with two or more...

  1. Expression of Treponema pallidum antigens in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Stamm, L V; Folds, J D; Bassford, P J

    1982-01-01

    A colony bank of recombinant plasmids harboring Treponema pallidum DNA inserts has been established in Escherichia coli K-12. By using an in situ immunoassay, we identified four E. coli clones that expressed T. pallidum antigens. Thus, recombinant DNA technology may provide powerful new tools for studying the pathogenesis of T. pallidum infection.

  2. Predictive value of prostate-specific antigen for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Leah; Borges, Alvaro Humberto; Ravn, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although prostate cancer (PCa) incidence is lower in HIV+ men than in HIV- men, the usefulness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in this population is not well defined and may have higher false negative rates than in HIV- men. We aimed to describe the kinetics and predict...

  3. Glycan bioengineering in immunogen design for tumor T antigen immunotargeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sendra, Victor G; Zlocowski, Natacha; Ditamo, Yanina;

    2009-01-01

    MM2 energy function showed that pentalysine (Lys5) linker and benzyl (Bzl) residue enhance TFD rigidity of the glycosidic bond. Antibodies raised against BzlalphaTFD-Lys5 immunogen recognize tumor T antigen. Competitive assays confirm that TFD-related structures are the main glycan epitope...

  4. Characterization of plant plasma membrane antigens: [Annual] progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protoplast plasma membranes were used to raise antibodies in mice to cell surface antigens. Monoclonal antibodies were selected from those produced and used for indirect immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of N. tabacum cells. In parallel studies cDNA expression libraries were prepared. (DT)

  5. Efficient synthesis of the antigenic phosphoglycans of the Leishmania parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhela, D; Vishwakarma, R A

    2001-10-01

    Antigenic phosphoglycan repeats of the Leishmania parasite can be assembled in a flexible and efficient manner without involving any glycosidation steps, and the chain can be extended either towards the non-reducing (6'-OH) or reducing (1-OH) end suitable for synthesis of lipophosphoglycan, proteophosphoglycan and analogues. PMID:12240271

  6. The universal detection of antigens from one skin biopsy specimen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, H.M.J. van der; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Pasch, M.C.; Boer-van Huizen, R.T. de; Lingen, R.G. van; Erp, P.E.J. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunohistochemistry is an important tool in dermatology but is limited. Certain antigens can only be preserved in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections, while others can only be detected on frozen sections, resulting in situations where two biopsies are needed. We aimed to develop a

  7. Intra-uterine exposure of horses to Sarcocystis spp. antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Antonello

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the intra-uterine exposure to Sarcocystis spp. antigens, determining the number of foals with detectable concentrations of antibodies against these agents in the serum, before colostrum ingestion and collect data about exposure of horses to the parasite. Serum samples were collected from 195 thoroughbred mares and their newborns in two farms from southern Brazil. Parasite specific antibody responses to Sarcocystis antigens were detected using the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT and immunoblot analysis. In 84.1% (159/189 of the pregnant mares and in 7.4% (14/189 of foals we detected antibodies anti-Sarcocystis spp. by IFAT. All samples seropositive from foals were also positive in their respective mares. Serum samples of seropositive foals by IFAT, showed no reactivity on the immunoblot, having as antigens S. neurona merozoites. In conclusion, the intra-uterine exposure to Sarcocystis spp. antigens in horses was demonstrated, with occurrence not only in mares, but also in their foals, before colostrum ingestion these occurrences were reduced.

  8. 42 CFR 410.68 - Antigens: Scope and conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... months that is— (1) Prepared for a patient by a doctor of medicine or osteopathy who has examined the... with the plan of treatment developed by the doctor of medicine or osteopathy who prepared the antigen; and (ii) By a doctor of medicine or osteopathy or by a properly instructed person under...

  9. Radioimmunoprecipitation polyethylene glycol assay for circulating Entamoeba histolytica antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, S.; Mohimen, A.; Mehra, S. (Calcutta Medical Research Inst., Calcutta (India). Kothari Centre of Gastroenterology)

    1982-12-17

    An assay capable of detecting circulating Entamoeba histolytica antigens in amoebiasis is described. This assay utilised a radiolabelled affinity purified rabbit anti-E. histolytica antibody that had been depleted of antibodies that cross-react with human serum proteins, and a polyethylene glycol precipitation step.

  10. Glycosylation of the major human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Koch, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the major rat P. carinii surface antigen is important for initial host-organism attachment, possibly through binding to fibronectin, mannose-binding protein, or surfactant protein A. Since a carbohydrate/lectin interaction may be involved in adhesion, we undertook...

  11. Measuring antigen-specific immune responses: 2008 Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); F. Kern (Florian); F. Manca (Fabrizio); M. Roederer (Mario)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOverall, the last 10 years have seen an explosion in the field of antigen-specific immune response monitoring. As summarized in this issue of Cytometry and at the MASIR conferences, these technologies have provided new insights into the basic biology of the immune system and are beginnin

  12. Distribution of HLA antigens in families of patients with leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since the discovery of major histocompatihility complex influence on manse leukaemia in 1964, an HLA association with leukaemia in humans has been considered as a possible genetic risk factor that contributes to development of leukaemia. In addition to associations of several IILA antigens with leukaemias, it has been observed that patients with leukaemia have an increase in the frequency of HLA identical siblings, higher degree of HLA compatibility with their parents as well as higher parental HLA sharing rate in comparison to the families without patients suffering from leukaemia. Material and methods. To test hypothesis that susceptibility to leukaemia can be caused bv influence of a recessive genes associated with the major histocompatibilily complex in man, we analyzed the distribution of I class HLA antigens in 77 families of patients suffering from different types of leukaemia. In the affected families and in 72 families of healthy controls, we investigated HLA identical sibling frequency, parental sharing of one, two or three HLA antigens and degree of compatibility of parents and off springs: existence of haploidentity, compatibility in l' and 4/4 HLA antigens of A and B loci. Results We have found that in families with affected persons there is a statistically significant difference in number of HLA identical siblings in comparison to the group of healthy controls (t=2,63. Also the results have shown that among the parents of affected persons there is a statistically significant difference in mutual compatibility in one (t=3,012 and two ft= 2,4 HLA antigens. In addition, we observed an increase in the frequency of higher rate of compatibility between patients and their parents (t=3,88 in l' HLA antigens, to their mothers (t=2,83 and to their fathers (t=2,55, respectively, in comparison to the healthy control group. Conclusion The results of this study show that in families with persons suffering from leukaemia there are

  13. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered

  14. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

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    T.R. Neyestani

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow's milk proteins in two animal models and to recommend the more sensitivie one, as an evaluation tool, to assess the antigenicity of a poteintial hypoallergenic formula. A crude extract of cow's milk was injected either to young male rabbits or BALB/C mice in four doses. Pure standard proteins of cow's milk were also injected to separate groups of animals to use their anti sera in later stages. The polyclonal pooled serum was then used to evaluate the antigenicity of the extract by indirect enzyme-linked immunossorbeni assay (LEISA. and Western blotting. Both the rabbit and BALB/C murine mode! demonstrated strong ELISA titres against casein and BSA proteins. However, the rabbit model also had a high antibody response against beta-lactoglobulin (/Mg. The lowest antibody response was found against alpha-kictalbumin («-la in both animal models and no response against immunoglobulins (Igs in either model. In Western blotting, rabbit antiserum showed four bands («-la, /Mg, caseins and BSA compared to two bands (caseins and BSA for mouse antiserum. Considering the allergenicity of these proteins in genetically prone subjects, it may be wise to exclude food sources of caseins as well as major whey proteins (BSA, from the diet of infants with a family history of atopy during the first year of life. The rabbit hyperimmunization model was more sensitive than the murine mode! in detecting antibodies against milk proteins. Thus, the rabbii model should be employed when

  15. Independent prognostic value of preoperative serum markers CA 242, specific tissue polypeptide antigen and human chorionic gonadotrophin beta, but not of carcinoembryonic antigen or tissue polypeptide antigen in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Carpelan-Holmström, M; Haglund, C.; Lundin, J; Alfthan, H.; Stenman, U H; Roberts, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The prognostic value of preoperative serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA 242, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA), specific tissue polypeptide antigen (TPS) and human chorionic gonadotrophin beta (hCG beta) in 251 patients with colorectal cancer (39 Dukes' A, 98 Dukes' B, 56 Dukes' C and 58 Dukes' D) was investigated. When using the cut-off levels recommended for diagnostic purposes, there was a significantly longer overall survival in patients with low tumour marker level...

  16. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  17. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Mahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  18. Proteome sampling by the HLA class I antigen processing pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Hoof

    Full Text Available The peptide repertoire that is presented by the set of HLA class I molecules of an individual is formed by the different players of the antigen processing pathway and the stringent binding environment of the HLA class I molecules. Peptide elution studies have shown that only a subset of the human proteome is sampled by the antigen processing machinery and represented on the cell surface. In our study, we quantified the role of each factor relevant in shaping the HLA class I peptide repertoire by combining peptide elution data, in silico predictions of antigen processing and presentation, and data on gene expression and protein abundance. Our results indicate that gene expression level, protein abundance, and rate of potential binding peptides per protein have a clear impact on sampling probability. Furthermore, once a protein is available for the antigen processing machinery in sufficient amounts, C-terminal processing efficiency and binding affinity to the HLA class I molecule determine the identity of the presented peptides. Having studied the impact of each of these factors separately, we subsequently combined all factors in a logistic regression model in order to quantify their relative impact. This model demonstrated the superiority of protein abundance over gene expression level in predicting sampling probability. Being able to discriminate between sampled and non-sampled proteins to a significant degree, our approach can potentially be used to predict the sampling probability of self proteins and of pathogen-derived proteins, which is of importance for the identification of autoimmune antigens and vaccination targets.

  19. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Amanda R; Vicentin, Elaine C; Jimenez, Maria C; Ricci, Ricardo; Leite, Juliana A; Costa, Fabio T; Ferreira, Luis C; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, François; Rénia, Laurent; Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2013-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP)-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3) as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2%) and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%). In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant) and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin). Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential. PMID:23457498

  20. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Bitencourt

    Full Text Available A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3 as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2% and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%. In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin. Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential.

  1. Differentiation of Rhizoctonia spp. Based on their antigenic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vico Ivana M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic properties and serological relationship was investigated in binucleate and multinucleate Rhizoctonia spp. isolates from strawberries soybean, alfalfa and potato plants from Serbia, from Spain, anastomosis group testers and in strawberry roots inoculated with binucleate Rhizoctonia AG A and AG I. Two polyclonal antisera, unabsorbed and cross absorbed, were used in dot-immunobinding assay for these investigations. Antisera were produced against mycelial antigens of two isolates, which belong to different anastomosis groups (AG of binucleate Rhizoctonia - AG A and AG I. Both unabsorbed antisera reacted positively with all tested Rhizoctonia spp. isolates, and the reaction was absent with control isolates (Pythium sp. Agaricus sp. and Fusarium sp. The results prove a close serological relationship among Rhizoctonia spp. isolates, and diversity between Rhizoctonia spp. and isolates from different taxonomic groups. Also, both unabsorbed antisera reacted with higher intensity with closely related antigens (belonging to the same AG than with ones from another AG of binucleate Rhizoctonia or R. solani (multinucleate Rhizoctonia. After cross absorption specificity of the antisera was enhanced, especially with the antiserum raised against mycelial proteins of binucleate Rhizoctonia AG I. This antiserum reacted positively only with antigens from the same AG, after cross absorption with antigens from AG A of binucleate Rhizoctonia and from R. solani AG 2-2. It proved to be specific to AG I of binucleate Rhizoctonia, and able to differentiate isolates of this AG from others. In this way the serological homology among isolates of one AG was proven, and also the diversity among isolates which belong to different AGs of binucleate Rhizoctonia as well as isolates of R. solani.

  2. Antigenic and allergenic analysis of psyllium seed components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlian, L G; Vyszenski-Moher, D L; Lawrence, A T; Schrotel, K R; Ritz, H L

    1992-04-01

    The outer portions (husk) of psyllium seeds are a concentrated source of natural fiber used in some bulk-fiber laxatives and cereals. They are known to elicit respiratory allergic reactions after inhalation or ingestion among sensitized individuals. Antigenic and allergenic characterization of three psyllium-seed fractions (husk, endosperm, and embryo) was conducted with crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE), crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the source of psyllium allergenicity. Homologous CIE demonstrated psyllium endosperm and embryo extracts contained seven and four antigens, respectively. Husk extracts were too gelatinous to react by CIE. However, heterologous CIE profiles of endosperm or embryo extracts, reacted with antihusk antibodies, resulted in antigen-antibody precipitin peaks that matched the heavy staining precipitin lines of homologous reactions for endosperm and embryo, respectively. These results indicated that commercial-grade husk, endosperm, and embryo contained similar antigens. Extracts of all three seed components contained antigens that bound IgE antibodies in the sera of 11 psyllium RAST-positive individuals, as determined by crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis. The few prominent husk protein/peptide bands resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were common in either embryo or endosperm. Immunoblots revealed common IgE reactive bands in all three seed fractions. Microscopic examination of the powdered commercial-grade psyllium (95% pure) revealed it contained endosperm and embryo particles. These immunologic, biochemical, and microscopic findings suggest that other contaminating seed components are primarily responsible for the allergenicity of commercial-grade psyllium-husk powder rather than the husk itself. PMID:1560169

  3. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  4. PULSED ELECTROCHEMICAL TECHNIQUE FOR MONITORING ANTIBODY-ANTIGEN REACTIONS AT INTERFACES. (R825323)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractThe mechanism of pulsed potential waveform for monitoring antibody¯antigen interactions at immunosensor interfaces is discussed. Some examples of antibody¯antigen interactions at quartz crystal microbalance and polymer-modified ...

  5. Extraction of Ku antigen and anti-Ku antibody assay in various autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To extract Ku antigen and to detect anti-Ku antibody in connective tissue diseases (CTDs). Methods: Ku antigen was prepared from rabbit thymus acetone powder. Anti-Ku antibodies were tested in 50 normal controls and 438 patients

  6. Elucidating the mechanisms of protein antigen adsorption to the CAF/NAF liposomal vaccine adjuvant systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamborg, Mette; Rose, Fabrice; Jorgensen, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    The reverse vaccinology approach has recently resulted in the identification of promising protein antigens, which in combination with appropriate adjuvants can stimulate customized, protective immune responses. Although antigen adsorption to adjuvants influences vaccine efficacy and safety, little...

  7. Molecular aspects of antibody-antigen interactions : size reduction of a herpes simplex virus neutralizing antibody and its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Gerardus Antonius

    1996-01-01

    Antibody molecules, produced as a response against foreign substances, interact with their antigen in a very specific manner. Antibodies with a predetermined specificity (monoclonal antibodies) can be produced and are widely used in medicine and science as indicator molecules. Genetic engineering of

  8. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M;

    1987-01-01

    and affinity-purified once more. Finally, reverse-phase chromatography resulted in a pure product. The B-G antigen was identified in the various fractions by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The final product was more than 99% pure, as estimated by SDS-PAGE analysis followed by silver stain of proteins. The yield...

  9. Distinct effects of endogenous interleukin-23 on eosinophilic airway inflammation in response to different antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Rika Ogawa; Yusuke Suzuki; Shizuko Kagawa; Katsunori Masaki; Koichi Fukunaga; Akihiko Yoshimura; Seitaro Fujishima; Takeshi Terashima; Tomoko Betsuyaku; Koichiro Asano

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of interleukin (IL)-23 in asthma pathophysiology is still controversial. We examined its role in allergic airway inflammation in response to two distinct antigens using IL-23-deficient mice. Methods: Allergic airway inflammation was evaluated in wild-type and IL-23p19−/− mice. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) by intraperitoneal injection of antigen and their airways were then exposed to the same antigen. Levels of antigen-specific immuno...

  10. Predicting the Mutating Distribution at Antigenic Sites of the Influenza Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyang Xu; Yiyan Yang; Shuning Wang; Ruixin Zhu; Tianyi Qiu; Jingxuan Qiu; Qingchen Zhang; Li Jin; Yungang He; Kailin Tang; Zhiwei Cao

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the influenza virus lead to antigenic changes that cause recurrent epidemics and vaccine resistance. Preventive measures would benefit greatly from the ability to predict the potential distribution of new antigenic sites in future strains. By leveraging the extensive historical records of HA sequences for 90 years, we designed a computational model to simulate the dynamic evolution of antigenic sites in A/H1N1. With templates of antigenic sequences, the model can effectively pred...

  11. Interlaboratory comparison of the toluidine red unheated serum test antigen preparation.

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, C E; Pettit, D E; Larsen, S A; Hambie, E A; Perryman, M W; McGrew, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    The toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST) antigen, a macroscopic flocculation test antigen developed by Pettit et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. 18:1141-1145, 1983) by modifying the color-coded antigen of Kasatiya and Lambert (Appl. Microbiol. 28:317-318, 1974), was compared with the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) slide and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) 18-mm circle card tests for sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. Two lots of TRUST antigen were prepared by two laboratories...

  12. Studies on mechanism of Sialy Lewis-X antigen in liver metastases of human colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Wei Li; Yan Qing Ding; Jun Jie Cai; Shao Qing Yang; Lian Bing An; Dong Fang Qiao

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Sialyl Lewis-X antigen ,correlated with carcinoma, is a group of carbohydrate antigen containing oligosaccharide expressed of embryonic tisue and glycoproteins on cell surface of embryonic tissue[1].The SLeX antigen located on cell surface is synthesized principally by two enzymes ,al ,3fucosyltransfrease and a2, 3sialyctransferase.In adults ,SLeX antigen is expressed principally on the surfaces of granulocytic cells and some tumor cells .

  13. COMPARISON OF EXCRETORY SECRETORY ANTIGENS OF ASCARIS LUMBRICOLDES AND TOXOCARA CATI 2ND. STAGE LARVAE WITH BIOCHEMICAL METHODES

    OpenAIRE

    F. Maleky; Massoud, J.

    1995-01-01

    Purification of parasitic antigens is a major activity in immunoparasitology because of its application in immunodiagnosis, vaccination analysis of immunopathology, preparation of monocolomal antibody and finding out the cross reactive antigens versus specific antigens of a parasite. In this survey F2 ultrafiltration excretory secretory antigens of Ascaris lumbricoides and Toxocara cati were separated by gel chromatography on sephacryl S-200 into several antigenic and non antigenic fractions....

  14. Antigen loading on dendritic cells affects the lell function in stimulating T cells.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of antigen loading on dendritic cells (DC). Methods: DCs collected from peripheral blood monocytes were loaded with a tumor antigen from XG-7 cell line. These DCs were then co-cultured with allogeneic T cells and were compared with those DCs without antigen exposure.

  15. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuschenbach, M.; Dorre, J.; Waterboer, T.; Kopitz, J.; Schneider, M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, E.; Kloor, M.; Knebel Doeberitz, M. von

    2014-01-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for

  16. Neuroinvasive Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Patient with a Negative Spinal Fluid Cryptococcus Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio C. Garcia-Santibanez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 58-year-old man presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, and gait disturbance. Brain MRI showed meningeal enhancement and herniation. Serum Cryptococcus antigen was positive but spinal fluid antigen and cultures were negative. A cerebellar biopsy revealed nonencapsulated Cryptococcus. He completed antifungal therapy. Serum Cryptococcus antigen titer decreased. He had a full neurological recovery.

  17. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  18. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  19. Failure of a novel, rapid antigen and antibody combination test to detect antigen-positive HIV infection in African adults with early HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kilembe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute HIV infection (prior to antibody seroconversion represents a high-risk window for HIV transmission. Development of a test to detect acute infection at the point-of-care is urgent. METHODS: Volunteers enrolled in a prospective study of HIV incidence in four African cities, Kigali in Rwanda and Ndola, Kitwe and Lusaka in Zambia, were tested regularly for HIV by rapid antibody test and p24 antigen ELISA. Five subgroups of samples were also tested by the Determine Ag/Ab Combo test 1 Antigen positive, antibody negative (acute infection; 2 Antigen positive, antibody positive; 3 Antigen negative, antibody positive; 4 Antigen negative, antibody negative; and 5 Antigen false positive, antibody negative (HIV uninfected. A sixth group included serial dilutions from a p24 antigen-positive control sample. Combo test results were reported as antigen positive, antibody positive, or both. RESULTS: Of 34 group 1 samples with VL between 5x105 and >1.5x107 copies/mL (median 3.5x106, 1 (2.9% was detected by the Combo antigen component, 7 (20.6% others were positive by the Combo antibody component. No group 2 samples were antigen positive by the Combo test (0/18. Sensitivity of the Combo antigen test was therefore 1.9% (1/52, 95% CI 0.0, 9.9. One false positive Combo antibody result (1/30, 3.3% was observed in group 4. No false-positive Combo antigen results were observed. The Combo antigen test was positive in group 6 at concentrations of 80 pg/mL, faintly positive at 40 and 20 pg/mL, and negative thereafter. The p24 ELISA antigen test remained positive at 5 pg/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Although the antibody component of the Combo test detected antibodies to HIV earlier than the comparison antibody tests used, less than 2% of the cases of antigen-positive HIV infection were detected by the Combo antigen component. The development of a rapid point-of-care test to diagnose acute HIV infection remains an urgent goal.

  20. Selection of protective antigens in Lawsonia intracellularis by reverse vaccinology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadekær, Dorte Fink; Lundegaard, Claus; Riber, Ulla;

    in Denmark. Experimental challenge studies previously performed at DTU-Vet show that a primary infection results in complete protection against reinfection due to induction of immunological memory. We aim to develop a subunit vaccine that mimics the induction of the immune response and hence causes...... protection against L. intracellularis. To this end, a reverse vaccinology approach was applied: the entire L. intracellularis genome encoding 1340 proteins was screened in silico using bioinformatics tools to identify potential protein antigens. Advanced software algorithms predicted 150 secreted and outer...... membrane proteins, and these were analyzed and given a score for presence of B and T cell epitopes. Using another in silico technology platform, which identifies novel B cell antigens eliciting a highly protective immune response, we obtained a second list of potential vaccine candidates. Six proteins were...

  1. Antibody avidity in swine lymphocyte antigen-defined miniature pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, G D; Mallard, B A; Kennedy, B W; Wilkie, B N

    1992-01-01

    Antibody avidity to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was measured by thiocyanate ion elution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in swine lymphocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs. Serum antibody avidity was evaluated on day 14 and 30 after primary (day 0) and secondary (day 14) immunizations in eight to ten week old miniature pigs previously typed for swine lymphocyte antigen genotype. The effect of SLA genotype, litter, and gender on anti-HEWL antibody avidity was determined by least squares. Antibody avidity varied amongst individuals. Antibody avidity maturation was observed as a mean rise in antibody avidity from primary response (0.89 +/- 0.64) to secondary response (1.23 +/- 0.54) (p < 0.0005). Overall, SLA genotype did not significantly influence antibody avidity or avidity maturation, but pigs of dd genotype had greater avidity maturation between primary and secondary responses than other genotypes. Litter effects significantly affected antibody avidity and maturation. PMID:1477799

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mqondisi Tshabalala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes.

  3. Synthesis and Identification of Artificial Antigen for Imidacloprid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guo-nian; GUI Wen-jun; ZHENG Zun-tao; CHENG Jing-li; WU Gang

    2006-01-01

    This study reported that a hapten of imidacloprid, 1-[(6-Carboxylethylthio-3- pyridinyl)methyl]-N -nitro-imidazolidinimine was synthesized using technical material of imidacloprid to react with 3-mercaptopropionic acid in hot alkaline solution.The hapten was conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) to form the immuno-antigens and the coating antigen, respectively. The antibody with high titer (2.56 x 104) was obtained after immuning rabbits. The results showed that the antibody had a high affinity to imidacloprid tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA),which IC50 and IC20 were 20.7 and 1.1 μg L-1; and the cross reactibilities to those compounds related with imidacloprid were less than 1.4%.

  4. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  5. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  6. [ELISA method for the determination of factor VII antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, J I; Aznar, J A; Monteagudo, J; Montoro, J M; Casaña, P; Pascual, I; Bañuls, E; Curats, R; Llopis, F

    1989-12-01

    The low plasma concentration of clotting factor VII makes it difficult to assay its antigenic fraction by the conventional methods of precipitation with specific antigens. Simple and peroxidase-conjugated antisera are currently available from commercial sources, thus allowing one to determine F VII:Ag by enzyme immunoassay. An ELISA method has been developed in this laboratory which provides sensitivity limits about 0.1% of the plasma concentration of F VII and correlates significantly with its functional activity (r = 0.603, n = 44, p less than 0.001). This technique can be highly helpful in characterising molecular variants of F VII, as well as in detecting acquired deficiencies of this factor.

  7. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  8. Lambda-Display: A Powerful Tool for Antigen Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gargano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1985, phage display technology has been successfully used in projects aimed at deciphering biological processes and isolating molecules of practical value in several applications. Bacteriophage lambda, representing a classical molecular cloning and expression system has also been exploited for generating large combinatorial libraries of small peptides and protein domains exposed on its capsid. More recently, lambda display has been consistently and successfully employed for domain mapping, antigen discovery and protein interaction studies or, more generally, in functional genomics. We show here the results obtained by the use of large libraries of cDNA and genomic DNA for the molecular dissection of the human B-cell response against complex pathogens, including protozoan parasites, bacteria and viruses. Moreover, by reviewing the experimental work performed in recent investigations we illustrate the potential of lambda display in the diagnostics field and for identifying antigens useful as targets for vaccine development.

  9. P System antigenic determiners expression in Ascaris lumbricoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponce De León Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The P System antigens have been detected in numerous parasites, bacterias and viruses, nevertheless the clinical significance is still unknown. The aim was to study the presence of P1 antigenic determiners in A. lumbricoides extracts by means of the use of 6 different monoclonal antibodies of well-known concentrations and Ig class. We worked with 14 A. lumbricoides extracts. Inhibition Agglutination Test was made in a bromelin enzymatic medium and 4 masculineC temperature. Titre, Score and Sensitivity Parameter were determined for each monoclonal antibody against red cells suspension used as revealing system. Ten extracts inhibited the agglutination of all anti P1 monoclonal antibodies. The 4 remaining extracts only inhibited the agglutination of some of them. It is demonstrated that the extracts have P1 activity. This activity is independent of titre, Score, Sensitivity Parameter, concentration and Ig class and it depends on the epitope at which the monoclonal antibody is directed.

  10. Original Antigenic Sin Response to RNA Viruses and Antiviral Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mee Sook; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved to fight against foreign pathogens. It plays a central role in the body's defense mechanism. However, the immune memory geared to fight off a previously recognized pathogen, tends to remember an original form of the pathogen when a variant form subsequently invades. This has been termed 'original antigenic sin'. This adverse immunological effect can alter vaccine effectiveness and sometimes cause enhanced pathogenicity or additional inflammatory responses, according to the type of pathogen and the circumstances of infection. Here we aim to give a simplified conceptual understanding of virus infection and original antigenic sin by comparing and contrasting the two examples of recurring infections such as influenza and dengue viruses in humans. PMID:27799871

  11. Effect of X-irradiation on antigenic properties of collogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelinska, M.M.; Mazanowska, A.M. (Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Changes in the antigenic properties of calf skin type 1 collagen were studied after irradiation in solution in the presence of air or nitrogen with doses ranging from 10 to 500 Gy. These changes were estimated on the basis of the ability of irradiated collagen to bind antibodies to native collagen; rabbit antiserum and the hemagglutination inhibition test were applied. Antibody binding decreased after irradiation in air with doses between 100 and 500 Gy and after irradiation in nitrogen with doses between 10 and 100 Gy. Irradiation in nitrogen with doses 100-500 Gy doses resulted in a gradual increase of average titer reduction (i.e. ability to inhibit hemagglutination) up to the value found for native collagen. Changes in the antigenic properties of collagen are discussed as the consequence of structural changes induced by X-irradiation.

  12. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was effici......Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...... was predominantly peptide in nature, as shown by its susceptibility to protease digestion. It was heterogeneous as measured by gel filtration (mean molecular weight approximately 3000), and when characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, it eluted over a wide concentration of solvent. Such self...

  13. Recognition of Leishmania antigens by T lymphocytes from nonexposed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hansen, M B; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    Crude antigen preparations of Leishmania promastigote sonicates were found to induce in vitro proliferation and gamma interferon production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals without known exposure to the parasite. The proliferating cells were mainly CD2-positive T cells...... than 1:10,000 and varied considerably between individuals. Depletion of CD45R0-positive (memory) cells from the PBMC abolished proliferative responses induced by Leishmania antigen and by tetanus toxoid. In cell populations depleted of CD45RA-positive (naive) cells, only a small reduction in response...... was observed. Cell populations depleted of either CD45R0-positive cells or CD45RA-positive cells both responded to PHA. We conclude that presumably unexposed individuals have a low number of Leishmania-reactive T cells in their circulatory systems. The Leishmania-reactive T cells in these individuals are most...

  14. Probing Antigen-Antibody Interaction Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengju Jiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the use of fluorescence detection coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL allowed us to fully characterize the antigen-antibody interaction. CE-FL allowed separation of unbound quantum dots (QDs and ligand bound QDs and also revealed an ordered assembly of biomolecules on QDs. Further, we observed FRET from QDs donor to DyLight acceptor, which were covalently conjugated with human IgG and goat anti-human IgG, respectively. The immunocomplex was formed and the mutual affinity of the antigen and antibody brought QDs and DyLight close enough to allow FRET to occur. This novel CE-based technique can be easily extended to other FRET systems based on QDs and may have potential application in the detection of antibodies.

  15. Do natural Treg become activated to antigen specific Treg in transplantation and in autoimmunity?

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Milne Hall; Tran, Giang T.; Nirupama eVerma; Karren ePlain; Catherine M. Robinson; Masaru eNomura; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen specific Treg are often CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T cells, with a phenotype similar to natural Treg (nTreg). It is assumed that nTreg cannot develop into an antigen specific Treg as repeated culture with IL-2 and a specific antigen does not increase the capacity or potency of nTreg to promote immune tolerance or suppress in vitro. This has led to an assumption that antigen specific Treg mainly develop from CD4+CD25-FoxP3- T cells, by activation with antigen and TGF-beta in the absence of infla...

  16. HLA-A and B antigens in AKA pygmies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J Y; Hallé, L; Jaeger, G

    1981-01-01

    HLA-A and B antigens were studied in 543 AKA pygmies. The present analysis showed two characteristics of this pygmoid group: the absence of HLA-A1, A11, B8 and Bw38 and the high frequency of Aw30, B17, B27, B37, B40 and Bw39. The strongest gametic associations were found with the haplotypes Aw30, B37 and A3, B5.

  17. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, H S; Lam, D M; Arntzen, C J

    1992-01-01

    Tobacco plants were genetically transformed with the gene encoding hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) linked to a nominally constitutive promoter. Enzyme-linked immunoassays using a monoclonal antibody directed against human serum-derived HBsAg revealed the presence of HBsAg in extracts of transformed leaves at levels that correlated with mRNA abundance. This suggests that there were no major inherent limitations of transcription or translation of this foreign gene in plants. Recombinant HBs...

  18. Distribution of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen in nonhematopoietic tissues

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA), as defined by J-5 murine monoclonal antibodies, was detected on renal tubular and glomerular cells from fetal and adult donors by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. CALLA could also be detected on epithelial cells of the fetal small intestine and on myoepithelial cells of adult breast but not on myoepithelial cells of the salivary gland. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of immunoprecipitated 125I-l...

  19. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Nicola S.; Russell, Colin A.; Langat, Pinky; Tavis K Anderson; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F.; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigeni...

  20. Differential expression of the Escherichia coli autoaggregation factor antigen 43

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Hjerrild, Louise; Gjermansen, Morten;

    2003-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a self-recognizing surface adhesin found in most Escherichia coli strains. Due to its excellent cell-to-cell aggregation characteristics, Ag43 expression confers clumping and fluffing of cells and promotes biofilm formation. Ag43 expression is repressed by the cellular redox......-forming potential of E. coli. Finally, we demonstrated that Ag43-mediated cell aggregation confers significant protection against hydrogen peroxide killing....

  1. HLA II class antigens and susceptibility to coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a systemic autoimmune, complex and multifactorial disorder, which is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The only established genetic risk factors so far are the human leucocyte antigens. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of II class human leukocyte antigens (HLA in patients with coeliac disease and to investigate the susceptibility to coeliac disease in family members. We typed HLA DR and DQ antigens in 37 patients from Vojvodina with coeliac disease, 23 first-degree relatives, and 210 controls, serologically using standard lymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA DQ5(1, DQ6(1, DR11(5, DQ7(3, DQ2 and DR15(2 were the most common antigens in the control group. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 was higher in CD patients than in the control group. The relative risks for HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 were 4.846, 6.986 and 2.106, respectively, while positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3 and CD. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR16(2 was higher in first-degree relatives than in the control group while a positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3. A negative association was found between HLA DQ5(1 and DQ6(1 in coeliac patients from Vojvodina and their relatives, in addition to HLA DR11(5 in the group of relatives (RR=0.363,PF=0.232. These findings indicate the impact of the HLA testing for CD in clinical practice in order to rule out the possibility to CD in doubtful cases or in at-risk subjects.

  2. Development of antibodies to human embryonic stem cell antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley Marisa; Rao Mahendra S; Olson Judith M; Cai Jingli; Taylor Eva; Ni Hsiao-Tzu

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Using antibodies to specific protein antigens is the method of choice to assign and identify cell lineage through simultaneous analysis of surface molecules and intracellular markers. Embryonic stem cell research can be benefited from using antibodies specific to transcriptional factors/markers that contribute to the "stemness" phenotype or critical for cell lineage. Results In this report, we have developed and validated antibodies (either monoclonal or polyclonal) specif...

  3. Adsorption of multimeric T cell antigens on carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadel, Tarek R; Li, Nan; Shah, Smith;

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific activation of cytotoxic T cells can be enhanced up to three-fold more than soluble controls when using functionalized bundled carbon nanotube substrates ((b) CNTs). To overcome the denaturing effects of direct adsorption on (b) CNTs, a simple but robust method is demonstrated...... to stabilize the T cell stimulus on carbon nanotube substrates through non-covalent attachment of the linker neutravidin....

  4. Production and purification of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity and virulence of Bacillus anthracis. Animals or human immunised with the protein acquire a complete protection against the disease. In addition to vaccine, PA can also be developed into a sensitive diagnostic test for anthrax. The purpose of this study was to produce PA using a culture medium easily obtained, and to develop a simple and effective technique for purification of the protein. To produce PA, B. anthracis Sterne 34F2 ...

  5. Antigen-activated dendritic cells ameliorate influenza A infections

    OpenAIRE

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Vogel, Leatrice; Orandle, Marlene; Zimmerman, Daniel; Talor, Eyal; Subbarao, Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a need for alternative or adjunct therapies, as resistance to currently used antiviral drugs is emerging rapidly. We tested ligand epitope antigen presentation system (LEAPS) technology as a new immune-based treatment for influenza virus infection in a mouse model. Influenza-J-LEAPS peptides were synthesized by conjugating the binding ligand derived from the β2-microglobulin chain of the human MHC class I molecu...

  6. Gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence immunoassay for malaria antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Bassem S S; Sá e Cunha, Cláudia; Gomes, Inês; Cavadas, Miguel; Silva, Isabel; Doria, Gonçalo; Blatch, Gregory L; Baptista, Pedro V; Pereira, Eulália; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mota, Maria M; Prudêncio, Miguel; Franco, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The development of rapid detection assays for malaria diagnostics is an area of intensive research, as the traditional microscopic analysis of blood smears is cumbersome and requires skilled personnel. Here, we describe a simple and sensitive immunoassay that successfully detects malaria antigens in infected blood cultures. This homogeneous assay is based on the fluorescence quenching of cyanine 3B (Cy3B)-labeled recombinant Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 (PfHsp70) upon binding to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with an anti-Hsp70 monoclonal antibody. Upon competition with the free antigen, the Cy3B-labeled recombinant PfHsp70 is released to solution resulting in an increase of fluorescence intensity. Two types of AuNP-antibody conjugates were used as probes, one obtained by electrostatic adsorption of the antibody on AuNPs surface and the other by covalent bonding using protein cross-linking agents. In comparison with cross-linked antibodies, electrostatic adsorption of the antibodies to the AuNPs surfaces generated conjugates with increased activity and linearity of response, within a range of antigen concentration from 8.2 to 23.8 μg.mL(-1). The estimated LOD for the assay is 2.4 μg.mL(-1) and the LOQ is 7.3 μg.mL(-1). The fluorescence immunoassay was successfully applied to the detection of antigen in malaria-infected human blood cultures at a 3% parasitemia level, and is assumed to detect parasite densities as low as 1,000 parasites.μL(-1).

  7. Antigen Discovery: a Postgenomic Approach to Leprosy Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Aráoz, Romulo; Honoré, Nadine; Cho, Sungae; Kim, Jong-Pill; Cho, Sang-Nae; Monot, Marc; Demangel, Caroline; Brennan, Patrick J.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2006-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious, neurodegenerative disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Despite effective control programs, the incidence of leprosy remains stubbornly high, suggesting that transmission may be more common than expected. The rationale of this work was to use bioinformatics and comparative genomics to identify potentially antigenic proteins for diagnostic purposes. This approach defined three classes of proteins: those restricted to M. leprae (class I), those present in M...

  8. Prognostic Effect of Pretreatment Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many studies have reported the prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (pre-CEA) levels on colorectal cancer outcomes. However, controversy remains concerning the significance of pre-CEA levels in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim in this study was to investigate the prognostic role of the pre-CEA level in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal exc...

  9. Immunosensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance for Antigen Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance(SPR)has been developed for the recognition of antigen.The sensor was designed on the basis of the fixed angle of incidence and measuring the reflected intensities in a wavelength range of 430-750 nm in real-time. An ultra-bright white light-emitting diode(LED)was used as the light source. Molecular self-assembling in solution was used to form the sensing membrane on gold substrate. It has been seen that the sensitivity of the SPR sensor with 3-mercaptopropionic acid(MPA)/protein A(SPA) sensing membrane is considerably higher than that with MPA or SPA modified Sensing membrane. The kinetic processes on the sensing membrane were studied. The human B factor(Bf), an activator of complement 3(C3), was recognized among the other antigens. This sensor can also be used for other antigen/antibody or adaptor/receptor recognition. Under optimized experimental conditions, the sensor has good selectivity, repeatability, and reversibility.

  10. Kinetics of humoral responsiveness and antigenic distribution in operated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, P; Mahieu, A; van Geertruyden, N

    1979-01-01

    Wistar R/A rats were injected intravenously with 10(9) sheep red blood cells (SRBC) prior to, during or after a standard laparotomy. Stimulation of anti-SRBC antibody synthesis was already observed when the antigen was given 4 h prior to surgery and was maximal if SRBC were administered at the time of operation. The enhancing effect on the immune response lasted for 2 days after surgery. From the third post-operative day on, the injection of SRBC induced a normal humoral response. No subsequent depression was detected. Inter-organ distribution studies of 51Cr-labelled SRBC injected at various times prior, during or after the surgical procedure, showed a maximum decrease of liver uptake during operation; the depression was still present 2 h later but on the first post-operative day, no significant difference from the controls could be demonstrated. When the labelled antigen was given before surgery, organ distribution was normal. Consequently, there is no time relationship between the stimulation of antibody production and the alteration of total phagocytosis induced by surgery. Therefore, the enhanced humoral response cannot be explained only by spillover of the antigen from the liver into lymphoid organs. PMID:511217

  11. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) isolated from melanoma patients and expanded in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2 treatment can elicit therapeutic response after adoptive transfer, but the antigen specificities of the T cells transferred have not been determined. By compiling all known melanoma-as...... from different fragments of resected melanoma lesions. In summary, our findings provide an initial definition of T-cell populations contributing to tumor recognition in TILs although the specificity of many tumor-reactive TILs remains undefined.......Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) isolated from melanoma patients and expanded in vitro by interleukin (IL)-2 treatment can elicit therapeutic response after adoptive transfer, but the antigen specificities of the T cells transferred have not been determined. By compiling all known melanoma......-associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...

  12. Expression of antigen tf and galectin-3 in fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallegos Itandehui Belem

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroadenomas are benign human breast tumors, characterized by proliferation of epithelial and stromal components of the terminal ductal unit. They may grow, regress or remain unchanged, as the hormonal environment of the patient changes. Expression of antigen TF in mucin or mucin-type glycoproteins and of galectin-3 seems to contribute to proliferation and transformations events; their expression has been reported in ductal breast cancer and in aggressive tumors. Findings Lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to examine the expression and distribution of antigen TF and galectin-3. We used lectins from Arachis hypogaea, Artocarpus integrifolia, and Amaranthus lecuocarpus to evaluate TF expression and a monoclonal antibody to evaluate galectin-3 expression. We used paraffin-embedded blocks from 10 breast tissues diagnosed with fibroadenoma and as control 10 healthy tissue samples. Histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis showed positive expression of galectin-3 in fibroadenoma tissue, mainly in stroma, weak interaction in ducts was observed; whereas, in healthy tissue samples the staining was also weak in ducts. Lectins from A. leucocarpus and A. integrifolia specificaly recognized ducts in healthy breast samples, whereas the lectin from A. hypogaea recognized ducts and stroma. In fibroadenoma tissue, the lectins from A. integrifolia, A. Hypogaea, and A. leucocarpus recognized mainly ducts. Conclusions Our results suggest that expression of antigen TF and galectin-3 seems to participate in fibroadenoma development.

  13. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems

  14. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Amari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  15. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  16. Glycan bioengineering in immunogen design for tumor T antigen immunotargeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra, Victor G; Zlocowski, Natacha; Ditamo, Yanina; Copioli, Silvina; Tarp, Mads P; Bennett, Eric P; Clausen, Henrik; Roth, German A; Nores, Gustavo A; Irazoqui, Fernando J

    2009-10-01

    Bioengineering of Galbeta3GalNAcalpha, known as Thomsen-Friedenreich disaccharide (TFD), is studied to promote glycan immunogenicity and immunotargeting to tumor T antigen (Galbeta3GalNAcalpha-O-Ser/Thr). Theoretical studies on disaccharide conformations by energy minimization of structures using MM2 energy function showed that pentalysine (Lys5) linker and benzyl (Bzl) residue enhance TFD rigidity of the glycosidic bond. Antibodies raised against BzlalphaTFD-Lys5 immunogen recognize tumor T antigen. Competitive assays confirm that TFD-related structures are the main glycan epitope. Antibodies produced by glycan bioengineering recognize HT29, T47D, MCF7, and CT26 epithelial tumor cells. Epithelial tumor cell adhesion to T antigen-binding lectins and endothelial cells was lower in the presence of antibodies raised against the engineered immunogen. The immune response directed to the bioengineered glycoconjugate inhibited CT26 tumor cell proliferation and reduced tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. These results show that TFD bioengineering is a useful immunogenic strategy with potential application in cancer therapy. The same approach can be extended to other glycan immunogens for immunotargeting purposes. PMID:19726087

  17. Antigenicity analysis of Vibrio harveyi TS-628 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Yingxue; WANG Jun; WANG Shifeng; YAN Qingpi

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi,the major causative agent of vibriosis,affects a diverse range of marine cultured organisms over a wide geographical area.However,reports about screening the effective antigen and research on vaccines of V.harveyi are scarce.Flagellin,lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and outer membrane proteins (OMP) are major immunogenic antigens in many Gram-negative bacteria.In this study,the flagellin,OMP and LPS of the V.harveyi TS-628 strain isolated from infected groupers were extracted and Western blot analysis was used to detect the antigenicity of these extractions.Results of the Western blot assay reveal that there are four positive flagellin bands:35 kDa,38 kDa,43 kDa,and 52 kDa,of which the 43 kDa and 52 kDa bands displayed the strongest positive reaction.There are five positive OMP bands about 35 kDa,38 kDa,43 kDa,47 kDa,and 52 kDa,of which the 43 kDa appeared to have the strongest positive reaction although the other four proteins also displayed strong reactions.However,LPS is Western blot-negative.These results indicate that the 43 kDa and 52 kDa flagellin and OMP of size 43 kDa,52 kDa can be candidates for developing vaccines against V.harveyi.

  18. Hepatitis B virus antigens impair NK cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    An inadequate immune response of the host is thought to be a critical factor causing chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, as one of the key players in the eradication and control of viral infections, were functionally impaired in CHB patients, which might contribute to viral persistence. Here, we reported that HBV antigens HBsAg and HBeAg directly inhibited NK cell function. HBsAg and/or HBeAg blocked NK cell activation, cytokine production and cytotoxic granule release in human NK cell-line NK-92 cells, which might be related to the downregulation of activating receptors and upregulation of inhibitory receptor. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms likely involved the suppression of STAT1, NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings implicated that HBV antigen-mediated inhibition of NK cells might be an efficient strategy for HBV evasion, targeting the early antiviral responses mediated by NK cells and resulting in the establishment of chronic virus infection. Therefore, this study revealed the relationship between viral antigens and human immune function, especially a potential important interaction between HBV and innate immune responses. PMID:27341035

  19. Transplant immuno-diagnostics: crossmatch and antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Andrew M; Grimm, Paul C

    2016-06-01

    Identifying and monitoring donor-directed anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies are a rapidly evolving area of solid organ transplantation. Donor-specific antibodies dictate pre-transplant donor choice and donor-recipient matching and underlie much acute and chronic allograft rejection and loss. The evolution of available technology has driven this progress. Early, labor-intensive, whole-cell assays based on complement-dependent cytotoxicity suffered from poor sensitivity and specificity, technical challenges and lack of precision. Sequential improvement in assay performance included anti-human immunoglobulin-enhanced, complement-dependent cytotoxicity techniques followed by cell-based flow cytometry. However, variable specificity and sensitivity inherent in cell-based testing continued to limit flow cytometry. The introduction of solid-phase assays led to a second revolution in histocompatibility testing with the use of purified antigens bound to artificial surfaces rather than whole cells. These techniques augmented sensitivity and specificity to detect even low-titer antibodies to previously undetected antigens. Identification of complement-activating antibodies is being introduced, but current technology is in the developmental stage. While the detection of alloantibodies has improved dramatically, our comprehension of their importance remains imperfect. Variability in methodology and a lack of standardization limits the clinical application of these tests. In spite of the hurdles that remain, antibody-mediated rejection has become a key target to improve graft survival. PMID:26139577

  20. Current opinion on human leukocyte antigen-G in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wei-hua; LIN Ai-fen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Since discovery and cloning of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅰ antigen HLA-G by Geraghty et al1 in 1987, a large number of studies have been carried out. HLA-G has a low polymorphism, limited distribution to normal tissues and seven isoforms resulting from its primary mRNA alternative splicing.2 HLA-G expression was first found on the extravillous cytotrophoblasts, at the fetal-maternal interface during normal pregnancy, which lacks the expression of HLA-A, -B and HLA Ⅱ antigens. Initial studies on HLA-G mainly addressed its function in fetal-maternal immunotolerance.3 Two decades later,HLA-G is now considered to be a very important immune molecule which plays a vital immune inhibitory role in the context of reproduction, oncology, transplantation,infection and also in autoimmune disease.4 A number of Chinese research teams are interested in, and have contributed to, the publication of more than 80 peer-reviewed articles and reviews on HLA-G over the past ten years. We summarize the key points in this field that were presented and discussed by them.

  1. Common leukocyte antigen staining of a primitive sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J M; Beschorner, W E; Kuhajda, F P; deMent, S H

    1987-04-15

    A 4-year-old boy presented with symptoms of tracheal obstruction and was found to have a polypoid tracheal mass, which was studied by biopsy. Light microscopy showed a tumor composed of small cells with round to oval dark nuclei, clumped chromatin, one to two nucleoli, and small, variable amounts of indistinct pink cytoplasm. In other areas the tumor had a loose, spindle appearance, with some cells showing more elongated nuclei, and fibrillar pink cytoplasm consistent with strap cells. Cross striations were not found. Electron microscopy showed desmosomes and 7 to 10 nm cytoplasmic filaments forming dense bodies. The findings are most consistent with a primitive sarcoma, probably rhabdomyosarcoma. Immunoperoxidase with three monoclonal antibodies for common leukocyte antigen showed diffuse membraneous staining with fresh-frozen tissue. All other lymphocyte and monocyte marker studies were negative. We believe that this case of anticommon leukocyte antigen staining, a rhabdomyosarcoma, represents the first report of a false positive reaction with monoclonal antibody to common leukocyte antigen.

  2. Proteomic analysis of antigens from Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea-Ayuela, María Auxiliadora; Rama-Iñiguez, Sara; Bolás-Fernández, Francisco

    2006-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by the species of the genus Leishmania, flagellated protozoa that multiply inside mammalian macrophages and are transmitted by the bite of the sandfly. The disease is widespread and due to the lack of fully effective treatment and vaccination the search for new drugs and immune targets is needed. Proteomics seems to be a suitable strategy because the annotated sequenced genome of L. major is available. Here, we present a high-resolution proteome for L. infantum promastigotes comprising of around 700 spots. Western blot with rabbit hyperimmune serum raised against L. infantum promastiogote extracts and further analysis by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS allowed the identification of various relevant functional antigenic proteins. Major antigenic proteins were identified as propionil carboxilasa, ATPase beta subunit, transketolase, proteasome subunit, succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase, a probable tubulin alpha chain, the full-size heat shock protein 70, and several proteins of unknown function. In addition, one enzyme from the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway (adrenodoxin reductase) and the structural paraflagellar rod protein 3 (PAR3) were found among non-antigenic proteins. This study corroborates the usefulness of proteomics in identifying new proteins with crucial biological functions in Leishmania parasites. PMID:16791830

  3. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bouchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN, were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA or pertussis toxin (PT deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells.

  4. Comparable quality attributes of hepatitis E vaccine antigen with and without adjuvant adsorption-dissolution treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Min; Yang, Fan; Li, Yufang; Zheng, Zizheng; Zhang, Xiao; Lin, Qingshan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian

    2015-01-01

    Most vaccines require adjuvants for antigen stabilization and immune potentiation. Aluminum-based adjuvants are the most widely used adjuvants for human vaccines. Previous reports demonstrated the preservation of antigen conformation and other antigen characteristics after recovery from adjuvanted Hepatitis B and human papillomavirus vaccines. In this study, we used a combination of various physiochemical and immunochemical methods to analyze hepatitis E vaccine antigen quality attributes after recovery from adjuvants. All biochemical and biophysical methods showed similar characteristics of the p239 protein after recovery from adjuvanted vaccine formulation compared to the antigen in solution which never experienced adsorption/desorption process. Most importantly, we demonstrated full preservation of key antigen epitopes post-recovery from adjuvanted vaccine using a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies as exquisite probes. Antigenicity of p239 was probed with a panel of 9 mAbs using competition/blocking ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and sandwich ELISA methods. These multifaceted analyses demonstrated the preservation of antigen key epitopes and comparable protein thermal stability when adsorbed on adjuvants or of the recovered antigen post-dissolution treatment. A better understanding of the antigen conformation in adjuvanted vaccine will enhanced our knowledge of antigen-adjuvant interactions and facilitate an improved process control and development of stable vaccine formulation.

  5. Hu Ly-m5: a unique antigen physically associated with HLA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, R L; McKenzie, I F

    1983-05-01

    A new human cell surface antigen (Hu Ly-m5) detected by a murine monoclonal antibody (E4.3) is described. The tissue distribution of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is similar to the HLA antigens (with which it was initially confused) but it is not present on all bone marrow cells nor the U266 myeloma, and is expressed on the HLA-negative K562 cell line. Nevertheless, the Hu Ly-m5 antigen has some affinity for HLA molecules as the two entities cocap and the Hu Ly-m5 antigen copurifies with the HLA antigens on an anti-beta 2-microglobulin immunoabsorbent column; however, the antigen complexes did not withstand the procedures used for coprecipitation. Despite their similarities, the Hu Ly-m5 and HLA antigens are distinct molecular entities--Hu Ly-m5 consists of two bands of apparent molecular weight 69 and 60 K while HLA is comprised of the 43 and 12 K bands of the HLA heavy chain and beta 2-microglobulin, respectively. The function of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is unknown, but no involvement in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to influenza virus-infected cells could be demonstrated. The two properties described (apparent molecular weight and physical association with the HLA antigens) suggests that the Hu Ly-m5 antigen may be a viral-encoded protein.

  6. Amino Acids Analysis in Different Antigens and Relationship with Immunoreactivity in Cysticercus cellulosae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yi; QIAO Dai-rong; JIANG Yan; YANG Tao

    2002-01-01

    The six antigens of Cysticercus cellulosae: CFag, CSag, CBWag, CWag, UCWag and TSag were prepared respectively. The amino acids of the antigens were determined quantitative by automatic amino acid analyzer. The relationship of original reaction was confirmed between amino acids and antigens. The results showed that there were 17 amino acids among all of the antigens. There were no significant difference (P >0.05) of Asp, Glu, Lys, His in composition of all antigens by data analysis software SPSS. There are also no significant difference ( P > 0.05) in the composition of all amino acids between CSag and CBWag. The composition of Thr, Ser, Tyr, Ved, Pro in UCWag shows significant difference (P < 0.05) with other antigens.The sensitivity and peculiarity of UCWag are higher than that of the others. Pro and Glu show significant linear correspondence with sensitivity and peculiarity of antigens respectively.

  7. Simple solid-phase radioimmunoassay for human leukemia-associated cell membrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a simple solid-phase radioimmunoassay was developed to determine detergent-extracted human leukemia-associated cell membrane antigens. In the assay, 96-well microtiter plates are coated with human leukemia cell membrane antigens containing a T cell leukemia or a non-T cell leukemia antigen in the presence of a detergent, and treated with 1.6% bovine serum albumin solution. The coated antigens were reacted with an appropriate murine monoclonal antibody (mAb). The bound mAb is determined by a second reaction with 125I-labeled F(ab')2 of goat anti-mouse Ig. The best antigen dose-dependent antibody binding results were obtained using the plates coated with antigens in the presence of taurocholate. In addition, the usefulness of the present assay with taurocholate during the purification of the antigens was demonstrated. (Auth.)

  8. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found...... monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...

  9. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  10. Production of schistosome antigens for immunodiagnosis and vaccines: the role of recombinant DNA technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major problem to confront biochemists studying the immunology of parasitic infection is a paucity of the organisms themselves. Conventional biochemical techniques for the isolation and purification of individual antigens are inappropriate. This problem has been alleviated by the application of recombinant DNA technology. It is now possible to produce large quantities of individual antigens by cloning the corresponding genes into plasmids (or other vectors) and subsequent expression in bacteria. Antigens produced in this way may provide the basis of a specific diagnostic test and vaccines. This paper describes the identification of cDNA clones of Schistosoma mansoni which encode a major egg antigen and schistosomula surface antigens. These antigens are thought to be species specific and may form the basis of a diagnostic test. The schistosomula antigens are also possible candidates for inclusion in an experimental vaccine against infection with S. mansoni. (author)

  11. Emergence of antigenic variants within serotype A FMDV in the Middle East with antigenically critical amino acid substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Mana; Statham, Bob; Li, Yanmin; Hammond, Jef; Paton, David; Parida, Satya

    2016-06-01

    A new immunologically distinct strain (A-Iran-05) of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A emerged in the Middle East in 2003 that replaced the previously circulating strains (A-Iran-96 and A-Iran-99) in the region. This resulted in introduction of a new vaccine of this strain (A/TUR/2006) in 2006. Though this vaccine strain has been predominantly used to control FMD in the region, recent viruses isolated in 2012 and 2013 have shown antigenic drift and a poor match with it. In this study, we report the antigenic matching results and capsid sequence data of currently circulating viruses belonging to the SIS-10 and SIS-12 sub-lineages of A-Iran-05 (isolated in 2012 and 2013), highlighting the inadequacy of the currently used serotype A vaccines. Implications of these results in the context of FMD control in the Middle East are discussed. PMID:27016651

  12. Highly Sensitive Nanoparticle-based Multifunctional Biosensor for Antigen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavoshi, Salome

    Precise and selective positioning of nanoparticles gives rise to many applications where assembly of nano building blocks with different biological or chemical functionalization is necessary. One remarkable application is the simultaneous early detection of multiple biomarkers in the field of miniaturized multiplex biosensors. To enable multiplex detection of antigens, nanoparticles with various antibody coatings can be selectively assembled in trenches on different regions on a biochip so that they bind selectively to the specific antigen of interest. The presented work utilizes electric field assisted assembly techniques to assemble nanoparticles with various surface functionalization and coatings. Nanoparticles are assembled into pre-fabricated via and trench patterns generated on a PMMA coated gold surface, using electron-beam lithography. Two techniques have been developed for selective assembly of nanoparticles: sequential size-selective directed assembly and sequential site-selective assembly. Both selective assembly techniques provide fast and reproducible assembly over large areas while achieving high yield. The sequential size-selective assembly is a template-assisted technique where the selectivity is achieved by controlling the size of the nanopatterns and the size of the nanoparticles. The possibility of particle detachment and the factors affecting the sorting efficiency for this technique is studied. We show that a complete sorting can be achieved when the size of the vias is close to the diameter of the nanoparticles and the size distribution of the chosen nanoparticles do not overlap. In the site-selective assembly, the selectivity is achieved by having electrically isolated sites (regions) on the same chip. Electrophoresis is performed for each region in a step by step process. Selective assembly results, for up to four nanoparticles with various coating/functionalization are presented using the site-selective assembly technique. We use the

  13. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the “next-generation” recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA...

  14. Emergence of antigenic variants within serotype A FMDV in the Middle East with antigenically critical amino acid substitutions

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra, Mana; Statham, Bob; Li, Yanmin; Hammond, Jef; Paton, David; Parida, Satya

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • The recent A-Iran-05 viruses circulating in the Middle East do not match with the existing vaccines. • Full capsid sequence of 13 SIS-10 and SIS-12 viruses was generated. • The r 1-values generated using antisera raised against two existing vaccines and a new vaccine. • Amino acid changes in neutralizing antigenic sites 1, 2 and 4 were observed.

  15. Is HCV core antigen a reliable marker of viral load? An evaluation of HCV core antigen automated immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Hadziyannis, Emilia; Minopetrou, Martha; Georgiou, Anastasia; Spanou, Fotini; Koskinas, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C viral (HCV) load detection and quantification is routinely accomplished by HCV RNA measurement, an expensive but essential test, both for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). HCV core antigen (Ag) testing has been suggested as an attractive alternative to molecular diagnostics. The aim of the study was to evaluate an automated chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) for HCV core Ag measurement in comparison to quantitative HCV RNA determination. Methods...

  16. Linearized hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core-related antigen in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, W-K; Wong, D K-H; Fung, J; Huang, F-Y; Liu, K S-H; Lai, C-L; Yuen, M-F

    2014-11-01

    Changes in two novel HBV serological markers, linearized hepatitis B surface antigen (HQ-HBsAg) and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) have not been well characterized. Serum HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg levels of 404 Asian treatment-naïve CHB patients were analysed in a cross-sectional manner. Patients were categorized into five groups: immune tolerant (IT group, n=52), immune clearance (IC group, n=105), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative hepatitis (ENH group, n=97), HBeAg-negative quiescent group (ENQ group, n=95) and CHB with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance (SC group, n=55). HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg were measured and correlated with HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBV genotype and clinical parameters. HQ-HBsAg showed good correlation with HBsAg, especially in the ENQ group (r=0.874, pHBcrAg correlated best with HBV DNA in the ENQ group (r=0.537, pHBcrAg; this subgroup of patients, when compared with those with detectable HBcrAg, had significantly lower median HBV DNA (3.17/4.48 log IU/mL, pHBcrAg up to 42 months after HBsAg seroclearance. When comparing anti-HBs positivity and median time after HBsAg seroclearance in the SC group with and without detectable HQ-HBsAg/HBcrAg, there was no significant difference (22.7% and 36.4%, respectively, p 0.284, and 76.5 and 93.2 months, respectively, p 0.245). HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg showed unique patterns of distribution throughout the five disease phases of CHB, including high detectability rates after HBsAg seroclearance, opening up different possibilities for their applicability.

  17. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  18. CD8+ T cell priming by dendritic cell vaccines requires antigen transfer to endogenous antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice W Yewdall

    Full Text Available Immunotherapeutic strategies to stimulate anti-tumor immunity are promising approaches for cancer treatment. A major barrier to their success is the immunosuppressive microenvironment of tumors, which inhibits the functions of endogenous dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary for the generation of anti-tumor CD8+ T cells. To overcome this problem, autologous DCs are generated ex vivo, loaded with tumor antigens, and activated in this non-suppressive environment before administration to patients. However, DC-based vaccines rarely induce tumor regression.We examined the fate and function of these DCs following their injection using murine models, in order to better understand their interaction with the host immune system. Contrary to previous assumptions, we show that DC vaccines have an insignificant role in directly priming CD8+ T cells, but instead function primarily as vehicles for transferring antigens to endogenous antigen presenting cells, which are responsible for the subsequent activation of T cells.This reliance on endogenous immune cells may explain the limited success of current DC vaccines to treat cancer and offers new insight into how these therapies can be improved. Future approaches should focus on creating DC vaccines that are more effective at directly priming T cells, or abrogating the tumor induced suppression of endogenous DCs.

  19. An efficient fusion protein system for expression ofBacillus anthracis protective antigen as immunogenic and diagnostic antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Bagheri; Hossein Motamedi; Masoud Reza Seifiabad Shapouri

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To produce high quantities of recombinant protective antigen (rPA) for human vaccine and diagnosis.Methods: ThePAgene was amplified byPCR with pXO1 plasmid as template. ThePCR product was cloned into pMAL-c2X vector using theBamHI andSalI restriction enzymes. The recombinant plasmid was transformed intoEscherichia coliDH5α strain and then screened for transformation. The expression of protective antigen was analyzed bySDS-PAGE and Western blotting after isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside(IPTG) induction.Results:The full-length PA gene (2.2kb) was cloned into pMAL vector system. The recombinant vector was confirmed by restriction enzyme andPCRanalysis. The expression of cytoplasmic maltose-binding protein-protective (MBP-P) antigen fusion protein was detected bySDS-PAGE and Western blotting, and obtained a125 kDa protein band, which was similar to expected size of fusion protein.Conclusions: This expression system can be used in the high production of rPA. After purification and immunization studies, the purified rPA may be used in the development of the human recombinant anthrax vaccine and also in diagnosis of anthrax disease.

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  1. Phase variable O antigen biosynthetic genes control expression of the major protective antigen and bacteriophage receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley D Seed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage.

  2. Human parvovirus B19 induced apoptotic bodies contain altered self-antigens that are phagocytosed by antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanoktip Thammasri

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 (B19V from the erythrovirus genus is known to be a pathogenic virus in humans. Prevalence of B19V infection has been reported worldwide in all seasons, with a high incidence in the spring. B19V is responsible for erythema infectiosum (fifth disease commonly seen in children. Its other clinical presentations include arthralgia, arthritis, transient aplastic crisis, chronic anemia, congenital anemia, and hydrops fetalis. In addition, B19V infection has been reported to trigger autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the mechanisms of B19V participation in autoimmunity are not fully understood. B19V induced chronic disease and persistent infection suggests B19V can serve as a model for viral host interactions and the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here we investigate the involvement of B19V in the breakdown of immune tolerance. Previously, we demonstrated that the non-structural protein 1 (NS 1 of B19V induces apoptosis in non-permissive cells lines and that this protein can cleave host DNA as well as form NS1-DNA adducts. Here we provide evidence that through programmed cell death, apoptotic bodies (ApoBods are generated by B19V NS1 expression in a non-permissive cell line. Characterization of purified ApoBods identified potential self-antigens within them. In particular, signature self-antigens such as Smith, ApoH, DNA, histone H4 and phosphatidylserine associated with autoimmunity were present in these ApoBods. In addition, when purified ApoBods were introduced to differentiated macrophages, recognition, engulfment and uptake occurred. This suggests that B19V can produce a source of self-antigens for immune cell processing. The results support our hypothesis that B19V NS1-DNA adducts, and nucleosomal and lysosomal antigens present in ApoBods created in non-permissive cell lines, are a source of self-antigens.

  3. Vitreous Cavity-Associated Immune Deviation Induced by Retinal S Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijie Li; Guanghua Peng; Chen Li

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the vitreous cavity(VC) supports the induction of deviant immune responses to retinal soluble(S) antigen and to observe the influence of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the immunologic properties of the VC. Methods: Retinal S antigen was inoculated into the anterior chamber(AC) and the VC in Wistar rats. Seven days after antigen inoculation, the recipient animals were immunized with S antigen and complete Freund's adjuvant. Delayed-type hypersen- sitivity(DTH) was assessed by footpad challenge. To alter systemic immune conditions,IL-1 was administrated by intraperitoneal injection.Results: Antigen-specific DTH did not develop in rats in which S antigen was injected into the AC and the VC. By contrast, when IL-1 administrated systemically, S antigen was injected into the AC and VC elicited strong DTH.Conclusion: The VC supports immune deviation for soluble antigen by acitivity suppressing antigen-Specific DTH. Systemic administration of exogenous IL-1 eliminates the capacity of the VC to support immune deviation to soluble antigen locally injected.

  4. New Concepts in Tumor Antigens: Their Significance in Future Immunotherapies for Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yang; Xiao-Feng Yang

    2005-01-01

    The identification and molecular characterization of self-antigens expressed by human malignancies that are capable of elicitation of anti-tumor immune responses in patients have been an active field in tumor immunology.More than 2,000 tumor antigens have been identified, and most of these antigens are self-antigens. These significant progresses have led to the renaissance of tumor immunology and studies on anti-tumor immunotherapy.However, despite of the progress in the identification of self-tumor antigens, current antigen-specific immunotherapies for tumors are far less satisfied than expected, which reflects the urgent need to improve our understanding on self-tumor antigens. In order to develop more effective antigen specific anti-tumor immunotherapies and to monitor the responses to these immunotherapies in patients with tumors, many important fundamental questions need to be addressed. We propose for the first time that the studies in addressing the characteristics of self-tumor antigens and autoantigens are grouped as a new subject termed "antigenology". In this brief review, we would outline the progress in the identification of tumor antigens in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, and overview the new concepts and principles of antigenology and their significance for future immunotherapies to these malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  5. A new MIC1-MAG1 recombinant chimeric antigen can be used instead of the Toxoplasma gondii lysate antigen in serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holec-Gąsior, Lucyna; Ferra, Bartłomiej; Drapała, Dorota; Lautenbach, Dariusz; Kur, Józef

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the MIC1 (microneme protein 1)-MAG1 (matrix antigen 1) Toxoplasma gondii recombinant chimeric antigen for the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis for the first time. The recombinant MIC1-MAG1 antigen was obtained as a fusion protein containing His tags at the N- and C-terminal ends using an Escherichia coli expression system. After purification by metal affinity chromatography, the chimeric protein was tested for usefulness in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-T. gondii immunoglobulin G (IgG). One hundred ten sera from patients at different stages of infection and 40 sera from seronegative patients were examined. The results obtained for the MIC1-MAG1 chimeric antigen were compared with those of IgG ELISAs using a Toxoplasma lysate antigen (TLA), a combination of recombinant antigens (rMIC1ex2-rMAG1) and single recombinant proteins (rMIC1ex2 and rMAG1). The sensitivity of the IgG ELISA calculated from all of the positive serum samples was similar for the MIC1-MAG1 chimeric antigen (90.8%) and the TLA (91.8%), whereas the sensitivities of the other antigenic samples used were definitely lower, at 69.1% for the mixture of antigens, 75.5% for the rMIC1ex2, and 60% for rMAG1. This study demonstrates that the MIC1-MAG1 recombinant chimeric antigen can be used instead of the TLA in the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

  6. Cell Wall-Associated Protein Antigens of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Function in Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; Jacobs, Ton

    1982-01-01

    Three cell wall-associated protein antigens (antigens b, c, and d) were isolated from mutanolysin-solubilized cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB and purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and immunoadsorption chromatography. Antigens b and c were also isolated from culture supernatants. Antigen b consisted of more than 80% protein and had an apparent molecular weight as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 320,000. Antigen c consisted of 57% protein, about 30% neutral sugar, and about 13% amino sugar, and its glycoprotein nature was confirmed by specific staining techniques. During sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis antigen c resolved into two or more bands, depending on the source or the isolation procedure, in the molecular weight range from 220,000 to 280,000. Antigen d consisted of 95% protein and was observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as two bands with molecular weights of 129,000 and 121,000. Under nondenaturing conditions all three antigens had molecular weights in the range from 1 × 106 to 3 × 106 as determined by gel filtration. The amino acid compositions of antigens b, c, and d were characterized by low amounts of basic amino acids and relatively high levels of nonpolar amino acids. Among oral streptococcal species antigens b and c were virtually restricted to strains of S. salivarius and most often to serotype I strains. Antigen b was recognized as the factor that mediates coaggregation of S. salivarius with Veillonella strains. The purified protein retained its biological activity. Antigen c could be linked to functions relating to adhesion of the streptococci to host tissues on the basis of its absence in mutant strains and blocking by specific antisera. The purified molecule had no detectable biological activity. Antigen d could not be linked to an established adhesion function. Images

  7. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  8. Targeting of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) in experimental immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously shown the superiority of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to function as effective immunogens when administered with bilayer membrane vesicles called liposomes. The ability of liposomes to target TAA to host antigen-presenting cells is analyzed here. 1-Butanol extracted TAA from two syngeneic rat colon cancer tumors (WB 2054 and W 1756) was radioiodinated (131I-TAA). Free 131I and 131I-TAA (2.8 X 10(7) cpm and 75 micrograms TAA per rat) were used as tracers, with or without incorporation into liposomes (composition: sphingomyelin, cholesterol, dicetyl phosphate at 70:24:6 molar ratio). Six groups of male rats (BN X WF for WB2054 and Wistar/Furth for W1756, n = 18 each group) were injected iv with either free tracers or the tracers incorporated into liposomes. Whole blood clearance curve was biphasic (half-life alpha = 5 min; half life beta = 12 hr), suggesting a two-compartmental model of distribution. Seven animals from each group were sacrificed at set times (15 min to 48 hr), organs harvested and cpm/g of tissue estimated. Liposome 131I and liposome 131I-TAA were targeted to and retained preferentially in liver and spleen. Four animals from each group were imaged serially using a gamma camera. Matched pair analysis of regions showed persistently higher activity in liver-spleen area when liposomes were used (P less than 0.001). The uptake of radiolabeled antigens by plastic adherent mononuclear cells in liver and spleen was significantly higher when presented with liposomes (macrophage uptake index: liver = 1.65 vs 0.55; spleen = 5.85 vs 1.15; with and without liposomes, respectively)

  9. Performance of calibration standards for antigen quantitation with flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkei, R; Gratama, J W; Rothe, G; Schmitz, G; D'hautcourt, J L; Arekrans, A; Mandy, F; Marti, G

    1998-10-01

    In the frame of the activities initiated by the Task Force for Antigen Quantitation of the European Working Group on Clinical Cell Analysis (EWGCCA), an experiment was conducted to evaluate microbead standards used for quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM). An unified window of analysis (UWA) was established on three different instruments (EPICS XL [Coulter Corporation, Miami, FL], FACScan and FACS Calibur [Becton Dickinson, San Jose, CA]) with QC3 microbeads (FCSC, PR). By using this defined fluorescence intensity scale, the performance of several monoclonal antibodies directed to CD3, CD4, and CD8 (conjugated and unconjugated), from three manufacturers (BDIS, Coulter [Immunotech], and DAKO) was tested. In addition, the QIFI system (DAKO) and QuantiBRITE (BDIS), and a method of relative fluorescence intensity (RFI, method of Giorgi), were compared. mAbs reacting with three more antigens, CD16, CD19, and CD38 were tested on the FACScan instrument. Quantitation was carried out using a single batch of cryopreserved peripheral blood leukocytes, and all tests were performed as single color analyses. Significant correlations were observed between the antibody-binding capacity (ABC) values of the same CD antigen measured with various calibrators and with antibodies differing in respect to vendor, labeling and possible epitope recognition. Despite the significant correlations, the ABC values of most monoclonal antibodies differed by 20-40% when determined by the different fluorochrome conjugates and different calibrators. The results of this study indicate that, at the present stage of QFCM consistent ABC values may be attained between laboratories provided that a specific calibration system is used including specific calibrators, reagents, and protocols.

  10. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen continuous epitopes determined by the spot method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solassol, I; Granier, C; Pèlegrin, A

    2001-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a heavily glycosylated tumor-associated protein with an N-A1-B1-A2-B2-A3-B3 domain structure. Circulating CEA immunoassays are used for monitoring digestive cancer patients, and radiolabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (MAb) are used for the diagnosis and therapy of CEA-positive tumors. The five major nonoverlapping epitopes (Gold 1-5) have been broadly correlated with the domain organization, but there is no precise localization of the epitopes at the sequence level. In an attempt to identify the peptide sequences corresponding to the five Gold epitopes on the CEA molecule, we prepared a set of 227 overlapping fifteen-mer peptides corresponding to the complete CEA sequence with the SPOT method. Using five high affinity MAbs directed against the five CEA Gold epitopes, we demonstrated that none of these epitopes could be mimicked by a fifteen-mer peptide sequence. However, using rabbit and goat anti-CEA sera, we identified six major continuous antigenic regions. All are included in the Ig-like domains of the CEA: two in the A1 domain (residues 120-134 and 153-164), one each in the A2 (329-337) and A3 domains (508-513), one at the junction between the A3 and B3 domains (553-561) and one in the B3 domain (565-573). A very homologous sequence (common residues VSPRL) was mapped in each of the three A domains. Thus, in terms of occurrence of continuous epitopes, the Ig-like domains A1, A2, A3 and B3 seem to be the most antigenic parts of CEA. These peptide sequences should be good candidates for the future development of site-specific anti-CEA MAbs. PMID:11275797

  12. Molecular structure and biological function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the core component of replication complex in eukaryote.As a processive factor of DNA polymerase delta, PCNA coordinates the replication process by interacting with various replication proteins. PCNA appears to play an essential role in many cell events, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, through the coordination or organization of different partners. PCNA is an essential factor in cell proliferation, and has clinical significance in tumor research. In this article we review the functional structure of PCNA, which acts as a function switch in different cell events.

  13. Cloning and Expression of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Bahram Kazemi; Mahvash Khodabandeh; Mojgan Bandehpour

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of both acute and chronic liver disease. It is estimated that there are 350 million carriers of the virus in the world, and a high proportion will develop serious liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was cloning and expression hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) gene to design a DNA vaccine.Methods: In this study, we amplified the HBsAg gene from Iranian patients. The gene was cloned in pGEMEX-1...

  14. Development of an enzyme immunoassay for poliovirus antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Hashimoto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An indirect solid-phase enzyme immunoassay (EIA was developed for the detection of poliovirus antigen. Virus antigen was obtained in LLC-MK2 cell cultures and used to prepare antibodies in rabbit and guinea pig. Antibodies were evaluated by double immunodiffusion and neutralization test. Optimal concentrations of guinea pig and rabbit immunoglobulins were determined by checkerboard titration. Microtitre plates were coated with 15.0 µg/ml guinea pig anti-polio immunoglobulin and rabbit anti-polio immunoglobulin at the concentration of 7.94 µg/ml was used as detecting antibody. The standard curve with eight different antigen concentrations in eight replicates resulted in a coefficient of variation (CV between 2.1% to 7.8%. The dose-response relationship was determined by simple linear regression with a coefficient of correlation (R² equal to 96.4%. The assay detected a minimum of 2.3 µg/ml poliovirus antigen.O trabalho apresenta o desenvolvimento de um ensaio imunoenzimático indireto para a detecção de antígeno de poliovírus. O antígeno viral foi obtido em cultura de células LLC-MK2 e usado para imunização de coelho e cobaia. Os soros hiperimunes foram avaliados por imunodifusão dupla e teste de neutralização. Após padronização, o soro de captura, produzido em cobaia, foi usado na concentração protéica de 15.0 µg/ml para sensibilizar microplacas de poliestireno e o soro de coelho (detector foi usado na concentração de 7.94 µg/ml. A curva padrão resultante da utilização de oito diferentes concentrações do antígeno padrão definiu um coeficiente de variação de 2.1% a 7.8%. A relação dose-resposta foi determinada por regressão linear simples com o estabelecimento do coeficiente de correlação (R² igual a 96.4%. O ensaio possibilitou a detecção mínima de 2.3 µg/ml de antígeno de poliovírus.

  15. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitkou, Louise; Dahl, Mette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F;

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on trophoblast cells and has been proposed to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Soluble HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) can be generated by the shedding of membrane-bound HLA-G molecules; however...... of importance for production of sHLA-G in the mother and child, or it may support the theory that sHLA-G in the pregnant woman and the fetus is partly derived from a "shared organ", the placenta....

  16. Human leucocyte antigens in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Aldershvile, J; Dietrichson, O;

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in the frequencies of HLA-B8, -B40, and other HLA-A, -B, and -C phenotypes were found among patients with histologically verified alcoholic cirrhosis compared with normal controls when the p values were multiplied by the number of comparisons. This was found both...... in the present study of 45 patients and in the combined data of this and three other similar studies. However, these findings do not rule out that alcoholic cirrhosis might be associated with HLA factors (for example. HLA-D/DR antigens) controlling immune responses....

  17. HLA-DP antigens in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Georgsen, J; Fugger, L;

    1991-01-01

    We studied the distribution of HLA-DP antigens in 74 HIV-infected Danish homosexual men and 188 ethnically matched healthy individuals, using the primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) technique. Forty of the patients developed AIDS within 3 years after diagnosis, whereas the remaining 34 were healthy or...... had only minor symptoms for 3 years or more (median observation time was 42 months). HLA-DPwl seemed to be decreased (relative risk = 0.3) in AIDS patients (5.0 per cent) when compared to patients with minor symptoms (14.7 per cent) and healthy controls (14.9 per cent). These differences were, however...

  18. Membrane Insertion by Anthrax Protective Antigen in Cultured Cells†

    OpenAIRE

    Qa'Dan, Maen; Christensen, Kenneth A; Zhang, Lei; Roberts, Thomas M.; Collier, R. John

    2005-01-01

    The enzymatic moieties of anthrax toxin enter the cytosol of mammalian cells via a pore in the endosomal membrane formed by the protective antigen (PA) moiety. Pore formation involves an acidic pH-induced conformational rearrangement of a heptameric precursor (the prepore), in which the seven 2β2-2β3 loops interact to generate a 14-strand transmembrane β-barrel. To investigate this model in vivo, we labeled PA with the fluorophore 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD) at cysteine residues intro...

  19. Antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Helena; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Souto, Juanita; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-05-01

    After 25 years without any reported cases of rabies in Uruguay, the northern region of the country experienced an epizootic of bovine paralytic rabies in October 2007. The outbreak affected bovines and equines, and the main source of infection was the bat Desmodus rotundus, the only hematophagous species in the country. From October 2007 to July 2008, 42 bovine, 3 equine and 120 chiropteran samples were submitted to the National Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for rabies testing. A total of 12 samples (7 bovine, 2 equine and 3 from D. rotundus) were positive by the fluorescent antibody test, and viruses were isolated by the mouse inoculation test. The objective of this study was to compare the antigenic and genetic characteristics of these isolates and three isolates from insectivorous bats from other regions. Antigenic typing using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies identified all 12 viruses as variant 3 (AgV3), a variant associated with D. rotundus. Two isolates from insectivorous bats (Tadarida brasiliensis and Molossus sp.) were characterized as antigenic variant 4 (AgV4) while the third, from Myotis sp., could not be characterized using this panel as its reactivity pattern did not match that of any of the known antigenic variants. Partial N-gene sequences (nt 149-1420) of these isolates were aligned with homologous sequences derived from GenBank by the CLUSTAL/W method and used to build a neighbor-joining distance tree with the Kimura 2-parameter model. All 12 isolates were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster as they shared 100% identity. In the phylogenetic analysis, the three isolates from insectivorous bats segregated into three clusters: one related to T. brasiliensis, one to Myotis sp. and the other to Lasiurus sp., although the isolate associated with the latter came from a Molossus sp. specimen. These results indicate that AgV3 was associated with the outbreak of bovine paralytic rabies in Uruguay. This is the first report of rabies

  20. Immunogenetic mechanisms driving norovirus GII.4 antigenic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Lindesmith

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are the principal cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide with GII.4 strains accounting for 80% of infections. The major capsid protein of GII.4 strains is evolving rapidly, resulting in new epidemic strains with altered antigenic potentials. To test if antigenic drift may contribute to GII.4 persistence, human memory B cells were immortalized and the resulting human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs characterized for reactivity to a panel of time-ordered GII.4 virus-like particles (VLPs. Reflecting the complex exposure history of the volunteer, human anti-GII.4 mAbs grouped into three VLP reactivity patterns; ancestral (1987-1997, contemporary (2004-2009, and broad (1987-2009. NVB 114 reacted exclusively to the earliest GII.4 VLPs by EIA and blockade. NVB 97 specifically bound and blocked only contemporary GII.4 VLPs, while NBV 111 and 43.9 exclusively reacted with and blocked variants of the GII.4.2006 Minerva strain. Three mAbs had broad GII.4 reactivity. Two, NVB 37.10 and 61.3, also detected other genogroup II VLPs by EIA but did not block any VLP interactions with carbohydrate ligands. NVB 71.4 cross-neutralized the panel of time-ordered GII.4 VLPs, as measured by VLP-carbohydrate blockade assays. Using mutant VLPs designed to alter predicted antigenic epitopes, two evolving, GII.4-specific, blockade epitopes were mapped. Amino acids 294-298 and 368-372 were required for binding NVB 114, 111 and 43.9 mAbs. Amino acids 393-395 were essential for binding NVB 97, supporting earlier correlations between antibody blockade escape and carbohydrate binding variation. These data inform VLP vaccine design, provide a strategy for expanding the cross-blockade potential of chimeric VLP vaccines, and identify an antibody with broadly neutralizing therapeutic potential for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, these data support the hypothesis that GII.4 norovirus evolution is heavily influenced by antigenic variation of neutralizing

  1. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Heide, Susan; RUSSELL, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP...

  2. Significance of carbohydrate antigen 50 expression in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the significance of carbohydrate antigen 50(CA50)expression in colorectal carcinoma.Methods Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect CA50 expression in 10 cases of normal colorectal mucosa and 40 cases of cancer mucosa.Results The expression of CA50 increased in normal colorectal mucosa,cancer distant mucosa,cancer adjacent mucosa and cancer mucosa,and there were significant differences among them(P<0.05).The expression of CA50 in colorectal carcinoma was correlated with the deg...

  3. Reagents for radioimmunological determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work was undertaken to prepare the reagents for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) radioimmunoassay with double antibody method. The CEA standard of high immunoreactivity was prepared and purified. The purified CEA was used for immunozation of goats. The goat anti - CEA sera were received. IgG fraction from normal goat serum was purified and used for the production of horse anti-goat IgG serum which was then used in the radioimmunoassay of CEA. The labelling of CEA with iodine-125 has been carried out be means of the enzymatic method.(Z.R.)

  4. Probing Antigen-Antibody Interaction Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Pengju Jiang; Jiang Xia; Jingyan Li; Cheli Wang; Yue Zhang; Lin Qiu; Jianhao Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the use of fluorescence detection coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) allowed us to fully characterize the antigen-antibody interaction. CE-FL allowed separation of unbound quantum dots (QDs) and ligand bound QDs and also revealed an ordered assembly of biomolecules on QDs. Further, we observed FRET from QDs donor to DyLight acceptor, which were covalently conjugated with human IgG and goat anti-human IgG, respectively. The immunocomplex was formed and the mutual affinit...

  5. Germinal center B cells recognize antigen through a specialized immune synapse architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosad, Carla R; Spillane, Katelyn M; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    B cell activation is regulated by B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling and antigen internalization in immune synapses. Using large-scale imaging across B cell subsets, we found that, in contrast with naive and memory B cells, which gathered antigen toward the synapse center before internalization, germinal center (GC) B cells extracted antigen by a distinct pathway using small peripheral clusters. Both naive and GC B cell synapses required proximal BCR signaling, but GC cells signaled less through the protein kinase C-β-NF-κB pathway and produced stronger tugging forces on the BCR, thereby more stringently regulating antigen binding. Consequently, GC B cells extracted antigen with better affinity discrimination than naive B cells, suggesting that specialized biomechanical patterns in B cell synapses regulate T cell-dependent selection of high-affinity B cells in GCs. PMID:27183103

  6. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis by immunization with novel recombinant antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles G; Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Lackenby, Julia; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-06-01

    Recombinant antigens from the oncosphere stage of the parasite Taenia solium were expressed in Escherichia coli. The TSOL16, TSOL45-1A and TSOL45-1B recombinant antigens, each consisting of fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain S, were produced as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and maltose binding protein (MBP). Groups of pigs were immunized twice with the GST fusions of the antigens and boosted a third time with the MBP fusions prior to receiving a challenge infection with T. solium eggs. The TSOL16 antigen was found to be capable of inducing high levels of immunity in pigs against a challenge infection with T. solium. Immunological investigations identified differences in immune responses in the pigs vaccinated with the various antigens. The results demonstrate that the TSOL16 antigen could be a valuable adjunct to current porcine vaccination approaches and may allow the further development of new vaccination strategies against T. solium cysticercosis.

  7. Immune response of sheep to Haemonchus contortus: serum antibodies against cross reacting antigens between parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charley, J; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1981-01-01

    Normal and H. contortus infected sera were studied by ELISA technique against different stages of the parasites. In all cases antibody activity was detected. This activity in serum is partially eliminated after absorption with an adult worm extract of N brasiliensis. N. brasiliensis and H. contortus antigens were analysed by TCIEP with a rabbit anti-N. brasiliensis serum to examine shared antigens of H. contortus. A minimum of seven cross reacting antigens were detected. H. contortus adult worm extract was absorbed by the rabbit anti-N. brasiliensis serum. After absorption all cross reacting antigens were removed but at least one antigen reacting with a rabbit serum anti-H. Contortus is maintained. When this antigen is tested in elisa technique only a weak antibody activity is found in normal serum.

  8. Effects of fucosylated milk of goat and mouse on Helicobacter pylori binding to Lewis b antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Xu; Ning Li; Lennart Hammarstr(o)m; Thomas Borén; Rolf Sj(o)str(o)m; Yao-Feng Zhao; Zheng-Xing Lian; Bao-Liang Fan; Zhi-Hui Zhao; Shu-Yang Yu; Yun-Ping Dai; Li-Li Wang; Hui-Ling Niu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of animal milk containing fucosylated antigens on Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) binding to Lewis b antigen.METHODS: A mammary gland expression vector containing human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA sequences was constructed. Transient expression of human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA in goat mammary cell and establishment of transgenic mice were performed. The adhesion inhibitory properties of milk samples were analyzed by using H pylori RESULTS: Goat milk samples were found to inhibit bacterial binding to Lewis b antigen. The highest inhibition was observed 42 h after injection of the plasmid. The binding activity of Hpylori to Lewis b antigen reduced mostly, by 83%, however milk samples from transgenic mice did not inhibit H pylori binding to Lewis b antigen.CONCLUSION: The use of "humanized" animal milk produced by the transgenic introduction of fucosylated antigen can perhaps provide an alternative therapy and preventive measure for H pylori infection.

  9. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith;

    2016-01-01

    be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode...... for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce...... protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have...

  10. Efficacy of a Vaccine Based on Protective Antigen and Killed Spores against Experimental Inhalational Anthrax▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, Yves P.; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Paucod, Jean-Charles; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Mock, Michèle; Goossens, Pierre L.; Vidal, Dominique R.

    2008-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA)-based anthrax vaccines acting on toxins are less effective than live attenuated vaccines, suggesting that additional antigens may contribute to protective immunity. Several reports indicate that capsule or spore-associated antigens may enhance the protection afforded by PA. Addition of formaldehyde-inactivated spores (FIS) to PA (PA-FIS) elicits total protection against cutaneous anthrax. Nevertheless, vaccines that are effective against cutaneous anthrax may not be so...

  11. Antigen presentation by liposomes bearing class II MHC and membrane IL-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakouche, O; LACHMAN, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    Liposomes containing membrane IL-1, Iak, and the antigen conalbumin were evaluated as "synthetic antigen presenting cells." The role of these three molecules in macrophage-T cell interaction was studied by testing their ability to induce the proliferation of a T-cell clone specific to conalbumin (the D10 cell line) or immune spleen cells sensitized three times in vivo with conalbumin. In the latter case, splenic macrophages were eliminated by adherence and a lysomotropic agent. The antigen co...

  12. NJ001 specific antigen expression in lung adenocarcinoma and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩月

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of NJ001 specific antigen in lung adenocarcinoma,and the relationship between the antigen and clinicopathological features.Methods A case-control study was conducted.Tumor tissues of 113 lung adenocarcinoma and 46 benignlung disease were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University.The expression of NJ001 specific antigen was examined by means of immunohistochemistry,and the results were scored by semi-

  13. The role of class I histocompatibility antigens in the regulation of T-cell activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, J D; Cemach, K; Dubey, D P; Yunis, E J; Amos, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility antigens in humans (HLA antigens) were found to participate in the regulation of T-cell activation and proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin. W6/32, a monomorphic antibody directed against class I HLA-A,B,C antigens, significantly inhibited the phytohemagglutinin-induced cell proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Almost complete suppression of cell activation was achieved on a subfraction of peripheral blood lymphocytes enriched in Mo1+ monocyte...

  14. A new role for complement C3: regulation of antigen processing through an inhibitory activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Villiers, Christian; Cretin, François,; Lefebvre, Nicole; Marche, Patrice; Villiers, Marie-Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    International audience Increasing evidence underlines the involvement of complement component C3 in the establishment of acquired immunity which appears to play a complex role and to act at different levels. As antigen proteolysis by antigen presenting cells is a key event in the control of antigen presentation efficiency, and consequently in the quality of the immune response, we investigated whether C3 could modulate this step. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C3 can inter...

  15. Wuchereria bancrofti microfilarial antigen in the diagnosis of human filariasis by skin test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrahmanyam M

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti microfilarial antigen was investigated in skin test on: (1 Microfilaria carriers, (2 Amicrofilaraemic cases from endemic villages with and without intestinal helminths, (3 Cases having apparent symptoms and signs of filariasis. The anti-gen reacted with specificity in cases having apparent symptoms and signs of filariasis. In microfilaria carriers and amicrofilaraemic individuals from endemic areas no reaction was seen. The diag-nostic value o f W. bancrofti microflarial antigen in chronic cases has been discussed.

  16. Experimental Study of Interference Between Pertussis Antigens and Salk Poliomyelitis Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mirehamsy

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available An interference is observed between whooping-cough antigens and Salk polioc vaccine even if the two components are mixed immediately before use. The phenomenon is more evident when flUlid antigens are injected. Pertussis soluble antigen, which gives a good serological response in rabbits, when used alone or combined with DT, is inactivated in the presence of Salk polio vacc:ne

  17. Database of mutations that alter the large tumor antigen in simian virus 40.

    OpenAIRE

    Kierstead, T D; Pipas, J M

    1996-01-01

    The SV40 T antigen database is a listing of plasmids and/or viruses that express mutant forms of the virus-encoded large T antigen protein. The parental virus strain, nucleic acid sequence of the mutations, the effect of the mutation on the T antigen amino acid sequence, and key references are included in the listing. The database is available from the authors as a Macintosh FileMaker Pro file, and as a hard copy printout.

  18. Circulating human basophils lack the features of professional antigen presenting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Beau, Remi; Sénéchal, Helene; Poncet, Pascal; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports in mice demonstrate that basophils function as antigen presenting cells (APC). They express MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, capture and present soluble antigens or IgE-antigen complexes and polarize Th2 responses. Therefore, we explored whether human circulating basophils possess the features of professional APC. We found that unlike dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, steady-state circulating human basophils did not express HLA-DR and co-stimulatory mo...

  19. Probing the S1 specificity pocket of the aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Georgiadou, Dimitra; Evnouchidou, Irini; Gajda, Anna; Poreba, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S.; Drag, Marcin; Hattori, Akira; Swevers, Luc; Vourloumis, Dionisios; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2011-01-01

    Abstract ER aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), ER aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) and Insulin Regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) are three homologous enzymes that play critical roles in the generation of antigenic peptides. These aminopeptidases excise amino acids from N-terminally extended precursors of antigenic peptides in order to generate the correct length epitopes for binding onto MHC class I molecules. The specificity of these peptidases can affect antigenic peptide selection, but has not yet...

  20. Evaluation of Nonstructural 1 Antigen Assays for the Diagnosis and Surveillance of Dengue in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Lai, Yee-Ling; Sng, Joshua; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of dengue is imperative for disease surveillance, which helps in the control of dengue in endemic countries. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercially available dengue nonstructural 1 (NS1) antigen assays (Bio-Rad Platelia™ Dengue NS1 Antigen ELISA, PanBio Dengue Early ELISA, and Bio-Rad Dengue NS1 Antigen Strip test) and compared them with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and other commercially available serological...

  1. Basophil response to antigen and anti-IgE 3. Ca(2+) influx and histamine release

    OpenAIRE

    Tanizaki,Yoshiro; Kitani,Hikaru; Okazaki, Morihiro; Mifune, Takashi; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Kimura,Ikuro

    1992-01-01

    The release mechanism of chemical mediators from basophils and mast cells was discussed when these cells were stimulated by different antigens and anti-IgE. 1. Ca(2+) influx into mast cells increased after stimulation by antigen. The increased Ca(2+) uptake by mast cells was inhibited by antiallergic agents, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and tranilast, and calcium antagonists, nifedipine and nicardipine. 2. The dose-response curve of histamine release by antigen was different from that by anti...

  2. Protective efficacy of vaccination with Neospora caninum multiple recombinant antigens against experimental Neospora caninum infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jung-Hwa; Chung, Woo-Suk; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Na, Byoung-kuk; Kang, Seung-Won; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Protective efficacy of vaccination with Neospora caninum multiple recombinant antigens against N. caninum infection was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Two major immunodominant surface antigens (NcSAG1 and NcSRS2) and two dense granule proteins (NcDG1 and NcDG2) of N. caninum tachyzoites were expressed in E. coli, respectively. An in vitro neutralization assay using polyclonal antisera raised against each recombinant antigen showed inhibitory effects on the invasion of N. caninum tachyzoites ...

  3. Interferon-gamma-like molecule induces Ia antigens on cultured mast cell progenitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, G H; Clark-lewis, I.; McKimm-Breschkin, J L; Schrader, J W

    1982-01-01

    Persisting (P) cells (murine cells that resemble mast cells and grow continuously in vitro for prolonged periods in the presence of a specific growth factor) did not express detectable levels of Ia antigens (murine class II major histocompatibility antigens) when their growth was supported by partially purified P cell-stimulating factor. However, when these Ia-negative P cells were transferred to medium conditioned by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells, Ia antigens appeared within 24 hr. ...

  4. Detection of tubercular antibody and antigen in sera of bone and joint tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pramanik, J; Lodam, A. N.; Badole, C.M.; Reddy, M. V. R.; Patond, K. R.; Harinath, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solubilized and DEAE fractionatedMycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra excretory-secretory (ES) antigen viz., Mtb EST DE1 and affinity purified goat antibodies to the TCA solubilized ES antigen (Mtb EST) were explored in detecting tubercular antibody and antigen respectively in sera of bone and joint tuberculosis by indirect and sandwich ELISA. Out of total 36 bone & joint tuberculosis cases, tubercular antibody was detected by indirect ELISA in 30 patients (sensitivity ...

  5. Antigenic evidence for host origin of exudative fluids in lesions of Treponema pallidum-infected rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Wos, S M; Wicher, K.

    1985-01-01

    Mucoid fluid accumulating within syphilitic lesions has been considered to be of Treponema pallidum origin. To test this assumption, we examined testicular exudative fluids from T. pallidum-infected rabbits for the presence of T. pallidum antigens by various sensitive immunochemical methods, including Western blot analysis. Antigenic analysis of these fluids revealed host components but not treponemal antigens. Prolonged immunization of rabbits, guinea pigs, and a goat with this material in c...

  6. The role of adjuvant in mediating antigen structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Latoya Jones; Eldridge, Aimee M; Cummiskey, Jessica; Arthur, Kelly K; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe the fate of a model antigen, a cysteine-free mutant of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, to the level of fine structural detail, as a consequence of its interaction with an aluminum (Al)-containing adjuvant. Fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare the thermal stability of the protein in solution versus adsorbed onto an Al-containing adjuvant. Differences in accessible hydrophobic surface areas were investigated using an extrinsic fluorescence probe, 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). As has been observed with other model antigens, the apparent thermal stability of the protein decreased following adsorption onto the adjuvant. ANS spectra suggested that adsorption onto the adjuvant caused an increase in exposure of hydrophobic regions of the protein. Electrostatic interactions drove the adsorption, and disruption of these interactions with high ionic strength buffers facilitated the collection of two-dimensional (15) N heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance data of protein released from the adjuvant. Although the altered stability of the adsorbed protein suggested changes to the protein's structure, the fine structure of the desorbed protein was nearly identical to the protein's structure in the adjuvant-free formulation. Thus, the adjuvant-induced changes to the protein that were responsible for the reduced thermal stability were not observed upon desorption.

  7. Chimeric Epitope Vaccine from Multistage Antigens for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugraha, G; Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Prita, P J Jeya; Khatri, V K; Amdare, N P; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 120 million people worldwide. Vaccination for filariasis by targeting different stages of the parasite will be a boon to the existing MDA efforts of WHO which required repeated administration of the drug to reduce the infection level and sustained transmission. Onset of a filaria-specific immune response achieved through antigen vaccines can act synergistically with these drugs to enhance the parasite killing. Multi-epitope vaccine approach has been proved to be successful against several parasitic diseases as it overcomes the limitations associated with the whole antigen vaccines. Earlier results from our group suggested the protective efficacy of multi-epitope vaccine comprising two immunodominant epitopes from Brugia malayi antioxidant thioredoxin (TRX), several epitopes from transglutaminase (TGA) and abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2). In this study, the prophylactic efficacy of the filarial epitope protein (FEP), a chimera of selective epitopes identified from our earlier study, was tested in a murine model (jird) of filariasis with L3 larvae. FEP conferred a significantly (P < 0.0001) high protection (69.5%) over the control in jirds. We also observed that the multi-epitope recombinant construct (FEP) induces multiple types of protective immune responses, thus ensuring the successful elimination of the parasite; this poses FEP as a potential vaccine candidate.

  8. Circadian control of antigen-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis CC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloé C Nobis,1–3 Nathalie Labrecque,2–4 Nicolas Cermakian1,5–8 1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 2Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, 3Department of Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, 4Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5Department of Psychiatry, 6Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 8Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The immune system is composed of two arms, the innate and the adaptive immunity. While the innate response constitutes the first line of defense and is not specific for a particular pathogen, the adaptive response is highly specific and allows for long-term memory of the pathogen encounter. T lymphocytes (or T cells are central players in the adaptive immune response. Various aspects of T cell functions vary according to the time of day. Circadian clocks located in most tissues and cell types generate 24-hour rhythms of various physiological processes. These clocks are based on a set of clock genes, and this timing mechanism controls rhythmically the expression of numerous other genes. Clock genes are expressed in cells of the immune system, including T cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian control of the adaptive immune response, with emphasis on T cells, including their development, trafficking, response to antigen, and effector functions. Keywords: circadian clock, adaptive immune response, T lymphocyte, antigen, cytokine, proliferation

  9. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  10. Binding of Todd-Hewitt broth antigens by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, M W; Jones, C A

    1983-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans 10449, grown in chemically defined culture medium, was tested for its ability to bind 3H-labeled Todd-Hewitt broth components (greater than 12,000 Mr). Maximum adsorption of radioactivity occurred within 5 min at room temperature, and cell-bound material was not completely removed by extended washing with buffer. Heat-killed, arsenate-inhibited, and viable bacteria bound similar quantities. Only 0.09% of the radioactivity in the preparation of high Mr Todd-Hewitt broth components was removed by absorption with excess numbers of S. mutans 10449 cells. Binding followed saturation kinetics and was competitively inhibited by unlabeled medium components, both the dialyzable and nondialyzable fractions. Other oral streptococci were also found to bind these complex medium components. Rabbit antiserum elicited to the high-molecular-weight Todd-Hewitt broth components reacted with monkey cardiac muscle and with S. mutans coated with medium components. Absorption of the anti-Todd-Hewitt broth serum with homogenized heart removed antibodies that reacted with Todd-Hewitt broth-coated S. mutans. Therefore, the tissue-specific antigens of this beef heart infusion medium that adsorb to S. mutans can interfere with the detection and characterization of antigens shared by these bacteria and animal tissues. Images PMID:6852915

  11. Characterization of 'e' antigen associated with hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, R S; Bull, F G

    1979-03-01

    Hepatitis B 'e' antigen (HBe) from the serum of a chronic carrier of HBsAg has been partially purified and characterized. It behaves as an acidic protein, pI 4.5--5.0, which is thermolabile and sulphydryl-sensitive. In serum it usually has a flotation density 1.3 g/cm3, but is sometimes found at density 1.15 g/cm3 because of its association with lipid. HBe from serum is polydisperse on gel filtration although most antigen is recovered with a nominal molecular weight of 3 x 10(5) Daltons. In contrast, in the presence of chaotropic ions, the bulk of serum HBe is found as a species of 3 X 10(4) Daltons previously detected in small amounts under non-dissociating conditions. This suggests that the larger material is formed by non-covalent association of the 3 X 10(4) Dalton species either with itself or other serum components. This would include IgG, although there is no evidence that HBe itself bears immunoglobulin determinants. Analysis of HBe precipitins by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and dissociating conditions suggests that its component polypeptide chains are about 1.7 X 10(4) Daltons. PMID:110505

  12. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  13. Research Techniques Made Simple: Immunofluorescence Antigen Mapping in Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has, Cristina; He, Yinghong

    2016-07-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa is a group of genetic blistering diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical severity and molecular defects. Epidermolysis bullosa results from mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion in the epidermis. Immunofluorescence antigen mapping makes use of monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the dermal-epidermal junction zone to determine the layer of skin where cleavage occurs and the relative protein abundance. It allows the diagnosis of the type and subtype of inherited epidermolysis bullosa and sheds light on molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Immunofluorescence mapping steps include obtaining a skin biopsy sample, processing the biopsy material, antigen-antibody interaction on tissue, washing, incubation with fluorescently conjugated secondary antibodies, mounting, observation under a fluorescence microscope, and interpretation. A minimal antibody panel allows discrimination of the main epidermolysis bullosa subtypes. Extended panels can be used depending on the diagnostic or scientific question to be addressed. Immunofluorescence mapping contributed to significant progress in understanding epidermolysis bullosa, including identification of new underlying genetic mutations, mutation mechanisms, and the presence of revertant mosaicism. It is also an important tool in the assessment of the efficacy of experimental therapeutic approaches. PMID:27342035

  14. Epidemiologic and HLA Antigen Profile in Patients with Aplastic Anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze patients suffering from aplastic anemia (AA, peripheral pancytopenia and hypocellular bone marrow in the absence of dysplasia, infiltration and fibrosis) for documenting patient's baseline characteristics and association with various human leucocyte antigens. Study Design: An observational, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The National Institute of Blood Disease (NIBD), Karachi, from March 2003 to August 2008. Methodology: All consecutive patients with confirmed diagnosis of AA were evaluated. Data included the baseline characteristics, complete blood counts (CBC), bone marrow biopsy findings, severity of disease, exposure to drugs or chemicals, viral serology and their HLA expression. The data was analyzed on SPSS programme and frequencies were documented. Results: Among 318 patients, there were 236 (74.21%) males and 82 (25.78%) females. Median age was 16 and 70% belonged to urban population. Drug exposure could be established in 23 (7.23%) of cases, while 4 (1.25%) were HBV surface antigen positive and 7 (2.2%) were HCV antibodies positive. In all, 73 (22.9%) had very severe AA, 195 (61.32%) had severe AA while 50 (15.7%) cases had non-severe AA. HLA B5 (52) showed high expression in 83 patients (26%) in comparison to 5.9% reported in healthy population. Conclusion: AA was found to affect young adult males living in urban areas. HLA B5 (52) showed higher expression in patients with aplastic anemia. (author)

  15. Serum Antibody Repertoire Profiling Using In Silico Antigen Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Tallo, Luke J; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Schettine, Cassandra A; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Ionov, Yurij

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies are valuable source of information on the health state of an organism. The profiles of serum antibody reactivity can be generated by using a high throughput sequencing of peptide-coding DNA from combinatorial random peptide phage display libraries selected for binding to serum antibodies. Here we demonstrate that the targets of immune response, which are recognized by serum antibodies directed against sequential epitopes, can be identified using the serum antibody repertoire profiles generated by high throughput sequencing. We developed an algorithm to filter the results of the protein database BLAST search for selected peptides to distinguish real antigens recognized by serum antibodies from irrelevant proteins retrieved randomly. When we used this algorithm to analyze serum antibodies from mice immunized with human protein, we were able to identify the protein used for immunizations among the top candidate antigens. When we analyzed human serum sample from the metastatic melanoma patient, the recombinant protein, corresponding to the top candidate from the list generated using the algorithm, was recognized by antibodies from metastatic melanoma serum on the western blot, thus confirming that the method can identify autoantigens recognized by serum antibodies. We demonstrated also that our unbiased method of looking at the repertoire of serum antibodies reveals quantitative information on the epitope composition of the targets of immune response. A method for deciphering information contained in the serum antibody repertoire profiles may help to identify autoantibodies that can be used for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune diseases or malignancies. PMID:23826227

  16. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4+ T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy

  17. Cloning and Expression of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Kazemi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major cause of both acute and chronic liver disease. It is estimated that there are 350 million carriers of the virus in the world, and a high proportion will develop serious liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was cloning and expression hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg gene to design a DNA vaccine.Methods: In this study, we amplified the HBsAg gene from Iranian patients. The gene was cloned in pGEMEX-1 expression vector and recombinant plasmid was transformed in to JM109 E. coli strain and induced by IPTG.Results: We amplified, cloned and expressed hepatitis B virus surface antigen successfully and expressed protein was serologically assayed using gel diffusion and western blot analysis. Gene was sequenced and submitted to GenBank. Conclusions: The cloned HBsAg gene is ready for using in experimental DNA vaccine animal study. There are some mutations on this recombinant protein (T45D, Y206C and S207R which will affect on folding and function of recombinant protein.Keywords: Hepatitis B Virus, HBsAg, Recombinant Protein, Vaccine

  18. Chimeric Epitope Vaccine from Multistage Antigens for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugraha, G; Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Prita, P J Jeya; Khatri, V K; Amdare, N P; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 120 million people worldwide. Vaccination for filariasis by targeting different stages of the parasite will be a boon to the existing MDA efforts of WHO which required repeated administration of the drug to reduce the infection level and sustained transmission. Onset of a filaria-specific immune response achieved through antigen vaccines can act synergistically with these drugs to enhance the parasite killing. Multi-epitope vaccine approach has been proved to be successful against several parasitic diseases as it overcomes the limitations associated with the whole antigen vaccines. Earlier results from our group suggested the protective efficacy of multi-epitope vaccine comprising two immunodominant epitopes from Brugia malayi antioxidant thioredoxin (TRX), several epitopes from transglutaminase (TGA) and abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2). In this study, the prophylactic efficacy of the filarial epitope protein (FEP), a chimera of selective epitopes identified from our earlier study, was tested in a murine model (jird) of filariasis with L3 larvae. FEP conferred a significantly (P < 0.0001) high protection (69.5%) over the control in jirds. We also observed that the multi-epitope recombinant construct (FEP) induces multiple types of protective immune responses, thus ensuring the successful elimination of the parasite; this poses FEP as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:26179420

  19. Murine T-lymphocyte activation by mycobacterial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been renewed interest in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections in the United States. Effective immunity to mycobacterial infections, as well as diagnosis by the skin test, involves T-cells rather than antibodies. Studies currently underway use the new technologies of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant DNA to define better mycobacterial antigens for T-cell activation, in the hope of identifying species specific antigens. Lymph node cells from mice sensitized to Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium avium were assayed for activation by mycobacterial fractions, and cell lines and clones were generated. Comparing BALB/c and B10 mice indicated better responses to M. avium sonicate by B10 mice. A recombinant gene product containing a M. intracellulare peptide was assayed with lymph node cells and indicated excellent T-cell stimulation in BALB/c lymph node cells and cell lines. However, assays using B10 T-cell clones have yet to detect responders to the recombinant protein. Future studies using synthetic epitopes produced by recombinant DNA techniques and defined by monoclonal antibodies are necessary for the identification of reactive T-cell epitopes that are potentially species specific. 4 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  20. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-10-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3,619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1, and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0-69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels are scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs.

  1. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro-Benito, Miguel; Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4(+) T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level.

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of carbohydrate antigens in chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Motohiro; Nakayama, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become an invaluable technique to detect antigens in tissue sections. Compared to Western blotting analysis, IHC is advantageous in determining histological distribution and localization of the antigen. Another advantage, if one can access human formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks of disease tissues, is that IHC makes it possible to analyze diseases retrospectively from archived pathological tissue specimens. In this chapter, we describe protocols used for both conventional and multiple immunostainings using FFPE tissue sections, which have been used for quantitative analysis of high endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels and lymphocyte subsets attached to HEV-like vessels in our studies of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. We also describe in detail a protocol using an L-selectinIgM chimera in situ binding assay on FFPE tissue sections for functional detection of L-selectin ligand carbohydrates expressed on HEV-like vessels. After presenting each protocol, we provide practical examples for its use obtained from our studies.

  3. Antigenic proteins of Helicobacter pylori of potential diagnostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilpour, Akbar; Santhanam, Amutha; Wei, Lee Chun; Saadatnia, Geita; Velusamy, Nagarajan; Osman, Sabariah; Mohamad, Ahmad Munir; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antigen was prepared from an isolate from a patient with a duodenal ulcer. Serum samples were obtained from culture-positive H. pylori infected patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers and gastritis (n=30). As controls, three kinds of sera without detectable H. pylori IgG antibodies were used: 30 from healthy individuals without history of gastric disorders, 30 from patients who were seen in the endoscopy clinic but were H. pylori culture negative and 30 from people with other diseases. OFF-GEL electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and Western blots of individual serum samples were used to identify protein bands with good sensitivity and specificity when probed with the above sera and HRP-conjugated anti-human IgG. Four H. pylori protein bands showed good (≥ 70%) sensitivity and high specificity (98-100%) towards anti-Helicobacter IgG antibody in culture- positive patients sera and control sera, respectively. The identities of the antigenic proteins were elucidated by mass spectrometry. The relative molecular weights and the identities of the proteins, based on MALDI TOF/ TOF, were as follows: CagI (25 kDa), urease G accessory protein (25 kDa), UreB (63 kDa) and proline/pyrroline- 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (118 KDa). These identified proteins, singly and/or in combinations, may be useful for diagnosis of H. pylori infection in patients.

  4. Toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2016-06-30

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can produce durable remissions in hematologic malignancies that are not responsive to standard therapies. Yet the use of CAR T cells is limited by potentially severe toxicities. Early case reports of unexpected organ damage and deaths following CAR T-cell therapy first highlighted the possible dangers of this new treatment. CAR T cells can potentially damage normal tissues by specifically targeting a tumor-associated antigen that is also expressed on those tissues. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a systemic inflammatory response caused by cytokines released by infused CAR T cells can lead to widespread reversible organ dysfunction. CRS is the most common type of toxicity caused by CAR T cells. Neurologic toxicity due to CAR T cells might in some cases have a different pathophysiology than CRS and requires different management. Aggressive supportive care is necessary for all patients experiencing CAR T-cell toxicities, with early intervention for hypotension and treatment of concurrent infections being essential. Interleukin-6 receptor blockade with tocilizumab remains the mainstay pharmacologic therapy for CRS, though indications for administration vary among centers. Corticosteroids should be reserved for neurologic toxicities and CRS not responsive to tocilizumab. Pharmacologic management is complicated by the risk of immunosuppressive therapy abrogating the antimalignancy activity of the CAR T cells. This review describes the toxicities caused by CAR T cells and reviews the published approaches used to manage toxicities. We present guidelines for treating patients experiencing CRS and other adverse events following CAR T-cell therapy. PMID:27207799

  5. Integrative discovery of epigenetically derepressed cancer testis antigens in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Glazer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs were first discovered as immunogenic targets normally expressed in germline cells, but differentially expressed in a variety of human cancers. In this study, we used an integrative epigenetic screening approach to identify coordinately expressed genes in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC whose transcription is driven by promoter demethylation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our screening approach found 290 significant genes from the over 47,000 transcripts incorporated in the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 expression array. Of the top 55 candidates, 10 showed both differential overexpression and promoter region hypomethylation in NSCLC. Surprisingly, 6 of the 10 genes discovered by this approach were CTAs. Using a separate cohort of primary tumor and normal tissue, we validated NSCLC promoter hypomethylation and increased expression by quantitative RT-PCR for all 10 genes. We noted significant, coordinated coexpression of multiple target genes, as well as coordinated promoter demethylation, in a large set of individual tumors that was associated with the SCC subtype of NSCLC. In addition, we identified 2 novel target genes that exhibited growth-promoting effects in multiple cell lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coordinated promoter demethylation in NSCLC is associated with aberrant expression of CTAs and potential, novel candidate protooncogenes that can be identified using integrative discovery techniques. These findings have significant implications for discovery of novel CTAs and CT antigen directed immunotherapy.

  6. Immunization with purified protein antigens from Streptococcus mutans against dental caries in rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehner, T; Russell, M W; Caldwell, J.; Smith, R.

    1981-01-01

    Protein antigens I, I/II, II, and III were prepared from Streptococcus mutans (serotype c). Their immunogenicities and protective effects against dental caries were investigated in 40 rhesus monkeys kept entirely on a human-type diet, containing about 15% sucrose. Antigens I, I/II and, to a lesser extent, antigen II induced significant reductions in dental caries, as compared with sham-immunized monkeys. This was achieved with 1 or 2 doses of antigen, the first of which was administered with ...

  7. Evidence for glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchoring of Toxoplasma gondii major surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomavo, S.; Schwarz, R.T.; Dubremetz, J.F. (Institut National de la Recheche Medicale, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France))

    1989-10-01

    The four major surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites (P43, P35, P30, and P22) were made water soluble by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). These antigens were biosynthetically labeled with {sup 3}H-fatty acids, ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and ({sup 3}H)carbohydrates. Treatment of {sup 3}H-fatty-acid-labeled parasite lysates with PI-PLC removed the radioactive label from these antigens. A cross-reacting determinant was exposed on these antigens after PI-PLC treatment.

  8. Identification of a potent microbial lipid antigen for diverse Natural Killer T cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Almeida, Catarina F.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Bhowruth, Veemal; Johnson, Darryl; Uldrich, Adam P.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Brigl, Manfred; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a well-characterized CD1d-restricted T cell subset. The availability of potent antigens and tetramers for iNKT cells has allowed this population to be extensively studied and has revealed their central roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. In contrast, diverse Natural Killer T (dNKT) cells are poorly understood because the lipid antigens they recognize are largely unknown. We sought to identify dNKT cell lipid antigen(s) by interrogating a panel of dNKT mouse cell hybridomas with lipid extracts from the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We identified Listeria phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as a microbial antigen that was significantly more potent than a previously characterized dNKT cell antigen, mammalian PG. Further, while mammalian PG loaded CD1d tetramers did not stain dNKT cells, the Listeria-derived PG loaded tetramers did. The structure of Listeria PG was distinct from mammalian PG since it contained shorter, fully-saturated anteiso fatty acid lipid tails. CD1d binding lipid displacement studies revealed that the microbial PG antigen binds significantly better to CD1d than counterparts with the same headgroup. These data reveal a highly-potent microbial lipid antigen for a subset of dNKT cells and provide an explanation for its increased antigen potency compared to the mammalian counterpart. PMID:26254340

  9. Identification of Antigenic Proteins from Lichtheimia corymbifera for Farmer’s Lung Disease Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognon, Bénédicte; Barrera, Coralie; Monod, Michel; Valot, Benoit; Roussel, Sandrine; Quadroni, Manfredo; Jouneau, Stephane; Court-Fortune, Isabelle; Caillaud, Denis; Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Reboux, Gabriel; Millon, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The use of recombinant antigens has been shown to improve both the sensitivity and the standardization of the serological diagnosis of Farmer’s lung disease (FLD). The aim of this study was to complete the panel of recombinant antigens available for FLD serodiagnosis with antigens of Lichtheimia corymbifera, known to be involved in FLD. L. corymbifera proteins were thus separated by 2D electrophoresis and subjected to western blotting with sera from 7 patients with FLD and 9 healthy exposed controls (HEC). FLD-associated immunoreactive proteins were identified by mass spectrometry based on a protein database specifically created for this study and subsequently produced as recombinant antigens. The ability of recombinant antigens to discriminate patients with FLD from controls was assessed by ELISA performed with sera from FLD patients (n = 41) and controls (n = 43) recruited from five university hospital pneumology departments of France and Switzerland. Forty-one FLD-associated immunoreactive proteins from L. corymbifera were identified. Six of them were produced as recombinant antigens. With a sensitivity and specificity of 81.4 and 77.3% respectively, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was the most effective antigen for discriminating FLD patients from HEC. ELISA performed with the putative proteasome subunit alpha type as an antigen was especially specific (88.6%) and could thus be used for FLD confirmation. The production of recombinant antigens from L. corymbifera represents an additional step towards the development of a standardized ELISA kit for FLD diagnosis. PMID:27490813

  10. Mapping the antigenicity of the parasites in Leishmania donovani infection by proteome serology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Forgber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis defines a cluster of protozoal diseases with diverse clinical manifestations. The visceral form caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe. So far, no vaccines exist for visceral leishmaniasis despite indications of naturally developing immunity, and sensitive immunodiagnostics are still at early stages of development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Establishing a proteome-serological methodology, we mapped the antigenicity of the parasites and the specificities of the immune responses in human leishmaniasis. Using 2-dimensional Western blot analyses with sera and parasites isolated from patients in India, we detected immune responses with widely divergent specificities for up to 330 different leishmanial antigens. 68 antigens were assigned to proteins in silver- and fluorochrome-stained gels. The antigenicity of these proteins did not correlate with the expression levels of the proteins. Although some antigens are shared among different parasite isolates, there are extensive differences and no immunodominant antigens, but indications of antigenic drift in the parasites. Six antigens were identified by mass spectrometry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proteomics-based dissection of the serospecificities of leishmaniasis patients provides a comprehensive inventory of the complexity and interindividual heterogeneity of the host-responses to and variations in the antigenicity of the Leishmania parasites. This information can be instrumental in the development of vaccines and new immune monitoring and diagnostic devices.

  11. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Cheng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen; goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody; finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were applied to the concomitant assay to analyze the feasibility. The first approach applied FITC and Cy3 when both targets were present at the same time, resulting in 50 ng/mL of the antibody detection limit and 10 ng/mL of antigen detection limit in the quantitative measurements of target concentration, taking the consideration of FRET efficiency of 68% between donor and acceptor. The sequential approach tended to lower the signal/noise (S/N ratio and the detection of the model antigen (lower than 1 ng/mL had better sensitivity than the model antibody (lower than 50 ng/mL. This combined antigen/antibody method might be useful for combined detection of antigens and antibodies. It will be helpful to screen for both antigen and antibody particularly in the situations of the multiserotype and high-frequency mutant virus infections.

  12. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2008-07-01

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  13. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2009-08-02

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magneticactivated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks, resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  14. Characterization of a common antigen of colorectal and mucinous ovarian tumors, COTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, K D; Zamora, P O; Rhodes, B A; Sachatello, C R; Hagihara, P F; Griffen, W O; van Nagell, J R; Fulks, R; Ram, M D

    1984-01-01

    A new colon cancer antigen is reported. It is designated as COTA, Colon-Ovarian Tumor Antigen, because it is found in mucins produced by both tissues during malignancy. The new antigen was identified by making antibodies against human colon cancer tissue in goats. The antisera were exhaustively absorbed with lyophilized extracts of normal colon, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, plasma, and the well-known colon tumor antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The new antigen was identified by immunodiffusion. Studies of 28 malignant tissue extracts, 10 ovarian adenocarcinoma cyst fluids, 43 normal tissues, and 5 plasma samples revealed that this antigen is found only in colon tumors and mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas. The antigen was not detected in serous adenocarcinoma of the ovaries, extracts of adenocarcinoma of lung, breast, kidney or stomach nor in the extracts of normal tissues. Other tests show that this antigen is not CEA, Ca 19-9, or CSAp. It is stable to heating at 65 degrees for 5 minutes; it elutes from an ion exchange matrix (DEAE) with 0.3-0.5M NaCl; it migrates to the alpha-2 region on immunoelectrophoresis; and its size, by exclusion chromatography on Sepharose 4B, is 3-15 million daltons. Anti-COTA stains colon cancer tissue sections indicating that COTA is present in goblet-cell mucin.

  15. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  16. STUDY ON MECHANISM OF MODIFICATION OF HLA ANTIGEN CAMOUFLAGED BY DIVERSE mPEGs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张印则; 周华友; 兰炯采; 李伟; 张志欣; 章扬培

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study mechanism of various effects of HLA antigen camouflaged by different mPEGs. Methods Effects of the modification of HLA antigen camouflaged by various mPEGs were detected by microlymphocytotoxicity test. The ability of modification was detected by SDS-PAGE. The mechanism of the modification was depicted by the three-dimensional structure of HLA antigen. Results The specific reaction between HLA-A2 antigen and its antibody were completely blocked by mPEG-BTC and mPEG-SPA. mPEG-MAL did not camouflage HLA antigen. The diversity of the modification of HLA antigen camouflaged by varied mPEGs was closely associated with the amides displayed on the surface of HLA antigen. Conclusion Only the amides which were exposed to the surface of HLA antigen can be camouflaged by mPEG. The amides on the surface of three-dimensional structure of HLA-A2 antigen determine the effect of the modification by various mPEGs.

  17. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen); goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC) was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody); finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were appli...

  18. [Comparative study of the antigens of Streptococcus group A. Rport I. Comparative characteristics of the immunologic activity of partially purified M-protien and the cytoplasmic protective antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseev, V A; Avdeeva, Zh I; Kondrashov, G I

    1975-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on mice. A study was made of the protective properties of the cytoplasmic fraction of streptococcus, group A, Type 1 and of an antigen isolated from it by sedimentation with ammonium sulfate, in comparison with M-protein partially purified by the method of Lancefield and Perlman. Cytoplasmic antigen was not inferior by immunogenicity in comparison with M-protein. In difference from the latter, it was thermolabile and sensitive to the action of hydrochloric acid. The protective antigen was revealed in the cytoplasm not only of the virulent, but also of avirulent strains of streptococcus devoid of M-protein.

  19. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  20. Radioimmunoassay in the detection of the hepatitis Be antigen/antibody system in asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay for hepatitis e antigen (HBeAg) and antibody to e (anti-HBe) was developed and sera of 71 asymptomatic chronic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), in 44 of whom liver biopsy was obtained, were tested. In addition, testing for Dane particle associated DNA polymerase activity was performed in all sera. HBeAg was detected in 14 subjects (19.7%) and anti-HBe in 46 (64.8%). The highest proportion of HBeAg positivity (40%) was found among carriers with histological evidence of chronic hepatitis, whereas anti-HBe was present in 80% of carriers with normal liver histology, in 58% of carriers with non-specific reactive hepatitis and in 60% of carriers with chronic liver lesions. DNA polymerase activity was present in 92.8% of sera positive for HBeAg, in 13% of sera positive for anti HBe, and in 9% of sera negative for both markers. Our results demonstrate that not all HBsAg carriers reactive to HBeAg show evidence of chronic hepatitis nor, conversely, that anti-HBe is invariably associated with the healthy carrier state of HBsAg. Finally, circulating Dane particles, as revealed by the presence of serum specific DNA polymerase activity, may also be present in anti-HBe positive sera other than those of some HBsAg carriers lacking both HBeAg and anti-HBe. (orig.)

  1. The T-cell anergy induced by Leishmania amazonensis antigens is related with defective antigen presentation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta O. Pinheiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the main agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, a disease associated with anergic immune responses. In this study we show that the crude antigen of Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg but not L. braziliensis promastigotes (LbAg contains substances that suppress mitogenic and spontaneous proliferative responses of T cells. The suppressive substances in LaAg are thermoresistant (100ºC/1h and partially dependent on protease activity. T cell anergy was not due to a decreased production of growth factors as it was not reverted by addition of exogenous IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma or IL-12. LaAg did not inhibit anti-CD3-induced T cell activation, suggesting that anergy was due to a defect in antigen presentation. It was also not due to cell necrosis, but was accompanied by expressive DNA fragmentation in lymph node cells, indicative of apoptosis. Although pre-incubation of macrophages with LaAg prevented their capacity to present antigens, this effect was not due to apoptosis of the former. These results suggest that the T cell anergy found in diffuse leishmaniasis may be the result of parasite antigen-driven apoptosis of those cells following defective antigen presentation.A Leishmania amazonensis é o principal agente etiológico da leishmaniose cutânea difusa, uma doença associada a respostas imunes anérgicas. Neste estudo nós mostramos que o extrato bruto de promastigotas de Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg, mas não de L. braziliensis (LbAg, contém substâncias que suprimem respostas proliferativas, espontâneas e mitogênicas, de células T. As substâncias supressoras no LaAg são termo-resistentes (100°C/1h e parcialmente dependentes da atividade de proteases. A anergia de células T não foi devida à diminuição na produção de fatores de crescimento, uma vez que não foi revertida pela adição de: IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gama ou IL-12. O LaAg não inibiu a ativação de células T induzida por anti-CD3, sugerindo que a anergia

  2. Viral sequestration of antigen subverts cross presentation to CD8(+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Tewalt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells (T(CD8+ are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector T(CD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated T(CD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the T(CD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation

  3. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Reeve

    Full Text Available Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype.

  4. Genetic mapping identifies novel highly protective antigens for an apicomplexan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damer P Blake

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp. was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed 'immune mapped protein-1' (IMP-1. Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate

  5. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Richard; Borley, Daryl W; Maree, Francois F; Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Esterhuysen, Jan J; Harvey, William T; Blignaut, Belinda; Fry, Elizabeth E; Parida, Satya; Paton, David J; Mahapatra, Mana

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype. PMID:27448206

  6. Probing vaccine antigens against bovine mastitis caused by Streptococcus uberis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Rosa; Prenafeta, Antoni; González-González, Luis; Pérez-Pons, Josep Antoni; Sitjà, Marta

    2016-07-19

    Streptococcus uberis is a worldwide pathogen that causes intramammary infections in dairy cattle. Because virulence factors determining the pathogenicity of S. uberis have not been clearly identified so far, a commercial vaccine is not yet available. Different S. uberis strains have the ability to form biofilm in vitro, although the association of this kind of growth with the development of mastitis is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential use as vaccine antigens of proteins from S. uberis biofilms, previously identified by proteomic and immunological analyses. The capability of eliciting a protective immune response by targeted candidates was assayed on a murine model. Sera from rabbits immunized with S. uberis biofilm preparations and a convalescent cow intra-mammary infected with S. uberis were probed against cell wall proteins from biofilm and planktonic cells previously separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Using rabbit immunized serum, two proteins were found to be up-regulated in biofilm cells as compared to planktonic cells; when serum from the convalescent cow was used, up to sixteen biofilm proteins were detected. From these proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fructose-biphosphate aldolase (FBA), and elongation factor Ts (EFTs) were chosen to be tested as vaccine antigen candidates. For this purpose, different groups of mice were immunized with the three recombinant-expressed proteins (each one formulated separately in a vaccine), and thereafter intraperitoneally challenged with S. uberis. The three proteins induced specific IgG antibodies, but a significant reduction of mortality was only observed in the groups of mice vaccinated with FBA or EFTs. These results suggest that FBA and EFTs might be considered as strong antigenic candidates for a vaccine against S. uberis bovine mastitis. Moreover, this is the first study to indicate that also in S. uberis, GAPDH, FBA and EFTs, as proteins

  7. Probing vaccine antigens against bovine mastitis caused by Streptococcus uberis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Rosa; Prenafeta, Antoni; González-González, Luis; Pérez-Pons, Josep Antoni; Sitjà, Marta

    2016-07-19

    Streptococcus uberis is a worldwide pathogen that causes intramammary infections in dairy cattle. Because virulence factors determining the pathogenicity of S. uberis have not been clearly identified so far, a commercial vaccine is not yet available. Different S. uberis strains have the ability to form biofilm in vitro, although the association of this kind of growth with the development of mastitis is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential use as vaccine antigens of proteins from S. uberis biofilms, previously identified by proteomic and immunological analyses. The capability of eliciting a protective immune response by targeted candidates was assayed on a murine model. Sera from rabbits immunized with S. uberis biofilm preparations and a convalescent cow intra-mammary infected with S. uberis were probed against cell wall proteins from biofilm and planktonic cells previously separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Using rabbit immunized serum, two proteins were found to be up-regulated in biofilm cells as compared to planktonic cells; when serum from the convalescent cow was used, up to sixteen biofilm proteins were detected. From these proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fructose-biphosphate aldolase (FBA), and elongation factor Ts (EFTs) were chosen to be tested as vaccine antigen candidates. For this purpose, different groups of mice were immunized with the three recombinant-expressed proteins (each one formulated separately in a vaccine), and thereafter intraperitoneally challenged with S. uberis. The three proteins induced specific IgG antibodies, but a significant reduction of mortality was only observed in the groups of mice vaccinated with FBA or EFTs. These results suggest that FBA and EFTs might be considered as strong antigenic candidates for a vaccine against S. uberis bovine mastitis. Moreover, this is the first study to indicate that also in S. uberis, GAPDH, FBA and EFTs, as proteins

  8. Identification of antigenic targets of paraproteins by expression cloning does not support a causal role of chronic antigenic stimulation in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma and MGUS

    OpenAIRE

    Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Held, Gerhard; Kubuschok, Boris; Hung, Chun-Zhu; Malatsidze, Natalia; Wagner, Mathias; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Antigenic targets of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and multiple myeloma (MM) paraproteins have been suggested to play an important role as growth stimulators in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. To identify such targets, we screened cDNA libraries from human testis, lung and breast cancer, bovine and porcine muscle and wheat germ for reactivity with paraproteins in the sera from 115 patients with MGUS and MM. Of >6 x 10(8) paraprotein-antigen interactions screen...

  9. Conjugating influenza a (H1N1) antigen to n-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan nanoparticles improves the immunogenicity of the antigen after nasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingfeng; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2015-11-01

    As one of the most serious infectious respiratory diseases, influenza A (H1N1) is a great threat to human health, and it has created an urgent demand for effective vaccines. Nasal immunization can induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses against viruses, and it can serve as an ideal route for vaccination. However, the low immunogenicity of antigens on nasal mucosa is a high barrier for the development of nasal vaccines. In this study, we covalently conjugated an influenza A (H1N1) antigen to the surface of N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles (H1N1-TMC/NP) through thioester bonds to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen after nasal administration. SDS-PAGE revealed that most of the antigen was conjugated on TMC nanoparticles, and an in vitro biological activity assay confirmed the stability of the antigen after conjugation. After three nasal immunizations, the H1N1-TMC/NP induced significantly higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA compared with free antigen. A hemagglutination inhibition assay showed that H1N1-TMC/NP induced much more protective antibodies than antigen-encapsulated nanoparticles or alum-precipitated antigen (I.M.). In the mechanistic study, H1N1-TMC/NP was shown to stimulate macrophages to produce IL-1β and IL-6 and to stimulate spleen lymphocytes to produce IL-2 and IFN-γ. These results indicated that H1N1-TMC/NP may be an effective vaccine against influenza A (H1N1) viruses for use in nasal immunization.

  10. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms.

  11. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein (GPBP) Directs Myofibril Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revert-Ros, Francisco; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Macías, Jesús; Breyer, Richard; Zent, Roy; Hudson, Billy G.; Saadeddin, Anas; Revert, Fernando; Blasco, Raül; Navarro, Carmen; Burks, Deborah; Saus, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Goodpasture antigen-binding protein-1 (GPBP-1) is an exportable non-conventional Ser/Thr kinase that regulates glomerular basement membrane collagen organization. Here we provide evidence that GPBP-1 accumulates in the cytoplasm of differentiating mouse myoblasts prior to myosin synthesis. Myoblasts deficient in GPBP-1 display defective myofibril formation, whereas myofibrils assemble with enhanced efficiency in those overexpressing GPBP-1. We also show that GPBP-1 targets the previously unidentified GIP130 (GPBP-interacting protein of 130 kDa), which binds to myosin and promotes its myofibrillar assembly. This report reveals that GPBP-1 directs myofibril formation, an observation that expands its reported role in supramolecular organization of structural proteins to the intracellular compartment. PMID:21832087

  12. Bullous pemphigoid antigen localization suggests an intracellular association with hemidesmosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westgate, G E; Weaver, A C; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    Autoantibodies to a normal component of stratified squamous epithelia, the bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPA), are synthesized in patients with the disease bullous pemphigoid. We have used these sera to study the distribution of BPA in vivo and in vitro. At low magnification, indirect...... immunofluorescent staining for BPA is linear at the basement membrane zone (BMZ) of skin and many other epithelial tissues. At higher magnification however, we observed a punctate staining pattern for BPA which was regular in appearance and suggested localization of BPA to discrete structures at the BMZ. Subsequent...... immunoelectron microscopy using both peroxidase and colloidal gold labeling techniques with patients' sera or IgG, revealed that BPA is associated with hemidesmosomes--putative adhesion structures at the BMZ, based on their similarity in ultrastructure to desmosomes. More specifically BPA was immunolocalized...

  13. Specific Lipids Modulate the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, C.; Parcej, D.; Ejsing, C. S.;

    2011-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a key role in adaptive immunity by translocating proteasomal degradation products from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum lumen for subsequent loading onto major histocompatibility (MHC) class I molecules. For functional...... and structural analysis of this ATP-binding cassette complex, we established the overexpression of TAP in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Screening of optimal solubilization and purification conditions allowed the isolation of the heterodimeric transport complex, yielding 30 mg of TAP/liter of culture....... Detailed analysis of TAP function in the membrane, solubilized, purified, and reconstituted states revealed a direct influence of the native lipid environment on activity. TAP-associated phospholipids, essential for function, were profiled by liquid chromatography Fourier transform mass spectrometry...

  14. Antigen stimulation in the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Marta; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the western world. The mechanism the mechanism of the disease development still remains unrevealed. In recent years new unique molecular and clinical features of CLL have emerged leading to a unified hypothesis of CLL origin. Major progress in understanding CLL biology was made after identification of mutational status of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (IGHV) genes, which also improved prediction of patients' clinical outcome. Preferential usage of IGHV genes has led to recognition of CLL-specific B cell receptors (BCRs), called stereotyped BCRs. Taken together, these data point to antigen stimulation of CLL progenitor cells. Studies on CLL antibody reactivity have shown affinity to molecular motifs on apoptotic cells and bacterial cell structures, supporting the current hypothesis of the CLL pathomechanism. In this paper we have summarized information available to date regarding current theory of cellular origin and pathology of CLL.

  15. Quantitating protein synthesis, degradation, and endogenous antigen processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princiotta, Michael F; Finzi, Diana; Qian, Shu-Bing; Gibbs, James; Schuchmann, Sebastian; Buttgereit, Frank; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2003-03-01

    Using L929 cells, we quantitated the macroeconomics of protein synthesis and degradation and the microeconomics of producing MHC class I associated peptides from viral translation products. To maintain a content of 2.6 x 10(9) proteins, each cell's 6 x 10(6) ribosomes produce 4 x 10(6) proteins min(-1). Each of the cell's 8 x 10(5) proteasomes degrades 2.5 substrates min(-1), creating one MHC class I-peptide complex for each 500-3000 viral translation products degraded. The efficiency of complex formation is similar in dendritic cells and macrophages, which play a critical role in activating T cells in vivo. Proteasomes create antigenic peptides at different efficiencies from two distinct substrate pools: rapidly degraded newly synthesized proteins that clearly represent defective ribosomal products (DRiPs) and a less rapidly degraded pool in which DRiPs may also predominate. PMID:12648452

  16. The immunoradiometric assay for carbohydrate antigen CA-242

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 125I-labelled monoclonal antibody (C242) against carbohydrate antigen CA-242, the sandwich immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) was developed. In preliminary clinical application of this method, the results of serum CA-242 measurements were 2.5 ± 4.5 U/ml for 77 normal individuals, 3.5 ± 7.0 U/ml for 128 cases of benign diseases, and 56.0 ± 91.3 U/ml for 210 cases of malignant tumors. The CA-242 values of patients with malignant tumors were significantly higher than that of patients with benign diseases. Taking 12 U/ml as normal upper limit, the positive detective rates of pancreatic and colorectal cancers were 86.6% and 62.0% respectively, while the false positive rate for normal individuals was 4%

  17. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sai; Rissanen, Ilona; Zeltina, Antra; Hepojoki, Jussi; Raghwani, Jayna; Harlos, Karl; Pybus, Oliver G; Huiskonen, Juha T; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses. PMID:27117403

  18. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV, a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses.

  19. Cross-dressing: an alternative mechanism for antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-12-01

    Cross-dressing involves the transfer of preformed functional peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of donor cells to recipient cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). These cross-dressed cells might eventually present the intact, unprocessed peptide-MHC complexes to T lymphocytes. In this review we will discuss some recent findings concerning the intercellular transfer of preformed MHC complexes and the possible mechanisms by which the transfer may occur. We will report evidences showing that both MHC class I and MHC class II functional complexes might be transferred, highlighting the physiological relevance of these cross-dressed cells for the presentation of exogenous antigens to both cytotoxic and helper T lymphocytes.

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) dynamics in stomach cancer patients receiving cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunologic assays of blood serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were conducted at major stages of treatment of gastric cancer by subtotal stomach resection and gastrectomy with preliminary cryotreatment and thawing of tumor. A short-term rise in CEA level occurred in 53.9 % of cases 3-4 days after combined therapy. A decrease in CEA concentration at discharge from hospital as compared with preoperative level and that registered 3-4 days after operation was observed in 50 and 75 % of cases of combined therapy, respectively, and 47.5 and 37.5 % of controls (surgery without cryotreatment). There was nocorrelation between cryotreatment and changes in CEA level in gastric ulcer patients

  1. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  2. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  3. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  4. Human platelet antigen gene frequencies in the Austrian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holensteiner, A; Walchshofer, S; Adler, A; Kittl, E M; Mayr, W R; Panzer, S

    1995-01-01

    Gene frequencies for the human platelet antigen systems HPA-1, -2, -3, and -5 were determined directly from DNA isolated from cord blood of more than 900 randomly selected Caucasoid newborns in Vienna, Austria. Genotyping was performed by specific amplification of the respective regions coding for platelet glycoproteins GP Ib, IIb, IIIa, and Ia by PCR. These PCR products were analyzed after restriction enzyme digestion and electrophoresis. The observed gene frequencies were: HPA-1a: 0.852, HPA-1b: 0.148; HPA-2a: 0.918, HPA-2b: 0.082; HPA-3a: 0.612, HPA-3b: 0.388; HPA-5a: 0.892, HPA-5b: 0.108. There was a good fit with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Results from serological determinations and genotyping showed no discrepancies. PMID:7607581

  5. Fetal antigen 2 in primary and secondary brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H B; Teisner, B; Schrøder, H D;

    1991-01-01

    Immunohistochemical deposition and distribution of fetal antigen 2 (FA2) was examined in normal brain tissue and in primary and metastatic tumors of the brain. In normal brain tissue FA2 was exclusively found linearly around the vessels, along pia and in arachnoidea. A similar localization was seen...... in primary brain tumors except in gliosarcoma where FA2 was distributed diffusely in the sarcoma region and was absent in the glioma region. In metastatic carcinoma with tumor stroma a diffuse staining reaction was seen in the stroma and with a basement membrane (BM) like staining at the tumor cell....../stroma interface. Intracytoplasmic FA2 staining of the tumor cells was seen in areas without tumor stroma. In metastatic melanoma a BM like FA2 staining was seen around and between individual tumor cells. The staining patterns seen in the metastatic tumors were in accordance with that of the corresponding primary...

  6. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  7. Antigenic mapping of an H9N2 avian influenza virus reveals two discrete antigenic sites and a novel mechanism of immune escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Thomas; Reddy, Kolli; James, Joe; Adamiak, Beata; Barclay, Wendy; Shelton, Holly; Iqbal, Munir

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus is a major cause of poultry production loss across Asia leading to the wide use of vaccines. Efficacy of vaccines is often compromised due to the rapid emergence of antigenic variants. To improve the effectiveness of vaccines in the field, a better understanding of the antigenic epitopes of the major antigen, hemagglutinin, is required. To address this, a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were generated against a contemporary Pakistani H9N2 isolate, which represents a major Asian H9N2 viral lineage. Antibodies were characterized in detail and used to select a total of 26 unique ‘escape’ mutants with substitutions across nine different amino acid residues in hemagglutinin including seven that have not been described as antigenic determinants for H9N2 viruses before. Competition assays and structural mapping revealed two novel, discrete antigenic sites “H9-A” and “H9-B”. Additionally, a second subset of escape mutants contained amino acid deletions within the hemagglutinin receptor binding site. This constitutes a novel method of escape for group 1 hemagglutinins and could represent an alternative means for H9N2 viruses to overcome vaccine induced immunity. These results will guide surveillance efforts for arising antigenic variants as well as evidence based vaccine seed selection and vaccine design. PMID:26738561

  8. γδ T cells recognize a microbial encoded B cell antigen to initiate a rapid antigen specific Interleukin 17 response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xun; Wei, Yu-ling; Huang, Jun; Newell, Evan W.; Yu, Hongxiang; Kidd, Brian A.; Kuhns, Michael S.; Waters, Ray W.; Davis, Mark M.; Weaver, Casey T.; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2012-01-01

    Summary γδ T cells contribute uniquely to host immune defense. However, how they function remains an enigma. Although it is unclear what most γδ T cells recognize, common dogma asserts that they recognize self-antigens. While they are the major initial Interleukin-17 (IL-17) producers in infections, it is unclear what is required to trigger these cells to act. Here, we report that a noted B cell antigen, the algae protein-phycoerythrin (PE) is an antigen for murine and human γδ T cells. PE also stained specific bovine γδ T cells. Employing this specificity, we demonstrated that antigen recognition, but not extensive clonal expansion, was required to activate naïve γδ T cells to make IL-17. In this activated state, γδ T cells gained the ability to respond to cytokine signals that perpetuated the IL-17 production. These results underscore the adaptability of lymphocyte antigen receptors and suggest a previously unrecognized antigen-driven rapid response in protective immunity prior to the maturation of classical adaptive immunity. PMID:22960222

  9. γδ T cells recognize a microbial encoded B cell antigen to initiate a rapid antigen-specific interleukin-17 response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xun; Wei, Yu-Ling; Huang, Jun; Newell, Evan W; Yu, Hongxiang; Kidd, Brian A; Kuhns, Michael S; Waters, Ray W; Davis, Mark M; Weaver, Casey T; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2012-09-21

    γδ T cells contribute uniquely to immune competence. Nevertheless, how they function remains an enigma. It is unclear what most γδ T cells recognize, what is required for them to mount an immune response, and how the γδ T cell response is integrated into host immune defense. Here, we report that a noted B cell antigen, the algae protein phycoerythrin (PE), is a murine and human γδ T cell antigen. Employing this specificity, we demonstrated that antigen recognition activated naive γδ T cells to make interleukin-17 and respond to cytokine signals that perpetuate the response. High frequencies of antigen-specific γδ T cells in naive animals and their ability to mount effector response without extensive clonal expansion allow γδ T cells to initiate a swift, substantial response. These results underscore the adaptability of lymphocyte antigen receptors and suggest an antigen-driven rapid response in protective immunity prior to the maturation of classical adaptive immunity. PMID:22960222

  10. CELLULAR VACCINES IN LISTERIOSIS: ROLE OF THE LISTERIA ANTIGEN GAPDH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eCalderon-Gonzalez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of live Listeria-based vaccines carries serious difficulties when administrated to immunocompromised individuals. However, cellular carriers have the advantage of inducing multivalent innate immunity as well as cell-mediated immune responses, constituting novel and secure vaccine strategies in listeriosis. Here, we compare the protective efficacy of dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages and their safety. We examined the immune response of these vaccine vectors using two Listeria antigens, listeriolysin O (LLO and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH, and several epitopes such as the LLO peptides, LLO189–201 and LLO91–99 and the GAPDH peptide, GAPDH1–22. We discarded macrophages as safe vaccine vectors because they show anti-Listeria protection but also high cytotoxicity. DCs loaded with GAPDH1–22 peptide conferred higher protection and security against listeriosis than the widely explored LLO91–99 peptide. Anti-Listeria protection was related to the changes in DC maturation caused by these epitopes, with high production of interleukin-12 as well as significant levels of other Th1 cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ, and with the induction of GAPDH1–22-specific CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses. This is believed to be the first study to explore the use of a novel GAPDH antigen as a potential DC-based vaccine candidate for listeriosis, whose efficiency appears to highlight the relevance of vaccine designs containing multiple CD4+ and CD8+ epitopes.

  11. Cellular vaccines in listeriosis: role of the Listeria antigen GAPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-González, Ricardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Bronchalo-Vicente, Lucía; Lecea-Cuello, M Jesús; Pareja, Eduardo; Bosch-Martínez, Alexandre; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Yañez-Díaz, Sonsoles; Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Alvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of live Listeria-based vaccines carries serious difficulties when administrated to immunocompromised individuals. However, cellular carriers have the advantage of inducing multivalent innate immunity as well as cell-mediated immune responses, constituting novel and secure vaccine strategies in listeriosis. Here, we compare the protective efficacy of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and their safety. We examined the immune response of these vaccine vectors using two Listeria antigens, listeriolysin O (LLO) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and several epitopes such as the LLO peptides, LLO189-201 and LLO91-99 and the GAPDH peptide, GAPDH1-22. We discarded macrophages as safe vaccine vectors because they show anti-Listeria protection but also high cytotoxicity. DCs loaded with GAPDH1-22 peptide conferred higher protection and security against listeriosis than the widely explored LLO91-99 peptide. Anti-Listeria protection was related to the changes in DC maturation caused by these epitopes, with high production of interleukin-12 as well as significant levels of other Th1 cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ, and with the induction of GAPDH1-22-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) immune responses. This is believed to be the first study to explore the use of a novel GAPDH antigen as a potential DC-based vaccine candidate for listeriosis, whose efficiency appears to highlight the relevance of vaccine designs containing multiple CD4(+) and CD8(+) epitopes.

  12. Efficacy demonstration of tetanus vaccines by double antigen ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosskopf, U; Noeske, K; Werner, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a double antigen ELISA (DAE) for rapid, specific and reliable assessment of the antitetanus immune status of horses and sheep. Compared with the indirect ELISA, the double antigen ELISA has the advantage of species-independent testing of sera. Thanks to its test design, it is more specific since the detected antibodies are forced to bind tetanus toxoid twice. In addition, it is very sensitive to tetanus antibodies, enabling the detection of low antibody titres, in range which is relevant for the assessment of the protective status (tetanus toxin neutralising antibodies). The detection limit of the DAE for tetanus antibodies is in the order of 10(-4) EU/ml. A comparison of in vitro results of individual sera with in vivo titres showed that horse sera with titres of 0.04 and 0.05 EU/ml in the DAE showed titres of > 0.05 IU and 0.034 IU/ml respectively during in vivo testing thus indicating good agreement. For tested sheep sera which were rated > 0.05 IU/ml in vivo, the corresponding titre in the DAE was 0.24 EU/ml. Clear tetanus antitoxin establishment of protective ELISA limits requires further comparative examination of sera with low titres (marketing authorisation procedures of tetanus vaccines ad us. vet. As a consequence, the toxin neutralisation test (still being the standard method of choice for quantifying tetanus toxin neutralising antitoxin titres) could be replaced, since it requires too great a number of animals per test and involves considerable suffering for the animals. The test described here reduces the use of mice and guinea pigs within vaccine efficacy testing. In addition, it involves less exposure of the laboratory personnel to toxin.

  13. INTRATHYMIC INOCULATION OF LIVER SPECIFIC ANTIGEN ALLEVIATES LIVER TRANSPLANT REJECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾长库; 郑树森; 朱有法

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of liver specific antigen (LSA) on liver allotransplantation rejection. Methods Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in this study. Group Ⅰ: syngeneic control (Wistar-to-Wistar); Group Ⅱ: acute rejection (SD-to-Wistar). Group Ⅲ: thymic inoculation of SD rat LSA day 7 before transplantation. The observation of general condition and survival time, rejection grades and the NF-κB activity of splenocytes were used to analyze severity of acute rejection and immune state of animals in different groups. Results The general condition of group Ⅰ was fair post transplantation with no sign of rejection. All recipients of group Ⅱ died within days 9 to 13 post transplantation with median survival time of 10.7 ±1.37 days. As for group Ⅲ, 5 out of 6 recipients survived for a long period with remarkably better general condition than that of group Ⅱ. Its rejection grades were significantly lower than group Ⅱ (P< 0.05).NF-κB activity was only detected in group Ⅰ between days 5 and 7 after transplantation, whereas high activity of NF-κB was detected at all points in group Ⅱ and low NF-κB activity was detected in group Ⅲ which was significantly lower than that of group Ⅱ (P < 0.05). Conclusions LSA is an important transplantation antigen directly involved in the immunorejection of liver transplantation. Intrathymic inoculation of LSA can alleviate the rejection of liver allotransplantation,grafts survive for a period of time thereby, allowing a novel way to liver transplantation immunotolerance.

  14. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  15. Antigenic variations of human influenza virus in Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moattari A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Influenza virus is a major cause of human respiratory infections and responsible for pandemics and regional outbreaks around the world. This investigation aims to determine the prevalent influenza genotypes during 2005-2007 outbreaks in Shiraz, the capital city of Fars province, southern Iran and compare the results obtained with those of previous study. Materials and Method: Of the 300 pharyngeal swabs collected from influenza patients, 26 were found to be positive by culture and hemagglutination (HA assays. Typing and subtyping of the isolates carried out by using multiplex RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis performed on isolated HA genes using neighbour-joining method. Result: Out of 26 positive isolates 12 and 14 were H1N1 and H3N2 respectively. The phylogenetic and amino acid sequence analyses of our H1N1 isolates showed 99-100% genetic resemblance to A/NewCaledonia/20/99 (H1N1 vaccine strain. Most of the Iranian H3N2 isolates varied form A/California/7/2004 vaccine strain in 20 amino acids of which positions 189,226 and 227 were located in antigenic sites of HA1 molecule. These substitutions were not observed in any of the H3N2 subtypes from the same region reported previously. Conclusion: The H3N2 subtype strains prevalent during the 2005/7 influenza outbreak in southern Iran demonstrated a drastic antigenic variation and differed from A/California/7/2004 vaccine strain. The H1N1 subtypes showed a notable resemblance to A/NewCaledonia/20/99 vaccine strain and therefore were predicted to be capable of conferring sufficient immunity against H1N1 subtypes.

  16. Cellular vaccines in listeriosis: role of the Listeria antigen GAPDH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-González, Ricardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Bronchalo-Vicente, Lucía; Lecea-Cuello, M. Jesús; Pareja, Eduardo; Bosch-Martínez, Alexandre; Fanarraga, Mónica L.; Yañez-Díaz, Sonsoles; Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Álvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of live Listeria-based vaccines carries serious difficulties when administrated to immunocompromised individuals. However, cellular carriers have the advantage of inducing multivalent innate immunity as well as cell-mediated immune responses, constituting novel and secure vaccine strategies in listeriosis. Here, we compare the protective efficacy of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and their safety. We examined the immune response of these vaccine vectors using two Listeria antigens, listeriolysin O (LLO) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and several epitopes such as the LLO peptides, LLO189−201 and LLO91−99 and the GAPDH peptide, GAPDH1−22. We discarded macrophages as safe vaccine vectors because they show anti-Listeria protection but also high cytotoxicity. DCs loaded with GAPDH1−22 peptide conferred higher protection and security against listeriosis than the widely explored LLO91−99 peptide. Anti-Listeria protection was related to the changes in DC maturation caused by these epitopes, with high production of interleukin-12 as well as significant levels of other Th1 cytokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ, and with the induction of GAPDH1−22-specific CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses. This is believed to be the first study to explore the use of a novel GAPDH antigen as a potential DC-based vaccine candidate for listeriosis, whose efficiency appears to highlight the relevance of vaccine designs containing multiple CD4+ and CD8+ epitopes. PMID:24600592

  17. THE SEARCH OF OPTIMAL COMBINATION OF ANTIGENS FOR SEROLOGICAL DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Vasilyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The four chimeric recombinant antigens CBD-CFP10, CBD-ESAT6, ESAT6-CFP10 and CBD-P38 contained aminoacid sequences of full-size proteins ESAT6, CFP10 and matured protein P38 of M. tuberculosis, joined with aminoacid sequences of cellulose bind domain of endogluconase A (CBD from Cellumonas fimi have been obtained by gene engineering methods. Recombinant proteins were purified by affine chromatography in column with Ni-NTA-sepharose 6В-CL and as PPDN-3 were used for detection of their antigenic activity in indirect ELISA for TB serological diagnostics. The sera from patients with lung tuberculosis (n = 321, from persons who had professional contacts with TB patients (n = 42, from healthy blood donors (n = 366 and from patients with lung diseases of non-TB etiology were tested. It was detected that there was positive correlation between antibodies level for all studied antigens compared by pair. It has been demonstrated that although antigens were different by antigenic and immunobiological characteristics they add each other in the content of antigenic diagnostics compositions. Thus, all these antigens can be used in the test kits for serological diagnostics of TB. Using of these antigens will allow to detect persons infected by TB and patients with active tuberculosis. 

  18. Distinct effects of endogenous interleukin-23 on eosinophilic airway inflammation in response to different antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Ogawa

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Different antigens induced IL-23 at different part of the body in our similar asthma models. Endogenous IL-23 production at the site of antigen sensitization facilitates type-2 immune responses, whereas IL-23 production and subsequent IL-17A synthesis in the airways suppresses allergic inflammation.

  19. Analysis of expression profiles of MAGE-A antigens in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Torsten E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immunological response to solid tumours is insufficient. Therefore, tumour specific antigens have been explored to facilitate the activation of the immune system. The cancer/testis antigen class of MAGE-A antigens is a possible target for vaccination. Their differential expression profiles also modulate the course of the cancer disease and its response to antineoplastic drugs. Methods The expression profiles of MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6 and -A10 in five own oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were characterised by rt-PCR, qrt-PCR and immunocytochemistry with a global MAGE-A antibody (57B and compared with those of an adult keratinocyte cell line (NHEK. Results All tumour cell lines expressed MAGE-A antigens. The antigens were expressed in groups with different preferences. The predominant antigens expressed were MAGE-A2, -A3 and -A6. MAGE-A10 was not expressed in the cell lines tested. The MAGE-A gene products detected in the adult keratinocyte cell line NHEK were used as a reference. Conclusion MAGE-A antigens are expressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The expression profiles measured facilitate distinct examinations in forthcoming studies on responses to antineoplastic drugs or radiation therapy. MAGE-A antigens are still an interesting aim for immunotherapy.

  20. Serological characterization of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biotype 1 strains antigenically related to both serotypes 2 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.; Andresen, Lars Ole; Plambeck, Tamara

    1996-01-01

    ). Immunodiffusion confirmed the antigenic relationship with serotype 2 and further demonstrated an antigenic relationship with strain WF83 (reference strain of serotype 7). SDS-PAGE with LPS from strains 1536, 4226, WF83 and strain 7317 (representative of the 9 isolates examined) showed that strains WF83 and 7317...

  1. FLUORESCENCE OVERLAY ANTIGEN MAPPING OF THE EPIDERMAL BASEMENT-MEMBRANE ZONE .1. GEOMETRIC ERRORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, S; DEJONG, MCJM; HEERES, K; WILKINSON, MHF; JONKMAN, MF; VANDERMEER, JB

    1994-01-01

    To identify in tissue sections the relative positions of antigen distributions close to the resolving power of the microscope, we have developed the fluorescence overlay antigen mapping (FOAM) procedure. As this technique makes high demands on the geometric fidelity of the overlay image, it is essen

  2. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  3. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  4. HLA-A and -B antigens and larynx carcinoma in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, S; Konstantopoulos, K; Bannis, K; Zervas, J

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of HLA antigens in 30 Greek larynx carcinoma patients was more prominent for the A21, A28 and B17 antigens compared to 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. It is suggested that immunogenetic factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of this neoplasia.

  5. Immunological characterization of a recombinant 27-kilodalton antigenic protein from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, B L; Garcia, A. M.; A. Restrepo; McEwen, J. G.

    1996-01-01

    We report the expression in Escherichia coli of a 27-kDa antigenic protein from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. When analyzed by immunoblotting, this recombinant antigenic protein was recognized by antibodies present in the sera of 40 of the 44 paracoccidioidomycosis patients studied. No cross-reactions were observed with sera from patients with other mycoses (histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, sporotrichosis, and chromoblastomycosis) or with tuberculosis.

  6. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules ex...

  7. The Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigen in salivary gland carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Christensen, M;

    1995-01-01

    The simple mucin-type T (Thomsen-Friedenreich) antigen is a marker of carcinomas, and has been related to aggressiveness of malignant tumours. We studied the expression of T, sialosyl-T, A and H blood group antigens in salivary gland carcinomas. The aim was to study whether the tumours, based on ...

  8. The uptake of soluble and particulate antigens by epithelial cells in the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Savannah E; Lickteig, Duane J; Plunkett, Kyle N; Ryerse, Jan S; Konjufca, Vjollca

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) overlying the villi play a prominent role in absorption of digested nutrients and establish a barrier that separates the internal milieu from potentially harmful microbial antigens. Several mechanisms by which antigens of dietary and microbial origin enter the body have been identified; however whether IECs play a role in antigen uptake is not known. Using in vivo imaging of the mouse small intestine, we investigated whether epithelial cells (enterocytes) play an active role in the uptake (sampling) of lumen antigens. We found that small molecular weight antigens such as chicken ovalbumin, dextran, and bacterial LPS enter the lamina propria, the loose connective tissue which lies beneath the epithelium via goblet cell associated passageways. However, epithelial cells overlying the villi can internalize particulate antigens such as bacterial cell debris and inert nanoparticles (NPs), which are then found co-localizing with the CD11c+ dendritic cells in the lamina propria. The extent of NP uptake by IECs depends on their size: 20-40 nm NPs are taken up readily, while NPs larger than 100 nm are taken up mainly by the epithelial cells overlying Peyer's patches. Blocking NPs with small proteins or conjugating them with ovalbumin does not inhibit their uptake. However, the uptake of 40 nm NPs can be inhibited when they are administered with an endocytosis inhibitor (chlorpromazine). Delineating the mechanisms of antigen uptake in the gut is essential for understanding how tolerance and immunity to lumen antigens are generated, and for the development of mucosal vaccines and therapies.

  9. Antigenic profiles of individual-matched pairs of primary and melanoma metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B. Meije; G.W.M. Swart; C. Lepoole; P.K. Das; J.J. van den Oord

    2009-01-01

    A unique collection of individual-matched pairs of primary and melanoma metastases were studied immunohistochemically with a panel of 6 monoclonal antibodies directed to gp-100, pigmentation-associated antigen, tyrosinase-related protein, human leukocyte antigen DR, MAA-1, and MAA-2 (high molecular

  10. Development of recombinant antigen array for simultaneous detection of viral antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Protein microarrays have been developed to study antibody reactivity against a large number of antigens, demonstrating extensive perspective for clinical application. We developed a viral antigen array by spotting four recombinant antigens and synthetic peptide, including glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 and 2, phosphoprotein 150 of cytomegalovirus (CMV, Rubella virus (RV core plus glycoprotein E1 and E2 as well as a E1 peptide with the optimal concentrations on activated glass slides to simultaneously detect IgG and IgM against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV in clinical specimens of sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs. The positive reference sera were initially used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of the array with the optimal conditions. Then clinical specimens of 144 sera and 93 CSFs were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV by the antigen array. Specificity of the antigen array for viral antibodies detection was satisfying compared to commercial ELISA kits but sensitivity of the array varied relying on quality and antigenic epitopes of the spotting antigens. In short, the recombinant antigen array has potential to simultaneous detect multiple viral antibodies using minute amount (3 µl of samples, which holds the particularly advantage to detect viral antibodies in clinical CSFs being suspicious of neonatal meningitis and encephalitis.

  11. Functional mimicry of a discontinuous antigenic site by a designed synthetic peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villen, J.; Borras, E.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Meloen, R.H.; Davila, M.; Domingo, E.; Giralt, E.; Andreu, D.

    2002-01-01

    Functional reproduction of the discontinuous antigenic site D of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been achieved by means of synthetic peptide constructions that integrate each of the three protein loops that define the antigenic site into a single molecule. The site D mimics were designed on

  12. Clinically Significant Minor Blood Group Antigens amongst North Indian Donor Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divjot Singh Lamba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Racial differences in blood group antigen distribution are common and may result in striking and interesting findings. These differences in blood group antigen distribution are important due to their influence on the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. Study Design and Methods. This is a prospective study, involving 1000 healthy regular repeat voluntary blood donors associated with the department. The clinically significant minor blood group antigens of these donors were studied. Results. Out of 1000 healthy regular repeat voluntary blood donors, 93% were D positive and 2.8% were K positive. Amongst the Rh antigens, e was the most common (99%, followed by D (93%, C (85.1%, c (62.3%, and E (21.5%. Within the MNS blood group system, antigen frequency was M (88%, N (57.5%, S (57.8%, and s (87.5%. Within the Duffy blood group system, antigen frequency was Fya (87.3% and Fyb (58.3%. Conclusions. This data base will help us to prevent alloimmunisation in young females, pregnant women, and patients who are expected to require repeated transfusions in life by providing them with antigen matched blood. Antigen negative blood can also be made available without delay to already alloimmunized multitransfused patients.

  13. Detection of 2 immunoreactive antigens in the cell wall of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Hernández-Mendoza, Gustavo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Toriello, Conchita; López-Romero, Everardo; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex contains highly antigenic molecules which are potentially useful for the diagnosis and treatment of sporotrichosis. In this study, 2 immunoreactive antigens of 60 (Gp60) and 70 kDa (Gp70) were detected in the cell wall of the yeast morphotypes of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

  14. Effect of hepatitis B immunisation in newborn infants of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Chuanfang; Gong, Yan; Brok, Jesper;

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of hepatitis B vaccine and immunoglobulin in newborn infants of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen.......To evaluate the effects of hepatitis B vaccine and immunoglobulin in newborn infants of mothers positive for hepatitis B surface antigen....

  15. Evaluation of Leishmania antigens preparation and storage for use in enzyme immunoassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Beatriz Julieta

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of time and temperature on the storage of an alkaline antigen of L.major-like and L.(V. braziliensis promastigotes added or not of a proteases inhibitor (PMSF was evaluted by means of an IgG-ELISA. Antibodies in assays using L. major-like antigen stored at -20oC for 6 monsths had a statistically lower geometric mean titer (GMT and different 95% confidence interval limits (CL than antigens stored otherwise, as assessed by the "t" statistic. The PMSF L. major-like antigen after storage for 6 months at a temperature of 4oC had the same GMT and 95% CL displayed at time zero as well as when storage for 4 and 6 months at -20oC. Significant diferences were not found when L.(V. braziliensis antigens were stored at times and temperatures mentioned; the PMSF antigen stored for 2 months at -70oC resulted in a lower serum GMT and 95% CL than any other, as assessed by the "t" statistic. Antigen performance did not show any statistical difference associated to the addition of PMSF within the same species; the largest difference between antigens was that between PMSF-L. (V. braziliensis and L. major-like without PMSF.

  16. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune r

  17. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The...

  18. Chloroquine inhibits accessory cell presentation of soluble natural and synthetic protein antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro effect of the lysosomotrophic agent, chloroquine, on the presentation of soluble protein antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. Chloroquine inhibited the capacity of antigen-pulsed accessory cells to stimulate proliferation in appropriately primed T cells. The effect...

  19. Rapid titration of retroviral vectors encoding intracellular antigens by flow cytometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Sladek, T L; Jacobberger, J W

    1990-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to detect cells infected with retroviral vectors encoding both simian virus 40 large T antigen and G418 resistance after indirect immunofluorescence staining using a T-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody and a fluorescein-conjugated secondary antibody. Titers of viral stocks determined by flow cytometry were equivalent to those determined by quantitation of G418-resistant colonies.

  20. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  1. Multivalent glycopeptide dendrimers for the targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. García-Vallejo; M. Ambrosini; A. Overbeek; W.E. van Riel; K. Bloem; W.W.J. Unger; F. Chiodo; J.G. Bolscher; K. Nazmi; H. Kalay; Y. van Kooyk

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most powerful type of antigen presenting cells. Current immunotherapies targeting dendritic cells have shown a relative degree of success but still require further improvement. One of the most important issues to solve is the efficiency of antigen delivery to dendritic cells

  2. Towards efficient cancer immunotherapy: advances in developing artificial antigen-presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, L.J.; Paulis, L.E.M.; Tel, J.; Figdor, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Active anti-cancer immune responses depend on efficient presentation of tumor antigens and co-stimulatory signals by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Therapy with autologous natural APCs is costly and time-consuming and results in variable outcomes in clinical trials. Therefore, development of artif

  3. Proteome-wide antigen discovery of novel protective vaccine candidates against Staphylococcus aureus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Pilely, Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    is an urgent need to institute non-antimicrobial measures, such as vaccination, against the spread of MRSA. With the aim of finding new protective antigens for vaccine development, this study used a proteome-wide in silico antigen prediction platform to screen the proteome of S. aureus strain MRSA252...

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF THE "DIAPLYTE" ANTIGEN OF DREYER ON TUBERCULOSIS OF THE GUINEA PIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Straub, E L

    1925-01-31

    We have prepared "diaplyte" antigen according to Dreyer's procedure and have studied its therapeutic and prophylactic value in experimental tuberculosis of guinea pigs. In our hands it has failed to yield beneficial effects. The animals treated with the antigen tended in general to develop lesions more quickly and to die earlier than the controls.

  5. Schistosoma mansoni antigens alter the cytokine response in vitro during cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Michelle Barbosa Bafica

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni infection or associated products are able to down-modulate the type 1 CD4+ T cell inflammatory response characteristic of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated how S. mansoni antigens altered the immune response that was induced by the soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL patients. Cytokines were measured from the supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures stimulated with SLA. This was performed using the sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique in the presence or absence of S. mansoni recombinant antigens Sm29, SmTSP-2 and PIII. The addition of S. mansoni antigens to the cultures resulted in the reduction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ levels in 37-50% of patients. Although to a lesser extent, the antigens were also able to decrease the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. We compared patients that either had or did not have reduction in IFN-γ and TNF-α production in cultures stimulated with SLA in the presence of S. mansoni antigens. We found that there was no significant difference in the levels of interleukin (IL-10 and IL-5 in response to S. mansoni antigens between the groups. The antigens used in this study down-modulated the in vitro proinflammatory response induced by SLA in a group of CL patients through a currently undefined mechanism.

  6. The role of CD4 in antigen-independent activation of isolated single T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelso, A; Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    The membrane molecule CD4 (L3T4) is thought to facilitate activation of Class II H-2-restricted T cells by binding to Ia determinants on antigen-presenting cells. Recent reports suggest that CD4 can also contribute to antigen-independent activation by anti-T cell receptor (TCR) antibodies. An assay...

  7. SPONGIOTIC DERMATITIS WITH A MIXED INFLAMMATORY INFILTRATE OF LYMPHOCYTES, ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELLS, IMMUNOGLOBULINS AND COMPLEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu Velez Ana Maria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical and histological presentation of spongiotic dermatitis and its inflammatory infiltrates warrant further investigation. In this case documentation of a patient with cutaneous spongiotic reactivity, we aim to characterize antigen presenting cells, as well as the skin-specific cutaneous lymphocyte antigen population by multiple techniques. Case report: A 30 year old Caucasian female presented with a two week history of blistering and erosions around the vaginal, rectal and axillary areas. Material and Methods: We utilized hematoxylin and eosin histology, direct immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy methods to evaluate the immune reaction patterns of the cutaneous inflammatory cells. Results: In the primary histologic areas of spongiotic dermatitis, a mixed population of B and T lymphocytes was seen. Ki-67 antigen proliferative index staining was accentuated in these areas, correlating with the presence of large numbers of epidermal and dermal antigen presenting cells. Among the antigen presenting cell population, we detected strong positivities with CD1a, Factor XIIIa, myeloid/hystoid antigen, S100, HAM-56, and CD68. Interestingly, immunoglobulins G, D and M and Complement factors C1q and C3 were also strongly expressed in antigen presenting cell areas, including positivity within the spongiotic epidermis and around dermal vessels. Conclusions: We document a heterogeneous population of B and T lymphocytes and the presence of multiple classes of antigen presenting cells, immunoglobulins and complement in and surrounding histologically spongiotic areas; these findings further correlated with increased levels of expression of Ki-67.

  8. Effect of particulate adjuvant on the anthrax protective antigen dose required for effective nasal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Dulce; Staats, Herman F; Borges, Olga

    2015-07-17

    Successful vaccine development is dependent on the development of effective adjuvants since the poor immunogenicity of modern subunit vaccines typically requires the use of potent adjuvants and high antigen doses. In recent years, adjuvant formulations combining both immunopotentiators and delivery systems have emerged as a promising strategy to develop effective and improved vaccines. In this study we investigate if the association of the mast cell activating adjuvant compound 48/80 (C48/80) with chitosan nanoparticles would promote an antigen dose sparing effect when administered intranasally. Even though the induction of strong mucosal immunity required higher antigen doses, incorporation of C48/80 into nanoparticles provided significant dose sparing when compared to antigen and C48/80 in solution with no significant effect on serum neutralizing antibodies titers. These results suggest the potential of this novel adjuvant combination to improve the immunogenicity of a vaccine and decrease the antigen dose required for vaccination. PMID:26087299

  9. Cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by MHC class I in dendritic cell subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric eGutiérrez-Martínez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ dendritic cells subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen presenting cells. Here we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by dendritic cells subsets

  10. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is ......Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen...... in the cells even throughout division. This leads to daughter cells containing half the fluorescence of their parents. When lymphocytes are loaded with CFSE prior to ex vivo stimulation with specific antigen, the measurement of serial halving of its fluorescence by flow cytometry identifies the cells...

  11. Analysis of sperm membrane antigens relevant to antisperm antibody using Western blot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangHF

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To identify the sperm membrane antigens associated with antisperm antibody.Methods:The antisperm antibody in serum was tested by ELISA.Antisperm antibody positive sera from 18 infertile men and 15 infertile women were used.The molecular weight(MW) of sperm membrane antigens associated with the antisperm antibody was analyzed with antisperm antibody positive serum using Western blot.Results:Eight kinds of MW of sperm membrane antigens were identified.The ratio of identification on the 78 KD(60.7%),60KD(71.4%),51KD(14.9%) and 23KD(14.29%)sperm antigen was higher than other.Conclusion:sperm membrane antigens with MW of 78KD,60KD,51KD and 23KD were associated with antisperm antibody and immunological infertility.

  12. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Rajkannan; E J Padma Malar

    2007-09-01

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the crystal structure of monoclonal antibody specific for the pres1 region of the hepatitis B virus. At the optimized docked conformation, the interactions between the amino acids of antigen and antibody were examined. It is found that the docked complex is stabilized by 59.3 kcal/mol. The stability of the docked antigen-antibody complex is due to hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The amino acids of the antigen and antibody responsible for the interaction were identified.

  13. From the Deep Sea to Everywhere: Environmental Antigens for iNKT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of innate T cells that share features with innate NK cells and adaptive memory T cells. The first iNKT cell antigen described was found 1993 in a marine sponge and it took over 10 years for other, bacterial antigens to be described. Given the paucity of known bacterial iNKT cell antigens, it appeared as if iNKT cells play a very specialist role in the protection against few, rare and unusual pathogenic bacteria. However, in the last few years several publications painted a very different picture, suggesting that antigens for iNKT cells are found almost ubiquitous in the environment. These environmental iNKT cell antigens can shape the distribution, phenotype and function of iNKT cells. Here, these recent findings will be reviewed and their implications for the field will be outlined. PMID:26703211

  14. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  15. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  16. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A;

    1999-01-01

    antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified......Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... patients and because patients with only two miscarriages were included in many studies; this is defined as repeated miscarriage. The odds ratios of repeated miscarriage for the HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens were calculated for the individual studies and subsequently the pooled odds ratios for the studies were...

  17. Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen has growth-promoting and inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G; Nghiem, Paul; DeCaprio, James A

    2013-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  18. Serum antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi in cottontail rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnarelli, Louis A; Norris, Steven J; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985-86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/ 76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (≥1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  19. INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IDENTIFY M. TUBERCULOSIS ANTIGENS AND EPITOPES USING GENOME-WIDE ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke eGeluk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the fact that only a small part of the Mtb expressome has been explored for identification of antigens capable of activating human T-cell responses, which is critically required for the design of better TB vaccination strategies, more emphasis should be placed on innovative ways to discover new Mtb antigens and explore their function at the several stages of infection. Better protective antigens for TB vaccines are urgently needed, also in view of the disappointing results of the MVA85 vaccine which failed to induce additional protection in BCG vaccinated infants [54]. Moreover, immune responses to relevant antigens may be useful to identify TB-specific biomarker signatures. Here we describe the potency of novel tools and strategies to reveal such Mtb antigens. Using proteins specific for different Mtb infection phases, many new antigens of the latency-associated Mtb DosR regulon as well as Rpf proteins, associated with resuscitating TB, were discovered that were recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, by employing MHC binding algorithms and bioinformatics combined with high throughput human T-cell screens and tetramers, HLA-class Ia restricted poly-functional CD8+ T-cells were identified in TB patients. Comparable methods, led to the identification of HLA-E-restricted Mtb epitopes recognized by CD8+ T-cells. A genome-wide unbiased antigen discovery approach was applied to analyse the in vivo Mtb gene expression profiles in the lungs of mice, resulting in the identification of IVE-TB antigens, which are expressed during infection in the lung, the main target organ of Mtb. IVE-TB antigens induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently Mtb infected individuals, and represent an interesting new group of TB antigens for vaccination. In summary, new tools have helped expand our view on the Mtb antigenome involved in human cellular immunity and provided new candidates for TB vaccination.

  20. Characteristics of 26 kDa antigen of H. Pylori by Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghahremani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alkylhydroperoxide reductase (AhpC, the 26 kDa antigen is one of the abundant antioxidant enzymes in Helicobacter pylori and seems to have a good potential for use in development of immunoassays to detect H. pylori infection in clinical specimens. This study aimed to investigate some properties of this antigen by the produced monoclonal antibodies. Five established hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori were cultivated and MAbs were purified by affinity chromatography. Subsequently, MAbs were conjugated with biotin, and different combinations of capture and tracer antibodies used in sandwich ELISA. Immunoblotting of bacterial extracts were performed to estimate aggregation status of the antigen. Release of antigen from the cultivated bacteria on solid media was examined by sandwich ELISA, and also, existence of interference in fecal extract was investigated by immunoblotting and sandwich ELISA. Our findings showed that the MAbs against 26 kDa antigen of H. pylori could recognize three bands of nearly 25 kDa, 50 kDa, and 75 kDa in immunoblotting. This study also indicated presence of more antigens in the culture medium around the bacteria than the bacterial extract itself. The results of sandwich ELISA and immunoblotting on fecal extracts suggest the presence of interfering agents that prevent detection of antigen by antibody in ELISA but not in immunoblotting. In this study the oligomerization of the 26 kDa antigen, presence of interfering agents in stool matrix, and release of antigen to outside of bacteria, were demonstrated.