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Sample records for antigens viral tumor

  1. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  2. Treating cancer as an infectious disease--viral antigens as novel targets for treatment and potential prevention of tumors of viral etiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Guo Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nearly 20% of human cancers worldwide have an infectious etiology with the most prominent examples being hepatitis B and C virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma and human papilloma virus-associated cervical cancer. There is an urgent need to find new approaches to treatment and prevention of virus-associated cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral antigens have not been previously considered as targets for treatment or prevention of virus-associated cancers. We hypothesized that it was possible to treat experimental HPV16-associated cervical cancer (CC and Hepatitis B-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by targeting viral antigens expressed on cancer cells with radiolabeled antibodies to viral antigens. Treatment of experimental CC and HCC tumors with (188Re-labeled mAbs to E6 and HBx viral proteins, respectively, resulted in significant and dose-dependent retardation of tumor growth in comparison with untreated mice or mice treated with unlabeled antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This strategy is fundamentally different from the prior uses of radioimmunotherapy in oncology, which targeted tumor-associated human antigens and promises increased specificity and minimal toxicity of treatment. It also raises an exciting possibility to prevent virus-associated cancers in chronically infected patients by eliminating cells infected with oncogenic viruses before they transform into cancer.

  3. Treating Cancer as an Infectious Disease—Viral Antigens as Novel Targets for Treatment and Potential Prevention of Tumors of Viral Etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Xing Guo Wang; Ekaterina Revskaya; Ruth A Bryan; Strickler, Howard D.; Robert D Burk; Arturo Casadevall; Ekaterina Dadachova

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nearly 20% of human cancers worldwide have an infectious etiology with the most prominent examples being hepatitis B and C virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma and human papilloma virus-associated cervical cancer. There is an urgent need to find new approaches to treatment and prevention of virus-associated cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral antigens have not been previously considered as targets for treatment or prevention of virus-associated cancers. We hypothes...

  4. Tumor Antigen Specific Activation of Primary Human T-Cells Expressing a Virally Encoded Chimeric T-Cell Receptor Specific for p185HER2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建民; MichaelSFRIEDMAN; ChristopherMREYNOLDS; MarianneTHUBEN; LeeWILKE; JenniferFULLER; 李桥; ZeligESHHAR; JamesJMULE; KevimTMCDONAGH

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested chimeric T-cell receptors (TCR) specific for p185HER2. In these experiments,retroviral vectors expressing the N297 or N29ξ receptors were constructed in pRET6. Amphotropic viral producer cells were established in the GALV-based PG13 packaging cell line. Ficoll purified human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were vitally transduced using an optimized protocol incorporating activation with immobilized anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies, followed by viral infection in the presence of fibronectin fragment CH296. Transduced cells were co-cultured with human tumor cell lines that overexpress (SK-OV-3) or underexpress (MCF7) p185HER2 to assay for antigen specific immune responses. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells transduced with the N297 or N29ξ chTCR demonstrated HER2-specific antigen responses, as determined by release of Th1 like cytokines, and cellular cytotoxicity assays. Our results support the feasibility of adoptive immunothempy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chTCR specific for p185HER2.

  5. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Kundu, Chanakya N. [School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar (India); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, School of Medicine, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Choudhuri, Tathagata, E-mail: tatha@ils.res.in [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati, Santiniketan, Bolpur (India)

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  6. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways

  7. Experimental fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus. II. Morphological reactions and distribution of viral antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmann, H B

    1982-01-01

    The effect of an infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus on fetal bovine tissues as well as the tissue-localization of viral antigen are described. Four bovine fetuses, 120-165 days of gestation, were inoculated in utero with a second passage virus strain. Lymphoid tissues were studied by light and electron microscopy. The infection induced precocious development of the secondary lymphoid organs. Characteristic changes were seen in postcapillary venules, cells of the mononuclear phagocyte ...

  8. Enhancing the recognition of tumor associated antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Irvine, Kari R.; Minev, Boris R.; Taggarse, Akash S.; McFariand, Barbra J.; Wang, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Activated CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) can directly recognize malignant cells because processed fragments of tumor associated antigens (TAA), 8-10 amino acids in length and complexed with MHC class I molecules, are displayed on tumor cell surfaces. Tumor cells have been genetically modified in a variety of ways in efforts to enhance the immune recognition of TAA. An alternative strategy is the expression of TAA in recombinant or synthetic form. This has been made possible by the recent cloning of TAA...

  9. The antigen specific composition of melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of tumor associated antigens has been characterized, but only a minor fraction of these are recognized by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes of melanoma, although these have shown the ability to recognize tumor and provide tumor regression upon adoptive transfer. Thus the peptide...... recognition of the majority of the CD8 tumor infiltrating lymphocytes remains to be identified....

  10. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  11. New Concepts in Tumor Antigens: Their Significance in Future Immunotherapies for Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yang; Xiao-Feng Yang

    2005-01-01

    The identification and molecular characterization of self-antigens expressed by human malignancies that are capable of elicitation of anti-tumor immune responses in patients have been an active field in tumor immunology.More than 2,000 tumor antigens have been identified, and most of these antigens are self-antigens. These significant progresses have led to the renaissance of tumor immunology and studies on anti-tumor immunotherapy.However, despite of the progress in the identification of self-tumor antigens, current antigen-specific immunotherapies for tumors are far less satisfied than expected, which reflects the urgent need to improve our understanding on self-tumor antigens. In order to develop more effective antigen specific anti-tumor immunotherapies and to monitor the responses to these immunotherapies in patients with tumors, many important fundamental questions need to be addressed. We propose for the first time that the studies in addressing the characteristics of self-tumor antigens and autoantigens are grouped as a new subject termed "antigenology". In this brief review, we would outline the progress in the identification of tumor antigens in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, and overview the new concepts and principles of antigenology and their significance for future immunotherapies to these malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  12. Advances in identification and application of tumor antigen inducing anti-cancer responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor antigen is one of the important bases of tumor immunotherapy[1]. With the discovery of novel tumor antigens, interest in specific immunotherapy for treatment of malignancies has increased substantially. Nowadays more and more scientists paid close attention to various tumor antigens with their roles or/and applications in anti-cancer immune responses, immune tolerance, tumor markers, tumor immunotherapy and so on. Here we discussed the classification of tumor antigens and summarized the technologies of identification and application of tumor antigens.

  13. Pericyte antigens in angiomyolipoma and PEComa family tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Asatrian, Greg; Barnhill, Raymond; Lugassy, Claire; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2015-08-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are an uncommon family of soft tissue tumors with dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. Although PEComa family tumors commonly demonstrate a perivascular growth pattern, pericyte antigen expression has not yet been examined among this unique tumor group. Previously, we demonstrated that a subset of perivascular soft tissue tumors exhibit a striking pericytic immunophenotype, with diffuse expression of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Here, we describe the presence of pericyte antigens across a diverse group of PEComa family tumors (n = 19 specimens). Results showed that pericyte antigens differed extensively by histological appearance. Typical angiomyolipoma (AML) specimens showed variable expression of pericyte antigens among both perivascular and myoid-appearing cells. In contrast, AML specimens with a predominant spindled morphology showed diffuse expression of pericyte markers, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. AML samples with predominant epithelioid morphology showed a marked reduction in or the absence of immunoreactivity for pericyte markers. Lymphangiomyoma samples showed more variable and partial pericyte marker expression. In summary, pericyte antigen expression is variable among PEComa family tumors and largely varies by tumor morphology. Pericytic marker expression in PEComa may represent a true pericytic cell of origin, or alternatively aberrant pericyte marker adoption. Markers of pericytic differentiation may be of future diagnostic utility for the evaluation of mesenchymal tumors, or identify actionable signaling pathways for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26123600

  14. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  15. Development of recombinant antigen array for simultaneous detection of viral antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Protein microarrays have been developed to study antibody reactivity against a large number of antigens, demonstrating extensive perspective for clinical application. We developed a viral antigen array by spotting four recombinant antigens and synthetic peptide, including glycoprotein G of herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 and 2, phosphoprotein 150 of cytomegalovirus (CMV, Rubella virus (RV core plus glycoprotein E1 and E2 as well as a E1 peptide with the optimal concentrations on activated glass slides to simultaneously detect IgG and IgM against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV in clinical specimens of sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs. The positive reference sera were initially used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of the array with the optimal conditions. Then clinical specimens of 144 sera and 93 CSFs were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and RV by the antigen array. Specificity of the antigen array for viral antibodies detection was satisfying compared to commercial ELISA kits but sensitivity of the array varied relying on quality and antigenic epitopes of the spotting antigens. In short, the recombinant antigen array has potential to simultaneous detect multiple viral antibodies using minute amount (3 µl of samples, which holds the particularly advantage to detect viral antibodies in clinical CSFs being suspicious of neonatal meningitis and encephalitis.

  16. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

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    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  17. The Prognostic, Diagnostic, and Therapeutic Potential of Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn

    Tumor antigens are a group of proteins recognized by the cells of immune system. Specifically, they are recognized in tumor cells where they are present in larger than usual amounts, or are physiochemically altered to a degree at which they no longer resemble native human proteins. Their presence...

  18. Tumor antigens as proteogenomic biomarkers in invasive ductal carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Winther, Ole;

    2014-01-01

    found to be perturbed. Conclusion: Tumor antigens are a group of proteins recognized by the cells of the immune system. Specifically, they are recognized in tumor cells where they are present in larger than usual amounts, or are physiochemically altered to a degree at which they no longer resemble...

  19. State of the Art in Tumor Antigen and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Chames

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of tumor immunology has resulted in multiple approaches for the treatment of cancer. However, a gap between research of new tumors markers and development of immunotherapy has been established and very few markers exist that can be used for treatment. The challenge is now to discover new targets for active and passive immunotherapy. This review aims at describing recent advances in biomarkers and tumor antigen discovery in terms of antigen nature and localization, and is highlighting the most recent approaches used for their discovery including “omics” technology.

  20. State of the Art in Tumor Antigen and Biomarker Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.chames@inserm.fr [INSERM U624, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-06-09

    Our knowledge of tumor immunology has resulted in multiple approaches for the treatment of cancer. However, a gap between research of new tumors markers and development of immunotherapy has been established and very few markers exist that can be used for treatment. The challenge is now to discover new targets for active and passive immunotherapy. This review aims at describing recent advances in biomarkers and tumor antigen discovery in terms of antigen nature and localization, and is highlighting the most recent approaches used for their discovery including “omics” technology.

  1. Detection of Avian Antigen-Specific T Cells Induced by Viral Vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen. There is ......Live attenuated viral vaccines are widely used in commercial poultry production, but the development of new effective inactivated/subunit vaccines is needed. Studies of avian antigen-specific T cells are primarily based on analyses ex vivo after activating the cells with recall antigen...... in the cells even throughout division. This leads to daughter cells containing half the fluorescence of their parents. When lymphocytes are loaded with CFSE prior to ex vivo stimulation with specific antigen, the measurement of serial halving of its fluorescence by flow cytometry identifies the cells...

  2. Tumor antigen specific iTreg accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and suppress therapeutic vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, Taylor H; Wolf, Dietlinde; Bodero, Maria; Podack, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Tumor specific antigens (TSA) provide an opportunity to mobilize therapeutic immune responses against cancer. To evade such responses, tumor development in immunocompetent hosts is accompanied by acquisition of both active and passive mechanisms of immune suppression, including recruitment of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). Thymic derived Treg (nTreg) may recognize self-antigens in the tumor microenvironment, while peripherally induced Treg (iTreg) may preferentially recognize the same ...

  3. Fetal antigen 2 in primary and secondary brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H B; Teisner, B; Schrøder, H D;

    1991-01-01

    Immunohistochemical deposition and distribution of fetal antigen 2 (FA2) was examined in normal brain tissue and in primary and metastatic tumors of the brain. In normal brain tissue FA2 was exclusively found linearly around the vessels, along pia and in arachnoidea. A similar localization was seen...... in primary brain tumors except in gliosarcoma where FA2 was distributed diffusely in the sarcoma region and was absent in the glioma region. In metastatic carcinoma with tumor stroma a diffuse staining reaction was seen in the stroma and with a basement membrane (BM) like staining at the tumor cell....../stroma interface. Intracytoplasmic FA2 staining of the tumor cells was seen in areas without tumor stroma. In metastatic melanoma a BM like FA2 staining was seen around and between individual tumor cells. The staining patterns seen in the metastatic tumors were in accordance with that of the corresponding primary...

  4. The pericyte antigen RGS5 in perivascular soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear lineage of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from or differentiate to pericytes or a modified perivascular cell. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation--although little bona fide evidence of pericytic differentiation exists. Likewise the perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) family shares a perivascular growth pattern, but with distinctive dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. RGS5, regulator of G-protein signaling 5, is a novel pericyte antigen with increasing use in animal models. Here, we describe the immunohistochemical expression patterns of RGS5 across perivascular soft tissue tumors, including glomus tumor (n = 6), malignant glomus tumor (n = 4), myopericytoma (n = 3), angioleiomyoma (n = 9), myofibroma (n = 4), solitary fibrous tumor (n = 10), and PEComa (n = 19). Immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantification was performed, and compared to αSMA (smooth muscle actin) expression. Results showed that glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma shared a similar diffuse immunoreactivity for RGS5 and αSMA across all tumors examined. In contrast, myofibroma, solitary fibrous tumor and PEComa showed predominantly focal to absent RGS5 immunoreactivity. These findings further support a common pericytic lineage of differentiation in glomus tumors, myopericytoma and angioleiomyoma. The pericyte marker RGS5 may be of future clinical utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26558691

  5. Cytotoxicity of tumor antigen specific human T cells is unimpaired by arginine depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Munder

    Full Text Available Tumor-growth is often associated with the expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells that lead to local or systemic arginine depletion via the enzyme arginase. It is generally assumed that this arginine deficiency induces a global shut-down of T cell activation with ensuing tumor immune escape. While the impact of arginine depletion on polyclonal T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion is well documented, its influence on chemotaxis, cytotoxicity and antigen specific activation of human T cells has not been demonstrated so far. We show here that chemotaxis and early calcium signaling of human T cells are unimpaired in the absence of arginine. We then analyzed CD8(+ T cell activation in a tumor peptide as well as a viral peptide antigen specific system: (i CD8(+ T cells with specificity against the MART-1aa26-35*A27L tumor antigen expanded with in vitro generated dendritic cells, and (ii clonal CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cells and T cells retrovirally transduced with a CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cell receptor were analyzed. Our data demonstrate that human CD8(+ T cell antigen specific cytotoxicity and perforin secretion are completely preserved in the absence of arginine, while antigen specific proliferation as well as IFN-γ and granzyme B secretion are severely compromised. These novel results highlight the complexity of antigen specific T cell activation and demonstrate that human T cells can preserve important activation-induced effector functions in the context of arginine deficiency.

  6. Immunofluorescence of bovine virus diarrhea viral antigen in white blood cells from experimentally infected immunocompetent calves.

    OpenAIRE

    Bezek, D M; Baker, J. C.; Kaneene, J B

    1988-01-01

    A study to evaluate the detection of bovine virus diarrhea viral antigen using immunofluorescence testing of white blood cells was conducted. Five colostrum-deprived calves were inoculated intravenously with a cytopathic strain of the virus. Lymphocyte and buffy coat smears were prepared daily for direct immunofluorescent staining for detection of antigen. Lymphocytes were separated from heparinized blood using a Ficoll density procedure. Buffy coat smears were prepared from centrifuged blood...

  7. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

  8. Is HCV core antigen a reliable marker of viral load? An evaluation of HCV core antigen automated immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Hadziyannis, Emilia; Minopetrou, Martha; Georgiou, Anastasia; Spanou, Fotini; Koskinas, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C viral (HCV) load detection and quantification is routinely accomplished by HCV RNA measurement, an expensive but essential test, both for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). HCV core antigen (Ag) testing has been suggested as an attractive alternative to molecular diagnostics. The aim of the study was to evaluate an automated chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) for HCV core Ag measurement in comparison to quantitative HCV RNA determination. Methods...

  9. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  10. Glycan bioengineering in immunogen design for tumor T antigen immunotargeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra, Victor G; Zlocowski, Natacha; Ditamo, Yanina; Copioli, Silvina; Tarp, Mads P; Bennett, Eric P; Clausen, Henrik; Roth, German A; Nores, Gustavo A; Irazoqui, Fernando J

    2009-10-01

    Bioengineering of Galbeta3GalNAcalpha, known as Thomsen-Friedenreich disaccharide (TFD), is studied to promote glycan immunogenicity and immunotargeting to tumor T antigen (Galbeta3GalNAcalpha-O-Ser/Thr). Theoretical studies on disaccharide conformations by energy minimization of structures using MM2 energy function showed that pentalysine (Lys5) linker and benzyl (Bzl) residue enhance TFD rigidity of the glycosidic bond. Antibodies raised against BzlalphaTFD-Lys5 immunogen recognize tumor T antigen. Competitive assays confirm that TFD-related structures are the main glycan epitope. Antibodies produced by glycan bioengineering recognize HT29, T47D, MCF7, and CT26 epithelial tumor cells. Epithelial tumor cell adhesion to T antigen-binding lectins and endothelial cells was lower in the presence of antibodies raised against the engineered immunogen. The immune response directed to the bioengineered glycoconjugate inhibited CT26 tumor cell proliferation and reduced tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. These results show that TFD bioengineering is a useful immunogenic strategy with potential application in cancer therapy. The same approach can be extended to other glycan immunogens for immunotargeting purposes. PMID:19726087

  11. Glycan bioengineering in immunogen design for tumor T antigen immunotargeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sendra, Victor G; Zlocowski, Natacha; Ditamo, Yanina;

    2009-01-01

    MM2 energy function showed that pentalysine (Lys5) linker and benzyl (Bzl) residue enhance TFD rigidity of the glycosidic bond. Antibodies raised against BzlalphaTFD-Lys5 immunogen recognize tumor T antigen. Competitive assays confirm that TFD-related structures are the main glycan epitope...

  12. COTA (colon-ovarian tumor antigen). An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, K D; Fenoglio-Preiser, C M; Berry, C O; Zamora, P O; Ram, M D; Fulks, R M; Rhodes, B A

    1986-07-01

    A goat anti-serum was prepared against mucinous ovarian cyst fluid and absorbed with normal colon and a variety of normal tissues until the only residual immunoreactivity was directed against colon cancer and ovarian tumor mucin. The set of antigenic determinants defined by this anti-serum has been called COTA, standing for colon-ovarian-tumor-antigen. This highly absorbed anti-serum (anti-COTA) was used for immunohistochemical staining of 42 different tissues in parallel with staining with a goat anti-CEA, which was also highly absorbed. The results suggest that COTA is a highly sensitive and specific antigen for colon carcinoma and may have potential for the early detection of malignant changes predictive of cancer of the colon.

  13. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  14. Identification and Charaterization of Genes Encoding Melanoma Antigens Recognized by Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-FuWang; StevenA.Rosenberg

    1995-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) into the autologous patient with melanoma resulted in the objective regression of tumor, suggesting that these TILs recognize tumor rejection antigens on the tumor cells.

  15. Viral sequestration of antigen subverts cross presentation to CD8(+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Tewalt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells (T(CD8+ are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector T(CD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated T(CD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the T(CD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation

  16. Comparison of E and NS1 antigens capture ELISA to detect dengue viral antigens from mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day-Yu Chao

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: With the future potential of antigen capture ELISA to be used in the resource deprived regions, the study showed that E-ELISA has similar sensitivity and antigen stability as NS1 Ag kit to complement the current established virological surveillance in human. The improvement of the sensitivity in detecting DENV-3/4 will be needed to incorporate this method into routine mosquito surveillance system.

  17. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  18. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4+ T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy

  19. Optimized tumor cryptic peptides: the basis for universal neo-antigen-like tumor vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menez-Jamet, Jeanne; Gallou, Catherine; Rougeot, Aude; Kosmatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-07-01

    The very impressive clinical results recently obtained in cancer patients treated with immune response checkpoint inhibitors boosted the interest in immunotherapy as a therapeutic choice in cancer treatment. However, these inhibitors require a pre-existing tumor specific immune response and the presence of tumor infiltrating T cells to be efficient. This immune response can be triggered by cancer vaccines. One of the main issues in tumor vaccination is the choice of the right antigen to target. All vaccines tested to date targeted tumor associated antigens (TAA) that are self-antigens and failed to show a clinical efficacy because of the immune self-tolerance to TAA. A new class of tumor antigens has recently been described, the neo-antigens that are created by point mutations of tumor expressing proteins and are recognized by the immune system as non-self. Neo-antigens exhibit two main properties: they are not involved in the immune self-tolerance process and are immunogenic. However, the majority of the neo-antigens are patient specific and their use as cancer vaccines requires their previous identification in each patient individualy that can be done only in highly specialized research centers. It is therefore evident that neo-antigens cannot be used for patient vaccination worldwide. This raises the question of whether we can find neo-antigen like vaccines, which would not be patient specific. In this review we show that optimized cryptic peptides from TAA are neo-antigen like peptides. Optimized cryptic peptides are recognized by the immune system as non-self because they target self-cryptic peptides that escape self-tolerance; in addition they are strongly immunogenic because their sequence is modified in order to enhance their affinity for the HLA molecule. The first vaccine based on the optimized cryptic peptide approach, Vx-001, which targets the widely expressed tumor antigen telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), has completed a large phase I clinical

  20. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate

  1. Direct identification of an HPV-16 tumor antigen from cervical cancer biopsy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derin B Keskin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV is the worldwide cause of many cancers, including cervical, anal, vulval, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal. Since T cells naturally eliminate the majority of chronic HPV infections by recognizing epitopes displayed on virally altered epithelium, we exploited Poisson detection mass spectrometry (MS3 to identify those epitopes and inform future T cell-based vaccine design. Nine cervical cancer biopsies from HPV-16 positive HLA-A*02 patients were obtained, histopathology determined, and E7 oncogene PCR-amplified from tumor DNA and sequenced. Conservation of E7 oncogene coding segments was found in all tumors. MS3 analysis of HLA-A*02 immunoprecipitates detected E711-19 peptide (YMLDLQPET in seven of the nine tumor biopsies. The remaining two samples were E711-19 negative and lacked the HLA-A*02 binding GILT thioreductase peptide despite possessing binding-competent HLA-A*02 alleles. Thus, the conserved E711-19 peptide is a dominant HLA-A*02 binding tumor antigen in HPV-16 transformed cervical squamous and adenocarcinomas. Findings that a minority of HLA-A*02:01 tumors lack expression of both E711-19 and a peptide from a thioreductase important in processing of cysteine-rich proteins like E7 underscore the value of physical detection, define a potential additional tumor escape mechanism and have implications for therapeutic cancer vaccine development.

  2. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) to determine whether this treatment could improve the profile of tumor antigen genes expressed in these cells. In addition, the presence of MAGE-A tumor antigen protein was evaluated in the purified tumor cell lysate used...

  3. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  4. Antigenic characterization of Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates by monoclonal antibodies and cross-neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botton S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV were characterized antigenically with a panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs (Corapi WV, Donis RO and Dubovi EJ (1990 American Journal of Veterinary Research, 55: 1388-1394. Eight isolates were further characterized by cross-neutralization using sheep monospecific antisera. Analysis of mAb binding to viral antigens by indirect immunofluorescence revealed distinct patterns of reactivity among the native viruses. Local isolates differed from the prototype Singer strain in recognition by up to 14 mAbs. Only two mAbs - one to the non-structural protein NS23/p125 and another to the envelope glycoprotein E0/gp48 - recognized 100% of the isolates. No isolate was recognized by more than 14 mAbs and twelve viruses reacted with 10 or less mAbs. mAbs to the major envelope glycoprotein E2/gp53 revealed a particularly high degree of antigenic variability in this glycoprotein. Nine isolates (47.3% reacted with three or less of 10 E2/gp53 mAbs, and one isolate was not recognized by any of these mAbs. Virus-specific antisera to eight isolates plus three standard BVDV strains raised in lambs had virus-neutralizing titers ranging from 400 to 3200 against the homologous virus. Nonetheless, many antisera showed significantly reduced neutralizing activity when tested against heterologous viruses. Up to 128-fold differences in cross-neutralization titers were observed for some pairs of viruses. When the coefficient of antigenic similarity (R was calculated, 49 of 66 comparisons (74.24% between viruses resulted in R values that antigenically distinguish strains. Moreover, one isolate had R values suggesting that it belongs to a distinct serologic group. The marked antigenic diversity observed among Brazilian BVDV isolates should be considered when planning diagnostic and immunization strategies.

  5. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayla K Shorter

    Full Text Available T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL, have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4 are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  6. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuschenbach, M.; Dorre, J.; Waterboer, T.; Kopitz, J.; Schneider, M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, E.; Kloor, M.; Knebel Doeberitz, M. von

    2014-01-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for

  7. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-10-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3,619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1, and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0-69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels are scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs.

  8. Targeting of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) in experimental immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously shown the superiority of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to function as effective immunogens when administered with bilayer membrane vesicles called liposomes. The ability of liposomes to target TAA to host antigen-presenting cells is analyzed here. 1-Butanol extracted TAA from two syngeneic rat colon cancer tumors (WB 2054 and W 1756) was radioiodinated (131I-TAA). Free 131I and 131I-TAA (2.8 X 10(7) cpm and 75 micrograms TAA per rat) were used as tracers, with or without incorporation into liposomes (composition: sphingomyelin, cholesterol, dicetyl phosphate at 70:24:6 molar ratio). Six groups of male rats (BN X WF for WB2054 and Wistar/Furth for W1756, n = 18 each group) were injected iv with either free tracers or the tracers incorporated into liposomes. Whole blood clearance curve was biphasic (half-life alpha = 5 min; half life beta = 12 hr), suggesting a two-compartmental model of distribution. Seven animals from each group were sacrificed at set times (15 min to 48 hr), organs harvested and cpm/g of tissue estimated. Liposome 131I and liposome 131I-TAA were targeted to and retained preferentially in liver and spleen. Four animals from each group were imaged serially using a gamma camera. Matched pair analysis of regions showed persistently higher activity in liver-spleen area when liposomes were used (P less than 0.001). The uptake of radiolabeled antigens by plastic adherent mononuclear cells in liver and spleen was significantly higher when presented with liposomes (macrophage uptake index: liver = 1.65 vs 0.55; spleen = 5.85 vs 1.15; with and without liposomes, respectively)

  9. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years.

  10. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  11. Attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus expressing oncofetal antigen (tumor-associated antigen) 5T4 induces active therapy of established tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulryan, Kate; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Shaw, David; Wang, Who; Kingsman, Susan M; Stern, Peter L; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-10-01

    The human oncofetal antigen 5T4 (h5T4) is a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by a wide spectrum of cancers, including colorectal, ovarian, and gastric, but with a limited normal tissue expression. Such properties make 5T4 an excellent putative target for cancer immunotherapy. The murine homologue of 5T4 (m5T4) has been cloned and characterized, which allows for the evaluation of immune intervention strategies in "self-antigen" in vivo tumor models. We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses based on the highly attenuated and modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA strain), expressing h5T4 (MVA-h5T4), m5T4 (MVA-m5T4), and Escherichia coli LacZ (MVA-LacZ). Immunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with MVA-h5T4 and MVA-m5T4 constructs induced antibody responses to human and mouse 5T4, respectively. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice vaccinated with MVA-h5T4 were challenged with syngeneic tumor line transfectants, B16 melanoma, and CT26 colorectal cells that express h5T4. MVA-h5T4-vaccinated mice showed significant tumor retardation compared with mice vaccinated with MVA-LacZ or PBS. In active treatment studies, inoculation with MVA-h5T4 was able to treat established CT26-h5T4 lung tumor and to a lesser extent B16.h5T4 s.c. tumors. Additionally, when C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 were challenged with B16 cells expressing m5T4, resulting growth of the tumors was significantly retarded compared with control animals. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 showed no signs of autoimmune toxicity. These data support the use of MVA-5T4 for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:12481437

  12. Antigenic variability in bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates from alpaca (Vicugna pacos), llama (Lama glama) and bovines in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, I M; Quezada, M P; Celedón, M O

    2014-01-31

    Llamas and alpacas are domesticated South American camelids (SACs) important to ancestral population in the Altiplano region, and to different communities where they have been introduced worldwide. These ungulates have shown to be susceptible to several livestock viral pathogens such as members of the Pestivirus genus and mainly to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Seventeen Chilean BVDV isolates were analyzed by serum cross neutralization with samples obtained from five llama, six alpacas, three bovines, plus three reference strains belonging to different subgroups and genotypes. The objective was to describe antigenic differences and similarities among them. Antigenic comparison showed significant differences between different subgroups. Consequently, antigenic similarities were observed among isolates belonging to the same subgroup and also between isolates from different animal species belonging the same subgroup. Among the analyzed samples, one pair of 1b subgroup isolates showed significant antigenic differences. On the other hand, one pair of isolates from different subgroups (1b and 1j) shared antigenic similarities indicating antigenic relatedness. This study shows for the first time the presence of antigenic differences within BVDV 1b subgroup and antigenic similarities within 1j subgroup isolates, demonstrating that genetic differences within BVDV subgroups do not necessary corresponds to differences on antigenicity.

  13. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søren; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...... imprints, which may be used to identify patient-specific arrays of TAA. This may enable a multi-epitope based immunotherapy with improved prospects of clinical tumor rejection....

  14. Forcing Tumor Cells to Present Their Own Tumor Antigens to the Immune System: a Necessary Design for an Efficient Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert E.Humphreys; Gilda G.Hillman; Eric von Hofe; Minzhen Xu

    2004-01-01

    The general principle for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance is to prevent tumor antigens from being recognized by the immune system. Many methods have been developed to increase the immunogenecity of the tumor cells. The most efficient methods are able to force tumor cells to present their own tumor antigens to the immune system. Stimulating Th cells by converting tumor cells into MHC class Ⅱ+/Ii- antigen presenting cells is one of the most efficient technologies. Using antisense methods, we suppress the expression of the Ii protein that normally co-expresses with MHC class Ⅱ molecules and blocks the antigenic peptide binding site of MHC class Ⅱ molecules during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In such tumor cells, the "unprotected" MHC class Ⅱ molecules pick up endogenous tumor antigenic peptides, which have been transported into the ER for binding to MHC class Ⅰ molecules. Simultaneous presentation of tumor antigens by both MHC class Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules generates a robust and long-lasting anti-tumor immune response. MHC class Ⅱ+/Ii- tumor cells are potent tumor cell vaccines and also cure a significant number of animals with renal and prostate tumors. We have developed analogous human gene vectors that are suitable for most patients and cancers.

  15. Forcing Tumor Cells to Present Their Own Tumor Antigens to the Immune System: a Necessary Design for an Efficient Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertE.Humphreys; GildaG.Hillman; EricyonHofe; MinzhenXu

    2004-01-01

    The general principle for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance is to prevent tumor antigens from being recognized by the immune system. Many methods have been developed to increase the immunogenecity of the tumor cells. The most efficient methods are able to force tumor cells to present their own tumor antigens to the immune system. Stimulating Th cells by converting tumor cells into MHC class II+/Ii- antigen presenting cells is one of the most efficient technologies. Using antisense methods, we suppress the expression of the Ii protein that normally co-expresses with MHC class II molecules and blocks the antigenic peptide binding site of MHC class II molecules during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In such tumor cells, the"unprotected" MHC class II molecules pick up endogenous tumor antigenic peptides, which have been transported into the ER for binding to MHC class I molecules. Simultaneous presentation of tumor antigens by both MHC class I and II molecules generates a robust and long-lasting anti-tumor immune response. MHC class II+/Ii- tumor cells are potent tumor cell vaccines and also cure a significant number of animals with renal and prostate tumors. We have developed analogous human gene vectors that are suitable for most patients and cancers.

  16. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  17. Co-expression of tumor antigen and interleukin-2 from an adenoviral vector augments the efficiency of therapeutic tumor vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nørgaard Nielsen, Karen;

    2014-01-01

    approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly...... prolonged tumor control in vaccinated wild type (WT) mice. The improved tumor control required antigen-specific cells, since no tumor control was observed, unless the melanoma cells expressed the vaccine targeted antigen. We also tested our new vaccine in immunodeficient (CD80/86 deficient) mice. Following...

  18. A Viral Vectored Prime-Boost Immunization Regime Targeting the Malaria Pfs25 Antigen Induces Transmission-Blocking Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Anna L.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Sumi Biswas; Yimin Wu; Hill, Adrian V.; Sinden, Robert E.; Draper, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63), human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a ...

  19. Defensiveness, trait anxiety, and Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen antibody titers in healthy college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterling, B A; Antoni, M H; Kumar, M; Schneiderman, N

    1993-03-01

    The relationship of individual differences in repressive coping styles with differences in antibody titer to Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) were investigated in a normal, healthy college population made up of people previously exposed to EBV. Each of 54 1st-year undergraduates completed a battery of physical-status questions and items pertaining to potential behavioral immunomodulatory confounds, along with the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (T-MAS) and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MC-SDS). Ss reporting high and middle levels of anxiety had higher antibody titers to EBV, suggesting poorer immune control over the latent virus, as compared with the low-anxious group. Similarly, high-defensive Ss had higher antibody titers than their low-defensive counterparts, and neither group differed from the middle group. PMID:8500440

  20. First report of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus antigen from pneumonic cattle in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intisar Kamil Saeed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To explore the expected role of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV in pneumonia in cattle, cattle lungs (n=242 showing signs of pneumonia were collected from slaughter houses of three different localities located at Northern, Central and Western Sudan during 2010–2013. The collected samples were tested for the presence of BVDV antigen using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, and Fluorescent Antibody Test (FAT. Twenty six (10.7% out of 242 samples were found to be positive for BVDV. Positive results were seen in all the three studied areas, with the highest prevalence (16.7%; n=4/24 at Gezira State in Central Sudan. BVDV genome could be detected in all ELISA positive samples. The results indicated the existence of BVDV infection in cattle in different areas in Sudan, and its possible association with respiratory infections in cattle. Analysis using BLAST indicated that the sequence was identical to the previously reported BVDV-1 (GenBank accession AF220247.1.; nucleotide A was found in our study at position 9 of our sequence, whereas T was present instead in the reference virus. This is the first report of detecting BVDV antigen, genome, and its sequence analysis collected from cattle lungs in Sudan.

  1. Simultaneous Targeting of Tumor Antigens and the Tumor Vasculature using T Lymphocyte Transfer Synergize to Induce Regression of Established Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Tran, Eric; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Most systemic cancer therapies target tumor cells directly though there is increasing interest in targeting the tumor stroma that can comprise a substantial portion of the tumor mass. We report here a synergy between two T cell therapies, one directed against the stromal tumor vasculature and the other directed against antigens expressed on the tumor cell. Simultaneous transfer of genetically engineered syngeneic T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor targeting the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2; KDR) that is over expressed on tumor vasculature and T cells specific for the tumor antigens gp100 (PMEL), TRP-1 (TYRP1), or TRP-2 (DCT) synergistically eradicated established B16 melanoma tumors in mice and dramatically increased the tumor-free survival of mice compared to treatment with either cell type alone or T cells coexpressing these two targeting molecules. Host lymphodepletion prior to cell transfer was required to mediate the anti-tumor effect. The synergistic antitumor response was accompanied by a significant increase in the infiltration and expansion and/or persistence of the adoptively transferred tumor antigen-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment and thus enhanced their anti-tumor potency. The data presented here emphasize the possible beneficial effects of combining anti-angiogenic with tumor-specific immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:23633494

  2. Targeting tumor antigens to secreted membrane vesicles in vivo induces efficient antitumor immune responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelenberg, I.S.; Ostrowski, M.; Krumeich, S.; Bobrie, A.; Jancic, C.; Boissonnas, A.; Delcayre, A.; Pecq, JB Le; Combadiere, B.; Amigorena, S.; Thery, C.

    2008-01-01

    Expression of non-self antigens by tumors can induce activation of T cells in vivo, although this activation can lead to either immunity or tolerance. CD8+ T-cell activation can be direct (if the tumor expresses MHC class I molecules) or indirect (after the capture and cross-presentation of tumor an

  3. Regeneration of tumor antigen-specific CTLs utilizing iPS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuya; Masuda, Kyoko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Tumor immunotherapy, especially tumor antigen specific T cell therapy, is currently attracting attention. However, a critical issue still awaits resolution; it is difficult to efficiently expand tumor antigen-specific T cells. To solve this problem, we are now utilizing iPS cell technology. When iPS cells are established from tumor antigen specific T cells, T cells regenerated from these iPS cells are expected to express the same TCRs as the original T cells. In line with this concept, we succeeded in regenerating tumor antigen specific cytotoxic T cells. The regenerated T cells exhibited TCR specific killing activity comparable to that of the original cells, and were able to kill leukemia cells in an antigen-specific manner. We are currently endeavoring to apply this method clinically. In the future, we intend to establish an allogeneic transfusion system, in which various tumor antigen specific T-iPS cells from a wide range of HLA haplotype homozygous donors will be lined up as a "T-iPS cell bank", with the aim of making off-the-shelf tumor immunotherapy a reality. PMID:27599425

  4. Quantitative analysis of viral load per haploid genome revealed the different biological features of Merkel cell polyomavirus infection in skin tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has recently been identified in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, an aggressive cancer that occurs in sun-exposed skin. Conventional technologies, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemistry, have produced conflicting results for MCPyV infections in non-MCC tumors. Therefore, we performed quantitative analyses of the MCPyV copy number in various skin tumor tissues, including MCC (n = 9 and other sun exposure-related skin tumors (basal cell carcinoma [BCC, n = 45], actinic keratosis [AK, n = 52], Bowen's disease [n = 34], seborrheic keratosis [n = 5], primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma [n = 5], malignant melanoma [n = 5], and melanocytic nevus [n = 6]. In a conventional PCR analysis, MCPyV DNA was detected in MCC (9 cases; 100%, BCC (1 case; 2%, and AK (3 cases; 6%. We then used digital PCR technology to estimate the absolute viral copy number per haploid human genome in these tissues. The viral copy number per haploid genome was estimated to be around 1 in most MCC tissues, and there were marked differences between the MCC (0.119-42.8 and AK (0.02-0.07 groups. PCR-positive BCC tissue showed a similar viral load as MCC tissue (0.662. Immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against the MCPyV T antigen (CM2B4 demonstrated positive nuclear localization in most of the high-viral-load tumor groups (8 of 9 MCC and 1 BCC, but not in the low-viral-load or PCR-negative tumor groups. These results demonstrated that MCPyV infection is possibly involved in a minority of sun-exposed skin tumors, including BCC and AK, and that these tumors display different modes of infection.

  5. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells. PMID:21447831

  6. Characterization of a common antigen of colorectal and mucinous ovarian tumors, COTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, K D; Zamora, P O; Rhodes, B A; Sachatello, C R; Hagihara, P F; Griffen, W O; van Nagell, J R; Fulks, R; Ram, M D

    1984-01-01

    A new colon cancer antigen is reported. It is designated as COTA, Colon-Ovarian Tumor Antigen, because it is found in mucins produced by both tissues during malignancy. The new antigen was identified by making antibodies against human colon cancer tissue in goats. The antisera were exhaustively absorbed with lyophilized extracts of normal colon, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, plasma, and the well-known colon tumor antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The new antigen was identified by immunodiffusion. Studies of 28 malignant tissue extracts, 10 ovarian adenocarcinoma cyst fluids, 43 normal tissues, and 5 plasma samples revealed that this antigen is found only in colon tumors and mucinous ovarian adenocarcinomas. The antigen was not detected in serous adenocarcinoma of the ovaries, extracts of adenocarcinoma of lung, breast, kidney or stomach nor in the extracts of normal tissues. Other tests show that this antigen is not CEA, Ca 19-9, or CSAp. It is stable to heating at 65 degrees for 5 minutes; it elutes from an ion exchange matrix (DEAE) with 0.3-0.5M NaCl; it migrates to the alpha-2 region on immunoelectrophoresis; and its size, by exclusion chromatography on Sepharose 4B, is 3-15 million daltons. Anti-COTA stains colon cancer tissue sections indicating that COTA is present in goblet-cell mucin.

  7. Polymorphic Expression of a Human Superficial Bladder Tumor Antigen Defined by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradet, Yves; Islam, Nazrul; Boucher, Lucie; Parent-Vaugeois, Carmen; Tardif, Marc

    1987-10-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up.

  8. STUDY OF MUTAGENICITY OF VIRAL VECTOR IN TUMOR GENETHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贺书; 李殿俊; 刘旭; 李大林

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the mutagenicity of retrovirus and adenovirus as transgenic vectors to evaluate the safety of transgenic tumor cells as tumor vaccines. Methods: Cells were cultured together with the virus. Then DNA and supernatant were tested for mutagenicity by means of genetic toxicological laboratory technique. Results: The results indicated that DNA and supernatant of transgenic cells had no mutagenicity through both in vivo and in vitro tests. Conclusion: The modified virus had no mutagenicity as a transgenic vector.

  9. New tumor-associated antigen SC6 in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Pei Liu; Xiao-Zhong Guo; Jian-Hua Xu; Di Wang; Hong-Yu Li; Zhong-Min Cui; Jia-Jun Zhao; Li-Nan Ren

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the concentration of a new antigen SC6 (SC6-Ag) recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb)in patients with pancreatic cancer and other malignant or benign diseases and to understand whether SC6-Ag has any clinical significance in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from other gastrointestinal diseases.METHODS: Six hundred and ninety-five serum specimens obtained from 115 patients with pancreatic cancer, 154 patients with digestive cancer and 95patients with non-digestive cancer were used and classified in this study. Serum specimens obtained from 140 patients with benign digestive disease and 89 patients with non-benign digestive disease served as controls. Ascites was tapped from 16 pancreatic cancer patients, 19 hepatic cancer patients, 16 colonic cancer patients, 10 gastric cancer and 6 severe necrotic pancreatitis patients. The samples were quantitated by solid-phase radioimmunoassay. The cut-off values (CV)of 41, 80, and 118 U/mL were used.RESULTS: The average intra- and interassay CV detected by immunoradiometric assay of SC6-Ag was 5.4% and 8.7%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 73.0% and 90.9% respectively. The levels in most malignant and benign cases were within the normal upper limit. Among the 16 pancreatic cancer cases, the concentration of SC6-Ag in ascites was over the normal range in 93.8% patients. There was no significant difference in the concentration of SC6-Ag.Decreased expression of SC6-Ag in sera was significantly related to tumor differentiation. The concentration of SC6-Ag was higher in patients before surgery than after surgery. The specificity of SC6-Ag and CA19-9 was significantly higher than that of ultrasound and computer tomography (CT) in pancreatic cancer patients. Higher positive predictive values were indicated in 92.3% SC6-Ag and 88.5% CA19-9, but lower in 73.8% ultrasound and 76.2% CT.CONCLUSION: The combined test of SC6-Ag and CA19-9 may improve the diagnostic rate of primary cancer. The detection of

  10. Combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A for improved detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Xu, Yi-Wei; Qiu, Si-Qi; Hong, Chao-Qun; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2014-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Southern China and Southeast Asia, and early detection remains a challenge. Autoantibodies have been found to precede the manifestations of symptomatic cancer by several months to years, making their identification of particular relevance for early detection. In the present study, the diagnostic value of serum autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 in NPC patients was evaluated. The study included 112 patients with NPC and 138 normal controls. Serum levels of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and classical Epstein-Barr virus marker, viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A (VCA-IgA), were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Measurement of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 42.9/94.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33.7-52.6/89.4-97.8%] and 55.4/95.7% (95% CI, 45.7-64.7/90.4-98.2%), respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 (0.821; 95% CI, 0.771-0.871) was marginally lower than that for VCA-IgA (0.860; 95% CI, 0.810-0.910) in NPC. The combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA yielded an enhanced sensitivity of 80.4% (95% CI, 71.6-87.0%) and a specificity of 90.6% (95% CI, 84.1-94.7%). Moreover, detection of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 could differentiate early-stage NPC patients from normal controls. Our results suggest that autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 may serve as a potential biomarker, as a supplement to VCA-IgA, for the screening and diagnosis of NPC.

  11. T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize T Cells Attacking Cancer: T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

  12. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  13. A Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Homologous Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Emad A. Hashish; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Chase, Christopher C.; Richard E Isaacson; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves agains...

  14. JC virus small T antigen binds phosphatase PP2A and Rb family proteins and is required for efficient viral DNA replication activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bollag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV produces five tumor proteins encoded by transcripts alternatively spliced from one precursor messenger RNA. Significant attention has been given to replication and transforming activities of JCV's large tumor antigen (TAg and three T' proteins, but little is known about small tumor antigen (tAg functions. Amino-terminal sequences of tAg overlap with those of the other tumor proteins, but the carboxy half of tAg is unique. These latter sequences are the least conserved among the early coding regions of primate polyomaviruses. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of wild type and mutant forms of JCV tAg to interact with cellular proteins involved in regulating cell proliferation and survival. The JCV P99A tAg is mutated at a conserved proline, which in the SV40 tAg is required for efficient interaction with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and the C157A mutant tAg is altered at one of two newly recognized LxCxE motifs. Relative to wild type and C157A tAgs, P99A tAg interacts inefficiently with PP2A in vivo. Unlike SV40 tAg, JCV tAg binds to the Rb family of tumor suppressor proteins. Viral DNAs expressing mutant t proteins replicated less efficiently than did the intact JCV genome. A JCV construct incapable of expressing tAg was replication-incompetent, a defect not complemented in trans using a tAg-expressing vector. CONCLUSIONS: JCV tAg possesses unique properties among the polyomavirus small t proteins. It contributes significantly to viral DNA replication in vivo; a tAg null mutant failed to display detectable DNA replication activity, and a tAg substitution mutant, reduced in PP2A binding, was replication-defective. Our observation that JCV tAg binds Rb proteins, indicates all five JCV tumor proteins have the potential to influence cell cycle progression in infected and transformed cells. It remains unclear how these proteins coordinate their unique and overlapping functions.

  15. Human lung tumor-associated antigen identified as an extracellular matrix adhesion molecule

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A single chain glycoprotein with an estimated molecular mass of 160 kD (gp160) was previously identified as a human lung tumor-associated antigen. This tumor marker is shown here to be associated noncovalently with a second 130-kD protein. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies of surface iodinated lung tumor cell lysates reveal that this heterodimeric complex is indistinguishable serologically and structurally from the integrin VLA-2, found originally on activated T lymphocytes and platelets...

  16. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  17. New tumor-associated antigen SC6 in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Min-Pei; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Xu, Jian-Hua; Wang, Di; Li, Hong-Yu; Cui, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Ren, Li-Nan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the concentration of a new antigen SC6 (SC6-Ag) recognized by monoclonal antibody (MAb) in patients with pancreatic cancer and other malignant or benign diseases and to understand whether SC6-Ag has any clinical significance in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from other gastrointestinal diseases.

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle substantial quantities of known positive and negative samp...

  19. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  20. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M;

    2001-01-01

    to identify TAA, mice were immunized with mixtures of peptides representing putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from one of the gene products. Indeed, such immunized mice were partially protected against subsequent tumor challenge. Despite being immunized with bona fide self antigens, no...

  1. Development of a sandwich Dot-ELISA for detecting bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen with E2 recombinant protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuelan ZHAO; Yuzhu ZUO; Lei ZHANG; Jinghui FAN; Hanchun YANG; Jianhua QIN

    2009-01-01

    The IgG antibodies of rabbit anti-E2 protein of the bovine viral diarrhea virus were prepared by a general method from high efficiency serum immunized by E2 recombinant protein antigen expressed in E. coli prokaryotic expression system and were labeled to make enzymelabeled antibody with the method of NaIO4. A sandwich Dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA) for the detection of BVDV was developed. The optimal reaction conditions of Dot-ELISAwere determined. The results show that optimal coating antibody was 300 μg·mL-1, the working concentration of HRP-labeled antibody was 1:50. The optimal blocking reagent and time were 5% bovine serum and 45 rain. The minimum detection of the content of antigen reached 1.35μg·mL-1. Compared with the routine IDEXX ELISA test kit with the whole virus, its specificity, sensitivity and coincidence rate were 90.48%, 96.55% and 95.24%, respectively. Compared with the sandwich Dot-ELISA with the negative staining electron microscope and RT-PCR, the coincidence rates were 90.9% and 93.1%, respectively. In addition, Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antigen of 178 samples collected from cow farms in the Hebei Province, China, were detected by the developed Dot-ELISA and the IDEXX BVDV antigen Test Kit simultaneously, BVDV antigen positive rate was 39.89%-41.01%. The result of detecting clinical samples demonstrated that the established method showed its specificity, sensitivity and repeatability, whereas the results were easily interpreted without an ELISA reader.

  2. A mutant chaperone converts a wild-type protein into a tumor-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietinger, Andrea; Philip, Mary; Yoshida, Barbara A; Azadi, Parastoo; Liu, Hui; Meredith, Stephen C; Schreiber, Hans

    2006-10-13

    Monoclonal antibodies have become important therapeutic agents against certain cancers. Many tumor-specific antigens are mutant proteins that are predominantly intracellular and thus not readily accessible to monoclonal antibodies. We found that a wild-type transmembrane protein could be transformed into a tumor-specific antigen. A somatic mutation in the chaperone gene Cosmc abolished function of a glycosyltransferase, disrupting O-glycan Core 1 synthesis and creating a tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitope consisting of a monosaccharide and a specific wild-type protein sequence. This epitope induced a high-affinity, highly specific, syngeneic monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity. Such tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitopes represent potential targets for monoclonal antibody therapy.

  3. Tumor-derived exosomes confer antigen-specific immunosuppression in a murine delayed-type hypersensitivity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Exosomes are endosome-derived small membrane vesicles that are secreted by most cell types including tumor cells. Tumor-derived exosomes usually contain tumor antigens and have been used as a source of tumor antigens to stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. However, many reports also suggest that tumor-derived exosomes can facilitate tumor immune evasion through different mechanisms, most of which are antigen-independent. In the present study we used a mouse model of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH and demonstrated that local administration of tumor-derived exosomes carrying the model antigen chicken ovalbumin (OVA resulted in the suppression of DTH response in an antigen-specific manner. Analysis of exosome trafficking demonstrated that following local injection, tumor-derived exosomes were internalized by CD11c+ cells and transported to the draining LN. Exosome-mediated DTH suppression is associated with increased mRNA levels of TGF-β1 and IL-4 in the draining LN. The tumor-derived exosomes examined were also found to inhibit DC maturation. Taken together, our results suggest a role for tumor-derived exosomes in inducing tumor antigen-specific immunosuppression, possibly by modulating the function of APCs.

  4. Localization of viral antigens in leaf protoplasts and plants by immunogold labelling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, van J.W.M.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of an immunocytochemical technique, immunogold labelling, new in the light and electron microscopic study of the plant viral infection. In Chapter 1 the present state of knowledge of the plant viral infection process, as revealed by insitu studies

  5. Effective tumor treatment targeting a melanoma/melanocyte-associated antigen triggers severe ocular autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas C Palmer; Chan, Chi-Chao; Gattinoni, Luca; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Powell, Daniel J.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Fariss, Robert N.; Yu, Zhiya; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2008-01-01

    Nonmutated tissue differentiation antigens expressed by tumors are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy, but the consequences of a highly effective antitumor immune response on self-tissue have not been fully characterized. We found that the infusion of ex vivo expanded adoptively transferred melanoma/melanocyte-specific CD8+ T cells that mediated robust tumor killing also induced autoimmune destruction of melanocytes in the eye. This severe autoimmunity was associated with the up-regu...

  6. Identification of tumor-associated antigens as diagnostic and predictive biomarkers in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Ying; Looi, Kok Sun; Tan, Eng M

    2009-01-01

    Many studies demonstrated that cancer sera contain antibodies which react with autologous cellular antigens generally known as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In our laboratories, the approach used in the identification of TAAs has involved initially examining the sera of cancer patients using extracts of tissue culture cells as source of antigens in Western blotting and by indirect immunofluorescence on whole cells. With these two techniques, we identify sera which have high-titer fluorescent staining or strong signals to cell extracts on Western blotting and subsequently use these sera as probes in immunoscreening cDNA expression libraries, and also in proteomic approaches to isolate and identify targeted antigens which might potentially be involved in malignant transformation. In this manner, several novel TAAs including HCC1, p62, p90, and others have been identified. In extension of these studies, we evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of different antigen-antibody systems as markers in cancer in order to develop "tumor-associated antigen array" systems for cancer diagnosis, cancer prediction, and for following the response of patients to treatment. PMID:19381943

  7. Tumor associated antigen specific T-cell populations identified in ex vivo expanded TIL cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Kvistborg, Pia; Køllgaard, Tania;

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from malignant melanoma (MM) and head & neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) share a similar oligoclonal composition of T effector memory cells, with HLA class I restricted lysis of tumor cell lines. In this study we show that ex vivo expanded...... TILs from MM and HNSCC demonstrate a heterogeneous composition in frequency and magnitude of tumor associated antigen specific populations by Elispot IFN¿ quantitation. TILs from MM and HNSCC shared reactivity towards NY ESO-1, cyclin B1 and Bcl-x derived peptides. Additionally we show that dominating...... the heterogeneous tumors upon adoptive transfer; increasing the probability of tumor control by minimizing immune evasion by tumor cell escape variants....

  8. T-cell response to p53 tumor-associated antigen in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, Marco; Gasser, Martin; Schramm, Nicolai; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Tocco, Georges; Gerstlauer, Christiane; Grimm, Martin; Nichiporuk, Ekaterina; Thalheimer, Andreas; Thiede, Arnulf; Meyer, Detlef; Benichou, Gilles; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2006-02-01

    Despite the radical surgical resection performed in patients with colorectal carcinoma, there is a high rate of tumor recurrence. Over an observation period of 3 years, 18% of the patients in our collective suffered a tumor relapse with local or distinct metastases after initial R0-resection. Some evidence suggests that this may be due to suppression of anti-tumor responses, a phenomenon that might be attributed to regulatory T cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the tumor-specific immune response depending on the UICC stage of patients with colorectal cancer. The cellular immune responses against defined antigens that are overexpressed in most of the patients with colorectal cancer were characterized. For this purpose, the tumor suppressor gene, p53, was chosen as the tumor-associated antigen that exhibits mutations and overexpression in up to 60% of colorectal carcinoma. We observed that p53 induced both IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion. The predominance of IL-10 production indicated that regulatory T cells directly participate in modulating the anti-tumor immune response. IL-10 levels in the blood as well as the expression of regulatory T-cell specific genes at the tumor site correlate with the UICC stage of the disease. These results may provide an explanation for the poor prognosis and increased recurrence rate in patients with advanced carcinoma.

  9. MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES TO HUMAN EMBRYONAL CARCINOMA-CELLS - ANTIGENIC RELATIONSHIPS OF GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIT, TFR; WILSON, L; VANDENELSEN, PJ; THIELEN, F; BREKHOFF, D; OOSTERHUIS, JW; PERA, MF; STERN, PL

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that show specificity for human embryonal carcinoma cells are described. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with Tera-2 embryonal carcinoma cells, and hybridomas were isolated and tested versus a set of human developmental tumor cell lines. The antigens exhibit relativel

  10. Viral-mimicking protein nanoparticle vaccine for eliciting anti-tumor responses

    OpenAIRE

    Molino, NM; Neek, M; Tucker, JA; Nelson, EL; Wang, S-W

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful resource for the eradication of cancer, but to overcome the low immunogenicity of tumor cells, a sufficiently strong CD8(+) T cell-mediated adaptive immune response is required. Nanoparticulate biomaterials represent a potentially effective delivery system for cancer vaccines, as they can be designed to mimic viruses, which are potent inducers of cellular immunity. We have been exploring the non-viral pyruvate dehydrogenase E2 protein nanoparticle as a biomimet...

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mie Grunnet; Sorensen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic...... significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those...... relevant for the present study. Four of these included both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients, and 31 dealt solely with NSCLC patients. Regarding SCLC no studies showed that serum level of CEA was a prognostic marker for overall survival (OS). The use of CEA...

  12. Role of tumor-associated antigen expression in radioimmunoguided surgery for colorectal and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoglio, S; Percivale, P; Schenone, F; Peressini, A; Murolo, C; Badellino, F

    1998-12-01

    One hundred thirty-six patients with colorectal and breast cancer were enrolled in a retrospective study using radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) with Iodine-125 (I125) radiolabeled B72.3 (Group A, 73 patients) and F023C5 (Group B, 63 patients) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The correlation between intraoperative tumor-to-normal tissue (T/NT) gamma-detecting probe (GDP) counts ratio and the expression of tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 (GroupA patients) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; Group B patients) tumor-associated antigens (TAA) expression of 209 resected or biopsy tumor specimens was assessed. Ex vivo radioimmunolocalization index (R.I.) was carried out on the same specimens as a control of intraoperative GDP ratio values. RIGS positive definition of tumor occurred in 80/113 (70.8%) tumor sites of Group A patients and in 84/96 (87.5%) tumor sites of Group B patients. Mean percent B72.3 TAA expression of 113 tumor sites of Group A patients was 62.74 +/- 28.79% vs. 73.00 +/- 26.28% of 96 tumor sites of Group B patients (P < 0.05). The higher incidence of positive RIGS results was observed in tumor sites with the higher expression of the relative TAA. A statistically significant correlation between RIGS ratios and B72.3 and CEA expression was observed in the 113 tumor sites of Group A (P < 0.05) and in the 96 tumor sites of Group B (P < 0.01), respectively. The role of a preoperative evaluation of TAA expression in patients undergoing RIGS is discussed. Its assessment, whenever possible, may help to select those patients who will benefit more from this immunodiagnostic technique.

  13. Coupled transcriptome and proteome analysis of human lymphotropic tumor viruses: insights on the detection and discovery of viral genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dresang Lindsay R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL, respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  14. Immunologic aspect of ovarian cancer and p53 as tumor antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burg SH

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer represents the fifth leading cause of death from all cancers for women. During the last decades overall survival has improved due to the use of new chemotherapy schedules. Still, the majority of patients die of this disease. Research reveals that ovarian cancer patients exhibit significant immune responses against their tumor. In this review the knowledge obtained thus far on the interaction of ovarian cancer tumor cells and the immune system is discussed. Furthermore the role of p53 as tumor antigen and its potential role as target antigen in ovarian cancer is summarized. Based on the increased knowledge on the role of the immune system in ovarian cancer major improvements are to be expected of immunotherapy based treatment of this disease.

  15. Understanding MHC class I presentation of viral antigens by human dendritic cells as a basis for rational design of therapeutic vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eVan Montfoort

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. Since dendritic cells (DC have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allows direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL.Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the DC subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated towards the role of human DC in MHC class I antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated.We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy.

  16. A rapid radioimmunoassay for determination of tumor antigens with reference to carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel experimental procedure for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by a solid phase microradioimmunoassay has been developed. Goat anti-CEA antibodies were immobilized by coupling to cyanogen bromide activated filter paper discs. The inhibition of binding of radioiodinated CEA to the discs was proportional to the amount of unlabelled CEA present in the test sample. The experimental procedure involved two steps: (i) the test material containing unlabelled CEA was allowed to react with the antibody coated discs at 37 deg C for 2 hrs., and (ii) a standard amount of 125I-CEA was added to the reaction mixture and incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C or room temperature. The discs were then washed 4 times and the radioactivity of each disc was determined. The sensitivity of the test in its present state of development was 2.5 ng/ml. (author)

  17. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape.

  18. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape. PMID:27427982

  19. Evaluation of tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 19 fragment and cancer-associated antigen 72-4 in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    L.V Teixeira; T.A. Guerra; F.O. Conrado; S.R. Terra; D.G. Gerardi; González, F.H.D.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of tumor markers in body fluids can be used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients. This study aimed to investigate the performance of tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1), cancer-associated antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions. In thirty-two neoplastic (n=16) and non-neoplastic (n=16) samples of canine thoracic or abdominal effusions, tumor markers were measured. Significant statistica...

  20. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling as tumor rejection epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise; Ruhwald, Morten; Thorn, Mette;

    2003-01-01

    immunization, but only two of these peptides (RAD23-31 and RAD24-31) were capable of generating a weak vaccination-induced protection against adoptive tumor growth. SM7 inoculated mice treated with a blocking antibody against the inhibitory T cell signal transducing molecule CTLA4 appeared to delay tumor take...... derived from potentially overexpressed tumor proteins, as identified by mRNA expression profiling of p53-/- thymoma cells, at best results in a weak tumor protection thus questioning this way of detection of new tumor rejection epitopes....

  1. Effective Delivery of Antigen-Encapsulin Nanoparticle Fusions to Dendritic Cells Leads to Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Activation and Tumor Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseo; Moon, Hyojin; Hong, Sung Joon; Shin, Changsik; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-08-23

    In cancer immunotherapy, robust and efficient activation of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell immune responses is a promising, but challenging task. Dendritic cells (DCs) are well-known professional antigen presenting cells that initiate and regulate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that kill their target cells directly as well as secrete IFN-γ, a cytokine critical in tumor rejection. Here, we employed recently established protein cage nanoparticles, encapsulin (Encap), as antigenic peptide nanocarriers by genetically incorporating the OT-1 peptide of ovalbumin (OVA) protein to the three different positions of the Encap subunit. With them, we evaluated their efficacy in activating DC-mediated antigen-specific T cell cytotoxicity and consequent melanoma tumor rejection in vivo. DCs efficiently engulfed Encap and its variants (OT-1-Encaps), which carry antigenic peptides at different positions, and properly processed them within phagosomes. Delivered OT-1 peptides were effectively presented by DCs to naïve CD8(+) T cells successfully, resulting in the proliferation of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. OT-1-Encap vaccinations in B16-OVA melanoma tumor bearing mice effectively activated OT-1 peptide specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells before or even after tumor generation, resulting in significant suppression of tumor growth in prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments. A large number of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that actively produce both intracellular and secretory IFN-γ were observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes collected from B16-OVA tumor masses originally vaccinated with OT-1-Encap-C upon tumor challenges. The approaches we describe herein may provide opportunities to develop epitope-dependent vaccination systems that stimulate and/or modulate efficient and epitope-specific cytotoxic T cell immune responses in nonpathogenic diseases.

  2. The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise Ndjamen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1 glycoprotein gE-gI is a transmembrane Fc receptor found on the surface of infected cells and virions that binds human immunoglobulin G (hIgG. gE-gI can also participate in antibody bipolar bridging (ABB, a process by which the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs of the IgG bind a viral antigen while the Fc binds to gE-gI. IgG Fc binds gE-gI at basic, but not acidic, pH, suggesting that IgG bound at extracellular pH by cell surface gE-gI would dissociate and be degraded in acidic endosomes/lysosomes if endocytosed. The fate of viral antigens associated with gE-gI-bound IgG had been unknown: they could remain at the cell surface or be endocytosed with IgG. Here, we developed an in vitro model system for ABB and investigated the trafficking of ABB complexes using 4-D confocal fluorescence imaging of ABB complexes with transferrin or epidermal growth factor, well-characterized intracellular trafficking markers. Our data showed that cells expressing gE-gI and the viral antigen HSV-1 gD endocytosed anti-gD IgG and gD in a gE-gI-dependent process, resulting in lysosomal localization. These results suggest that gE-gI can mediate clearance of infected cell surfaces of anti-viral host IgG and viral antigens to evade IgG-mediated responses, representing a general mechanism for viral Fc receptors in immune evasion and viral pathogenesis.

  3. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  4. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  5. Activated human nasal epithelial cells modulate specific antibody response against bacterial or viral antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Yueh Yeh

    Full Text Available Nasal mucosa is an immune responsive organ evidenced by eliciting both specific local secretory IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses with intra-nasal administration of antigens. Nevertheless, the role of nasal epithelial cells in modulating such responses is unclear. Human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs obtained from sinus mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were cultured in vitro and firstly were stimulated by Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLPs in order to examine their role on antibody production. Secondly, both antigens of immunodominant protein IDG60 from oral Streptococcus mutans and hemagglutinin (HA from influenza virus were tested to evaluate the specific antibody response. Stimulated hNECs by BLPs exhibited a significant increase in the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP. Conditioned medium of stimulated hNECs has effects on enhancing the proliferation of CD4+ T cells together with interferon-γ and IL-5 production, increasing the costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and augmenting the production of IDG60 specific IgA, HA specific IgG, IgA by human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Such production of antigen specific IgG and IgA is significantly counteracted in the presence of IL-6 and TSLP neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, properly stimulated hNECs may impart immuno-modulatory effects on the antigen-specific antibody response at least through the production of IL-6 and TSLP.

  6. HCA520, A NOVEL TUMOR ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN, INVOLVED IN CELL PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨美香; 曲迅; 刘福利; 郑广娟

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Tumor associated antigen encoding gene HCA520 (AF146019) was identified by screening a human hepatocellular carcinoma expressing cDNA library using SEREX technique. In this experiment we studied the effect of HCA520 on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods: Gene HCA520 was gained by PCR and transfected into 293 cells. The stable expression cells were obtained by G418 selection. The cell proliferation was measured by [3H]-TdR uptake and apoptosis assay was measured by FACS. Results: Eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3-HCA520 was constructed and its stable transfectants were obtained. Overexpression of HCA520 inhibited the cell proliferation and enhanced cell apoptosis after serum deprivation. Conclusion: HCA520 is a novel tumor associated antigen that can affect cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  7. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy

  8. SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESS OF SOME NONHORMONAL ANTIGENS IN PANCREATIC ENDOCRINE TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jiyao

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the express of some nonhormonal antigens in pancreatic endocrine tumors. Methods: The nonhormonal antigens including Alpha-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (α-HCG), progesterone receptors (PR), 7B2, HISL-19, in normal pancreatic islets and in 52cases of pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: It was found that HCG can be detected in PET but not in normal islet cells. HCG immunoreactivity was expressed by 3 of 28 (10.7%) benign PET and by 14 of 24 (58.3%)malignant PET. PR was found by 20 of 28 (71.4%) benign PET and by 7 of 24 (29%) malignant PET. 7B2 was detected by 23 of 28 (82.1%) benign PET and by 13 of 24(54.2%) malignant PET. HISL-19 was appeared by 23 of 28 benign PET and by 11 of 24 (46%) malignant PET.Golgitype persisted in 87.5% malignant tumors.Conclusion: The assay of nonhormonal antigens may be well defined the clinico-pathological characteristics of PET.

  9. Novel Tumor-associated Antigen of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Defined by Monoclonal Antibody E4-65

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke ZOU; Jihang JU; Hong XIE

    2007-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, E4-65, produced by immunizing mice with SMMC-7721 cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, was used to identify and characterize an unreported HCC-associated antigen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies showed that E4-65 antibody reacted with five out of eight HCC cell lines, but not with 10 non-HCC tumor cell lines or a normal liver cell line. Using immunohistochemical examination, E4-65 antigen was detected on the cell membranes and in the cytoplasm of human liver tumor tissues, but was not found in most other tumors, or normal adult or fetal tissues, except for a weakly positive reaction in tissues of the digestive system. Western blot analysis showed that E4-65 antibody bound to a 45 kDa protein in the human HCC cell line and tissue lysates. Enzyme treatment and lectin blotting did not detect the carbohydrate chain in E4-65 antigen. This HCC-associated protein represents a potentially useful target for diagnoses and immunotherapy of human HCC.

  10. Exposure to ozone reduces influenza disease severity and alters distribution of influenza viral antigens in murine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, J A; Zee, Y C; Osebold, J W

    1982-09-01

    Exposure to ambient levels of ozone (0.5 ppm) was shown to alter the pathogenesis of respiratory infection after aerosol infection of mice with influenza A virus. A semiquantitative method for determination of the sites of virus replication by direct immunofluorescence indicated that exposure to ozone reduced the involvement of respiratory epithelium in the infectious process and resulted in a less widespread infection of the alveolar parenchyma. Furthermore, the ozone-mediated alteration in viral antigen distribution was consistent with significantly reduced influenza disease mortality and prolonged survival time, but only when the oxidant was present during the course of infection. Reduced disease severity in ozone-exposed animals appeared to be independent of peak pulmonary virus titers, pulmonary interferon titers, and pulmonary and serum-neutralizing antibody titers. These studies suggested that the distribution of influenza virus in the murine lung was a key factor in disease severity. PMID:6182839

  11. In situ Delivery of Tumor Antigen- and Adjuvant-Loaded Liposomes Boosts Antigen-Specific T-Cell Responses by Human Dermal Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Martine A; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; de Gruijl, Tanja; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor antigen with an adjuvant is beneficial for cross-presentation and the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses. We therefore developed liposomes that contain the melanoma-associated antigen glycoprotein 100280-288 peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligand monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) as adjuvant. These liposomes are efficiently taken up by monocyte-derived DCs, and antigen presentation to CD8(+) T cells was significantly higher with MPLA-modified liposomes as compared with non-modified liposomes or the co-administration of soluble MPLA. We used a human skin explant model to evaluate the efficiency of intradermal delivery of liposomes. Liposomes were efficiently taken up by CD1a(+) and especially CD14(+) dermal DCs. Induction of CD8(+) T-cell responses by emigrated dermal DCs was significantly higher when MPLA was incorporated into the liposomes as compared with non-modified liposomes or co-administration of soluble MPLA. Thus, the modification of antigen-carrying liposomes with TLR ligand MPLA significantly enhances tumor-specific T-cell responses by dermal DCs and is an attractive vaccination strategy in human skin. PMID:26083554

  12. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling as tumor rejection epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie; Ruhwald, Morten; Thorn, Mette;

    2003-01-01

    immunization, but only two of these peptides (RAD23-31 and RAD24-31) were capable of generating a weak vaccination-induced protection against adoptive tumor growth. SM7 inoculated mice treated with a blocking antibody against the inhibitory T cell signal transducing molecule CTLA4 appeared to delay tumor take......Thirteen H-2b-binding peptides derived from six potentially overexpressed proteins in p53-/- thymoma (SM7) cells were studied for immunogenecity and vaccine-induced prevention of tumor growth in mice inoculated with SM7 tumor cells. Six of the peptides generated specific CTL responses after......, suggesting that SM7 thymoma cells are recognized by the adaptive immune system of the host. However, prophylactic vaccination with RAD23-31 and RAD24-31 peptides combined with anti-CTLA4 Ab treatment and did not improve tumor resistance. Our data would indicate that vaccination with immunogenic peptides...

  13. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  14. An overview of viral oncology in Italy - report from the Pavia meeting on solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perfetti Vittorio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a report on some of the research activities currently ongoing in Italy as outlined at the “Viruses and solid tumors” meeting jointly organized by the Oncology Sections of IRCCS Policlinico “San Matteo” (Pavia and IRCCS National Cancer Institute (Aviano, held in Pavia, Italy, on October 2011. Experts from the various disciplines involved in the study of the complex relationships between solid tumors and viruses met to discuss recent developments in the field and to report their personal contributions to the specified topics. Secondary end point was to establish a multidisciplinary work group specifically devoted to solid tumors and infectious agents, aimed to identify areas of common interest, promoting and establishing collaborative projects and programs, and to coordinate clinical and research activities. The group, which will be named IVOG (Italian Viral Oncology Group, will operate under the patronage of the various scientific societies of interest.

  15. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ...-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Bladder Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Pancreatic..., gastric cancer, kidney cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, ovarian......

  16. Analysis of endogenous peptides bound by soluble MHC class I molecules: a novel approach for identifying tumor-specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Patoka, Renana; Ziv, Tamar; Kessler, Ofra; Tzehoval, Esther; Eisenbach, Lea; Zavazava, Nicholas; Admon, Arie

    2002-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at comprehensive cataloging of peptides presented within the context of different human leukocyte antigens (HLA) expressed by cells of various tissue origins, both in health and in disease. Of major interest are peptides presented on cancer cells, which include peptides derived from tumor antigens that are of interest for immunotherapy. Here, HLA-restricted tumor-specific antigens were identified by transfecting human breast, ovarian and prostate tumor cell lines with truncated genes of HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Soluble HLA secreted by these cell lines were purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed by nano-capillary electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Typically, a large peptide pool was recovered and sequenced including peptides derived from MAGE-B2 and mucin and other new tumor-derived antigens that may serve as potential candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:11782012

  17. Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes can Target Chemoresistant Side-Population Tumor Cells in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Jessica A.; Cruz, Conrad R.; Leen, Ann M; Ku, Stephanie; LU, AN; Rousseau, Alexandra; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M; Bollard, Catherine M.; Foster, Aaron E.

    2010-01-01

    Side-population (SP) analysis has been used to identify progenitor cells from normal and malignant tissues as well as revealing tumor cells with increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Despite enhanced chemoresistance, tumor SP cells may still express tumor associated antigens (TAA) which may render them susceptible to elimination by the immune system. In this study, we show that both Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) cell lines and primary HL tumor samples contain a distinct SP phenotype. ...

  18. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer. PMID:25901861

  19. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells for Solid Tumors: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have highlighted the successes of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T- (CART- cell-based therapy for B-cell malignancies, and early phase clinical trials have been launched in recent years. The few published clinical studies of CART cells in solid tumors have addressed safety and feasibility, but the clinical outcome data are limited. Although antitumor effects were confirmed in vitro and in animal models, CART-cell-based therapy still faces several challenges when directed towards solid tumors, and it has been difficult to achieve the desired outcomes in clinical practice. Many studies have struggled to improve the clinical responses to and benefits of CART-cell treatment of solid tumors. In this review, the status quo of CART cells and their clinical applications for solid tumors will be summarized first. Importantly, we will suggest improvements that could increase the therapeutic effectiveness of CART cells for solid tumors and their future clinical applications. These interventions will make treatment with CART cells an effective and routine therapy for solid tumors.

  20. Identification of a panel of tumor-associated antigens from breast carcinoma cell lines, solid tumors and testis cDNA libraries displayed on lambda phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianfriglia Maurizio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated antigens recognized by humoral effectors of the immune system are a very attractive target for human cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to molecular definition of immunogenic tumor proteins based on their reactivity with autologous patient sera (SEREX. Methods Several high complexity phage-displayed cDNA libraries from breast carcinomas, human testis and breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-468 were constructed. The cDNAs were expressed in the libraries as fusion to bacteriophage lambda protein D. Lambda-displayed libraries were efficiently screened with sera from patients with breast cancer. Results A panel of 21 clones representing 18 different antigens, including eight proteins of unknown function, was identified. Three of these antigens (T7-1, T11-3 and T11-9 were found to be overexpressed in tumors as compared to normal breast. A serological analysis of the 21 different antigens revealed a strong cancer-related profile for at least five clones (T6-2, T6-7, T7-1, T9-21 and T9-27. Conclusions Preliminary results indicate that patient serum reactivity against five of the antigens is associated with tumor disease. The novel T7-1 antigen, which is overexpressed in breast tumors and recognized specifically by breast cancer patient sera, is potentially useful in cancer diagnosis.

  1. Human antibodies targeting cell surface antigens overexpressed by the hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer cells: ICAM-1 is a tumor antigen that mediates prostate cancer cell invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Fraser; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xin; Chalkley, Robert J.; Burlingame, Alma L; Marks, James D.; Liu, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Transition from hormone-sensitive to hormone-refractory metastatic tumor types poses a major challenge for prostate cancer treatment. Tumor antigens that are differentially expressed during this transition are likely to play important roles in imparting prostate cancer cells with the ability to grow in a hormone-deprived environment and to metastasize to distal sites such as the bone and thus, are likely targets for therapeutic intervention. To identify those molecules and particularly cell s...

  2. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line.

  3. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line. PMID:17584150

  4. Tumor localization of radiolabeled antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified, [131I]-labeled goat antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen, which have been shown to localize in human carcinoma in nude mice, were injected into 27 patients with carcinoma. Patients were scanned with a scintillation camera at various intervals. In 11 patients, radioactivity was detectable in the tumor 48 h after injection. Computerized subtraction of blood-pool radioactivity provided clearer pictures in positive cases, but in 16 patients the scans remained doubtful or negative. To study the specificity of [131]-antibody localization, we gave some patients simultaneous injections of [125]-labeled normal IgG. Both isotopes were measured by means of scintillation counting in tumors and normal tissues recovered after surgery. The results demonstrated that only the anti-CEA antibodies localized in tumors. However, the total antibody-derived radioactivity in the tumor was only about 0.001 of the injected dose. We conclude that, despite the present demonstration of specificity, this method of tumor detection is not yet clinically useful

  5. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. ► HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. ► HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  6. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire, EA 4589, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Lagaudriere-Gesbert, Cecile, E-mail: cecile.lagaudriere-gesbert@u-psud.fr [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire, EA 4589, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Testing Hepatitis B–Positive Pregnant Women for Hepatitis B e Antigen or Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. METHODS A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (108 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. RESULTS The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. CONCLUSION Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective. PMID:24785842

  8. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  9. Polyomavirus large T antigen binds symmetrical repeats at the viral origin in an asymmetrical manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Celia; Jiang, Tao; Banerjee, Pubali; Meinke, Gretchen; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Schaffhausen, Brian; Bohm, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Polyomaviruses have repeating sequences at their origins of replication that bind the origin-binding domain of virus-encoded large T antigen. In murine polyomavirus, the central region of the origin contains four copies (P1 to P4) of the sequence G(A/G)GGC. They are arranged as a pair of inverted repeats with a 2-bp overlap between the repeats at the center. In contrast to simian virus 40 (SV40), where the repeats are nonoverlapping and all four repeats can be simultaneously occupied, the crystal structure of the four central murine polyomavirus sequence repeats in complex with the polyomavirus origin-binding domain reveals that only three of the four repeats (P1, P2, and P4) are occupied. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that the stoichiometry is the same in solution as in the crystal structure. Consistent with these results, mutation of the third repeat has little effect on DNA replication in vivo. Thus, the apparent 2-fold symmetry within the DNA repeats is not carried over to the protein-DNA complex. Flanking sequences, such as the AT-rich region, are known to be important for DNA replication. When the orientation of the central region was reversed with respect to these flanking regions, the origin was still able to replicate and the P3 sequence (now located at the P2 position with respect to the flanking regions) was again dispensable. This highlights the critical importance of the precise sequence of the region containing the pentamers in replication.

  10. INDUCEMENT OF ANTITUMOR-IMMUNITY BY DC ACTIVATED BY HSP70-H22 TUMOR ANTIGEN PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯作化; 黄波; 张桂梅; 李东; 王洪涛

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of decreasing the dosage of tumor antigen peptides by dendritic cell (DC)-presenting and the characteristics of modification of DC by heat shock protein (Hsp70) and antigen peptides. Methods: Peptides were bound to Hsp70 and used to modify DC in vitro. The metabolism of the modified DC and the cytokines secreted by the modified DC were determined. The activation of lymphocytes by the modified DC and Hsp70-H22 peptides was tested. The cytotoxicity of the activated lymphocytes to H22 tumor cells was analyzed. The inhibitory effect of tumor in mice by the injection of DC and Hsp70-H22 peptides was tested. Results: 0.15μg of H22 peptides bound with Hsp70 could make 2×105 DC mature. 4×103 matured DC could activate 2×106 lymphocytes. The same amount of lymphocytes could be activated to produce similar cytotoxicity to tumor cells by either DC modified by 0.003μg of peptides bound with Hsp70 or by direct stimulation with 0.15μg of peptides bound with Hsp70. The dosage of peptides could be reduced by about 50 folds if the modified DC was used for injection instead of Hsp70-peptides. Peptides from normal hepatocytes, bound with Hsp70, could not make DC mature, nor activate lymphocytes through DC. Conclusion: The dosage of Hsp70-H22 peptides can be reduced significantly by DC-presenting to activate lymphocytes. Peptides from normal cells could not activate lymphocytes by either Hsp70-presenting or DC-presenting and they have little chance to induce autoimmunity.

  11. The Interplay of Antigen Affinity, Internalization, and Pharmacokinetics on CD44-Positive Tumor Targeting of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt, Dylan M; Beckford Vera, Denis R; Parrott, Matthew C; Luft, J Christopher; Benhabbour, S Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offer promise as effective tumor targeting and drug delivery agents for cancer therapy. However, comparative biological and clinical characteristics of mAbs targeting the same tumor-associated antigen (TAA) often differ widely. This study examined the characteristics of mAbs that impact tumor targeting using a panel of mAb clones specific to the cancer-associated cell-surface receptor and cancer stem cell marker CD44. CD44 mAbs were screened for cell-surface binding, antigen affinity, internalization, and CD44-mediated tumor uptake by CD44-positive A549 cells. It was hypothesized that high-affinity, rapidly internalizing CD44 mAbs would result in high tumor uptake and prolonged tumor retention. Although high-affinity clones rapidly bound and were internalized by A549 cells in vitro, an intermediate-affinity clone demonstrated significantly greater tumor uptake and retention than high-affinity clones in vivo. Systemic exposure, rather than high antigen affinity or rapid internalization, best associated with tumor targeting of CD44 mAbs in A549 tumor-bearing mice. PMID:27079967

  12. Pretreatment of serum samples to reduce interference of colostrum-derived specific antibodies with detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by ELISA in young calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Reichel, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is used for the detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected (BVDV PI) cattle; however, colostrum-derived antibodies may interfere with antigen detection in serum from young PI calves. Our study aimed to assess serum pretreatment methods for reducing such interference. Dilution of PI serum with serum containing specific antibody showed that antibody levels equivalent to those observed in colostrum-fed calves were able to eliminate all antigen signals in a serum sample. Serum was treated with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid at pH 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5, then boiled, centrifuged, and the supernatant-recovered. BVDV antibody was undetectable by ELISA in supernatants from treated samples, and the antigen ELISA signal was improved. Maximum antigen signal recovery of >90% was achieved at pH 5 ± 0.5. When this optimal treatment method was applied to field samples from 3 PI calves (which were negative in the antigen-capture ELISA without treatment), the antigen signal improved and gave a positive result in each case. Pretreatment may provide an improvement in the detection of young PI calves. PMID:27016723

  13. Immune tolerance to tumor antigens occurs in a specialized environment of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugel, Stefano; Peranzoni, Elisa; Desantis, Giacomo; Chioda, Mariacristina; Walter, Steffen; Weinschenk, Toni; Ochando, Jordi C; Cabrelle, Anna; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-09-27

    Peripheral tolerance to tumor antigens (Ags) is a major hurdle for antitumor immunity. Draining lymph nodes are considered the privileged sites for Ag presentation to T cells and for the onset of peripheral tolerance. Here, we show that the spleen is fundamentally important for tumor-induced tolerance. Splenectomy restores lymphocyte function and induces tumor regression when coupled with immunotherapy. Splenic CD11b(+)Gr-1(int)Ly6C(hi) cells, mostly comprising proliferating CCR2(+)-inflammatory monocytes with features of myeloid progenitors, expand in the marginal zone of the spleen. Here, they alter the normal tissue cytoarchitecture and closely associate with memory CD8(+) T cells, cross-presenting tumor Ags and causing their tolerization. Because of its high proliferative potential, this myeloid cell subset is also susceptible to low-dose chemotherapy, which can be exploited as an adjuvant to passive immunotherapy. CCL2 serum levels in cancer patients are directly related to the accumulation of immature myeloid cells and are predictive for overall survival in patients who develop a multipeptide response to cancer vaccines.

  14. Immune Tolerance to Tumor Antigens Occurs in a Specialized Environment of the Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ugel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral tolerance to tumor antigens (Ags is a major hurdle for antitumor immunity. Draining lymph nodes are considered the privileged sites for Ag presentation to T cells and for the onset of peripheral tolerance. Here, we show that the spleen is fundamentally important for tumor-induced tolerance. Splenectomy restores lymphocyte function and induces tumor regression when coupled with immunotherapy. Splenic CD11b+Gr-1intLy6Chi cells, mostly comprising proliferating CCR2+-inflammatory monocytes with features of myeloid progenitors, expand in the marginal zone of the spleen. Here, they alter the normal tissue cytoarchitecture and closely associate with memory CD8+ T cells, cross-presenting tumor Ags and causing their tolerization. Because of its high proliferative potential, this myeloid cell subset is also susceptible to low-dose chemotherapy, which can be exploited as an adjuvant to passive immunotherapy. CCL2 serum levels in cancer patients are directly related to the accumulation of immature myeloid cells and are predictive for overall survival in patients who develop a multipeptide response to cancer vaccines.

  15. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

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    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  16. IgE/FcεRI-Mediated Antigen Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Enhances Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

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    Barbara Platzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies discovered an inverse association between immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergies and cancer, implying tumor-protective properties of IgE. However, the underlying immunologic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is of key importance for anti-tumor immunity because it induces the generation of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs with specificity for tumor antigens. We demonstrate that DCs use IgE and FcεRI, the high-affinity IgE receptor, for cross-presentation and priming of CTLs in response to free soluble antigen at low doses. Importantly, IgE/FcεRI-mediated cross-presentation is a distinct receptor-mediated pathway because it does not require MyD88 signals or IL-12 induction in DCs. Using passive immunization with tumor antigen-specific IgE and DC-based vaccination experiments, we demonstrate that IgE-mediated cross-presentation significantly improves anti-tumor immunity and induces memory responses in vivo. Our findings suggest a cellular mechanism for the tumor-protective features of IgE and expand the known physiological functions of this immunoglobulin.

  17. Expression of a neuroendocrine gene signature in gastric tumor cells from CEA 424-SV40 large T antigen-transgenic mice depends on SV40 large T antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Ihler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large fraction of murine tumors induced by transgenic expression of SV40 large T antigen (SV40 TAg exhibits a neuroendocrine phenotype. It is unclear whether SV40 TAg induces the neuroendocrine phenotype by preferential transformation of progenitor cells committed to the neuroendocrine lineage or by transcriptional activation of neuroendocrine genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this question we analyzed CEA424-SV40 TAg-transgenic mice that develop spontaneous tumors in the antral stomach region. Immunohistology revealed expression of the neuroendocrine marker chromogranin A in tumor cells. By ELISA an 18-fold higher level of serotonin could be detected in the blood of tumor-bearing mice in comparison to nontransgenic littermates. Transcriptome analyses of antral tumors combined with gene set enrichment analysis showed significant enrichment of genes considered relevant for human neuroendocrine tumor biology. This neuroendocrine gene signature was also expressed in 424GC, a cell line derived from a CEA424-SV40 TAg tumor, indicating that the tumor cells exhibit a similar neuroendocrine phenotype also in vitro. Treatment of 424GC cells with SV40 TAg-specific siRNA downregulated expression of the neuroendocrine gene signature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SV40 TAg thus appears to directly induce a neuroendocrine gene signature in gastric carcinomas of CEA424-SV40 TAg-transgenic mice. This might explain the high incidence of neuroendocrine tumors in other murine SV40 TAg tumor models. Since the oncogenic effect of SV40 TAg is caused by inactivation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and RB1 and loss of function of these proteins is commonly observed in human neuroendocrine tumors, a similar mechanism might cause neuroendocrine phenotypes in human tumors.

  18. ET-54IMMUNOTHERAPY BASED ON TUMOR TRANSPLANT ANTIGEN RECOGNITION EMERGES AS A PROMISING STRATEGY FOR RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME (GBM) PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Schijns, Virgil; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence; Kruse, Carol; Chen, Thomas; Oertel, Joachim; Hantos, Peter; Bota, Daniela; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) prognosis remains very poor. This is especially true when the tumors relapse on the current standard of care treatments. Our preclinical data, generated in a rat CNS-1 glioma model in Lewis rats, provided the scientific rationale for a prototype clinical vaccine preparation, named ERC 1671 (Gliovac). ERC1671 is composed of autologous antigens, derived from the patient's own tumour tissue, and administered in conjunction with allogeneic antigens from histologicall...

  19. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The calcium–sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment. PMID:26893368

  20. A viral vectored prime-boost immunization regime targeting the malaria Pfs25 antigen induces transmission-blocking activity.

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    Anna L Goodman

    Full Text Available The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63, human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a heterologous prime-boost regime. Immunization of mice with AdHu5 Pfs25 at week 0 and MVA Pfs25 at week 10 (Ad-MVA Pfs25 resulted in high anti-Pfs25 IgG titers, consisting of predominantly isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a. A single priming immunization with ChAd63 Pfs25 was as effective as AdHu5 Pfs25 with respect to ELISA titers at 8 weeks post-immunization. Sera from Ad-MVA Pfs25 immunized mice inhibited the transmission of P. falciparum to the mosquito both ex vivo and in vivo. In a standard membrane-feeding assay using NF54 strain P. falciparum, oocyst intensity in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes was significantly reduced in an IgG concentration-dependent manner when compared to control feeds (96% reduction of intensity, 78% reduction in prevalence at a 1 in 5 dilution of sera. In addition, an in vivo transmission-blocking effect was also demonstrated by direct feeding of immunized mice infected with Pfs25DR3, a chimeric P. berghei line expressing Pfs25 in place of endogenous Pbs25. In this assay the density of Pfs25DR3 oocysts was significantly reduced when mosquitoes were fed on vaccinated as compared to control mice (67% reduction of intensity, 28% reduction in prevalence and specific IgG titer correlated with efficacy. These data confirm the utility of the adenovirus-MVA vaccine platform for the induction of antibodies with transmission-blocking activity, and support the continued development of this alternative approach to transmission-blocking malaria subunit

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Exosomes Derived from Tumor Cells Genetically Expressing Model Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修方明; 杨云山; 蔡志坚; 王建莉; 曹雪涛

    2004-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes have been proposed as non-cellular nanomeric vaccine which could induce potent antitumor immune response in mice. In order to develop the protocols to prepare tumor cell-derived exosomes for basic research and clinical trail, we isolated exosomes from ovalbumin (OVA)-expressing thymoma cells EG. 7-OVA by various preparation methods. We demonstrate the non-sedimentation method is simple, rapid, efficient with higher yield and purity of exosomes. EG. 7-OVA-derived exosomes are 40-100 nm in diameter sequestered by lipid bi-layer, and contain rich heat shock protein (HSP) and OVA. The result of the size distribution determination is consistent with the calculation by the visual microscopic inspection, with 90.4% particles at the range of 50-90 nm. Moreover, as a model antigen of the EG. 7 cells, OVA concentration in EG.7-derived exosomes can be regarded as a good quality control parameter. Therefore, we have established a platform to efficiently prepare exosomes for tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Tumor Expression of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen Correlates with High Mitotic Activity and Cell Pleomorphism Index in Lung Carcinoma

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    Rancés Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, some research efforts are focusing on the evaluation of a variety of tumor associated antigens (TAAs for a better understanding of tumor biology and genetics of lung tumors. For this reason, we evaluated the tissue expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and ior C2 (a cell surface O-linked glycoprotein carbohydrate chain TAA in lung carcinomas, as well as its correlation with a variety of clinicopathological features. The tissue expression of CEA was evidenced in 22/43 (51.16% lung carcinomas and it was correlated with mitotic activity, cell pleomorphism indexes, and age of patients. The expression of ior C2 was observed in 15/43 (34.88% tumors but no correlation with the clinicopathological features mentioned above was obtained. No correlation between both CEA and ior C2 antigens expression and the overall survival (OS of non-small-cell lung cancer patients was also observed. However, CEA-negative patients displayed higher OS rates as compared with positive ones (69.74 versus 58.26 months. Our results seem to be in agreement with the role of CEA expression in tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of cell polarizations and tissue architecture distortion. The significance of ior C2 antigen in these malignancies and it potential use in diagnosis, prognosis, and/or immunotherapy must be reevaluated.

  3. Screening of human tumor antigens for CD4 T cell epitopes by combination of HLA-transgenic mice, recombinant adenovirus and antigen peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Osen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells can mediate strong therapeutic anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients we set out to establish a comprehensive screening strategy for the identification of tumor-specific CD4+ T cell epitopes suitable for detection, isolation and expansion of tumor-reactive T cells from patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To scan the human melanoma differentiation antigens TRP-1 and TRP-2 for HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4+ T cell epitopes we applied the following methodology: Splenocytes of HLA-DRB1*0301-transgenic mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus encoding TRP-1 (Ad5.TRP-1 or TRP-2 (Ad5.TRP-2 were tested for their T cell reactivity against combinatorial TRP-1- and TRP-2-specific peptide libraries. CD4+ T cell epitopes thus identified were validated in the human system by stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy donors and melanoma patients. Using this strategy we observed that recombinant Ad5 induced strong CD4+ T cell responses against the heterologous tumor antigens. In Ad5.TRP-2-immunized mice CD4+ T cell reactivity was detected against the known HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted TRP-2(60-74 epitope and against the new epitope TRP-2(149-163. Importantly, human T cells specifically recognizing target cells loaded with the TRP-2(149-163-containing library peptide or infected with Ad5.TRP-2 were obtained from healthy individuals, and short term in vitro stimulation of PBMC revealed the presence of epitope-reactive CD4+ T cells in melanoma patients. Similarly, immunization of mice with Ad5.TRP-1 induced CD4+ T cell responses against TRP-1-derived peptides that turned out to be recognized also by human T cells, resulting in the identification of TRP-1(284-298 as a new HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4+ T cell epitope. CONCLUSIONS: Our screening approach identified new HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4+ T cell epitopes derived from melanoma antigens. This strategy is generally applicable to target

  4. Development of solid phase immunoradiometric assay for determination of carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumor marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of solid phase coated tube immunoradiometric assay for estimation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was the aim of the present study. Labeling of CEA was carried out using Ch-T and iodogen as oxidizing agents and 125I. The tracers were used to test the presence of antibodies produced by immunization. Production of polyclonal antibody was carried out through immunization of four mice. After purification step, the tubes were coated by purified polyclonal antibodies. Immunoradiometric that system was performed using the commercial IZOTOP 125I-anti hCEA tracer then the validity studies were carried out. The results show that the local coated tubes made the assay is more than sufficient to fulfill the clinical requirement of CEA as a tumor marker. (author)

  5. Interior engineering of a viral nanoparticle and its tumor homing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Amy M; Shukla, Sourabh; Saxena, Pooja; Aljabali, Alaa A A; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Dey, Sourav; Mealy, Joshua E; Yang, Alice C; Evans, David J; Lomonossoff, George P; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2012-12-10

    The development of multifunctional nanoparticles for medical applications is of growing technological interest. A single formulation containing imaging and/or drug moieties that is also capable of preferential uptake in specific cells would greatly enhance diagnostics and treatments. There is growing interest in plant-derived viral nanoparticles (VNPs) and establishing new platform technologies based on these nanoparticles inspired by nature. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) serves as the standard model for VNPs. Although exterior surface modification is well-known and has been comprehensively studied, little is known of interior modification. Additional functionality conferred by the capability for interior engineering would be of great benefit toward the ultimate goal of targeted drug delivery. Here, we examined the capacity of empty CPMV (eCPMV) particles devoid of RNA to encapsulate a wide variety of molecules. We systematically investigated the conjugation of fluorophores, biotin affinity tags, large molecular weight polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and various peptides through targeting reactive cysteines displayed selectively on the interior surface. Several methods are described that mutually confirm specific functionalization of the interior. Finally, CPMV and eCPMV were labeled with near-infrared fluorophores and studied side-by-side in vitro and in vivo. Passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and optical imaging were confirmed using a preclinical mouse model of colon cancer. The results of our studies lay the foundation for the development of the eCPMV platform in a range of biomedical applications.

  6. Prostate-specific membrane antigen expression in tumor-associated vasculature of breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, Alla Gabriella; Varma, Sonal; Greenwood, Eleni A; Christos, Paul J; Chao, K S Clifford; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in the tumor-associated neovasculature of multiple solid tumor types including breast cancers. However, thus far, the number of cases studied from some tumor types has been limited. In this study, we set out to assess PSMA expression in the tumor-associated vasculature associated with invasive breast carcinomas in a sizable cohort of patients. One hundred and six patients with AJCC stage 0-IV breast cancer were identified. Ninety-two of these patients had primary breast cancer [invasive breast carcinoma with or without co-existing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (74) or DCIS alone (18)]. In addition, 14 patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain were identified. Immunohistochemical staining for PSMA and CD31 was performed on parallel representative tumor sections in each case. Tumor-associated vascular endothelial cell PSMA immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively assessed based on two parameters: overall percent of endothelial positivity and staining intensity. PSMA expression for tumor-associated vascular endothelial cells was scored 0 if there was no detectable PSMA expression, 1 if PSMA staining was detectable in 5-50%, and 2 if PSMA expression was positive in >50% of microvessels. CD 31 staining was concurrently reviewed to confirm the presence of vasculature in each case. Tumor-associated vasculature was PSMA-positive in 68/92 (74%) of primary breast cancers and in 14/14 (100%) of breast cancers metastatic to brain. PSMA was not detected in normal breast tissue or carcinoma cells. All but 2 cases (98%) showed absence of PSMA expression in normal breast tissue-associated vasculature. The 10-year overall survival was 88.7% (95% CI = 80.0%, 93.8%) in patients without brain metastases. When overall survival (OS) was stratified based on PSMA score group, patients with PSMA scores of 0, 1, and 2 had 10-year OS of 95.8%, 96.0%, and 79.7%, respectively (p = 0.12). When PSMA scores

  7. IMMUNOTHERAPY OF SPONTANEOUS METASTATIC LUNG CANCER WITH TUMOR ANTIGEN-PULSED, INTERLEUKIN-12 GENE-MODIFIED DENDRITIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈吉泉; 修清玉; 颜泽敏; 罗文侗

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the treatment of spontaneous metastatic lung cancer by tumor antigen-pulsed, interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene-modified dendritic cells (DC). Methods:The spontaneous metastatic lung cancer model, prepared by injection of the 3LL Lewis lung cancer cells into the footpads of C57BL/6 mice, was treated by subcutaneous vaccination with tumor antigen peptide mut1-pulsed, IL-12 gene-modified dendritic cells (DC-IL-12/mut1) derived from the normal bone morrow. After treatment, the lung weight, the number of lung metastatic nodes and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice were observed, and the NK and CTL activity were determined respectively. The mice were divided into 8 groups with 12 mice in each group. Results: Compared with mice treated with mut1-pulsed, control LacZ gene modified DC and untreated DC, tumor-bearing mice treated with DC-IL-12/mut1 had the lightest lung weights (P<0.01), the least lung metastatic node number (P<0.01), the longest survival time (P<0.01), also with the induction of potent CTL activity (P<0.01) and NK activity (P<0.01). Conclusion: Tumor antigen-pulsed, IL-12 gene-modified dendritic cells have significant therapeutic effects on the spontaneous metastatic lung cancer, providing a new approach to treatment of lung tumors.

  8. Clinical evaluation of a new enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B virus core-related antigen; a marker distinct from viral DNA for monitoring lamivudine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokuhara, A; Tanaka, E; Matsumoto, A; Kimura, T; Yamaura, T; Orii, K; Sun, X; Yagi, S; Maki, N; Kiyosawa, K

    2003-07-01

    We aimed to assess the clinical performance of a newly developed chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) for the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) in patients with chronic HBV infection. A total of 82 patients with chronic HBV infection and 167 HBV-negative controls were studied. HBcrAg was measured by CLEIA with monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV DNA was measured by transcription-mediated amplification assay (TMA) and in-house real-time detection polymerase chain reaction (RTD-PCR). The HBcrAg assay detected viremia in 189 of 216 samples (88%) collected from 72 patients whilst the TMA assay detected viremia in 178 of the 216 samples (82%) (P = 0.019). The HBcrAg concentration correlated linearly with the HBV DNA concentration (P HBcrAg assay was not affected by the absence of hepatitis B e antigen from the serum or the presence of precore mutations in the HBV genome. In patients without anti-viral drugs, changes in their serum HBcrAg concentration over time corresponded to their HBV DNA concentration. In six additional patients who were later treated with lamivudine, HBV DNA concentration declined more rapidly than their HBcrAg concentration. Three months after treatment commenced, the ratio of HBcrAg: HBV DNA had increased in all six patients (P = 0.031). The HBcrAg assay is a sensitive and useful test for the assessment of a patient's HBV load. When monitoring the anti-viral effect of lamivudine, HBcrAg provides a viral marker which is independent of HBV DNA.

  9. Development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for detecting ovarian tumor-associated antigen fraction OCA in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian tumor-associated antigen isolated from human tumor tissue was shown to have a different mobility from that of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis in agarose. The ovarian tumor antigen is composed of six species with different electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three of these species were detected in Sephadex G-100 ovarian fraction OCA (from the void volume peak) and the other three species of lower apparent molecular weight were detected in fraction OCD (from the second peak). Fractions OCA and OCD did not share common antigenic determinants as determined by immunodiffusion. CEA was shown to share antigenic determinants with both OCA and OCD. A double-antibody radioimmunoassay capable of detecting nanogram quantities of plasma OCA was developed. In a preliminary study of ovarian cancer patients, OCA appeared to be a more sensitive marker for ovarian cancer than CEA. There was virtually no correlation (r2 = 0.1) between OCA and CEA levels in these patients, as determined by radioimmunoassay

  10. Identification of a New Member of the Ep-CAM (17-1A)Tumor-Associated Antigen Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦莉; 陈应华

    2002-01-01

    The tumor-associated antigen Ep-CAM (17-1A antigen), defined by the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1A, has been identified as a 42-kD glycoprotein. The mAb 17-1A has been used for immunotherapy of colorectal cancer. We obtained mAb 19F4 using a synthetic peptide containing antigen determinants of 17-1A antigen. The mAb 19F4 can bind the corresponding dominants of the 17-1A antigen in ELISA. Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mAb 19F4 recognized a 50-kD protein from cell lysates of MCF-7 (breast cancer cell line). Both mAb 19F4 and 17-1A detected a 42-kD protein in the cell lysates of HT-29 (colorectal cancer cell line). The results suggest that new members of the tumor-associated antigen family 17-1A may exist.

  11. Immunostimulatory Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing the CpG Motif are Effective as Immune Adjuvants in Tumor Antigen Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, George J.; Liu, Hsin-Ming; Wooldridge, James E.; Dahle, Christopher E.; Krieg, Arthur M.

    1997-09-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the immune response are allowing for the logical design of new approaches to cancer immunization. One area of interest is the development of new immune adjuvants. Immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides containing the CpG motif (CpG ODN) can induce production of a wide variety of cytokines and activate B cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and NK cells. Using the 38C13 B cell lymphoma model, we assessed whether CpG ODN can function as immune adjuvants in tumor antigen immunization. The idiotype served as the tumor antigen. Select CpG ODN were as effective as complete Freund's adjuvant at inducing an antigen-specific antibody response but were associated with less toxicity. These CpG ODN induced a higher titer of antigen-specific IgG2a than did complete Freund's adjuvant, suggesting an enhanced TH1 response. Mice immunized with CpG ODN as an adjuvant were protected from tumor challenge to a degree similar to that seen in mice immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant. We conclude that CpG ODN are effective as immune adjuvants and are attractive as part of a tumor immunization strategy.

  12. NLRC5 elicits antitumor immunity by enhancing processing and presentation of tumor antigens to CD8+ T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Galaxia M.; Bobbala, Diwakar; Serrano, Daniel; Mayhue, Marian; Champagne, Audrey; Saucier, Caroline; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A.; Menendez, Alfredo; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancers can escape immunesurveillance by diminishing the expression of MHC class-I molecules (MHC-I) and components of the antigen-processing machinery (APM). Developing new approaches to reverse these defects could boost the efforts to restore antitumor immunity. Recent studies have shown that the expression of MHC-I and antigen-processing molecules is transcriptionally regulated by NOD-like receptor CARD domain containing 5 (NLRC5). To investigate whether NLRC5 could be used to improve tumor immunogenicity, we established stable lines of B16-F10 melanoma cells expressing NLRC5 (B16-5), the T cell co-stimulatory molecule CD80 (B16-CD80) or both (B16-5/80). Cells harboring NLRC5 constitutively expressed MHC-I and LMP2, LMP7 and TAP1 genes of the APM. The B16-5 cells efficiently presented the melanoma antigenic peptide gp10025–33 to Pmel-1 TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells and induced their proliferation. In the presence of CD80, B16-5 cells stimulated Pmel-1 cells even without the addition of gp100 peptide, indicating that NLRC5 facilitated the processing and presentation of endogenous tumor antigen. Upon subcutaneous implantation, B16-5 cells showed markedly reduced tumor growth in C57BL/6 hosts but not in immunodeficient hosts, indicating that the NLRC5-expressing tumor cells elicited antitumor immunity. Following intravenous injection, B16-5 and B16-5/80 cells formed fewer lung tumor foci compared to control cells. In mice depleted of CD8+ T cells, B16-5 cells formed large subcutaneous and lung tumors. Finally, immunization with irradiated B16-5 cells conferred protection against challenge by parental B16 cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that NLRC5 could be exploited to restore tumor immunogenicity and to stimulate protective antitumor immunity. PMID:27471621

  13. NLRC5 elicits antitumor immunity by enhancing processing and presentation of tumor antigens to CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Bobbala, Diwakar; Serrano, Daniel; Mayhue, Marian; Champagne, Audrey; Saucier, Caroline; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A; Menendez, Alfredo; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-06-01

    Cancers can escape immunesurveillance by diminishing the expression of MHC class-I molecules (MHC-I) and components of the antigen-processing machinery (APM). Developing new approaches to reverse these defects could boost the efforts to restore antitumor immunity. Recent studies have shown that the expression of MHC-I and antigen-processing molecules is transcriptionally regulated by NOD-like receptor CARD domain containing 5 (NLRC5). To investigate whether NLRC5 could be used to improve tumor immunogenicity, we established stable lines of B16-F10 melanoma cells expressing NLRC5 (B16-5), the T cell co-stimulatory molecule CD80 (B16-CD80) or both (B16-5/80). Cells harboring NLRC5 constitutively expressed MHC-I and LMP2, LMP7 and TAP1 genes of the APM. The B16-5 cells efficiently presented the melanoma antigenic peptide gp10025-33 to Pmel-1 TCR transgenic CD8(+) T cells and induced their proliferation. In the presence of CD80, B16-5 cells stimulated Pmel-1 cells even without the addition of gp100 peptide, indicating that NLRC5 facilitated the processing and presentation of endogenous tumor antigen. Upon subcutaneous implantation, B16-5 cells showed markedly reduced tumor growth in C57BL/6 hosts but not in immunodeficient hosts, indicating that the NLRC5-expressing tumor cells elicited antitumor immunity. Following intravenous injection, B16-5 and B16-5/80 cells formed fewer lung tumor foci compared to control cells. In mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells, B16-5 cells formed large subcutaneous and lung tumors. Finally, immunization with irradiated B16-5 cells conferred protection against challenge by parental B16 cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that NLRC5 could be exploited to restore tumor immunogenicity and to stimulate protective antitumor immunity. PMID:27471621

  14. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab, immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum.

  15. Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles for Direct Delivery of Tumor Antigens to Lymph Node and Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Ko, Ho Kyung; Ryu, Ju Hee; Ahn, Keum Young; Lee, Young-Ho; Oh, Se Jin; Na, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Woo; Byun, Youngro; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) to lymph nodes (LNs) is essential to eliciting robust immune response for cancer immunotherapy but still remains unsolved. Herein, we evaluated the direct LN-targeting performance of four different protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and origin [Escherichia coli DNA binding protein (DPS), Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (PTS), hepatitis B virus capsid (HBVC), and human ferritin heavy chain (hFTN)] in live mice, using an optical fluorescence imaging system. Based on the imaging results, hFTN that shows rapid LN targeting and prolonged retention in LNs was chosen as a carrier of the model TSA [red fluorescence protein (RFP)], and the flexible surface architecture of hFTN was engineered to densely present RFPs on the hFTN surface through genetic modification of subunit protein of hFTN. The RFP-modified hFTN rapidly targeted LNs, sufficiently exposed RFPs to LN immune cells during prolonged period of retention in LNs, induced strong RFP-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, and notably inhibited RFP-expressing melanoma tumor growth in live mice. This suggests that the strategy using protein nanoparticles as both TSA-carrying scaffold and anti-cancer vaccine holds promise for clinically effective immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:27725782

  16. An adenoviral cancer vaccine co-encoding a tumor associated antigen together with secreted 4-1BBL leads to delayed tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Pedersen, Anders Elm;

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown promising results when using an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody treatment against established tumors. While this is promising, this type of treatment can induce severe side effects. Therefore, we decided to incorporate the membrane form of 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL......) in a replicative deficient adenovirus vaccine expressing the invariant chain (Ii) adjuvant fused to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). The Ii adjuvant increases and prolongs TAA specific CD8+ T cells as previously shown and local expression of 4-1BBL was chosen to avoid the toxicity associated with systemic...... presenting cells, but it did not enhance T cell responses in mice towards the Ii linked antigen. In tumor-bearing mice, our vaccine was found to decrease the frequency of TAA specific CD8+ T cells, but this difference did not alter the therapeutic efficacy. In order to reconcile our findings...

  17. Simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen causes stepwise changes in SV40 origin structure during initiation of DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied structural changes in the simian virus 40 (SV40) replication origin induced by SV40 large tumor antigen (T antigen). T-antigen-induced changes in origin DNA conformation can be visualized as specific and discrete topologic changes in origin DNA minicircles. We discovered three origin-T-antigen complexes defined by changes in DNA linking number. These complexes probably reflected essential early steps in the initiation of DNA replication since their formation required DNA seque...

  18. A Novel Chimeric Antigen Receptor Against Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Mediates Tumor Destruction in a Humanized Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Kiran H.; Tran, Eric; Zheng, Zhili; Gattinoni, Luca; Yu, Zhiya; Burns, William R.; Miermont, Anne M.; Teper, Yaroslav; Rudloff, Udo; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Feldman, Steven A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite advances in the understanding of its molecular pathophysiology, pancreatic cancer remains largely incurable, highlighting the need for novel therapies. We developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a glycoprotein that is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer starting at early stages of malignant transformation. To optimize the CAR design, we used antigen-recognition domains derived from mouse or human antibodies, and intracellular signaling domains containing one or two T cell costimulatory elements, in addition to CD3zeta. Comparing multiple constructs established that the CAR based on human monoclonal antibody Ha1-4.117 had the greatest reactivity in vitro. To further analyze this CAR, we developed a human pancreatic cancer xenograft model and adoptively transferred CAR-engineered T cells into animals with established tumors. CAR-engineered human lymphocytes induced significant antitumor activity, and unlike what has been described for other CARs, a second-generation CAR (containing CD28 cosignaling domain) induced a more potent antitumor effect than a third-generation CAR (containing CD28 and 41BB cosignaling domains). While our results provide evidence to support PSCA as a target antigen for CAR-based immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer, the expression of PSCA on selected normal tissues could be a source of limiting toxicity. PMID:24694017

  19. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with serum anti-thyroid antibodies and IgM antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen: a case report and one year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chun-Ling

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is an increasingly common autoimmune disorder mediated by antibodies to certain subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Recent literatures have described anti-thyroid and infectious serology in this encephalitis but without follow-up. Case presentation A 17-year-old Chinese female patient presented with psychiatric symptoms, memory deficits, behavioral problems and seizures. She then progressed through unresponsiveness, dyskinesias, autonomic instability and central hypoventilation during treatment. Her conventional blood work on admission showed high titers of IgG antibodies to thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and IgM antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen. An immature ovarian teratoma was found and removal of the tumor resulted in a full recovery. The final diagnosis of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis was made by the identification of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in her cerebral spinal fluid. Pathology studies of the teratoma revealed N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 positive ectopic immature nervous tissue and Epstein-Barr virus latent infection. She was discharged with symptoms free, but titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies remained elevated. One year after discharge, her serum remained positive for anti-thyroid peroxidase and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies, but negative for anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and IgM against Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen. Conclusions Persistent high titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies from admission to discharge and until one year later in this patient may suggest a propensity to autoimmunity in anti- N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis and support the idea that neuronal and thyroid autoimmunities represent a pathogenic spectrum. Enduring anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies from admission to one year

  20. Evaluation of tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 19 fragment and cancer-associated antigen 72-4 in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of tumor markers in body fluids can be used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients. This study aimed to investigate the performance of tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1, cancer-associated antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA in the neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions. In thirty-two neoplastic (n=16 and non-neoplastic (n=16 samples of canine thoracic or abdominal effusions, tumor markers were measured. Significant statistical difference was found only for the CYFRA 21-1 marker. The levels were significantly higher for the neoplastic group. The lack of significance between groups for markers CA 72-4 and CEA can be explained by the presence of other diseases in the non-neoplastic group, causing elevated levels of these markers. This study concludes that CYFRA 21-1 performed well, showing good sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of neoplastic effusions in dogs. However, further investigations are necessary in patients with malignancy as those with benign effusions.

  1. Antigenic differences between bovine viral diarrhea viruses and HoBi virus: Possible impacts on diagnosis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compare antigenic differences between HoBi virus and BVDV strains that might impact on diagnostics and control. Eighteen non-cytopathic isolates of pestiviruses including the 5 genotypic groups (BVDV1a-c, BVDV2, BDV) and HoBi virus, were tested using antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...

  2. Analysis of precore/core covariances associated with viral kinetics and genotypes in hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Pei Cheng

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV is one of the most common DNA viruses that can cause aggressive hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although many people are persistently infected with HBV, the kinetics in serum levels of viral loads and the host immune responses vary from person to person. HBV precore/core open reading frame (ORF encoding proteins, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg and core antigen (HBcAg, are two indicators of active viral replication. The aim of this study was to discover a variety of amino acid covariances in responses to viral kinetics, seroconversion and genotypes during the course of HBV infection. A one year follow-up study was conducted with a total number of 1,694 clones from 23 HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients. Serum alanine aminotransferase, HBV DNA and HBeAg levels were measured monthly as criteria for clustering patients into several different subgroups. Monthly derived multiple precore/core ORFs were directly sequenced and translated into amino acid sequences. For each subgroup, time-dependent covariances were identified from their time-varying sequences over the entire follow-up period. The fluctuating, wavering, HBeAg-nonseroconversion and genotype C subgroups showed greater degrees of covariances than the stationary, declining, HBeAg-seroconversion and genotype B. Referring to literature, mutation hotspots within our identified covariances were associated with the infection process. Remarkably, hotspots were predominant in genotype C. Moreover, covariances were also identified at early stage (spanning from baseline to a peak of serum HBV DNA in order to determine the intersections with aforementioned time-dependent covariances. Preserved covariances, namely representative covariances, of each subgroup are visually presented using a tree-based structure. Our results suggested that identified covariances were strongly associated with viral kinetics, seroconversion and genotypes. Moreover

  3. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue Virus Group Specific Antigen by Viral Vectors: Analysis of the Induced Immune Responses and Evaluation of Protective Potential in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  4. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue virus group specific antigen by viral vectors: analysis of the induced immune responses and evaluation of protective potential in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Bouet-Cararo

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0 or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7, to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity.

  5. Viral-mediated oncolysis is the most critical factor in the late-phase of the tumor regression process upon vaccinia virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In principle, the elimination of malignancies by oncolytic virotherapy could proceed by different mechanisms - e.g. tumor cell specific oncolysis, destruction of the tumor vasculature or an anti-tumoral immunological response. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of these factors to elucidate the responsible mechanism for regression of human breast tumor xenografts upon colonization with an attenuated vaccinia virus (VACV. Methods Breast tumor xenografts were analyzed 6 weeks post VACV infection (p.i.; regression phase by immunohistochemistry and mouse-specific expression arrays. Viral-mediated oncolysis was determined by tumor growth analysis combined with microscopic studies of intratumoral virus distribution. The tumor vasculature was morphologically characterized by diameter and density measurements and vessel functionality was analyzed by lectin perfusion and extravasation studies. Immunological aspects of viral-mediated tumor regression were studied in either immune-deficient mouse strains (T-, B-, NK-cell-deficient or upon cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression (MHCII+-cell depletion in nude mice. Results Late stage VACV-infected breast tumors showed extensive necrosis, which was highly specific to cancer cells. The tumor vasculature in infected tumor areas remained functional and the endothelial cells were not infected. However, viral colonization triggers hyperpermeability and dilatation of the tumor vessels, which resembled the activated endothelium in wounded tissue. Moreover, we demonstrated an increased expression of genes involved in leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in VACV-infected tumors, which orchestrate perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration. The immunohistochemical analysis of infected tumors displayed intense infiltration of MHCII-positive cells and colocalization of tumor vessels with MHCII+/CD31+ vascular leukocytes. However, GI-101A tumor growth analysis upon VACV-infection in

  6. Failure of expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens to alter tumor immunogenicity of a spontaneous murine carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, D A; Kerbel, R S; Elliott, B E

    1989-05-10

    We have shown previously that clonal immunogenic variants of murine mammary adenocarcinoma 10.1 can be isolated after treatment in vitro with the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-aza). Such immunogenic variants frequently express elevated class I major histocompatibility complex antigens relative to the level of expression in the parent tumor and are rejected in syngeneic mice by a T-cell-dependent process. To ascertain whether elevated immunogenicity is a function of increased class I antigen expression, we isolated high class I antigen expressors from 5-aza-treated 10.1 cells by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Clonal variants displaying any increase in class I antigen expression were more efficient stimulators of allo-class I antigen-specific cytolytic T-cell precursors. However, these variants displayed unaltered tumorigenicity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Thus, phenotypic changes other than, or in addition to, elevated class I antigen expression cause the reduced tumorigenicity of immunogenic clones of 10.1 cells isolated after 5-aza treatment.

  7. Tissue expression of Squamous Cellular Carcinoma Antigen (SCCA is inversely correlated to tumor size in HCC

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    Mangia Anita

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate squamous cellular carcinoma antigen (SCCA in serum and in tumoral and paired peritumoral tissues. We studied 27 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC and 55 with HCC: 20 with a single nodule 3 cm or multifocal (l-HCC. Methods Serum SCCA was measured by the ELISA kit, and in frozen tissues by immunohistochemistry, quantified with appropriate imaging analysis software and expressed in square microns. Continuous variables are reported as means and 95% confidence intervals. Comparisons between independent groups were performed with a generalized linear model and Tukey grouping. Pearson's correlation coefficients were determined to evaluate relations between markers. Qualitative variables were summarized as count and percentage. Statistical significance was set at p-value Results Serum SCCA values in LC patients were 0.41 (0.31–0.55 ng/ml and statistically different from both HCC groups: 1.6 (1.0–2.6 ng/ml in s-HCC, 2.2 (1.28–2.74 ng/ml in l-HCC. SCCA in hepatic tissue was 263.8 (176.6–394.01 μm2 in LC patients, statistically different from values in s-HCC: 1163.2 (863.6–1566.8 μm2 and l-HCC: 625.8 (534.5–732.6. All pairwise comparisons between groups yielded statistically significant differences. Tumoral SCCA resulted linearly related with nodule size, showing a statistically significant inverse relation between the two variables (b = -0.099, p = 0.024. Conclusion There was no statistically significant correlation between tissue and serum levels of SCCA. The significantly stronger expression of SCCA in smaller compared to larger HCC could be important for early HCC detection. However, the increased expression in peritumoral tissue could affect the significance of serological detection.

  8. Nuclear Expression of Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Is Associated with Recurrence of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinomas: Role of Viral Protein in Tumor Recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jing; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Kyu Ho; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays well-known roles in tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in infected patients. However, HBV-associated protein status in tumor tissues and the relevance to tumor behavior has not been reported. Our study aimed to examine the expression of HBV-associated proteins in HCC and adjacent nontumorous tissue and their clinicopathologic implication in HCC patients. Methods: HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV core antigen (HBcAg), and HBV X protein (HB...

  9. Autoantibodies to Tailor-Made Panels of Tumor-Associated Antigens in Breast Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettie Piura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies (AAbs to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs have been identified in the sera of cancer patients. In a previous review published in this journal, we have focused on recent knowledge related to circulating AAbs to individual TAAs in breast carcinoma. This review will focus on recent knowledge related to AAb assays to tailor-made panels of TAAs in breast carcinoma. So far, AAb assays to the following tailor-made panels of TAAs have been assessed in breast carcinoma: (1 p53, c-myc, HER2, NY-ESO-1, BRCA2, and MUC1, (2 IMP1, p62, Koc, p53, c-MYC, cyclin B1, and survivin, (3 PPIA, PRDX2, FKBP52, HSP-60, and MUC1, (4 MUC1, HER2, p53, and IGFBP2, (5 p53, HER2, IGFBP-2, and TOPO2α, (6 survivin and livin, (7 ASB-9, SERAC1, and RELT, and (8 p16, p53, and c-myc. Assessment of serum AAbs to a tailor-made panel of TAAs provides better sensitivity to diagnosis of breast carcinoma than measuring serum AAbs to a single TAA. Nevertheless, measurement of serum AAbs to a panel of TAAs for screening and early diagnosis of breast carcinoma is still investigational and should be carried out along with traditional diagnostic studies.

  10. Higher importance of interleukin 6 than classic tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell cancer antigen) in the diagnosis of esophageal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukaszewicz-Zając, M; Mroczko, B; Kozłowski, M; Nikliński, J; Laudański, J; Szmitkowski, M

    2012-04-01

    It has been suggested that interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a potential role in the growth and progression of tumors, including esophageal cancer (EC). The aim of the study was to compare clinical significance of serum IL-6 with classic tumor markers - carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell cancer antigen (SCC-Ag) - in EC patients in relation to its histological types - squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (AD) of esophagus. The study included 53 EC patients and 90 healthy subjects. Serum IL-6 and CEA levels were determined using immunoenzyme assays, while SCC-Ag - chemiluminescent assay. The diagnostic criteria and prognostic values for markers were defined. The levels of all proteins tested in EC, ESCC, and AD were higher than in healthy subjects. The percentage of elevated results was substantially higher for IL-6 (86%) than for CEA (30%) and SCC-Ag (24%) in EC, similarly as in ESCC (87%, 23%, and 33%) and AD (87%, 39%, and 13%, respectively) patients. Concentrations of IL-6 depended on distant metastases and patients' survival in EC and were significantly higher in ESCC patients with more advanced tumor stage and nodal metastases. The IL-6 area under receiver operating characteristic curve (0.92) was larger than for CEA (0.84) and SCC-Ag (0.62) in EC, likewise in ESCC (0.92, 0.87, 0.77) and AD (0.91, 0.79, 0.57, respectively). Our findings indicate better usefulness of IL-6 than classic tumor markers in the diagnosis of EC, especially in patients with ESCC.

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Peptides Derived from Tumor Antigens Induced by Inhibition of DNA Methylation for Development of Drug-facilitated Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shraibman, Bracha; Kadosh, Dganit Melamed; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of cancer cells with anticancer drugs often fails to achieve complete remission. Yet, such drug treatments may induce alteration in the tumor's gene expression patterns, including those of Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTA). The degradation products of such antigens can be presented as HLA peptides on the surface of the tumor cells and be developed into anticancer immunotherapeutics. For example, the DNA methyl transferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) has limited antitumor efficacy, yet it induces the expression of many genes, including CTAs that are normally silenced in the healthy adult tissues. In this study, the presentation of many new HLA peptides derived from CTAs and induced by Decitabine was demonstrated in three human Glioblastoma cell lines. Such presentation of CTA-derived HLA peptides can be exploited for development of new treatment modalities, combining drug treatment with anti-CTA targeted immunotherapy. The Decitabine-induced HLA peptidomes include many CTAs that are not normally detected in healthy tissues or in cancer cells, unless treated with the drug. In addition, the study included large-scale analyses of the simultaneous effects of Decitabine on the transcriptomes, proteomes and HLA peptidomes of the human Glioblastoma cells. It demonstrates the poor correlations between these three levels of gene expression, both in their total levels and in their response to the drug. The proteomics and HLA peptidomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003790 and the transcriptomics data are available via GEO with identifier GSE80137.

  12. Meta-Analysis of DNA Tumor-Viral Integration Site Selection Indicates a Role for Repeats, Gene Expression and Epigenetics

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    Janet M. Doolittle-Hall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoviruses cause tremendous global cancer burden. For several DNA tumor viruses, human genome integration is consistently associated with cancer development. However, genomic features associated with tumor viral integration are poorly understood. We sought to define genomic determinants for 1897 loci prone to hosting human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV or Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. These were compared to HIV, whose enzyme-mediated integration is well understood. A comprehensive catalog of integration sites was constructed from the literature and experimentally-determined HPV integration sites. Features were scored in eight categories (genes, expression, open chromatin, histone modifications, methylation, protein binding, chromatin segmentation and repeats and compared to random loci. Random forest models determined loci classification and feature selection. HPV and HBV integrants were not fragile site associated. MCPyV preferred integration near sensory perception genes. Unique signatures of integration-associated predictive genomic features were detected. Importantly, repeats, actively-transcribed regions and histone modifications were common tumor viral integration signatures.

  13. Comparison between tissue and serum content of CA 125, CA 19-9, and carcinoembryonic antigen in ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenecker, G; Neunteufel, W; Bieglmayer, C; Kölbl, H; Schieder, K

    1989-01-01

    Tumor markers CA 125, CA 19-9, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were detected by immunohistochemistry in paraffin embedded tissue samples obtained from two different locations in 35 ovarian tumors. In addition, serum concentrations of these tumor markers were measured before cytoreductive surgery. The staining reaction was heterogeneous in different parts of the tumor as well as within the parenchyma. Of the marker positive tumors, a staining reaction was observed in both tissue samples in only 10 of 22 cases for CA 125, in eight of 13 cases for CEA, and in three of eight cases for CA 19-9. Eighty-one percent of the patients whose tumor was positive for CA 125 also showed elevated serum levels of this marker. A poor correlation was found between tissue and circulating CA 19-9 levels. CEA was detected in 28% of the tumors and seemed to be valuable only for monitoring in rare cases of ovarian cancer. For purposes of selecting a marker for monitoring of patients with ovarian carcinoma, immunohistochemistry has a predictive value for CA 125 only. In order to better define the marker expressed in a tumor, it is necessary to examine at least two samples of different parts of the malignant tissue.

  14. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujiwara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs, transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  15. Local CD4 and CD8 T-cell reactivity to HSV-1 antigens documents broad viral protein expression and immune competence in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia.

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    Monique van Velzen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection results in lifelong chronic infection of trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons, also referred to as neuronal HSV-1 latency, with periodic reactivation leading to recrudescent herpetic disease in some persons. HSV-1 proteins are expressed in a temporally coordinated fashion during lytic infection, but their expression pattern during latent infection is largely unknown. Selective retention of HSV-1 reactive T-cells in human TG suggests their role in controlling reactivation by recognizing locally expressed HSV-1 proteins. We characterized the HSV-1 proteins recognized by virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells recovered from human HSV-1-infected TG. T-cell clusters, consisting of both CD4 and CD8 T-cells, surrounded neurons and expressed mRNAs and proteins consistent with in situ antigen recognition and antiviral function. HSV-1 proteome-wide scans revealed that intra-TG T-cell responses included both CD4 and CD8 T-cells directed to one to three HSV-1 proteins per person. HSV-1 protein ICP6 was targeted by CD8 T-cells in 4 of 8 HLA-discordant donors. In situ tetramer staining demonstrated HSV-1-specific CD8 T-cells juxtaposed to TG neurons. Intra-TG retention of virus-specific CD4 T-cells, validated to the HSV-1 peptide level, implies trafficking of viral proteins from neurons to HLA class II-expressing non-neuronal cells for antigen presentation. The diversity of viral proteins targeted by TG T-cells across all kinetic and functional classes of viral proteins suggests broad HSV-1 protein expression, and viral antigen processing and presentation, in latently infected human TG. Collectively, the human TG represents an immunocompetent environment for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition of HSV-1 proteins expressed during latent infection. HSV-1 proteins recognized by TG-resident T-cells, particularly ICP6 and VP16, are potential HSV-1 vaccine candidates.

  16. The DnaJ domain of polyomavirus large T antigen is required to regulate Rb family tumor suppressor function.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Q.; Denis, D; Ratnofsky, M; Roberts, T.M.; DeCaprio, J A; Schaffhausen, B

    1997-01-01

    Tumor suppressors of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene family regulate cell growth and differentiation. Polyomavirus large T antigens (large T) bind Rb family members and block their function. Mutations of large T sequences conserved with the DnaJ family affect large T binding to a cellular DnaK, heat shock protein 70. The same mutations abolish large T activation of E2F-containing promoters and Rb binding-dependent large T activation of cell cycle progression. Cotransfection of a cellul...

  17. Database of mutations that alter the large tumor antigen in simian virus 40.

    OpenAIRE

    Kierstead, T D; Pipas, J M

    1996-01-01

    The SV40 T antigen database is a listing of plasmids and/or viruses that express mutant forms of the virus-encoded large T antigen protein. The parental virus strain, nucleic acid sequence of the mutations, the effect of the mutation on the T antigen amino acid sequence, and key references are included in the listing. The database is available from the authors as a Macintosh FileMaker Pro file, and as a hard copy printout.

  18. Epstein–Barr virus latent antigens EBNA3C and EBNA1 modulate epithelial to mesenchymal transition of cancer cells associated with tumor metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaur, Nivedita; Gandhi, Jaya; Erle S Robertson; Verma, Subhash C.; Kaul, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition is an important mechanism in cancer invasiveness and metastasis. We had previously reported that cancer cells expressing Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) latent viral antigens EBV nuclear antigen EBNA3C and/ or EBNA1 showed higher motility and migration potential and had a propensity for increased metastases when tested in nude mice model. We now show that both EBNA3C and EBNA1 can modulate cellular pathways critical for epithelial to mesenchymal transition of cancer...

  19. Adenovirus tumor targeting and hepatic untargeting by a coxsackie/adenovirus receptor ectodomain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen bispecific adapter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-Jung; Everts, Maaike; Pereboeva, Larisa; Komarova, Svetlana; Idan, Anat; Curiel, David T; Herschman, Harvey R

    2007-06-01

    Adenovirus vectors have a number of advantages for gene therapy. However, because of their lack of tumor tropism and their preference for liver infection following systemic administration, they cannot be used for systemic attack on metastatic disease. Many epithelial tumors (e.g., colon, lung, and breast) express carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). To block the natural hepatic tropism of adenovirus and to "retarget" the virus to CEA-expressing tumors, we used a bispecific adapter protein (sCAR-MFE), which fuses the ectodomain of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (sCAR) with a single-chain anti-CEA antibody (MFE-23). sCAR-MFE untargets adenovirus-directed luciferase transgene expression in the liver by >90% following systemic vector administration. Moreover, sCAR-MFE can "retarget" adenovirus to CEA-positive epithelial tumor cells in cell culture, in s.c. tumor grafts, and in hepatic tumor grafts. The sCAR-MFE bispecific adapter should, therefore, be a powerful agent to retarget adenovirus vectors to epithelial tumor metastases.

  20. Tumor Destruction and In Situ Delivery of Antigen Presenting Cells Promote Anti-Neoplastic Immune Responses: Implications for the Immunotherapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi AA

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presenting cells (APCs activate helper and cytotoxic T cells specific for antigens expressed by tissue cells, including neoplastic cells. This event occurs after the antigen transfer from tissue cells to APC, and is referred to as "cross-presentation". The number and the state of activation of APC in the tumor control the outcome of cross-presentation, including the establishment of protective immune responses. Cell death favors cross-presentation. Cancer cells normally die, either spontaneously or as a consequence of targeted therapies. The transfer of tumor antigens from dying tumor cells to APCs in vivo, exploiting the cross-presentation pathway, has the potential of yielding novel immunotherapeutic strategies. Their success will depend on at least two factors: the induction of synchronized cell death in the tumor, and the recruitment of activated dendritic cells in the tumor. Under normal conditions, pancreatic cancer represents a privileged environment; its profound chemoresistance reflects limited apoptosis after chemotherapy. Moreover, it usually contains only a few cells endowed with APC function. Endoscopic ultrasonography offers attractive possibilities of circumventing this privilege, including the delivery of ultrasound, radiofrequency or radiation in order to destroy the tumor and the delivery in situ of autologous APC or appropriate chemotactic signals. In general, loco-regional approaches offer the possibility of using the tumor of each patient as a complex antigen source, thus limiting the risk of tumor escape and reducing the need for extensive ex vivo handling of the neoplasm and of the patient APCs.

  1. Performance evaluation of new automated hepatitis B viral markers in the clinical laboratory: two quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen assays and an HBV core-related antigen assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongjung; Hong, Duck Jin; Shin, Saeam; Cho, Yonggeun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) assays and a hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) assay. A total of 529 serum samples from patients with hepatitis B were tested. HBsAg levels were determined by using the Elecsys (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and Architect (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) qHBsAg assays. HBcrAg was measured by using Lumipulse HBcrAg assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). Serum aminotransferases and HBV DNA were respectively quantified by using the Hitachi 7600 analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies, Tokyo, Japan) and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test (Roche). Precision of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays was assessed, and linearity of the qHBsAg assays was verified. All assays showed good precision performance with coefficients of variation between 4.5% and 5.3% except for some levels. Both qHBsAg assays showed linearity from 0.1 to 12,000.0 IU/mL and correlated well (r = 0.9934). HBsAg levels correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.3373) and with HBcrAg (r = 0.5164), and HBcrAg also correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.5198; P HBcrAg assays.

  2. Non-virally engineered human adipose mesenchymal stem cells produce BMP4, target brain tumors, and extend survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Gullotti, David; Kozielski, Kristen L; Kim, Jennifer E; Seng, Michael; Abbadi, Sara; Schiapparelli, Paula; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Vescovi, Angelo; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Green, Jordan J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for enabling non-viral nanobiotechnology to allow safe and effective gene therapy and cell therapy, which can be utilized to treat devastating diseases such as brain cancer. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) display high anti-glioma tropism and represent a promising delivery vehicle for targeted brain tumor therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that non-viral, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to engineer hAMSCs with higher efficacy (75% of cells) than leading commercially available reagents and high cell viability. To accomplish this, we engineered a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer structure to transfect hAMSCs with significantly higher efficacy than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We then assessed the ability of NP-engineered hAMSCs to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which has been shown to have a novel therapeutic effect by targeting human brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), a source of cancer recurrence, in a human primary malignant glioma model. We demonstrated that hAMSCs genetically engineered with polymeric nanoparticles containing BMP4 plasmid DNA (BMP4/NP-hAMSCs) secrete BMP4 growth factor while maintaining their multipotency and preserving their migration and invasion capacities. We also showed that this approach can overcome a central challenge for brain therapeutics, overcoming the blood brain barrier, by demonstrating that NP-engineered hAMSCs can migrate to the brain and penetrate the brain tumor after both intranasal and systemic intravenous administration. Critically, athymic rats bearing human primary BTIC-derived tumors and treated intranasally with BMP4/NP-hAMSCs showed significantly improved survival compared to those treated with control GFP/NP-hAMCSs. This study demonstrates that synthetic polymeric nanoparticles are a safe and effective approach for stem cell-based cancer-targeting therapies. PMID:27240162

  3. Local Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor Encoded by Recombinant Vaccinia Virus is Effective in Controlling Viral Replication in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambhi, Sharan K.; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R. J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-α. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-α during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo.

  4. Vaginal superficial myofibroblastoma: a rare mesenchymal tumor of the lower female genital tract and a study of its association with viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Lan; Su, Tzu-Cheng; Shen, Ko-Hung; Lin, Shu-Hui; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Jui-Chang; Chen, Chih-Jung

    2012-06-01

    Superficial myofibroblastoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor in the lower female genital tract. The exact etiology of superficial myofibroblastoma remains unclear. The association of viral infection and mesenchymal tumors has been well established in some particular types of soft tissue tumors. In the lower female genital tract, the intimate correlation of viral infection and tumor pathogenesis has been also proposed. We present a 59-year-old woman with postcoital bleeding for 1 month. The pelvic examination revealed a 2-cm polypoid mass mimicking leiomyoma at the vaginal fornix. Local excision was performed, and the pathological examination revealed a superficial myofibroblastoma. No tumor recurrence was noted during the 12-month follow-up. Pathological differential diagnosis of this tumor from other mesenchymal tumors is essential because of its distinct clinicopathological features. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization of human papilloma virus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as well as immunohistochemical staining of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), was negative in tumor cells. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first group to study the possible relationship of viral infection and the occurrence of this mesenchymal tumor. Our results suggested no association of vaginal superficial myofibroblastoma and infection with HPV, EBV, or HHV8.

  5. Targeting of non-dominant antigens as a vaccine strategy to broaden T-cell responses during chronic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Ragonnaud, Emeline;

    2015-01-01

    challenge with live virus, the CD8+ T cells specific for vaccine-encoded epitopes, displayed a phenotype typically associated with prolonged/persistent antigenic stimulation marked by high levels of KLRG-1, as compared to T cells reacting to epitopes not included in the vaccine. Notably, this association...

  6. Ability of Lactococcus lactis to export viral capsid antigens: a crucial step for development of live vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieye, Y.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Clier, F.; Juillard, V.; Boot, H.J.; Piard, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Thefood grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is a potential vehicle for protein delivery in the gastrointestinal tract. As a model, we constructed lactococcal strains producing antigens of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). IBDV infects chickens and causes depletion of B-lymphoid cells in the bur

  7. Sorafenib Decreases Tumor Exposure to an Anti-carcinoembryonic Antigen Monoclonal Antibody in a Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veena A; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    In this investigation, we test the hypothesis that treatment with sorafenib, an anti-angiogenic agent, decreases tumor vascularization and, consequently, hinders the delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to xenograft tumors. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressing tumor xenografts were divided into control and sorafenib-treated groups. Sorafenib was administered to the latter group at 50 mg/kg IP every 48 h, starting 4 days post-tumor implantation. When tumors attained a size of 200-300 mm(3), mice were evaluated for (a) tumor microvessel density (using immunohistochemical analysis), (b) tumor macromolecular extravasation (using Evans Blue Dye (EBD)), (c) pharmacokinetics of an anti-CEA mAb, T84.66, following an intravenous dose of 10 mg/kg, and (d) intra-tumoral spatial distribution of T84.66 (using autoradiography). Sorafenib treatment resulted in a substantial reduction in tumor growth rate, a visible reduction in tumor microvessel density, and in a 46.4% decrease in EBD extravasation in tumor tissue (p area under the mAb plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-7d): 1.67 × 10(3) ± 1.28 × 10(2) vs. 1.76 × 10(3) ± 1.75 × 10(2) nM × day, p = 0.51). However, tumor AUC(0-7d) was reduced by 40.8% in sorafenib-treated mice relative to that observed in control mice (5.61 × 10(2) ± 4.27 × 10(1) vs. 9.48 × 10(2) ± 5.61 × 10(1) nM × day, p < 0.001). Sorafenib therapy was also found to markedly alter mAb tumor spatial distribution. The results collectively suggest that sorafenib treatment causes a significant reduction in mAb delivery to, and distribution within, solid tumors. PMID:27029796

  8. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  9. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  10. TCR-engineered T cells meet new challenges to treat solid tumors: choice of antigen, T cell fitness and sensitisation of tumor milieu (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre eKunert

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells gene-engineered with antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs has proven its feasibility and therapeutic potential in the treatment of malignant tumors. To ensure further clinical development of TCR gene therapy, it is necessary to target immunogenic epitopes that are related to oncogenesis and selectively expressed by tumor tissue, and implement strategies that result in optimal T cell fitness. In addition, in particular for the treatment of solid tumors, it is equally necessary to include strategies that counteract the immune-suppressive nature of the tumor micro-environment. Here, we will provide an overview of the current status of TCR gene therapy, and redefine the following three challenges of improvement: ‘choice of target antigen’; ‘fitness of T cells’; and ‘sensitisation of tumor milieu’. We will categorize and discuss potential strategies to address each of these challenges, and argue that advancement of clinical TCR gene therapy critically depends on developments towards each of the three challenges.

  11. Durable Complete Response from Metastatic Melanoma after Transfer of Autologous T Cells Recognizing 10 Mutated Tumor Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Todd D; Crystal, Jessica S; Cohen, Cyrille J; Pasetto, Anna; Parkhurst, Maria R; Gartner, Jared J; Yao, Xin; Wang, Rong; Gros, Alena; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Trebska-McGowan, Kasia; Rosenberg, Steven A; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy treatment of patients with metastatic cancer has assumed a prominent role in the clinic. Durable complete response rates of 20% to 25% are achieved in patients with metastatic melanoma following adoptive cell transfer of T cells derived from metastatic lesions, responses that appear in some patients to be mediated by T cells that predominantly recognize mutated antigens. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the reactivity of T cells administered to a patient with metastatic melanoma who exhibited a complete response for over 3 years after treatment. Over 4,000 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified by whole-exome sequence analysis of the patient's autologous normal and tumor cell DNA. Autologous B cells transfected with 720 mutated minigenes corresponding to the most highly expressed tumor cell transcripts were then analyzed for their ability to stimulate the administered T cells. Autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes recognized 10 distinct mutated gene products, but not the corresponding wild-type products, each of which was recognized in the context of one of three different MHC class I restriction elements expressed by the patient. Detailed clonal analysis revealed that 9 of the top 20 most prevalent clones present in the infused T cells, comprising approximately 24% of the total cells, recognized mutated antigens. Thus, we have identified and enriched mutation-reactive T cells and suggest that such analyses may lead to the development of more effective therapies for the treatment of patients with metastatic cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 669-78. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. Methods mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. Results MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20. In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41 and 36.6% (15/41, while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41 and 14.6% (6/41. In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7 and 14.3% (1/7. The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P P Conclusion Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer. These genes can be used as one of the important indicators for early diagnosis, efficacy evaluation and prognostic determination of ovarian cancer.

  13. A new Combi test for simultaneous detection of antibodies to viral capsid, early and EBNA antigens of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobec, M

    1993-06-01

    In order to facilitate the differentiation between a recent (acute) and a past Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, the Combi test was developed. This test is an anticomplement immunofluorescence test (ACIF) requiring only a single serum dilution to be tested on a single cellular spot. The cell line used expresses viral capsid antigen (VCA) and early antigen (EA) in about 5 to 10 percent of the cells as well as EBV nuclear antigens (EBNA) in more than 90 percent of cells. A satisfactory agreement between the Combi test and other tests for antibodies to EBV was obtained (IgG and IgM antibodies to VCA by IFA and EIA and antibodies to EBNA by ACIF including tests for heterophile and complement-fixing antibodies). When the standard serological tests gave negative results, the Combi test was also negative (absence of any fluorescence in the cells). Serologically confirmed recent (acute) infections lead to specific fluorescence in only 5 to 10 percent of the cells, while past infections result in fluorescence in 90 percent or more of the cells. For the diagnosis of a reactivated EBV infection or of EBV-associated malignancies, other tests should be employed. The test is based on the measurement of the activation and specific distribution of the C3 component of complement; the antibody class differentiation is therefore not necessary. The presence of rheumatoid factor (RF) and the IgG competition phenomenon do not influence the results of the Combi test. An introduction of the Combi test will enable a simplified, less expensive and more reliable serodiagnosis of EBV infections. PMID:8394757

  14. Expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in lung cancer cells and tumor neovasculature endothelial cells and its clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-long Wang

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA has been found in tumor neovasculature endothelial cells (NECs of non-prostate cancers and may become the most promising target for anti-tumor therapy. To study the value of PSMA as a potential new target for lung cancer treatment, PSMA expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and small cell lung cancer (SCLC tissues and its relationship with clinicopathology were investigated in the current study.Immunohistochemistry was used to detect PSMA expression in a total of 150 lung specimens of patients with lung cancer. The data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses.The percentages of NSCLC patients who had PSMA (+ tumor cells and PSMA (+ NECs were 54.02% and 85.06%, respectively. The percentage of patients younger than 60 years old who had PSMA (+ tumor cells was 69.05%, which was significantly greater than the percentage of patients aged 60 years or older (40.00%, p<0.05. A significant difference was observed in the percentage of NSCLC patients with PMSA (+ NECs and stage I or II cancer (92.98% and those patients with stage III or IV cancer (76.77%. In the SCLC tissues, NEC PSMA expression (70.00% did not differ significantly from NSCLC. SCLC tumor cells and normal lung tissues cells were all negative. There was no significant correlation between the presence of PSMA (+ NECs in SCLC patients and the observed clinicopathological parameters.PSMA is expressed not only in NECs of NSCLC and SCLC but also in tumor cells of most NSCLC patients. The presence of PSMA (+ tumor cells and PSMA (+ NECs in NSCLC was negatively correlated with age and the clinicopathological stage of the patients, respectively.

  15. Second antibody clearance of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen for improved tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated the use of a second antibody (SA) directed against the radiolabeled primary anti-tumor antibody (PA) to enhance the clearance rate of the PA from the circulation and nontarget tissues. Administration of 50 or 250 μg of anti-goat IgG (SA) hr after the administration of 10 μg of /sup 131/I-goat anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody (PA) to hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts resulted in a 5-fold reduction in the level of circulating PA after 4 hr in comparison to the control group only given /sup 131/I-PA. The percentage of PA in the blood decreased rapidly over 72 hr in animals given 250 μg of the SA, but at 50 μg of SA the level of activity in the blood after 24 hr was similar to the control. Tumor accretion was identical after 4 hr, but after 24 hr the animals given 250 μg of SA had 2-3 fold less PA in the tumor than either the control group or the 50 μg dose of SA. Tumor/nontumor ratios for all major organs but the spleen improved 6-8 fold within 48 hr after injection of 250 μg of the SA with tumor/blood ratios as high as 40:1. A SA dose of 50 μg resulted in a significantly higher tumor/blood ratio after only 4 hr; tumor/nontumor ratios at later times were similar to the control group. Tumors located in the hind legs were visible in all groups by imaging 24 hr after injection of the SA, but only the 250 μg dose of SA showed a significant reduction in total body activity. These results suggest that the SA approach may be used to reduce the total background radioactivity while maintaining tumor accretion of /sup 131/I-PA to allow for selective tumor imaging

  16. Persistent High Level of Urinary Tumor Marker Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Prenatally Diagnosed Dysplastic Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Khorramirouz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9 level has gained clinical significance in gastrointestinal malignancies and in various solid and cystic diseases. Dysplastic kidney is a congenital abnormality resulting from atresia of the ureteral bud during the embryogenesis which can be unilateral or bilateral. We report unilateral dysplastic kidney with extremely large cyst diagnosed by routine ultrasonography in the 32nd week of gestational age with high levels of CA 19-9 in cystic and amniotic fluid, as well as persistent high urinary levels of this tumor marker during the 1-year follow-up. Persistent high urinary CA 19-9 level even after cyst aspiration may be attributable to remained function of dysplastic kidney due to remained epithelial lining.

  17. Enhanced antitumor effects of tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cells by their transfection with GM-CSF gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹雪涛; 章卫平; 马施华; 张明徽; 王建莉; 叶天星

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the biological characterization and antitumor activitites of GM-CSF gene-transfected dendritic cells, the splenic dendritic cells were infected with GM-CSF recombinant replication-deficient adenoviruses in vitro . Their enhanced expression of B7 was demonstrated by FACS analysis, and more potent stimulatory activity was confirmed by allogeneic MLR. Immunization of dendritic cells pulsed with irradiated B16 melanoma cells induced sig-nificant CTL and enabled host to resist the challenge of wild-type B16 cells. When they were transfected with GM-CSF gene subsequently, the induced CTL activity was higher, and the produced protection against B16 cell challenge and therapeutic effect on the mice with preestablished pulmonary melastases more effective. These data suggest that the dendritic cells pulsed with tumor antigen then transfected with GM-CSF gene can be used as an effective vaccine in tumor immunotherapy.

  18. Cancer immunotherapy using novel tumor-associated antigenic peptides identified by genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    Recent genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in comprehensive tumor types coupled with isolation of cancer tissues by laser-microbeam microdissection have revealed ideal tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and lung cancer, but not in most normal tissues except for testis, placenta, and fetal organs. Preclinical studies using HLA-transgenic mice and human T cells in vitro showed that TAA-derived CTL-epitope short peptides (SPs) are highly immunogenic and induce HLA-A2 or -A24-restricted CTLs. Based on the accumulated evidence, we carried out a phase II clinical trial of the TAA-SP vaccine in advanced 37 HNSCC patients. This study showed a significant induction of TAA-specific CTLs in the majority of patients without serious adverse effects. Importantly, clinical responses including a complete response were observed in this study. Another phase II clinical trial of therapeutic TAA-SP vaccine, designed to evaluate the ability of prevention of recurrence, is ongoing in HNSCC patients who have received curative operations. Further studies in human preclinical studies and in vivo studies using HLA class I transgenic mice showed TAA-derived long peptides (TAA-LPs) have the capacity to induce not only promiscuous HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells but also tumor-specific CTLs through a cross-presentation mechanism. Moreover, we observed an augmentation of TAA-LP-specific T helper type 1 cell responses and tumor antigen-spreading in HNSCC patients vaccinated with TAA-SPs. This accumulated evidence suggests that therapeutic TAA-SPs and LPs vaccines may provide a promising cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Cytokine regulation by virus infection: bovine viral diarrhea virus, a flavivirus, downregulates production of tumor necrosis factor alpha in macrophages in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, H; Jungi, T. W.; Pfister, H; Strasser, M; Sileghem, M; Peterhans, E

    1996-01-01

    Bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected in vitro with noncytopathic or cytopathic strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus. Infection with both biotypes resulted in a decreased production of tumor necrosis factor alpha upon stimulation with heat-inactivated Salmonella dublin or lipopolysaccharide. Other macrophage functions were not downregulated, indicating that the observed effect was not due to a loss in macrophage viability. The downregulated production of tumor necrosis factor...

  20. Cloning and expression of the tumor-associated antigen L6.

    OpenAIRE

    Marken, J S; Schieven, G L; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E; Aruffo, A

    1992-01-01

    The L6 cell surface antigen, which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas, has attracted attention as a therapeutic target for murine monoclonal antibodies and their humanized counterparts. Its molecular nature has, however, remained elusive. Here we describe the expression cloning of a cDNA encoding the L6 antigen. COS cells transfected with this cDNA direct the expression of an approximately 24-kDa surface protein that reacts with the two anti-L6 monoclonal antib...

  1. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  2. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Bayrak, Savaş; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  3. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunoassay of antibody against tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen amplified by functionalized graphene derivates and enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Liu, Mingshuai; Mao, Yaning; Xu, Yunpeng; Niu, Shuyan

    2014-09-15

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are often found on the surface of cancer cells. The determination of the carbohydrate components of glycoconjugates is challenging because of the chemical complexity of glycan chains. Through monitoring corresponding antibody, we can get a good solution for clinical diagnosis. Here breast tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens Tn were used as a model and a new photoelectrochemical biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of antibody against Tn was developed. To enhance the sensitivity, both graphene oxide and graphene were used during the construction of biosensor. Through the formation of immunocomplex and the insoluble biocatalytic precipitation (BCP) product, photocurrent intensity was decreased greatly and the antibody could be detected from 0.5 to 500 pg/mL with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-13) g/mL. At the same time, the developed biosensor showed acceptable selectivity and could be used in the complex matrix. Compared with the traditional glycoarray method, this PEC method is more sensitive (5 orders of magnitude), and thus provides another platform to monitor the immune response to carbohydrate epitopes at different stages during differentiation, metastasis, or treatment.

  4. Development of oligoclonal nanobodies for targeting the tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali;

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72) is a membrane mucin whose over-expression is correlated with advanced tumor stage and increased invasion and metastasis. In this study, we identified a panel of four nanobodies, single variable domains of dromedary heavy-chain antibodies that specific...

  5. Potential of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein-Derived Protein Transduction Domains as Antigen Carriers for Nasal Vaccine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hae-Duck; Lee, Joohyun; Jin, Xing-Hai; Lee, Kyunglim

    2016-09-01

    Nasal vaccination offers a promising alternative to intramuscular (i.m.) vaccination because it can induce both mucosal and systemic immunity. However, its major drawback is poor absorption of large antigens in the nasal epithelium. Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides, have been proposed as vehicles for nasal delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. Here, we evaluated the potential of a mutant PTD derived from translationally controlled tumor protein (designated TCTP-PTD 13) as an antigen carrier for nasal vaccines. We first compared the l- and d-forms of TCTP-PTD 13 isomers (l- or d-TCTP-PTD 13) as antigen carriers. Studies in mice demonstrated that nasally administered mixtures of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) and d-TCTP-PTD 13 induced higher plasma IgG titers and secretory IgA levels in nasal washes than nasally administered OVA alone, OVA/l-TCTP-PTD 13, or i.m.-injected OVA. Plasma IgG subclass responses (IgG1 and IgG2a) of mice nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 showed that the predominant IgG subclass was IgG1, indicating a Th2-biased immune response. We also used synthetic CpG oligonucleotides (CpG) as a Th1 immune response-inducing adjuvant. Nasally administered CpG plus OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 was superior in eliciting systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to those induced by nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13. Furthermore, the OVA/CpG/d-TCTP-PTD 13 combination skewed IgG1 and IgG2a profiles of humoral immune responses toward a Th1 profile. These findings suggest that TCTP-derived PTD is a suitable vehicle to efficiently carry antigens and to induce more powerful antigen-specific immune responses and a more balanced Th1/Th2 response when combined with a DNA adjuvant. PMID:27454469

  6. Expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To observe mRNA expression of tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, to explore the relationship between gene expression and diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of ovarian cancer, and to evaluate the feasibility of their gene products as markers, and an immunotherapy target for ovarian cancer. mRNA expression of MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE-1/2 and BAGE were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 14 cases of normal ovarian tissue, 20 cases of ovarian benign tumor specimens, 41 cases of ovarian cancer specimens, and ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3, A2780, and COC1. MAGE, GAGE and BAGE genes were not expressed in normal ovarian tissue. In benign tumors, only the MAGE gene was expressed; the expression rate of this gene in benign tumors was 15% (3/20). In ovarian cancer tissues, MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was highly expressed, with expression rates of 53.7% (22/41) and 36.6% (15/41), while GAGE-1/2 and BAGE had relatively low expression, with rates of 26.8% (11/41) and 14.6% (6/41). In metastatic lesions of ovarian cancer, only MAGE-1 and BAGE were expressed, with expression rates of 28.6% (2/7) and 14.3% (1/7). The positive expression rates of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 in serous cystadenocarcinoma were significantly higher than that in other types of ovarian cancer (P < 0.05). Gene expression rate was not correlated with menopause or lymph node metastasis. Positive expression of MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 was positively correlated with tumor differentiation and the clinical stage of the ovarian cancer. In addition, the positive expression rate of BAGE was significantly higher in ovarian cancer patients with ascites (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression profiles of MAGE, GAGE and BAGE in ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3, A2780 and COC1 varied, but there was at least one gene expressed in each cell line. Tumor-specific antigen MAGE, BAGE and GAGE may play a role in the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer

  7. 黑色素瘤抗原A家族与肿瘤的关系%Melanoma antigen-A family in tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁春艳; 桑梅香

    2010-01-01

    As a tumor-specific antigen highly expressed in various types of tumors, MACE-A does not exist in normal adult tissues, except for testis and placenta. Therefore MAGE-A antigens are regarded. tumor specific antigen,and have significant significance for cancer immunotherapy.%黑色素瘤抗原A(MAGE-A)基因家族在正常人中除在睾丸和胎盘组织中有表达外,在其他组织中均不表达,而在许多恶性肿瘤组织中却呈高表达状态,被认为是一种肿瘤特异性抗原,在肿瘤免疫治疗中具有重要意义.

  8. Tumor-targeted delivery of IL-2 by NKG2D leads to accumulation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the tumor loci and enhanced anti-tumor effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Heung Kang

    Full Text Available Interleukin-2 (IL-2 has been shown to promote tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and differentiation but systemic administration of IL-2 results in significant toxicity. Therefore, a strategy that can specifically deliver IL-2 to the tumor location may alleviate concerns of toxicity. Because NKG2D ligands have been shown to be highly expressed in many cancer cells but not in healthy cells, we reason that a chimeric protein consisting of NKG2D linked to IL-2 will lead to the specific targeting of IL-2 to the tumor location. Therefore, we created chimeric proteins consisting of NKG2D linked to Gaussia luciferase (GLuc; a marker protein or IL-2 to form NKG2D-Fc-GLuc and NKG2D-Fc-IL2, respectively. We demonstrated that NKG2D linked to GLuc was able to deliver GLuc to the tumor location in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that TC-1 tumor-bearing mice intramuscularly injected with DNA encoding NKG2D-Fc-IL2, followed by electroporation, exhibited an increased number of luciferase-expressing E7-specific CD8+ T cells at the tumor location. More importantly, treatment with the DNA construct encoding NKG2D-Fc-IL2 significantly enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects generated by intradermal vaccination with therapeutic HPV DNA in tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, by linking NKG2D to IL2, we are able to specifically deliver IL-2 to the tumor location, enhancing antigen-specific T-cell immune response and controlling tumor growth. Our approach represents a platform technology to specifically deliver proteins of interest to tumor loci.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against antigens displayed on a progressively growing mammary tumor.

    OpenAIRE

    Tax, A; Manson, L A

    1981-01-01

    We have produced lymphocyte hybridomas between mouse myeloma cells and either spleen cells of C3H/f/C57BL/6 mice bearing the Mm5mt/c1 tumor-producing murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or spleen cells from Fisher rats inoculated with the same tumor. Two classes of hybridoma-secreted monoclonal antibodies were obtained. In the first class are IVC11, IIIA1, and VE7, each of which precipitated a 52,000-dalton protein from 125I-labeled purified preparations of MMTV and [3H]glucosamine-labeled Mm5m...

  10. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti......, spontaneous cellular immune responses against the Bcl-2 family proteins have been identified as frequent features in cancer patients underscoring that these proteins are natural targets for the immune system. Thus, Bcl-2 family may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti......-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, alone or in the combination with conventional therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of Bcl-2 family proteins as T-cell antigens, which has set the stage for the first explorative trial using these antigens in therapeutic vaccinations against cancer, and discuss future...

  11. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc;

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium....... On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer....

  12. Lewis antigen mediated adhesion of freshly removed human bladder tumors to E-selectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skorsteensgaard, Karna; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Langkilde, Niels;

    1999-01-01

    in invasive tumors. The binding property was correlated to the detection of carbohydrate structures in Western blots and tissue sections of the same tumors, using six different monoclonal antibodies: anti-sLe(a), anti-sLe(x), anti-Le(a), anti-Le(x) (two different clones) and anti-Le(b). Most blot-stainings.......001), and was correlated to number of bound cells (p staining of Le(a) on cell membranes correlated with frequent binding (p

  13. Sinks, suppressors and antigen presenters: how lymphodepletion enhances T cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Khong, Hung T.; Antony, Paul A.; Douglas C Palmer; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2005-01-01

    Lymphodepletion followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous, tumor-reactive T cells boosts antitumor immunotherapeutic activity in mouse and in humans. In the most recent clinical trials, lymphodepletion together with ACT has an objective response rate of 50% in patients with solid metastatic tumors. The mechanisms underlying this recent advance in cancer immunotherapy are beginning to be elucidated and include: the elimination of cellular cytokine ‘sinks’ for homeostatic γC-cytoki...

  14. Viral blips during long-term treatment with standard or double dose lamivudine in HBe antigen negative chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate safety and effect on hepatitis B virus (HBV) suppression of a long-term treatment with lamivudine (LAM) at standard (100 mg/d) or double (200 mg/d) dose in chronic hepatitis B. METHODS: This was a case study with matched controls (1:3) in patients with chronic hepatitis B with anti-Hbe antibodies. RESULTS: Twelve patients received LAM 200 mg/d and 35 LAM 100 mg/d, for a median of 28 mo. A primary response (PR; I.e. Negative HBV-DNA with Amplicor assay) was achieved in 100% of LAM-200 patients and 83% of LAM-100 patients. A virological breakthrough occurred in 16.7 and 24.7%, respectively, of the PR-patients, with the appearance of typical LAM resistance mutations in all but one patient. Viremia blips (I.e. Transient HBV-DNA below 80 IU/Ml in patients who tested negative at Amplicor assay) were detected using a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and occurred in seven out of nine patients with subsequent BT and in four out of 32 patients with end-of-study response (77.7% vs 12.5%; P = 0.001) at chi-square test). At the end of the study, 51.4% of LAM-100 patients and 83.3% of LAM-200 patients had remained stably HBV-DNA negative. Double-dose LAM was well tolerated. CONCLUSION: Long-term treatment of anti-Hbe positive chronic hepatitis B with double dose lamivudine causes a more profound and stable viral suppression as compared to conventional treatment.

  15. Wild-type, but not mutant, human p53 proteins inhibit the replication activities of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, P N; Kern, S. E.; Vogelstein, B; Prives, C

    1990-01-01

    Murine p53 blocks many of the replication activities of simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen (T antigen) in vitro. As murine cells do not replicate SV40 DNA, it was of interest to determine how p53 from permissive human cells functions. Recombinant baculoviruses encoding either the wild-type form of human p53 or a mutant p53 cloned from a human tumor cell line were constructed, and p53 proteins were purified from infected insect cells. Surprisingly, we found that wild-type human p53 was...

  16. Functional characterization of viral tumor necrosis factor receptors encoded by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yang; Qi, Hemei; Yuan, Jimin; Wang, Rui; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Dong, Chuanfu

    2015-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) is a large double-stranded DNA virus of Alloherpesviridae family in the order Herpesvirales. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in common carp and its ornamental koi variety, and threatens the aquaculture industries worldwide. Mimicry of cytokines and cytokine receptors is a particular strategy for large DNA viruses in modulating the host immune response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two novel viral homologues of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) encoded by CyHV3-ORF4 and -ORF12, respectively. CyHV3-ORF4 was identified as a homologue of HVEM and CyHV3-ORF12 as a homologue of TNFRSF1. Overexpression of ORF4 and ORF12 in zebrafish embryos results in embryonic lethality, morphological defects and increased apoptosis. Although we failed to identify any interaction between the two vTNFRs and their potential ligands in zebrafish TNF superfamily by yeast two-hybrid system, the expression of some genes in TNF superfamily or TNFR superfamily were mis-regulated in ORF4 or ORF12-overexpressing embryos, especially the death receptor zHDR and its cognate ligand DL1b. Further studies showed that the apoptosis induced by the both CyHV3 vTNFRs is mainly activated through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and requires the crosstalk between the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Additionally, using RT-qPCR and Western blot assays, the expression patterns of the both vTNFRs were also analyzed during CyHV3 productive infection. Collectively, this is the first functional study of two unique vTNFRs encoded by a herpesvirus infecting non-mammalian vertebrates, which may provide novel insights into viral immune regulation mechanism and the pathogenesis of CyHV3 infection. PMID:26052019

  17. Development of a Serum Biomarker Assay That Differentiates Tumor-Associated MUC5AC (NPC-1C ANTIGEN from Normal MUC5AC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janos Luka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A serum ELISA using a monoclonal antibody that detects a MUC5AC-related antigen (NPC-1C antigen expressed by pancreatic and colorectal cancer was developed. The NPC-1C antibody reacts with specific epitopes expressed by tumor-associated MUC5AC that does not appear on MUC5AC from normal tissues. Based on observations of a highly specific antibody, we tested the ELISA to differentiate serum from healthy blood donors compared to serum from patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer. Additionally, patient tumor tissue was stained to examine the expression pattern of MUC5AC-related antigen in pancreatic and colorectal cancers. The results indicate the NPC-1C antibody ELISA distinguished serum of cancer patients from normal donors with very good sensitivity and specificity. Most patient's tumor biopsy exhibited NPC-1C antibody reactivity, indicating that tumor-associated MUC5AC antigen from tumor is shed into blood, where it can be detected by the NPC-1C antibody ELISA. This serum test provides a new tool to aid in the diagnosis of these cancers and immune monitoring of cancer treatment regimens.

  18. Adenoviral vaccination combined with CD40 stimulation and CTLA-4 blockage can lead to complete tumor regression in a murine melanoma model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Holst, Peter J; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard;

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination with replication deficient adenovirus expressing a viral antigen linked to invariant chain was recently found to markedly delay the growth of B16.F10 melanomas expressing the same antigen; however, complete regression of the tumors was never observed. Here we show that the......Therapeutic vaccination with replication deficient adenovirus expressing a viral antigen linked to invariant chain was recently found to markedly delay the growth of B16.F10 melanomas expressing the same antigen; however, complete regression of the tumors was never observed. Here we show...

  19. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27130449

  20. Prevalence study of Bovine viral diarrhea virus by evaluation of antigen capture ELISA and RT-PCR assay in Bovine, Ovine, Caprine, Buffalo and Camel aborted fetuses in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae that cause abortions and stillbirths in livestock and its traditional diagnosis is based on cell culture and virus neutralization test. In this study, for more sensitive, specific detection and determined the prevalence of virus in aborted Bovine, Ovine, Caprine, Buffalo and Camel fetuses the antigen capture ELISA and RT-PCR were recommended. From the total of 2173 aborted fetuses, 347 (15.96%) and 402 (18.49%) were positi...

  1. Recognition of melanoma-derived antigens by CTL: possible mechanisms involved in down-regulating anti-tumor T-cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivoltini, L; Loftus, D J; Squarcina, P;

    1998-01-01

    immunotherapeuties capable of significantly impacting disease outcome, it is necessary to identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the failure of some antigens to mediate significant anti-tumor responses in vivo. In the case of the MART-1(27-35) epitope, we hypothesize that one of these mechanisms may be...

  2. In situ delivery of tumor antigen- and adjuvant-loaded liposomes boosts antigen-apecific T-Cell responses by human dermal dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.; Bruijns, Sven C.M.; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Bloois, van Louis; Storm, G.; Gruijl, de T.D.; Kooyk, van Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor ant

  3. In situ Delivery of Tumor Antigen- and Adjuvant-Loaded Liposomes Boosts Antigen-Specific T-Cell Responses by Human Dermal Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Martine A.; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Van Bloois, Louis; Storm, G; De Gruijl, Tanja; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor ant

  4. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina;

    2013-01-01

    only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn). Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) knockout (KO) of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast...... steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr), STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr), T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr), and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr) antigens...

  5. Mini-Array of Multiple Tumor-Associated Antigens to Enhance Autoantibody Detection for Immunodiagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2009-01-01

    Liver cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is particularly prevalent in Africa and Asia. HCC affects the Hispanic population of the United States at a rate double that of the white population. The majority of people with HCC will die within 1 year of its detection. This high case-fatality rate can in part be attributed to lack of diagnostic methods that allow early detection. How to establish a methodology to identify the high-risk individuals for HCC remains to be investigated. The multi-factorial and multi-step nature in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers must be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies to identify markers which will be useful for early detection of cancer. Our recent studies demonstrated that a mini-array of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) might enhance autoantibody detection for diagnosis of HCC, especially for the alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-negative cases. It also suggested that different types of cancer might require different panels of TAAs to achieve the sensitivity and specificity required to make immunodiagnosis a feasible adjunct to tumor diagnosis. PMID:17289549

  6. Construction, expression and characterization of the engineered antibody against tumor surface antigen, p185c-erbB-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The c-erbB-2 proto-oncogene encodes a 185kDa protein p185, which belongs to epidermal growth factorreceptor family. Amplification of this gene has been shown to correlate with poor clinical prognosis forcertain cancer patients. The monoclonal antibody A21 which directed against p185 specifically inhibitsproliferation of tumor cells overexpressing p185, hence allows it to be a candidate for targeted therapy. Inorder to overcome several drawbacks of murine MAb, we cloned its VH and VL genes and constructed thesingle-chain Fv (scFv) through a peptide linker. The recombinant scFvA21 was expressed in Escherichiacoli and purified by the affinity column. Subsequently it was characterized by ELISA, Western blot, cellimmunohistochemistry and FACS. All these assays showed the binding activity to extracellular domain(ECD) of p185. Based on those properties of scFvA21, we further constructed the scFv-Fc fusion moleculewith a homodimer form and the recombinant product was expressed in mammalian cells. In a series ofsubsequent analysis this fusion protein showed identical antigen binding site and activity with the parentantibody. These anti-p185 engineered antibodies have promised to be further modified as a tumor targetingdrugs, with a view of application in the diagnosis and treatment of human breast cancer.

  7. Immune-scintigraphy of recurrent colorectal tumors with Tc-99m-marked monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After surgery in 24 patients aged 39-80 years with colorectal tumors, immune-scintigraphic examinations with Tc-99m carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) MAb were carried out. Prior to scintigraphy, the levels of CEA and Ca 19-9 tumor markers were determined. In the majority of cases there was firm clinical evidence of local recurrence or metastases. Twenty-two of the 24 cases were scintigraphically positive. Local recurrence and metastases of the liver were correctly identified in 12 and four cases, respectively. It was difficult to detect widespread metastases of the peritoneum or a growth at the helum of the lung. In three cases, metastases of lymph nodes were confirmed by both surgery and scintigraphy, although the computed tomographic (CT) examinations were negative. In 20 patients, CT and immune-scintigraphic findings correlated. Most positive scans were confirmed surgically and at biopsy. In two patients, none of the diagnostic procedures showed positive results, despite clinical grounds for suspecting a further spread of the disease. A false-positive immune-scintigram was observed in a histologically confirmed case of inflammation of the mucous membrane. In several cases Tc-99m enhancement was detected in almost all parts of the colon. This could be due to the antibody metabolism or to the deposit of free technetium in the bowel. There was no correlation between CEA serum levels and a positive immune-scan

  8. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Expressed by Recombinant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attenuates Viral Replication and Increases the Level of Pulmonary Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Belyakov, Igor M.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.

    2001-01-01

    An obstacle to developing a vaccine against human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is that natural infection typically does not confer solid immunity to reinfection. To investigate methods to augment the immune response, recombinant RSV (rRSV) was constructed that expresses murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from a transcription cassette inserted into the G-F intergenic region. Replication of rRSV/mGM-CSF in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of BALB/c mice was reduced 23- to 74- and 5- to 588-fold, respectively, compared to that of the parental rRSV. Despite this strong attenuation of replication, the level of RSV-specific serum antibodies induced by rRSV/mGM-CSF was comparable to, or marginally higher than, that of the parental rRSV. The induction of RSV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was moderately reduced during the initial infection, which might be a consequence of reduced antigen expression. Mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF had elevated levels of pulmonary mRNA for gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40 compared to animals infected by wild-type rRSV. Elevated synthesis of IFN-γ could account for the restriction of RSV replication, as was observed previously with an IFN-γ-expressing rRSV. The accumulation of total pulmonary mononuclear cells and total CD4+ T lymphocytes was accelerated in animals infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to that in animals infected with the control virus, and the level of IFN-γ-positive or IL-4-positive pulmonary CD4+ cells was elevated approximately twofold. The number of pulmonary lymphoid and myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages was increased up to fourfold in mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to those infected with the parental rRSV, and the mean expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, a marker of activation, was significantly increased in the two subsets of dendritic cells. Enhanced antigen presentation likely accounts for the

  9. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  10. The Immunodominant Antigen of an Ultraviolet-induced Regressor Tumor Is Generated by a Somatic Point Mutation in the DEAD Box Helicase p68

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Purnima; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Skipper, Jonathan C.A.; Engelhard, Victor H.; Hunt, Donald F.; Schreiber, Hans

    1997-01-01

    The genetic origins of CD8+ T cell–recognized unique antigens to which mice respond when immunized with syngeneic tumor cells are unknown. The ultraviolet light-induced murine tumor 8101 expresses an H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant antigen, A, that induces cytolytic CD8+ T cells in vivo A+ 8101 cells are rejected by naive mice while A− 8101 tumor cells grow. To identify the antigen H-2Kb molecules were immunoprecipitated from A+ 8101 cells and peptides were eluted by acid. The sensitizing peptide was isolated by sequential reverse-phase HPLC and sequenced using microcapillary HPLC-triple quadruple mass spectrometry. The peptide, SNFVFAGI, matched the sequence of the DEAD box protein p68 RNA helicase except for a single amino acid substitution, caused by a single nucleotide change. This mutation was somatic since fibroblasts from the mouse of tumor origin expressed the wild-type sequence. The amino acid substitution created an anchor for binding of the mutant peptide to H-2Kb. Our results are consistent with mutant p68 being responsible for rejection of the tumor. Several functions of p68, which include nucleolar assembly and inhibition of DNA unwinding, may be mediated through its IQ domain, which was altered by the mutation. This is the first description of a somatic tumor–specific mutation in the coding region of a nucleic acid helicase. PMID:9034148

  11. Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein gH/gL antibodies complement IgA-viral capsid antigen for diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lin-Quan; Zhang, Hua; Li, Yan; Liu, Wan-Li; Zhong, Qian; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether measuring antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein gH/gL in serum could improve diagnostic accuracy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cases, gH/gL expressed in a recombinant baculovirus system was used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies in two independent cohorts. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed using results from a training cohort (n = 406) to establish diagnostic mathematical models, which were validated in a second independent cohort (n = 279). Levels of serum gH/gL antibodies were higher in NPC patients than in healthy controls (p gL ELISA had a sensitivity of 83.7%, specificity of 82.3% and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.893 (95% CI, 0.862-0.924) for NPC diagnosis. Furthermore, gH/gL maintained diagnostic capacity in IgA-VCA negative NPC patients (sensitivity = 78.1%, specificity = 82.3%, AUC = 0.879 [95% CI, 0.820 - 0.937]). Combining gH/gL and viral capsid antigen (VCA) detection improved diagnostic capacity as compared to individual tests alone in both the training cohort (sensitivity = 88.5%, specificity = 97%, AUC = 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97 - 0.991]), and validation cohort (sensitivity = 91.2%, specificity = 96.5%, AUC = 0.97 [95% CI, 0.951-0.988]). These findings suggest that EBV gH/gL detection complements VCA detection in the diagnosis of NPC and aids in the identification of patients with VCA-negative NPC. PMID:27093005

  12. Collection of corneal impression cytology directly on a sterile glass slide for the detection of viral antigen: An inexpensive and simple technique for the diagnosis of HSV epithelial keratitis – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandlapally Sesha

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK is a sight threatening ocular infection and occurs worldwide. A prompt laboratory diagnosis is often very useful. Conventional virology techniques are often expensive and time consuming. We describe here a highly economical, simple, rapid and sensitive technique for the collection of impression cytology, for the laboratory diagnosis of HSK. Methods Fifteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK (either dendritic or geographic ulcers and five patients with other corneal infections (Mycotic keratitis, n = 3, Bacterial keratitis, n = 2 were included in the study. Corneal impression cytology specimens were collected using a sterile glass slide with polished edges instead of a membrane, by pressing the surface of one end of the slide firmly, but gently on the corneal lesion. Additionally, corneal scrapings were collected following the impression cytology procedure. Impression cytology and corneal scrapings were stained by an immunoperoxidase or immunofluorescence assay for the detection of HSV-1 antigen using a polyclonal antibody to HSV-1. Corneal scrapings were processed for viral cultures by employing a shell vial assay. Results This simple technique allowed the collection of adequate corneal epithelial cells for the detection of HSV-1 antigen in a majority of the patients. HSV-1 antigen was detected in 12/15 (80% cases while virus was isolated from 5/15 (33.3% patients with HSK. All the patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK (n = 15 were confirmed by virological investigations (viral antigen detection and/or viral cultures. HSV-1 antigen was detected in the impression cytology smears and corneal scrapings in 11/15 (73.3% and 12/15 (80% of the patients, respectively (P = 1.00. None of the patients in the control group were positive for viral antigen or virus isolation. Minimal background staining was seen in impression cytology smears, while there was some background staining in corneal

  13. Identification and Validation of HCC-specific Gene Transcriptional Signature for Tumor Antigen Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Caruso, Francesca Pia; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Ceccarelli, Michele; Costa, Valerio; Aprile, Marianna; Esposito, Roberta; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-07-08

    A novel two-step bioinformatics strategy was applied for identification of signatures with therapeutic implications in hepatitis-associated HCC. Transcriptional profiles from HBV- and HCV-associated HCC samples were compared with non-tumor liver controls. Resulting HCC modulated genes were subsequently compared with different non-tumor tissue samples. Two related signatures were identified, namely "HCC-associated" and "HCC-specific". Expression data were validated by RNA-Seq analysis carried out on unrelated HCC samples and protein expression was confirmed according to The Human Protein Atlas" (http://proteinatlas.org/), a public repository of immunohistochemistry data. Among all, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10, and IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 3 were found strictly HCC-specific with no expression in 18/20 normal tissues. Target peptides for vaccine design were predicted for both proteins associated with the most prevalent HLA-class I and II alleles. The described novel strategy showed to be feasible for identification of HCC-specific proteins as highly potential target for HCC immunotherapy.

  14. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen: A Novel Tumor Marker for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen (SCC-Ag) by ELISA technique and Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) by IRMA technique were measured in 65 patients with hepatic focal lesion. 49 patients suffered from proved hepatocellular carcinoma and 16 patients were having cirrhosis and 20 normal controls. Median levels of serum AFP and SCC-Ag in HCC patients was significantly higher when compared with both cirrhotic patients and controls. On using receiver operator characteristic curve to improve sensitivity and specificity of AFP and SCC-Ag for detection of HCC, the best chosen cut-off values were 40 IU/mL for AFP and 2.55 ng/L for SCC-Ag, these yielded a sensitivity of 67.2% and 61.2% respectively and specificity 100%. The diagnostic sensitivity of them increased to 87.7% when they was combiendly calculated. It was found that the combined use of AFP and SCC-Ag is useful in screening patients with hepatic focal lesion to increase the chance of early diagnosis of HCC patients.

  15. Análise antigênica e molecular de amostras citopáticas do vírus da diarréia viral bovina Antigenic and molecular analysis of cytopathic isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luiz Tobias

    2000-03-01

    Mucosas.Seven cytopathic isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV isolated from clinical cases and blood of calves from herds with reproductive problems were analysed. All isolates contained a mixture of cytopathic (cp and noncytopathic (ncp viruses which were biologically cloned yielding pure populations of viruses of either biotype. The cp and ncp viruses obtained by cloning were characterized antigenically with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and regarding to the expression of the non-structural polypeptide NS3. The analysis of MAb binding revealed two patterns of reactivity: 1. In five isolates, the cp and ncp viruses from the same isolate were antigenically very similar to each other, suggesting they represent true "pairs"of viruses. 2. Two isolates, however, yielded cp and ncp viruses antigenically different from each other. Western immunoblot analysis of non-structural polypeptides of ncp viruses revealed a unique band of reactivity, with a mass of approximately 125kDa, corresponding to the NS23 of the standard BVDV Singer strain. In addition to NS23, the cp viruses expressed a polypeptide of approximatelly 80kDa, corresponding to the NS3. The NS23 of two cp viruses displayed an altered migration in SDS-PAGE compared to the other viruses. In one virus, the NS23 had a molecular mass lower than expected whereas in other virus, two bands of reactivity were observed: one smaller and another bigger than the standard NS23, respectively. Our findings confirm previous results that cytopathic BVDV field isolates usually contain a mixture of viruses of both biotypes and that cytopathogenicity correlates with the expression of NS3. The isolation of cp viruses from the blood of clinically normal cattle, however, demonstrates that their occurrence is not restricted to cases of mucosal disease.

  16. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  17. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr, STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr, T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr, and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr antigens are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn. Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN knockout (KO of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps, as demonstrated for glycan elongation beyond Tn and STn, can be important for fine tuning of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer cells.

  18. Detection of polyomavirus simian virus 40 tumor antigen DNA in AIDS-related systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (S-NHL) is a common malignancy during HIV infection, and it is hypothesized that infectious agents may be involved in the etiology. Epstein-Barr virus DNA is found in pathogenesis. We analyzed AIDS-related S-NHL samples, NHL samples from HIV-negative patients, peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected and -uninfected patients without NHL, and lymph nodes without tumors from HIV-infected patients. Specimens were examined by polymerase chain reaction analysis with use of primers specific for an N-terminal region of the oncoprotein large tumor antigen ( T-ag ) gene conserved among all three polyomaviruses (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus). Polyomavirus T-ag DNA sequences, proven to be SV40-specific, were detected more frequently in AIDS-related S-NHL samples (6 of 26) than in peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 69; p =.0001), NHL samples from HIV-negative patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 10; p =.09), or lymph nodes (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 7; p =.16). Sequences of C-terminal T-ag DNA from SV40 were amplified from two AIDS-related S-NHL samples. Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences were detected in 38% (10 of 26) AIDS-related S-NHL samples, 50% (5 of 10) HIV-negative S-NHL samples, and 57% (4 of 7) lymph nodes. None of the S-NHL samples were positive for both Epstein-Barr virus DNA and SV40 DNA. Further studies of the possible role of SV40 in the pathogenesis of S-NHL are warranted.

  19. Natural killer cells contribute to hepatic injury and help in viral persistence during progression of hepatitis B e-antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Nandi, M; Pal, S; Mukhopadhyay, D; Chakraborty, B C; Khatun, M; Bhowmick, D; Mondal, R K; Das, S; Das, K; Ghosh, R; Banerjee, S; Santra, A; Chatterjee, M; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B e-antigen negative (e(-)) chronic HBV infection (CHI) encompasses a heterogeneous clinical spectrum ranging from inactive carrier (IC) state to e(-) chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. In the backdrop of dysfunctional virus-specific T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are emerging as innate effectors in CHI. We characterized CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells in clinically well-defined, treatment-naive e(-) patients in IC, e(-)CHB or decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) phase to appraise their role in disease progression. The NK cell frequencies increased progressively with disease severity (IC 8.2%, e(-)CHB 13.2% and LC 14.4%). Higher proportion of NK cells from LC/e(-)CHB expressed CD69, NKp46, NKp44, TRAIL and perforin, the last two being prominent features of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK subsets, respectively. The frequencies of CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells together with TRAIL(+) CD56(bright) and Perforin(+) CD56(dim) NK cells correlated positively with serum alanine transaminase levels in e(-)CHB/LC. K562 cell-stimulated NK cells from e(-)CHB/LC exhibited significantly greater degranulation but diminished interferon-γ production than IC. Further, Perforin(+) NK cell frequency inversely correlated with autologous CD4(+) T-cell count in e(-) patients and ligands of NK receptors were over-expressed in CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB/LC relative to IC. Co-culture of sorted CD56(dim) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB showed enhanced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis, which was reduced by perforin inhibitor, concanamycin A, suggesting a possible perforin-dependent NK cell-mediated CD4(+) T-cell depletion. Moreover, greater incidence of perforin-expressing NK cells and decline in CD4(+) T cells were noticed intrahepatically in e(-)CHB than IC. Collectively, NK cells contribute to the progression of e(-)CHI by enhanced TRAIL- and perforin-dependent cytolytic activity and by restraining anti-viral immunity through reduced interferon-γ secretion and

  20. Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs belong to a rare group of cancers. Most patients have developed metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, for which there is currently no cure. The delay in diagnosis is a major issue in the clinical management of the patients and new markers are urgently needed. We have previously identified paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2 as a novel SI-NET tissue biomarker. Therefore, we evaluated whether Ma2 autoantibodies detection in the blood stream is useful for the clinical diagnosis and recurrence of SI-NETs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A novel indirect ELISA was set up to detect Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples of patients with SI-NET at different stages of disease. The analysis was extended to include typical and atypical lung carcinoids (TLC and ALC, to evaluate whether Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood stream become a general biomarker for NETs. In total, 124 blood samples of SI-NET patients at different stages of disease were included in the study. The novel Ma2 autoantibody ELISA showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with ROC curve analysis underlying an area between 0.734 and 0.816. Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood from SI-NET patients were verified by western blot and sequential immunoprecipitation. Serum antibodies of patients stain Ma2 in the tumor tissue and neurons. We observed that SI-NET patients expressing Ma2 autoantibody levels below the cutoff had a longer progression and recurrence-free survival compared to those with higher titer. We also detected higher levels of Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples from TLC and ALC patients than from healthy controls, as previously shown in small cell lung carcinoma samples. CONCLUSION: Here we show that high Ma2 autoantibody titer in the blood of SI-NET patients is a sensitive and specific biomarker, superior to chromogranin A (CgA for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of these tumors.

  1. Preparation of bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 targeted microbubbles and ultrasound molecular imaging for tumor vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prepare the bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2)-targeted micro-bubbles (BST2-TMBs) for detecting the vascular endothelial cells of tumor via ultrasound molecular imaging technology. Methods: The targeted microbubbles (BST2-TMBs) were obtained through linking anti-BST2 antibodies to the surface of microbubbles via biotin-avidin bridge. The morphology of TMBs was examined under microscope and size distribution was observed using an optical particle counter. The specific binding of TMBs to endothelial cells was detected by in vitro cell adhesion assay. Murine prostatic carcinoma was used to investigate the capability of TMBs in detecting the vascular endothelial cells and for validating the expression of BST2 proteins. The t test was used by SPSS 19.0 to analyze the data. Results: The targeted microbubbles had the mean diameter of 1.61 μm, with 95% microbubbles between 1 to 5 μm. The in vitro cell adhesion assay demonstrated that the TMBs were able to specifically bind to the surface of endothelial cells, with (165 ±25) TMBs per field of view,significantly higher than that of the non-targeted microbubbles ((10 ± 3) microbubbles per field of view, t=10.662, P<0.01). The enhancement of ultrasonic signals of these cells bound with TMBs was also observed (TMBs: 27.93 ± 5.14 (gray-level), non-targeted microbubbles: 3.61 ± 1.67 (gray-level) ; t=7.239, P<0.01). Significant enhancement of signal intensity (gray-level: 38.79 ±0.29 at 7 min, remaining 47.65% of that (81.40 ±0.37) at 30 s) was found in the tumors of mice injected with BST2-TMBs, which was 4.27-fold higher than that (gray-level: 9.46 ±0.17 at 7 min, remaining 11.39% of that (83.01 ± 0.60) at 30 s) of mice injected with non-targeted microbubbles (t=65.587, P<0.01). This finding was further confirmed through immunohistochemistry assay. Conclusion: BST2-TMBs can be used for detecting the vascular endothelial cells of tumors via ultrasound molecular imaging. (authors)

  2. Transfection of B7-1 cDNA empowers antigen presentation of blood malignant cells for activation of anti-tumor T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    克晓燕; 贾丽萍; 王晶; 王德炳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To define roles of B7-1 co-stimulation factor expressed in human malignant cell lines in mediating anti-tumor T cell immune responses. Methods Examining human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and B7 expressions on 8 human blood malignancies cell lines by flow cytometry. Transfecting B7-1 gene to B7-1 negative (B7*!-) Raji and B7*!- Jurkat cell lines by liposome, and comparing the potencies of blood malignant cell lines in the induction of T cell activation by examination of T cell cytokine mRNAs before and after transfection using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results High level of HLA Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules were expressed in most human blood malignant cell lines examined, and the co-stimulatory factor B7-2 was also highly expressed. In contrast, another member of B7 family: B7-1 was either not expressed or very limitedly expressed in most of these hematopoietic malignant cell lines. Most importantly, transfection of B7-1 gene to B7*!-. Raji and B7*!-. Jurkat cell lines made these cell lines better antigen presenting cells for stimulation of anti-tumor T cell activation, which was demonstrated by up regulation of expression of T cell cytokines IL-2, IL-4 and INF-γ mRNAs after incubation of these tumor cells with T cells for 24 h. Conclusions B7 co-stimulation plays an important role in anti-tumor immunity. Transfection of B7-1 gene to the human hematopoietic malignant cell lines that are deficient in the B7-1 expression empowers their antigen presentation potency for activation of anti-tumor T cells. Our results suggested that repairing the deficiency of B7-1 co-stimulatory pathway in tumor cells might be a novel immunotherapeutic approach for human hematopoietic malignancies.

  3. Tumor immunolocalization using {sup 124}I-iodine-labeled JAA-F11 antibody to Thomsen-Friedenreich alpha-linked antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Richa [Department of Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University at Buffalo, StateUniversity of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Heimburg, Jamie [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University at Buffalo, StateUniversity of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Yan, Jun; Koury, Stephen [Department of Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University at Buffalo, StateUniversity of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Sajjad, Munawwar; Abdel-Nabi, Hani H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University at Buffalo, StateUniversity of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate [Department of Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University at Buffalo, StateUniversity of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University at Buffalo, StateUniversity of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)], E-mail: krolson@buffalo.edu

    2008-03-15

    Clinical immunolocalization has been attempted by others with an anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag) mAb that bound both alpha- and beta-linked TF-Ag. In this report, {sup 124}I-labeled mAb JAA-F11 specific for alpha-linked TF-Ag showed higher tumor specificity in in vivo micro-positron emission tomography (micro-PET) of the mouse mammary adenocarcinoma line, 4T1, showing no preferential uptake by the kidney. Labeled product remained localized in the tumor for at least 20 days. Glycan array analysis showed structural specificity of the antibody.

  4. The Role of Antigenic Drive and Tumor-Infiltrating Accessory Cells in the Pathogenesis of Helicobacter-Induced Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Anne; O’Rourke, Jani; Chu, Pauline; Chu, Amanda; Michael F. Dixon; Bouley, Donna M.; Lee, Adrian; Falkow, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    Gastric B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type is closely linked to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Most clinical and histopathological features of the tumor can be reproduced by prolonged Helicobacter infection of BALB/c mice. In this study, we have addressed the role of antigenic stimulation in the pathogenesis of the lymphoma by experimental infection with Helicobacter felis, followed by antibiotic eradication therapy and subsequent re-infection. Antimicrobial the...

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of tumor antigens MAGE-A3/4 and NY-ESO-1 in renal oncocytoma and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirović, Alma; Džombeta, Tihana; Tomas, Davor; Spajić, Borislav; Pavić, Ivana; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Milošević, Milan; Cupić, Hrvoje; Krušlin, Božo

    2010-10-15

    The distinction between renal oncocytoma (RO) and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), especially the eosinophilic variant, can often be difficult. Our study has documented for the first time the expression of MAGE-A3/4 and NY-ESO-1 cancer testis antigens (CTAs) in these tumors. A total of 35 patients (17 ROs and 18 ChRCCs) were included in the study. Two antibodies were used for immunohistochemical staining: 57B recognizing multiple MAGE-A and D8.38 recognizing NY-ESO-1 CTAs. Fifteen (88.2%) samples of RO stained positively for both MAGE-A3/4 and NY-ESO-1 antigens. Regarding ChRCC, seven (38.9%) stained positively for MAGE-A3/4 and six (33.3%) for NY-ESO-1 antigens. Median MAGE-A3/4 expression was moderately positive in RO and negative in ChRCC. The difference in MAGE-A3/4 expression between two tumor groups was significant (P=0.0013). Median NY-ESO-1 expression was strongly positive in RO and negative in ChRCC. The difference in NY-ESO-1 expression between two tumor groups was also significant (P=0.0008). Our study has shown that RO had a significantly higher expression of both CTAs. However, additional research is needed to clarify their potential diagnostic implications.

  6. Valency and density matter: Deciphering impacts of immunogen structures on immune responses against a tumor associated carbohydrate antigen using synthetic glycopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qian; Yin, Zhaojun; Wu, Xuanjun; Haas, Karen M; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-09-01

    For successful carbohydrate based anti-cancer vaccines, it is critical that B cells are activated to secret antibodies targeting the tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Despite the availability of many TACA based constructs, systematic understanding of the effects of structural features on anti-glycan antibody responses is lacking. In this study, a series of defined synthetic glyco-polymers bearing a representative TACA, i.e., the Thomsen-nouveau (Tn) antigen, have been prepared to probe the induction of early B cell activation and antibody production via a T cell independent mechanism. Valency and density of the antigen in the polymers turned out to be critical. An average of greater than 6 Tn per chain was needed to induce antibody production. Glycopolymers with 40 antigens per chain and backbone molecular weight of 450 kDa gave the strongest stimulation to B cells in vitro, which correlated well with its in vivo activity. Deviations from the desired valency and density led to decreased antibody production or even antigen specific B cell non-responsiveness. These findings provide important insights on how to modulate anti-TACA immune responses facilitating the development of TACA based anti-cancer vaccines using glycopolymers. PMID:27294537

  7. Silencing B7-H1 enhances the anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer antigen-loaded dendritic cell vaccine in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Wang,1 Yonghua Wang,1 Jing Liu,2 Shixiu Shao,1 Xianjun Li,1 Jiannan Gao,1 Haitao Niu,1 Xinsheng Wang1 1Department of Urology, 2Department of Pediatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to examine whether short hairpin RNA (shRNA expressing lentiviral particles targeting B7-H1 infection could result in B7-H1 knockdown on dendritic cells (DCs and to investigate whether B7-H1 silencing could augment the immune function of DCs and further elicit a more potent anti-tumor immune effect against bladder cancer cells in vitro. Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, were infected by a recombinant lentivirus containing shRNA sequence aimed at B7-H1. After that, the infected DCs were pulsed by tumor antigens and used to stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocytes-based anti-tumor effect in vitro. Results: The lentivirus-mediated shRNA delivery method efficiently and effectively silenced B7-H1 in DCs. Furthermore, the B7-H1 silencing enhanced the stimulatory capacity and the secretion of interleukin-12, but down-regulated interleukin-10 secretion. And more importantly, the anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer antigen-loaded DC vaccine in vitro was also potentially augmented. Conclusion: This study suggests that a combination of B7-H1 knockdown and target antigen delivery could augment anti-tumor effects in vitro, which potentially provides a novel strategy in the immunotherapy of bladder cancer. Keywords: B7-H1, bladder cancer, dendritic cell, vaccine, immunotherapy

  8. Effect of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific 10-Kilodalton Antigen on Macrophage Release of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovic, Vladimir; Singh, Gyanesh; Singh, Balwan; Singh, Sarman; Sharma, Pawan

    2002-01-01

    Secreted proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are major targets of the specific immunity in tuberculosis and constitute promising candidates for the development of more efficient vaccines and diagnostic tests. We show here that M. tuberculosis-specific antigen 10 (MTSA-10, originally designated CFP-10) can bind to the surface of mouse J774 macrophage-like cells and stimulate the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). MTSA-10 also synergized with gamma interferon (IFN-γ) for the induction of the microbicidal free radical nitric oxide (NO) in J774 cells, as well as in bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages. On the other hand, pretreatment of J774 cells with MTSA-10 markedly reduced NO but not TNF-α or interleukin 10 (IL-10) release upon subsequent stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or the cell lysate of M. tuberculosis. The presence of IFN-γ during stimulation with M. tuberculosis lysate antagonized the desensitizing effect of MTSA-10 pretreatment on macrophage NO production. The activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and the serine/threonine kinases p38 MAPK and ERK was apparently required for MTSA-10 induction of TNF-α and NO release, as revealed by specific kinase inhibitors. However, only p38 MAPK activity, not PTK or ERK activity, was partly responsible for MTSA-10-mediated macrophage desensitization. The modulation of macrophage function by MTSA-10 suggests a novel mechanism for its involvement in immunopathogenesis of tuberculosis and might have implications for the prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of this disease. PMID:12438325

  9. Functions of tumor-testis antigen and its application for tumor immunotherapy%肿瘤-睾丸抗原的功能与肿瘤免疫治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林丽燕

    2010-01-01

    肿瘤-睾丸抗原(CTA)是一类肿瘤相关性抗原,在多种肿瘤组织中表达,仅在少数正常组织表达.CTA功能众多,至今仍未完全明了,该抗原具有致免疫原性,在体内可产生细胞和体液免疫应答,为肿瘤免疫治疗提供了新的途径.%Cancer-testis antigen (CTA) is a kind of tumor-associated antigen, which expresses in various types of human tumor tissues but only express in a few of normal tissues. The CTA has numerous functions that not yet are fully understood. The CTA possesses immunogenicity that may induce cellular and humoral responses in vivo, which can provide a new approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Formation of the tetraploid intermediate is associated with the development of cells with more than four centrioles in the elastase-simian virus 40 tumor antigen transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The development of pancreatic cancer in transgenic mice expressing the simian virus 40 tumor antigen placed under controlling regions of the elastase I gene is characterized by the sequential appearance of tetraploid and then multiple aneuploid cell populations. Pancreatic tissues from such transgenic mice were studied between 8 and 32 days of age. Virtually 100% of acinar cell nuclei had immunohistochemically detectable tumor antigen by 18 days. Tetraploid cells were demonstrated by DNA cont...

  11. Active treatment of murine tumors with a highly attenuated vaccinia virus expressing the tumor associated antigen 5T4 (TroVax) is CD4+ T cell dependent and antibody mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Richard; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Redchenko, Irina; Kingsman, Susan M; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-09-01

    5T4 is a tumor associated antigen that is expressed on the surface of a wide spectrum of human adenocarcinomas. The highly attenuated virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to express human 5T4 (h5T4). In a pre-clinical murine model, the recombinant virus (TroVax) induces protection against challenge with CT26-h5T4 (a syngeneic tumor line expressing h5T4). Anti-tumor activity is long lived, with protection still evident 6 months after the final vaccination. In a therapeutic setting, injection of mice with TroVax results in a reduction in tumor burden of >90%. Depletion of CD8+ T cells has no effect upon therapy in the active treatment model, whereas depletion of CD4+ T cells completely abrogates anti-tumor activity. In a prophylactic setting, depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after the induction of a h5T4 immune response has no deleterious effect on protection following challenge with CT26-h5T4. In light of these studies, the role of antibodies in protection against tumor challenge was investigated. 5T4 specific polyclonal serum decreased tumor burden by approximately 70%. Thus, we conclude that CD4+ T cells are essential for the induction of a protective immune response and that antibodies are the likely effector moiety in this xenogeneic murine tumor model. PMID:16311730

  12. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  13. MAGE-C2-Specific TCRs Combined with Epigenetic Drug-Enhanced Antigenicity Yield Robust and Tumor-Selective T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Andre; van Brakel, Mandy; van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; da Silva, Marvin; Coulie, Pierre G; Lamers, Cor; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2016-09-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has shown significant clinical success for patients with advanced melanoma and other tumors. Further development of T cell therapy requires improved strategies to select effective, yet nonself-reactive, TCRs. In this study, we isolated 10 TCR sequences against four MAGE-C2 (MC2) epitopes from melanoma patients who showed clinical responses following vaccination that were accompanied by significant frequencies of anti-MC2 CD8 T cells in blood and tumor without apparent side effects. We introduced these TCRs into T cells, pretreated tumor cells of different histological origins with the epigenetic drugs azacytidine and valproate, and tested tumor and self-reactivities of these TCRs. Pretreatment of tumor cells upregulated MC2 gene expression and enhanced recognition by T cells. In contrast, a panel of normal cell types did not express MC2 mRNA, and similar pretreatment did not result in recognition by MC2-directed T cells. Interestingly, the expression levels of MC2, but not those of CD80, CD86, or programmed death-ligand 1 or 2, correlated with T cell responsiveness. One of the tested TCRs consistently recognized pretreated MC2(+) cell lines from melanoma, head and neck, bladder, and triple-negative breast cancers but showed no response to MHC-eluted peptides or peptides highly similar to MC2. We conclude that targeting MC2 Ag, combined with epigenetic drug-enhanced antigenicity, allows for significant and tumor-selective T cell responses. PMID:27489285

  14. MicroRNA-regulated non-viral vectors with improved tumor specificity in an orthotopic rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronald, J A; Katzenberg, R; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen;

    2013-01-01

    In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), tumor specificity of gene therapy is of utmost importance to preserve liver function. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful negative regulators of gene expression and many are downregulated in human HCC. We identified seven miRNAs that are also downregulated in tumors...

  15. A kinetic analysis of the tumor-associated galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy--D-galactopyranoside antigen-lectin interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bandaru Narasimha Murthy; Narayanaswamy Jayaraman

    2008-01-01

    A kinetic study of the tumor-associated galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy--Dgalactopyranoside (T-antigen) with lectin peanut agglutinin is described. The disaccharide antigen was synthesized by chemical methods and was functionalized suitably for immobilization onto a carboxymethylated sensor chip. The ligand immobilized surface was allowed interaction with the lectin peanut agglutinin, which acted as the analyte and the interaction was studied by the surface plasmon resonance method. The ligand-lectin interaction was characterized by the kinetic on-off rates and a bivalent analyte binding model was found to describe the observed kinetic constants. It was identified that the antigen-lectin interaction had a faster association rate constant (a1) and a slower dissociation rate constant (d1) in the initial binding step. The subsequent binding step showed much reduced kinetic rates. The antigen-lectin interaction was compared with the kinetic rates of the interaction of a galactopyranosyl-(1→ 4)--D-galactopyranoside derivative and a mannopyranoside derivative with the lectin.

  16. Myeloid leukemias and virally induced lymphomas in miniature inbred swine; development of a large animal tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAIMON eDURAN-STRUUCK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the MGH miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in MHC characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  17. Young T Cells Age During a Redirected Anti-Tumor Attack: Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Provided Dual Costimulation is Half the Battle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Andreas A; Abken, Hinrich

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells showed spectacular efficacy in the treatment of leukemia in recent early phase trials. Patient's T cells were ex vivo genetically engineered with a CAR, amplified and re-administered to the patient. While T cells mediating the primary response were predominantly of young effector and central memory phenotype, repetitive antigen engagement irreversible triggers T cell maturation leaving late memory cells with the KLRG1(+) CD57(+) CD7(-) CCR7(-) phenotype in the long-term. These cells preferentially accumulate in the periphery, are hypo-responsive upon TCR engagement and prone to activation-induced cell death. A recent report indicates that those T cells can be rescued by CAR provided CD28 and OX40 (CD134) stimulation. We discuss the strategy with respect to prolong the anti-tumor response and to improve the over-all efficacy of adoptive cell therapy. PMID:23761793

  18. A High-avidity WT1-reactive T-Cell Receptor Mediates Recognition of Peptide and Processed Antigen but not Naturally Occurring WT1-positive Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaigirdar, Adnan; Rosenberg, Steven A; Parkhurst, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) is an attractive target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in many hematologic malignancies and solid tumors but has limited, low-level expression in normal adult tissues. Multiple HLA class I and class II restricted epitopes have been identified in WT1, and multiple investigators are pursuing the treatment of cancer patients with WT1-based vaccines and adoptively transferred WT1-reactive T cells. Here we isolated an HLA-A*0201-restricted WT1-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) by stimulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors with the peptide WT1:126-134 in vitro. This TCR mediated peptide recognition down to a concentration of ∼0.1 ng/mL when pulsed onto T2 cells as well as recognition of HLA-A*0201 target cells transfected with full-length WT1 cDNA. However, it did not mediate consistent recognition of many HLA-A*0201 tumor cell lines or freshly isolated leukemia cells that endogeneously expressed WT1. We dissected this pattern of recognition further and observed that WT1:126-134 was more efficiently processed by immunoproteasomes compared with standard proteasomes. However, pretreatment of WT1 tumor cell lines with interferon gamma did not appreciably enhance recognition by our TCR. In addition, we highly overexpressed WT1 in several leukemia cell lines by electroporation with full-length WT1 cDNA. Some of these lines were still not recognized by our TCR suggesting possible antigen processing defects in some leukemias. These results suggest WT1:126-134 may not be a suitable target for T-cell based tumor immunotherapies. PMID:26938944

  19. Vaccination with an adenoviral vector encoding the tumor antigen directly linked to invariant chain induces potent CD4(+) T-cell-independent CD8(+) T-cell-mediated tumor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Maria R; Holst, Peter J; Pircher, Hanspeter;

    2009-01-01

    of the vaccine antigen to invariant chain (Ii). To evaluate this strategy we used a mouse model, in which an immunodominant epitope (GP33) of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP) represents the tumor-associated neoantigen. Prophylactic vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with a replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 vector...... vaccination with adenovirus expressing GP alone (Ad-GP), or GP and Ii unlinked (Ad-GP+Ii). Ad-Ii-GP- induced tumor control depended on an improved generation of the tumor-associated neoantigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell response and was independent of CD4(+) T cells. IFN-gamma was shown to be a key player during...

  20. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma.

  1. Prevalence and Antigenic Differences Observed between Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotypes Isolated from Cattle in Australia and Feedlots in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are divided into two different species within the pestivirus genus, BVDV type 1 (BVDV1) and BVDV type 2 (BVDV2). Further phylogenetic analysis has revealed subgenotype groupings within the BVDV1 and BVDV2 species. Thus far twelve BVDV1 subgenotypes (BVDV1a throu...

  2. Therapeutic Strategies for Human IgM Antibodies Directed at Tumor-Associated Ganglioside Antigens: Discoveries Made During the Morton Era and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter C; Irie, Reiko F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated gangliosides have been investigated for their potential as antigenic targets for more than 35 years, culminating in the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of dinutuximab (Unituxin), an IgG antibody targeted against GD2, for the treatment of neuroblastoma in children. This review is focused on discoveries and development of therapeutic approaches involving human IgM antibodies directed against gangliosides, which occurred over the past 40 years at University of California-Los Angeles and the John Wayne Cancer Institute, where Dr. Donald Morton led the surgical oncology department until his death. PMID:27481004

  3. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  4. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  5. Identification of new tumor associated antigens and their usage for new therapeutic strategies based on the combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy for colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main general objective of this project was to characterize a new colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumor-associated antigen (TAA) and validate a new therapeutic strategy combining chemotherapy and tumor vaccination for the treatment of cancer patients. To this purpose a strategic interaction between Drs. Proietti/Maccali at the ISS and the group of Drs. Rosenberg/Robbins at the NIH was established. A stage of Dr. Maccalli at the NIH allowed to carry out the first steps for the identification and the initial characterization of the CRC TAA named COA-1. A laboratory meeting with Dr. Robbins has been planned on May 24-25 2006 at the ISS, during the International Meeting on Immunotherapy of Cancer: Challenges and Needs, for discussing results and perspectives of this research project

  6. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  7. Induction of antigen-presenting capacity in tumor cells upon infection with non-replicating recombinant vaccinia virus encoding murine MHC class II and costimulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, W R; Oertli, D; Meko, J B; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-01-15

    The possibility of inducing antigen-presenting capacity in cells normally lacking such capacity, currently represents a major goal in vaccine research. To address this issue we attempted to generate 'artificial' APC able to stimulate CD4+ T cell responses when tumor cells were infected with a single, recombinant, vaccinia virus (rVV) containing the two genes encoding murine MHC class II I-Ak and a third gene encoding the murine B7-1 (mB7-1) costimulatory molecule. To minimize the cytopathic effect and to improve safety, in view of possible in vivo applications, we made this rVV replication incompetent by Psoralen and long wave UV treatment. Tumor cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak alone, pulsed with hen egg white lysozyme peptide (HEL46-61), induced IL-2 secretion by an antigen-specific T hybridoma. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding mB7-1 provided costimulation for activating resting CD4+ T cells in the presence of ConA. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding I-Ak and mB7-1, and pulsed with chicken ovotransferrin peptide (conalbumin133-145), induced a significantly higher response in a specific Th2 cell clone (D10.G4.1) as compared to cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak molecules only. Thus, this replication incompetent rVV represents a safe, multiple gene, vector system able to confer in one single infection step effective APC capacity to non-professional APCs.

  8. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Vitiazeva

    Full Text Available Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer.In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn. The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes.The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC.Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas appear to be different from

  9. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  10. Análise antigênica e molecular de amostras citopáticas do vírus da diarréia viral bovina Antigenic and molecular analysis of cytopathic isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Luiz Tobias; Anselmo Odeon; Edwiges Maristela Pituco; Rudi Weiblen; Dino César Garcez; Eduardo Furtado Flores

    2000-01-01

    Sete amostras citopáticas do vírus da Diarréia Viral Bovina (BVDV) isoladas de casos clínicos e do sangue de bezerros de rebanhos com problemas reprodutivos foram analisadas. Todas as amostras caracterizadas possuíam uma mistura de vírus citopáticos (cp) e não-citopáticos (ncp), que foram clonados biologicamente, originando populações puras de vírus de cada biotipo. Os clones cp e ncp obtidos foram caracterizados antigenicamente com um painel de anticorpos monoclonais (MAbs) e quanto à expres...

  11. Cooperation of c-raf-1 and c-myc protooncogenes in the neoplastic transformation of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overexpression of c-raf-1 and the myc family of protooncogenes is primarily associated with small cell carcinoma, which accounts for ∼ 25% of human lung cancer. To determine the functional significance of the c-raf-1 and/or c-myc gene expression in lung carcinogenesis and to delineate the relationship between protooncogene expression and tumor phenotype, the authors introduced both protooncogenes, alone or in combination, into human bronchial epithelial cells. Two retroviral recombinants, pZip-raf and pZip-myc, containing the complete coding sequences of the human c-raf-1 and murine c-myc genes, respectively, were constructed and transfected into simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B); this was followed by selection for G418 resistance. Cell lines established from tumors (designated RMT) revealed the presence of the cotransfected c-raf-1 and c-myc sequences and expressed morphological, chromosomal, and isoenzyme markers, which identified BEAS-2B cells as the progenitor line of the tumors. The data demonstrate that the concomitant expression of the c-raf and c-myc protooncogenes causes neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells resulting in large cell carcinomas with certain neuroendocrine markers. The presented model system should be useful in studies of molecular events involved in multistage lung carcinogenesis

  12. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM3m), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM3m, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2–31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM3m occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level (≤400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM3m (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p 3m, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  13. Reactivity of a monoclonal antibody with tissues and tumors from the human breast. Immunohistochemical localization of a new antigen and clinicopathologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani-Costantini, R; Barbanti, P; Colnaghi, M I; Ménard, S; Clemente, C; Rilke, F

    1984-04-01

    The reactions of a monoclonal antibody to the MCF7 breast cancer cell line were immunohistochemically studied on a variety of breast tumors, primary and metastatic, on mammary epithelium and on nonneoplastic breast lesions. A high proportion of positive reactions was observed in ductal, lobular, and tubular carcinomas as well as in mammary Paget's disease. Mucinous, medullary, and papillary carcinomas showed a low incidence of reactivity. Carcinomas with metaplasia, carcinoids, and nonepithelial breast tumors were unreactive with the antibody. Positive immunostaining was documented also in nodal and extranodal metastatic lesions. The staining of nodal metastases was correlated with the positive reaction of the primary tumor. Reactivity was widely distributed in normal breast epithelial cells and in benign breast lesions. Staining of nonneoplastic mammary epithelial was associated with reactivity of adjacent neoplastic tissues. Staining differences between nonneoplastic and neoplastic mammary tissues were related to the intensity and cytologic distribution of the labeling. Heterogeneous reactivity of morphologically similar cells was documented in nonneoplastic and neoplastic breast epithelial cells as well as in nodal and extranodal breast carcinoma metastases. Immunohistologically detectable antigen was not correlated with prognostic factors such as histologic grade or nodal status. A retrospective study of T1NO cases failed to substantiate any prognostic value for the reactivity of primary breast tumors with this monoclonal antibody.

  14. Combining Viral Vectored and Protein-in-adjuvant Vaccines Against the Blood-stage Malaria Antigen AMA1: Report on a Phase 1a Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne H. Hodgson; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Thomas W Rampling; Biswas, Sumi; Ian D Poulton; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D.; Alanine, Daniel GW; Illingworth, Joseph J.; de Cassan, Simone C.; ZHU, DAMING; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines—chimpanzee adenovir...

  15. Off-the-shelf adenoviral-mediated immunotherapy via bicistronic expression of tumor antigen and iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnade, Jan Ole; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Narayanan, Priya; Levitt, Jonathan M; McCormick, Alison A; Spencer, David M

    2012-07-01

    Recent modest successes in ex vivo dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy have motivated continued innovation in the area of DC manipulation and activation. Although ex vivo vaccine approaches continue to be proving grounds for new DC manipulation techniques, the intrinsic limits of ex vivo therapy, including high cost, minimal standardization, cumbersome delivery, and poor accessibility, incentivizes the development of vaccines compatible with in vivo DC targeting. We describe here a method to co-deliver both tumor-specific antigen (TSA) and an iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant (iMC), to DCs that combines toll-like receptor (TLR) and CD40 signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that simple TSA delivery via adenoviral vectors results in strong antitumor immunity. Addition of iMC delivered in a separate vector is insufficient to enhance this effect. However, when delivered simultaneously with TSA in a single bicistronic vector (BV), iMC is able to significantly enhance antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses and inhibit established tumor growth. This study demonstrates the spatial-temporal importance of concurrent DC activation and TSA presentation. Further, it demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular enhancement of DCs necessary for effective antitumor immune responses.

  16. Comparison of Vaccine-Induced Effector CD8 T Cell Responses Directed against Self- and Non-Self-Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara R; Sørensen, Maria R; Buus, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that CD8 T cells play a major role in tumor control, yet vaccination aimed at eliciting potent CD8 T cell responses are rarely efficient in clinical trials. To try and understand why this is so, we have generated potent adenoviral vectors encoding the endogenous tumor Ags...

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is induced in fibroblasts in polyomavirus middle T antigen-driven mammary carcinoma without influencing tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Boye S; Egeblad, Mikala; Rank, Fritz;

    2008-01-01

    intraepithelial neoplasias. To determine if MMP13 plays a role in tumor progression, we crossed MMTV-PyMT mice with Mmp13 deficient mice. The absence of MMP13 did not influence tumor growth, vascularization, progression to more advanced tumor stages, or metastasis to the lungs, and the absence of MMP13 was not......Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13 (collagenase 3) is an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme that is induced in myofibroblasts during the earliest invasive stages of human breast carcinoma, suggesting that it is involved in tumor progression. During progression of mammary carcinomas in the...... polyoma virus middle T oncogene mouse model (MMTV-PyMT), Mmp13 mRNA was strongly upregulated concurrently with the transition to invasive and metastatic carcinomas. As in human tumors, Mmp13 mRNA was found in myofibroblasts of invasive grade II and III carcinomas, but not in benign grade I and II mammary...

  18. Establishment of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice for the identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of tumor-associated antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Yatsuda

    Full Text Available Reports have shown that activation of tumor-specific CD4(+ helper T (Th cells is crucial for effective anti-tumor immunity and identification of Th-cell epitopes is critical for peptide vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. Although computer algorithms are available to predict peptides with high binding affinity to a specific HLA class II molecule, the ability of those peptides to induce Th-cell responses must be evaluated. We have established HLA-DR4 (HLA-DRA*01:01/HLA-DRB1*04:05 transgenic mice (Tgm, since this HLA-DR allele is most frequent (13.6% in Japanese population, to evaluate HLA-DR4-restricted Th-cell responses to tumor-associated antigen (TAA-derived peptides predicted to bind to HLA-DR4. To avoid weak binding between mouse CD4 and HLA-DR4, Tgm were designed to express chimeric HLA-DR4/I-E(d, where I-E(d α1 and β1 domains were replaced with those from HLA-DR4. Th cells isolated from Tgm immunized with adjuvant and HLA-DR4-binding cytomegalovirus-derived peptide proliferated when stimulated with peptide-pulsed HLA-DR4-transduced mouse L cells, indicating chimeric HLA-DR4/I-E(d has equivalent antigen presenting capacity to HLA-DR4. Immunization with CDCA155-78 peptide, a computer algorithm-predicted HLA-DR4-binding peptide derived from TAA CDCA1, successfully induced Th-cell responses in Tgm, while immunization of HLA-DR4-binding Wilms' tumor 1 antigen-derived peptide with identical amino acid sequence to mouse ortholog failed. This was overcome by using peptide-pulsed syngeneic bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC followed by immunization with peptide/CFA booster. BM-DC-based immunization of KIF20A494-517 peptide from another TAA KIF20A, with an almost identical HLA-binding core amino acid sequence to mouse ortholog, successfully induced Th-cell responses in Tgm. Notably, both CDCA155-78 and KIF20A494-517 peptides induced human Th-cell responses in PBMCs from HLA-DR4-positive donors. Finally, an HLA-DR4 binding DEPDC1191

  19. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the recombinantly expressed human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2704 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loll, Bernhard [Institut für Chemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Zawacka, Anna [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany); Biesiadka, Jacek [Institut für Chemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Petter, Cordula; Rückert, Christine [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany); Saenger, Wolfram [Institut für Chemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ziegler@charite.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Chemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Crystallization of HLA-B*2704 in complex with two peptides. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2704 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by three amino acids at heavy-chain residues 77 (Ser instead of Asp), 152 (Glu instead of Val) and 211 (Gly instead of Ala). In contrast to the ubiquitous HLA-B*2705 subtype, HLA-B*2704 occurs only in orientals. Both subtypes are strongly associated with spondyloarthropathies and the peptides presented by these subtypes are suspected to play a role in disease pathogenesis. HLA-B*2704 was crystallized in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitant. Both crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Data sets were collected to 1.60 Å (complex with the self-peptide pVIPR) or to 1.90 Å (complex with the viral peptide pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With HLA-B*2705 complexed with pVIPR as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for the complexes of HLA-B*2704 with both peptides.

  20. Comparison of serum, ear notches, and nasal and saliva swabs for Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection in colostrum-fed persistently infected (PI) calves and non-PI calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Sims, Sarah K; Cockcroft, Peter D; Reichel, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of neonatal and young calves persistently infected (PI) with Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) by antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACE) may be complicated by interference from colostrum-derived specific antibodies. Ten calves, with 3 calves identified as PI and 7 as non-PI were used in the current study. All non-PI calves were shown to be seropositive for BVDV-specific antibodies by antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ab-ELISA) on serum. Serum samples, ear notch samples, and nasal and saliva swabs were collected from each calf from birth until 12 weeks of age and tested by ELISA for BVDV-specific antigen and antibodies. Following colostrum ingestion, Ab-ELISA sample-to-positive (S/P) ratios rose by a mean of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.64-1.25) and 1.72 (95% CI = 1.55-1.89) in seropositive, non-PI calves and in PI calves, respectively. The mean S/P ratios then declined to approximately 1.1 in non-PI calves and 0.5 in PI calves at between 60 and 80 days of age. In PI calves, testing for antigen in serum and nasal and saliva swabs was subject to interference by colostrum-derived antibodies in calves up to 3 weeks of age. Nasal swabs were less affected than serum and saliva swabs. Ear notches maintained positive ACE corrected optical densities at all sample times, despite a drop in the signal following the ingestion of colostrum. PMID:25227419

  1. Prevalence of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus antibodies and antigen among the aborted cows in industrial dairy cattle herds in Mashhad area of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseri, Z.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of antibody responses of animals exposed to BVDV either through a natural exposure or an immunization protocol is still a standard procedure. For BVDV, the test formats have been largely limited to ELISA which is a valuable diagnostic test to measure the level of BVDV specific antibodies as well as antigen in blood samples. In the present study, 120 blood samples were collected from the cows with the history of abortion in different period of pregnancy from different industrial dairy cattle herds of Mashhad area of Iran. Also 30 samples were collected from the cows with no history of abortion as control. The presence of antibody against BVDV from the 120 serum samples was investigated by indirect ELISA. From 120 serum samples which were collected from aborted cows, 89 samples were positive (%74.16. From these positive samples, 12(13.48%, 54 (60.68% and 23 (25.84% samples belong to the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy, respectively. From 89 positive samples, 12 (13.48% samples were related to stillbirth and 8 (8.99% samples were belongs to the mummified fetus. From 89 positive samples, 71 (79.78% were related to cattle between 2-5 years old and 18 (20.22% were associated to cattle more than 5 years old. In control group, 20 samples (66.66% were antibody positive. Also the presence of BVDV antigen in serum samples was investigated by Ag-capture ELISA. From 120 serum samples, 2 samples were positive (1.67%, which belongs to the second period of pregnancy. In control group, none of the samples were antigen positive. The results of this study showed that the prevalence of BVDV infection is high among the aborted cows of Mashhad area. Although this prevalence is higher than the control group, the observed difference is not significant.

  2. Simian virus 40 T antigen can transcriptionally activate and mediate viral DNA replication in cells which lack the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Trifillis, P; Picardi, J; Alwine, J C

    1990-01-01

    Simian virus 40 T antigen is a multifunctional protein which has recently been shown to form a complex with the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (Rb protein) (J.A. DeCaprio, J.W. Ludlow, J. Figge, J.-Y. Shaw, C.-M. Huang, W.-H. Lee, E. Marsilio, E. Paucha, and D.M. Livingston, Cell 54:275-283, 1988; P. Whyte, K.J. Buchkovich, J.M. Horowitz, S.H. Friend, M. Raybuck, R.A. Weinberg, and E. Harlow, Nature (London) 334:124-129, 1988). This interaction may facilitate some of the functions...

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin 1β Up-Regulate Gastric Mucosal Fas Antigen Expression in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, JeanMarie; Macera-Bloch, Lisa S.; Harrison, Lawrence; Kim, Kyung H.; Korah, Reju M.

    2000-01-01

    Fas-mediated gastric mucosal apoptosis is gaining attention as a cause of tissue damage due to Helicobacter pylori infection. We explored the effects of H. pylori directly, and the effects of the inflammatory environment established subsequent to H. pylori infection, on Fas-mediated apoptosis in a nontransformed gastric mucosal cell line (RGM-1). Exposure to H. pylori-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), but not H. pylori itself, induced Fas antigen (Fas Ag) expression, indic...

  4. Combining viral vectored and protein-in-adjuvant vaccines against the blood-stage malaria antigen AMA1: report on a phase 1a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Choudhary, Prateek; Elias, Sean C; Milne, Kathryn H; Rampling, Thomas W; Biswas, Sumi; Poulton, Ian D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Douglas, Alexander D; Alanine, Daniel Gw; Illingworth, Joseph J; de Cassan, Simone C; Zhu, Daming; Nicosia, Alfredo; Long, Carole A; Moyle, Sarah; Berrie, Eleanor; Lawrie, Alison M; Wu, Yimin; Ellis, Ruth D; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective vaccines against difficult disease targets will require the identification of new subunit vaccination strategies that can induce and maintain effective immune responses in humans. Here we report on a phase 1a clinical trial using the AMA1 antigen from the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite delivered either as recombinant protein formulated with Alhydrogel adjuvant with and without CPG 7909, or using recombinant vectored vaccines--chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 and the orthopoxvirus MVA. A variety of promising "mixed-modality" regimens were tested. All volunteers were primed with ChAd63, and then subsequently boosted with MVA and/or protein-in-adjuvant using either an 8- or 16-week prime-boost interval. We report on the safety of these regimens, as well as the T cell, B cell, and serum antibody responses. Notably, IgG antibody responses primed by ChAd63 were comparably boosted by AMA1 protein vaccine, irrespective of whether CPG 7909 was included in the Alhydrogel adjuvant. The ability to improve the potency of a relatively weak aluminium-based adjuvant in humans, by previously priming with an adenoviral vaccine vector encoding the same antigen, thus offers a novel vaccination strategy for difficult or neglected disease targets when access to more potent adjuvants is not possible. PMID:25156127

  5. The Immunogenicity of the Tumor-Associated Antigen α-Fetoprotein Is Enhanced by a Fusion with a Transmembrane Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Tran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA vector to induce an immune response against a well-tolerated self-antigen. Methods. rMVA vectors expressing different form of α-fetoprotein (AFP were produced and characterized. Naïve mice were vaccinated with MVA vectors expressing the AFP antigen in either a secreted, or a membrane-bound, or an intracellular form. The immune response was monitored by an IFNΓ ELISpot assay and antibody detection. Results. Vaccination with the membrane-associated form of AFP induced a stronger CD8+ T-cell response compared to the ones obtained with the MVA encoding the secreted or the intracellular forms of AFP. Moreover, the vaccination with the membrane-bound AFP elicited the production of AFP-specific antibodies. Conclusions. The AFP transmembrane form is more immunogenic. Expressing a membrane-bound form in the context of an MVA vaccination could enhance the immunogenicity of a self-antigen.

  6. EC5S ubiquitin complex is recruited by KSHV latent antigen LANA for degradation of the VHL and p53 tumor suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Liang Cai

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular protein degradation pathways can be utilized by viruses to establish an environment that favors their propagation. Here we report that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA directly functions as a component of the EC5S ubiquitin complex targeting the tumor suppressors von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and p53 for degradation. We have characterized a suppressor of cytokine signaling box-like motif within LANA composed of an Elongin B and C box and a Cullin box, which is spatially located at its amino and carboxyl termini. This motif is necessary for LANA interaction with the Cul5-Elongin BC complex, to promote polyubiquitylation of cellular substrates VHL and p53 in vitro via its amino- and carboxyl-terminal binding domain, respectively. In transfected cells as well as KSHV-infected B lymphoma cells, LANA expression stimulates degradation of VHL and p53. Additionally, specific RNA interference-mediated LANA knockdown stabilized VHL and p53 in primary effusion lymphoma cells. Thus, manipulation of tumor suppressors by LANA potentially provides a favorable environment for progression of KSHV-infected tumor cells.

  7. [Viral superantigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    Superantigens (SAgs) are microbial proteins produced by various microorganisms that elicit excessive and strong stimulation of T cells via an unconventional mechanism. They cause polyclonal activation of T cells in a non-specific manner, by binding to a particular variable-beta (Vβ) chain of T-cell receptor (TCR) and MHC class II molecule, in unprocessed form and outside of peptide-binding cleft, forming a bridge between the antigen presenting cell and the T cell. SAgs are classified into three groups, namely 1) exogenous (soluble proteins and exotoxins secreted by microorganisms), 2) endogenous (transmembrane proteins encoded by viruses which are integrated into the genome) and 3) B-cell SAgs (proteins which stimulate predominantly B cells). The best characterized and mostly studied SAgs are staphylococcal and streptococcal exotoxins, however it is well-known that many other microorganisms also possess SAg activities. Despite the presence of several viruses that cause severe infections in humans, the number of viruses that have proteins identified with SAg property in their pathogenesis, is relatively low. To date, the defined viruses that encoded SAgs are as follows; mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) (Marrack, et al. 1991), rabies virus (Lafon, et al. 1992), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (Sutkowski, et al. 1996), human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) (Conrad, et al. 1997), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (Posnett, et al. 1995; Torres, et al. 1996; Townsley-Fuchs, et al. 1997) and Ebola virus (Leroy, et al. 2011). SAgs were first described in the MMTV, a polymorphic B-type retrovirus that is either contained in the genome as an endogenous provirus (germline transmission) or exogenous infectious virus that transmits vertically via breast milk. Both MMTV forms encode SAgs. The SAg-mediated massive T cell activation is required for the spread of exogenous MMTV from intestines to mammary glands, facilitating the transmission of infectious virus. On the other hand

  8. Análisis de técnicas de recuperación antigénica para la detección inmunohistoquímica del virus de la diarrea viral bovina Analysis of antigen retrieval techniques for the immunohistochemical detection of the Bovine Viral Diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Marini

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se evaluaron diferentes métodos de recuperación antigénica para permitir la inmunodetección del virus de la Diarrea Viral Bovina (vDVB en materiales fijados con formol. Se analizó el efecto de la aplicación de digestión proteolítica (ficina, tripsina, pepsina, proteinasa K y su combinación con tratamiento en un horno microondas empleando diferentes concentraciones y tiempos de incubación para el anticuerpo primario. El tratamiento más efectivo fue el realizado con proteinasa K, utilizando diluciones de 1:30 para los anticuerpos primarios, con incubación durante toda la noche a temperatura ambiente. Concluimos que la fijación formólica afecta la antigenicidad del vDVB pero estos efectos pueden ser revertidos por digestión proteolítica específica permitiendo la utilización de la inmunohistoquímica como técnica de rutina para el diagnóstico de la enfermedad.In the present work different methods of antigen retrieval were evaluated to allow the immunodetection of the Bovine Viral Diarrhea virus (BVDv in materials fixed with formol. The effect of the application of proteolytic digestion was analyzed (ficin, trypsin, pepsin, proteinase K and its combination with treatment in a microwave oven using different concentrations and times of incubation for the primary antibody. The most effective treatment was the one carried out with proteinase K, using 1:30 dilution for the primary antibodies, with overnight incubation at room temperature. We conclude that the formol fixation affects the antigenicity of the BVDv but these effects can be reverted by specific proteolytic digestion allowing the use of the immunohistochemical routine technique for the diagnosis of the disease.

  9. Long-term outcome of hepatitis B e antigen-positive patients with compensated cirrhosis treated with interferon alfa. European Concerted Action on Viral Hepatitis (EUROHEP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattovich, G; Giustina, G; Realdi, G;

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) treatment-associated virological and biochemical remission improves survival in a cohort of 90 white patients with compensated cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B (Child A) followed for a mean period of 7 years. Inclusion...... criteria were biopsy-proven cirrhosis, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity, abnormal serum aminotransferase levels, exclusion of hepatitis delta virus, and absence of complications of cirrhosis. Of the 40 IFN-treated patients, 27 (67%) showed sustained HBeAg loss with alanine aminotransferase (ALT...... = .028). During follow-up, liver-related death occurred in 8 treated patients, caused by liver failure in 5 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3; all 8 had continued to be HBeAg-positive with elevated ALT. None of the treated patients undergoing remission developed liver-related complications...

  10. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  11. Identification of prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor as a tumor antigen recognized by CD8(+ T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Matsueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among elderly men in the US, and immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising strategy to treat patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Efforts to identify novel prostate specific tumor antigens will facilitate the development of effective cancer vaccines against prostate cancer. Prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR is a novel antigen that has been shown to be specifically over-expressed in human prostate cancer tissues. In this study, we describe the identification of PSGR-derived peptide epitopes recognized by CD8(+ T cells in an HLA-A2 dependent manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-one PSGR-derived peptides were predicted by an immuno-informatics approach based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptides were examined for their ability to induce peptide-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from either HLA-A2(+ healthy donors or HLA-A2(+ prostate cancer patients. The recognition of HLA-A2 positive and PSGR expressing LNCaP cells was also tested. Among the 21 PSGR-derived peptides, three peptides, PSGR3, PSGR4 and PSGR14 frequently induced peptide-specific T cell responses in PBMCs from both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Importantly, these peptide-specific T cells recognized and killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells in an HLA class I-restricted manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted PSGR-derived peptides recognized by CD8(+ T cells, which, in turn, recognize HLA-A2(+ and PSGR(+ tumor cells. The PSGR-derived peptides identified may be used as diagnostic markers as well as immune targets for development of anticancer vaccines.

  12. ET-54 immunotherapy based on tumor transplant antigen recognition emerges as a promising strategy for recurrent glioblastoma multiform (GBM) patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pretto, C.; Devillers, L.; Pierre, D.; Hofman, F.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) prognosis remains very poor. This is especially true when the tumors relapse on the current standard of care treatments. Our preclinical data, generated in a rat CNS-1 glioma model in Lewis rats, provided the scientific rationale for a prototype clinical vaccine prepara

  13. Diagnóstico rápido de citomegalovirus (CMV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos mediante anticuerpos monoclonales que reconocen proteinas precoces virales Rapid diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompromised patients by using monoclonal antibodies against early viral antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Alvarez

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Se aplicó la técnica de detección de antigenos precoces fluorescentes (DAPF usando el anticuerpo monoclonal E-13 McAb, mediante el cual se lograron detectar 15 casos positivos a CMV de 75 muestras de orina o sangre ("buffy coat" tomadas de 52 pacientes inmunocomprometidos ingresados en el Instituto de Nefrología de ciudad Habana. Aplicando las técnicas clásicas de aislamiento en fibroblastos humanos diploides (MRC-5, se lograron aislar 12 cepas de CMV de casos previamente positivos por DAPF; lográndose además un aislamiento en una muestra reportada negativa por fluorescencia. Se observó una coincidencia de un 80% entre ambas técnicas. Se detectó la presencia de anticuerpos IgG contra CMV en todos los casos estudiados, utilizando para ello la técnica ELISA.A technique was applied to detect early fluorescent antigens (DEFA of cytomegalovirus (CMV using the E13 monoclonal antibodies in 52 immunocompromised patients hospitalized in the Nephrology Institute of Havana. Of the 75 urine or blood (buffy coat samples taken, 15 were found positive to CMV. Using classical diploide human fibroblast isolation technique, 12 CMV strains were isloation of previously detected positive samples by DEFA. In addition, CMV was isolated from one sample reported to be negative by DEFA. A coincidence of 80% was found between both techniques. With the ELISA test, all the sample studied have IgG antibodies to CMV.

  14. Polyanionic Drugs and Viral Oncogenesis: a Novel Approach to Control Infection, Tumor-associated Inflammation and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Chiodelli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyanionic macromolecules are extremely abundant both in the extracellular environment and inside the cell, where they are readily accessible to many proteins for interactions that play a variety of biological roles. Among polyanions, heparin, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs and glycosphingolipids (GSLs are widely distributed in biological fluids, at the cell membrane and inside the cell, where they are implicated in several physiological and/or pathological processes such as infectious diseases, angiogenesis and tumor growth. At a molecular level, these processes are mainly mediated by microbial proteins, cytokines and receptors that exert their functions by binding to HSPGs and/or GSLs, suggesting the possibility to use polyanionic antagonists as efficient drugs for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. Polysulfated (PS or polysulfonated (PSN compounds are a heterogeneous group of natural, semi-synthetic or synthetic molecules whose prototypes are heparin and suramin. Different structural features confer to PS/PSN compounds the capacity to bind and inhibit the biological activities of those same heparin-binding proteins implicated in infectious diseases and cancer. In this review we will discuss the state of the art and the possible future development of polyanionic drugs in the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer.

  15. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C viral infection and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an Egyptian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshied, Mervat Mamdooh; Gouda, Heba Mahmoud; Khorshid, Ola M Reda

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The present study aimed to investigate the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell NHL risk in Egypt. Genotyping of CTLA-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for 181 adult patients with B-NHL and 200 controls. Our study revealed that CTLA-4 + 49 A/G polymorphism conferred increased risk of B-NHL (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-2.565). The prevalence of HCV infection in individuals harboring the mutant genotype + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T SNPs was higher in patients with B-NHL and was associated with increased risk of B-NHL (OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.24-6.93 for + 49 A/G and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.01-15.98 for - 318 C/T). In conclusion, some SNPs of CTLA-4 are genetic risk factors for B-NHL. Moreover, this study identified an association of CTLA-4 + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T promoter polymorphisms with HCV infection.

  16. Quantitative RT-PCR assays for the determination of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 mRNA in primary tumor tissue of breast cancer patients: comparison to antigen quantification by ELISA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, J.C.; Holzscheiter, L.; Kotzsch, M.; Luther, T.; Kiechle-Bahat, M.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.; Schmitt, M.; Magdolen, V.

    2008-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) play a key role in tumor-associated processes such as the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins, tissue remodeling, cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. High antigen levels of uPA an

  17. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  18. Viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  19. Structural Analysis of a Viral Ovarian Tumor Domain Protease from the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Complex with Covalently Bonded Ubiquitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capodagli, Glenn C.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Baker, Erica A.; Masters, Emily M.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Pegan, Scott D. (Denver); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(-)] nairovirus that produces fever, prostration, and severe hemorrhages in humans. With fatality rates for CCHF ranging up to 70% based on several factors, CCHF is considered a dangerous emerging disease. Originally identified in the former Soviet Union and the Congo, CCHF has rapidly spread across large sections of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Recent reports have identified a viral homologue of the ovarian tumor protease superfamily (vOTU) within its L protein. This protease has subsequently been implicated in downregulation of the type I interferon immune response through cleavage of posttranslational modifying proteins ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like interferon-simulated gene 15 (ISG15). Additionally, homologues of vOTU have been suggested to perform similar roles in the positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [ssRNA(+)] arteriviruses. By utilizing X-ray crystallographic techniques, the structure of vOTU covalently bound to ubiquitin propylamine, a suicide substrate of the enzyme, was elucidated to 1.7 {angstrom}, revealing unique structural elements that define this new subclass of the OTU superfamily. In addition, kinetic studies were carried out with aminomethylcoumarin (AMC) conjugates of monomeric Ub, ISG15, and NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 8) substrates in order to provide quantitative insights into vOTU's preference for Ub and Ub-like substrates.

  20. Perspectives and limits of an immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) for herpes simplex virus (HSV) tumor-associated antigen (TAA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarro, G; D'Alessandro, G; Esposito, C; Flaminio, G; Mascolo, A; Maturo, S

    1981-01-01

    An ELISA has been developed to detect specific antibodies for HSV-TAA in sera of patients with head, neck and urogenital tract carcinomas (Cancer, 45:1980). Further studies have shown that 64/800 controls (8.12%), i.e. healthy people, are positive against 312/425 patients with herpes associated tumors (73.41%). People with herpes recurrens show 18% positivity, precancerous lesions 44% and other cancers 6%. Immunodepression, chemo- and radio-therapy play an inhibitory role on the ELISA positivity for TAA. Radical surgery of the HSV-TAA positive cancers results in lack of specific antibody whereas relapse or metastasis of the tumor yields positive results. The reproducibility of the test is very good and the standard error is low (1.0655). The conclusions allow us to foresee the use of this ELISA for early detection of the HSV-TAA antibodies in certain human carcinomas.

  1. Human prostate tumor antigen-specific CD8+ regulatory T cells are inhibited by CTLA-4 or IL-35 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian M; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Becker, Jordan T; Vignali, Dario A A; Burlingham, William J; McNeel, Douglas G

    2012-12-15

    Regulatory T cells play important roles in cancer development and progression by limiting the generation of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity. We hypothesized that in addition to natural CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor Ag-specific Tregs interfere with the detection of anti-tumor immunity after immunotherapy. Using samples from prostate cancer patients immunized with a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and a trans-vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity (tvDTH) assay, we found that the detection of PAP-specific effector responses after immunization was prevented by the activity of PAP-specific regulatory cells. These regulatory cells were CD8(+)CTLA-4(+), and their suppression was relieved by blockade of CTLA-4, but not IL-10 or TGF-β. Moreover, Ag-specific CD8(+) Tregs were detected prior to immunization in the absence of PAP-specific effector responses. These PAP-specific CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) suppressor T cells expressed IL-35, which was decreased after blockade of CTLA-4, and inhibition of either CTLA-4 or IL-35 reversed PAP-specific suppression of tvDTH response. PAP-specific CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) T cells also suppressed T cell proliferation in an IL-35-dependent, contact-independent fashion. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel population of CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) IL-35-secreting tumor Ag-specific Tregs arise spontaneously in some prostate cancer patients, persist during immunization, and can prevent the detection of Ag-specific effector responses by an IL-35-dependent mechanism.

  2. Combination of Circulating Tumor Cells with Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Enhances Clinical Prediction of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Xu Wang; Hua He; Ziling Liu; Ji-Fan Hu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and surveillance of lung cancer. However, CTC detection is not only costly, but its sensitivity is also low, thus limiting its usage and the collection of robust data regarding the significance of CTCs in lung cancer. We aimed to seek clinical variables that enhance the prediction of CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical samples and pathological data were c...

  3. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient’s HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  4. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-05-14

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM.

  5. Study of a new tumor marker, CYFRA 21-1, in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, and comparison with squamous cell carcinoma antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis value of a new tumor marker, CYFRA 21-1, was studied in the blood samples collected from 22 controls, and 87 pre-treatment patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Sensitivity and specificity of CYFRA 21-1 was was compared with those of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) measured in the sera of the same patients. Serum CYFRA 21-1 levels were higher in patients with squamous cell carcinoma than in controls (p < 0.05), and correlated with FIGO stage (Stage IIb-IV vs. Stage Ib-IIa, p = 0.0477). Using 2.5 ng/ml as cut-off value, elevated CYFRA 21-1 levels were found in 13.6% of controls, 34.8% of patients with Stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, and 63.5% of patients with Stage IIb-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. However, there was less sensitivity and specificity of CYFRA 21-1 than those of SCC in detecting squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. CYFRA 21-1 may not be a better tumor marker than SCC for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. (author)

  6. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM. PMID:27187383

  7. Antitumor activities of dFv-LDP-AE: An enediyne-energized fusion protein targeting tumor-associated antigen gelatinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Gen-Shen; Wu, Min-Na; Guo, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Miao, Qing-Fang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2012-10-01

    Gelatinases play an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, and overexpression of these molecules is strongly correlated with poor prognosis in a variety of malignant tumors. Lidamycin is an enediyne antitumor antibiotic with potent cytotoxicity. We previously reported that a tandem scFv format (dFv-LDP-AE) showed enhanced binding ability with gelatinases compared with the scFv-lidamycin conjugate (Fv-LDP-AE). In this study, the antitumor activities of dFv-LDP-AE on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. By SDS-PAGE analysis, it was found that partial fusion protein dFv-LDP existed as dimer; the results of ELISA and immunofluorescence demonstrated that the fusion protein dFv-LDP could efficiently bind to hepatoma cells in vitro. The apparent arrest of cell cycle at G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis at nanomole levels indicated that the dFv-LDP-AE was very potent against HCC. In in vivo experiments, dFv-LDP-AE shown enhanced cytotoxic effects compared to those of LDM. Administration at mouse tolerable dosage level, the inhibition rate of tumor growth was 89.5% of dFv-LDP-AE vs. 73.6% of LDM on transplantable H22 in mice (Penediyne-energized fusion protein dFv-LDP-AE showed potential application as a new agent for therapeutic appications in HCC. PMID:22797730

  8. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation.

  9. X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2706 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawacka, Anna [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany); Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ziegler@charite.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*2706 in complex with two peptides is reported. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles HLA-B*2704 and HLA-B*2706 show an ethnically restricted distribution and are differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis, with HLA-B*2706 lacking association with this autoimmune disease. However, the products of the two alleles differ by only two amino acids, at heavy-chain residues 114 (His in HLA-B*2704; Asp in HLA-B*2706) and 116 (Asp in HLA-B*2704; Tyr in HLA-B*2706). Both residues could be involved in contacting amino acids of a bound peptide, suggesting that peptides presented by these subtypes play a role in disease pathogenesis. Two HLA-B*2706–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as precipitant. Data sets were collected to resolutions of 2.70 Å (viral peptide pLMP2, RRRWRRLTV; space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}) and 1.83 Å (self-peptide pVIPR, RRKWRRWHL; space group P2{sub 1}). Using HLA-B*2705 complexed with the pGR peptide (RRRWHRWRL) as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for both HLA-B*2706 complexes.

  10. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  11. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    BLÁHOVÁ, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  12. A novel HLA-B18 restricted CD8+ T cell epitope is efficiently cross-presented by dendritic cells from soluble tumor antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rona Y Zhao

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 has been a major target of many immunotherapy trials because it is expressed by various cancers and is highly immunogenic. In this study, we have identified a novel HLA-B*1801-restricted CD8(+ T cell epitope, NY-ESO-1(88-96 (LEFYLAMPF and compared its direct- and cross-presentation to that of the reported NY-ESO-1(157-165 epitope restricted to HLA-A*0201. Although both epitopes were readily cross-presented by DCs exposed to various forms of full-length NY-ESO-1 antigen, remarkably NY-ESO-1(88-96 is much more efficiently cross-presented from the soluble form, than NY-ESO-1(157-165. On the other hand, NY-ESO-1(157-165 is efficiently presented by NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells and its presentation was not enhanced by IFN-γ treatment, which induced immunoproteasome as demonstrated by Western blots and functionally a decreased presentation of Melan A(26-35; whereas NY-ESO-1(88-96 was very inefficiently presented by the same tumor cell lines, except for one that expressed high level of immunoproteasome. It was only presented when the tumor cells were first IFN-γ treated, followed by infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding NY-ESO-1, which dramatically increased NY-ESO-1 expression. These data indicate that the presentation of NY-ESO-1(88-96 is immunoproteasome dependent. Furthermore, a survey was conducted on multiple samples collected from HLA-B18(+ melanoma patients. Surprisingly, all the detectable responses to NY-ESO-1(88-96 from patients, including those who received NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX™ vaccine were induced spontaneously. Taken together, these results imply that some epitopes can be inefficiently presented by tumor cells although the corresponding CD8(+ T cell responses are efficiently primed in vivo by DCs cross-presenting these epitopes. The potential implications for cancer vaccine strategies are further discussed.

  13. Humanized Affinity-matured Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Has Potent Antitumor Activity and Binds to FG Loop of Tumor Antigen B7-H3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Goldgur, Yehuda; Cheal, Sarah M; Guo, Hong-fen; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-kong V

    2015-12-11

    B7-H3 (CD276) is both an inhibitory ligand for natural killer cells and T cells and a tumor antigen that is widely expressed among human solid tumors. Anti-B7-H3 mouse monoclonal antibody 8H9 has been successfully used for radioimmunotherapy for patients with B7-H3(+) tumors. We present the humanization, affinity maturation, and epitope mapping of 8H9 based on structure determination, modeling, and yeast display methods. The crystal structure of ch8H9 Fab fragment was solved to 2.5-Å resolution and used as a template for humanization. By displaying the humanized 8H9 single chain Fv (scFv) on the surface of yeast, the affinity was matured by sequential random mutagenesis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Six mutations (three in the complementarity-determining region and three in the framework regions) were identified and incorporated into an affinity-matured humanized 8H9 construct (hu8H9-6m) and an affinity-matured chimeric 8H9 construct (ch8H9-6m). The hu8H9-6m scFv had a 160-fold improvement in affinity (0.9 nm KD) compared with parental hu8H9 scFv (144 nm KD). The IgG formats of ch8H9-6m and hu8H9-6m (nanomolar to subnanomolar KD) had 2-9-fold enhancements in affinity compared with their parental forms, potent in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (0.1-0.3 μg/ml EC50), and high tumor uptake in mouse xenografts. Based on in silico docking studies and experimental validation, the molecular epitope of 8H9 was determined to be dependent on the FG loop of B7-H3, a region critical to its function in immunologic blockade and unique among anti-B7-H3 antibodies published to date. PMID:26487718

  14. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Katzelnick (Leah); J.M. Fonville (Judith); G.D. Gromowski (Gregory D.); J.B. Arriaga (Jose Bustos); A. Green (Angela); S.L. James (Sarah ); L. Lau (Louis); M. Montoya (Magelda); C. Wang (Chunling); L.A. Van Blargan (Laura A.); C.A. Russell (Colin); H.M. Thu (Hlaing Myat); T.C. Pierson (Theodore C.); P. Buchy (Philippe); J.G. Aaskov (John G.); J.L. Muñoz-Jordán (Jorge L.); N. Vasilakis (Nikos); R.V. Gibbons (Robert V.); R.B. Tesh (Robert B.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Durbin (Anna); C.P. Simmons (Cameron P.); E.C. Holmes (Edward C.); E. Harris (Eva); S.S. Whitehead (Stephen S.); D.R. Smith (Derek Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution.We scharacterized antigenic diversity

  15. TCRs Used in Cancer Gene Therapy Cross-React with MART-1/Melan-A Tumor Antigens via Distinct Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Hossain, Moushumi; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2013-09-18

    T cells engineered to express TCRs specific for tumor Ags can drive cancer regression. The first TCRs used in cancer gene therapy, DMF4 and DMF5, recognize two structurally distinct peptide epitopes of the melanoma-associated MART-1/Melan-A protein, both presented by the class I MHC protein HLA-A*0201. To help understand the mechanisms of TCR cross-reactivity and provide a foundation for the further development of immunotherapy, we determined the crystallographic structures of DMF4 and DMF5 in complex with both of the MART-1/Melan-A epitopes. The two TCRs use different mechanisms to accommodate the two ligands. Although DMF4 binds the two with a different orientation, altering its position over the peptide/MHC, DMF5 binds them both identically. The simpler mode of cross-reactivity by DMF5 is associated with higher affinity toward both ligands, consistent with the superior functional avidity of DMF5. More generally, the observation of two diverging mechanisms of cross-reactivity with the same Ags and the finding that TCR-binding orientation can be determined by peptide alone extend our understanding of the mechanisms underlying TCR cross-reactivity.

  16. A phase I toxicity, pharmacology, and dosimetry trial of monoclonal antibody OKB7 in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Effects of tumor burden and antigen expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheinberg, D.A.; Straus, D.J.; Yeh, S.D.; Divgi, C.; Garin-Chesa, P.; Graham, M.; Pentlow, K.; Coit, D.; Oettgen, H.F.; Old, L.J. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Eighteen patients with relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were infused with escalating doses of monoclonal antibody (mAb) OKB7, trace-labeled with iodine-131 (131I), in order to study toxicity, pharmacology, antibody localization, and dosimetry of radioiodine. OKB7 is a noncytotoxic mouse immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) mAb reactive with B cells and most B-cell NHL. Three patients each were treated at six dose levels ranging from 0.1 mg to 40 mg. All patients had radionuclide imaging and counting daily, had serial blood sampling to study pharmacokinetics, human antimouse antibody (HAMA), and circulating antigen, and had a biopsy of accessible lymphoma to determine delivery of isotope to tumors and assess the effect of tumor antigen expression on mAb delivery. Bone marrow biopsies were also done in the majority of patients. There was no toxicity. Serum clearance showed a median early phase half-life of 1.9 hours and a later phase half-life of 21.7 hours. Median total body clearance half-life was 22 hours. Pharmacokinetics were not dose-related. Circulating blocking antigen was detected in the serum of four patients, but at levels that were of pharmacologic consequence only in one. Biopsied tumor tissue from five patients did not express OKB7 antigen. No significant uptake of antibody was seen in these tumor sites. Mean total uptake of isotope into lymphoma measured in biopsies correlated linearly over the 400-fold increase in injected mAb dose. However, the percent of injected dose found per gram of tumor was unrelated to dose, but correlated inversely with tumor burden. In two patients with minimal tumor burden, 1.0 mg and 5.0 mg doses of OKB7 resulted in tumor to body radioisotope dose ratios of 22 and 7, which would theoretically permit tolerable delivery of 4,400 and 1,400 rads to these tumors, respectively, if OKB7 were conjugated with higher doses of 131I.

  17. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pravin [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Merino, Elena; López de Castro, José A. [Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Saenger, Wolfram, E-mail: saenger@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara, E-mail: saenger@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  18. Amino-functionalized poly(L-lactide lamellar single crystals as a valuable substrate for delivery of HPV16-E7 tumor antigen in vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bonito P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paola Di Bonito,1 Linda Petrone,1 Gabriele Casini,2 Iolanda Francolini,2 Maria Grazia Ammendolia,3 Luisa Accardi,1 Antonella Piozzi,2 Lucio D’Ilario,2 Andrea Martinelli2 1Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-mediated Diseases, Italian National Institute of Health, 2Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Technology and Health, Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy Background: Poly(L-lactide (PLLA is a biodegradable polymer currently used in many biomedical applications, including the production of resorbable surgical devices, porous scaffolds for tissue engineering, nanoparticles and microparticles for the controlled release of drugs or antigens. The surfaces of lamellar PLLA single crystals (PLLAsc were provided with amino groups by reaction with a multifunctional amine and used to adsorb an Escherichia coli-produced human papillomavirus (HPV16-E7 protein to evaluate its possible use in antigen delivery for vaccine development.Methods: PLLA single crystals were made to react with tetraethylenepentamine to obtain amino-functionalized PLLA single crystals (APLLAsc. Pristine and amino-functionalized PLLAsc showed a two-dimensional microsized and one-dimensional nanosized lamellar morphology, with a lateral dimension of about 15–20 µm, a thickness of about 12 nm, and a surface specific area of about 130 m2/g. Both particles were characterized and loaded with HPV16-E7 before being administered to C57BL/6 mice for immunogenicity studies. The E7-specific humoral-mediated and cell-mediated immune response as well as tumor protective immunity were analyzed in mice challenged with TC-1 cancer cells.Results: Pristine and amino-functionalized PLLAsc adsorbed similar amounts of E7 protein, but in protein-release experiments E7-PLLAsc released a higher amount of protein than E7-APLLAsc. When the complexes were dried for observation by scanning electron microscopy, both samples showed a

  19. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  20. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and pdyes). Human pancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (pdyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  1. Faktor Risiko Non Viral Pada Karsinoma Nasofaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukri Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak           Latar belakang: Karsinoma nasofaring adalah tumor ganas epitel nasofaring yang sampai saat ini penyebabnya belum diketahui, infeksi virus Epstein Barr dilaporkan sebagai faktor dominan terjadinya karsinoma nasofaring tetapi faktor non viral juga berperan untuk timbulnya keganasan nasofaring. Tujuan: Untuk mengetahui faktor non viral  yang dapat meningkatkan kejadian karsinoma nasofaring sehingga dapat mencegah dan menghindari faktor-faktor non viral tersebut. Tinjauan Pustaka: Karsinoma nasofaring merupakan tumor ganas epitel nasofaring yang penyebabnya berhubungan dengan faktor viral dan non viral diantaranya asap rokok, ikan asin, formaldehid, genetik, asap kayu bakar , debu kayu, infeksi kronik telinga hidung tenggorok, alkohol dan obat tradisional. Kesimpulan: Pembuktian secara klinis dan ilmiah terhadap faktor non viral sebagai penyebab timbulnya karsinoma nasofaring masih belum dapat dijelaskan secara pasti. Faktor non viral merupakan salah satu faktor risiko yang dapat meningkatkan angka kejadian timbulnya keganasan nasofaring Kata kunci: karsinoma nasofaring, faktor risiko, non viral AbstractBackground: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a malignant epithelial nasopharyngeal tumor that until now the cause still unknown, Epstein barr virus infection had reported as predominant occurance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma but non viral factors may also contribute to the onset of the incidence of nasopharyngeal malignancy. Purpose: To find non viral factors that may increase the incidence of nasopharyngel carcinoma in order to prevent and avoid non-viral factors Literature: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a malignant tumor that causes nasopharyngeal epithelium associated with viral and non-viral factors such as cigarette smoke, salt fish, formaldehyde, genetic, wood smoke ,wood dust, ear nose throat chronic infections, alcohol, and traditional medicine. Conclusion: Clinically and scientifically proving the non-viral factors as

  2. Characterization of highly frequent epitope-specific CD45RA+/CCR7+/- T lymphocyte responses against p53-binding domains of the human polyomavirus BK large tumor antigen in HLA-A*0201+ BKV-seropositive donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajac Paul

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human polyomavirus BK (BKV has been implicated in oncogenic transformation. Its ability to replicate is determined by the binding of its large tumor antigen (LTag to products of tumor-suppressor genes regulating cell cycle, as specifically p53. We investigated CD8+ T immune responses to BKV LTag portions involved in p53 binding in HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals. Peptides selected from either p53-binding region (LTag351–450 and LTag533–626 by current algorithms and capacity to bind HLA-A*0201 molecule were used to stimulate CD8+ T responses, as assessed by IFN-γ gene expression ex vivo and detected by cytotoxicity assays following in vitro culture. We observed epitope-specific immune responses in all HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals tested. At least one epitope, LTag579–587; LLLIWFRPV, was naturally processed in non professional antigen presenting cells and induced cytotoxic responses with CTL precursor frequencies in the order of 1/20'000. Antigen specific CD8+ T cells were only detectable in the CD45RA+ subset, in both CCR7+ and CCR7- subpopulations. These data indicate that widespread cellular immune responses against epitopes within BKV LTag-p53 binding regions exist and question their roles in immunosurveillance against tumors possibly associated with BKV infection.

  3. Tumor Progression Locus 2 Promotes Induction of IFNλ, Interferon Stimulated Genes and Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protects against Influenza Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teneema Kuriakose

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP cascades are important in antiviral immunity through their regulation of interferon (IFN production as well as virus replication. Although the serine-threonine MAP kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2/MAP3K8 has been implicated as a key regulator of Type I (IFNα/β and Type II (IFNγ IFNs, remarkably little is known about how Tpl2 might contribute to host defense against viruses. Herein, we investigated the role of Tpl2 in antiviral immune responses against influenza virus. We demonstrate that Tpl2 is an integral component of multiple virus sensing pathways, differentially regulating the induction of IFNα/β and IFNλ in a cell-type specific manner. Although Tpl2 is important in the regulation of both IFNα/β and IFNλ, only IFNλ required Tpl2 for its induction during influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. Further studies revealed an unanticipated function for Tpl2 in transducing Type I IFN signals and promoting expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs. Importantly, Tpl2 signaling in nonhematopoietic cells is necessary to limit early virus replication. In addition to early innate alterations, impaired expansion of virus-specific CD8+ T cells accompanied delayed viral clearance in Tpl2-/- mice at late time points. Consistent with its critical role in facilitating both innate and adaptive antiviral responses, Tpl2 is required for restricting morbidity and mortality associated with influenza virus infection. Collectively, these findings establish an essential role for Tpl2 in antiviral host defense mechanisms.

  4. Effect of cell culture system on the production of human viral antigens Efeito do sistema de cultura celular na produção de antígenos virais humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Zucatelli Mendonça

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study was performed in the production of different viral antigens by using microcarrier systems and traditional systems. Vero, BHK and MA 104 cells were cultivated in microcarriers (2mg/ml using a bioreactor with a working capacity of 3.7 liters, in parallel with conventional Roux bottles. After four days (BHK cells, and seven days of culture (Vero and MA-104 cells, the cells were infected with 0.1 MOI (multiplicity of infection of rabies virus, measles virus, poliovirus and rotavirus. The yields of the cells and virus in microcarriers and in the conventional system were determined. It was observed that in the microcarrier system, an average increase of twenty-fold more cells/ml was obtained in relation to the conventional monolayer culture, using Roux bottle. On the other hand, cells grown in Roux bottles presented 1.3 to 6.7 more viruses/ml culture than those in the microcarrier systems. However, the overall data showed that yieldings, in terms of viruses per batch, were statistically similar for both systems (p > 0.05. The amount of viral antigen production seems to depend not only on cell concentration, but also on other culture factors such as the characteristic of the cell-growth surface. Thus, the present findings provide a baseline for further improvements and strategies to be established for a scaling-up virus production since depending on the type of virus the optimal conditions found for a small-scale virus production seem unsuitable for large-scale production, requiring new standardization and evaluation.Foi realizado estudo comparativo na produção de diferentes antígenos virais usando sistema de microcarregador e sistema tradicional. Células Vero, BHK e MA-104 foram cultivadas em microcarregadores (2mg/ml utilizando-se biorreatores com capacidade de 3,7 litros e, em paralelo, no sistema convencional com garrafas Roux. Após quatro dias de cultura para as células BHK e sete dias para as células Vero e MA-104, as c

  5. Analysis of Mmultiple Viral Antigens in Pediatric Patients Detection Result by Direct Immunofluorescence Method%直接免疫荧光法分析儿童呼吸道病毒的分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯辉; 刘永林; 陈益民

    2015-01-01

    [目的]采用直接免疫荧光法检测呼吸道病毒抗原,为儿童呼吸道病毒感染诊断提供帮助。[方法]选择398例呼吸道感染的住院患儿,采用直接免疫荧光法对咽部脱落细胞中的呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)、腺病毒(adenovirus,ADV)、流感病毒A型(the influenza virus type A, IFVA)、流感病毒B型(the influenza virus type B,IFVB)、副流感病毒1型(parainfluenza virus type 1,PIV1)、副流感病毒2型(parainfluenza virus type 2, PIV2)和副流感病毒3型(parainfluenza virus type 3,PIV3)7种常见病毒抗原进行检测,并进行统计学分析。[结果]在398例呼吸道感染患儿中,阳性91例,检出率为22.86%。其中最高为RSV 37例(40.66%),其次为PIV319例(20.88%)、IFVB 14例(15.38%)。急性扁桃体炎、毛细支气管炎、肺炎、急性支气管炎、上呼吸道感染的病毒阳性率分别是46.67%(14/30)、40.00%(20/50)、26.67%(40/150)、18.42%(7/38)、7.69%(10/130)。随着年龄的增长,呼吸道病毒的感染率逐步下降(P<0.05),≤1岁的病毒感染率最高,为26.52%。儿童呼吸道病毒感染以冬春两季好发。[结论]本地区儿童急性呼吸道感染的主要病毒是RSV,病毒感染随年龄增加而下降,治疗中应谨慎使用抗生素。%Purpose] To detect respiratory virus antigen by direct immunofluorescence method and provide evidence for early diagnosis of children with viral infection of the respiratory tract disease.[Methods] Select 398 cases of respiratory tract infection in hospitalized children, pharynx in exfoliated cells in respiratory syncytial virus by direct immunofluorescence(RSV), adenovirus(ADV), influenza virus type A(IFVA),influenza virus type B(IFVB), parainfluenza virus type 1(PIV1), parainfluenza virus type 2(PIV2) and parainflue-Nza virus type 3(PIV3) of 7 common viral antigens were detected, and carried on statistics analysis

  6. VIRAL MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    OLENTSOVA Y. A

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This project seeks to investigate how the company Gitz can create awareness towards their brand by using viral marketing. To do this we analyze which elements of viral marketing the company can use, to reach their goal. In order to utilize the selected tools of viral marketing best possible, we need to figure out the company’s customer segment and figure out how to reach that segment. This has been done with the use of Henrik Dahl’s Minerva-model that divides the population into f...

  7. Diversidade antigênica de amostras do vírus da diarréia viral bovina isoladas no Brasil: implicações para o diagnóstico e estratégias de imunização Antigenic diversity of Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV: implications for diagnosis and immunization strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Flores

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Seqüenciamento e análise filogenética de 17 amostras do vírus da diarréia viral bovina (BVDV isoladas no Brasil identificaram quatro amostras (23,5% do genótipo 1a (BVDV-1a, nove amostras (52,9% do genótipo 1b (BVDV tipo 1b e quatro amostras (23,5% do genótipo 2 (BVDV tipo 2. As amostras brasileiras de BVDV tipo 2 apresentaram-se genotipicamente distintas dos BVDV tipo 2 até então identificados na América do Norte e Europa, sugerindo pertencerem a um novo subgenótipo. A caracterização antigênica dessas amostras por neutralização cruzada revelou reatividade sorológica muito reduzida com cepas vacinais do BVDV. O anti-soro produzido contra três cepas vacinais do BVDV apresentou atividade neutralizante muito reduzida contra várias amostras brasileiras de BVDV tipos 1 e 2. Diferenças de até 128 vezes nos títulos de anticorpos neutralizantes foram observadas entre cepas vacinais e amostras brasileiras do BVDV. Nos testes de soroneutralização (SN contra o vírus dos tipos 1 e 2, de 1134 amostras testadas, 280 (24,7% possuiam anticorpos neutralizantes anti-BVDV e dessas, 215 (76,8% apresentaram atividade neutralizante contra ambos os vírus, 37 (13,2% reagiram apenas contra o BVDV tipo 2 e 28 amostras (10% foram positivas apenas contra o BVDV tipo 1. Esses resultados demonstram que testes de SN utilizando vírus de apenas um genótipo podem resultar em um número significativo de falsos-negativos e indica a necessidade da formulação de vacinas com amostras locais de BVDV e/ou contendo vírus dos dois genótipos.Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 17 Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV identified four isolates (23.5% belonging to genotype 1a (BVDV-1a, nine isolates (52.9% of the genotype 1b (BVDV-1b and four isolates (23.5% belonging to genotype 2 (BVDV-2. The Brazilian BVDV type 2 isolates were shown to be genotypically different from the BVDV type 2 identified so far in North America and

  8. Detection of PMTV Using Polyclonal Antibodies Raised Against a Capsid-Specific Peptide Antigen / Detección de PMTV Utilizando Anticuerpos Policlonales Contra un Péptido Antigénico Derivado de la Cápside Viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Gallo García

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Potato mop-top virus (PMTV; genus Pomovirus;family Virgaviridae is the causing agent of the spraing disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum. PMTV is transmitted by Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (Sss. This disease has a widespread distribution in potato growing regions around the world. The possibility of obtaining strain specific antibodies at low cost can greatly increase the sensitivity and use of serological tests in seed certification programs, plant breeding and quarantine regulations to avoid dissemination of this injurious virus. This work presents an alternative procedure for the production of PMTV specific antibodies useful in serological test such as ELISAand lateral flow. In contrast to standard methods requiring theisolation of viral particles or expression of recombinant capsid, this method uses peptides mimicking the N-terminal region of PMTV capsid protein as antigen for the production of specific polyclonal antibodies. The antibodies were tested against bait plants grown in soil infested with viruliferous Sss, as well as potato plants obtained from naturally Sss infested fields in Colombia. PMTV was detected in 9/14 and 24/28 foliage samples of N. benthamiana and S. phureja, respectively. In the case of field plants, the virus wasdetected in eight out of 12 root tissues evaluated. The minimumpeptide concentration detected by ELISA was of the order of 0.1 nM. / Potato mop-top virus (PMTV; género Pomovirus; familia Virgaviridae es transmitido por Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (Sss, agente causal de la sarna polvosa de la papa. Esta enfermedad tiene una amplia distribución en las regiones cultivadoras de papa alrededor del mundo. La posibilidad de obtener anticuerpos específicos contra cepas de este virus, puede incrementar la sensibilidad y la utilización de pruebas serológicas en programas de certificación de semilla, mejoramiento genético y regulaciones cuarentenarias que eviten su diseminaci

  9. Viral pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    More serious infections can result in respiratory failure, liver failure, and heart failure. Sometimes, bacterial infections occur during or just after viral pneumonia, which may lead to more serious forms ...

  10. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis viruses B and C can cause both acute and chronic infections. Chronic hepatitis B and C are serious health problems. They can lead to: Cirrhosis (suh-ROH-suhs) Liver failure Liver cancer Return to top How is viral ...

  11. Pharyngitis - viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001392.htm Pharyngitis - viral To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pharyngitis , or sore throat, is swelling, discomfort, pain, or ...

  12. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  13. Viral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Sorina Raula Gîrboveanu; Silvia Puiu

    2008-01-01

    With consumers showing increasing resistance to traditional forms of advertising such as TV or newspaper ads, marketers have turned to alternate strategies, including viral marketing. Viral marketing exploits existing social networks by encouraging customers to share product information with their friends.In our study we are able to directly observe the effectiveness of person to person word of mouth advertising for hundreds of thousands of products for the first time

  14. Papillomavirus-Associated Tumor Formation Critically Depends on c-Fos Expression Induced by Viral Protein E2 and Bromodomain Protein Brd4

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Delcuratolo; Jasmin Fertey; Markus Schneider; Johanna Schuetz; Natalie Leiprecht; Benjamin Hudjetz; Stephan Brodbeck; Silke Corall; Marcel Dreer; Roxana Michaela Schwab; Martin Grimm; Shwu-Yuan Wu; Frank Stubenrauch; Cheng-Ming Chiang; Thomas Iftner

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of how the papillomavirus E2 transcription factor can activate promoters through activator protein (AP)1 binding sites. Using an unbiased approach with an inducible cell line expressing the viral transcription factor E2 and transcriptome analysis, we found that E2 induces the expression of the two AP1 components c-Fos and FosB in a Brd4-dependent manner. In vitro RNA interference confirmed that c-Fos is one of the AP1 members driving the expression of viral oncog...

  15. Vaccination with a recombinant protein encoding the tumor-specific antigen NY-ESO-1 elicits an A2/157-165-specific CTL repertoire structurally distinct and of reduced tumor reactivity than that elicited by spontaneous immune responses to NY-ESO-1-expressing Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioley, Gilles; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel; Bhardwaj, Nina; Mears, Gregory; Old, Lloyd; Valmori, Danila; Ayyoub, Maha

    2009-01-01

    In a recent vaccination trial assessing the immunogenicity of an NY-ESO-1 (ESO) recombinant protein administered with Montanide and CpG, we have obtained evidence that this vaccine induces specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) in half of the patients. Most vaccine-induced CTLs were directed against epitopes located in the central part of the protein, between amino acids 81 and 110. This immunodominant region, however, is distinct from another ESO CTL region, 157-165, that is a frequent target of spontaneous CTL responses in A2+ patients bearing ESO tumors. In this study, we have investigated the CTL responses to ESO 157-165 in A2+ patients vaccinated with the recombinant protein. Our data indicate that after vaccination with the protein, CTL responses to ESO 157-165 are induced in some, but not all, A2+ patients. ESO 157-165-specific CTLs induced by vaccination with the ESO protein were functionally heterogeneous in terms of tumor recognition and often displayed decreased tumor reactivity as compared with ESO 157-165-specific CTLs isolated from patients with spontaneous immune responses to ESO. Remarkably, protein-induced CTLs used T-cell receptors similar to those previously isolated from patients vaccinated with synthetic ESO peptides (Vbeta4.1) and distinct from those used by highly tumor-reactive CTLs isolated from patients with spontaneous immune responses (Vbeta1.1, Vbeta8.1, and Vbeta13.1). Together, these results demonstrate that vaccination with the ESO protein elicits a repertoire of ESO 157-165-specific CTLs bearing T-cell receptors that are structurally distinct from those of CTLs found in spontaneous immune responses to the antigen and that are heterogeneous in terms of tumor reactivity, being often poorly tumor reactive.

  16. Enhanced cytotoxicity of natural killer cells following the acquisition of chimeric antigen receptors through trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Nan Cho

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have the capacity to target tumors and are ideal candidates for immunotherapy. Viral vectors have been used to genetically modify in vitro expanded NK cells to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, which confer cytotoxicity against tumors. However, use of viral transduction methods raises the safety concern of viral integration into the NK cell genome. In this study, we used trogocytosis as a non-viral method to modify NK cells for immunotherapy. A K562 cell line expressing high levels of anti-CD19 CARs was generated as a donor cell to transfer the anti-CD19 CARs onto NK cells via trogocytosis. Anti-CD19 CAR expression was observed in expanded NK cells after these cells were co-cultured for one hour with freeze/thaw-treated donor cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the localization of the anti-CD19 CARs on the NK cell surface. Acquisition of anti-CD19 CARs via trogocytosis enhanced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL cell lines and primary B-ALL cells derived from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report that describes the increased cytotoxicity of NK cells following the acquisition of CARs via trogocytosis. This novel strategy could be a potential valuable therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell tumors.

  17. Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen has growth-promoting and inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingwei; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Paulson, Kelly G; Nghiem, Paul; DeCaprio, James A

    2013-06-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive form of skin cancer. In at least 80% of all MCC, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) DNA has undergone clonal integration into the host cell genome, and most tumors express the MCPyV large and small T antigens. In all cases of MCC reported to date, the integrated MCPyV genome has undergone mutations in the large T antigen. These mutations result in expression of a truncated large T antigen that retains the Rb binding or LXCXE motif but deletes the DNA binding and helicase domains. However, the transforming functions of full-length and truncated MCPyV large T antigen are unknown. We compared the transforming activities of full-length, truncated, and alternatively spliced 57kT forms of MCPyV large T antigen. MCPyV large T antigen could bind to Rb but was unable to bind to p53. Furthermore, MCPyV-truncated large T antigen was more effective than full-length and 57kT large T antigen in promoting the growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, expression of the MCPyV large T antigen C-terminal 100 residues could inhibit the growth of several different cell types. These data imply that the deletion of the C terminus of MCPyV large T antigen found in MCC serves not only to disrupt viral replication but also results in the loss of a distinct growth-inhibitory function intrinsic to this region. PMID:23514892

  18. Papillomavirus-Associated Tumor Formation Critically Depends on c-Fos Expression Induced by Viral Protein E2 and Bromodomain Protein Brd4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Delcuratolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the mechanism of how the papillomavirus E2 transcription factor can activate promoters through activator protein (AP1 binding sites. Using an unbiased approach with an inducible cell line expressing the viral transcription factor E2 and transcriptome analysis, we found that E2 induces the expression of the two AP1 components c-Fos and FosB in a Brd4-dependent manner. In vitro RNA interference confirmed that c-Fos is one of the AP1 members driving the expression of viral oncogenes E6/E7. Mutation analysis and in vivo RNA interference identified an essential role for c-Fos/AP1 and also for the bromodomain protein Brd4 for papillomavirus-induced tumorigenesis. Lastly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 binds together with Brd4 to a canonical E2 binding site (E2BS in the promoter of c-Fos, thus activating c-Fos expression. Thus, we identified a novel way how E2 activates the viral oncogene promoter and show that E2 may act as a viral oncogene by direct activation of c-Fos involved in skin tumorigenesis.

  19. Papillomavirus-Associated Tumor Formation Critically Depends on c-Fos Expression Induced by Viral Protein E2 and Bromodomain Protein Brd4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcuratolo, Maria; Fertey, Jasmin; Schneider, Markus; Schuetz, Johanna; Leiprecht, Natalie; Hudjetz, Benjamin; Brodbeck, Stephan; Corall, Silke; Dreer, Marcel; Schwab, Roxana Michaela; Grimm, Martin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Stubenrauch, Frank; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Iftner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of how the papillomavirus E2 transcription factor can activate promoters through activator protein (AP)1 binding sites. Using an unbiased approach with an inducible cell line expressing the viral transcription factor E2 and transcriptome analysis, we found that E2 induces the expression of the two AP1 components c-Fos and FosB in a Brd4-dependent manner. In vitro RNA interference confirmed that c-Fos is one of the AP1 members driving the expression of viral oncogenes E6/E7. Mutation analysis and in vivo RNA interference identified an essential role for c-Fos/AP1 and also for the bromodomain protein Brd4 for papillomavirus-induced tumorigenesis. Lastly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 binds together with Brd4 to a canonical E2 binding site (E2BS) in the promoter of c-Fos, thus activating c-Fos expression. Thus, we identified a novel way how E2 activates the viral oncogene promoter and show that E2 may act as a viral oncogene by direct activation of c-Fos involved in skin tumorigenesis. PMID:26727473

  20. Viral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  1. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiological role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  2. Tumorigenic activity of merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Megan E; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T; Lambert, Paul F; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-03-15

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contains wild-type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads, and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiologic role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  3. Viral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Jelínková, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Diploma thesis is focused on Viral marketing, as a part of internet marketing communication i.e. iPromotion. It’s presented as a „niche” in the way of reaching the target group (audience) that rejects traditional forms of promotion. There’s an explanation of differences between various types of viral marketing as well as proposed possibilities of it’s applying into a practice including the rules of campaign execution. The primary data sources, necessary for the solution of investigated issue...

  4. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  5. Avaliação de três cepas de vírus rábico, antigenicamente distintas, em camundongos: II - Estudo da disseminação viral por diferentes órgãos Evaluation of three antigenically different rabies virus strains in mice: II -Study of the viral dissemination in different organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Manuel Leal Germano

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se, comparativamente, o grau de disseminação de três cepas de vírus rábico, duas de origem de cão, Jales e Nigéria, e uma de origem de morcego, DR 19, com perfis antigênicos do nucleocapside distintos. Estas cepas foram inoculadas por via intramuscular, na face interna da coxa, em dois grupos de camundongos, com 21 e 28 dias de idade. Os animais foram mantidos em observação por um período total de 30 dias, e dos animais vitimados pela infecção, foram coletados diferentes órgãos, músculo lingual, coração, pulmão, rim e fígado, além do cérebro e da medula espinal, para avaliar-se o grau de disseminação de cada cepa viral, através da prova de imunofluorescência direta (IFD. Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram que os decalques de cérebro e de medula espinal apresentaram total concordância na prova de IFD, constatando-se as maiores diferenças com as cepas Jales e Nigéria, situando-se a cepa DR 19, intermediariamente, a estas duas. O músculo lingual foi o órgão que apresentou maior freqüência de positividade para ambos os grupos etários e para as três cepas virais.A study was conducted to compare three strains of rabies virus, two of them, Jales and Nigeria, isolated from dogs, and the other DR 19, from vampire bats, with different nucleo-capside antigenic characteristics. These strains were intramuscularly inoculated in the inner side of the thigh of 21 and 28 day-old mice. The animals were observed for 30 days and different organs: brain, spinal cord, tongue, heart, lung, kidney and liver were collected from the animals which died of rabies for the dissemination study by the immunofluorescent antibody technique (IFA. This technique showed complete agreement between brain and spinal cord. The greatest differences in dissemination were observed between Jales and Nigeria strains. The results observed for the DR 19 strain were situated between those of the two dog strains. The greates degree of dissemination

  6. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two virus types have been clearly shown to have epidemiologic importance in viral gastroenteritis, i.e., rotavirus and Norwalk virus. Four other virus types have been associated with gastroenteritis but their epidemiologic importance is not yet known, i.e., enteric adenovirus, ca...

  7. Viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Bukh, Jens

    2013-01-01

    With millions of humans infected yearly with HCV, leading to cirrhosis and cancer, a vaccine is urgently needed. Cultured virus particles constitute the antigen in most antiviral vaccines. A study in mice demonstrated induction of neutralizing antibodies by immunization with cell-culture-derived ...

  8. Utilización del Método de Elisa en la detección directa de antígeno de virus diarrea viral bovina en muestras de suero sanguíneo de bovinos Use of an ELISA test in the direct diagnosis of viral antigens of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV in bovine blood serum samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. REINHARDT

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El virus de la Diarrea Viral Bovina (VDVB es un agente infeccioso importante del ganado bovino y está distribuido ampliamente en el mundo, produciendo pérdidas económicas sustanciales en la producción pecuaria. La principal fuente de contagio de los animales susceptibles está en las secreciones y excreciones de los animales infectados persistentes e inmunotolerantes (PI, condición que se produce en la etapa gestacional, específicamente antes de los 120 días de preñez, período en que el sistema inmune del embrión aún no se desarrolla adecuadamente. El propósito de este estudio fue aplicar la utilización de un método inmunoenzimático (ELISA-antígeno para detectar la presencia de animales PI en planteles lecheros de la Xª Región de Chile, a partir de muestras de suero sanguíneo. Para ello se examinaron 335 sueros de bovinos provenientes de 9 predios. Los resultados obtenidos indican que el 33.3% de los planteles analizados presentaron algún animal PI y que a nivel de prevalencia intrapredial, ella varió entre 0.7 y 1.0%. Se concluyó que el método utilizado permite detectar animales PI en forma rápida y sencilla, pudiendo utilizarse en gran cantidad de muestrasBVDV is an important virus of cattle worldwide that induces to substantial economic losses in dairy farms. The major source of infection are secretions and excretions of immunotolerant and persistent infected cattle. That condition is adquired during the early gestational period. The scope of this communication is to inform the use of an ELISA test to detect BVDV persistent infected bovine using blood serum samples in cattle of 9 dairy farms from the Xth. Region of Chile. The results indicated that 0.3% of the serum samples were positive to the ELISA test, and 33.3% of the dairy herds with persistently infected animals. It is concluded that this method diagnose persistently infected cattle, and is very easy to manipulate therefore, is possible to test many animals in

  9. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    OpenAIRE

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogeni...

  10. The inducible caspase-9 suicide gene system as a ‘safety switch’ to limit on-target, off-tumor toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa eGargett

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immune modulation has become a central element in many cancer treatments, and T cells genetically engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR may provide a new approach to cancer immunotherapy. Autologous CAR T cells that have been re-directed towards tumor-associated antigens (TAA have shown promising results in phase 1 clinical trials, with some patients undergoing complete tumor regression. However this T-cell therapy must carefully balance effective T-cell activation, to ensure antitumor activity, with the potential for uncontrolled activation that may produce immunopathology. An inducible Caspase 9 (iCasp9 ‘safety switch’ offers a solution that allows for the removal of inappropriately activated CAR T cells. The induction of iCasp9 depends on the administration of the small molecule dimerizer drug AP1903 and dimerization results in rapid induction of apoptosis in transduced cells, preferentially killing activated cells expressing high levels of transgene. The iCasp9 gene has been incorporated into vectors for use in preclinical studies and demonstrates effective and reliable suicide gene activity in phase 1 clinical trials. A third-generation CAR incorporating iCasp9 re-directs T cells towards the GD2 TAA. GD2 is over-expressed in melanoma and other malignancies of neural crest origin and the safety and activity of these GD2-iCAR T cells will be investigated in CARPETS and other actively recruiting phase 1 trials.

  11. The relationship between sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 expression and tumor size, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA expression and histological grading in rat breast carcinoma induced by dimethylbenz(anthracene (DMBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novrita Padauleng Dewajani Purnomosari, Sri Herwiyanti Harjadi, Irianiwati, Sitarina Widyarini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Controversy regarding the role of SIRT1 in pathology of cancers exists and is still under debate.SIRT1 could act as either a tumor supressor or tumor promotor. This study was conducted toevaluate the relationship between SIRT1 expression and tumor size, Proliferating Cell NuclearAntigen (PCNA expression and histological grading in rat breast carcinoma induced bydimethylbenz(áanthracene (DMBA. Thirty female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocatedinto three groups with 10 rats in each group. Group 1 as negative control was just fed thestandard food. Group 2 as vehicle control was fed the standard food and corn oil. Group 3 asinduction group was fed the standard food and induced with DMBA at dose of 20 mg/kg bodyweight (BW in corn oil twice a week for five weeks. All rats were palpated weekly to determinethe appearance, size and location of tumors. Sixteen weeks after DMBA induction rats weresacrified and histological preparations of the breast carcinoma tissue were then processed forSIRT1 and PCNA expression examination as well as histological grading. The result showed thatSIRT1 expression was significantly higher in breast carcinoma tissue compared to normal gland(26.12 vs 0.05; p = 0.004. SIRT1-positive was observed mostly in poor histological gradecarcinomas (56.2%, and it was not observed in good histological grade carcinomas. However,there was no significantly difference between SIRT1 and histological grading (p = 0.097; r =0.285. A significant correlation between SIRT1 expression and the tumor size (p =0.009; r=0.877, as well as PCNA expression (p =0.000; r =0.790 was observed. In conclusion, thereis relationship between SIRT1 expression and tumor size as well as PCNA expression in rat breastcarcinoma induced by DMBA.

  12. Reduced interleukin-4 receptor α expression on CD8+ T cells correlates with higher quality anti-viral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available With the hope of understanding how interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 modulated quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cells, we evaluated the expression of receptors for these cytokines following a range of viral infections (e.g. pox viruses and influenza virus. Results clearly indicated that unlike other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα was significantly down-regulated on anti-viral CD8(+ T cells in a cognate antigen dependent manner. The infection of gene knockout mice and wild-type (WT mice with vaccinia virus (VV or VV expressing IL-4 confirmed that IL-4, IL-13 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 were required to increase IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells, but not interferon (IFN-γ. STAT6 dependent elevation of IL-4Rα expression on CD8(+ T cells was a feature of poor quality anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity as measured by the production of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α in response to VV antigen stimulation in vitro. We propose that down-regulation of IL-4Rα, but not the other IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunits, is a mechanism by which CD8(+ T cells reduce responsiveness to IL-4 and IL-13. This can improve the quality of anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity. Our findings have important implications in understanding anti-viral CD8(+ T cell immunity and designing effective vaccines against chronic viral infections.

  13. Aqueous synthesized quantum dots interfere with the NF-κB pathway and confer anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhilin; Song, Bin; Xu, Lei; Zhong, Yiling; Peng, Fei; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Fang; Yang, Chengkui; Zhou, Jinying; Su, Yuanyuan; Chen, Suning; He, Yao; He, Sudan

    2016-11-01

    The NF-κB pathway plays crucial roles in inflammatory responses and cell survival. Aberrant constitutive NF-κB activation is associated with various human diseases including cancer and inflammatory and auto-immune diseases. Consequently, it is highly desirable to develop new kinds of inhibitors, which are highly efficacious for blocking the NF-κB pathway. In this study, by using a typical kind of aqueous synthesized quantum dots (QDs), i.e., CdTe QDs, as a model, we for the first time demonstrated that the QDs could selectively affect the cellular nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, but do not affect the AKT or ERK pathways. Typically, the QDs efficiently inhibited the activation of IKKα and IKKβ, resulting in the suppression of both the canonical and the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathways. Inhibition of NF-κB by QDs downregulates anti-apoptotic genes and promotes apoptosis in cancer cells. The QDs induced NF-κB inhibition and cytotoxicity could be blocked by N-acetylcysteine due to the reduced cellular uptake of QDs. Importantly, inhibition of NF-κB by QDs displayed promising effects against the viral replication and in vivo bacterial endotoxin-induced inflammatory responses. These data suggest the QDs as potent inhibitors of the NF-κB signaling pathway, both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings highlight the potential of using QDs in the development of anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-inflammatory approaches, and also facilitate better understanding of QDs-related cellular behavior under the molecular level. PMID:27639114

  14. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Alexander I; Wei, Jinxiong; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40). Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections. PMID:26379246

  15. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  16. In vivo targeting of antigens to maturing dendritic cells via the DEC-205 receptor improves T cell vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Bonnyay, David P; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M; Steinman, Ralph M

    2004-03-15

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic alpha-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the alphaDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models.

  17. In Vivo Targeting of Antigens to Maturing Dendritic Cells via the DEC-205 Receptor Improves T Cell Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura C.; Bonnyay, David P.; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I.; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K.; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic α-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the αDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models. PMID:15024047

  18. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma (PRAME and Wilms’ Tumor 1 (WT 1 Genes Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Prognostic Role and Correlation with Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engy El Khateeb

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: It is concluded that the expression of PRAME and WT1 genes are indicators of favorable prognosis and can be useful tools for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD in acute leukemia especially in patients without known genetic markers. Differential expression between acute leukemia patients and healthy volunteers suggests that the immunogenic antigens (PRAME and WT1 are potential candidates for immunotherapy in childhood acute leukemia.

  19. Novel Polyomavirus associated with Brain Tumors in Free-Ranging Raccoons, Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, Florante N.; Giannitti, Federico; Li, Linlin; Woods, Leslie W.; Del Valle, Luis; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of any type are exceedingly rare in raccoons. High-grade brain tumors, consistently located in the frontal lobes and olfactory tracts, were detected in 10 raccoons during March 2010–May 2012 in California and Oregon, suggesting an emerging, infectious origin. We have identified a candidate etiologic agent, dubbed raccoon polyomavirus, that was present in the tumor tissue of all affected animals but not in tissues from 20 unaffected animals. Southern blot hybridization and rolling circle amplification showed the episomal viral genome in the tumors. The multifunctional nuclear protein large T-antigen was detectable by immunohistochemical analyses in a subset of neoplastic cells. Raccoon polyomavirus may contribute to the development of malignant brain tumors of raccoons. PMID:23260029

  20. Hallazgo de antígenos en un tumor murino espontáneo no inmunogénico mediante el uso de una vacuna basada en células dendríticas Unveiling antigens in a non-immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor using a dendritic cell-based vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica L. Reffo

    2008-08-01

    absence of tumor antigens or to the existence of tolerogenic mechanisms preventing such antigens from initiating an antitumor immune response. We have used two murine tumors -a non-immunogenic spontaneous lymphoma (LB and a strongly immunogenic methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma (MC-C- together with a vaccination strategy based on the inoculation of dendritic cells (DC loaded with a tumor lysate. When DC were pulsed with LB lysate (DC+LB, no maturation of DC was achieved in vitro and no protection against LB implants after DC+LB inoculation was observed in vivo. On the other hand, when DC were pulsed with MC-C lysate (DC+MC-C, maturation of DC was observed along with a strong protection against MC-C implants after DC+MC-C inoculaton. Finally, when DC were pulsed with both LB and MC-C lysates (DC+LB+MC-C, maturation of DC and protection against LB implants were achieved. Since no immune cross reaction between MC-C and LB was ever observed, the most likely interpretation is that LB bears specific tumor antigens but lacks other signals to achieve DC maturation. These signals would be provided by MC-C which would enable DC to mature and to initiate an effective anti-LB immune response.

  1. High-throughput identification of antigen-specific TCRs by TCR gene capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnemann, Carsten; Heemskerk, Bianca; Kvistborg, Pia;

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) genes into patient T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of both viral infections and cancer. Although efficient methods exist to identify antibodies for the treatment of these diseases, comparable strategies to identify TCRs have been lacking. We...... have developed a high-throughput DNA-based strategy to identify TCR sequences by the capture and sequencing of genomic DNA fragments encoding the TCR genes. We establish the value of this approach by assembling a large library of cancer germline tumor antigen-reactive TCRs. Furthermore, by exploiting...... knowledge of antigen specificities, which may be the first step toward the development of autologous TCR gene therapy to target patient-specific neoantigens in human cancer....

  2. Dead cells in melanoma tumors provide abundant antigen for targeted delivery of ionizing radiation by a mAb to melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Shi, Li; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Frenkel, Annie; Nosanchuk, Jerome S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma is a cancer with a rising incidence, and metastatic disease is almost always lethal. We investigated the feasibility of targeting melanin, an intracellular melanocyte pigment, to deliver cytotoxic radiation to human melanoma cells in vivo by using a melanin-binding mAb (6D2). Nude mice bearing MNT1 pigmented human melanoma tumors were treated with mAb 6D2 labeled with 1.5 mCi (1 Ci = 37 GBq) of the β-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and manifested inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged ...

  3. Down-regulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen class I heavy chain in tumors is associated with a poor prognosis in advanced esophageal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kimitaka; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Masaki; Maki, Takehiro; ICHINOKAWA, MASAOMI; KUBOTA, KANAKO C.; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi; Ferrone, Soldano; DOSAKA-AKITA, HIROTOSHI; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Kondo, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) plays a crucial role in the anticancer immune response. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of APM components in esophageal cancer. A total of 11 esophageal cancer cell lines were evaluated by Western blot analysis for 13 HLA class I APM components. There was a different expression pattern among cancer cell lines for HLA class I heavy chain (HLA-HC), β2 microglobulin, Tapasin, TAP-1, TAP-2, LMP-7 and LMP-10. Immunohi...

  4. Down-regulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen class I heavy chain in tumors is associated with a poor prognosis in advanced esophageal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kimitaka; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Masaki; Maki, Takehiro; ICHINOKAWA, MASAOMI; KUBOTA, KANAKO C.; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi; Ferrone, Soldano; DOSAKA-AKITA, HIROTOSHI; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Kondo, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) plays a crucial role in the anticancer immune response. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of APM components in esophageal cancer. A total of 11 esophageal cancer cell lines were evaluated by Western blot analysis for 13 HLA class I APM components. There was a different expression pattern among cancer cell lines for HLA class I heavy chain (HLA-HC), β2 microglobulin, Tapasin, TAP-1, TAP-2, LMP-7 and LMP-10. Immunohi...

  5. Downregulation of CD99 and upregulation of human leukocyte antigen class II promote tumor aggravation and poor survival in patients with osteosarcomas

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Q; Xu J; Zhao J; Zhang S; Pan W

    2014-01-01

    Quan Zhou,* Jin Xu,* Jiali Zhao, Shaoxian Zhang, Wei PanDepartment of Orthopaedics, the second Hospital of Huai'an city Affiliated to Xuzhou Medical College and the second Hospital of Huai'an city, Huai'an, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: CD99 is involved in the intracellular transport of human leukocyte antigen class II (HLA-II) protein. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical value of CD99 and HL...

  6. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Radhika; Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Deniger, Drew; Huls, Helen; Torikai, Hiroki; Singh, Harjeet; Champlin, Richard E; Laskowski, Tamara; McNamara, George; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb), coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR's in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies.

  7. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Radhika; Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Deniger, Drew; Huls, Helen; Torikai, Hiroki; Singh, Harjeet; Champlin, Richard E; Laskowski, Tamara; McNamara, George; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb), coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR's in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies. PMID:27548616

  8. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Deniger, Drew; Huls, Helen; Torikai, Hiroki; Singh, Harjeet; Champlin, Richard E.; Laskowski, Tamara; McNamara, George; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb), coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR’s in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies. PMID:27548616

  9. Integrin Activation and Viral Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-dian GAO; Jun-zheng DU; Jian-hua ZHOU; Hui-yun CHANG; Qing-ge XIE

    2008-01-01

    Integrins are members of a ubiquitous membrane receptor family which includes 18 different α subunits and 8 β subunits forming more than 20 α/β heterodimers. Integrins play key functions in vascular endothelial cell and tumour cell adhesion, lymphocyte trafficking, tumor growth and viral infection. Current understanding of the molecular basis of integrins as viral receptors has been achieved through many decades of study into the biology of transmembrane glycoproteins and their interactions with several viruses. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the molecular bases of interactions between viruses and integrins, which are of potential practical significance. Inhibition of virus-integrin interactions at the points of virus attachment or entry will provide a novel approach for the therapeutic treatment of viral diseases.

  10. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with multiple tumor antigens for treatment of patients with malignant melanoma: results from a phase I/II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Berntsen, Annika; Hadrup, Sine Reker;

    2010-01-01

    vaccination with autologous monocyte-derived mature dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with p53, survivin and telomerase-derived peptides (HLA-A2+ patients) or with autologous/allogeneic tumor lysate (HLA-A2(-) patients) in combination with low-dose interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-alpha2b....

  11. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    /testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...

  12. Anti-tumor effect of CTLs activated by dendritic cells pulsed with K-ras mutant peptide and whole tumor antigen on pancreatic cancer%K-ras突变多肽与全细胞抗原致敏DCs诱导CTLs对胰腺癌的杀伤活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Tan; Zhongyu Wang; Xin Zhang; Zhengang Cai; Junkai Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Objective:We studied the role of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes(CTLs)activated by dendritic cells(DCs)presenting cationic nanoparticles with the K-ras(12-Val)mutant peptide and whole tumor antigen in the killing of different pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and in vitro.Methods:Peripheral blood DCs were induced by rhGM-CSF and IL-4 and cultured.DCs were sensitized by whole antigen of a pancreatic cancer cell line(PANC-1)with expression of K-ras mutant,K-ras mutant peptide(K-ras+peptide)and cationic nanoparticles with K-ras mutant peptide(K-ras+peptide-CNP),respectively.Cell surface markers were measured by flow cytometry.Lymphocyte proliferation was detected by the 3H-TdR test,and ELISA was performed to detect IFN-γ secretion.125I-UdR was used to measure the killing effect of CTLs.We also evaluated the antitumor activity of CTLs in vivo in a tumor-bearing nude mouse model prepared with the PANC-1(K-ras+)and SW1990(K-ras-)cell lines.Results:Compared with K-ras+peptide,low concentration K-ras+peptide-CNP can be effectively presented by DCs(P0.05)on SW1990 cell lines(P>0.05).Conclusion:Cationic nanoparticles with K-res(12-Val)mutant peptide can be effectively presented by DCs at a low concentration in a short time.CTLs induced by K-ras+peptide-CNP had specific killing activity for the pancreatic cancer cell line with the K-ras(12-Val)mutant and could significantly inhibit tumor growth and increase the survival time of tumor-bearing nude mice.

  13. Dependence of intracellular and exosomal microRNAs on viral E6/E7 oncogene expression in HPV-positive tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Honegger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs cause cervical cancer. Cervical cancers exhibit aberrant cellular microRNA (miRNA expression patterns. By genome-wide analyses, we investigate whether the intracellular and exosomal miRNA compositions of HPV-positive cancer cells are dependent on endogenous E6/E7 oncogene expression. Deep sequencing studies combined with qRT-PCR analyses show that E6/E7 silencing significantly affects ten of the 52 most abundant intracellular miRNAs in HPV18-positive HeLa cells, downregulating miR-17-5p, miR-186-5p, miR-378a-3p, miR-378f, miR-629-5p and miR-7-5p, and upregulating miR-143-3p, miR-23a-3p, miR-23b-3p and miR-27b-3p. The effects of E6/E7 silencing on miRNA levels are mainly not dependent on p53 and similarly observed in HPV16-positive SiHa cells. The E6/E7-regulated miRNAs are enriched for species involved in the control of cell proliferation, senescence and apoptosis, suggesting that they contribute to the growth of HPV-positive cancer cells. Consistently, we show that sustained E6/E7 expression is required to maintain the intracellular levels of members of the miR-17~92 cluster, which reduce expression of the anti-proliferative p21 gene in HPV-positive cancer cells. In exosomes secreted by HeLa cells, a distinct seven-miRNA-signature was identified among the most abundant miRNAs, with significant downregulation of let-7d-5p, miR-20a-5p, miR-378a-3p, miR-423-3p, miR-7-5p, miR-92a-3p and upregulation of miR-21-5p, upon E6/E7 silencing. Several of the E6/E7-dependent exosomal miRNAs have also been linked to the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. This study represents the first global analysis of intracellular and exosomal miRNAs and shows that viral oncogene expression affects the abundance of multiple miRNAs likely contributing to the E6/E7-dependent growth of HPV-positive cancer cells.

  14. Cul7/p185/p193 Binding to Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Has a Role in Cellular Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Syed Hamid; Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A.

    2004-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) is a viral oncoprotein that can promote cellular transformation. TAg's transforming activity results in part by binding and inactivating key tumor suppressors, including p53 and the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). We have identified a TAg-associated 185-kDa protein that has significant homology to the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. TAg binds to an SCF-like complex that contains p185/Cul7, Rbx1, and the F box protein Fbw6. This SCF-like complex binds...

  15. Targeting thapsigargin towards tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doan, Nhu Thi Quynh; Paulsen, Eleonora Sandholdt; Sehgal, Pankaj;

    2015-01-01

    substrates for either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) prodrugs were created, which selectively affect prostate cancer cells or neovascular tissue in tumors. One of the prodrug is currently tested in clinical phase II. The prodrug under clinical trial has been...

  16. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  17. The Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 Gene, SOX10, Is a Novel Tumor-associated Antigen Identified in a Patient with a Dramatic Response to Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Khong, Hung T.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we have identified, for the first time, the presence of de novo cellular immune reactivity against the transcription factor SOX10, using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from a patient who experienced a dramatic clinical response to immunotherapy. SOX10 acts as a critical transactivator of tyrosinase-related protein-2 during melanoblast development and a potent transactivator of micropthalmia-associated transcription factor, which is considered to be a master gene that c...

  18. Genetically modified natural killer cells specifically recognizing the tumor-associated antigens ErbB2/HER2 and EpCAM

    OpenAIRE

    Uherek B; Tonn T; Müller T.; Uherek C; Klingemann H-G; Wels WS

    2007-01-01

    The continuously growing natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 is highly cytotoxic against malignant cells of various origin without affecting normal human cells. Based on this selectivity, the potential of NK-92 cells for adoptive therapy is currently being investigated in phase I clinical studies. To further enhance the antitumoral activity of NK-92 cells and expand the range of tumor entities suitable for NK-92-based therapies, here by transduction with retroviral vectors we have generated g...

  19. The progression of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells in malignant tumor%嵌合抗原受体修饰T细胞在恶性肿瘤中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张少华; 毕经旺

    2014-01-01

    近年来在肿瘤免疫治疗领域,嵌合抗原受体(CAR)修饰T细胞在基础研究和临床试验中取得了巨大进展。CAR由特异性单克隆抗体的可变区和CD3ζ结构域组成。CAR修饰T细胞的胞外区直接识别肿瘤相关抗原(TAA)。T细胞和靶抗原结合后可直接介导细胞毒性,并释放一些细胞因子如穿孔素、颗粒酶、干扰素-γ(IFN-γ)和肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α),最终导致肿瘤细胞的坏死。尽管CAR-T细胞具有显著的抗肿瘤效应,一些基础研究和临床实验中观察到的安全性问题值得关注。%Recentyearshavewitnessedmuchprogressinbothbasicresearchandclinicaltrialsregar-ding cancer immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.CAR combine the varia-ble regions of a specific monoclonal antibody (scFv)with the CD3ζendodomain.The extracellular domain of CAR-engineered T cells directly dock to the tumor-associated antigen (TAA).When T cells bind to target anti-gens,they mediated redirected cytotoxicity and secrete a series of cytokines such as Perforin,Granzyme,Inter-feron-γ(IFN-γ)and Tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α),which would eventually lead to the necrosis of tumor cells.Although the antitumor response of the CAR-engineered T cells is considered as successful and surpri-sing,it should be noted that some safety issues have been observed in other several basic researches and clinical trials.This overview focuses upon the utility and safety of the CAR-engineered T cells.

  20. A competitive-inhibiton radioimmunoassay for influenza virus envelope antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-antibody competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay for influenza virus envelope antigens is described. A viral antigen preparation from influenza A virus recombinant MRC11 [antigenically identical to A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2)] consisting of haemagglutinin and neuraminidase was labelled with radioiodine. Rabbit antisera were allowed to react with the labelled antigen and the resultant antigen-antibody complexes were precipitated with the appropriate antiglobulin. The competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay very sensitively elucidated differences even among closely related influenza virus strains. Attempts have been made to eliminate neuraminidase from radioimmunoprecipitation to obtain a competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay system for haemagglutinin alone. (author)

  1. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and CD44 variant exon 6 in primary tumors and corresponding lymph node metastases of colorectal carcinoma with Dukes'stage C or D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Cheng Zhang; Zuo-Ren Wang; Yan-Juan Cheng; Ding-Zhong Yang; Jing-Sen Shi; Ai-Lin Liang; Ning-Na Liu; Xiao-Min Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study changes in characteristics of colorectal carcinoma during the metastatic process and to investigate the correlation between cell proliferation activity and metastatic ability of patients with Dukes′ stage C or D.METHODS: Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded materials of primary tumors and corresponding lymph node metastases resected from 56 patients with Dukes′ stage C or D of colorectal carcinoma were stained immunohistochemically with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD44variant exon 6 (CD44v6).RESULTS: Thirty-one of 56 patients (55.4 %) expressed PCNA in the primary sites and 36 of 56 patients (64.3 %)expressed PCNA in the metastatic lymph nodes. A significant relation in PCNA expression was observed between the primary site and the metastatic lymph node (0.010<P<0.025).Forty-one of 56 patients (73.2 %) expressed CD44v6 in the primary site and 39 of 56 patients (69.6 %) expressed CD44v6 in the metastatic lymph node. There was also an significant relationship of CD44v6 between the primary site and the metastatic lymph node (0.005<P<0.010). No difference was observed between expression of CD44v6 and PCNA in the primary site (0.250<P<0.500).CONCLUSION: This study partially demonstrates that tumor cells in metastatic lymph node of colorectal carcinoma still possess cell proliferation activity and metastatic ability of tumor cells in primary site. There may be no association between cell proliferation activity and metastatic ability in colorectal carcinoma.

  2. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  3. Localization of tumors by radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of utilizing radiolabelled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigens for determining the site of tumors which produce or are associated with carcinoembryonic antigen is disclosed. 3 claims, no drawings

  4. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  5. Enzyme immunoassay for direct detection of influenza type A and adenovirus antigens in clinical specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    Harmon, M W; Pawlik, K M

    1982-01-01

    Detection of viral antigens in specimens without prior cultivation in cell culture provides the most rapid method for specific viral diagnosis. A solid-phase, double-antibody enzyme immunoassay was developed for this purpose and tested with clinical specimens containing influenza type A and adenovirus. Polystyrene microtiter wells were the solid phase and were coated with virus-specific guinea pig immunoglobulins. Specimens were added, and bound viral antigens were detected by addition of vir...

  6. Rapid detection and quantification of tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) using a superparamagnetic immunochromatographic strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanrong; Wang, Kan; Liu, Zongrui; Sun, Rongjin; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and quantitative detection of biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity has become a common practice in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Herein, a quantitative lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) was developed for detection of carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) in human serum. This direct and rapid method did not involve any sample preparation and was accomplished using a test strip in which a sandwich reaction was performed. Probes on the conjugate pad were prepared by coupling monoclonal antibody CC49 specific to CA72-4 onto SPMNPs. Coupled monoclonal antibody B72.3 and goat anti-mouse IgG were loaded onto a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane, serving as the test and control lines, respectively. Initially, results were evaluated by macroscopic observation. Afterwards, the magnetic signal strength of the reaction area was quantified using a magnetic assay reader (MAR). Several parameters that may influence the detection sensitivity were studied and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method was capable of detecting as low as 0.38 IU/mL of CA72-4 in 20 min and had a wide detection linearity range (0-100 IU/mL). We evaluated 100 clinical samples (70 positive and 30 negative) to assess the validity of these test strips, which exhibited high sensitivity (99 %) and specificity (97 %). The results indicated a high rate of accuracy (98.4-102 %) and a low relative standard deviation according to the average recovery test. In conclusion, the test strips based on SPMNP probes are a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative method for the detection of CA72-4 and possess great potential in point-of-care testing (POCT). Graphical Abstract Schematic illustration of the strategy for CA72-4 detection and quantification using a superparamagnetic immunochromatographic strip. PMID:26825343

  7. Development of Antigen Capture ELISA of Detection Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus%牛病毒性腹泻病毒抗原捕获 ELISA 方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范晴; 谢芝勋; 谢志勤; 刘加波; 庞耀珊; 邓显文; 谢丽基; 罗思思

    2015-01-01

    A antigen capture enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) method was developed to detect antigen of bovine virus diarrhea(BVDV) using mouse monoclonal antibody against NS3 protein of bovine virus diarrhea as capture antibody and polyclonal antiserum (rabbit serum against BVDV ) as coating anti‐body .The optimum conditions were achieved :coating antibody was diluted for 1 :1600 ,the mouse mono‐clonal antibody was diluted for 1∶2 000 and the enzyme‐label antibody was diluted for 1 :2000 .BRV , IBRV and MB were detected by the Ag‐capture ELISA and the result showed that there was no crossing‐reaction with BVDV .The method has a minimum detection concentration is 7 .9 × 103 TCID50 .The result of positive detection by Ag‐capture ELISA were consistent with RT‐PCR .The result showed that the Ag‐capture ELISA was highly rapid ,specific and sensitive ,and it could be the basic for controlling BVDV .%用兔抗牛病毒性腹泻病毒(BVDV )多抗作为包被抗体,BVDV NS3单克隆抗体作为捕获抗体,建立了检测BVDV抗原的捕获ELISA 方法,对各项反应条件进行优化,最终获得最佳工作条件为兔多抗1∶1600稀释包被,NS3单抗1∶2000稀释,酶标抗体工作浓度为1∶4000稀释。特异性和敏感性试验结果表明,该方法对牛轮状病毒、牛传染性鼻气管炎病毒、牛结核杆菌无特异性交叉反应,其最低可检测7.9×103个TCID50的病毒量,与RT‐PCR方法的相比较,符合率为100%。所建立的BVDV抗原捕获ELISA 方法快速、特异、敏感可用于BVDV抗原的检测。

  8. 汉坦病毒感染BALB/c小鼠组织中特异性抗原及病毒RNA的检测%Detection of the specific antigens and viral RNA in the tissues of the BALB/c mice infected with hantavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永妮; 胡至察; 程林峰; 张芳琳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish an evaluation system about animals infected with hantavirus,an observation of the BALB/c mice infected with hantavirus was made.Methods BALB/c mice were infected with hantavirus by intramuscular injection with stock solution.The specific antigen from BALB/c mice tissues after 3 days was detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and viral RNA with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Within a short term,the specific antigen and viral RNA were detected from the brain and liver at day 3 after infection,but not be detected from the heart,spleen,lung,and kidney samples.Conclusions The results provided ones with some information on animals infected with hantavirus.%目的 检测汉坦病毒感染BALB/c小鼠组织中特异性抗原及病毒RNA,建立汉坦病毒感染动物的评价体系.方法 将1000LD50的汉坦病毒悬液经肌肉注射感染BALB/c小鼠,在感染后的第3天,分别取小鼠的心、肝、脾、肺、肾、脑等组织研磨后制成病毒悬液,以ELISA法和qRT-PCR法分别检测各组织中的汉坦病毒特异性抗原及病毒RNA.结果 BALB/c小鼠感染汉坦病毒后短期内在脑和肝组织中可以检测到大量汉坦病毒特异性抗原以及病毒RNA,而心、脾、肺、肾组织中未检测到特异性抗原及病毒RNA.结论 实验结果为建立汉坦病毒感染动物模型的评价体系提供了参考依据.

  9. Problems in diagnosing viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, F; Colloredo Mels, G; Bellati, G; Ideo, G; Oliveri, F; Colombatto, P; Brunetto, M R

    1993-01-01

    The most reliable method of making a specific aetiological diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis would be to identify virus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes responsible for the killing of virus infected hepatocytes in each patient's liver. Unfortunately, this can not be proposed for routine diagnosis and surrogate tests are required. The detection of virus markers, and even of the virus itself, does not imply that liver damage is caused by virus infection. Indirect markers of the host's antiviral immunoresponse have to be used to confirm more specifically the diagnosis of viral hepatitis. IgM antibodies against viral antigens implicated in the elimination of the virus seem to be suitable alternative candidates. Significant changes in the serum values of viraemia and aminotransferases occur within a few days, while a significant variation in liver histology takes much longer. Only the kinetics of the highly variable parameters can be used for an appropriate study of the relationship between viraemia, antiviral immunoresponse, and liver cell necrosis. Quantitative and dynamic analyses of hepatitis virus markers seem the most suitable and reliable methods of monitoring the patients eligible for antiviral treatment and identifying the most appropriate time to start this. PMID:8314490

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus antibody in cattle.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, H J; Masri, S A; Deregt, D; Yeo, S G; Thomas, E J

    1991-01-01

    A reliable bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) viral antigen was prepared from BVD virus grown on Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells by solubilizing the virus with detergent MEGA-10 (decanoyl-N-methylglucamide) followed by removal of hydrophobic proteins with Triton X-100 treatment. By these treatments, problems of high background associated with BVD viral antigen in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were eliminated. With this new antigen, an ELISA was adapted to detect bovine serum a...

  11. Comprehensive analysis of LANA interacting proteins essential for viral genome tethering and persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Verma

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus is tightly linked to multiple human malignancies including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL and Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD. KSHV like other herpesviruses establishes life-long latency in the infected host by persisting as chromatin and tethering to host chromatin through the virally encoded protein Latency Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA. LANA, a multifunctional protein, is capable of binding to a large number of cellular proteins responsible for transcriptional regulation of various cellular and viral pathways involved in blocking cell death and promoting cell proliferation. This leads to enhanced cell division and replication of the viral genome, which segregates faithfully in the dividing tumor cells. The mechanism of genome segregation is well known and the binding of LANA to nucleosomal proteins, throughout the cell cycle, suggests that these interactions play an important role in efficient segregation. Various biochemical methods have identified a large number of LANA binding proteins, including histone H2A/H2B, histone H1, MeCP2, DEK, CENP-F, NuMA, Bub1, HP-1, and Brd4. These nucleosomal proteins may have various functions in tethering of the viral genome during specific phases of the viral life cycle. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive analysis of their interaction with LANA using a number of different assays. We show that LANA binds to core nucleosomal histones and also associates with other host chromatin proteins including histone H1 and high mobility group proteins (HMGs. We used various biochemical assays including co-immunoprecipitation and in-vivo localization by split GFP and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET to demonstrate their association.

  12. A role for naturally occurring alleles of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidases in tumor immunity and cancer predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios eStratikos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic Reticulum aminopeptidase 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2 are key components on the pathway that generates antigenic epitopes for presentation to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs. Coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in these enzymes have been associated with predisposition to several major human diseases including inflammatory diseases with autoimmune aetiology, viral infections and virally induced cancer. The function of these enzymes has been demonstrated to affect cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL and natural killer (NK cell responses towards healthy and malignant cells as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated that SNPs in ERAP1 and ERAP2 can affect their ability to generate or destroy antigenic epitopes and define the immunopeptidome. In this review we examine the potential role of these enzymes and their polymorphic states on the generation of cytotoxic responses towards malignantly transformed cells. Given the current state-of-the-art, it is possible that polymorphic variation in these enzymes may contribute to the individual’s predisposition to cancer through altered generation or destruction of tumor antigens that can facilitate tumor immune evasion.

  13. New strategy of tumor immunotherapy based on chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells%基于嵌合抗原受体修饰T细胞的肿瘤免疫治疗新策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艺; 赵颖颖; 韩双印

    2013-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cell is a newly developed strategy of adoptive immunotherapy.Its unique theoretical superiority and attractive application prospects open up a promising arena for anticancer therapy.CAR combines single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody recognizing tumor-associated antigen with T cell activation motif,which endows T cells with tumor-orientated targeting ability,stronger killing activity,and prolonged survival by genetic modification.Since first proposed by Dr.Eshhar in 1989,CAR has been developed from the first generation to the second and the third generations containing costimulatory molecular.The clinical trials in leukemia,lymphoma,and melanoma have obtained exciting results.However,the off-target effect,cytokine strom,and graft-versus-host disease are potential challenges for clinical use.Future research will focus on designing safer CAR of the fourth generation,selecting good therapeutic T cell subsets,optimizing clinical scheme of administration,and improving pre-clinical models.It is believed that the obstacles from bench to clinic will be cleared and that CAR will become one of the main cancer therapies with breakthroughs in immunology,gene therapy and cell engineering.%嵌合抗原受体(chimeric antigen receptor,CAR)修饰T细胞是近年来迅速发展的肿瘤过继免疫治疗新手段,其独特的作用机制和诱人的应用前景为肿瘤生物治疗开辟了一个崭新的舞台.CAR将识别肿瘤相关抗原的单链抗体和T细胞的活化基序相结合,通过基因转导赋予T细胞肿瘤靶向性、更强的杀伤活性和持久的生命力.自1989年Eshhar等首次提出CAR以来,CAR已从第一代发展至含有共刺激分子的第二、三代,CAR的Ⅰ/Ⅱ期临床试验在白血病、淋巴瘤、黑素瘤等恶性肿瘤中取得了可喜的成果,但是也面临脱靶效应、细胞因子风暴、移植物抗宿主病等潜在的安全性问题,未来研究将集中于设计更安全

  14. Molecular Programming of Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells and IL15 Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doedens, Andrew L; Rubinstein, Mark P; Gross, Emilie T; Best, J Adam; Craig, David H; Baker, Megan K; Cole, David J; Bui, Jack D; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2016-09-01

    Despite clinical potential and recent advances, durable immunotherapeutic ablation of solid tumors is not routinely achieved. IL15 expands natural killer cell (NK), natural killer T cell (NKT) and CD8(+) T-cell numbers and engages the cytotoxic program, and thus is under evaluation for potentiation of cancer immunotherapy. We found that short-term therapy with IL15 bound to soluble IL15 receptor α-Fc (IL15cx; a form of IL15 with increased half-life and activity) was ineffective in the treatment of autochthonous PyMT murine mammary tumors, despite abundant CD8(+) T-cell infiltration. Probing of this poor responsiveness revealed that IL15cx only weakly activated intratumoral CD8(+) T cells, even though cells in the lung and spleen were activated and dramatically expanded. Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells exhibited cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic resistance to IL15. Our data showed that in the case of persistent viral or tumor antigen, single-agent systemic IL15cx treatment primarily expanded antigen-irrelevant or extratumoral CD8(+) T cells. We identified exhaustion, tissue-resident memory, and tumor-specific molecules expressed in tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells, which may allow therapeutic targeting or programming of specific subsets to evade loss of function and cytokine resistance, and, in turn, increase the efficacy of IL2/15 adjuvant cytokine therapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 799-811. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Diversidade antigênica de amostras do vírus da diarréia viral bovina isoladas no Brasil: implicações para o diagnóstico e estratégias de imunização Antigenic diversity of Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV): implications for diagnosis and immunization strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, E. F.; R. Weiblen; L.H.V.G. Gil; F.L. Tobias; M. Lima; D.C. Garcez; S.A. Botton

    2000-01-01

    Seqüenciamento e análise filogenética de 17 amostras do vírus da diarréia viral bovina (BVDV) isoladas no Brasil identificaram quatro amostras (23,5%) do genótipo 1a (BVDV-1a), nove amostras (52,9%) do genótipo 1b (BVDV tipo 1b) e quatro amostras (23,5%) do genótipo 2 (BVDV tipo 2). As amostras brasileiras de BVDV tipo 2 apresentaram-se genotipicamente distintas dos BVDV tipo 2 até então identificados na América do Norte e Europa, sugerindo pertencerem a um novo subgenótipo. A caracterização ...

  16. Engineered measles virus Edmonston strain used as a novel oncolytic viral system against human hepatoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatoblastoma (HB) is the most common primary, malignant pediatric liver tumor in children. The treatment results for affected children have markedly improved in recent decades. However, the prognosis for high-risk patients who have extrahepatic extensions, invasion of the large hepatic veins, distant metastases and very high alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels remains poor. There is an urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. An attenuated strain of measles virus, derived from the Edmonston vaccine lineage, was genetically engineered to produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We investigated the antitumor potential of this novel viral agent against human HB both in vitro and in vivo. Infection of the Hep2G and HUH6 HB cell lines, at multiplicities of infection (MOIs) ranging from 0.01 to 1, resulted in a significant cytopathic effect consisting of extensive syncytia formation and massive cell death at 72–96 h after infection. Both of the HB lines overexpressed the measles virus receptor CD46 and supported robust viral replication, which correlated with CEA production. The efficacy of this approach in vivo was examined in murine Hep2G xenograft models. Flow cytometry assays indicated an apoptotic mechanism of cell death. Intratumoral administration of MV-CEA resulted in statistically significant delay of tumor growth and prolongation of survival. The engineered measles virus Edmonston strain MV-CEA has potent therapeutic efficacy against HB cell lines and xenografts. Trackable measles virus derivatives merit further exploration in HB treatment

  17. Rapid diagnosis of viral neuroinfections by immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase technics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, N; Manovich, Z; Seletskaya, T; Kaptsova, T; Nikulina, V

    1979-03-22

    The results of immunofluorescent (IF) and immunoperoxidase (IP) technics applied for the detection of antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells in patients with mumps, herpes zoster and herpes simplex meningitis and meningoencephalitis are presented. Thirty patients were under study. The detection of mumps and herpes zoster viral antigen in CSF cells was possible in 100% of cases investigated. Herpes simplex virus antigen was detected in four of seven cases with symptoms of severe meningoencephalitis. Complement fixation (CF) antibodies to herpes simplex virus (type I) and positive seroconversion were detected in the four latter patients. The diagnostic value of the methods used for the detection of mumps, herpes simplex and herpes zoster viral antigens in CSF cells of patients is discussed.

  18. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) ...

  19. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  20. 北京地区男男性接触人类免疫缺陷病毒感染者人类白细胞抗原-Ⅰ类分子多态性对病毒载量的影响%The influence of human leucocyte antigen-Ⅰ polymorphisms on plasma viral load in human immunodeficiency virus infected male homosexual population in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张欣; 王熠; 王爽; 李伟华; 胡文静; 赵丹彤; 闫惠平

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析北京地区男男性接触人群HIV感染者人类白细胞抗原(HLA)-Ⅰ的多态性及其对病毒载量的影响.方法 用序列特异性引物-聚合酶链反应(SSP-PCR)对157例慢性HIV感染者的HLA-A、HLA-B、HLA-C等位基因分型,同时检测HIV载量.正态分布的计量资料采用单因素或多因素方差分析,非正态分布的计量资料用Mann-Whitney U检验.结果 157例HIV感染者中,HLA-B携带Bw4表位簇个数与低病毒载量有关(F=3.01,P=0.045),HLA-B携带Bw4/4纯合子的感染者HIV载量为(4.19±0.76) lg IU/mL,Bw6/6纯合子的感染者为(4.63±0.74) lg IU/mL(t=2.27,P=0.010).HLA-A、HLA-B同时携带3个Bw4的感染者HIV载量为(3.92±0.97)lg IU/mL,显著低于携带1个Bw4的感染者HIV载量(4.54±0.88) lg IU/mL和不携带Bw4者HIV载量(4.60±0.72) lg IU/mL(t=2.11,P=0.039;t=2.53,P=0.015).HLA-Ⅰ类分子(HLA-A、HLA-B、HLA-C)均携带杂合子的感染者,其病毒载量与任一座位携带纯合子的感染者病毒载量比较,差异无统计学意义.HLA-Ⅰ类分子均携带杂合子且HLA-B携带Bw4/4纯合子的感染者其HIV载量中位数为4.09 lg IU/mL,低于HLA-B携带Bw6/6纯合子感染者的4.55 lg IU/mL(U=210.50,P=0.041).携带A30/B13/C06单体型或A33/B58/C03单体型的感染者其HIV载量与不携带A30/B13/C06单体型或A33/B58/C03单体型感染者比较,差异无统计学意义(t=0.40,P=0.69;t=0.68,P=0.49).结论 HIV感染者HLA-B携带Bw4/4纯合子与低病毒载量有关,且HLA Ⅰ类分子携带杂合子的个体可受HLA-B携带Bw4/4纯合子影响,这些HIV感染者病毒载量更低.%Objective To analyze the influence of the polymorphisms of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ⅰ molecule and the effects on plasma viral load of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected male homosexual population in Beijing.Methods The HLA-A,HLA-B,HLA-C allele were typed by sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR),and viral load was detected in 157 chronic HIV infected

  1. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L;

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  2. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  3. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems

  4. Polymorphisms of transporter associated with antigen presentation, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 and their implications for protection and susceptibility to severe forms of dengue fever in patients in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anira N Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To date, a clear understanding of dengue disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Some infected individuals display no symptoms while others develop severe life-threatening forms of the disease. It is widely believed that host genetic factors influence dengue severity. Aims: This study evaluates the relationship between certain polymorphisms and dengue severity in Sri Lankan patients. Settings and Design: Polymorphism studies are carried out on genes for; transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP, promoter of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and promoter of interleukin-10 (IL-10. In other populations, TAP1 (333, TAP2 (379, TNF-α (−308, and IL-10 (−1082, −819, −592 have been associated with dengue and a number of different diseases. Data have not been collected previously for these polymorphisms for dengue patients in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: The polymorphisms were typed by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction in 107 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients together with 62 healthy controls. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson′s Chi-square contingency table analysis with Yates′ correction. Results: Neither the TAP nor the IL-10 polymorphisms considered individually can define dengue disease outcome with regard to severity. However, the genotype combination, IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 CCA/ATA was significantly associated with development of severe dengue in these patients, suggesting a risk factor to developing DHF. Also, identified is the genotype combination IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 ATA/ATG which suggested a possibility for protection from DHF. The TNF-α (−308 GG genotype was also significantly associated with severe dengue, suggesting a significant risk factor. Conclusions: The results reported here are specific to the Sri Lankan population. Comparisons with previous reports imply that data may vary from population to population.

  5. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  6. Chronic hepatitis in chimpanzee carriers of hepatitis B virus: morphologic, immunologic, and viral DNA studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Shouval, D.; Chakraborty, P R; Ruiz-Opazo, N.; Baum, S.; Spigland, I; Muchmore, E; Gerber, M. A.; Thung, S. N.; Popper, H.; Shafritz, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Years after infection with hepatitis B virus, chimpanzees may have manifestations of the carrier state as described in man. In addition to serologic evidence for persistent viral infection, percutaneous liver biopsy specimens showed hepatitis B virus surface antigen in the cytoplasm and hepatitis B virus core antigen in the nucleus. Four carrier animals had portal inflammatory reaction as seen in human chronic persistent hepatitis. Viral DNA was demonstrated in nucleic acid extracts of liver ...

  7. Cellular transformation by Simian Virus 40 and Murine Polyoma Virus T antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingwei; DeCaprio, James A; Fluck, Michele M; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2009-08-01

    Simian Virus 40 (SV40) and Mouse Polyoma Virus (PY) are small DNA tumor viruses that have been used extensively to study cellular transformation. The SV40 early region encodes three tumor antigens, large T (LT), small T (ST) and 17KT that contribute to cellular transformation. While PY also encodes LT and ST, the unique middle T (MT) generates most of the transforming activity. SV40 LT mediated transformation requires binding to the tumor suppressor proteins Rb and p53 in the nucleus and ST binding to the protein phosphatase PP2A in the cytoplasm. SV40 LT also binds to several additional cellular proteins including p300, CBP, Cul7, IRS1, Bub1, Nbs1 and Fbxw7 that contribute to viral transformation. PY MT transformation is dependent on binding to PP2A and the Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and assembly of a signaling complex on cell membranes that leads to transformation in a manner similar to Her2/neu. Phosphorylation of MT tyrosine residues activates key signaling molecules including Shc/Grb2, PI3K and PLCgamma1. The unique contributions of SV40 LT and ST and PY MT to cellular transformation have provided significant insights into our understanding of tumor suppressors, oncogenes and the process of oncogenesis. PMID:19505649

  8. Bacterial coinfections in children with viral wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, P; Jartti, T; Virkki, R; Vuorinen, T; Leinonen, M; Peltola, V; Ruohola, A; Ruuskanen, O

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial coinfections occur in respiratory viral infections, but the attack rates and the clinical profile are not clear. The aim of this study was to determine bacterial coinfections in children hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing with defined viral etiology. A total of 220 children aged 3 months to 16 years were investigated. The viral etiology of wheezing was confirmed by viral culture, antigen detection, serologic investigation, and/or PCR. Specific antibodies to common respiratory bacteria were measured from acute and convalescent serum samples. All children were examined clinically for acute otitis media, and subgroups of children were examined radiologically for sinusitis and pneumonia. Rhinovirus (32%), respiratory syncytial virus (31%), and enteroviruses (31%) were the most common causative viruses. Serologic evidence of bacterial coinfection was found in 18% of the children. Streptococcus pneumoniae (8%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (5%) were the most common causative bacteria. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 44% of the children. Chest radiographs showed alveolar infiltrates in 10%, and paranasal radiographs and clinical signs showed sinusitis in 17% of the older children studied. Leukocyte counts and serum C-reactive protein levels were low in a great majority of patients. Viral lower respiratory tract infection in children is often associated with bacterial-type upper respiratory tract infections. However, coexisting bacterial lower respiratory tract infections that induce systemic inflammatory response are seldom detected.

  9. RNAi, a new therapeutic strategy against viral infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fischer L. TAN; James Q. YIN

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an adaptive defense mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). It is a powerful reverse genetic tool that has been widely employed to silence gene expression in mammalian and human cells.RNAi-based gene therapies, especially in viral diseases have become more and more interesting and promising. Recently,small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be used to protect host from viral infection, inhibit the expression of viral antigen and accessory genes, control the transcription and replication of viral genome, hinder the assembly of viral particles, and display influences in virus-host interactions. In this review, we attempt to present recent progresses of this breakthrough technology in the above fields and summarize the possibilities of siRNA-based drugs.

  10. Developing effective tumor vaccines:basis,challenges and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qingwen; CHEN Weifeng

    2007-01-01

    A remarkable advance in tumor immunology during the last decade is the elucidation of the antigenic basis of tumor recognition and destruction.A variety of tumor antigens have been identified using several strategies including conventional experiments and newly developed bioinformatics.Among these antigens,cancer/testis antigen (CT antigen) is considered to be the most promising target for immunotherapy by vaccination.Successful immunotherapy of tumors requires understanding of the natural relationship between the immune system and tumor in the status of differentiation,invasion and maturation.Continued progress in development of effective cancer vaccines depends on the identification of appropriate target antigens,the establishment of optimal immunization strategies without harmful autoimmune responses and the ability of manipulating tumor microenvironment to circumvent immune suppression and to augment the anti-tumor immune response.

  11. A role for naturally occurring alleles of endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in tumor immunity and cancer pre-disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratikos, Efstratios; Stamogiannos, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Fruci, Doriana

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2) are key components on the pathway that generates antigenic epitopes for presentation to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). Coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these enzymes have been associated with pre-disposition to several major human diseases including inflammatory diseases with autoimmune etiology, viral infections, and virally induced cancer. The function of these enzymes has been demonstrated to affect CTL and natural killer cell responses toward healthy and malignant cells as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated that SNPs in ERAP1 and ERAP2 can affect their ability to generate or destroy antigenic epitopes and define the immunopeptidome. In this review, we examine the potential role of these enzymes and their polymorphic states on the generation of cytotoxic responses toward malignantly transformed cells. Given the current state-of-the-art, it is possible that polymorphic variation in these enzymes may contribute to the individual's pre-disposition to cancer through altered generation or destruction of tumor antigens that can facilitate tumor immune evasion. PMID:25566501

  12. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  13. Vaccines for viral and parasitic diseases produced with baculovirus vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The baculovirus¿insect cell expression system is an approved system for the production of viral antigens with vaccine potential for humans and animals and has been used for production of subunit vaccines against parasitic diseases as well. Many candidate subunit vaccines have been expressed in this

  14. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections. PMID:26059175

  15. Modeling Influenza Antigenic Shift and Drift with LEGO Bricks

    OpenAIRE

    Boriana Marintcheva

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of antigenic shift and drift could be found in almost every microbiology and virology syllabus, usually taught in the context of Influenza virus biology. They are central to understanding viral diversity and evolution and have direct application to anti-flu vaccine design and effectiveness. To aid student understanding of the concepts, I have developed an exercise to visualize the mechanistic aspects of antigenic shift and drift using LEGO bricks. This hands-on/minds-on exercise ...

  16. Fibroblasts as Efficient Antigen-Presenting Cells in Lymphoid Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundig, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Martin F.; Dipaolo, Claudio; Simard, John J. L.; Battegay, Manuel; Lother, Heinz; Gessner, Andre; Kuhlcke, Klaus; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1995-06-01

    Only so-called "professional" antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of hematopoietic origin are believed capable of inducing T lymphocyte responses. However, fibroblasts transfected with viral proteins directly induced antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo, without involvement of host APCs. Fibroblasts induced T cells only in the milieu of lymphoid organs. Thus, antigen localization affects self-nonself discrimination and cell-based vaccine strategies.

  17. Characterization of Ewing sarcoma associated cancer/testis antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlendorf, Dorothea E.; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from tumors of the Ewing family (EFT) is still poor. Immunotherapy strategies are pursued and EFT-specific antigens have to be identified as targets for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Due to the lack of expression of cancer/testis antigens (CTA) in normal tissues, these antigens are partially able to induce immune responses in cancer patients. Therefore, they are promising targets for immunotherapy. EFT are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements involv...

  18. The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robert T; Carbery, Baevin; Mac, Lisa; Berns, Kenneth I; Chapman, Louisa; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean-Louis; Gurwith, Marc; Hendry, Michael; Khan, Arifa S; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Klug, Bettina; Robertson, James S; Seligman, Stephen J; Sheets, Rebecca; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant viral vectors provide an effective means for heterologous antigen expression in vivo and thus represent promising platforms for developing novel vaccines against human pathogens from Ebola to tuberculosis. An increasing number of candidate viral vector vaccines are entering human clinical trials. The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to improve our ability to anticipate potential safety issues and meaningfully assess or interpret safety data, thereby facilitating greater public acceptance when licensed. PMID:25305565

  19. Novel serum tumor marker, RCAS1, in pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Enjoji, Munechika; Nakashima, Manabu; Nakamuta, Makoto; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: As tumor markers for pancreatic carcinoma, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 have been used, but the sensitivity and specificity are not enough for the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  1. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infecti

  2. Tonsillar crypt epithelium is an important extra-central nervous system site for viral replication in EV71 encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaoxin; Ong, Kien Chai; Gao, Zifen; Zhao, Xishun; Anderson, Virginia M; McNutt, Michael A; Wong, Kum Thong; Lu, Min

    2014-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71; family Picornaviridae, species human Enterovirus A) usually causes hand, foot, and mouth disease, which may rarely be complicated by fatal encephalomyelitis. We investigated extra-central nervous system (extra-CNS) tissues capable of supporting EV71 infection and replication, and have correlated tissue infection with expression of putative viral entry receptors, scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded CNS and extra-CNS tissues from seven autopsy cases were examined by IHC and in situ hybridization to evaluate viral antigens and RNA. Viral receptors were identified with IHC. In all seven cases, the CNS showed stereotypical distribution of inflammation and neuronal localization of viral antigens and RNA, confirming the clinical diagnosis of EV71 encephalomyelitis. In six cases in which tonsillar tissues were available, viral antigens and/or RNA were localized to squamous epithelium lining the tonsillar crypts. Tissues from the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, mesenteric nodes, spleen, and skin were all negative for viral antigens/RNA. Our novel findings strongly suggest that tonsillar crypt squamous epithelium supports active viral replication and represents an important source of viral shedding that facilitates person-to-person transmission by both the fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. It may also be a portal for viral entry. A correlation between viral infection and SCARB2 expression appears to be more significant than for PSGL-1 expression.

  3. Protamine-based nanoparticles as new antigen delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Peleteiro Olmedo, Mercedes; González-Fernández, África; Alonso Fernández, María José; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2015-11-01

    The use of biodegradable nanoparticles as antigen delivery vehicles is an attractive approach to overcome the problems associated with the use of Alum-based classical adjuvants. Herein we report, the design and development of protamine-based nanoparticles as novel antigen delivery systems, using recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen as a model viral antigen. The nanoparticles, composed of protamine and a polysaccharide (hyaluronic acid or alginate), were obtained using a mild ionic cross-linking technique. The size and surface charge of the nanoparticles could be modulated by adjusting the ratio of the components. Prototypes with optimal physicochemical characteristics and satisfactory colloidal stability were selected for the assessment of their antigen loading capacity, antigen stability during storage and in vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept studies. In vitro studies showed that antigen-loaded nanoparticles induced the secretion of cytokines by macrophages more efficiently than the antigen in solution, thus indicating a potential adjuvant effect of the nanoparticles. Finally, in vivo studies showed the capacity of these systems to trigger efficient immune responses against the hepatitis B antigen following intramuscular administration, suggesting the potential interest of protamine-polysaccharide nanoparticles as antigen delivery systems.

  4. Histocompatibility antigen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common in certain autoimmune diseases . For example, HLA-B27 antigen is found in many people (but not ... More Ankylosing spondylitis Autoimmune disorders Bone marrow transplant HLA-B27 antigen Kidney transplant Reactive arthritis Update Date 2/ ...

  5. [Circulating "tumor markers" in gastrointestinal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlinghaus, P; Lamerz, R

    1991-09-01

    Tumor markers (TM) of the neoplastic cell can be divided into non-shedded substances and antigens shedded in blood, urine or other body fluids. For clinicians circulating TM are more important. All relevant circulating TM are not useful in screening of asymptomatic patients because of insufficient sensitivity and specificity. With caution they are useful in the observation of risk groups. Circulating TM have their main significance as additional parameters in monitoring symptomatic patients with malignancies. Several follow up determinations are more important than one single measurement. During follow up of tumor patients TM should not be checked automatically if there are no diagnostic or therapeutical consequences. The clinically most important circulating TM in non-hormone secreting tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the oncofetal antigens CEA and AFP and antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies e. g. CA 19-9 and CA 72-4. AFP is the primary TM in hepatocellular carcinoma, often elevated in hepatoblastoma and always normal in cholangiocellular carcinoma. CEA is the TM of first choice in patients with colorectal carcinomas and liver metastasis. CA 19-9 is TM of first choice in pancreatic carcinoma and additionally of diagnostic value in cholangiocellular carcinoma and tumors of the bile ducts. In cancer of the stomach CA 19-9 and CEA are secondary TM in combination with CA 72-4 as primary TM. Care should be taken that slight and moderate elevations of TM can be observed in benign diseases of liver, pancreas and bowel.

  6. Viral marketing on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    ŠTVERÁK, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Thesis provides an overview of viral marketing. It describes the process by which you can be inspired to implement viral campaign. The thesis includes analysis of specific viral Web project. The aim of this thesis is to create a breakdown of the various components of viral marketing, to establish conditions that should be satisfied for the viral marketing to success, suggesting how to use viral marketing on social network Facebook and evaluate the various components of this service for the pr...

  7. Heterologous Protection Against Influenza by Injection of DNA Encoding a Viral Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Donnelly, John J.; Parker, Suezanne E.; Rhodes, Gary H.; Felgner, Philip L.; Dwarki, V. J.; Gromkowski, Stanislaw H.; Deck, R. Randall; Dewitt, Corrille M.; Friedman, Arthur; Hawe, Linda A.; Leander, Karen R.; Martinez, Douglas; Perry, Helen C.; Shiver, John W.; Montgomery, Donna L.; Liu, Margaret A.

    1993-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for conserved viral antigens can respond to different strains of virus, in contrast to antibodies, which are generally strain-specific. The generation of such CTLs in vivo usually requires endogenous expression of the antigen, as occurs in the case of virus infection. To generate a viral antigen for presentation to the immune system without the limitations of direct peptide delivery or viral vectors, plasmid DNA encoding influenza A nucleoprotein was injected into the quadriceps of BALB/c mice. This resulted in the generation of nucleoprotein-specific CTLs and protection from a subsequent challenge with a heterologous strain of influenza A virus, as measured by decreased viral lung titers, inhibition of mass loss, and increased survival.

  8. Lymphocyte subpopulation in acute viral hepatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, U; Sehgal, S.; Pal, S. R.; Dhall, K; Singh, S.; Datta, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of peripheral blood lymphocytes were performed in 41 patients with acute viral hepatitis, in grade III-IV coma; 16 patients were in the third trimester of pregnancy. There were significant reductions in absolute lymphocyte count and T cell number in patients who succumbed to the disease, when compared with those who survived. B cell counts were similar in the two groups and migration inhibition test with BCG antigen was normal. It is postulated that a decrease in the number of cells i...

  9. Rapid titration of retroviral vectors encoding intracellular antigens by flow cytometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Sladek, T L; Jacobberger, J W

    1990-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to detect cells infected with retroviral vectors encoding both simian virus 40 large T antigen and G418 resistance after indirect immunofluorescence staining using a T-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody and a fluorescein-conjugated secondary antibody. Titers of viral stocks determined by flow cytometry were equivalent to those determined by quantitation of G418-resistant colonies.

  10. Antigen loading on dendritic cells affects the lell function in stimulating T cells.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of antigen loading on dendritic cells (DC). Methods: DCs collected from peripheral blood monocytes were loaded with a tumor antigen from XG-7 cell line. These DCs were then co-cultured with allogeneic T cells and were compared with those DCs without antigen exposure.

  11. To Go Viral

    CERN Document Server

    Cintron-Arias, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models are validated against empirical data, while examining potential indicators for an online video that went viral. We revisit some concepts of infectious disease modeling (e.g. reproductive number) and we comment on the role of model parameters that interplay in the spread of innovations. The dataset employed here provides strong evidence that the number of online views is governed by exponential growth patterns, explaining a common feature of viral videos.

  12. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young ch...

  13. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  14. Promotion of Tumor Invasion by Cooperation of Granulocytes and Macrophages Activated by Anti-tumor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Barbera-Guillem

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the potential role of anti-tumor antibodies and tumor antigens in the formation of immune complexes which promote matrix degradation and angiogenesis. B-cell deficient or B-cell depleted mice showed a reduction in tumor invasion and metastasis. In vitro invasion assays and in vivo models of metastasis showed that anti-sTn antibodies and sTn tumor antigens form complexes which induce granulocytes and macrophages together to mediate tumor invasion and metastasis by processes including extracellular matrix degradation and angiogenesis. These results suggest the existence of a tumor promoting role of a B-cell immune response induced by shed tumor associated antigens of solid, nonlymphoid tumors.

  15. 多种肿瘤相关抗原抗体在乳癌早期诊断中的应用%Application of antibodies against a panel of multiple tumor-associated antigens in early diagnosis of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐莉娟; 代丽萍; 王凯娟; 张建营; 王鹏

    2012-01-01

    目的:评价多种肿瘤相关抗原 (TAA) 抗体的联合检测在乳癌早期诊断中的价值,探索一种真实可靠的乳癌早期诊断方法.方法:应用酶联免疫吸附试验对115例乳癌患者和153例正常对照血清中的14种TAA抗体进行检测,应用流行病学方法对检测结果进行综合评价.结果:单独应用14种TAA中的任何一种进行检测时,灵敏度普遍偏低(最高低于33%);对14种TAA进行不同的组合,逐渐增加抗原数目进行检测,随着检测抗体的增多,诊断的灵敏度随之增加,抗原数目增加到8种(Cyclin E,Koc,Imp1,cIAP,p62,p16,Cyclin B1和Calnuc)时,灵敏度达到最高;联合8种TAA检测的灵敏度提高到72.2%,特异度达到91.2%,阳性、阴性似然比分别为8.490、0.304,阳性、阴性预测值分别为86.5%、81.4%,Kappa值0.650.结论:该诊断实验结果与真实值中度一致,8种TAA联合检测乳癌的诊断价值较高.%Aim:To evaluate the diagnostic value of antibodies against multiple tumor-associated antigens ( TAAs ) in the early diagnosis of breast cancer and to develop a valid and reliable diagnostic method for breast cancer. Methods: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA ) was used to detect antibodies against fourteen TAAs in 115 sera samples from patients with breast cancer,and also in 153 sera samples from normal individuals. Epidemiological methods were used to e-valuate the testing results for each anti-TAA antibody. Results:The sensitivities were low( the highest below 33% )when a separate TAA was used;with the successive addition of TAAs, there was a stepwise increase of sensitivity. The sensitivity did not increase until when there were eight TAAs ( Cyclin E,Koc,Impl ,cIAP,p62,pl6,Cyclin Bl and Calnuc ). The positive antibody reaction of the eight TAAs reached a sensitivity of 72. 2% and a specificity of 91. 2% . Positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 8. 490 and 0. 304. Positive and negative predictive values were 86. 5% and

  16. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  17. Viral Evasion and Subversion Mechanisms of the Host Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Ghaemi-Bafghi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most abundant and versatile pathogens which challenge the immune system and cause major threats to human health. Viruses employ differ¬ent mechanisms to evade host immune responses that we describe them under the following headings: Inhibition of humoral responses, Interference with interferons, Inhibition and modulation of cytokines and chemokines, Inhibitors of apoptosis, Evading CTLs and NKs, and modulating MHC function.Viruses inhibit humoral immunity in different ways which contains change of viral antigens, production of regulatory proteins of complement system and receptors of the Fc part of antibodies. Viruses block interferon production and function via interruption of cell signaling JAK/STAT pathway, Inhibition of eIF-2α phosphorylation and translational arrest and 2'5'OS/RNAse L system. Also, Poxviruses produce soluble versions of receptors for interferons. One of the most important ways of viral evasion is inhibition and manipulation of cytokines; for example, Herpsviruses and Poxviruses produce viral cytokines (virokines and cytokine receptors (viroceptors. In addition, viruses change maturation and expression of MHC I and MHC II molecules to interrupt viral antigens presentation and hide them from immune system recognition. Also, they inhibit NK cell functions.In this review, we provide an overview of the viral evasion mechanisms of immune system. Since most viruses have developed strategies for evasion of immune system, if we know these mechanisms in detail we can fight them more successfully.

  18. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in major salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Thorn, J;

    1994-01-01

    , on the other hand, expressed A, H, and inconstantly sialosyl-T, Tn, and sialosyl-Tn antigens in major salivary glands, whereas serous cells of minor (labial) salivary glands expressed H exclusively, Tn and sialosyl-T antigens inconstantly, but never sialosyl-Tn and A antigens. The difference may be related...... to a more simple cytodifferentiation of serous cells of minor (labial) salivary glands as compared with major salivary glands. Duct cells in major salivary glands expressed A, H, and inconstantly T, sialosyl-T, and Tn antigens, whereas minor (labial) salivary glands ducts exclusively expressed H, T...... and sialosyl-T antigens, differences that may be related to dissimilarities in the duct system. Myoepithelial cells and basal cells exclusively expressed T and sialosyl-T antigens, which may prove useful in studies of salivary gland tumors, since these cells are known to play a key role in the histological...

  19. Studies on mechanism of Sialy Lewis-X antigen in liver metastases of human colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Wei Li; Yan Qing Ding; Jun Jie Cai; Shao Qing Yang; Lian Bing An; Dong Fang Qiao

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Sialyl Lewis-X antigen ,correlated with carcinoma, is a group of carbohydrate antigen containing oligosaccharide expressed of embryonic tisue and glycoproteins on cell surface of embryonic tissue[1].The SLeX antigen located on cell surface is synthesized principally by two enzymes ,al ,3fucosyltransfrease and a2, 3sialyctransferase.In adults ,SLeX antigen is expressed principally on the surfaces of granulocytic cells and some tumor cells .

  20. Persistent human papillomavirus infection in the etiology of cervical carcinoma: The role of immunological, genetic, viral and cellular factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živadinović Radomir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to present the role of human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical carcinogenesis from several aspects. By explaining the HPV virus lifecycle and structure, its effect on cervical cell cycle and subversion of immune response can be better understood. Early E region of the viral genome encodes proteins that are directly involved in carcinogenesis. The E6 protein binds to p53 protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene blocking and degrading it, which in turn prevents cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. E6 is also capable of telomerase activation, which leads to cell immortalization; it also reacts with host proto-oncogene c-jun, responsible for transcription, shortens G1 phase and speeds up the transition from G1 to S phase of the cells infected by HPV. E7 forms bonds with retinoblastoma protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene and inactivates it. It can inactivate cyclin inhibitors p21, p27, and abrogate the mitotic spindle checkpoint with the loss of protective effect of pRB and p53. The immune system cannot initiate early immunological reaction since the virus is non-lytic, while the concentration of viral proteins - antigens is low and has a basal intracellular position. Presentation through Langerhans cells (LC is weak, because the number of these cells is low due to the effect of HPV. E7 HPV reduces the expression of E-cadherin, which is responsible for LC adhesion to HPVtransformed keratinocytes. Based on these considerations, it may be concluded that the process of cervical carcinogenesis includes viral, genetic, cellular, molecular-biological, endocrine, exocrine and immunological factors.

  1. PREVALENCE OF BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHOEA VIRUS IN WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD is one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. The present study was undertaken to diagnose the persistently infected (PI animals by AntigenELISA and Reverse Transcriptase PCR using serum samples from organized farms as well as rural areas of West Bengal. The results showed that out of 964 serum samples tested 07 (0.73% was positive for BVDV by Antigen-ELISA. For further confirmation, RNA was extracted from the positive samples and RT-PCR was performed with 5' UTR specific primers which showed 294 bp amplicons. This finding showed circulation of BVDV in cattle in West Bengal, India.

  2. Nosocomial viral respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graman, P S; Hall, C B

    1989-12-01

    Nosocomial infections with respiratory tract viruses, particularly influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, account for the majority of serious nosocomial viral disease. Chronically ill, immunocompromised, elderly, and very young hosts are especially vulnerable to potentially life-threatening involvement of the lower respiratory tract. Effective preventive strategies are based upon early accurate viral diagnosis and an appreciation of the epidemiology and mechanisms of transmission for each viral agent. Influenza viruses spread via airborne dispersion of small particle aerosols, resulting in explosive outbreaks; control measures emphasize immunization and chemoprophylaxis of susceptible patients and personnel, and isolation of those already infected. Transmission of respiratory syncytial virus, in contrast, seems to require closer contact, with virus passed on hands, fomites, or in large droplets inoculated into the eyes and nose at close range. Strategies for control of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus are designed to interrupt hand carriage and inoculation of virus onto mucous membranes.

  3. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  4. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  5. Viral infections in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  6. Oral immune regulation: a novel method for modulation of anti-viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Maya; Ilan, Yaron

    2004-12-01

    Chronic viral infections, including hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, afflict a significant part of the world's population. In many of these diseases, chronicity has been linked to defective anti-viral immunity that damages host tissues without producing viral clearance. Currently available therapeutic measures for chronic viral infections are limited. Oral immune regulation, the manipulation of immune responses towards antigens by their oral administration, is a relatively simple and antigen-specific immune-modulatory tool. Recent evidence suggests that induction of oral immune-regulation towards viral antigens may entail a complex immune effect, characterized by simultaneous enhancement and suppression of different elements of the immune response in a manner that benefits the host. Such manipulation of the immune response towards viruses may achieve a combination of upregulated specific anti-viral immunity and inhibition of immune-mediated damage. Oral immune regulation may prove to be an important addition to the available therapeutic arsenal for chronic viral infections. PMID:15567096

  7. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA inter...

  8. Questing for an optimal, universal viral agent for oncolytic virotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, L R; Ferreira, S C

    2011-01-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses designed to exploit specific altered pathways. Here, the effects of oncolytic virotherapy on tumors having compact, papillary and disconnected morphologies are investigated through computer simulations of a multiscale model coupling macroscopic reaction diffusion equations for the nutrients with microscopic stochastic rules for the actions of individual cells and viruses. The interaction among viruses and tumor cells involves cell infection, intracellular virus replication and release of new viruses in the tissue after cell lysis. The evolution in time of both viral load and cancer cell population, as well as the probabilities for tumor eradication were evaluated for a range of multiplicities of infection, viral entries and burst sizes. It was found that in immunosuppressed hosts, the antitumor efficacy of a virus is primarily determined by its entry efficiency, its replicative capacity within the tumor, and its ability to sprea...

  9. Seoul virus suppresses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses of antigen presenting cells from Norway rats

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Rebecca Y.; Jedlicka, Anne E.; Li, Wei; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L.

    2010-01-01

    Hantavirus infection reduces antiviral defenses, increases regulatory responses, and causes persistent infection in rodent hosts. To address whether hantaviruses alter the maturation and functional activity of antigen presenting cells (APCs), rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and macrophages (BMDMs) were generated and infected with Seoul virus (SEOV) or stimulated with TLR ligands. SEOV infected both DCs and macrophages, but copies of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious vir...

  10. Benefit of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Assay in Prediction of Therapeutic Response to Interferon and Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) ...

  11. Viral diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, Aric P; Simpson, Janet E; Korte, Scott W

    2005-01-01

    Viral disease in the rabbit is encountered infrequently by the clinical practitioner; however, several viral diseases were reported to occur in this species. Viral diseases that are described in the rabbit primarily may affect the integument, gastrointestinal tract or, central nervous system or maybe multi-systemic in nature. Rabbit viral diseases range from oral papillomatosis, with benign clinical signs, to rabbit hemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis, which may result in significant clinical disease and mortality. The wild rabbit may serve as a reservoir for disease transmission for many of these viral agents. In general, treatment of viral disease in the rabbit is supportive in nature. PMID:15585192

  12. Expression of CD 68, CD 45 and human leukocyte antigen-DR in central and peripheral giant cell granuloma, giant cell tumor of long bones, and tuberculous granuloma: An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: CD 68 and CD 45 expression was found in central giant cell granuloma, peripheral giant cell granuloma and GCT, suggesting the origin from mononuclear phagocyte system and considering their clinical behavior of osteoclast type. High expressivity of HLA-DR in tuberculous granulomas which is an essential factor for presentation of the microbial antigen to CD 4 helper cells thus reassuring the fact that they are up-regulated in response to infection.

  13. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  14. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet gives information on viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS). VHS is caused by a single stranded RNA virus of the family Rhabdoviridae, genus Novirhabdoviridae. VHS is listed as a non-exotic disease under EU Directive 2006/88/EC, and is notifiable in Ireland, according to S.I. No. 261 of 2008.

  15. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. BVDV viruses are further subclassified as cytopathic and noncytopathic based on their activity in cultured epithelial cells. Noncytopathic BVDV p...

  16. BIOMARKERS OF VIRAL EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral and protozoan pathogens associated with raw sludge can cause encephalitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and a number of other diseases. Raw sludge that has been treated to reduce these pathogens can be used for land application according to the regulations spec...

  17. WATERBORNE VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the study of human gastroenteritis, the use of electron microscopy and related techniques has led to the identification of new viral agents which had previously escaped detection by routine cell-culture procedures. Efforts to characterize and further study these agents are cur...

  18. Concerted In Vitro Trimming of Viral HLA-B27-Restricted Ligands by Human ERAP1 and ERAP2 Aminopeptidases

    OpenAIRE

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Johnstone, Carolina; Mir, Carmen; Jiménez, Mercedes; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen processing and presentation pathway, the antigenic peptides are generated from viral proteins by multiple proteolytic cleavages of the proteasome (and in some cases other cytosolic proteases) and transported to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen where they are exposed to aminopeptidase activity. In human cells, two different ER-resident enzymes, ERAP1 and ERAP2, can trim the N-terminally extended residues of peptide precursors. ...

  19. Aetiology of childhood viral gastroenteritis in Lucknow, north India

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpi Gupta; Singh, K. P.; Amita Jain; Shilpi Srivastava; Vishwajeet Kumar; Mastan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Due to limited availability of data on viral aetiology of acute gastroenteritis in north India, the present study was planned to detect rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus in stool samples of both in hospitalized and non-hospitalized children less than five years of age presenting with acute gastroenteritis. Methods: A total of 278 stool samples from equal number of children were tested for rotavirus antigen using ELISA and for norovirus, sapovirus and...

  20. [Prognosis in tumor diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, G

    1983-01-01

    This essay on prognosis in tumor diagnosis pathology resp. tumor etiology, cancerogenesis and molecular oncology is the authors personal opinion. Generally tumor diagnosis improves with progress in histo- and cytological methods for example in tumors of the APUD-system and precancerous lesions especially of the breast. Fundamental principle of developed tumor diagnosis is the knowledge of malignant transformation. Its profits favours the etiology in cancerogenesis and e.g. non Hodgkin lymphomas (Burkitt lymphoma, adult T-cell lymphoma) and to result from new methods in molecular biology and viral genetics (DNS-hybridizing, -recombination and gene technology). With the beginning century a stepwise fitted diagnosis of malignant lymphomas is evident up to monoclonal dedifferentiated lymphoid cells and their multifarious phenotypical markers. This concept may be of general significance in tumor diagnosis already indicated in prelymphomas. Finally the present prognosis of tumor diagnosis is evaluated by contents, tasks and strategies of its corresponding research lines in clinical and experimental tumor pathology resp. its organization.

  1. STING activator c-di-GMP enhances the anti-tumor effects of peptide vaccines in melanoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zili; Celis, Esteban

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to induce anti-tumor CD8 T cells have been used in clinical trials for advanced melanoma patients, but the clinical response rate and overall survival time have not improved much. We believe that these dismal outcomes are caused by inadequate number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells generated by most vaccines. In contrast, huge CD8 T cell responses readily occur during acute viral infections. High levels of type-I interferon (IFN-I) are produced during these infections, and this cytokine not only exhibits anti-viral activity but also promotes CD8 T cell responses. The studies described here were performed to determine whether promoting the production of IFN-I could enhance the potency of a peptide vaccine. We report that cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which activates the stimulator of interferon genes, potentiated the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of a peptide vaccine against mouse B16 melanoma. The synergistic effects of c-di-GMP required co-administration of costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody, the adjuvant poly-IC, and were mediated in part by IFN-I. These findings demonstrate that peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes can be effective inducers of large CD8 T cell responses in vaccination strategies that mimic acute viral infections.

  2. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  3. Combining multiple serum biomarkers in tumor diagnosis: A clinical assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin; LU, JUN; Ren, Hui; CHEN, TIANJUN; Gao, Lin; DI, LIGAI; SONG, ZHUCUI; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Tian; THAKUR, ASMITANANDA; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Yin, Yanhai; Chen, Mingwei

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic/prognostic value of various clinical tumor markers, including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA21-1), α-fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA-125), carbohydrate antigen-19.9 (CA-19.9) and ferritin, individually or in combination. The electro-chemiluminescence immunization method was performed to detect the levels of seven tumor markers in 560 cancer patients and 103 healthy subjects f...

  4. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  5. Measles viral load may reflect SSPE disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, slowly progressive neurological disorder caused by the persistent infection with measles virus (MV. Despite much research into SSPE, its pathology remains obscure. We examined autopsy tissues of eight SSPE patients by real time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting to determine viral load. MV N, M and H gene RNA could be detected in the central nervous system (CNS of all patients and in two non-CNS tissues of one patient. The viral burden between patients differed up to four-fold by quantitative PCR and corresponded with detection of MV protein. The level of both viral RNA and antigen in the brain may correlate with disease progression.

  6. Microglia retard dengue virus-induced acute viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Jhan, Ming-Kai; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dengue virus (DENV) infection may also present acute viral encephalitis through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that encephalitic DENV-infected mice exhibited progressive hunchback posture, limbic seizures, limbic weakness, paralysis, and lethality 7 days post-infection. These symptoms were accompanied by CNS inflammation, neurotoxicity, and blood-brain barrier destruction. Microglial cells surrounding the blood vessels and injured hippocampus regions were activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically depleting microglia unexpectedly increased viral replication, neuropathy, and mortality in DENV-infected mice. In microglia-depleted mice, the DENV infection-mediated expression of antiviral cytokines and the infiltration of CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was abolished. DENV infection prompted the antigen-presenting cell-like differentiation of microglia, which in turn stimulated CTL proliferation and activation. These results suggest that microglial cells play a key role in facilitating antiviral immune responses against DENV infection and acute viral encephalitis. PMID:27279150

  7. Carcinoma of the ureter with extensive squamous differentiation and positive immunoperoxidase staining for carcinoembryonic antigen: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, R M; Falace, P B

    1985-01-01

    A case of ureteral carcinoma with extensive squamous differentiation and positive staining for carcinoembryonic antigen by the immunoperoxidase method is presented. Ureteral carcinoma should be added to the list of tumors that may produce carcinoembryonic antigen or antigen-like material.

  8. Regulation of the tumor marker Fascin by the viral oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) depends on promoter activation and on a promoter-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Caroline F; Gross, Christine; Bros, Matthias; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Biesinger, Brigitte; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a highly infiltrative neoplasia of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes that occurs in about 5% of carriers infected with the deltaretrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral oncoprotein Tax perturbs cellular signaling pathways leading to upregulation of host cell factors, amongst them the actin-bundling protein Fascin, an invasion marker of several types of cancer. However, transcriptional regulation of Fascin by Tax is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a triple mode of transcriptional induction of Fascin by Tax, which requires (1) NF-κB-dependent promoter activation, (2) a Tax-responsive region in the Fascin promoter, and (3) a promoter-independent mechanism sensitive to the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2. Thus, Tax regulates Fascin by a multitude of signals. Beyond, using Tax-expressing and virus-transformed lymphocytes as a model system, our study is the first to identify the invasion marker Fascin as a novel target of PP2, an inhibitor of metastasis.

  9. Geminiviral vectors based on bean yellow dwarf virus for production of vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qiang; He, Junyun; Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo; Mason, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of recombinant vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies using plant viral vectors has developed extensively during the past several years. The approach benefits from high yields of recombinant protein obtained within days after transient delivery of viral vectors to leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, a tobacco relative. Modified viral genomes of both RNA and DNA viruses have been created. Geminiviruses such as bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV) have a small, single stranded DNA genome...

  10. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S.

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing...

  11. Engineering influenza viral vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junwei; Arévalo, Maria T; Zeng, Mingtao

    2013-01-01

    The influenza virus is a respiratory pathogen with a negative-sense, segmented RNA genome. Construction of recombinant influenza viruses in the laboratory was reported starting in the 1980s. Within a short period of time, pioneer researchers had devised methods that made it possible to construct influenza viral vectors from cDNA plasmid systems. Herein, we discuss the evolution of influenza virus reverse genetics, from helper virus-dependent systems, to helper virus-independent 17-plasmid sys...

  12. Deteccion de citomegalovirus mediante la tecnica de inmunoperoxidasa y aislamiento viral Cytomegalovirus detection by Immunoperoxidase assay and viral isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Alvarez

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio se comparó la técnica de inmunoperoxidasa para la detección de citomegalovirus (IPCMV utilizando anticuerpos monoclonales que reconocen proteínas precoces virales con el método convencional de aislamiento viral en fibroblastos humanos. Un total de 150 muestras de orina fueron examinadas encontrando una sensibilidad de un 89.8% y una especificidad de 91.3% de la técnica de IPCMV comparada con el aislamiento viral. Una de las ventajas que presentó la IPCMV fue la rapidez con que fueron obtenidos los resultados (48 horas mientras que el aislamiento viral fue como promedio 14 días.An Immunoperoxidase assay was applied to detect early antigens of Cytomegalovirus (CMV in 150 urine samples from immunocompromised patients, using the commercial available monoclonal antibody against CMV El3. The detection of early antigen by IP (IPCMV is compared to the conventional cell culture isolation regarding specificity and sensitivity in order to evaluate is usefulness in the diagnostic of CMV infections. The IPCMV showed a sensitivity of 89.8% and a specificity of 91.3% when compared to the isolation method. The great advantage of the IPCMV is based on the shorter time results are achieved, since 48-72 Hs can be enough to provide evidence of CMV infection, while in the isolation technique cytopatho-genic effect was present around 14 days after sample inoculation.

  13. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Reeve

    Full Text Available Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype.

  14. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Richard; Borley, Daryl W; Maree, Francois F; Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Esterhuysen, Jan J; Harvey, William T; Blignaut, Belinda; Fry, Elizabeth E; Parida, Satya; Paton, David J; Mahapatra, Mana

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype. PMID:27448206

  15. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  16. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  17. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  18. Renaissance in tumor immunotherapy: possible combination with phototherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce highly toxic reactive oxygen species that destroy tumors. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. PDT may accomplish this feat and stimulate long-term, specific anti-tumor immunity. PDT causes an acute inflammatory response, the rapid induction of large amounts of necrotic and apoptotic tumor cells, induction of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) including heat-shock proteins, stimulates tumor antigen presentation to naïve T-cells, and generation of cytotoxic T-cells that can destroy distant tumor metastases. By using various syngeneic mouse tumors in immunocompetent mice, we have studied specific PDT regimens related to tumor type as well as mouse genotype and phenotype. We have investigated the role of tumor-associated antigens in PDT-induced immune response by choosing mouse tumors that express: model defined antigen, naturally-occurring cancer testis antigen, and oncogenic virus-derived antigen. We studied the synergistic combination of low-dose cyclophosphamide and PDT that unmasks the PDT-induced immune response by depleting the immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells. PDT combined with immunostimulants (toll-like receptor ligands) can synergistically maximize the generation of anti-tumor immunity by activating dendritic cells and switching immunosuppressive macrophages to a tumor rejection phenotype. Tumors expressing defined tumor-associated antigens with known MHC class I peptides allows anti-tumor immunity to be quantitatively compared.

  19. Lung adenocarcinoma with clear cell features producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Taichiro; Hada, Masao; Oyama, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    A 76-year-old man underwent surgery for lung cancer. Histopathologically, most of the resected tumor was composed of polygonal cells with foamy cytoplasm, and the cells were arranged predominantly in acinar patterns. In this case, although the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was high before surgery, it normalized after resection. The tumor was considered a carbohydrate antigen 19-9-producing tumor, which was further supported by the results of immunohistochemical analysis. Adenocarcinoma with clear cell features, producing carbohydrate antigen 19-9, is an exceedingly rare entity.

  20. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazumi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function. PMID:26927155

  1. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Nakano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function.

  2. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazumi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-02-24

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function.

  3. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cristin C W; Olival, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007-2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  4. 聚乙二醇干扰素α-2a联合阿德福韦治疗e抗原阳性高病毒载量慢性乙型肝炎给药时机的选择%Appropriate Time Selection for Pegylated Interferonα-2a Combined with Adefovir in Treatment of Chronic Hep-atitis B Patients with High Viral Load of Positive e Antigens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安红杰; 何文艳; 徐金凤; 赵崇山; 高美丽

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the appropriate time selection of Pegylated interferonα-2a (peg-IFNα-2a) combined with Adefovir ( ADV) in treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients with high viral load of positive e antigens. Methods A total of 90 chronic hepatitis B patients with positive e antigens ( HBeAg ) ( HBV-DNA≥7 log10 U/ml ) were divided into group A (n=30), group B (n=30) and group C (n=30). Group A underwent peg-IFNα-2a com-bined with ADV at the beginning;group B underwent ADV at the beginning, and then ADV combined with peg-IFNα-2a was given when HBV-DNA was inhibited to 4-5 log10 U/ml;group C underwent ADV at the beginning, and then ADV combined with peg-IFNα-2a was given when HBV-DNA was inhibited to 3-4 log10 U/ml. The courses of combined thera-pies in the three groups were not less than 48 weeks. The differences in seroconversion rates of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), HBV-DNA negative conversion rate and alanine transarninase (ALT) normalization rate were comparatively analyzed, and the incidence rates of adverse reactions were also observed among the three groups in the 24th and 48th week of combined therapy. Results In the 24th week of combined therapy, the differ-ences in HBsAg seroconversion rate, ALT normalization rate and HBV-DNA negative conversion rate in the three groups were not statistically significant (P>0. 05);HBeAg seroconversion rate in group C was significantly higher than those in group A and B (P0. 05). In the 48th week of combined therapy, HBsAg seroconversion rate in group C was higher than those in group A and B, but the differences were not statistically significant (P>0. 05), while the increasing tend-ency was obvious;HBeAg seroconversion rate in group C was significantly higher than those in group A and B ( P 0. 05);The difference in ALT normali-zation rate and HBV-DNA negative conversion rate were not statistically significant among the three groups (P>0. 05). During the treatment

  5. The Study on the Confirmatory Protocol of the Reactive Results of Hepatitis B Viral Surface Antigen Blood Screening Test%乙型肝炎病毒表面抗原血液复查阳性结果确认方案的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宇宁; 伍晓菲; 贾尧; 蔡菊英; 刘晓音; 王迅

    2011-01-01

    目的 为探讨简便、经济、可行的HBsAg阳性结果确认方案,为今后在检验常规工作中开展血液筛查阳性结果的确认奠定基础.方法 随机抽取2004~2006年奉贤区血站HBsAg检测不合格血浆标本441份,采用Murex、Organon、新创和科华酶标(EIA)试剂进行复检,对Murex复检为阳性的标本采用Murex中和试验进行确认,并对无法确认或确认为可疑的标本进行HBV DNA检测.结果经EIA复检、中和试验确认及HBV DNA检测,确认441份标本中406份为阳性,7份为可疑,28份为阴性.通过对4种EIA试剂阳性预期值和漏检情况的分析,发现其阳性预期值均达98.74%以上,试剂间差异无统计学意义,而漏检率分别为0.49%、4.19%、3.45%和9.36%,其差异无统计学意义.进一步分析发现,无论4种、3种或2种试剂组合检测,其阳性预期值的差异无统计学意义,但2种EIA试剂组合检测时,“Organon+新创”、“Organon+科华”、“新创十科华”组合的漏检率明显较其他组合为高.结论选择合适的2种EIA试剂组合检测,结果同时为阳性时,不必做中和试验而直接判断待检标本为真阳性,当2种试剂组合中其中一种为Murex时,能获得较高的确认效率.%Objective In order to explore a simple, economic and feasible protocol for confirming the reactive results of hepatitis B viral surface antigen (HBsAg) blood screening test, promote the application of the confirmatory assay in the routine blood screening program. Methods 441 samples were randomly selected from all the HBsAg unqualified samples from 2004 to 2006. Murex, Organon, Xinchuang and Kehua Biotech HBsAg El A reagents were used to re-test the samples. Murex reactive samples were confirmed by Murex HBsAg Confirmatory Assay. The samples only reactive to other 3 reagents and the indeterminate samples with confirmatory assay were further tested by HBV DNA PCR tests. Results After re-test, neutralised confirmatory assay and HBV DNA

  6. Protein L: a novel reagent for the detection of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) expression by flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Zhili; Chinnasamy Nachimuthu; Morgan Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There has been significant progress in the last two decades on the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. Structurally CARs consist of a single chain antibody fragment directed against a tumor-associated antigen fused to an extracellular spacer and transmembrane domain followed by T cell cytoplasmic signaling moieties. Currently several clinical trials are underway using gene modified peripheral blood lymp...

  7. Clinical significant of combined determination of serum CEA and carbohydrate antigen tumor markers in 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma%肺腺癌患者血清CEA和糖链抗原肿瘤标记物联合测定的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈粉秧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significant of combined determination of serum CEA and car-bohydrate antigen (CA125, CA199, CA153) tumor markers in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Methods The serum CEA and carbohydrate antigen (CA125, CA199 and CA153) levels were determined with chemilumescence immunoassay in 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma, 35 patients with lung squanous carcinoma, 42 patients with small cell lung cancer and 49 patients with benign lung disease. Results In 162 patients with lung cancer, the ser-um CEA and carbohydrate antigen levels were significantly higher in 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma, 35 pa-tients with lung squanous carcinoma and 42 patients with small cell lung cancer than those in 49 patients with benign lung disease (P<0. 001) and the level of 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma was the highest. So did the serum carbohydrate antigen levels. The sensitivity (95. 29%) and accuracy (83. 76%) in the four tumor markers combined determination were significantly higher than those in single item ( P all<0. 01 ) , and the specificity was 75. 23%. Conclusion The combined detection of serum CEA and carbohydrate antigen levels is helpful for the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma, with higher sensitivity and accuracy.%目的:为了探讨85例肺腺癌患者血清CEA和糖链抗原肿瘤标记物水平联合测定的临床意义。方法化学发光免疫分析测定85例肺腺癌、35例肺鳞癌、42例小细胞肺癌和49例良性肺部疾病血清CEA和糖链抗原(CA125、CA199和CA153)水平,并进行了比较性研究。结果162例肺癌患者中,85例肺腺癌、35例肺鳞癌、42例小细胞肺癌患者血清CEA水平较之49例良性肺部疾病明显增高( P<0.001、P<0.01和P<0.001),以肺腺癌增高最为明显。血清糖链抗原(CA125、CA199和 CA153)水平亦然,也以肺腺癌血清CA125、CA199和CA153水平增高最为显著。四项肿瘤标记物的联合测定对85例肺腺癌的敏感性为95.29

  8. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, Mark [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Murphy, John R. [Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Fred, E-mail: fwang@research.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients.

  9. Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs; Identification of Oropharyngeal Tonsils as Sites of Primary and Sustained Viral Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Stenfeldt; Pacheco, Juan M.; Luis L Rodriguez; Jonathan Arzt

    2014-01-01

    A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural, intra-oropharyngeal, inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglottic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi) characterized by regional localization of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus. At this time FMDV antigen was localized in cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells and CD172a...

  10. [The vaccines based on the replicon of the venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus against viral hemorrhagic fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A A; Plekhanova, T M; Sidorova, O N; Borisevich, S V; Makhlay, A A

    2015-01-01

    The status of the various recombinant DNA and RNA-derived candidate vaccines, as well as the Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) replicon vaccine system against extremely hazardous viral hemorrhagic fevers, were reviewed. The VEEV-based replication-incompetent vectors offer attractive features in terms of safety, high expression levels of the heterologous viral antigen, tropism to dendritic cells, robust immune responses, protection efficacy, low potential for pre-existing anti-vector immunity and possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines were tested. These features of the VEEV replicon system hold much promise for the development of new generation vaccine candidates against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  11. De novo assembly of highly diverse viral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity in viral populations within infected hosts and the divergence of variants from existing reference genomes impede the analysis of deep viral sequencing data. A de novo population consensus assembly is valuable both as a single linear representation of the population and as a backbone on which intra-host variants can be accurately mapped. The availability of consensus assemblies and robustly mapped variants are crucial to the genetic study of viral disease progression, transmission dynamics, and viral evolution. Existing de novo assembly techniques fail to robustly assemble ultra-deep sequence data from genetically heterogeneous populations such as viruses into full-length genomes due to the presence of extensive genetic variability, contaminants, and variable sequence coverage. Results We present VICUNA, a de novo assembly algorithm suitable for generating consensus assemblies from genetically heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate its effectiveness on Dengue, Human Immunodeficiency and West Nile viral populations, representing a range of intra-host diversity. Compared to state-of-the-art assemblers designed for haploid or diploid systems, VICUNA recovers full-length consensus and captures insertion/deletion polymorphisms in diverse samples. Final assemblies maintain a high base calling accuracy. VICUNA program is publicly available at: http://www.broadinstitute.org/scientific-community/science/projects/viral-genomics/ viral-genomics-analysis-software. Conclusions We developed VICUNA, a publicly available software tool, that enables consensus assembly of ultra-deep sequence derived from diverse viral populations. While VICUNA was developed for the analysis of viral populations, its application to other heterogeneous sequence data sets such as metagenomic or tumor cell population samples may prove beneficial in these fields of research.

  12. Natural and genetically engineered viral agents for oncolysis and gene therapy of human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Joseph G; Horvath, Joseph C

    2008-12-01

    Based on personal acquaintances and experience dating back to the early 1950s, the senior author reviews the history of viral therapy of cancer. He points out the difficulties encountered in the treatment of human cancers, as opposed by the highly successful viral therapy of experimentally maintained tumors in laboratory animals, especially that of ascites carcinomas in mice. A detailed account of viral therapy of human tumors with naturally oncolytic viruses follows, emphasizing the first clinical trials with viral oncolysates. The discrepancy between the high success rates, culminating in cures, in the treatment of tumors of laboratory animals, and the moderate results, such as stabilizations of disease, partial responses, very rare complete remissions, and frequent relapses with virally treated human tumors is recognized. The preclinical laboratory testing against established human tumor cell lines that were maintained in tissue cultures for decades, and against human tumors extricated from their natural habitat and grown in xenografts, may not yield valid results predictive of the viral therapy applied against human tumors growing in their natural environment, the human host. Since the recent discovery of the oncosuppressive efficacy of bacteriophages, the colon could be regarded as the battlefield, where incipient tumor cells and bacteriophages vie for dominance. The inner environment of the colon will be the teaching ground providing new knowledge on the value of the anti-tumor efficacy of phage-induced innate anti-tumor immune reactions. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses are reviewed next. The molecular biology of viral oncolysis is explained in details. Elaborate efforts are presented to elucidate how gene product proteins of oncolytic viruses switch off the oncogenic cascades of cancer cells. The facts strongly support the conclusion that viral therapy of human cancers will remain in the front lines of modern cancer therapeutics. It may be a

  13. Hu Ly-m5: a unique antigen physically associated with HLA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, R L; McKenzie, I F

    1983-05-01

    A new human cell surface antigen (Hu Ly-m5) detected by a murine monoclonal antibody (E4.3) is described. The tissue distribution of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is similar to the HLA antigens (with which it was initially confused) but it is not present on all bone marrow cells nor the U266 myeloma, and is expressed on the HLA-negative K562 cell line. Nevertheless, the Hu Ly-m5 antigen has some affinity for HLA molecules as the two entities cocap and the Hu Ly-m5 antigen copurifies with the HLA antigens on an anti-beta 2-microglobulin immunoabsorbent column; however, the antigen complexes did not withstand the procedures used for coprecipitation. Despite their similarities, the Hu Ly-m5 and HLA antigens are distinct molecular entities--Hu Ly-m5 consists of two bands of apparent molecular weight 69 and 60 K while HLA is comprised of the 43 and 12 K bands of the HLA heavy chain and beta 2-microglobulin, respectively. The function of the Hu Ly-m5 antigen is unknown, but no involvement in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to influenza virus-infected cells could be demonstrated. The two properties described (apparent molecular weight and physical association with the HLA antigens) suggests that the Hu Ly-m5 antigen may be a viral-encoded protein.

  14. Potential Target Antigens for a Universal Vaccine in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Vermeij

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, the primary cause of death from gynaecological malignancies, has only modestly improved over the last decades. Immunotherapeutic treatment using a cocktail of antigens has been proposed as a “universal” vaccine strategy. We determined the expression of tumor antigens in the context of MHC class I expression in 270 primary tumor samples using tissue microarray. Expression of tumor antigens p53, SP17, survivin, WT1, and NY-ESO-1 was observed in 120 (48.0%, 173 (68.9%, 208 (90.0%, 129 (56.3%, and 27 (11.0% of 270 tumor specimens, respectively. In 93.2% of EOC, at least one of the investigated tumor antigens was (overexpressed. Expression of MHC class I was observed in 78.1% of EOC. In 3 out 4 primary tumors, (overexpression of a tumor antigen combined with MHC class I was observed. These results indicate that a multiepitope vaccine, comprising these antigens, could serve as a universal therapeutic vaccine for the vast majority of ovarian cancer patients.

  15. Hepatitis B virus antigens impair NK cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    An inadequate immune response of the host is thought to be a critical factor causing chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, as one of the key players in the eradication and control of viral infections, were functionally impaired in CHB patients, which might contribute to viral persistence. Here, we reported that HBV antigens HBsAg and HBeAg directly inhibited NK cell function. HBsAg and/or HBeAg blocked NK cell activation, cytokine production and cytotoxic granule release in human NK cell-line NK-92 cells, which might be related to the downregulation of activating receptors and upregulation of inhibitory receptor. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms likely involved the suppression of STAT1, NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings implicated that HBV antigen-mediated inhibition of NK cells might be an efficient strategy for HBV evasion, targeting the early antiviral responses mediated by NK cells and resulting in the establishment of chronic virus infection. Therefore, this study revealed the relationship between viral antigens and human immune function, especially a potential important interaction between HBV and innate immune responses. PMID:27341035

  16. Tumor heterogeneity as a rationale for a multi-epitope approach in an autologous renal cell cancer tumor vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittke S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Wittke,1 Susann Baxmann,2 Dirk Fahlenkamp,3 Stephan T Kiessig2 1University of Applied Sciences Bremerhaven, Faculty of Biotechnology Bremerhaven, 2Ruhr-Plasma-Centre GmbH, Bochum, 3Department of Urology, Zeisigwald Bethanien Hospital, Chemnitz, Germany Purpose: An autologous tumor vaccine already used successfully in the immune therapy of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in detail. The evaluation of potential tumor markers should allow for the assessment of potency according to pharmaceutical regulations.Methods: A panel of 36 tumor-associated antigens and cellular marker proteins was characterized in a total of 133 tumor cell lysates by methods such as ELISA, Western blots, and topological proteomics. The induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific antibodies was demonstrated by immunization in mice.Results: Tumor heterogeneity was demonstrated: none of the tumor-associated antigens investigated were detectable in each tumor lysate. In parallel, the coincidental presence of potential danger signals was shown for HSP-60 and HSP-70. The presence of both antigen and danger signal allowed a successful induction of an immune response in a murine model.Conclusion: The verified tumor heterogeneity indicates the need for a multi-epitope approach for the successful immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma. Keywords: renal cell carcinoma, kidney cancer, tumor-associated antigens, tumor marker, ELISA, Western Blot, immunotherapy, therapeutic vaccine, potency testing, topological proteomics

  17. Viral hepatitis screening guideline before biological drug use in rheumatic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, Ömer; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Özer, Birol; Kaymakoğlu, Sabahattin; Kuş, Yeşim; İnanç, Murat; Keser, Gökhan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Biological drugs (tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, rituximab, tocilizumab, abatacept, and tofacitinib) are important treatment alternatives in rheumatology, particularly for resistant patients. However, they may cause hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) reactivation; for instance, HBV reactivation may occur in a patient who is an inactive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier or who has resolved HBV infection. Therefore, the screening of patients before biological treatment and the application of a prophylactic treatment, particularly with respect to latent HBV infections, are recommended when necessary. This guideline covers pre-treatment screening and follow-up recommendations, if required, with respect to viral hepatitides in rheumatology patients who are planned to be given biological drugs. Although this guideline is prepared for biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), it is recommended to be used also for target-oriented DMARDS and medium–high dose corticosteroids (>7.5 mg prednisolone/day equivalent). It should be considered that the reactivation risk is higher when more than one immunosuppressive drug is used.

  18. Viral infections of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned. PMID:23642871

  19. 乳腺癌细胞抗原负载的自体树突状细胞体内诱导特异性T细胞应答%Specific T-cell response induced in vivo by dendritic cells loaded with breast tumor cells antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉兰; 钱科卿; 秦建伟; 陈小平; 时宏珍; 赖娅娜; 唐金海

    2010-01-01

    目的 以乳腺癌细胞抗原体外负载自体树突状细胞(DCs)对24例乳腺癌患者进行自身免疫,探讨其体内诱导特异性T细胞免疫应答的能力.方法 新鲜癌组织制备成热休克凋亡细胞抗原负载外周单核细胞来源DC,分别在采血后第1、2、4、6周于患者腹股沟淋巴结富集区进行皮内注射,细胞剂量为4×10+~6×106/次.结果 DC免疫治疗后患者血清抗瘤免疫因子水平明显上升:白细胞介素(IL)-2治疗前为(33.8±7.2)ng/L,治疗后为(68.5±12.4)ng/L;IL-12治疗前为(48.5±10.9)ng/L,治疗后为(118.2±31.5)ng/L;肿瘤坏死因子(TNF)-α治疗前为(18.7±5.3)ng/L,治疗后为(78.3±11.5)ng/L;干扰素(IFN)-γ治疗前为(20.5±6.3)ng/L,治疗后为(92.6±14.9)ng/L,治疗前后比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);DTH试验阳性率为7/10;4/10例IFN-γ+CD8+T细胞频率较治疗前明显增加.随访发现:除1例患者在治疗后3个月内疾病进展(PD),其余患者病情稳定无复发与转移症状(SD).结论 以乳腺癌细胞为抗原负载自体DC免疫患者,能够有效提高患者非特异免疫水平,激发体内特异性T细胞免疫应答,是一种安全、副反应较小、有效的乳腺癌辅助治疗手段.%Objective To explore the potential of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with breast tumor cells antigen in inducing tumor-specific T cells response in vivo. Methods Fresh tumor samples from patients with breast cancer were collected and made into apoptotic heat shock tumor cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated. DCs were induced from monocytes with granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) combination for 5 days. DCs were co-cultured with autologous apoptotic heat shock tumor cells for 48 h. Twenty-four patients with breast cancers received four vaccinations of auto-DCs at 1 st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week with cell number from 4×106 to 6×106. Results The vaccinations were well

  20. Viral infections and cell cycle G2/M regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Y.ZHAO; Robert T.ELDER

    2005-01-01

    Progression of cells from G2 phase of the cell cycle to mitosis is a tightly regulated cellular process that requires activation of the Cdc2 kinase, which determines onset of mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. In both human and fission yeast(Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cells, the activity of Cdc2 is regulated in part by the phosphorylation status of tyrosine 15(Tyr15) on Cdc2, which is phosphorylated by Wee1 kinase during late G2 and is rapidly dephosphorylated by the Cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase to trigger entry into mitosis. These Cdc2 regulators are the downstream targets of two well-characterized G2/M checkpoint pathways which prevent cells from entering mitosis when cellular DNA is damaged or when DNA replication is inhibited. Increasing evidence suggests that Cdc2 is also commonly targeted by viral proteins,which modulate host cell cycle machinery to benefit viral survival or replication. In this review, we describe the effect of viral protein R (Vpr) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on cell cycle G2/M regulation. Based on our current knowledge about this viral effect, we hypothesize that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a mechanism that is to some extent different from the classic G2/M checkpoints. One the unique features distinguishing Vpr-induced G2 arrest from the classic checkpoints is the role of phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Vpr-induced G2 arrest.Interestingly, PP2A is targeted by a number of other viral proteins including SV40 small T antigen, polyomavirus T antigen, HTLV Tax and adenovirus E4orf4. Thus an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Vpr-induced G2 arrest will provide additional insights into the basic biology of cell cycle G2/M regulation and into the biological significance of this effect during host-pathogen interactions.