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Sample records for antigenic variation molecular

  1. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  2. Molecular technology and antigenic variation among intraerythrocytic hemoparasites: do we see reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, D R

    2001-11-22

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism of immune evasion utilized by many microorganisms--encompassing such broad evolutionary groups as viruses, bacteria, and protozoa--to survive the onslaught of a specifically activated host immune system. Because of its importance to the survival of many infectious agents there is considerable interest in understanding this phenomenon. With knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which these microbes deliberately manipulate their genomes, it may be possible to disrupt the molecular machinery of the responsible genetic mechanisms. Among intraerythrocytic parasites, genetic mechanisms that have been observed or postulated to control antigenic variation include segmental gene conversion, epigenetically controlled in situ transcriptional switching, alterations of chromosomal structure associated with transcriptional control, and recombination during sexual reproduction. Likely, more than one type of mechanism is used by all organisms that undergo antigenic variation. In this paper, both the observed mechanisms and some of the molecular technology used to detect these mechanisms are discussed. While often seemingly straightforward from a technical standpoint, sometimes subtle differences in the methods used to study this process may affect what is observed. Some examples of this phenomenon are discussed in the context of a small selection of intraerythrocytic parasites.

  3. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

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    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  4. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  5. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B. I.

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  6. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Vink (Cornelis); L. Rudenko (Larisa); H.S. Seifert (H. Steven)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a

  7. Antigenic variation in the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargantini, Pablo Rubén; Serradell, Marianela Del Carmen; Ríos, Diego Nicolás; Tenaglia, Albano Heraldo; Luján, Hugo Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Giardia lamblia trophozoites undergo antigenic variation, where one member of the Variant-specific Surface Protein (VSP) family is expressed on the surface of proliferating trophozoites and periodically replaced by another one. Two main questions have challenged researchers since antigenic switching was discovered in Giardia: What are the mechanisms involved? How are they influenced by other cellular processes or by the environment? Two molecular mechanisms have been proposed, both involving small non-coding RNAs. Here we postulate that (a) chromatin remodeling, triggered by environmental factors, also plays an important role in selecting the VSP that will be expressed and (b) the particular VSP structure may not only protect the parasite in the small intestine but also signal the need to exchange the existing VSP for another. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

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    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  9. Immunogenetic mechanisms driving norovirus GII.4 antigenic variation.

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    Lisa C Lindesmith

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are the principal cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide with GII.4 strains accounting for 80% of infections. The major capsid protein of GII.4 strains is evolving rapidly, resulting in new epidemic strains with altered antigenic potentials. To test if antigenic drift may contribute to GII.4 persistence, human memory B cells were immortalized and the resulting human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs characterized for reactivity to a panel of time-ordered GII.4 virus-like particles (VLPs. Reflecting the complex exposure history of the volunteer, human anti-GII.4 mAbs grouped into three VLP reactivity patterns; ancestral (1987-1997, contemporary (2004-2009, and broad (1987-2009. NVB 114 reacted exclusively to the earliest GII.4 VLPs by EIA and blockade. NVB 97 specifically bound and blocked only contemporary GII.4 VLPs, while NBV 111 and 43.9 exclusively reacted with and blocked variants of the GII.4.2006 Minerva strain. Three mAbs had broad GII.4 reactivity. Two, NVB 37.10 and 61.3, also detected other genogroup II VLPs by EIA but did not block any VLP interactions with carbohydrate ligands. NVB 71.4 cross-neutralized the panel of time-ordered GII.4 VLPs, as measured by VLP-carbohydrate blockade assays. Using mutant VLPs designed to alter predicted antigenic epitopes, two evolving, GII.4-specific, blockade epitopes were mapped. Amino acids 294-298 and 368-372 were required for binding NVB 114, 111 and 43.9 mAbs. Amino acids 393-395 were essential for binding NVB 97, supporting earlier correlations between antibody blockade escape and carbohydrate binding variation. These data inform VLP vaccine design, provide a strategy for expanding the cross-blockade potential of chimeric VLP vaccines, and identify an antibody with broadly neutralizing therapeutic potential for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, these data support the hypothesis that GII.4 norovirus evolution is heavily influenced by antigenic variation of neutralizing

  10. Variational methods in molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book presents tutorial overviews for many applications of variational methods to molecular modeling. Topics discussed include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov-Feynman variational principle, square-gradient models, classical density functional theories, self-consistent-field theories, phase-field methods, Ginzburg-Landau and Helfrich-type phenomenological models, dynamical density functional theory, and variational Monte Carlo methods. Illustrative examples are given to facilitate understanding of the basic concepts and quantitative prediction of the properties and rich behavior of diverse many-body systems ranging from inhomogeneous fluids, electrolytes and ionic liquids in micropores, colloidal dispersions, liquid crystals, polymer blends, lipid membranes, microemulsions, magnetic materials and high-temperature superconductors. All chapters are written by leading experts in the field and illustrated with tutorial examples for their practical applications to specific subjects. With emphasis placed on physical unders...

  11. Biological variation of total prostate-specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg; Semjonow, Axel; Sibley, Paul E C

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objectives of this study were to determine whether a single result for total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) can be used confidently to guide the need for prostate biopsy and by how much serial tPSA measurements must differ to be significant. tPSA measurements include both...... analytical and biological components of variation. The European Group on Tumor Markers conducted a literature survey to determine both the magnitude and impact of biological variation on single, the mean of replicate, and serial tPSA measurements. METHODS: The survey yielded 27 studies addressing the topic......, and estimates for the biological variation of tPSA could be derived from 12 of these studies. RESULTS: The mean biological variation was 20% in the concentration range 0.1-20 microg/L for men over 50 years. The biological variation means that the one-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of the dispersion...

  12. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

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    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  13. Genetic variation and significance of hepatitis B surface antigen

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    ZHANG Zhenhua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV is prone to genetic variation because there is reverse transcription in the process of HBV replication. The gene mutation of hepatitis B surface antigen may affect clinical diagnosis of HBV infection, viral replication, and vaccine effect. The current research and existing problems are discussed from the following aspects: the mechanism and biological and clinical significance of S gene mutation. Most previous studies focused on S gene alone, so S gene should be considered as part of HBV DNA in the future research on S gene mutation.

  14. A high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptor redirects lymphocytes to target human melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William R; Zhao, Yangbing; Frankel, Timothy L; Hinrichs, Christian S; Zheng, Zhili; Xu, Hui; Feldman, Steven A; Ferrone, Soldano; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2010-04-15

    Immunotherapy, particularly the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), is a very promising therapy for metastatic melanoma. Some patients unable to receive TIL have been successfully treated with autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen-restricted, melanoma antigen-reactive T-cell receptors; however, substantial numbers of patients remain ineligible due to the lack of expression of the restricting HLA class I allele. We sought to overcome this limitation by designing a non-MHC-restricted, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), which is highly expressed on more than 90% of human melanomas but has a restricted distribution in normal tissues. HMW-MAA-specific CARs containing an antigen recognition domain based on variations of the HMW-MAA-specific monoclonal antibody 225.28S and a T-cell activation domain based on combinations of CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3zeta activation motifs were constructed within a retroviral vector to allow stable gene transfer into cells and their progeny. Following optimization of the HMW-MAA-specific CAR for expression and function in human PBL, these gene-modified T cells secreted cytokines, were cytolytic, and proliferated in response to HMW-MAA-expressing cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor functioned in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, was non-MHC restricted, and reacted against explanted human melanomas. To evaluate this HMW-MAA-specific CAR in patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a clinical-grade retroviral packaging line. This may represent a novel means to treat the majority of patients with advanced melanoma, most notably those unable to receive current ACT therapies. (c)2010 AACR.

  15. Genetic analysis of a Treponema phagedenis locus encoding antigenic lipoproteins with potential for antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mamoona; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Loftsdottir, Heidur; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo; Zuerner, Richard; Rosander, Anna

    2016-06-30

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a painful and debilitating claw disease in cattle. Spirochetes of the genus Treponema are found in high numbers in the lesions and are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The occurrence of Treponema phagedenis in DD lesions, especially near the interface of healthy and diseased tissue, suggests that this species contributes to the development and/or progression of the lesions. In this study we characterized a genetic locus in T. phagedenis that contains coding regions for three antigenic proteins, PrrA, VpsA, and VpsB. Comparative analysis of homologous loci from fifteen strains suggests that prrA may be transposed into or out of this locus. Alterations in the copy number of TA repeats within the putative promoter region may regulate VpsA/B expression. The vpsA and prrA genes occur in allelic variants in different T. phagedenis isolates and may provide one explanation for the antigenic variation observed in T. phagedenis DD isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Characteristics of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Nonspecific Cross-reacting Antigen(Clinical Application of Tumor Antigen)

    OpenAIRE

    内山, 一晃; Uchiyama, Kazuaki

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is one of the most famous laboratory tests of tumor markers. CEA was first reported in 1965, but molecular structure of CEA was not clear untill recent years. Amino acid sequence of CEA was reported in 1987, by the success of cDNA clonig of CEA. The CEA molecule is composed of five major domains, called domain N, I, II, III, C from the -NH_2 terminal. But sugar chains of CEA are complicated and have much variety, so there are few informations about them. If CEA ...

  17. The molecular relationship between antigenic domains and epitopes on hCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-08-01

    Antigenic domains are defined to contain a limited number of neighboring epitopes recognized by antibodies (Abs) but their molecular relationship remains rather elusive. We thoroughly analyzed the antigenic surface of the important pregnancy and tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a cystine knot (ck) growth factor, and set antigenic domains and epitopes in molecular relationships to each other. Antigenic domains on hCG, its free hCGα and hCGβ subunits are dependent on appropriate inherent molecular features such as molecular accessibility and protrusion indices that determine bulging structures accessible to Abs. The banana-shaped intact hCG comprises ∼7500Å(2) of antigenic surface with minimally five antigenic domains that encompass a continuum of overlapping non-linear composite epitopes, not taking into account the C-terminal peptide extension of hCGβ (hCGβCTP). Epitopes within an antigenic domain are defined by specific Abs, that bury nearly 1000Å(2) of surface accessible area on the antigen and recognize a few up to 15 amino acid (aa) residues, whereby between 2 and 5 of these provide the essential binding energy. Variability in Ab binding modes to the contact aa residues are responsible for the variation in affinity and intra- and inter-species specificity, e.g. cross-reactions with luteinizing hormone (LH). Each genetically distinct fragment antigen binding (Fab) defines its own epitope. Consequently, recognition of the same epitope by different Abs is only possible in cases of genetically identical sequences of its binding sites. Due to combinatorial V(D)J gene segment variability of heavy and light chains, Abs defining numerous epitopes within an antigenic domain can be generated by different individuals and species. Far more than hundred Abs against the immuno-dominant antigenic domains of either subunit at both ends of the hCG-molecule, the tips of peptide loops one and three (Ł1+3) protruding from the central ck, encompassing h

  18. Mini-review: Strategies for Variation and Evolution of Bacterial Antigens

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    Janet Foley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the eubacteria, antigenic variation has emerged as a strategy to evade host immunity. However, phenotypic variation in some of these antigens also allows the bacteria to exploit variable host niches as well. The specific mechanisms are not shared-derived characters although there is considerable convergent evolution and numerous commonalities reflecting considerations of natural selection and biochemical restraints. Unlike in viruses, mechanisms of antigenic variation in most bacteria involve larger DNA movement such as gene conversion or DNA rearrangement, although some antigens vary due to point mutations or modified transcriptional regulation. The convergent evolution that promotes antigenic variation integrates various evolutionary forces: these include mutations underlying variant production; drift which could remove alleles especially early in infection or during life history phases in arthropod vectors (when the bacterial population size goes through a bottleneck; selection not only for any particular variant but also for the mechanism for the production of variants (i.e., selection for mutability; and overcoming negative selection against variant production. This review highlights the complexities of drivers of antigenic variation, in particular extending evaluation beyond the commonly cited theory of immune evasion. A deeper understanding of the diversity of purpose and mechanisms of antigenic variation in bacteria will contribute to greater insight into bacterial pathogenesis, ecology and coevolution with hosts.

  19. Genetic diversity of K-antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli and their molecular typing using a suspension array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Xi, Daoyi; Jing, Fuyi; Kong, Deju; Wu, Junli; Feng, Lu; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Lei

    2018-04-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs), or K-antigens, are the major surface antigens of Escherichia coli. More than 80 serologically unique K-antigens are classified into 4 groups (Groups 1-4) of capsules. Groups 1 and 4 contain the Wzy-dependent polymerization pathway and the gene clusters are in the order galF to gnd; Groups 2 and 3 contain the ABC-transporter-dependent pathway and the gene clusters consist of 3 regions, regions 1, 2 and 3. Little is known about the variations among the gene clusters. In this study, 9 serotypes of K-antigen gene clusters (K2ab, K11, K20, K24, K38, K84, K92, K96, and K102) were sequenced and correlated with their CPS chemical structures. On the basis of sequence data, a K-antigen-specific suspension array that detects 10 distinct CPSs, including the above 9 CPSs plus K30, was developed. This is the first report to catalog the genetic features of E. coli K-antigen variations and to develop a suspension array for their molecular typing. The method has a number of advantages over traditional bacteriophage and serum agglutination methods and lays the foundation for straightforward identification and detection of additional K-antigens in the future.

  20. Variations of immunoglobulins after antigenic injection in irradiated rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, P.; Borgard, J.P.

    Study on the influence of irradiation upon rabbit immunoglobulins is developed. It is tried to check if the observed delay, after cephalic irradiation, in specified antibody response of injected antigen, could be in relation with a transient hypoimmunoglobulinemia in these same animals [fr

  1. Antigen-dependent fluorescence response of anti-c-Myc Quenchbody studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu; Okumura, Hisashi; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    We performed metadynamics molecular dynamics simulations to reveal mechanism of antigen-dependent fluorescence response observed for site-specifically fluorescent-labeled single-chain antibody against c-Myc peptide antigen. We found that VH and VL bind with each other only when the antigen exists and that the fluorophore labeled at the N-terminus of VH interacts with Trp103 most stably. These results support the mechanism proposed from previous experiments: In the absence of antigen, Trp residues are partially exposed at the interface of VH and quench the fluorophore. In the presence of antigen, the Trp residues are buried between VH and VL , and the quenching is eliminated.

  2. Antigenic Variation of TprK Facilitates Development of Secondary Syphilis

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Tara B.; Molini, Barbara J.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2014-01-01

    Although primary syphilis lesions heal spontaneously, the infection is chronic, with subsequent clinical stages. Healing of the primary chancre occurs as antibodies against outer membrane antigens facilitate opsonophagocytosis of the bacteria by activated macrophages. TprK is an outer membrane protein that undergoes antigenic variation at 7 variable regions, and variants are selected by immune pressure. We hypothesized that individual TprK variants escape immune clearance and seed new dissemi...

  3. Mapping replication dynamics in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a link with telomere transcription and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Rebecca; Marques, Catarina A; Paape, Daniel; Prorocic, Marko; Zurita-Leal, Andrea C; Campbell, Samantha J; Lapsley, Craig; Dickens, Nicholas; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-05-26

    Survival of Trypanosoma brucei depends upon switches in its protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat by antigenic variation. VSG switching occurs by frequent homologous recombination, which is thought to require locus-specific initiation. Here, we show that a RecQ helicase, RECQ2, acts to repair DNA breaks, including in the telomeric site of VSG expression. Despite this, RECQ2 loss does not impair antigenic variation, but causes increased VSG switching by recombination, arguing against models for VSG switch initiation through direct generation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). Indeed, we show DSBs inefficiently direct recombination in the VSG expression site. By mapping genome replication dynamics, we reveal that the transcribed VSG expression site is the only telomeric site that is early replicating - a differential timing only seen in mammal-infective parasites. Specific association between VSG transcription and replication timing reveals a model for antigenic variation based on replication-derived DNA fragility.

  4. Leishmania-specific surface antigens show sub-genus sequence variation and immune recognition.

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    Daniel P Depledge

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A family of hydrophilic acylated surface (HASP proteins, containing extensive and variant amino acid repeats, is expressed at the plasma membrane in infective extracellular (metacyclic and intracellular (amastigote stages of Old World Leishmania species. While HASPs are antigenic in the host and can induce protective immune responses, the biological functions of these Leishmania-specific proteins remain unresolved. Previous genome analysis has suggested that parasites of the sub-genus Leishmania (Viannia have lost HASP genes from their genomes.We have used molecular and cellular methods to analyse HASP expression in New World Leishmania mexicana complex species and show that, unlike in L. major, these proteins are expressed predominantly following differentiation into amastigotes within macrophages. Further genome analysis has revealed that the L. (Viannia species, L. (V. braziliensis, does express HASP-like proteins of low amino acid similarity but with similar biochemical characteristics, from genes present on a region of chromosome 23 that is syntenic with the HASP/SHERP locus in Old World Leishmania species and the L. (L. mexicana complex. A related gene is also present in Leptomonas seymouri and this may represent the ancestral copy of these Leishmania-genus specific sequences. The L. braziliensis HASP-like proteins (named the orthologous (o HASPs are predominantly expressed on the plasma membrane in amastigotes and are recognised by immune sera taken from 4 out of 6 leishmaniasis patients tested in an endemic region of Brazil. Analysis of the repetitive domains of the oHASPs has shown considerable genetic variation in parasite isolates taken from the same patients, suggesting that antigenic change may play a role in immune recognition of this protein family.These findings confirm that antigenic hydrophilic acylated proteins are expressed from genes in the same chromosomal region in species across the genus Leishmania. These proteins are

  5. Monitoring antigenic variations of enterovirus 71: implications for virus surveillance and vaccine development.

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    Min-Yuan Chia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 causes life-threatening epidemics in Asia and can be phylogenetically classified into three major genogroups (A ∼ C including 11 genotypes (A, B1 ∼ B5, and C1 ∼ C5. Recently, EV71 epidemics occurred cyclically in Taiwan with different genotypes. In recent years, human studies using post-infection sera obtained from children have detected antigenic variations among different EV71 strains. Therefore, surveillance of enterovirus 71 should include phylogenetic and antigenic analysis. Due to limitation of sera available from children with EV71 primary infection, suitable animal models should be developed to generate a panel of antisera for monitoring EV71 antigenic variations. Twelve reference strains representing the 11 EV71 genotypes were grown in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Infectious EV71 particles were purified and collected to immunize rabbits. The rabbit antisera were then employed to measure neutralizing antibody titers against the 12 reference strains and 5 recent strains. Rabbits immunized with genogroup B and C viruses consistently have a lower neutralizing antibody titers against genogroup A (≧ 8-fold difference and antigenic variations between genogroup B and C viruses can be detected but did not have a clear pattern, which are consistent with previous human studies. Comparison between human and rabbit neutralizing antibody profiles, the results showed that ≧ 8-fold difference in rabbit cross-reactive antibody ratios could be used to screen EV71 isolates for identifying potential antigenic variants. In conclusion, a rabbit model was developed to monitor antigenic variations of EV71, which are critical to select vaccine strains and predict epidemics.

  6. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody–Protein Antigen Complexes Using Small-Angle Scattering and Molecular Modeling

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    Maria Monica Castellanos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of monoclonal antibody interactions with protein antigens in solution can lead to important insights guiding physical characterization and molecular engineering of therapeutic targets. We used small-angle scattering (SAS combined with size-exclusion multi-angle light scattering high-performance liquid chromatography to obtain monodisperse samples with defined stoichiometry to study an anti-streptavidin monoclonal antibody interacting with tetrameric streptavidin. Ensembles of structures with both monodentate and bidentate antibody–antigen complexes were generated using molecular docking protocols and molecular simulations. By comparing theoretical SAS profiles to the experimental data it was determined that the primary component(s were compact monodentate and/or bidentate complexes. SAS profiles of extended monodentate complexes were not consistent with the experimental data. These results highlight the capability for determining the shape of monoclonal antibody–antigen complexes in solution using SAS data and physics-based molecular modeling.

  7. The Small Chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei Involved in Antigenic Variation Are Constructed Around Repetitive Palindromes

    OpenAIRE

    Wickstead, Bill; Ersfeld, Klaus; Gull, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Most eukaryotic genomes contain large regions of satellite DNA. These arrays are often associated with essential chromosomal functions, but remain largely absent from genome projects because of difficulties in cloning and sequence assembly. The numerous small chromosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei fall into this category, yet are critical to understanding the genome because of their role in antigenic variation. Their relatively small size, however, makes them particularly amenable to ...

  8. Molecular characterization of the capsular antigens of Pasteurella multocida isolates using multiplex PCR

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    Khalid S. Al-Maary

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular techniques for detection and characterization of the Pasteurella multocida is very important for rapid and specific detection and characterization of the organism. During the period from 15th February, 2014 to 15th April, 2015, 425 nasopharyngeal swabs and 175 lung and spleen samples were collected and examined by conventional methods, 80 strains (18.82% of P. multocida were isolated from the calves, sheep and goat with respiratory manifestation. Meanwhile, 77 strains (44% were isolated from emergency slaughtered animals. All the recovered strains were positive for specific PCR for detection of P. multocida strains previously identified as P. multocida by standard microbiological techniques. Multiplex PCR for molecular typing of the capsular antigens of the recovered P. multocida revealed positive amplification of 1044 bp fragments specific to the capsular antigen type A with 105 strains (66.88%, and amplification 511 bp fragments of the capsular antigen type E with 52 strain (33.12% and absence of B, D and F antigens. Multiplex PCR for molecular typing of the capsular antigens of P. multocida can be used as a simple, sensitive, rapid, reliable technique instead of the serological techniques for identification of the capsular antigens of P. multocida

  9. Loss of high-molecular-weight cytokeratin antigenicity in prostate tissue obtained by transurethral resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhaupt, H A; Fessler, J N; Warhol, M J

    2000-12-01

    Staining of prostatic basal cells for the expression of high-molecular-weight cytokeratin has been suggested as a way of distinguishing benign from malignant prostate glands. We evaluated the utility of high-molecular-weight cytokeratin in the diagnosis of malignancy in prostate specimens obtained in various ways. Prostate tissues obtained from needle biopsies, transurethral resections, and total prostatectomies were immunostained with monoclonal antibody 34betaE12, an antibody directed against high-molecular-weight cytokeratins. Antiserum to high-molecular-weight cytokeratin only stained the basal cells in normal glands in 3 (12%) of 25 specimens obtained by transurethral resection. Other antigens, such as the alternate 10-nm filament protein vimentin, were unaffected and were detected in 100% of these specimens. However, keratin antigenicity in transurethral biopsies could be restored in these specimens by antigen retrieval in a low pH citrate buffer using a microwave heat technique. Keratin staining in needle biopsies and total prostatectomies was unaffected. In summary, our results indicate the technique of transurethral resection results in a specific loss of keratin antigenicity. This limits the utility of anticytokeratin 34betaE12 in interpreting transurethral resections without the application of antigen retrieval.

  10. Molecular typing of human platelet and neutrophil antigens (HPA and HNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuisen, Barbera; Porcelijn, Leendert; Ellen van der Schoot, C; de Haas, Masja

    2014-04-01

    Genotyping is an important tool in the diagnosis of disorders involving allo-immunisation to antigens present on the membranes of platelets and neutrophils. To date 28 human platelet antigens (HPAs) have been indentified on six polymorphic glycoproteins on the surface of platelets. Antibodies against HPAs play a role in foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and refractoriness to donor platelets. The 11 human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) described to date have been indentified on five polymorphic proteins on the surface of granulocytes. Antibodies to HNAs are implicated with foetal and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia (FNAIN), autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). In this report, we will review the molecular basis and techniques currently available for the genotyping of human platelet and neutrophil antigens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombinant carcinoembryonic antigen as a reporter gene for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Wu, Anna M. [David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Braun, Jonathan [David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Reporter genes can provide a way of noninvasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression, or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human Fc{gamma}RIIb receptor. The NA3-Fc{gamma}RIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-Fc{gamma}RIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-Fc{gamma}RIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA {sup 124}I-labeled single-chain Fv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4 h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8 {+-} 0.2, 15.2 {+-} 1.3, and 4.6 {+-} 1.2 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 4, 20, and 48 h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48 h demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8 {+-} 0.8%ID/g. The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. (orig.)

  12. Regulation of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum: censoring freedom of expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael F; Reeder, John C; Brown, Graham V

    2003-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs a strategy of clonal antigenic variation to evade the host immune response during the intraerythrocytic stage of its life cycle. The major variant parasite molecule is the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein (PfEMP)1, which is encoded by the var multigene family. The parasite switches between different PfEMP1 molecules through regulation of var transcription. Recent studies have shed considerable light on this process, but much remains unknown. However, striking parallels between transcriptional control of var and genes in other organisms provide direction for future studies.

  13. Interpretation of sequential measurements of cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) based on analytical imprecision and biological variation in the monitoring of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, M.K.; Söletormos, G.; Petersen, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective with cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) monitoring of ovarian cancer patients is to detect an early change of disease activity with high reliability. We hypothesized that a monitoring scheme for ovarian cancer......, the standard deviations, and the coefficients of variation differed among subjects, and iii) the steady state variability differed among the markers. In conclusion, our data indicate that the assessment of sequential CA 125, CEA, and TPA concentrations is more complex than hitherto recognized. We suggest...

  14. Molecular variation in Cucumis melo as revealed by isoenzyme and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular variation in Cucumis melo as revealed by isoenzyme and RAPD markers. Tarek M Mohamed. Abstract. No Abstract. The Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol. 23(2) 2005: 141-153. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  15. Antigenic variation of TprK facilitates development of secondary syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Tara B; Molini, Barbara J; Fernandez, Mark C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2014-12-01

    Although primary syphilis lesions heal spontaneously, the infection is chronic, with subsequent clinical stages. Healing of the primary chancre occurs as antibodies against outer membrane antigens facilitate opsonophagocytosis of the bacteria by activated macrophages. TprK is an outer membrane protein that undergoes antigenic variation at 7 variable regions, and variants are selected by immune pressure. We hypothesized that individual TprK variants escape immune clearance and seed new disseminated lesions to cause secondary syphilis. As in human syphilis, infected rabbits may develop disseminated secondary skin lesions. This study explores the nature of secondary syphilis, specifically, the contribution of antigenic variation to the development of secondary lesions. Our data from the rabbit model show that the odds of secondary lesions containing predominately TprK variant treponemes is 3.3 times higher than the odds of finding TprK variants in disseminated primary lesions (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.98 to 11.0]; P = 0.055) and that 96% of TprK variant secondary lesions are likely seeded by single treponemes. Analysis of antibody responses demonstrates significantly higher antibody titers to tprK variable region sequences found in the inoculum compared to reactivity to tprK variant sequences found in newly arising secondary lesions. This suggests that tprK variants escape the initial immune response raised against the V regions expressed in the inoculum. These data further support a role for TprK in immune evasion and suggest that the ability of TprK variants to persist despite a robust immune response is instrumental in the development of later stages of syphilis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Interpretation of sequential measurements of cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) based on analytical imprecision and biological variation in the monitoring of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Sölétormos, G; Petersen, P H

    2001-01-01

    patients with serological tumor markers should take into account the stochastic variation, i.e. the probability that observed increases and decreases may solely be due to analytical imprecision and normal intra-individual biological variation. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed characteristic......, the standard deviations, and the coefficients of variation differed among subjects, and iii) the steady state variability differed among the markers. In conclusion, our data indicate that the assessment of sequential CA 125, CEA, and TPA concentrations is more complex than hitherto recognized. We suggest......The main objective with cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) monitoring of ovarian cancer patients is to detect an early change of disease activity with high reliability. We hypothesized that a monitoring scheme for ovarian cancer...

  17. Molecular characterization of antigen-peptide pulsed dendritic cells: immature dendritic cells develop a distinct molecular profile when pulsed with antigen peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy X Yang

    Full Text Available As dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC, immature DC (iDC, and mature DC (mDC from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20, a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC. When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA, pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN, anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA, DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1, and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61 in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host.

  18. Telomere length affects the frequency and mechanism of antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel A Hovel-Miner

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a master of antigenic variation and immune response evasion. Utilizing a genomic repertoire of more than 1000 Variant Surface Glycoprotein-encoding genes (VSGs, T. brucei can change its protein coat by "switching" from the expression of one VSG to another. Each active VSG is monoallelically expressed from only one of approximately 15 subtelomeric sites. Switching VSG expression occurs by three predominant mechanisms, arguably the most significant of which is the non-reciprocal exchange of VSG containing DNA by duplicative gene conversion (GC. How T. brucei orchestrates its complex switching mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Recent work has demonstrated that an exogenous DNA break in the active site could initiate a GC based switch, yet the source of the switch-initiating DNA lesion under natural conditions is still unknown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that telomere length directly affects VSG switching. We demonstrate that telomerase deficient strains with short telomeres switch more frequently than genetically identical strains with long telomeres and that, when the telomere is short, switching preferentially occurs by GC. Our data supports the hypothesis that a short telomere at the active VSG expression site results in an increase in subtelomeric DNA breaks, which can initiate GC based switching. In addition to their significance for T. brucei and telomere biology, the findings presented here have implications for the many diverse pathogens that organize their antigenic genes in subtelomeric regions.

  19. The use of high-throughput DNA sequencing in the investigation of antigenic variation: application to Neisseria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Davies

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3' end of the silent loci (copy 1 as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11 are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species.

  20. BGMUT: NCBI dbRBC database of allelic variations of genes encoding antigens of blood group systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2012-01-01

    Analogous to human leukocyte antigens, blood group antigens are surface markers on the erythrocyte cell membrane whose structures differ among individuals and which can be serologically identified. The Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation Database (BGMUT) is an online repository of allelic variations in genes that determine the antigens of various human blood group systems. The database is manually curated with allelic information collated from scientific literature and from direct submissions from research laboratories. Currently, the database documents sequence variations of a total of 1251 alleles of all 40 gene loci that together are known to affect antigens of 30 human blood group systems. When available, information on the geographic or ethnic prevalence of an allele is also provided. The BGMUT website also has general information on the human blood group systems and the genes responsible for them. BGMUT is a part of the dbRBC resource of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA, and is available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gv/rbc/xslcgi.fcgi?cmd=bgmut. The database should be of use to members of the transfusion medicine community, those interested in studies of genetic variation and related topics such as human migrations, and students as well as members of the general public.

  1. Variational cellular model of the molecular and crystal electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.G.; Leite, J.R.

    1977-12-01

    A variational version of the cellular method is developed to calculate the electronic structure of molecules and crystals. Due to the simplicity of the secular equation, the method is easy to be implemented. Preliminary calculations on the hydrogen molecular ion suggest that it is also accurate and of fast convergence [pt

  2. Molecular typing for blood group antigens within 40 minutes by direct PCR from plasma or serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz Friedrich; Flegel, Willy Albert; Bittner, Rita; Döscher, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Determining blood group antigens by serological methods may be unreliable in certain situations, such as in patients after chronic or massive transfusion. Red cell genotyping offers a complementary approach, but current methods may take much longer than conventional serological typing, limiting their utility in urgent situations. To narrow this gap, we devised a rapid method using direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification while avoiding the DNA extraction step. DNA was amplified by PCR directly from plasma or serum of blood donors followed by a melting curve analysis in a capillary rapid-cycle PCR assay. We evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying the clinically relevant Fya, Fyb, Jka and Jkb antigens, with our analysis being completed within 40 min of receiving a plasma or serum sample. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value at least 84%. Direct PCR with melting point analysis allowed faster red cell genotyping to predict blood group antigens than any previous molecular method. Our assay may be used as a screening tool with subsequent confirmatory testing, within the limitations of the false-negative rate. With fast turnaround times, the rapid-cycle PCR assay may eventually be developed and applied to red cell genotyping in the hospital setting. PMID:27991657

  3. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  4. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The small chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei involved in antigenic variation are constructed around repetitive palindromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstead, Bill; Ersfeld, Klaus; Gull, Keith

    2004-06-01

    Most eukaryotic genomes contain large regions of satellite DNA. These arrays are often associated with essential chromosomal functions, but remain largely absent from genome projects because of difficulties in cloning and sequence assembly. The numerous small chromosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei fall into this category, yet are critical to understanding the genome because of their role in antigenic variation. Their relatively small size, however, makes them particularly amenable to physical mapping. We have produced fine-resolution maps of 17 complete minichromosomes and partial maps of two larger intermediate-sized chromosomes. This revealed a canonical structure shared by both chromosomal classes based around a large central core of 177-bp repeats. Around the core are variable-length genic regions, the lengths of which define chromosomal class. We show the core region to be a repetitive palindrome with a single inversion point common to all the chromosomes of both classes, suggesting a mechanism of genesis for these chromosomes. Moreover, palindromy appears to be a feature of (peri)centromeres in other species that can be easily overlooked. We propose that sequence inversion is one of the higher-order sequence motifs that confer chromosomal stability. Copyright 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

  6. A Molecular Basis for the Presentation of Phosphorylated Peptides by HLA-B Antigens*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpízar, Adán; Marino, Fabio; Ramos-Fernández, Antonio; Lombardía, Manuel; Jeko, Anita; Pazos, Florencio

    2017-01-01

    As aberrant protein phosphorylation is a hallmark of tumor cells, the display of tumor-specific phosphopeptides by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I molecules can be exploited in the treatment of cancer by T-cell-based immunotherapy. Yet, the characterization and prediction of HLA-I phospholigands is challenging as the molecular determinants of the presentation of such post-translationally modified peptides are not fully understood. Here, we employed a peptidomic workflow to identify 256 unique phosphorylated ligands associated with HLA-B*40, -B*27, -B*39, or -B*07. Remarkably, these phosphopeptides showed similar molecular features. Besides the specific anchor motifs imposed by the binding groove of each allotype, the predominance of phosphorylation at peptide position 4 (P4) became strikingly evident, as was the enrichment of basic residues at P1. To determine the structural basis of this observation, we carried out a series of peptide binding assays and solved the crystal structures of HLA-B*40 in complex with a phosphorylated ligand or its nonphosphorylated counterpart. Overall, our data provide a clear explanation to the common motif found in the phosphopeptidomes associated to different HLA-B molecules. The high prevalence of phosphorylation at P4 is dictated by the presence of the conserved residue Arg62 in the heavy chain, a structural feature shared by most HLA-B alleles. In contrast, the preference for basic residues at P1 is allotype-dependent and might be linked to the structure of the A pocket. This molecular understanding of the presentation of phosphopeptides by HLA-B molecules provides a base for the improved prediction and identification of phosphorylated neo-antigens, as potentially used for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27920218

  7. Carbohydrate-rich high-molecular-mass antigens are strongly recognized during experimental Histoplasma capsulatum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrine Sales Massafera Tristão

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: During histoplasmosis, Histoplasma capsulatum soluble antigens (CFAg can be naturally released by yeast cells. Because CFAg can be specifically targeted during infection, in the present study we investigated CFAg release in experimental murine histoplasmosis, and evaluated the host humoral immune response against high-molecular-mass antigens (hMMAg. >150 kDa, the more immunogenic CFAg fraction. METHODS: Mice were infected with 2.2x10(4 H. capsulatum IMT/HC128 yeast cells. The soluble CFAg, IgG anti-CFAg, IgG anti-hMMAg, and IgG-hMMAg circulating immune complexes (CIC levels were determined by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay, at days 0, 7, 14, and 28 post-infection. RESULTS: We observed a progressive increase in circulating levels of CFAg, IgG anti-CFAg, IgG anti-hMMAg, and IgG-hMMAg CIC after H. capsulatum infection. The hMMAg showed a high percentage of carbohydrates and at least two main immunogenic components. CONCLUSIONS: We verified for the first time that hMMAg from H. capsulatum IMT/HC128 strain induce humoral immune response and lead to CIC formation during experimental histoplasmosis.

  8. Antigenic and Molecular Characterization of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Viruses, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Smith, Gavin J.D.; Fourment, Mathieu; Walker, David; McClenaghan, Laura; Alam, S.M. Rabiul; Hasan, M. Kamrul; Seiler, Patrick; Franks, John; Danner, Angie; Barman, Subrata; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Human infection with avian influenza A(H9N2) virus was identified in Bangladesh in 2011. Surveillance for influenza viruses in apparently healthy poultry in live-bird markets in Bangladesh during 2008–2011 showed that subtype H9N2 viruses are isolated year-round, whereas highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 viruses are co-isolated with subtype H9N2 primarily during the winter months. Phylogenetic analysis of the subtype H9N2 viruses showed that they are reassortants possessing 3 gene segments related to subtype H7N3; the remaining gene segments were from the subtype H9N2 G1 clade. We detected no reassortment with subtype H5N1 viruses. Serologic analyses of subtype H9N2 viruses from chickens revealed antigenic conservation, whereas analyses of viruses from quail showed antigenic drift. Molecular analysis showed that multiple mammalian-specific mutations have become fixed in the subtype H9N2 viruses, including changes in the hemagglutinin, matrix, and polymerase proteins. Our results indicate that these viruses could mutate to be transmissible from birds to mammals, including humans. PMID:23968540

  9. Comparative Investigation of the Genomic Regions Involved in Antigenic Variation of the TprK Antigen among Treponemal Species, Subspecies, and Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Stephanie L.; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Reid, Tara Brinck; Godornes, Charmie; Molini, Barbara J.; Benzler, Martin; Hartig, Jörg S.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Although the three Treponema pallidum subspecies (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum), Treponema paraluiscuniculi, and the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc treponeme cause clinically distinct diseases, these pathogens are genetically and antigenically highly related and are able to cause persistent infection. Recent evidence suggests that the putative surface-exposed variable antigen TprK plays an important role in both treponemal immune evasion and persistence. tprK heterogeneity is generated by nonreciprocal gene conversion between the tprK expression site and donor sites. Although each of the above-mentioned species and subspecies has a functional tprK antigenic variation system, it is still unclear why the level of expression and the rate at which tprK diversifies during infection can differ significantly among isolates. To identify genomic differences that might affect the generation and expression of TprK variants among these pathogens, we performed comparative sequence analysis of the donor sites, as well as the tprK expression sites, among eight T. pallidum subsp. pallidum isolates (Nichols Gen, Nichols Sea, Chicago, Sea81-4, Dal-1, Street14, UW104, and UW126), three T. pallidum subsp. pertenue isolates (Gauthier, CDC2, and Samoa D), one T. pallidum subsp. endemicum isolate (Iraq B), the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc isolate, and the Cuniculi A strain of T. paraluiscuniculi. Synteny and sequence conservation, as well as deletions and insertions, were found in the regions harboring the donor sites. These data suggest that the tprK recombination system is harbored within dynamic genomic regions and that genomic differences might be an important key to explain discrepancies in generation and expression of tprK variants among these Treponema isolates. PMID:22661689

  10. Antigenic Variation in H5N1 clade 2.1 Viruses in Indonesia from 2005 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Setiawaty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A (H5N1 virus, has spread to several countries in the world and has a high mortality rate. Meanwhile, the virus has evolved into several clades. The human influenza A (H5N1 virus circulating in Indonesia is a member of clade 2.1, which is different in antigenicity from other clades of influenza A (H5N1. An analysis of the antigenic variation in the H5 hemagglutinin gene (HA of the influenza A (H5N1 virus strains circulating in Indonesia has been undertaken. Several position of amino acid mutations, including mutations at positions 35, 53, 141, 145, 163, 174, 183, 184, 189, and 231, have been identified. The mutation Val-174-Iso appears to play an important role in immunogenicity and cross-reactivity with rabbit antisera. This study shows that the evolution of the H5HA antigenic variation of the influenza A (H5N1 virus circulating in Indonesia from 2005 to 2011 may affect the immunogenicity of the virus.

  11. Recruitment of PfSET2 by RNA polymerase II to variant antigen encoding loci contributes to antigenic variation in P. falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchechi E Ukaegbu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important regulators of gene expression in all eukaryotes. In Plasmodium falciparum, these epigenetic marks regulate expression of genes involved in several aspects of host-parasite interactions, including antigenic variation. While the identities and genomic positions of many histone modifications have now been cataloged, how they are targeted to defined genomic regions remains poorly understood. For example, how variant antigen encoding loci (var are targeted for deposition of unique histone marks is a mystery that continues to perplex the field. Here we describe the recruitment of an ortholog of the histone modifier SET2 to var genes through direct interactions with the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II. In higher eukaryotes, SET2 is a histone methyltransferase recruited by RNA pol II during mRNA transcription; however, the ortholog in P. falciparum (PfSET2 has an atypical architecture and its role in regulating transcription is unknown. Here we show that PfSET2 binds to the unphosphorylated form of the CTD, a property inconsistent with its recruitment during mRNA synthesis. Further, we show that H3K36me3, the epigenetic mark deposited by PfSET2, is enriched at both active and silent var gene loci, providing additional evidence that its recruitment is not associated with mRNA production. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of PfSET2 designed to disrupt binding to RNA pol II induced rapid var gene expression switching, confirming both the importance of PfSET2 in var gene regulation and a role for RNA pol II in its recruitment. RNA pol II is known to transcribe non-coding RNAs from both active and silent var genes, providing a possible mechanism by which it could recruit PfSET2 to var loci. This work unifies previous reports of histone modifications, the production of ncRNAs, and the promoter activity of var introns into a mechanism that contributes to antigenic variation by malaria parasites.

  12. Genetic and molecular dissection of naturally occurring variations in rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Masahiro [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The progress for structural analysis of the rice genome has allowed us to embark on the sequencing of the whole rice genome. Resources - genetic markers, sequence data, and genomic clones - derived from many efforts will be used for the functional analysis of rice genes in the next decade. Although artificially induced variations, such as mutants, have been used mainly for genetic and physiological studies in rice and other plant species, the development of DNA markers has made possible access to naturally occurring allelic variations underlying complex traits. Such analysis is often referred to as quantitative traits locus (QTL) analysis. Many QTLs have been mapped for many complex traits in rice. During the analyses of several quantitative traits by the DNA marker-assisted strategy, two questions about QTL analysis have been raised: 1) Does a QTL represent a single Mendelian locus or a cluster of multiple loci? 2) Is it possible to precisely map a QTL and identify QTLs at the molecular level using map-based or other strategies? To answer these questions, a series of analyses on heading date, including the identification of putative QTLs, characterization and fine mapping of QTLs using nearly isogenic lines (NILs), and identification of genes at QTLs for heading date by the map-based strategy has been performed. In addition, several primary permanent mapping populations and secondary genetic resources, such as chromosomal segmental substitution lines, have been developed to facilitate the genetic analysis of naturally occurring allelic variation. (M. Suetake)

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and antigenicity of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (Babesia cf. motasi) apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qingli; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Guan, Guiquan; Pan, Yuping; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) has been described as a potential vaccine candidate in apicomplexan parasites. Here we characterize the ama-1 gene. The full-length ama-1 gene of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (BLTAMA-1) is 1785 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 65-kDa protein of 594 amino acid residues; by definition, the 5' UTR precedes the first methionine of the ORF. Phylogenetic analysis based on AMA-1 amino acid sequences clearly separated Piroplasmida from other Apicomplexa parasites. The Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 sequence is most closely associated with that of B. ovata and B. bigemina, with high bootstrap value. A recombinant protein encoding a conserved region and containing ectodomains I and II of BLTAMA-1 was constructed. BLTrAMA-1-DI/DII proteins were tested for reactivity with sera from sheep infected by Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan). In Western-blot analysis, native Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 proteins were recognized by antibodies raised in rabbits against BLTrAMA-1 in vitro. The results of this study are discussed in terms of gene characterization, taxonomy and antigenicity.

  14. Molecular and Antigenic Characterization of Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannimuthu Dhamotharan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV-1 causes heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. Recently, a novel PRV (formerly PRV-Om, here called PRV-3, was found in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss with HSMI-like disease. PRV is considered to be an emerging pathogen in farmed salmonids. In this study, molecular and antigenic characterization of PRV-3 was performed. Erythrocytes are the main target cells for PRV, and blood samples that were collected from experimentally challenged fish were used as source of virus. Virus particles were purified by gradient ultracentrifugation and the complete coding sequences of PRV-3 were obtained by Illumina sequencing. When compared to PRV-1, the nucleotide identity of the coding regions was 80.1%, and the amino acid identities of the predicted PRV-3 proteins varied from 96.7% (λ1 to 79.1% (σ3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRV-3 belongs to a separate cluster. The region encoding σ3 were sequenced from PRV-3 isolates collected from rainbow trout in Europe. These sequences clustered together, but were distant from PRV-3 that was isolated from rainbow trout in Norway. Bioinformatic analyses of PRV-3 proteins revealed that predicted secondary structures and functional domains were conserved between PRV-3 and PRV-1. Rabbit antisera raised against purified virus or various recombinant virus proteins from PRV-1 all cross-reacted with PRV-3. Our findings indicate that despite different species preferences of the PRV subtypes, several genetic, antigenic, and structural properties are conserved between PRV-1 and-3.

  15. Serological versus molecular typing of surface-associated immune evading polysaccharide antigens-based phenotypes of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryah, Charlene B; Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Wells, Kelsi; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Sunagar, Raju; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Hegde, Nagendra; Richmond, Peter; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of serological versus molecular typing methods to detect capsular polysaccharide (CP) and surface-associated polysaccharide antigen 336 phenotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Molecular typing of CP types 1, 5 and 8 was carried out using PCR, whereas serological typing of CP1, 2, 5, 8 and antigen 336 was carried out by slide agglutination using specific antisera. By genotyping, 14/31 strains were CP8 positive, 12/31 strains were CP5 and the remaining 6/31 isolates were non-typable (NT). One isolate was positive for both CP5 and CP8 by PCR, but was confirmed as CP8 type serologically. Detection of CP2 and type 336 by PCR was not possible because specific primers were either not available or non-specific. Using serotyping, 14/31 strains were CP8 positive, 11/31 CP5 positive and 2/31 positive for antigen 336. The remaining four S. aureus isolates were serologically NT. However, three of four NT and two 336-positive S. aureus isolates were encapsulated as determined by light microscopy after capsular staining. This discovery was surprising and warrants further investigations on the identification and characterization of additional capsular phenotypes prevalent among S. aureus clinical isolates. It was concluded that serological typing was a better method than molecular typing for use in epidemiological investigations based upon the distribution of surface-associated polysaccharide antigens-based phenotypes. © 2014 The Authors.

  16. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Molecular typing of human platelet and neutrophil antigens (HPA and HNA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuisen, Barbera; Porcelijn, Leendert; Ellen van der Schoot, C.; de Haas, Masja

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping is an important tool in the diagnosis of disorders involving allo-immunisation to antigens present on the membranes of platelets and neutrophils. To date 28 human platelet antigens (HPAs) have been indentified on six polymorphic glycoproteins on the surface of platelets. Antibodies

  18. Variation in general practice prostate-specific antigen testing and prostate cancer outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Brugen af prostata-specifikt antigen (PSA) er mangedoblet i dansk almen praksis siden introduktionen i 1990’erne. Dansk Urologisk Selskab anbefaler brug af testen ved relevante symptomer og arvelig disposition, men ikke til screening. Alligevel varierer brugen af PSA-tests i almen praksis. Dette...... registerstudie undersøger variationen i brugen af PSA-tests blandt praktiserende læger i Region Midtjylland i perioden 2004-2009. Studiet ser også nærmere på, hvilke konsekvenser variationen har for mændene i de forskellige praksispopulationer. Almen praksis blev inddelt i fire grupper efter deres brug af PSA......-tests. Den mest testende fjerdedel af praksis brugte teksten 3,6 gange oftere end den mindst testende praksisgruppe. I den mest testende gruppe fik 76 % flere personer en biopsi af prostata og 37 % flere mænd blev diagnosticeret med prostatacancer sammenlignet med den mindst testende gruppe. Risikoen...

  19. Molecular mechanisms of viral immune evasion proteins to inhibit MHC class I antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang

    2009-01-01

    Viral products inhibit MHC class I antigen processing and presentation via three major pathways: inhibition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression on cells, blockade of peptide trafficking and loading on MHC class I molecules, and inhibition of peptide generation in host cells. Viral products also interfere with IFN-gamma -mediated JAK/STAT signal transduction in cells. These results imply that viral proteins probably inhibit the function of IFN-gamma in MHC class I antigen presentation via inactivation of JAK/STAT signal transduction in host cells. Mechanisms of viral products to inhibit IFN-gamma -mediated MHC class I antigen presentation were summarized in this literature review.

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally

    2004-01-01

    ... variation. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) component of the immune system, encoded by highly polymorphic genes that vary across racial/ethnic groups, has been suggested to be a biologically based risk factor for breast cancer and thus...

  1. Interlaboratory variation in the detection of HPA-specific alloantibodies and in molecular HPA typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, D.; Ouwehand, W. H.; de Haas, M.; Kekomaki, R.; Kaplan, C.; Metcalfe, P.

    2007-01-01

    Platelet immunology quality assurance exercises have been organized by National Institute for Biological Standards and Control since 1991 and, as of 2006, 35 laboratories participate in the serology section. Molecular human platelet antigen (HPA) typing has been included in the exercises since 1998

  2. Clinicopathological characteristics of patients of certain molecular subtypes and elevated postoperative cancer antigen 15.3 levels and its correlation with menopausal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumi Saha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It is well established that breast cancer subtypes differ in their outcome and treatment response. Aim: To observe tumor characteristics of different molecular subgroup and patients with postoperative (PO raised cancer antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3 group and variation of tumor nature between pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Blood samples and tumor blocks were collected from 95 nonmetastatic female breast cancer patients. Immunohistochemical stains for estrogen receptors (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and HER2/Neu were used to classify molecular subtypes. CA 15.3 level was detected by ELISA. Significance levels were ascertained by Pearson Chi-square test. Results: Prevalence of luminal A tumor with grade 3 was high. Triple negative and ER positive (ER+ types showed tumors with high grade and high lymph node (LN metastasis. More nodal involvement was noticed in patients with PO raised CA 15.3. In addition, premenopausal patients with triple-negative and ER+ subtypes exhibited more aggressive tumors which were characterized by high grade and large numbers of LN metastasis. Conclusion: Clinicopathological characteristics of certain molecular subtypes and influence of menopausal status on it can predict disease recurrence or overall survival of breast cancer patients.

  3. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encompassing MHC Class I and Class II genes in the Tasmanian devil. Four genomic regions approximately 960 kb in length were assembled and annotated using BAC contigs and physically mapped to devil Chromosome 4q. 34 genes and pseudogenes were identified, including five Class I and four Class II loci. Interestingly, when two haplotypes from two individuals were compared, three genomic copy number variants with sizes ranging from 1.6 to 17 kb were observed within the classical Class I gene region. One deletion is particularly important as it turns a Class Ia gene into a pseudogene in one of the haplotypes. This deletion explains the previously observed variation in the Class I allelic number between individuals. The frequency of this deletion is highest in the northwestern devil population and lowest in southeastern areas. Conclusions The third sequenced marsupial MHC provides insights into the evolution of this dynamic genomic region among the diverse marsupial species. The two sequenced devil MHC haplotypes revealed three copy number variations that are likely to significantly affect immune response and suggest that future work should focus on the role of copy number variations in disease susceptibility in this species.

  4. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  5. Variations in MHC Class II Antigen Processing and Presentation in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unanue, Emil R; Turk, Vito; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-05-20

    MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules are critical in the control of many immune responses. They are also involved in most autoimmune diseases and other pathologies. Here, we describe the biology of MHC-II and MHC-II variations that affect immune responses. We discuss the classic cell biology of MHC-II and various perturbations. Proteolysis is a major process in the biology of MHC-II, and we describe the various components forming and controlling this endosomal proteolytic machinery. This process ultimately determines the MHC-II-presented peptidome, including cryptic peptides, modified peptides, and other peptides that are relevant in autoimmune responses. MHC-II also variable in expression, glycosylation, and turnover. We illustrate that MHC-II is variable not only in amino acids (polymorphic) but also in its biology, with consequences for both health and disease.

  6. A molecular basis for the presentation of phosphorylated peptides by HLA-B antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpízar, Adán; Marino, Fabio; Ramos-Fernández, Antonio; Lombardía, Manuel; Jeko, Anita; Pazos, Florencio; Paradela, Alberto; Santiago, César; Heck, Albert J R; Marcilla, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    As aberrant protein phosphorylation is a hallmark of tumor cells, the display of tumor-specific phosphopeptides by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I molecules can be exploited in the treatment of cancer by T-cell-based immunotherapy. Yet, the characterization and prediction of HLA-I

  7. Molecular typing for blood group antigens within 40 min by direct polymerase chain reaction from plasma or serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F; Flegel, Willy A; Bittner, Rita; Döscher, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Determining blood group antigens by serological methods may be unreliable in certain situations, such as in patients after chronic or massive transfusion. Red cell genotyping offers a complementary approach, but current methods may take much longer than conventional serological typing, limiting their utility in urgent situations. To narrow this gap, we devised a rapid method using direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification while avoiding the DNA extraction step. DNA was amplified by PCR directly from plasma or serum of blood donors followed by a melting curve analysis in a capillary rapid-cycle PCR assay. We evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying the clinically relevant Fy a , Fy b , Jk a and Jk b antigens, with our analysis being completed within 40 min of receiving a plasma or serum sample. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value at least 84%. Direct PCR with melting point analysis allowed faster red cell genotyping to predict blood group antigens than any previous molecular method. Our assay may be used as a screening tool with subsequent confirmatory testing, within the limitations of the false-negative rate. With fast turnaround times, the rapid-cycle PCR assay may eventually be developed and applied to red cell genotyping in the hospital setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Antigenic variation and the genetics and epigenetics of the PfEMP1 erythrocyte surface antigens in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, David E; Jensen, Anja T R

    2011-01-01

    How immunity to malaria develops remains one of the great unresolved issues in bio-medicine and resolution of its various paradoxes is likely to be the key to developing effective malaria vaccines. The basic epidemiological observations are; under conditions of intense natural transmission, humans...... on the function and control of this multi-gene family of parasite variable surface antigens....

  9. Evaluation of Molecular Species of Prostate-Specific Antigen Complexed with Immunoglobulin M in Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Goč

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at defining molecular species of prostate-specific antigen (PSA in immune complexes with immunoglobulin M (IgM. Having in mind the oligoreactivity of IgM and its preference for carbohydrate antigens, there is the possibility that it can selectively recognize known PSA glycoisoforms. PSA-IgM complexes and free PSA fractions were separated from the sera of subjects with prostate cancer (PCa and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH by gel filtration and subjected to on-chip immunoaffinity and ion-exchange chromatography. PSA-immunoreactive species were detected using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. The obtained spectra were analyzed for protein and glycan composition. The general pattern of the molecular species of PCa PSA and BPH PSA found in complexes with IgM was similar. It comprised major peaks at 17 kDa and minor peaks at 28 kDa, corresponding to the entire mature glycosylated PSA. The main difference was the presence of incompletely glycosylated 26.8 kDa species, having putative paucimannosidic structures, observed in PCa PSA-IgM, but not in BPH PSA-IgM. Characteristic PCa PSA-IgM glycoforms pose the question of the possible role of glycosylation as a framework for immune surveillance and may be of interest in light of recent data indicating mannose-containing glycans as cancer biomarker.

  10. Diverse monoclonal antibodies against the CA 19-9 antigen show variation in binding specificity with consequences for clinical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Katie; Maupin, Kevin A; Brand, Randall E; Haab, Brian B

    2012-07-01

    The CA 19-9 antigen is currently the best individual marker for the detection of pancreatic cancer. In order to optimize the CA 19-9 assay and to develop approaches to further improve cancer detection, it is important to understand the specificity differences between CA 19-9 antibodies and the consequential affect on biomarker performance. Antibody arrays enabled multiplexed comparisons between five different CA 19-9 antibodies used in the analysis of plasma samples from pancreatic cancer patients and controls. Major differences were observed between antibodies in their detection of particular patient samples. Glycan array analysis revealed that certain antibodies were highly specific for the canonical CA 19-9 epitope, sialyl-Lewis A, while others bound sialyl-Lewis A in addition to a related structure called sialyl-Lewis C and modification with Nue5Gc. In a much larger patient cohort, we confirmed the binding of sialyl-Lewis C glycan by one of the antibodies and showed that the broader specificity led to the detection of an increased number of cancer patients without increasing detection of pancreatitis patient samples. This work demonstrates that variation between antibody specificity for cancer-associated glycans can have significant implications for biomarker performance and highlights the value of characterizing and detecting the range of glycan structures that are elevated in cancer. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibawa, Hendra; Henning, Joerg; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Junaidi, Akhmad; Bingham, John; Daniels, Peter; Meers, Joanne

    2011-09-07

    Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1), clade 2.1.3 (80), and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3) that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to chickens over the study period suggests that ducks are

  12. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaidi Akhmad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. Results All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1, clade 2.1.3 (80, and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3 that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. Conclusions The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to

  13. Research Article Allelic Variation of High Molecular Weight Glutenin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sky123.Org

    HMW-GS may be an important source of genes for quality improvement, uncovering the composition of HMW-GS in different wheat varieties is essential for molecular design breeding in controlling wheat end-use quality. In Hebei Province, the study of genetic improvement of wheat quality has begun since 1980's, and some ...

  14. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-02-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves.

  15. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves. PMID:26911983

  16. Detailed analysis of sequence changes occurring during vlsE antigenic variation in the mouse model of Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Coutte

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease Borrelia can infect humans and animals for months to years, despite the presence of an active host immune response. The vls antigenic variation system, which expresses the surface-exposed lipoprotein VlsE, plays a major role in B. burgdorferi immune evasion. Gene conversion between vls silent cassettes and the vlsE expression site occurs at high frequency during mammalian infection, resulting in sequence variation in the VlsE product. In this study, we examined vlsE sequence variation in B. burgdorferi B31 during mouse infection by analyzing 1,399 clones isolated from bladder, heart, joint, ear, and skin tissues of mice infected for 4 to 365 days. The median number of codon changes increased progressively in C3H/HeN mice from 4 to 28 days post infection, and no clones retained the parental vlsE sequence at 28 days. In contrast, the decrease in the number of clones with the parental vlsE sequence and the increase in the number of sequence changes occurred more gradually in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. Clones containing a stop codon were isolated, indicating that continuous expression of full-length VlsE is not required for survival in vivo; also, these clones continued to undergo vlsE recombination. Analysis of clones with apparent single recombination events indicated that recombinations into vlsE are nonselective with regard to the silent cassette utilized, as well as the length and location of the recombination event. Sequence changes as small as one base pair were common. Fifteen percent of recovered vlsE variants contained "template-independent" sequence changes, which clustered in the variable regions of vlsE. We hypothesize that the increased frequency and complexity of vlsE sequence changes observed in clones recovered from immunocompetent mice (as compared with SCID mice is due to rapid clearance of relatively invariant clones by variable region-specific anti-VlsE antibody responses.

  17. Loss of high-molecular-weight cytokeratin antigenicity in prostate tissue obtained by transurethral resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Fessler, J N; Warhol, M J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Staining of prostatic basal cells for the expression of high-molecular-weight cytokeratin has been suggested as a way of distinguishing benign from malignant prostate glands. We evaluated the utility of high-molecular-weight cytokeratin in the diagnosis of malignancy in prostate specim...

  18. Molecular Variation in Picea Rubens and Picea Mariana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobola, Michael S.

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) variation was examined among samples from the entire range of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.), the eastern complex of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), control -cross red-on-black hybrids, and natural populations of red and black spruce. Within-species and population variation was examined. In addition an accurate species index capable of identifying red spruce, black spruce and hybridization between the two species was developed. The nuclear rDNA repeat unit size in Picea ranged from a minimum of 32 kbp to greater than 40 kbp, two to three fold larger than the typical angiosperm rDNA unit. At a size greater than 32 kbp and a concentration averaging 1.2-1.3 times 10^4 copies per pg genomic DNA, the rDNA repeat constitutes approximately 4% of the spruce genome. The rDNA repeat units were found to be polymorphic within an individual genome with up to five distinct rDNA repeat unit types (alleles) evident. The RFLPs observed in the rDNA repeat were not species specific; however, noticeable trends in internal allelic frequencies were noticed which were useful for between-species differentiation. One marker (EMW 4.35) displayed a significant relationship with geographic origins and habitat suggesting that the observed between-species variation for this marker may be due to selection rather than the result of a true species difference. Variation in the nuclear rDNA repeat could not accurately differentiate hybrids from black spruce. Additional markers were required to identify hybrids. RFLPs were identified for the organelle genomes of red spruce, and black spruce. The organelle inheritance pattern was deduced using controlled-cross hybrids. Organelle markers were combined with allelic data from the nuclear rDNA repeat to derive a simple three character index capable of identifying red spruce, black spruce and hybridization between the two species. Significant gene flow was observed between red and black spruce

  19. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  20. Molecular characterization of atypical antigenic variants of canine rabies virus reveals its reintroduction by wildlife vectors in southeastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna M; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra I; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Hernández-Rivas, Lucía; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2017-12-01

    Rabies is an infectious viral disease that is practically always fatal following the onset of clinical signs. In Mexico, the last case of human rabies transmitted by dogs was reported in 2006 and canine rabies has declined significantly due to vaccination campaigns implemented in the country. Here we report on the molecular characterization of six rabies virus strains found in Yucatan and Chiapas, remarkably, four of them showed an atypical reaction pattern when antigenic characterization with a reduced panel of eight monoclonal antibodies was performed. Phylogenetic analyses on the RNA sequences unveiled that the three atypical strains from Yucatan are associated with skunks. Analysis using the virus entire genome showed that they belong to a different lineage distinct from the variants described for this animal species in Mexico. The Chiapas atypical strain was grouped in a lineage that was considered extinct, while the others are clustered within classic dog variants.

  1. A molecular analysis of viral persistence in surface antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, J; Hasegawa, K; Torii, N; Yamauchi, K; Hayashi, N

    1996-03-01

    To identify the mechanisms of viral persistence in patients with chronic hepatitis B after the acquisition of anti-hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies (antiHBs), we serially analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the envelope region in a cohort of infected patients. Four patients with histological diagnoses of chronic hepatitis B who had at least 5 years of observance by our hospital staff were studied. All but one showed normalization of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentration after clearance of the hepatitis B surface of antigen (HBsAg) and the appearance of anti-HBs. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was still detectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification assay in serum specimens from two patients, even in the presence of circulating anti-HBs. The envelope gene was amplified by PCR in serum samples obtained both before and after seroconversion, and direct cycle sequencing of the PCR products was performed. A mutation resulting in a premature stop codon was found in the pre-S1 region of one patient just prior to clearance of HBsAg. Two years later, the stop codon was converted to a leucine codon and three mutations developed in the "a" loop. In the other patient, 16 amino acids had been deleted between amino acids 8 and 23 in the pre-S2 region before clearance of HBsAg. After the appearance of circulating anti-HBs, the pre-S2 gene reverted to the wild type but three additional mutations appeared inside the "a" loop. These results suggest that HBV mutates when HBsAg is cleared, which may contribute to viral persistence due to an evasion of the host immune surveillance.

  2. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    ), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  3. Prevalence and sequence variations of the genes encoding the five antigens included in the novel 5CVMB vaccine covering group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Hedberg, Sara Thulin; Mölling, Paula; Unemo, Magnus; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Olcén, Per

    2009-03-04

    During the recent years, projects are in progress for designing broad-range non-capsular-based meningococcal vaccines, covering also serogroup B isolates. We have examined three genes encoding antigens (NadA, GNA1030 and GNA2091) included in a novel vaccine, i.e. the 5 Component Vaccine against Meningococcus B (5CVMB), in terms of gene prevalence and sequence variations. These data were combined with the results from a similar study, examining the two additional antigens included in the 5CVMB (fHbp and GNA2132). nadA and fHbp v. 1 were present in 38% (n=36), respectively 71% (n=67) of the isolates, whereas gna2132, gna1030 and gna2091 were present in all the Neisseria meningitidis isolates tested (n=95). The level of amino acid conservation was relatively high in GNA1030 (93%), GNA2091 (92%), and within the main variants of NadA and fHbp. GNA2132 (54% of the amino acids conserved) appeared to be the most diversified antigen. Consequently, the theoretical coverage of the 5CVMB antigens and the feasibility to use these in a broad-range meningococcal vaccine is appealing.

  4. Molecular definition of multiple sites of antibody inhibition of malaria transmission-blocking vaccine antigen Pfs25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Stephen W; McLeod, Brandon; Bosch, Alexandre; Miura, Kazutoyo; Liang, Qi; Carroll, Sean; Reponen, Sini; Nguyen, Ngan; Giladi, Eldar; Rämisch, Sebastian; Yusibov, Vidadi; Bradley, Allan; Lemiale, Franck; Schief, William R; Emerling, Daniel; Kellam, Paul; King, C Richter; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-11-16

    The Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 protein (Pfs25) is a leading malaria transmission-blocking vaccine antigen. Pfs25 vaccination is intended to elicit antibodies that inhibit parasite development when ingested by Anopheles mosquitoes during blood meals. The Pfs25 three-dimensional structure has remained elusive, hampering a molecular understanding of its function and limiting immunogen design. We report six crystal structures of Pfs25 in complex with antibodies elicited by immunization via Pfs25 virus-like particles in human immunoglobulin loci transgenic mice. Our structural findings reveal the fine specificities associated with two distinct immunogenic sites on Pfs25. Importantly, one of these sites broadly overlaps with the epitope of the well-known 4B7 mouse antibody, which can be targeted simultaneously by antibodies that target a non-overlapping site to additively increase parasite inhibition. Our molecular characterization of inhibitory antibodies informs on the natural disposition of Pfs25 on the surface of ookinetes and provides the structural blueprints to design next-generation immunogens.

  5. Molecular characteristics of an immobilization antigen gene of the fish-parasitic protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, a ciliated protozoan parasite of fish, expresses surface antigens (i-antigens), which react with host antibodies that render them immobile. The nucleotide sequence of an i-antigen gene of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6 was deduced. The predicted protein of 47...

  6. Comparative study of molecular and antigenic characterization for intratypic differentiation (ITD) of poliovirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedeji, A O; Okonko, I O; Adu, F D

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the sensitivity of a Sabin vaccine strain-specific PCR assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with polyclonal cross-absorbed antisera (PAb-E) for intratypic differentiation (ITD) of polioviruses (PVs). These were used for the definitive characterization of the strains. Poliovirus strains isolated in L20B and RD cell lines were subjected to both PCR and ELISA. Both PCR and ELISA identified 3 (13.6%) out of 22 isolates, respectively as poliovirus Sabin 1. PCR identified 4 (18.2%) out of 22 isolates as poliovirus Sabin 2 and ELISA identified 2 (9.1%) out of 22 isolates as poliovirus Sabin 2. None of the two assay identified poliovirus Sabin 3. Both PCR and ELISA identified 12 (54.5%) out of 22 isolates, respectively as wild poliovirus (WPV) 1. None of the assays identified any of the isolates as WPV 2 and 3. Only PCR assay was able to identify the mixture of two poliovirus Sabin serotypes (a mixture of Sabin 1 and 2) and two mixtures of poliovirus Sabin 2 and 3. In this study, only ELISA was able to identified two invalid results. Invalid results observed in this study are of important practical implication to the emergence of vaccine-derived poliovirus. This may have epidemic potential. Hence, the two ITD assays are of paramount importance for identification of PVs. It is therefore recommended in line with WHO guideline that at least two methods be used for the ITD of poliovirus isolates, and each method should be based on a different principle (i.e., antigenic and genetic properties). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Schistosoma mansoni major egg antigen Smp40: molecular modeling and potential immunoreactivity for anti-pathology vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F Abouel-Nour

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Schistosoma mansoni infection is largely determined by host T-cell mediated immune responses such as the granulomatous response to tissue deposited eggs and subsequent fibrosis. The major egg antigens have a valuable role in desensitizing the CD4+ Th cells that mediate granuloma formation, which may prevent or ameliorate clinical signs of schistosomiasis.S. mansoni major egg antigen Smp40 was expressed and completely purified. It was found that the expressed Smp40 reacts specifically with anti-Smp40 monoclonal antibody in Western blotting. Three-dimensional structure was elucidated based on the similarity of Smp40 with the small heat shock protein coded in the protein database as 1SHS as a template in the molecular modeling. It was figured out that the C-terminal of the Smp40 protein (residues 130 onward contains two alpha crystallin domains. The fold consists of eight beta strands sandwiched in two sheets forming Greek key. The purified Smp40 was used for in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients infected with S. mansoni using phytohemagglutinin mitogen as a positive control. The obtained results showed that there is no statistical difference in interferon-g, interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 levels obtained with Smp40 stimulation compared with the control group (P > 0.05 for each. On the other hand, there were significant differences after Smp40 stimulation in IL-5 (P = 0.006 and IL-10 levels (P < 0.001 compared with the control group. Gaining the knowledge by reviewing the literature, it was found that the overall pattern of cytokine profile obtained with Smp40 stimulation is reported to be associated with reduced collagen deposition, decreased fibrosis, and granuloma formation inhibition. This may reflect its future prospect as a leading anti-pathology schistosomal vaccine candidate.

  8. Identifying Patient-Specific Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 Genetic Variation and Potential Autoreactive Targets Relevant to Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tschochner

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection represents a major environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS, with evidence of selective expansion of Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1-specific CD4+ T cells that cross-recognize MS-associated myelin antigens in MS patients. HLA-DRB1*15-restricted antigen presentation also appears to determine susceptibility given its role as a dominant risk allele. In this study, we have utilised standard and next-generation sequencing techniques to investigate EBNA-1 sequence variation and its relationship to HLA-DR15 binding affinity, as well as examining potential cross-reactive immune targets within the central nervous system proteome.Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 73 Western Australian MS cases, without requirement for primary culture, with additional FLX 454 Roche sequencing in 23 samples to identify low-frequency variants. Patient-derived viral sequences were used to predict HLA-DRB1*1501 epitopes (NetMHCII, NetMHCIIpan and candidates were evaluated for cross recognition with human brain proteins.EBNA-1 sequence variation was limited, with no evidence of multiple viral strains and only low levels of variation identified by FLX technology (8.3% nucleotide positions at a 1% cut-off. In silico epitope mapping revealed two known HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted epitopes ('AEG': aa 481-496 and 'MVF': aa 562-577, and two putative epitopes between positions 502-543. We identified potential cross-reactive targets involving a number of major myelin antigens including experimentally confirmed HLA-DRB1*15-restricted epitopes as well as novel candidate antigens within myelin and paranodal assembly proteins that may be relevant to MS pathogenesis.This study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining autologous EBNA-1 sequences directly from buffy coat samples, and confirms divergence of these sequences from standard laboratory strains. This approach has identified a number of

  9. Molecular cloning and variation of ω-gliadin genes from a somatic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Chen F., Yang L., Zhao F., Min H. and Xia G. 2011 Molecular cloning and variation of ω-gliadin genes from a somatic hybrid introgression line II-12 and parents (Triticum aestivum cv. Jinan 177 and Agropyron .... As expected, proline, glutamine and phenylalanine rep- resented ∼80% of the residues in each of the predicted.

  10. Environmental proxies of antigen exposure explain variation in immune investment better than indices of pace of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrocks, N.P.C.; Hegemann, A.; Ostrowski, S.; Ndithia, H.; Shobrak, M.; Williams, J.B.; Matson, K.D.; Tieleman, B.I.

    2015-01-01

    Investment in immune defences is predicted to covary with a variety of ecologically and evolutionarily relevant axes, with pace of life and environmental antigen exposure being two examples. These axes may themselves covary directly or inversely, and such relationships can lead to conflicting

  11. Ureaplasma Species Multiple Banded Antigen (MBA) Variation Is Associated with the Severity of Inflammation In vivo and In vitro in Human Placentae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Emma L; Kallapur, Suhas G; Meawad, Simone; Gisslen, Tate; Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Jobe, Alan H; Knox, Christine L

    2017-01-01

    Background: The multiple banded antigen (MBA), a surface-exposed lipoprotein, is a proposed virulence factor of Ureaplasma spp. We previously demonstrated that the number of Ureaplasma parvum MBA size variants in amniotic fluid was inversely proportional to the severity of chorioamnionitis in experimentally infected pregnant sheep. However, the effect of ureaplasma MBA size variation on inflammation in human pregnancies has not been reported. Methods: Ureaplasmas isolated from the chorioamnion of pregnant women from a previous study ( n = 42) were speciated/serotyped and MBA size variation was demonstrated by PCR and western blot. Results were correlated with the severity of chorioamnionitis and cord blood cytokines. In vitro , THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed to recombinant-MBA proteins of differing sizes and NF-κB activation and cytokine responses were determined. Results: MBA size variation was identified in 21/32 (65.6%) clinical isolates (in 10 clinical isolates MBA size variation was unable to be determined). Any size variation (increase/decrease) of the MBA (regardless of Ureaplasma species or serovar) was associated with mild or absent chorioamnionitis ( P = 0.023) and lower concentrations of cord blood cytokines IL-8 ( P = 0.04) and G-CSF ( P = 0.008). In vitro , recombinant-MBA variants elicited different cytokine responses and altered expression of NF-κB p65. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that size variation of the ureaplasma MBA protein modulates the host immune response in vivo and in vitro .

  12. Diurnal Variation of Hormonal and Lipid Biomarkers in a Molecular Epidemiology-Like Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda W M van Kerkhof

    Full Text Available Many molecular epidemiology studies focusing on high prevalent diseases, such as metabolic disorders and cancer, investigate metabolic and hormonal markers. In general, sampling for these markers can occur at any time-point during the day or after an overnight fast. However, environmental factors, such as light exposure and food intake might affect the levels of these markers, since they provide input for the internal time-keeping system. When diurnal variation is larger than the inter-individual variation, time of day should be taken into account. Importantly, heterogeneity in diurnal variation and disturbance of circadian rhythms among a study population might increasingly occur as a result of our increasing 24/7 economy and related variation in exposure to environmental factors (such as light and food.The aim of the present study was to determine whether a set of often used biomarkers shows diurnal variation in a setting resembling large molecular epidemiology studies, i.e., non-fasted and limited control possibilities for other environmental influences.We show that markers for which diurnal variation is not an issue are adrenocorticotropic hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, estradiol and high-density lipoprotein. For all other tested markers diurnal variation was observed in at least one gender (cholesterol, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, free fatty acids, low-density lipoprotein, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, testosterone, triglycerides, total triiodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone or could not reliably be detected (human growth hormone.Thus, studies investigating these markers should take diurnal variation into account, for which we provide some options. Furthermore, our study indicates the need for investigating diurnal variation (in literature or experimentally before setting up studies measuring markers in routine and controlled settings, especially since time-of-day likely matters for many more

  13. A nanobody targeting carcinoembryonic antigen as a promising molecular probe for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Meng, Ai-Min; Li, Sheng-Hua; Zhou, Xiao-Liang

    2017-07-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a biomarker and therapy target for non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which is the most common type of lung cancer. Nanobodies with high target specificity are promising candidates to function as anti‑CEA probes. In the present study, the targeting effects of an anti‑CEA nanobody obtained from phage display were investigated using technetium‑99 m (99mTc) and fluorescence labeling. In vitro binding and immunofluorescent staining assays, as well as in vivo blood clearance and biodistribution assays were performed. High specificity and affinity of the nanobody for CEA‑positive H460 cells was observed in vitro. The pharmacokinetics assay of the 99mTc‑nanobody in Wistar rats demonstrated that the nanobody had appropriate T1/2α and T1/2β, which were 20.2 and 143.5 min, respectively. The biodistribution assay using H460 xenograft‑bearing nude mice demonstrated a high ratio of signal in tumor compared with background, which confirmed that the nanobody may be useful as a molecular probe for CEA‑positive cancer, particularly in NSCLC.

  14. A member of the HSP90 family from ovine Babesia in China: molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis and antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Aihong; Li, Youquan; Niu, Qingli; Gao, Jinliang; Luo, Jianxun; Chauvin, Alain; Yin, Hong; Moreau, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a key component of the molecular chaperone complex essential for activating many signalling proteins involved in the development and progression of pathogenic cellular transformation. A Hsp90 gene (BQHsp90) was cloned and characterized from Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan), an ovine Babesia isolate belonging to Babesia motasi-like group, by screening a cDNA expression library and performing rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA of BQHsp90 is 2399 bp with an open reading frame of 2154 bp encoding a predicted 83 kDa polypeptide with 717 amino acid residues. It shows significant homology and similar structural characteristics to Hsp90 of other apicomplex organisms. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the HSP90 amino acid sequences, showed that the Babesia genus is clearly separated from other apicomplexa genera. Five Chinese ovine Babesia isolates were divided into 2 phylogenetic clusters, namely Babesia sp. Xinjiang (previously designated a new species) cluster and B. motasi-like cluster which could be further divided into 2 subclusters (Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan)/Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. BQ1 (Ningxian)/Babesia sp. Hebei). Finally, the antigenicity of rBQHSP90 protein from prokaryotic expression was also evaluated using western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  15. Molecular interplay between T-Antigen and splicing factor, arginine/serine-rich 1 (SRSF1) controls JC virus gene expression in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigie, Michael; Regan, Patrick; Otalora, Yolanda-Lopez; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret

    2015-11-24

    Human polyomavirus JCV is the etiologic agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease characterized by lytic infection of glial cells in the central nervous system. PML is seen primarily in immunosuppressed patients and is mainly classified as an AIDS-defining disease. In addition to structural capsid proteins, JCV encodes multiple regulatory proteins, including T-antigen and agnoprotein, which are required for functional lytic infection. Previous studies have suggested that molecular interaction between viral proteins and host factors play an important role in reactivation of JCV and progression of the viral life cycle in glial cells. Recently, serine/arginine rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1), a cellular alternative splicing factor, was identified as a strong negative regulator of JCV in glial cells. SRSF1 inhibits JCV gene expression and viral replication by directly interacting with viral promoter sequences. Here, we have investigated possible impact of JCV regulatory proteins, T-antigen and agnoprotein, on SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression in glial cells. Reporter gene analysis has suggested that T-antigen rescues viral transcriptional suppression mediated by SRSF1. Further analyses have revealed that T-antigen promotes viral gene expression by suppressing SRSF1 gene transcription in glial cells. A subsequent ChIP analysis revealed that T-antigen associates with the promoter region of SRSF1 to induce the transcriptional suppression. These findings have revealed a molecular interplay between cellular SRSF1 and viral T-antigen in controlling JCV gene expression, and may suggest a novel mechanism of JCV reactivation in patients who are at risk of developing PML.

  16. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  17. IgG responses to Anopheles gambiae salivary antigen gSG6 detect variation in exposure to malaria vectors and disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, Will; Bousema, Teun; Jones, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of exposure to malaria vectors is important to our understanding of spatial and temporal variations in disease transmission and facilitates the targeting and evaluation of control efforts. Recently, an immunogenic Anopheles gambiae salivary protein (gSG6) was identified and proposed...... as the basis of an immuno-assay determining exposure to Afrotropical malaria vectors. In the present study, IgG responses to gSG6 and 6 malaria antigens (CSP, AMA-1, MSP-1, MSP-3, GLURP R1, and GLURP R2) were compared to Anopheles exposure and malaria incidence in a cohort of children from Korogwe district......, Tanzania, an area of moderate and heterogeneous malaria transmission. Anti-gSG6 responses above the threshold for seropositivity were detected in 15% (96/636) of the children, and were positively associated with geographical variations in Anopheles exposure (OR 1.25, CI 1.01-1.54, p¿=¿0.04). Additionally...

  18. Design of a comprehensive biochemistry and molecular biology experiment: phase variation caused by recombinational regulation of bacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation, antibody agglutination test, and PCR analysis. Phase variation was observed by baterial motility assay and identified by antibody agglutination test and PCR analysis. This comprehensive experiment can be performed to help students improve their ability to use the knowledge acquired in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Copyright © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. The Molecular Determinants of Antibody Recognition and Antigenic Drift in the H3 Hemagglutinin of Swine Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Santos, Jefferson; Lewis, Nicola S.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Stratton, Jered; Skepner, Eugene; Rajao, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important respiratory pathogen that affects both humans and swine. Vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) is the primary method used to control disease. However, due to antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be periodically updated. Six of the 7 positions previously identified in human seasonal H3 (positions 145, 155, 156, 158, 159, 189, and 193) were also indicated in swine H3 antigenic evolution. To experimentally test the effect on virus antigenicity of these 7 positions, substitutions were introduced into the HA of an isogenic swine lineage virus. We tested the antigenic effect of these introduced substitutions by using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) data with monovalent swine antisera and antigenic cartography to evaluate the antigenic phenotype of the mutant viruses. Combinations of substitutions within the antigenic motif caused significant changes in antigenicity. One virus mutant that varied at only two positions relative to the wild type had a >4-fold reduction in HI titers compared to homologous antisera. Potential changes in pathogenesis and transmission of the double mutant were evaluated in pigs. Although the double mutant had virus shedding titers and transmissibility comparable to those of the wild type, it caused a significantly lower percentage of lung lesions. Elucidating the antigenic effects of specific amino acid substitutions at these sites in swine H3 IAV has important implications for understanding IAV evolution within pigs as well as for improved vaccine development and control strategies in swine. IMPORTANCE A key component of influenza virus evolution is antigenic drift mediated by the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, resulting in escape from prior immunity generated by natural infection or vaccination. Understanding which amino acid positions of the HA contribute to the ability

  20. Molecular variation of human major histocompatibility complex DQw3. beta. -chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, A.K.L.; Lindsay, J.; Bodmer, J.; Trowsdale, J.

    1987-11-15

    Histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DQ molecules exhibit polymorphism of both DQ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chains. Histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DQw3 is associated with both DR4 and DR5 and can be further subdivided by reactivity with the monoclonal antibody TA10. To determine the molecular nature of the DQ polymorphic alleles associated with the DR4 haplotype, the authors have sequenced and analyzed DQ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. cDNA clones obtained from a DR4, Dw4, DQw3 cell line which is TA10-positive, using electrophoresis and autoradiography. The DQ..cap alpha..-chain sequence was identical to previously published sequences from the DR4 haplotype, but the DQ..beta.. sequence differed from published DR4-DQ..beta.. sequences obtained from DQw3-positive TA10-negative cell lines by eight amino acids, six of which were located in the ..beta..1 domain. Thus, the TA10 serologic determinants reside on the DQ..beta..-chain. A TA10-specific oligonucleotide probe was constructed based on the DQ..beta.. sequence, and its specificity was confirmed in a panel of TA10-positive and TA10-negative cell lines. An additional band was observed in Southern blotting experiments which may indicate a donor sequence for gene conversion.

  1. Molecular variation of human major histocompatibility complex DQw3β-chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, A.K.L.; Lindsay, J.; Bodmer, J.; Trowsdale, J.

    1987-01-01

    Histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DQ molecules exhibit polymorphism of both DQα- and β-chains. Histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DQw3 is associated with both DR4 and DR5 and can be further subdivided by reactivity with the monoclonal antibody TA10. To determine the molecular nature of the DQ polymorphic alleles associated with the DR4 haplotype, the authors have sequenced and analyzed DQα and β cDNA clones obtained from a DR4, Dw4, DQw3 cell line which is TA10-positive, using electrophoresis and autoradiography. The DQα-chain sequence was identical to previously published sequences from the DR4 haplotype, but the DQβ sequence differed from published DR4-DQβ sequences obtained from DQw3-positive TA10-negative cell lines by eight amino acids, six of which were located in the β1 domain. Thus, the TA10 serologic determinants reside on the DQβ-chain. A TA10-specific oligonucleotide probe was constructed based on the DQβ sequence, and its specificity was confirmed in a panel of TA10-positive and TA10-negative cell lines. An additional band was observed in Southern blotting experiments which may indicate a donor sequence for gene conversion

  2. Phylogenetic estimates of diversification rate are affected by molecular rate variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchêne, D A; Hua, X; Bromham, L

    2017-10-01

    Molecular phylogenies are increasingly being used to investigate the patterns and mechanisms of macroevolution. In particular, node heights in a phylogeny can be used to detect changes in rates of diversification over time. Such analyses rest on the assumption that node heights in a phylogeny represent the timing of diversification events, which in turn rests on the assumption that evolutionary time can be accurately predicted from DNA sequence divergence. But there are many influences on the rate of molecular evolution, which might also influence node heights in molecular phylogenies, and thus affect estimates of diversification rate. In particular, a growing number of studies have revealed an association between the net diversification rate estimated from phylogenies and the rate of molecular evolution. Such an association might, by influencing the relative position of node heights, systematically bias estimates of diversification time. We simulated the evolution of DNA sequences under several scenarios where rates of diversification and molecular evolution vary through time, including models where diversification and molecular evolutionary rates are linked. We show that commonly used methods, including metric-based, likelihood and Bayesian approaches, can have a low power to identify changes in diversification rate when molecular substitution rates vary. Furthermore, the association between the rates of speciation and molecular evolution rate can cause the signature of a slowdown or speedup in speciation rates to be lost or misidentified. These results suggest that the multiple sources of variation in molecular evolutionary rates need to be considered when inferring macroevolutionary processes from phylogenies. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. HLA DNA sequence variation among human populations: molecular signatures of demographic and selective events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Buhler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular differences between HLA alleles vary up to 57 nucleotides within the peptide binding coding region of human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes, but it is still unclear whether this variation results from a stochastic process or from selective constraints related to functional differences among HLA molecules. Although HLA alleles are generally treated as equidistant molecular units in population genetic studies, DNA sequence diversity among populations is also crucial to interpret the observed HLA polymorphism. In this study, we used a large dataset of 2,062 DNA sequences defined for the different HLA alleles to analyze nucleotide diversity of seven HLA genes in 23,500 individuals of about 200 populations spread worldwide. We first analyzed the HLA molecular structure and diversity of these populations in relation to geographic variation and we further investigated possible departures from selective neutrality through Tajima's tests and mismatch distributions. All results were compared to those obtained by classical approaches applied to HLA allele frequencies.Our study shows that the global patterns of HLA nucleotide diversity among populations are significantly correlated to geography, although in some specific cases the molecular information reveals unexpected genetic relationships. At all loci except HLA-DPB1, populations have accumulated a high proportion of very divergent alleles, suggesting an advantage of heterozygotes expressing molecularly distant HLA molecules (asymmetric overdominant selection model. However, both different intensities of selection and unequal levels of gene conversion may explain the heterogeneous mismatch distributions observed among the loci. Also, distinctive patterns of sequence divergence observed at the HLA-DPB1 locus suggest current neutrality but old selective pressures on this gene. We conclude that HLA DNA sequences advantageously complement HLA allele frequencies as a source of data used

  4. Phenotypic and molecular variation in the green and black poison-dart frog Dendrobates auratus (Anura: Dendrobatidae) from Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa D Patrick; Mahmood Sasa

    2009-01-01

    The green and black poison-dart frog Dendrobates auratus exhibits high intraspecific variation in hue color and pattern throughout its range, making it a very popular species in the pet trade. We analyzed the correspondence between color variation and molecular variation of D. auratus from Costa Rica using RAPD analysis. Twenty-six random primers were analyzed for variation in 99 individuals from seven populations. Color pattern was scored from digital images of the dorsal and ventral views. ...

  5. Pseudomonas viridiflava, a multi host plant pathogen with significant genetic variation at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis F Sarris

    Full Text Available The pectinolytic species Pseudomonas viridiflava has a wide host range among plants, causing foliar and stem necrotic lesions and basal stem and root rots. However, little is known about the molecular evolution of this species. In this study we investigated the intraspecies genetic variation of P. viridiflava amongst local (Cretan, as well as international isolates of the pathogen. The genetic and phenotypic variability were investigated by molecular fingerprinting (rep-PCR and partial sequencing of three housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoD and rpoB, and by biochemical and pathogenicity profiling. The biochemical tests and pathogenicity profiling did not reveal any variability among the isolates studied. However, the molecular fingerprinting patterns and housekeeping gene sequences clearly differentiated them. In a broader phylogenetic comparison of housekeeping gene sequences deposited in GenBank, significant genetic variability at the molecular level was found between isolates of P. viridiflava originated from different host species as well as among isolates from the same host. Our results provide a basis for more comprehensive understanding of the biology, sources and shifts in genetic diversity and evolution of P. viridiflava populations and should support the development of molecular identification tools and epidemiological studies in diseases caused by this species.

  6. Contribution of genetic variation rs266882 to prostate-specific antigen levels in healthy controls with serum PSA below 2.0 ng/ml.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaeman; Park, Heeyoon; Lee, Gilho

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the impact of genetic variation in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene (rs266882) on serum PSA levels in healthy men as well as risk factors for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) and prostate cancer. The study population comprised 91 men with PSA levels below 2.0 ng/ml as healthy controls, 78 men with PSA 2-10 ng/ml as a BPH group, and 128 prostate cancer patients, all in Korea. DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the product was sequenced. We found that PSA levels were associated with a G/A polymorphism only in healthy controls. The transition, however, was not associated with PSA levels of BPH and cancer patients, nor was it a risk factor. In conclusion, this genetic factor is important for determining serum PSA levels in the naive group, whereas the disruption of prostatic architecture in BPH or prostate cancer may be a major determining factor for PSA levels.

  7. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, Rikke L. V.; Oettinger, Thomas; Rosenkrands, Ida

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate....... The molecules were characterized, mapped in a two-dimensional electrophoresis reference map of short-term culture filtrate, and compared with another recently identified low-mass protein, CFP10 (F. X. Berthet, P, B. Rasmussen, I. Rosenkrands, P. Andersen, and B. Gicquel. Microbiology 144:3195-3203, 1998......), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  8. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate....... The molecules were characterized, mapped in a two-dimensional electrophoresis reference map of short-term culture filtrate, and compared with another recently identified low-mass protein, CFP10 (F. X. Berthet, P. B. Rasmussen, I. Rosenkrands, P. Andersen, and B. Gicquel. Microbiology 144:3195-3203, 1998......), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  9. Structural Variations of Human Glucokinase Glu256Lys in MODY2 Condition Using Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Kumar Yellapu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK is the predominant hexokinase that acts as glucose sensor and catalyses the formation of Glucose-6-phosphate. The mutations in GK gene influence the affinity for glucose and lead to altered glucose levels in blood causing maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (MODY2 condition, which is one of the prominent reasons of type 2 diabetic condition. In view of the importance of mutated GK resulting in hyperglycemic condition, in the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in intact and 256 E-K mutated GK structures and their energy values and conformational variations were correlated. Energy variations were observed in mutated GK (3500 Kcal/mol structure with respect to intact GK (5000 Kcal/mol, and it showed increased γ-turns, decreased β-turns, and more helix-helix interactions that affected substrate binding region where its volume increased from 1089.152 Å2 to 1246.353 Å2. Molecular docking study revealed variation in docking scores (intact = −12.199 and mutated = −8.383 and binding mode of glucose in the active site of mutated GK where the involvement of A53, S54, K56, K256, D262 and Q286 has resulted in poor glucose binding which probably explains the loss of catalytic activity and the consequent prevailing of high glucose levels in MODY2 condition.

  10. Molecular and antigenic traits on hemagglutinin gene of avian influenza H9N2 viruses: Evidence of a new escape mutant in Egypt adapted in quails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, Amany; Arafa, Abdelsatar; Hussein, Hussein A; El-Sanousi, Ahmed A

    2017-06-01

    The LPAI viruses of H9N2 subtype became widely distributed in Middle Eastern countries, causing great economic losses in poultry industry especially when complicated with other pathogens. The H9N2 viruses in Egypt have a wide spread nature since its first occurrence in 2011. In this study, we collected cloacal and tracheal samples from 19 flocks for detection and propagation of H9N2 virus using real-time RT-PCR and egg inoculation. We studied the molecular evolution of the Hemagglutinin gene of H9N2 viruses by full HA gene sequencing, then the antigenic characterization was implemented using the cross HI assay and analyzed using 3D Bioinformatics cartography software. The phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene of Egyptian H9N2 viruses clearly points out the presence of only one group (Egy/G1) of originally introduced viruses in 2011 related to the G1 lineage within group B, with the presence of multiple minor clusters includes viruses from 2011 to 2015. However, a new variant (Egy/G1var) cluster was detected in quails since 2012. Genetically, Egy/G1var viruses characterized by presence of 20 amino acid substitutions within and adjacent to the antigenic sites in comparison to other Egyptian viruses. In addition, two glycosylation sites at amino acid residues 127 and 189 were determined in close to the receptor binding and antigenic sites. The antigenic analysis based on 3D antigenic mapping showed that the Egy/G1var cluster was clearly distinct from the original Egy/G1 viruses. In conclusion, Egy/G1var is shown to be a new escape mutant variant cluster with an adaptive evolution in quails. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Swine Leukocyte Antigen- Gene Variation and Its Association with Piglet Diarrhea in Large White, Landrace and Duroc

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    Q. L. Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The swine leukocyte antigen class II molecules are possibly associated with the induction of protective immunity. The study described here was to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in exon 2 of the swine DQA gene and piglet diarrhea. This study was carried out on 425 suckling piglets from three purebred pig strains (Large White, Landrace and Duroc. The genetic diversity of exon 2 in swine DQA was detected by PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis, eight unique SSCP patterns (AB, BB, BC, CC, CD, BD, BE and DD representing five specific allele (A to E sequences were detected. Sequence analysis revealed 21 nucleotide variable sites and resulting in 12 amino acid substitutions in the populations. A moderate level polymorphism and significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of the genotypes distribution were observed in the populations (p<0.01. The association analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant difference in the score of piglet diarrhea between different genotypes, individuals with genotype CC showed a lower diarrhea score than genotypes AB (0.98±0.09, BB (0.85±0.77 and BC (1.25±0.23 (p<0.05, and significantly low than genotype BE (1.19±0.19 (p<0.01, CC genotype may be a most resistance genotype for piglet diarrhea.

  12. Color pattern variation in Cichla temensis (Perciformes: Cichlidae: resolution based on morphological, molecular, and reproductive data

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    Paul Reiss

    Full Text Available Morphological variants of Cichla temensis, readily differentiated by their striking color pattern differences, are found in several Amazon basin flood pulse river systems. The adult variants have at times been thought to represent different species or sexual dimorphism. A three part study was performed in two regions in Brazil (rio Igapó Açú and rio Caures to elucidate the nature of the variants. In part one; selected diagnostic morphometric characters were compared intraspecifically among the variants and interspecifically with C. monoculus and C. orinocensis. All of the C. temensis variants were found to differ significantly from their sympatric congeners while not differing among each other. In part two, mitochondrial DNA samples were compared intraspecifically among the variants and interspecifically with their sympatric congeners. There were no diagnostic molecular synapomorphies that would unambiguously distinguish the variants and all C. temensis variants were clearly diagnosable and divergent from their sympatric congeners. In part three, color pattern variation in both sexes was compared to a gonadosomatic index (GSI. A significant correlation between color pattern variation and gonadosomatic index was found. The results of this study demonstrate that Cichla temensis variants are confirmed to be members of a single species and that the variation does not represent a sexual dimorphism. The color pattern variation is a cyclically occurring secondary sexual characteristic and is indicative of the specific degree of an individual's seasonal sexual maturation.

  13. Genetic variation of space flight carried rice and mutant analysis by AFLP molecular marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Zhigang; Zhang Zhiyong; Xiang Yuewu; Zhang Zhixiong; Cai Pingzhong; Wen Chunmiao; Zheng Jiakui

    2006-01-01

    Rice seeds were carried by 'Shenzhou No.3' space shuttle, a mutant with golden chaff, stem and leaf was selected and named Golden 1 after the seeds returned to the earth. Except the golden color, other traits of Golden 1 are no obviously different with its original material H9808. Genetic analysis identified that color variation was control by a pair of recessive gene. The DNA fragments of the mutant were compared with its parent by AFLP molecular markers. Five specific bands were found through a serial selection. (authors)

  14. Epitope mapping of histo blood group antigens bound to norovirus VLPs using STD NMR experiments reveals fine details of molecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Brigitte; Leuthold, Mila; Parra, Francisco; Dalton, Kevin P; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; Peters, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Attachment of human noroviruses to histo blood group antigens (HBGAs) is thought to be critical for the infection process. Therefore, we have determined binding epitopes of synthetic type 1 to 6 blood group A- and B-tetrasaccharides binding to GII.4 human Norovirus virus like particles (VLPs) using STD NMR experiments. So far, little information is available from crystal structure analysis studies on the interactions of the reducing-end sugars with the protruding domain (P-domain) of the viral coat protein VP1. Here, we show that the reducing-end sugars make notable contacts with the protein surface. The type of glycosidic linkage, and the identity of the sugar at the reducing end modulate HBGA recognition. Most strikingly, type 2 structures yield only very poor saturation transfer indicating impeded binding. This observation is in accordance with previous mass spectrometry based affinity measurements, and can be understood based on recent crystal structure data of a complex of highly homologous GII.4 P-dimers with H-type 2 trisaccharide where the N-acetyl group of the reducing N-acetyl glucosamine residue points towards a loop comprising amino acids Q390 to H395. We suggest that in our case, binding of type 2 A- and B-tetrasaccharides leads to steric conflicts with this loop. In order to identify factors determining L-Fuc recognition, we also synthesized GII.4 VLPs with point mutations D391A and H395A. Prior studies had suggested that these residues, located in a second shell around the L-Fuc binding site, assist L-Fuc binding. STD NMR experiments with L-Fuc and B-trisaccharide in the presence of wild type and mutant VLPs yield virtually identical binding epitopes suggesting that these two mutations do not significantly alter HBGA recognition. Our study emphasizes that recognition of α-(1→2)-linked L-Fuc residues is a conserved feature of GII.4 noroviruses. However, structural variation of the HBGA core structures clearly modulates molecular recognition

  15. The study of evolution in the Crow - Kimura molecular genetics model using methods of calculus of variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotina, Nina N.; Shagalova, Lyubov G.

    2017-11-01

    The Cauchy problem for a nonlinear noncoercive Hamilton - Jacobi equation with state constraints is under consideration. Such a problem originates in molecular biology. It describes the process of evolution in molecular genetics according to the Crow - Kimura model. A generalized solution of prescribed structure is constructed and justifed via calculus of variations. The results of computer simulation are presented.

  16. Induction of complete and molecular remissions in acute myeloid leukemia by Wilms' tumor 1 antigen-targeted dendritic cell vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendeloo, V.F. Van; Velde, A. van de; Driessche, A. Van; Cools, N.; Anguille, S.; Ladell, K.; Gostick, E.; Vermeulen, K.; Pieters, K.; Nijs, G.; Stein, B.; Smits, E.L.; Schroyens, W.A.; Gadisseur, A.P.; Vrelust, I.; Jorens, P.G.; Goossens, H.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Price, D.A.; Oji, Y.; Oka, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Berneman, Z.N.

    2010-01-01

    Active immunization using tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of cancer to eradicate or control residual disease, but so far, most dendritic cell trials have been performed in end-stage cancer patients with high tumor loads. Here, in a phase I/II trial, we

  17. Antigenic Variation of East/Central/South African and Asian Chikungunya Virus Genotypes in Neutralization by Immune Sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Long Chua

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging mosquito-borne virus which causes epidemics of fever, severe joint pain and rash. Between 2005 and 2010, the East/Central/South African (ECSA genotype was responsible for global explosive outbreaks across India, the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. From late 2013, Asian genotype CHIKV has caused outbreaks in the Americas. The characteristics of cross-antibody efficacy and epitopes are poorly understood.We characterized human immune sera collected during two independent outbreaks in Malaysia of the Asian genotype in 2006 and the ECSA genotype in 2008-2010. Neutralizing capacity was analyzed against representative clinical isolates as well as viruses rescued from infectious clones of ECSA and Asian CHIKV. Using whole virus antigen and recombinant E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins, we further investigated antibody binding sites, epitopes, and antibody titers. Both ECSA and Asian sera demonstrated stronger neutralizing capacity against the ECSA genotype, which corresponded to strong epitope-antibody interaction. ECSA serum targeted conformational epitope sites in the E1-E2 glycoprotein, and E1-E211K, E2-I2T, E2-H5N, E2-G118S and E2-S194G are key amino acids that enhance cross-neutralizing efficacy. As for Asian serum, the antibodies targeting E2 glycoprotein correlated with neutralizing efficacy, and I2T, H5N, G118S and S194G altered and improved the neutralization profile. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal linear neutralizing epitope from the ECSA sequence has reduced binding capacity and neutralization efficacy against Asian CHIKV. These findings imply that the choice of vaccine strain may impact cross-protection against different genotypes.Immune serum from humans infected with CHIKV of either ECSA or Asian genotypes showed differences in binding and neutralization characteristics. These findings have implications for the continued outbreaks of co-circulating CHIKV genotypes and effective

  18. Efficient elimination of response parameters in molecular property calculations for variational and nonvariational energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Jørgensen, Poul; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Helgaker, Trygve

    2008-12-07

    A general method is presented for the efficient elimination of response parameters in molecular property calculations for variational and nonvariational energies. For variational energies, Wigner's 2n+1 rule is obtained as a special case of the more general k(2n+1) rule, which states that for a subset of k perturbations within a total set of z>or=k perturbations, response parameters may be eliminated according to the 2n+1 rule (normally applied to the full set of perturbations). Nonvariational energies may be treated by introducing Lagrange multipliers that satisfy the stronger 2n+2 rule for the k perturbations, while the wave-function parameters still satisfy the 2n+1 rule for the k perturbations. The corresponding rule for nonvariational energies is referred to as the k(2n+1,2n+2) rule. For k=z, the well-known 2n+2 rule for the multipliers is reproduced, while the wave-function parameters satisfy the 2n+1 rule. The application of the k(2n+1) and k(2n+1,2n+2) rules minimizes the total number of response equations to be solved when the molecular property contains k extensive perturbations (e.g., geometrical derivatives) and z-k intensive perturbations (e.g., electric fields).

  19. Molecular variations in aromatic cosolutes: critical role in the rheology of cationic wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Thiago H; Miranda, Paulo C M L; Morgon, Nelson H; Heerdt, Gabriel; Dreiss, Cécile A; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2014-10-07

    Wormlike micelles formed by the addition to cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) of a range of aromatic cosolutes with small molecular variations in their structure were systematically studied. Phenol and derivatives of benzoate and cinnamate were used, and the resulting mixtures were studied by oscillatory, steady-shear rheology, and the microstructure was probed by small-angle neutron scattering. The lengthening of the micelles and their entanglement result in remarkable viscoelastic properties, making rheology a useful tool to assess the effect of structural variations of the cosolutes on wormlike micelle formation. For a fixed concentration of CTAB and cosolute (200 mmol L(-1)), the relaxation time decreases in the following order: phenol > cinnamate> o-hydroxycinnamate > salicylate > o-methoxycinnamate > benzoate > o-methoxybenzoate. The variations in viscoelastic response are rationalized by using Mulliken population analysis to map out the electronic density of the cosolutes and quantify the barrier to rotation of specific groups on the aromatics. We find that the ability of the group attached to the aromatic ring to rotate is crucial in determining the packing of the cosolute at the micellar interface and thus critically impacts the micellar growth and, in turn, the rheological response. These results enable us for the first time to propose design rules for the self-assembly of the surfactants and cosolutes resulting in the formation of wormlike micelles with the cationic surfactant CTAB.

  20. Integrated molecular and bioprocess engineering for bacterially produced immunogenic modular virus-like particle vaccine displaying 18 kDa rotavirus antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekewe, Alemu; Fan, Yuanyuan; Tan, Emilyn; Middelberg, Anton P J; Lua, Linda H L

    2017-02-01

    A high global burden of rotavirus disease and the unresolved challenges with the marketed rotavirus vaccines, particularly in the developing world, have ignited efforts to develop virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines for rotavirus. While rotavirus-like particles comprising multiple viral proteins can be difficult to process, modular VLPs presenting rotavirus antigenic modules are promising alternatives in reducing process complexity and cost. In this study, integrated molecular and bioprocess engineering approaches were used to simplify the production of modular murine polyomavirus capsomeres and VLPs presenting a rotavirus 18 kDa VP8* antigen. A single construct was generated for dual expression of non-tagged murine polyomavirus capsid protein VP1 and modular VP1 inserted with VP8*, for co-expression in Escherichia coli. Co-expressed proteins assembled into pentameric capsomeres in E. coli. A selective salting-out precipitation and a polishing size exclusion chromatography step allowed the recovery of stable modular capsomeres from cell lysates at high purity, and modular capsomeres were successfully translated into modular VLPs when assembled in vitro. Immunogenicity study in mice showed that modular capsomeres and VLPs induced high levels of VP8*-specific antibodies. Our results demonstrate that a multipronged synthetic biology approach combining molecular and bioprocess engineering enabled simple and low-cost production of highly immunogenic modular capsomeres and VLPs presenting conformational VP8* antigenic modules. This strategy potentially provides a cost-effective production route for modular capsomere and VLP vaccines against rotavirus, highly suitable to manufacturing economics for the developing world. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 397-406. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Correlation and agreement between eplet mismatches calculated using serological, low-intermediate and high resolution molecular human leukocyte antigen typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Samantha; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Irish, Ashley B; Lewis, Joshua R; Wong, Germaine; Lim, Wai H

    2018-03-02

    Structural human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching at the eplet level can be identified by HLAMatchmaker, which requires the entry of four-digit alleles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between eplet mismatches calculated by serological and two-digit typing methods compared to high-resolution four-digit typing. In a cohort of 264 donor/recipient pairs, the evaluation of measurement error was assessed using intra-class correlation to confirm the absolute agreement between the number of eplet mismatches at class I (HLA-A, -B, C) and II loci (HLA-DQ and -DR) calculated using serological or two-digit molecular typing compared to four-digit molecular typing methods. The proportion of donor/recipient pairs with a difference of >5 eplet mismatches between the HLA typing methods was also determined. Intra-class correlation coefficients between serological and four-digit molecular typing methods were 0.969 (95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 0.960-0.975) and 0.926 (95% CI 0.899-0.944), respectively; and 0.995 (95% CI 0.994-0.996) and 0.993 (95% CI 0.991-0.995), respectively between two-digit and four-digit molecular typing methods. The proportion of donor/recipient pairs with a difference of >5 eplet mismatches at class I and II loci was 4% and 16% for serological versus four-digit molecular typing methods, and 0% and 2% for two-digit versus four-digit molecular typing methods, respectively. In this small predominantly Caucasian population, compared with serology, there is a high level of agreement in the number of eplet mismatches calculated using two-compared to four-digit molecular HLA-typing methods, suggesting that two-digit typing may be sufficient in determining eplet mismatch load in kidney transplantation.

  2. Using large-scale genome variation cohorts to decipher the molecular mechanism of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Nina; Mardin, Balca R; Yakneen, Sergei; Korbel, Jan O

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing genomic structural variations (SVs) in the human genome remains challenging, and there is a growing interest to understand somatic SVs occurring in cancer, a disease of the genome. A havoc-causing SV process known as chromothripsis scars the genome when localized chromosome shattering and repair occur in a one-off catastrophe. Recent efforts led to the development of a set of conceptual criteria for the inference of chromothripsis events in cancer genomes and to the development of experimental model systems for studying this striking DNA alteration process in vitro. We discuss these approaches, and additionally touch upon current "Big Data" efforts that employ hybrid cloud computing to enable studies of numerous cancer genomes in an effort to search for commonalities and differences in molecular DNA alteration processes in cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Phenotypic and molecular variation in the green and black poison-dart frog Dendrobates auratus (Anura: Dendrobatidae from Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa D Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The green and black poison-dart frog Dendrobates auratus exhibits high intraspecific variation in hue color and pattern throughout its range, making it a very popular species in the pet trade. We analyzed the correspondence between color variation and molecular variation of D. auratus from Costa Rica using RAPD analysis. Twenty-six random primers were analyzed for variation in 99 individuals from seven populations. Color pattern was scored from digital images of the dorsal and ventral views. In general, frogs from the Caribbean coast had significantly more light coloration than black color but cannot be grouped by population based only on hue pattern. Only 3 RAPD primers were found to be polymorphic, representing a total of 16 loci. Most of the molecular variation encountered here occurs within populations, thus making unclear the degree of population structure and differentiation. Further examination of COI mtDNA sequences from our samples also supports these results. Partial Mantel correlations suggested that the pattern of molecular variation is not congruent with the variation in color pattern in this species, an outcome that is discussed in terms of phenotypic evolution. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (Suppl. 1: 313-321. Epub 2009 November 30.

  4. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: antigenic and molecular diversity of British isolates and implications for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Fearnley, Catherine; Naidu, Brindha; Errington, Jane; Westcott, David G; Drew, Trevor W

    2012-08-17

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an endemic disease of pigs, caused by PRRS virus, a member of the Arteriviridae family. First seen in Britain in 1991, the disease continues to be a significant economic and welfare problem for pig producers. To date, only PRRSV genotype 1 has been found in Britain. At the genetic level, a considerable increase has been reported in the diversity of PRRS viruses isolated in Britain between 2003 and 2007, versus the early 1990 s. In this study, the diversity has been shown to extend to the antigenic level too, with potential consequences for diagnostic methods. Antigenic diversity was assessed using a panel of twelve monoclonal antibodies, only one of which reacted with all isolates tested. Nine diverse viruses were compared as potential antigens in immunoperoxidase monolayer assays, where each one produced quite different results for a common panel of sera. As a single virus is used in each diagnostic assay, results must therefore be interpreted cautiously. For a real-time RT-PCR assay, published oligonucleotide primer and probe sequences were evaluated against available genetic sequences of British and European viruses, and were re-designed where considerable mismatches were found. The multiplex assay incorporating these modified primers to detect genotype 1 and 2 PRRS viruses was then validated for use with diagnostic sera and tissues. As the increasing degree of diversity exhibited by British strains is mirrored in other countries, PRRSV will continue to provide an ongoing challenge to diagnosis at a global, as well as national level. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Natural genetic variation for morphological and molecular determinants of plant growth and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Nascimento, Vitor de Laia; de Oliveira Silva, Franklin Magnum; Zsögön, Agustin; Araújo, Wagner L; Sulpice, Ronan

    2016-05-01

    The rates of increase in yield of the main commercial crops have been steadily falling in many areas worldwide. This generates concerns because there is a growing demand for plant biomass due to the increasing population. Plant yield should thus be improved in the context of climate change and decreasing natural resources. It is a major challenge which could be tackled by improving and/or altering light-use efficiency, CO2 uptake and fixation, primary metabolism, plant architecture and leaf morphology, and developmental plant processes. In this review, we discuss some of the traits which could lead to yield increase, with a focus on how natural genetic variation could be harnessed. Moreover, we provide insights for advancing our understanding of the molecular aspects governing plant growth and yield, and propose future avenues for improvement of crop yield. We also suggest that knowledge accumulated over the last decade in the field of molecular physiology should be integrated into new ideotypes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Study of genetic variation in some Iranian saffron accessions using molecular markers of RAPD and ISSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shokrpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Saffron (Crocus sativus L. is one of the most valuable medicinal and spice herbs in the world. In spite of the ancient cultivation history in Iran, there are limited breeding studies on the plant due to its vegetative reproduction. In order to evaluation genetic diversity of Iranian saffron germplasm, sixty-five different saffron accessions from the main cultivation areas in Khorasan including Torbat heidarieh, Gonabad, Mahvelat, Ghaenat and Ferdows were collected and were studied by molecular markers. The used RAPD and ISSR primers produced 43 and 122 polymorphic markers loci, respectively, and totally 165 markers with average of 7.5 markers by each primer, totally. Diversity index ranged from 0.36 to 0.7 with average of 0.23. Also, marker index with the average of 0.16 varied in the range of 0.2 to 0.7. The accessions from Ghaenat and Mahvelat had the maximum (83.03% and the minimum (52.73% polymorphism, respectively. Grouping the studied saffron accessions using cluster analysis displayed four distinct groups which had little correspondence to their collection areas, while clustering for the main cultivation areas had relatively good correspondence to their geographical distances. So, it is expected to have nearly approaching improvements of qualitative and quantitative yields via the selection of superior clones of saffron. Key words: Saffron, Molecular variation, Germplasm, RAPD, ISSR, Khorasan region, clustering .

  7. Vaccination Against Hydatidosis: Molecular Cloning and Optimal Expression of the EG95NC-Recombinant Antigen in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazouli, M; Lightowlers, M; Gauci, C G; Tadlaoui, K; Belmlih, A; Ennaji, M M; Elharrak, M

    2017-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widely distributed zoonosis that is highly endemic in the Mediterranean basin. The disease represents a serious public health threat and causes economic losses. The parasite life-cycle involves dogs and ruminants as definitive and intermediate hosts; humans are accidently infected, causing serious clinical issues. Vaccination of ruminants and dog treatments represent the most efficient measures to prevent parasite transmission. The recombinant protein vaccine, EG95, has been used successfully in sheep vaccine trials against CE in several countries. In this study, we expressed the modified antigen, EG95NC-GST, in Escherichia coli for use as a vaccine against Echinococcus granulosus in ruminants. We tested three different media formulations for E. coli culture and established for each culture conditions for optimal levels of soluble EG95 expression. The results demonstrate that SOC and TB media provided high yields in cell density and EG95 protein expression. Purification of the recombinant protein with affinity chromatography (using FPLC) was also performed to increase the purity of the EG95NC - -GST antigen.

  8. Determination of human platelet antigen typing by molecular methods: Importance in diagnosis and early treatment of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinsburg, Suzanne A; Shaz, Beth H; Westhoff, Connie; Cushing, Melissa M

    2012-05-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is the most common cause of severe thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage in the perinatal period. While the gold standard for making a diagnosis of NAIT is detection of a human platelet antigen (HPA)-specific antibody in maternal serum, together with identifying an incompatibility between the parents for the cognate HPA antigen, platelet genotyping is the gold standard method for HPA typing. Platelet genotyping is critical in screening at-risk fetuses for the presence ofthe HPA corresponding to the maternal antibody. In addition, platelet genotyping may play a role in population screening to identify women at risk for sensitization, and thus, fetuses at risk for NAIT. The most commonly used methods of platelet genotyping are sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSP), restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (PCR-RFLP), and TaqMan real-time PCR. PCR-SSP and PCR-RFLP are relatively inexpensive and technically simple methods, but they are not easily automated and require expertise for reliable interpretation of results. Newer methods that allow for multiplexing, automation, and easily interpretable results, such as bead arrays, are currently in development and available for research purposes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Electrochemical immunoassay for the prostate specific antigen using a reduced graphene oxide functionalized with a high molecular-weight silk peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanying; Qu, Ying; Li, Chunya; Wu, Kangbing; Liu, Guishen; Hou, Xiaodong; Huang, Yina; Wu, Wangze

    2015-01-01

    High molecular-weight silk peptide (SP) was used to functionalize the surface of nanosheets of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The SP-rGO nanocomposite was then mixed with mouse anti-human prostate specific antigen monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA) and coated onto a glassy carbon electrode to fabricate an immunosensor. By using the hexacyanoferrate redox system as electroactive probe, the immunosensor was characterized by voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The peak current, measured at the potential of 0.24 V (vs. SCE), is distinctly reduced after binding prostate specific antigen (PSA). Response (measured by differential pulse voltammetry) is linearly related to PSA concentration in the range from 0.1 to 5.0 ng · mL −1 and from 5.0 to 80.0 ng∙mL −1 , and the detection limit is 53 pg∙mL −1 (at an SNR of 3). The immunosensor was successfully applied to the determination of PSA in clinical serum samples, and the results were found to agree well with those obtained with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (author)

  10. Using molecular principal axes for structural comparison: determining the tertiary changes of a FAB antibody domain induced by antigenic binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman B David

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of different protein x-ray structures has previously been made in a number of different ways; for example, by visual examination, by differences in the locations of secondary structures, by explicit superposition of structural elements, e.g. α-carbon atom locations, or by procedures that utilize a common symmetry element or geometrical feature of the structures to be compared. Results A new approach is applied to determine the structural changes that an antibody protein domain experiences upon its interaction with an antigenic target. These changes are determined with the use of two different, however comparable, sets of principal axes that are obtained by diagonalizing the second-order tensors that yield the moments-of-geometry as well as an ellipsoidal characterization of domain shape, prior to and after interaction. Determination of these sets of axes for structural comparison requires no internal symmetry features of the domains, depending solely upon their representation in three-dimensional space. This representation may involve atomic, Cα, or residue centroid coordinates. The present analysis utilizes residue centroids. When the structural changes are minimal, the principal axes of the domains, prior to and after interaction, are essentially comparable and consequently may be used for structural comparison. When the differences of the axes cannot be neglected, but are nevertheless slight, a smaller relatively invariant substructure of the domains may be utilized for comparison. The procedure yields two distance metrics for structural comparison. First, the displacements of the residue centroids due to antigenic binding, referenced to the ellipsoidal principal axes, are noted. Second, changes in the ellipsoidal distances with respect to the non-interacting structure provide a direct measure of the spatial displacements of the residue centroids, towards either the interior or exterior of the domain

  11. Molecular mechanisms of Ellis-van Creveld gene variations in ventricular septal defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fadi; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Zhenyan; Yuan, Ping; Zhou, Qiongqiong; Jin, Jiejing; Yan, Xia; Xu, Zixuan; Cao, Qing; Yu, Jianhua; Cheng, Yingzhang; Wan, Rong; Hong, Kui

    2018-01-01

    The Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) gene is associated with various congenital heart diseases. However, studies on EVC gene variations in ventricular septal defect (VSD) and the underlying molecular mechanisms are sparse. The present study detected 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 65 patients with VSD and 210 control patients from the Chinese Han population. Of the identified SNPs only the c.1727G>A SNP site was positively associated with the development of VSD (PG, was also identified, which causes a leucine to valine substitution at amino acid 115 of the EVC protein (p.L115V). The results of functional prediction indicated that c.343C>G may be a pathogenic mutation. In addition, in NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, the EVC c.343C>G mutation significantly decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Further investigation demonstrated that in NIH3T3 cells, overexpression of EVC c.343C>G mutation reduced the binding between EVC and smoothened, which further downregulated the activity of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and the expression of downstream cyclin D1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 proteins with SAG. The c.1727G>A SNP of the EVC gene increased VSD susceptibility in patients from the Chinese Han population. The molecular mechanism underlying the development of VSD induced by the EVC c.343C>G mutation may be due to a reduction in the anti-apoptotic and proliferative abilities of cardiomyocytes via downregulation of Hh pathway activity. The results of the present study may provide novel targets for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with VSD. PMID:29257216

  12. Molecular mechanisms of Ellis‑van Creveld gene variations in ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fadi; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Zhenyan; Yuan, Ping; Zhou, Qiongqiong; Jin, Jiejing; Yan, Xia; Xu, Zixuan; Cao, Qing; Yu, Jianhua; Cheng, Yingzhang; Wan, Rong; Hong, Kui

    2018-01-01

    The Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) gene is associated with various congenital heart diseases. However, studies on EVC gene variations in ventricular septal defect (VSD) and the underlying molecular mechanisms are sparse. The present study detected 11 single‑nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 65 patients with VSD and 210 control patients from the Chinese Han population. Of the identified SNPs only the c.1727G>A SNP site was positively associated with the development of VSD (PG, was also identified, which causes a leucine to valine substitution at amino acid 115 of the EVC protein (p.L115V). The results of functional prediction indicated that c.343C>G may be a pathogenic mutation. In addition, in NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, the EVC c.343C>G mutation significantly decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Further investigation demonstrated that in NIH3T3 cells, overexpression of EVC c.343C>G mutation reduced the binding between EVC and smoothened, which further downregulated the activity of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and the expression of downstream cyclin D1 and B‑cell lymphoma 2 proteins with SAG. The c.1727G>A SNP of the EVC gene increased VSD susceptibility in patients from the Chinese Han population. The molecular mechanism underlying the development of VSD induced by the EVC c.343C>G mutation may be due to a reduction in the anti‑apoptotic and proliferative abilities of cardiomyocytes via downregulation of Hh pathway activity. The results of the present study may provide novel targets for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with VSD.

  13. Mutations of different molecular origins exhibit contrasting patterns of regional substitution rate variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Elango

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Transitions at CpG dinucleotides, referred to as "CpG substitutions", are a major mutational input into vertebrate genomes and a leading cause of human genetic disease. The prevalence of CpG substitutions is due to their mutational origin, which is dependent on DNA methylation. In comparison, other single nucleotide substitutions (for example those occurring at GpC dinucleotides mainly arise from errors during DNA replication. Here we analyzed high quality BAC-based data from human, chimpanzee, and baboon to investigate regional variation of CpG substitution rates. We show that CpG substitutions occur approximately 15 times more frequently than other single nucleotide substitutions in primate genomes, and that they exhibit substantial regional variation. Patterns of CpG rate variation are consistent with differences in methylation level and susceptibility to subsequent deamination. In particular, we propose a "distance-decaying" hypothesis, positing that due to the molecular mechanism of a CpG substitution, rates are correlated with the stability of double-stranded DNA surrounding each CpG dinucleotide, and the effect of local DNA stability may decrease with distance from the CpG dinucleotide.Consistent with our "distance-decaying" hypothesis, rates of CpG substitution are strongly (negatively correlated with regional G+C content. The influence of G+C content decays as the distance from the target CpG site increases. We estimate that the influence of local G+C content extends up to 1,500 approximately 2,000 bps centered on each CpG site. We also show that the distance-decaying relationship persisted when we controlled for the effect of long-range homogeneity of nucleotide composition. GpC sites, in contrast, do not exhibit such "distance-decaying" relationship. Our results highlight an example of the distinctive properties of methylation-dependent substitutions versus substitutions mostly arising from errors during DNA replication. Furthermore

  14. Molecular polymorphism related to flowering trait variation in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Lorenzo; Tissi, Carlo; Mazzucato, Andrea; Negri, Valeria

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the flowering variation and the molecular polymorphism in key regulatory genes that control flowering in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. collection of 94 accessions from Europe and the Americas. The analysis of variance revealed that the difference in days-to-flowering between accessions was significant, with European accessions characterized by flowering precocity. Population structure analysis corroborated previous data on the genetic distinction between the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. A low level of admixture was detected. Genomic sequences of 15 gene fragments were obtained. About 7.0 kb per accession were sequenced and a total of 48 nucleotide substitutions identified. A Mixed Linear Model analysis, including population structure and kinship, was used to identify marker-trait associations. Haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs) associated with the studied traits were detected: in PvVRN1 and PvPHYB with days-to-flowering, in PvMYB29 with number of flower buds per inflorescence and in PvTFL1z and PvFCA with inflorescence length. The two genes associated with days-to-flowering control belong to the photoperiod and vernalization pathways. In particular, the PvVRN1 gene appears to play an important role in regulating the adaptation process of common bean. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular composition and seasonal variation of amino acids in urban aerosols from Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lujie; Bai, Huahua; Yu, Xi; Wu, Fengchang; Yue, Siyao; Ren, Hong; Li, Linjie; Lai, Senchao; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Fu, Pingqing

    2018-05-01

    Fifteen hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) were quantified in urban aerosols (TSP samples) collected during April 2012 to May 2013 in Beijing, China using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after their derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), to investigate their molecular distributions and seasonal variation. Total concentrations of amino acids ranged from 1.73-25.7 nmol m- 3 with a peak in spring (13.7 nmol m- 3), followed by winter (11.5 nmol m- 3), fall (9.51 nmol m- 3) and summer (7.45 nmol m- 3). Glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala) and valine (Val) are found to be the most abundant species, which account for 46% of the total THAA. Compared with those recorded in previous studies, the atmospheric levels of amino acids in Beijing were higher than those from other regions. Enhanced amounts of methionine, tyrosine, histidine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found during the rainfall events. The factor analysis further suggests that amino acids in urban Beijing originated from multiple sources including biological emission, biomass burning, as well as anthropogenic activities.

  16. Variational calculation of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy with electronic polarization of solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-04-01

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculation presents a significant challenge due to an excessive number of QM calculations. A useful approach for reducing the computational cost is that based on the mean field approximation to the QM subsystem. Here, we describe such a mean-field QM/MM theory for electronically polarizable systems by starting from the Hartree product ansatz for the total system and invoking a variational principle of free energy. The MM part is then recast to a classical polarizable model by introducing the charge response kernel. Numerical test shows that the potential of mean force (PMF) thus obtained agrees quantitatively with that obtained from a direct QM/MM calculation, indicating the utility of self-consistent mean-field approximation. Next, we apply the obtained method to prototypical reactions in several qualitatively different solvents and make a systematic comparison of polarization effects. The results show that in aqueous solution the PMF does not depend very much on the water models employed, while in nonaqueous solutions the PMF is significantly affected by explicit polarization. For example, the free energy barrier for a phosphoryl dissociation reaction in acetone and cyclohexane is found to increase by more than 10 kcal/mol when switching the solvent model from an empirical to explicitly polarizable one. The reason for this is discussed based on the parametrization of empirical nonpolarizable models.

  17. A molecular assembly system for presentation of antigens on the surface of HBc virus-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhina, Elena A.; Kuprianov, Victor V. [Centre ' Bioengineering' , Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Prosp. 60-letya Oktyabrya 7-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stepanova, Ludmila A.; Tsybalova, Ludmila M. [Research Institute of Influenza, Russian Federation Ministry of Health and Social Development, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kiselev, Oleg I. [Research Institute of Influenza, Russian Federation Ministry of Health and Social Development, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); GenNanotech Ltd, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ravin, Nikolai V., E-mail: nravin@biengi.ac.ru [Centre ' Bioengineering' , Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Prosp. 60-letya Oktyabrya 7-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); GenNanotech Ltd, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Skryabin, Konstantin G. [Centre ' Bioengineering' , Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Prosp. 60-letya Oktyabrya 7-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); GenNanotech Ltd, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-20

    Hepatitis B virus-like particles, icosahedral structures formed by multiple core protein dimers, are promising immune-enhancing vaccine carriers for foreign antigens. Insertions into the surface-exposed immunodominant loop are especially immunogenic. However, the need to conserve the particulate structure to ensure high immunogenicity imposes restraints on the nature of the heterologous sequence that can be inserted. We propose a new approach to constructing HBc particles linked to the target epitopes that relies on non-covalent interactions between the epitope and pre-assembled unmodified HBc particles. Interaction was enabled by fusion of the epitope to the GSLLGRMKGA peptide, binding to the spike tips. This peptide may be used as a 'binding tag' allowing in vitro construction of HBc particles carrying the target peptide. Such virus-like particles carrying multiple copies of the extracellular domain of the M2 protein of different influenza strains appeared to be highly immunogenic and protected immunised mice against a lethal influenza challenge.

  18. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen as a molecular biomarker for spermatogenesis in PTU-induced hypothyroidism of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousson, Ehab; Ali, Ehab M M; Ibrahim, Wafaa; Mansour, Mohammed A

    2011-07-01

    The thyroid hormone has few serious effects on the testes except during the neonatal stage. There is little knowledge concerning the prolonged effect of thyroid hormone deficiency throughout the rat's life span and its effect on spermatogenesis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a nuclear matrix protein, which is essential for multiple cell cycle pathways. Here we used PCNA immunohistochemistry as a marker to differentiate between the testes of control and hypothyroid rats. About 20 rats were equally divided into 2 groups; the first group was the control group, while the second group was the experimental group in which rats were fed 0.05% 6-n-propyl thiouracil (PTU) in drinking water for 6 weeks. Immunohistochemistry, using an antibody against PCNA, showed at least 3 differences in the pattern of PCNA immunoreactivity (PCNA-ir). First, PCNA-ir was not detected in Sertoli and Leydig cells in the testes of control rats and detected in some of the hypothyroid rats. Second, in the control group more than 96% of spermatogonia were PCNA-positive cells; however, hypothyroidism caused the reduction to approximately 25% PCNA staining in spermatogonia. The third difference was in the abnormal distribution of spermatogonia seen in the hypothyroid rat testis, not in the control one. These results suggest that prepubertal hypothyroidism affects the proliferation of spermatogenic cells leading to impaired spermatogenesis and that PCNA index is a useful marker for assessing germ cell kinetics and spermatogenesis in prepubertal hypothyroidism.

  19. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  20. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  1. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  2. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  3. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  4. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  5. A simple and inexpensive point-of-care test for hepatitis B surface antigen detection: serological and molecular evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, R G; Gutierrez, J A; Navarro-Cazarez, N; Giang, K; Adler, D; Tran, B; Locarnini, S; Hammond, R; Bowden, S

    2014-12-01

    Early identification of chronic hepatitis B is important for optimal disease management and prevention of transmission. Cost and lack of access to commercial hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) immunoassays can compromise the effectiveness of HBV screening in resource-limited settings and among marginalized populations. High-quality point-of-care (POC) testing may improve HBV diagnosis in these situations. Currently available POC HBsAg assays are often limited in sensitivity. We evaluated the NanoSign(®) HBs POC chromatographic immunoassay for its ability to detect HBsAg of different genotypes and with substitutions in the 'a' determinant. Thirty-seven serum samples from patients with HBV infection, covering HBV genotypes A-G, were assessed for HBsAg titre with the Roche Elecsys HBsAg II quantification assay and with the POC assay. The POC assay reliably detected HBsAg at a concentration of at least 50 IU/mL for all genotypes, and at lower concentrations for some genotypes. Eight samples with substitutions in the HBV 'a' determinant were reliably detected after a 1/100 dilution. The POC strips were used to screen serum samples from 297 individuals at risk for HBV in local clinical settings (health fairs and outreach events) in parallel with commercial laboratory HBsAg testing (Quest Diagnostics EIA). POC testing was 73.7% sensitive and 97.8% specific for detection of HBsAg. Although the POC test demonstrated high sensitivity over a range of genotypes, false negatives were frequent in a clinical setting. Nevertheless, the POC assay offers advantages for testing in both developed and resource-limited countries due to its low cost (0.50$) and immediately available results. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Molecular and antigenic evolution and geographical spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in western Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducatez, M F; Olinger, C M; Owoade, A A; Tarnagda, Z; Tahita, M C; Sow, A; De Landtsheer, S; Ammerlaan, W; Ouedraogo, J B; Osterhaus, A D M E; Fouchier, R A M; Muller, C P

    2007-08-01

    In Africa, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus was first detected in northern Nigeria and later also in other regions of the country. Since then, seven other African countries have reported H5N1 infections. This study reports a comparison of full-length genomic sequences of H5N1 isolates from seven chicken farms in Nigeria and chicken and hooded vultures in Burkina Faso with earlier H5N1 outbreaks worldwide. In addition, the antigenicity of Nigerian H5N1 isolates was compared with earlier strains. All African strains clustered within three sublineages denominated A (south-west Nigeria, Niger), B (south-west Nigeria, Egypt, Djibouti) and C (northern Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Sudan, Côte d'Ivoire), with distinct nucleotide and amino acid signatures and distinct geographical distributions within Africa. Probable non-African ancestors within the west Asian/Russian/European lineage distinct from the south-east Asian lineages were identified for each sublineage. All reported human cases in Africa were caused by sublineage B. Substitution rates were calculated on the basis of sequences from 11 strains from a single farm in south-west Nigeria. As H5N1 emerged essentially at the same time in the north and south-west of Nigeria, the substitution rates confirmed that the virus probably did not spread from the north to the south, given the observed sequence diversity, but that it entered the country via three independent introductions. The strains from Burkina Faso seemed to originate from northern Nigeria. At least two of the sublineages also circulated in Europe in 2006 as seen in Germany, further suggesting that the sublineages had already emerged outside of Africa and seemed to have followed the east African/west Asian and Black Sea/Mediterranean flyways of migratory birds.

  7. Organic molecular compositions and temporal variations of summertime mountain aerosols over Mt. Tai, North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pingqing; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Okuzawa, Kazuhiro; Aggarwal, Shankar Gopala; Wang, Gehui; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2008-10-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m above sea level) on a daytime and nighttime basis during a summertime campaign (May-June 2006) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The n-Alkanes, fatty acids, fatty alcohols, sugars, glycerol and polyacids, and phthalate esters were found as major organic compound classes, whereas lignin and resin products, sterols, aromatic acids, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected as minor classes. Sugars (49.8-2115 ng m-3, average 640 ng m-3 in daytime; 18.1-4348 ng m-3, 799 ng m-3 in nighttime) were found to be the dominant compound class. Levoglucosan, a specific cellulose pyrolysis product, was detected as the most abundant single compound, followed by C28 fatty alcohol, diisobutyl and di-n-butyl phthalates, C29n-alkane, C16 and C28 fatty acids, and malic acid. By grouping organic compounds based on their sources, we found that emission of terrestrial plant waxes was the most significant source (30-34%) of the TSP, followed by biomass burning products (25-27%) (e.g., levoglucosan and lignin and resin products), soil resuspension (15-18%) due to agricultural activities, secondary oxidation products (8-10%), plastic emission (3-10%), marine/microbial sources (6%), and urban/industrial emissions from fossil fuel use (4%). However, low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids (such as oxalic acid) of photochemical origin were not included in this study. Malic acid was found to be much higher than those reported in the ground level, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production in the free troposphere over mountain areas. Temporal variations of biomass burning tracers (e.g., levoglucosan, galactosan, mannosan) and some higher plant wax derived compound classes suggested that there were two major (E1 and E2) and one minor (E3) biomass-burning events during this

  8. ONE ANTIGEN MISMATCHED RELATED VS. HLA-MATCHED UNRELATED DONOR HEMATOPOIETIC TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA: CIBMTR RESULTS IN THE ERA OF MOLECULAR HLA TYPING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, David; Sierra, Jorge; Wang, Tao; Kan, Fangyu; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Marks, David I.; McCarthy, Philip L; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W; Ringdén, Olle; Setterholm, Michelle; Spellman, Stephen R; Waller, Edmund K.; Gajewski, James L; Marino, Susana R.; Senitzer, David; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 13% of patients lacking an HLA-identical sibling have a 1-antigen-mismatched related donor (MMRD). Historically, outcomes using a 1-antigen MMRD were considered equivalent to a matched unrelated donor (UD). Recent improvements in unrelated donor (UD) stem cell transplantation (SCT) due to better molecular HLA-matching justifies investigating if UD should be preferred to MMRD in adult patients with acute leukemia. Patients and Methods The outcomes of MMRD (n=89) and HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 allele matched UD (n=700) SCT reported to the CIBMTR between 1995 and 2005 were compared. Patients were transplanted for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in first or second complete remission. Results Donor type was not associated with hematological recovery. Univariate and multivariate comparisons of MMRD vs. HLA-matched UD transplants showed no statistically significant differences in overall survival, disease free survival, transplant related mortality, relapse, and 100-day grade III–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). MMRD SCT was associated with a lower rate of chronic GVHD at 1-year, 35% vs 47% p=0.03, which was confirmed in multivariate analysis (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.39-0.85, p<0.01). Conclusion HLA-matched UD and MMRD SCT are associated with comparable survival. Since less chronic GVHD was observed in MMRD, this option when available remains the first choice in acute leukemia patients without an HLA-identical sibling in need of allogeneic transplantation. PMID:20674756

  9. From phenotypic to molecular polymorphisms involved in naturally occurring variation for plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Mendez-Vigo, B.; Koornneef, M.

    2005-01-01

    An enormous amount of naturally occurring genetic variation affecting development is found within wild and domesticated plant species. This diversity is presumably involved in plant adaptation to different natural environments or in human preferences. In addition, such intraspecific variation

  10. Effect of different hapten-carrier conjugation ratios and molecular orientations on antibody affinity against a peptide antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M. K.; Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2006-01-01

    ten dines at two-weeks intervals with low doses of the eight conjugates, Blood samples collected between each immunisation were analysed by ELISA for specific antibody titres and relative affinities. With both types of conjugations, the anti-peptide antibody titres increased in response to increasing...... the affinity and titre of antibodies raised against the hapten using different conjugation ratios and orientations. The peptide was coupled to ovalbumin in four Conjugation ratios and two molecular orientations - terminal and central - and the Conjugates were verified by mass spectrometry. Mice were immunised...

  11. Molecular variation in the Paragonimus heterotremus complex in Thailand and Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpool, Oranuch; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Nawa, Yukifumi; Blair, David; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is an important food-borne parasitic zoonosis caused by infection with lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus. Of the 7 members of the genus known in Thailand until recently, only P. heterotremus has been confirmed as causing human disease. An 8th species, P. pseudoheterotremus, has recently been proposed from Thailand, and has been found in humans. Molecular data place this species as a sister species to P. heterotremus, and it is likely that P. pseudoheterotremus is not specifically distinct from P. heterotremus. In this study, we collected metacercariae of both nominal species (identification based on metacercarial morphology) from freshwater crabs from Phetchabun Province in northern Thailand, Saraburi Province in central Thailand, and Surat Thani Province in southern Thailand. In addition, we purchased freshwater crabs imported from Myanmar at Myawaddy Province, western Thailand, close to the Myanmar-Thailand border. The DNAs extracted from excysted metacercariae were PCR-amplified and sequenced for ITS2 and cox1 genes. The ITS2 sequences were nearly identical among all samples (99-100%). Phylogenies inferred from all available partial cox1 sequences contained several clusters. Sequences from Indian P. heterotremus formed a sister group to sequences from P. pseudoheterotremus-type metacercariae. Sequences of P. heterotremus from Thailand, Vietnam, and China formed a separate distinct clade. One metacercaria from Phitsanulok Province was distinct from all others. There is clearly considerable genetic variation in the P. heterotremus complex in Thailand and the form referred to as P. pseudoheterotremus is widely distributed in Thailand and the Thai-Myanmar border region.

  12. Molecular Karyotyping and Exome Analysis of Salt-Tolerant Rice Mutant from Somaclonal Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanikarn Udomchalothorn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available LPT123-TC171 is a salt-tolerant (ST and drought-tolerant (DT rice line that was selected from somaclonal variation of the original Leuang Pratew 123 (LPT123 rice cultivar. The objective of this study was to identify the changes in the rice genome that possibly lead to ST and/or DT characteristics. The genomes of LPT123 and LPT123-TC171 were comparatively studied at the four levels of whole chromosomes (chromosome structure including telomeres, transposable elements, and DNA sequence changes by using next-generation sequencing analysis. Compared with LPT123, the LPT123-TC171 line displayed no changes in the ploidy level, but had a significant deficiency of chromosome ends (telomeres. The functional genome analysis revealed new aspects of the genome response to the in vitro cultivation condition, where exome sequencing revealed the molecular spectrum and pattern of changes in the somaclonal variant compared with the parental LPT123 cultivar. Mutation detection was performed, and the degree of mutations was evaluated to estimate the impact of mutagenesis on the protein functions. Mutations within the known genes responding to both drought and salt stress were detected in 493 positions, while mutations within the genes responding to only salt stress were found in 100 positions. The possible functions of the mutated genes contributing to salt or drought tolerance were discussed. It was concluded that the ST and DT characteristics in the somaclonal variegated line resulted from the base changes in the salt- and drought-responsive genes rather than the changes in chromosome structure or the large duplication or deletion in the specific region of the genome.

  13. A Study of Molecular Mimicry and Immunological Cross-reactivity between Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Myelin Mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Vergani

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the reported association between hepatitis B vaccination (HBvacc and autoimmune demyelinating complications such as multiple sclerosis (MS, we have looked for aminoacid similarities between the small hepatitis B virus surface antigen (SHBsAg, and the MS-autoantigens myelin basic protein (MBP and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG that could serve as targets of immunological cross-reactivity. Twenty-mer peptides spanning 4 SHBsAg/MOG and 1 SHBsAg/MBP mimicking pairs, were constructed and tested by ELISA as targets of cross-reactive responses. A total of 147 samples from 58 adults were collected before HBvacc (58/58, and post-HBvacc (48/58 before the second and 41/58 before the third boost. Eighty-seven sera from anti-SHBsAg antibody negative patients with various diseases were tested as pathological controls. Reactivity to at least one of the SHBsAg peptides was found in 8 (14% pre-HBvacc subjects; amongst the remaining 50, reactivity to at least one of the SHBsAg peptides appeared in 47 (94% post-HBvacc. Reactivity to at least one of the MOG mimics was present in 4 (8% pre-HBvacc and in 30 (60% post-HBvacc (p < 0.001. Overall 30/50 (60% vaccinees had SHBsAg/MOG double reactivity on at least one occasion compared to none before-vaccination and in 2 (2% of the pathological controls (p < 0.001 for both. SHBsAg/MOG double reactivity was cross-reactive as confirmed by inhibition studies. At 6 months post-vaccination, 3 of the 4 anti-MOG reactive cases before vaccination and 7 of the 24 (29% of the anti-MOG reactive cases at 3 months post-vaccination had lost their reactivity to MOG5-24. There was no reactivity to the SHBsAg/MBP mimics. None of the vaccinees reported symptoms of demyelinating disorders. In view of the observed SHBsAg/MOG cross-reactivity, the vaccine's possible role as an immunomodulator of viral/self cross-reactivity must be further investigated.

  14. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mu [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ruan Yuxia [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Cai Jiye, E-mail: tjycai@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. > We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. > Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. > The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 {+-} 4.62 nm to 129.70 {+-} 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 {+-} 0.16% to 75.14 {+-} 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 {mu}M curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 {mu}M curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  15. Novel Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccines: evidence-based searching for variant surface antigens as candidates for vaccination against pregnancy-associated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Jensen, Anja T R; Theander, Thor G

    2002-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has traditionally concentrated on careful molecular, biochemical, and immunological characterisation of candidate antigens. In contrast, evidence of the importance of identified antigens in immunity to human infection and disease has generally been limited......) in particular, to provide robust evidence of a causal link between the two in order to allow efficient and evidence-based identification of candidate antigens for malaria vaccine development....... to statistically significant co-variation with protection rather than on demonstration of causal relationships. We have studied the relationship between variant surface antigen-specific antibodies and clinical protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria in general, and from pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM...

  16. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mu; Ruan Yuxia; Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan; Cai Jiye

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. → We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. → Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. → The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 ± 4.62 nm to 129.70 ± 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 ± 0.16% to 75.14 ± 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 μM curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 μM curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  17. The microgeographical patterns of morphological and molecular variation of a mixed ploidy population in the species complex Actinidia chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Liu

    Full Text Available Polyploidy and hybridization are thought to have significant impacts on both the evolution and diversification of the genus Actinidia, but the structure and patterns of morphology and molecular diversity relating to ploidy variation of wild Actinidia plants remain much less understood. Here, we examine the distribution of morphological variation and ploidy levels along geographic and environmental variables of a large mixed-ploidy population of the A. chinensis species complex. We then characterize the extent of both genetic and epigenetic diversity and differentiation exhibited between individuals of different ploidy levels. Our results showed that while there are three ploidy levels in this population, hexaploids were constituted the majority (70.3%. Individuals with different ploidy levels were microgeographically structured in relation to elevation and extent of niche disturbance. The morphological characters examined revealed clear difference between diploids and hexaploids, however tetraploids exhibited intermediate forms. Both genetic and epigenetic diversity were high but the differentiation among cytotypes was weak, suggesting extensive gene flow and/or shared ancestral variation occurred in this population even across ploidy levels. Epigenetic variation was clearly correlated with changes in altitudes, a trend of continuous genetic variation and gradual increase of epigenomic heterogeneities of individuals was also observed. Our results show that complex interactions between the locally microgeographical environment, ploidy and gene flow impact A. chinensis genetic and epigenetic variation. We posit that an increase in ploidy does not broaden the species habitat range, but rather permits A. chinensis adaptation to specific niches.

  18. Molecular, biological, and antigenic characterization of a Border disease virus isolated from a pig during classical swine fever surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Makoto; Aoki, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kozasa, Takashi; Tominaga-Teshima, Kaho; Mine, Junki; Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Kobayashi, Tsubasa; Nishine, Kaoru; Tateishi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yudai; Fukuhara, Mai; Ohmori, Keitaro; Todaka, Reiko; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Shigeyuki; Kida, Hiroshi; Shirai, Junsuke

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, molecular, biological, and antigenic analyses were performed to characterize Border disease virus (BDV) strain FNK2012-1 isolated from a pig in 2012 in Japan. The complete genome comprises 12,327 nucleotides (nt), including a large open reading frame of 11,685 nt. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that FNK2012-1 was clustered into BDV genotype 1 with ovine strains. FNK2012-1 grew in porcine, bovine, and ovine primary cells and cell lines, but grew better in bovine and ovine cells than in porcine cells. Specific pathogen-free pigs inoculated with FNK2012-1 did not show any clinical signs. Noninoculated contact control pigs also did not show clinical signs and did not seroconvert. The results suggest that FNK2012-1 may be of ruminant origin and is poorly adapted to pigs. Such observations can provide important insights into evidence for infection and transmission of BDV, which may be of ruminant origin, among pigs.

  19. Molecular Basis of Ribotype Variation in the Seventh Pandemic Clone and its O139 Variant of Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiting Lan

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribotyping has been widely used to characterise the seventh pandemic clone including South American and O139 variants which appeared in 1991 and 1992 respectively. To reveal the molecular basis of ribotype variation we analysed the rrn operons and their flanking regions. All but one variation detected by BglI, the most discriminatory enzyme, was found to be due to changes within the rrn operons, resulting from recombination between operons. The recombinants are detected because of the presence of a BglI site in the 16S gene in three of the nine rrn operons and/or changes of intergenic spacer types of which four variants were identified. As the frequency of rrn recombination is high, ribotyping becomes a less useful tool for evolutionary studies and long term monitoring of the pathogenic clones of Vibrio cholerae as variation could undergo precise reversion by the same recombination event.

  20. Immunoenzymatic detection of three kinds of 43,000-molecular-weight antigens by monoclonal antibodies in the insoluble fraction of Toxoplasma gondii.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, K; Kasahara, T; Shioiri-Nakano, K; Igarashi, I; Suzuki, M

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (TpM 3, TpM 6, and TpM 19) against Toxoplasma gondii insoluble antigens were produced by the hybridization of NS-1, a mouse myeloma cell line, with spleen cells from mice immunized with T. gondii insoluble antigens. TpM 3, TpM 6, and TpM 19 were characterized by the dye test, the latex agglutination test, two types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, using either T. gondii supernatant antigens or T. gondii insoluble antigens, and immunoperoxidase staining. TpM 3, TpM ...

  1. A single Alal 39-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to Chinook salmon leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57.

  2. DNA fingerprinting of sugarcane for detecting molecular evidence of somaclonal variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Leal, M.; Canales, E.; Michel, R.; Coto, O.; Cornide, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular characterisation of eight sugarcane mutants which tolerate 1% NaCl, was performed by means of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis at the genomic level, using a group of molecular probes for ribosomal DNAs and two others, Δ-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (ΔP5CR) and ATPase, probably related to salinity stress tolerance. Results showed the molecular evidence of genetic changes in comparison to the susceptible donor variety and the possible presence of more that one mechanism to tolerate salt stress. (author)

  3. Genetic and molecular analyses of natural variation indicate CBF2 as a candidate gene for underlying a freezing tolerance quantitative trait locus in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Gomez-Mena, C.; Llorente, F.; Koornneef, M.; Salinas, J.; Martinez-Zapater, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural variation for freezing tolerance is a major component of adaptation and geographic distribution of plant species. However, little is known about the genes and molecular mechanisms that determine its naturally occurring diversity. We have analyzed the intraspecific freezing tolerance

  4. Factor correction as a tool to eliminate between-session variation in replicate experiments: application to molecular biology and retrovirology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Atze T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In experimental biology, including retrovirology and molecular biology, replicate measurement sessions very often show similar proportional differences between experimental conditions, but different absolute values, even though the measurements were presumably carried out under identical circumstances. Although statistical programs enable the analysis of condition effects despite this replication error, this approach is hardly ever used for this purpose. On the contrary, most researchers deal with such between-session variation by normalisation or standardisation of the data. In normalisation all values in a session are divided by the observed value of the 'control' condition, whereas in standardisation, the sessions' means and standard deviations are used to correct the data. Normalisation, however, adds variation because the control value is not without error, while standardisation is biased if the data set is incomplete. Results In most cases, between-session variation is multiplicative and can, therefore, be removed by division of the data in each session with a session-specific correction factor. Assuming one level of multiplicative between-session error, unbiased session factors can be calculated from all available data through the generation of a between-session ratio matrix. Alternatively, these factors can be estimated with a maximum likelihood approach. The effectiveness of this correction method, dubbed "factor correction", is demonstrated with examples from the field of molecular biology and retrovirology. Especially when not all conditions are included in every measurement session, factor correction results in smaller residual error than normalisation and standardisation and therefore allows the detection of smaller treatment differences. Factor correction was implemented into an easy-to-use computer program that is available on request at: biolab-services@amc.uva.nl?subject=factor. Conclusion Factor correction

  5. Diurnal variation of hormonal and lipid biomarkers in a molecular epidemiology-like setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.W.M. van Kerkhof (Linda); K.C.G. van Dycke (Kirsten); E.H.J.M. Jansen (Eugene); P.K. Beekhof (Piet); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); T. Ruskovska (Tatjana); N. Velickova (Nevenka); N. Kamcev (Nikola); J.L.A. Pennings (Jeroen); H. van Steeg (Harry); W. Rodenburg (Wendy)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Many molecular epidemiology studies focusing on high prevalent diseases, such as metabolic disorders and cancer, investigate metabolic and hormonal markers. In general, sampling for these markers can occur at any time-point during the day or after an overnight fast.

  6. Purification of nonlipopolysaccharide antigen from Brucella abortus during preparation of antigen used for indirect hemolysis test.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, E M; Houle, J J

    1986-01-01

    The indirect hemolysis test (IHLT) for the diagnosis of brucellosis uses a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen obtained by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction of Brucella abortus. We showed that a non-LPS antigen can be obtained as a by-product of the IHLT antigen preparation. The antigen was purified to homogeneity by a combination of gel-filtration chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. The substance contained 8% protein and about 65% carbohydrate. The molecular weight of the primary unit w...

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally L

    2005-01-01

    .... The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) component of the immune system, coded by highly polymorphic genes whose distribution varies by race/ethnicity, may be a biologically based risk factor for breast cancer and thus may explain...

  8. Variation of Prostate-specific Antigen Value in Men and Risk of High-grade Prostate Cancer: Analysis of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe; Perrin, Paul; Boyle, Peter

    2015-05-01

    To investigate variations in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels among men with an initial normal PSA level in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial study. Data were extracted from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial study data set on all men in the interventional arm, with 2 tests performed in a period of levels was 3.4% (interquartile range, -15% to +26%). The variation in PSA value was not associated with the delay between the first and the second test (P = .36), age (P = .16), body mass index (P = .41), and race (P = .12). A total of 2,781 prostate cancers were diagnosed during follow-up. Adjusting for age and initial PSA level, the risk of prostate cancer increased linearly with increasing PSA level at the second test, with an odds ratio of 1.079 (95% confidence interval, 1.058-1.101) for each percent increase in PSA level. However, the variation in PSA was not associated with a higher Gleason score (P = .95 for level variations in cancer of Gleason score level over time is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, this association is not related to more aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular characterization of thyroid hormone receptor beta from Schistosoma japonicum and assessment of its potential as a vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Chunhui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid hormones (TH modulate growth, development and differentiation and metabolic processes by interacting with thyroid hormone receptors (THRs. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel thyroid hormone receptor beta encoding gene of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTHRβ and to investigate its potential as a vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis in BALB/c mice. Methods The full-length cDNA sequence of SjTHRβ, its gene organization, and its transcript levels were characterized, and the phylogenetic relationship between THR, RAR and RXR from other organisms were analysis, the ability of this protein binding to a conserved DNA core motif, and its potential as a vaccine candidate antigen against schistosomiasis in BALB/c mice were evaluated. Results The SjTHRβ cDNA was cloned, verified by 5’ and 3’ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends and shown to be polyadenylated at the 3’end, suggesting the transcript is full-length. SjTHRβ is homologous to THRs from other species and has a predicted conservative DNA binding domain and ligand binding domain that normally characterizes these receptors. A comparative quantitative PCR analysis showed that SjTHRβ was the highest expressed in 21d worms and the lowest in 7 d and 13 d schistosomula. The cDNA corresponding to DNA binding domain (SjTHRβ-DBD and ligand binding domain (SjTHRβ-LBD were cloned and subsequently expressed in E coli. The expressed proteins were used to immunize mice and generate specific serum against recombinant SjTHRβ (rSjTHRβ. Western blotting revealed that anti-rSjTHRβ-LBD serum recognized two protein bands in extracts from 21 d worm with molecular sizes of approximately 95 kDa and 72 kDa. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA analysis showed that rSjTHRβ-DBD could bind to a conserved DNA core motif. Immunization of BALB/c mice with rSjTHRβ-LBD could induce partial protective efficacy(27.52% worm reduction and 29.50% liver eggs

  10. RichMol: A general variational approach for rovibrational molecular dynamics in external electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Alec; Yachmenev, Andrey

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a general variational approach for computing the rovibrational dynamics of polyatomic molecules in the presence of external electric fields is presented. Highly accurate, full-dimensional variational calculations provide a basis of field-free rovibrational states for evaluating the rovibrational matrix elements of high-rank Cartesian tensor operators and for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The effect of the external electric field is treated as a multipole moment expansion truncated at the second hyperpolarizability interaction term. Our fully numerical and computationally efficient method has been implemented in a new program, RichMol, which can simulate the effects of multiple external fields of arbitrary strength, polarization, pulse shape, and duration. Illustrative calculations of two-color orientation and rotational excitation with an optical centrifuge of NH3 are discussed.

  11. Molecular responses in root-associative rhizospheric bacteria to variations in plant exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Plant exudates are a major factor in the interface of plant-soil-microbe interactions and it is well documented that the microbial community structure in the rhizosphere is largely influenced by the particular exudates excreted by various plants. Azospirillum brasilense is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium that is known to interact with a large number of plants, including important food crops. The regulatory gene flcA has an important role in this interaction as it controls morphological differentiation of the bacterium that is essential for attachment to root surfaces. Being a response regulatory gene, flcA mediates the response of the bacterial cell to signals from the surrounding rhizosphere. This makes this regulatory gene a good candidate for analysis of the response of bacteria to rhizospheric alterations, in this case, variations in root exudates. We will report on our studies on the response of Azospirillum, an ecologically, scientifically and agriculturally important bacterial genus, to variations in the rhizosphere.

  12. Forensic interpretation of molecular variation on networks of disease transmission and genetic inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsko, Stephan P; Osburn, Joanne; Allen, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the inference-on-networks (ION) framework for forensic interpretat ION of molecular typing data in cases involving allegations of infectious microbial transmission, association of disease outbreaks with alleged sources, and identifying familial relationships using mitochondrial or Y chromosomal DNA. The framework is applicable to molecular typing data obtained using any technique, including those based on electrophoretic separations. A key insight is that the networks associated with disease transmission or DNA inheritance can be used to define specific testable relationships and avoid the ambiguity and subjectivity associated with the criteria used for inferring genetic relatedness now in use. We discuss specific applications of the framework to the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Singapore and the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outbreak in Great Britain. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Farzana A; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG(+), m-ETS(+), m-SPINK1(+), or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG(+) was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, pRacial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Echinococcus P29 antigen: molecular characterization and implication on post-surgery follow-up of CE patients infected with different species of the Echinococcus granulosus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Ghalia; Gottstein, Bruno; Hemphill, Andrew; Babba, Hamouda; Spiliotis, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The protein P29 is a potential serological marker for post-treatment monitoring of cystic echinococcosis (CE) especially in young patients. We now have demonstrated that P29 is encoded in the Echinococcus genus by a single gene consisting of 7 exons spanning 1.2 kb of DNA. Variability of the p29 gene at inter- and intra-species level was assessed with 50 cDNA and 280 genomic DNA clones isolated from different E. granulosus s.l. isolates (E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1), E. equinus (G4), E. ortleppi (G5), E. canadensis (G6), E. canadensis (G7) and E. canadensis (G10)) as well as four E. multilocularis isolates. Scarce interspecies polymorphism at the p29 locus was observed and affected predominantly E. granulosus s.s. (G1), where we identified two alleles (A1 and A2) coding for identical P29 proteins and yielding in three genotypes (A1/A1, A2/A2 and A1/A2). Genotypic frequencies expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium revealed a high rate of heterozygosity (47%) that strongly supports the hypothesis that E. granulosus s.s. (G1) is predominantly outbreeding. Comparative sequence analyses of the complete p29 gene showed that phylogenetic relationships within the genus Echinococcus were in agreement with those of previous nuclear gene studies. At the protein level, the deduced P29 amino acid (AA) sequences exhibited a high level of conservation, ranging from 97.9% AA sequence identity among the whole E. granulosus s.l. group to 99.58% identity among E. multilocularis isolates. We showed that P29 proteins of these two species differ by three AA substitutions without implication for antigenicity. In Western-blot analyses, serum antibodies from a human CE patient infected with E. canadensis (G6) strongly reacted with recombinant P29 from E. granulosus s.s. (G1) (recEg(G1)P29). In the same line, human anti-Eg(G1)P29 antibodies bound to recEcnd(G6)P29. Thus, minor AA sequence variations appear not to impair the prognostic serological use of P29.

  15. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics as a successive variational method in nuclear many-body system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myo, Takayuki, E-mail: takayuki.myo@oit.ac.jp [General Education, Faculty of Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Toki, Hiroshi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Ikeda, Kiyomi [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Horiuchi, Hisashi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Suhara, Tadahiro [Matsue College of Technology, Matsue 690-8518 (Japan)

    2017-06-10

    We study the tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (TOAMD) as a successive variational method in many-body systems with strong interaction for nuclei. In TOAMD, the correlation functions for the tensor force and the short-range repulsion and their multiples are operated to the AMD state as the variational wave function. The total wave function is expressed as the sum of all the components and the variational space can be increased successively with the multiple correlation functions to achieve convergence. All the necessary matrix elements of many-body operators, consisting of the multiple correlation functions and the Hamiltonian, are expressed analytically using the Gaussian integral formula. In this paper we show the results of TOAMD with up to the double products of the correlation functions for the s-shell nuclei, {sup 3}H and {sup 4}He, using the nucleon–nucleon interaction AV8′. It is found that the energies and Hamiltonian components of two nuclei converge rapidly with respect to the multiple of correlation functions. This result indicates the efficiency of TOAMD for the power series expansion in terms of the tensor and short-range correlation functions.

  16. Study on the variations of molecular structures of some biomolecules induced by free electron laser using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Su, Yunlan; Wu, Jinguang; Zhao, Kui; Wang, Mingkai; Xu, Jinqiang; Dai, Zhiping; Chen, Jia'er

    2007-05-01

    In this study, free electron laser (FEL) with selective wavelength was used to induce structure changes of biomolecules, which were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. For understanding of the interactions between FEL and biomolecules as well as biological tissues, the biomolecules investigated are ATP, ADP, AMP, t-RNA, D-ribose and the complex of SmCl 3- D-ribose. Their FTIR spectra before and after irradiation of FEL show molecular structure variations of the samples after irradiation of FEL, especially the rearrangement of their hydrogen bond networks. Along with the various irradiation wavelengths, irradiation time and molecular structures, the changes after irradiation are different for these molecules. In the FTIR spectra after irradiation, the phenomenon that the bands split into several peaks indicates the existence of several structures, conformations and configurations, which may be prompted by multiple photons process induced by FEL. After irradiation, the changes in their IR spectra indicate the occurrence of stable or metastable states of the molecules after irradiation, which illustrated that IR spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of molecular structure and provides us a method to detect the information related to the mechanism of the irradiation process.

  17. Variation, sex, and social cooperation: molecular population genetics of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Flowers

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum is a eukaryotic microbial model system for multicellular development, cell-cell signaling, and social behavior. Key models of social evolution require an understanding of genetic relationships between individuals across the genome or possibly at specific genes, but the nature of variation within D. discoideum is largely unknown. We re-sequenced 137 gene fragments in wild North American strains of D. discoideum and examined the levels and patterns of nucleotide variation in this social microbial species. We observe surprisingly low levels of nucleotide variation in D. discoideum across these strains, with a mean nucleotide diversity (pi of 0.08%, and no strong population stratification among North American strains. We also do not find any clear relationship between nucleotide divergence between strains and levels of social dominance and kin discrimination. Kin discrimination experiments, however, show that strains collected from the same location show greater ability to distinguish self from non-self than do strains from different geographic areas. This suggests that a greater ability to recognize self versus non-self may arise among strains that are more likely to encounter each other in nature, which would lead to preferential formation of fruiting bodies with clonemates and may prevent the evolution of cheating behaviors within D. discoideum populations. Finally, despite the fact that sex has rarely been observed in this species, we document a rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium between SNPs, the presence of recombinant genotypes among natural strains, and high estimates of the population recombination parameter rho. The SNP data indicate that recombination is widespread within D. discoideum and that sex as a form of social interaction is likely to be an important aspect of the life cycle.

  18. Molecular variation at a candidate gene implicated in the regulation of fire ant social behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Gotzek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The fire ant Solenopsis invicta and its close relatives display an important social polymorphism involving differences in colony queen number. Colonies are headed by either a single reproductive queen (monogyne form or multiple queens (polygyne form. This variation in social organization is associated with variation at the gene Gp-9, with monogyne colonies harboring only B-like allelic variants and polygyne colonies always containing b-like variants as well. We describe naturally occurring variation at Gp-9 in fire ants based on 185 full-length sequences, 136 of which were obtained from S. invicta collected over much of its native range. While there is little overall differentiation between most of the numerous alleles observed, a surprising amount is found in the coding regions of the gene, with such substitutions usually causing amino acid replacements. This elevated coding-region variation may result from a lack of negative selection acting to constrain amino acid replacements over much of the protein, different mutation rates or biases in coding and non-coding sequences, negative selection acting with greater strength on non-coding than coding regions, and/or positive selection acting on the protein. Formal selection analyses provide evidence that the latter force played an important role in the basal b-like lineages coincident with the emergence of polygyny. While our data set reveals considerable paraphyly and polyphyly of S. invicta sequences with respect to those of other fire ant species, the b-like alleles of the socially polymorphic species are monophyletic. An expanded analysis of colonies containing alleles of this clade confirmed the invariant link between their presence and expression of polygyny. Finally, our discovery of several unique alleles bearing various combinations of b-like and B-like codons allows us to conclude that no single b-like residue is completely predictive of polygyne behavior and, thus, potentially causally

  19. The molecular basis of quantitative variation in foliar secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus globulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külheim, Carsten; Yeoh, Suat Hui; Wallis, Ian R; Laffan, Shawn; Moran, Gavin F; Foley, William J

    2011-09-01

    Eucalyptus is characterized by high foliar concentrations of plant secondary metabolites with marked qualitative and quantitative variation within a single species. Secondary metabolites in eucalypts are important mediators of a diverse community of herbivores. We used a candidate gene approach to investigate genetic associations between 195 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 24 candidate genes and 33 traits related to secondary metabolites in the Tasmanian Blue Gum (Eucalyptus globulus). We discovered 37 significant associations (false discovery rate (FDR) Q < 0.05) across 11 candidate genes and 19 traits. The effects of SNPs on phenotypic variation were within the expected range (0.018 < r(2) < 0.061) for forest trees. Whereas most marker effects were nonadditive, two alleles from two consecutive genes in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway (MEP) showed additive effects. This study successfully links allelic variants to ecologically important phenotypes which can have a large impact on the entire community. It is one of very few studies to identify the genetic variants of a foundation tree that influences ecosystem function. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Neto E.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  1. Physiological and Molecular Response of Ostrich to the Seasonal and Diurnal Variations in Egyptian conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.H.; Khalifa, H.H; Elaroussi, M.A.; Elsayed, M.A.; Basuony, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Twelve immature ostrich›s birds, 7 months old were used to evaluate the effect of ambient temperature variation and diurnal effect on response changes of some physiological and chemical parameters. All birds were reared out doors and exposed to daily ambient temperatures fluctuations during summer and winter. Blood samples were taken twice, one in the morning at 7 Am and once in the afternoon at 3 Pm during a representative 7 hot days of June (summer) (40±2ºC) and the 7 cold days of January (winter) (18±2ºC). Serum calcium, inorganic phosphorus, sodium, potassium, uric acid concentrations and aldosterone level were determined. The amount of total body water (TBW) and serum heat shock proteins (HSP) were estimated. Serum calcium, phosphorus, sodium and potassium concentrations in ostrich were significantly decreased, while uric acid concentration and aldosterone hormone level were significantly increased in summer as compared in winter during both at morning and at afternoon periods. Concerning the diurnal variation, serum calcium, phosphorus, sodium and potassium concentrations and aldosterone hormone level in ostrich were significantly increased, while uric acid concentration was significantly decreased at morning as compared at afternoon during both summer and winter seasons. TBW was significantly higher in summer season by 15.04% than winter season. It is concluded from the present study that heat or cold stress has a negative effect on most of the parameters studied and we recommend must be supplement diet with some nutrients like vitamins C, and E, sodium bicarbonate or yeast to overcome the negative effect and to better perform under such conditions

  2. Structural Variation of Chondroitin Sulfate Chains Contributes to the Molecular Heterogeneity of Perineuronal Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Miyata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggrecan, a chondroitin sulfate (CS proteoglycan, forms lattice-like extracellular matrix structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs. Neocortical PNNs primarily ensheath parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neurons (parvalbumin, PV cells late in brain development. Emerging evidence indicates that PNNs promote the maturation of PV cells by enhancing the incorporation of homeobox protein Otx2 and regulating experience-dependent neural plasticity. Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA, an N-acetylgalactosamine-specific plant lectin, binds to the CS chains of aggrecan and has been widely used to visualize PNNs. Although PNNs show substantial molecular heterogeneity, the importance of this heterogeneity in neural plasticity remains unknown. Here, in addition to WFA lectin, we used the two monoclonal antibodies Cat315 and Cat316, both of which recognize the glycan structures of aggrecan, to investigate the molecular heterogeneity of PNNs. WFA detected the highest number of PNNs in all cortical layers, whereas Cat315 and Cat316 labeled only a subset of PNNs. WFA+, Cat315+, and Cat316+ PNNs showed different laminar distributions in the adult visual cortex. WFA, Cat315 and Cat316 detected distinct, but partially overlapping, populations of PNNs. Based on the reactivities of these probes, we categorized PNNs into four groups. We found that two subpopulation of PNNs, one with higher and one with lower WFA-staining are differentially labeled by Cat316 and Cat315, respectively. CS chains recognized by Cat316 were diminished in mice deficient in an enzyme involved in the initiation of CS-biosynthesis. Furthermore, WFA+ and Cat316+ aggrecan were spatially segregated and formed microdomains in a single PNN. Otx2 co-localized with Cat316+ but not with WFA+ aggrecan in PNNs. Our results suggest that the heterogeneity of PNNs around PV cells may affect the functional maturation of these cells.

  3. Chemical Variation in Molecular Cloud Cores in the Orion A Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hirota, Tomoya; Kandori, Ryo; Umemoto, Tomofumi

    2010-12-01

    We have observed molecular cloud cores in the Orion A giant molecular cloud (GMC) in CCS, HC3N, DNC, and HN13C to study their chemical characteristics. We detected CCS in the Orion A GMC for the first time. CCS was detected in about a third of the observed cores. The cores detected in CCS are not localized, but widely distributed over the Orion A GMC. The CCS peak intensity of the core tends to be high in the southern region of the Orion A GMC. The HC3N peak intensity of the core also tends to be high in the southern region, while there are HC3N intense cores near Orion KL, which is not seen in CCS. The core associated with Orion KL shows a broad HC3N line profile, and the star-formation activity near to Orion KL seems to enhance the HC3N emission. The column density ratio of NH3 to CCS is lower near the middle of the filament, and higher toward the northern and southern regions along the Orion A GMC filament. This ratio is known to trace the chemical evolution in nearby dark cloud cores, but seems to be affected by the core gas temperature in the Orion A GMC: cores with low NH3 to CCS column density ratios tend to have a warmer gas temperature. The value of the column density ratio of DNC to HN13 is generally similar to that in dark cloud cores, but becomes lower around Orion KL due to a higher gas temperature.

  4. State-by-state Variation in Prostate-specific Antigen Screening Trends Following the 2011 United States Preventive Services Task Force Panel Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterlein, Malte W; Dalela, Deepansh; Sammon, Jesse D; Karabon, Patrick; Sood, Akshay; Jindal, Tarun; Meyer, Christian P; Löppenberg, Björn; Sun, Maxine; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Menon, Mani; Abdollah, Firas

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate state-by-state trends in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening prevalence after the 2011 United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against this practice. We included 222,475 men who responded to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 and 2014 surveys, corresponding to early and late post-USPSTF populations. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PSA screening and to calculate the adjusted and weighted state-by-state PSA screening prevalence and respective relative percent changes between 2012 and 2014. To account for unmeasured factors, the correlation between changes in PSA screening over time and changes in screening for colorectal and breast cancer were assessed. All analyses were conducted in 2016. Overall, 38.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 38.6%-39.2%) reported receiving PSA screening in 2012 vs 35.8% (95% CI = 35.1%-36.2%) in 2014. State of residence, age, race, education, income, insurance, access to care, marital status, and smoking status were independent predictors of PSA screening in both years (all P trends following the 2011 USPSTF recommendation. Further research is needed to elucidate the reasons for this heterogeneity in screening behavior among the states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular variation in AVP and AVPR1a in New World monkeys (Primates, Platyrrhini: evolution and implications for social monogamy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongren Ren

    Full Text Available The neurohypophysial hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP plays important roles in fluid regulation and vascular resistance. Differences in AVP receptor expression, particularly mediated through variation in the noncoding promoter region of the primary receptor for AVP (AVPR1a, may play a role in social phenotypes, particularly social monogamy, in rodents and humans. Among primates, social monogamy is rare, but is common among New World monkeys (NWM. AVP is a nonapeptide and generally conserved among eutherian mammals, although a recent paper demonstrated that some NWM species possess a novel form of the related neuropeptide hormone, oxytocin. We therefore characterized variation in the AVP and AVPR1a genes in 22 species representing every genus in the three major platyrrhine families (Cebidae, Atelidae and Pitheciidae. For AVP, a total of 16 synonymous substitutions were detected in 15 NWM species. No non-synonymous substitutions were noted, hence, AVP is conserved in NWM. By contrast, relative to the human AVPR1a, 66 predicted amino acids (AA substitutions were identified in NWM. The AVPR1a N-terminus (ligand binding domain, third intracellular (G-protein binding domain, and C-terminus were variable among species. Complex evolution of AVPR1a is also apparent in NWM. A molecular phylogenetic tree inferred from AVPR1a coding sequences revealed some consensus taxonomic separation by families, but also a mixed group composed of genera from all three families. The overall dN/dS ratio of AVPR1a was 0.11, but signals of positive selection in distinct AVPR1a regions were observed, including the N-terminus, in which we identified six potential positive selection sites. AA substitutions at positions 241, 319, 399 and 409 occurred uniquely in marmosets and tamarins. Our results enhance the appreciation of genetic diversity in the mammalian AVP/AVPR1a system, and set the stage for molecular modeling of the neurohypophyseal hormones and social behavior in

  6. Molecular genetic variations in vitamin D receptor gene with risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahid, S.; Tahir, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association of Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and development of osteoporosis. Methodology: This case-control study was conducted at Sir Ganga Hospital and Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan from January 2015 to August 2015. A total of 136 postmenopausal women between 46-75 years of age were included in the study while women with serious internal disease and premature (surgical) menopause before the age of 45 years were excluded. Genotyping of VDR ApaI, TaqI and BsmI loci was done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Levels of ionized calcium, C-reactive protein, alkaline phosphatase were measured and body mass index was calculated. Statistical analysis was done by using SPSS version 16.0. Results: Percentage of AA genotype was higher (28%) as compared to controls (16.6%). The postmenopausal cases showed 54% TT, 42%Tt and 4% tt genotype. The Bb genotype (42.6 %) was most frequent in both cases and controls. Postmenopausal cases and controls showed non-significant difference in alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein and ionized calcium levels. Conclusions: Findings explained the earlier inconsistent association results and no particular genetic variation in Vitamin D receptor gene had pronounced effect in predisposition to osteoporosis. (author)

  7. A molecular genetic study of the variations in metabolic function during schistosome development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Skelly

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available During their complex life cycle schistosomes alternate between the use of stored glycogen and reliance on host glucose to provide for their energy needs. In addition, there is dramatic variation between the relative contribution of aerobic versus anaerobic glucose metabolism during development. We have cloned a set of representative cDNAs that encode proteins involved in glucose uptake, glycolysis, Kreb's cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. The different cDNAs were used as probes to examine the expression of glucose metabolism genes during the schistosome life cycle. Steady state mRNA levels from whole cercariae, isolated cercarial tails, schistosomula and adult worms were analysed on Northern blots and dot blots which were quantified using storage phosphor technology. These studies reveal: (1 Transcripts encoding glycogen metabolic enzymes are expressed to much higher levels in cercarial tails than whole cercariae or schistosomula while the opposite pattern is found for glucose transporters and hexokinase transcripts; (2 Schistosomula contain low levels of transcripts encoding respiratory enzymes but regain the capacity for aerobic glucose metabolism as they mature to adulthood; (3 Male and female adults contain similar levels of the different transcripts involved in glucose metabolism.

  8. Molecular genetic variation in sheep of the central Volga area inhabited by Finno-Ugric peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. TAPIO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on morphology, native northern European sheep breeds belong to the short tailed type, of which the Romanov is the only native example still distributed in northwest Russia. Besides this, there exist local sheep populations kept by Finno-Ugric peoples in the central Volga region, which represent additional genetic resources in the area. Four sheep populations from the central Volga region were genotyped for 20 microsatellites and compared with geographically proximate breeds (Estonian Whitehead and Blackhead, the Finnsheep and an exported and a native population of Russian Romanov and with local populations in Estonia, Finland and Russian Karelia. Between-breed analyses including admixture analysis using molecular genetic markers and the phenotypic characteristics indicated that the Volgaic populations have not remained pure. The Viena population from Russian Karelia, the Romanov breed and, to some extent, the Komi population, have escaped extensive mixing, making them most attractive for conservation programmes. The study compared imported and native Romanov breed populations and the results suggest that the diversity parameters are markedly similar in these two populations.;

  9. DNA variations in oculocutaneous albinism: an updated mutation list and current outstanding issues in molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R; Wang, Xinjing; Wang, Chen; Sergeev, Yuri; Dolinska, Monika; Bower, Matthew; Fischer, Roxanne; Winer, David; Dubrovsky, Genia; Balog, Joan Z; Huizing, Marjan; Hart, Rachel; Zein, Wadih M; Gahl, William A; Brooks, Brian P; Adams, David R

    2013-06-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a rare genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented hair, skin, and eyes. There are four types of OCA caused by mutations in TYR (OCA-1), OCA2 (OCA-2), TYRP1 (OCA-3), or SLC45A2 (OCA-4). Here we report 22 novel mutations in the OCA genes; 14 from a cohort of 61 patients seen as part of the NIH OCA Natural History Study and eight from a prior study at the University of Minnesota. We also include a comprehensive list of almost 600 previously reported OCA mutations along with ethnicity information, carrier frequencies, and in silico pathogenicity predictions as a supplement. In addition to discussing the clinical and molecular features of OCA, we address the cases of apparent missing heritability. In our cohort, 26% of patients did not have two mutations in a single OCA gene. We demonstrate the utility of multiple detection methods to reveal mutations missed by Sanger sequencing. Finally, we review the TYR p.R402Q temperature-sensitive variant and confirm its association with cases of albinism with only one identifiable TYR mutation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Morphological and molecular variation in Tylototriton (Caudata: Salamandridae) in Laos, with description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phimmachak, Somphouthone; Aowphol, Anchalee; Stuart, Bryan L

    2015-08-24

    The salamandrid genus Tylototriton is poorly known in Laos, with one described species and unverified reports of two others. We undertook new fieldwork and obtained samples of Tylototriton at six localities across northern Laos during 2009-2013. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA, principal component analyses of 13 mensural characters, and qualitative morphological comparisons with samples from across the geographic range of Tylototriton were performed. Samples from Laos fell into four molecular and morphological groups, consisting of T. notialis, T. panhai, T. anguliceps, and a fourth lineage that is hypothesized here to be an undescribed species. Tylototriton podichthys sp. nov. is distinguished from its congeners by having distinct mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and in characteristics of the glandular skin on the head and body, shape of the rib nodules, and coloration of the body and limbs. This study expands the number of confirmed Tylototriton species in Laos from one to four, with the description of one species and extension of the ranges of T. panhai and T. anguliceps to Laos. An improved understanding of the geographic ranges of T. podichthys sp. nov. and T. anguliceps within Laos is needed.

  11. DNA Variations in Oculocutaneous Albinism: An Updated Mutation List and Current Outstanding Issues in Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Wang, Xinjing; Wang, Chen; Sergeev, Yuri; Dolinska, Monika; Bower, Matthew; Fischer, Roxanne; Winer, David; Dubrovsky, Genia; Balog, Joan Z.; Huizing, Marjan; Hart, Rachel; Zein, Wadih M.; Gahl, William A.; Brooks, Brian P.; Adams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a rare genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented hair, skin, and eyes. There are four types of OCA, caused by mutations in TYR (OCA-1), OCA2 (OCA-2), TYRP1 (OCA-3), or SLC45A2 (OCA-4). Here we report 22 novel mutations; 14 from a cohort of 61 patients seen as part of the NIH OCA Natural History Study and 8 from a prior study at the University of Minnesota. We also include a comprehensive list of almost 600 previously reported OCA mutations, along with ethnicity information, carrier frequencies, and in silico pathogenicity predictions. In addition to discussing the clinical and molecular features of OCA, we address the cases of apparent missing heritability. In our cohort, 25% of patients did not have two mutations in a single OCA gene. We demonstrate the utility of multiple detection methods to reveal mutations missed by Sanger sequencing. Finally, we review the TYR p.R402Q temperature sensitive variant and confirm its association with cases of albinism with only one identifiable TYR mutation. PMID:23504663

  12. Molecular genetic anatomy of inter- and intraserotype variation in the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beres, Stephen B; Richter, Ellen W; Nagiec, Michal J; Sumby, Paul; Porcella, Stephen F; DeLeo, Frank R; Musser, James M

    2006-05-02

    In recent years we have studied the relationship between strain genotypes and patient phenotypes in group A Streptococcus (GAS), a model human bacterial pathogen that causes extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide. We have concentrated our efforts on serotype M3 organisms because these strains are common causes of pharyngeal and invasive infections, produce unusually severe invasive infections, and can exhibit epidemic behavior. Our studies have been hindered by the lack of genome-scale phylogenies of multiple GAS strains and whole-genome sequences of multiple serotype M3 strains recovered from individuals with defined clinical phenotypes. To remove some of these impediments, we sequenced to closure the genome of four additional GAS strains and conducted comparative genomic resequencing of 12 contemporary serotype M3 strains representing distinct genotypes and phenotypes. Serotype M3 strains are a single phylogenetic lineage. Strains from asymptomatic throat carriers were significantly less virulent for mice than sterile-site isolates and evolved to a less virulent phenotype by multiple genetic pathways. Strain persistence or extinction between epidemics was strongly associated with presence or absence, respectively, of the prophage encoding streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A. A serotype M3 clone significantly underrepresented among necrotizing fasciitis cases has a unique frameshift mutation that truncates MtsR, a transcriptional regulator controlling expression of genes encoding iron-acquisition proteins. Expression microarray analysis of this clone confirmed significant alteration in expression of genes encoding iron metabolism proteins. Our analysis provided unprecedented detail about the molecular anatomy of bacterial strain genotype-patient phenotype relationships.

  13. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtra...

  14. New successive variational method of tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics for nuclear many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myo, Takayuki; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2017-07-01

    We recently proposed a new variational theory of “tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics” (TOAMD), which treats the strong interaction explicitly for finite nuclei [T. Myo et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2015, 073D02 (2015)]. In TOAMD, the correlation functions for the tensor force and the short-range repulsion and their multiple products are successively operated to the AMD state. The correlated Hamiltonian is expanded into many-body operators by using the cluster expansion and all the resulting operators are taken into account in the calculation without any truncation. We show detailed results for TOAMD with the nucleon-nucleon interaction AV8‧ for s-shell nuclei. The binding energy and the Hamiltonian components are successively converged to exact values of the few-body calculations. We also apply TOAMD to the Malfliet-Tjon central potential having a strong short-range repulsion. TOAMD can treat the short-range correlation and provided accurate energies of s-shell nuclei, reproducing the results of few-body calculations. It turns out that the numerical accuracy of TOAMD with double products of the correlation functions is beyond the variational Monte Carlo method with Jastrow's product-type correlation functions.

  15. Successive variational method of the tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics for central interaction in finite nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myo, Takayuki; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2017-04-01

    Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (TOAMD) is the basis of the successive variational method for the nuclear many-body problem. We apply TOAMD to finite nuclei described by the central interaction with strong short-range repulsion, and compare the results with those from the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). In TOAMD, the pair-type correlation functions and their multiple products are operated to the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) wave function. We show the results of TOAMD using the Malfliet-Tjon central potential containing the strong short-range repulsion. By adding the double products of the correlation functions in TOAMD, the binding energies are converged quickly to the exact values of the few-body calculations for s -shell nuclei. This indicates the high efficiency of TOAMD for treating the short-range repulsion in nuclei. We also employ the s -wave configurations of nuclei with the central part of UCOM, which reduces the short-range relative amplitudes of nucleon pair in nuclei to avoid the short-range repulsion. In UCOM, we further perform the superposition of the s -wave configurations with various size parameters, which provides a satisfactory solution of energies close to the exact and TOAMD values.

  16. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  17. Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Variation of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, Ronnie G.; Zamudio, Maria L.; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a foodborne pathogen that has become a public health concern at the global scale. The epidemiological significance of V. parahaemolyticus infections in Latin America received little attention until the winter of 1997 when cases related to the pandemic clone were detected in the region, changing the epidemic dynamics of this pathogen in Peru. With the aim to assess the impact of the arrival of the pandemic clone on local populations of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in Peru, we investigated the population genetics and genomic variation in a complete collection of non-pandemic strains recovered from clinical sources in Peru during the pre- and post-emergence periods of the pandemic clone. A total of 56 clinical strains isolated in Peru during the period 1994 to 2007, 13 strains from Chile and 20 strains from Asia were characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and checked for the presence of Variable Genomic Regions (VGRs). The emergence of O3:K6 cases in Peru implied a drastic disruption of the seasonal dynamics of infections and a shift in the serotype dominance of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. After the arrival of the pandemic clone, a great diversity of serovars not previously reported was detected in the country, which supports the introduction of additional populations cohabitating with the pandemic group. Moreover, the presence of genomic regions characteristic of the pandemic clone in other non-pandemic strains may represent early evidence of genetic transfer from the introduced population to the local communities. Finally, the results of this study stress the importance of population admixture, horizontal genetic transfer and homologous recombination as major events shaping the structure and diversity of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23696906

  18. Molecular variation at the SLC6A3 locus predicts lifetime risk of PTSD in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Chiao Chang

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests that the 9-repeat (9R allele located in the 3'UTR VNTR of the SLC6A3 gene increases risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, no study reporting this association to date has been based on population-based samples. Furthermore, no study of which we are aware has assessed the joint action of genetic and DNA methylation variation at SLC6A3 on risk of PTSD. In this study, we assessed whether molecular variation at SLC6A3 locus influences risk of PTSD. Participants (n = 320; 62 cases/258 controls were drawn from an urban, community-based sample of predominantly African American Detroit adult residents, and included those who had completed a baseline telephone survey, had provided blood specimens, and had a homozygous genotype for either the 9R or 10R allele or a heterozygous 9R/10R genotype. The influence of DNA methylation variation in the SLC6A3 promoter locus was also assessed in a subset of participants with available methylation data (n = 83; 16 cases/67 controls. In the full analytic sample, 9R allele carriers had almost double the risk of lifetime PTSD compared to 10R/10R genotype carriers (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.02-3.86, controlling for age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, number of traumas, smoking, and lifetime depression. In the subsample of participants with available methylation data, a significant (p = 0.008 interaction was observed whereby 9R allele carriers showed an increased risk of lifetime PTSD only in conjunction with high methylation in the SLC6A3 promoter locus, controlling for the same covariates. Our results confirm previous reports supporting a role for the 9R allele in increasing susceptibility to PTSD. They further extend these findings by providing preliminary evidence that a "double hit" model, including both a putatively reduced-function allele and high methylation in the promoter region, may more accurately capture molecular risk of PTSD at the SLC6A3 locus.

  19. Expression of Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg from genotypes A, D and F and influence of amino acid variations related or not to genotypes on HBsAg detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Araujo

    Full Text Available The impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV genotypes on the sensitivity of surface antigen (HBsAg detection assays has been poorly investigated. Here, plasmids carrying consensus or variant coding sequences for HBV surface proteins from genotypes A, D and F, were constructed. HBsAg levels were evaluated in medium and extracts of transfected CHO cells by a commercial polyclonal-based assay. We show that HBsAg detection values of consensus forms from genotypes D and F were, respectively, 37% and 30% lower than those obtained by genotype A. However, the presence of two single variations, T143M in genotype A, and T125M in genotype D, produced a decrease of 44% and an increase of 34%, respectively, on HBsAg mean values in comparison with their consensus forms. In conclusion, HBsAg detection levels varied among HBV genotypes. However, unique amino acid substitutions not linked to genotypes, such as T125M and T143M described here, should have more implications in HBV immunological diagnostics than the set of variations characteristic of each HBV genotype.

  20. Production, Quality Control, Stability and Pharmacotoxicity of a Malaria Vaccine Comprising Three Highly Similar PfAMA1 Protein Molecules to Overcome Antigenic Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W Faber

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1 is a leading asexual blood stage vaccine candidate for malaria. In preparation for clinical trials, three Diversity Covering (DiCo PfAMA1 ectodomain proteins, designed to overcome the intrinsic polymorphism that is present in PfAMA1, were produced under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP in Pichia pastoris. Using identical methodology, the 3 strains were cultivated in 70-L scale fed-batch fermentations and PfAMA1-DiCos were purified by two chromatography steps, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration procedure and size exclusion chromatography, resulting in highly pure (>95% PfAMA1-DiCo1, PfAMA1 DiCo2 and PfAMA1 DiCo3, with final yields of 1.8, 1.9 and 1.3 gram, respectively. N-terminal determinations showed that approximately 50% of each of the proteins lost 12 residues from their N-terminus, in accordance with SDS-PAGE (2 main bands and MS-data. Under reducing conditions a site of limited proteolytic cleavage within a disulphide bonded region became evident. The three proteins quantitatively bound to the mAb 4G2 that recognizes a conformational epitope, suggesting proper folding of the proteins. The lyophilized Drug Product (1:1:1 mixture of PfAMA1-DiCo1, DiCo2, DiCo3 fulfilled all pre-set release criteria (appearance, dissolution rate, identity, purity, protein content, moisture content, sub-visible particles, immuno-potency (after reconstitution with adjuvant, abnormal toxicity, sterility and endotoxin, was stable in accelerated and real-time stability studies at -20°C for over 24 months. When formulated with adjuvants selected for clinical phase I evaluation, the Drug Product did not show adverse effect in a repeated-dose toxicity study in rabbits. The Drug Product has entered a phase Ia/Ib clinical trial.

  1. Genetic Variations Affecting Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels and Status of Regional Lymph Nodes in Patients with Sporadic Colorectal Cancer from Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong; Tan, Aihua; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haiying; Hu, Yanling; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan; Zhang, Shijun; Mo, Linjian; Liang, Zhenjia; Shi, Deyi; Huang, Zhang; Guan, Yingyong; Zhou, Jicheng; Winkler, Cheryl; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Xu, Jianfeng; Mo, Zengnan; Peng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (sCEA) level might be an indicator of disease. Indeed, an elevated sCEA level is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. However, the genetic determinants of sCEA level in healthy and CRC population remains unclear. Thus we investigated the genetic markers associated with elevated serum sCEA level in these two populations and its clinical implications. Methods and Findings Genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted in a cohort study with 4,346 healthy male adults using the Illumina Omni 1 M chip. Candidate SNPs associated with elevated sCEA levels were validated in 194 CRC patients on ABI Taqman platform. Eight candidate SNPs were validated in CRC patients. The rs1047781 (chr19- FUT2) (A/T) was associated with elevated sCEA levels, and rs8176746 (chr9- ABO) was associated with the regional lymph metastasis in the CRC patients. The preoperative sCEA level was a risk factor for tumor recurrence in 5 years after operation (OR = 1.427, 95% CI: 1.005∼1.843, P = 0.006). It was also one of the risk factors for regional lymph node metastasis (OR = 2.266, 95% CI: 1.196∼4.293, P = 0.012). The sCEA level in rs1047781-T carriers was higher than that in the A carriers in CRC patients without lymph node metastasis (P = 0.006). The regional lymph node metastasis in patients with homozygote AA of rs8176746 was more common than that in the heterozygote AG carriers (P = 0.022). In addition, rs1047781-AT and TT CRC patients exhibited a worse disease-free survival than AA genotype carriers (P = 0.023). Conclusions We found candidate SNPs associated with elevated sCEA levels in both healthy males and CRC population. Rs1047781 (chr19- FUT2) may be the susceptible locus for recurrence of CRC in a population from Southern China. PMID:24941225

  2. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  3. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation.

  4. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lothar Beutin

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1-10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates.

  5. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1-10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates.

  6. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1–10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates. PMID:26000885

  7. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  8. Spatial distributions of and diurnal variations in low molecular weight carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater, and the controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazuhiko; Katoh, Shinya; Mitsui, Yumi; Nakano, Shinichi; Nakatani, Nobutake; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We studied the spatial distributions of and the diurnal variations in four low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and glyoxal, in coastal seawater. The samples were taken from the coastal areas of Hiroshima Bay, the Iyo Nada, and the Bungo Channel, western Japan. The formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glyoxal concentrations were higher in the northern part of Hiroshima Bay than at offshore sampling points in the Iyo Nada and the Bungo Channel. These three compounds were found at much higher concentrations in the surface water than in deeper water layers in Hiroshima Bay. It is noteworthy that propionaldehyde was not detected in any of the seawater samples, the concentrations present being lower than the detection limit (1 nanomole per liter (nM)) of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system we used. Photochemical and biological experiments were performed in the laboratory to help understand the characteristic distributions and fates of the LMW carbonyl compounds. The primary process controlling their fate in the coastal environment appears to be their biological consumption. The direct photo degradation of propionaldehyde, initiated by ultraviolet (UV) absorption, was observed, although formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not degraded by UV irradiation. Our results suggest that the degradation of the LMW carbonyl compounds by photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals is relatively insignificant in the study area. Atmospheric deposition is a possible source of soluble carbonyl compounds in coastal surface seawater, but it may not influence the carbonyl concentrations in offshore waters. - Highlights: • Low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater were determined. • Photochemical productions of LMW carbonyl compounds in seawater were observed. • LMW carbonyl compounds were largely consumed biologically. • Photochemical degradation was relatively insignificant in the study area

  9. Antigenic cartography of H1N1 influenza viruses using sequence-based antigenic distance calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S; McCall, Patrick R; Stern, Harry A; Yang, Hongmei; Topham, David J

    2018-02-12

    that strains cluster antigenically similar to what has been reported for H3N2 viruses. Furthermore, we demonstrated that genetic variation differs across antigenic sites and discuss the implications.

  10. ANTIGENIC PROMOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Yu; Cinader, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with p-azobenzene arsonic acid derivatives of human serum albumin (HA-As) or of dissociated keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The IgM response to the hapten was evaluated in terms of the number of hapten-specific plaque-forming cells in the lymph node draining the injection site. In some experiments, antibody was measured by agglutination of tanned and sensitized erythrocytes. The hapten response of animals immunized with HA-As was increased (promoting effect) when the animals were injected with one of several structurally unrelated macromolecules: keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), horse spleen ferritin (HSF), lysozyme (Lys), alum-precipitated human gamma globulin (alum-precipitated HGG). Different macromolecules differed in the magnitude of the promoting effect they induced, e.g., promotion by the associated form of KLH was greater than that by the dissociated form; alum-precipitated HGG was a better promoter than was soluble HGG. The relative magnitude of promotion by different macromolecules (associated vs. dissociated KLH, alum-precipitated vs. soluble HGG) correlated with the relative magnitude of the carrier effect, as judged by the hapten response induced by p-azobenzene arsonic acid conjugated to various proteins. Promotion was detected by agglutination assay of circulating antibody, by plaque assay of cells from the popliteal lymph node draining the site of preinjection, but not by plaque assay of cells from the contralateral lymph node. Promotion was dependent on the dose of the promoting macromolecule and on the dose of the hapten-protein conjugate. It was not observed in animals tolerant to the promoting macromolecule. Inhibition (i.e. antigenic competition), rather than promotion, was observed upon a secondary response to the preinjected macromolecule or when the hapten-protein conjugate was incorporated in Freund's adjuvant. PMID:15776570

  11. Molecular variation in Leishmania parasites from sandflies species of a zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in northeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Spotin, Adel; Taherkhani, Heshmatollah; Roshanghalb, Mona; Parvizi, Parviz

    2014-03-01

    In the well-known zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) focus in Turkmen Sahara, border of Iran and Turkmenistan, ZCL has increased among humans in the past five years. The present study was undertaken to incriminate vectors of ZCL in the region, and to find molecular variation in Leishmania parasites. The sandflies were sampled using CDC light-traps and sticky papers. All the sandflies were identified using morphological characters of the head and abdominal terminalia. DNA was extracted from the dissected thorax and attached anterior abdomen of individual female sandfly. Leishmania detection and identification of sandflies were performed using PCR, digestion of BsuRI restriction enzyme and sequencing of ITS-rDNA gene and also by semi-nested PCR to amplify minicircle kinetoplast (k) DNA of Leishmania. Leishmania infections were detected in 26 out of 206 female sandflies. Of the infected sandflies, 18 were Phlebotomus papatasi while eight were P. caucasicus/P. mongolensis. Two infections of L. turnica were detected, one in P. papatasi and other in P. caucasicus/P. mongolensis and the rest of the sandflies were found infected with L. major. Our finding showed that L. major had low diversity with only one common haplotype (GenBank Access No. EF413075). The novel haplotypes were discovered in L. major (GenBank Access No. KF152937) and in L. turanica (GenBank Access No. EF413079) in low frequency. These Leishmania parasites are circulating to maintain infections in the P. papatasi and P. caucasicus/P. mongolensis in Turkmen Sahara.

  12. Combining molecular and immunohistochemical analyses of key drivers in primary melanomas: interplay between germline and somatic variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Bruno; Claudia, Martinuzzi; Bruna, Dalmasso; Virginia, Andreotti; Lorenza, Pastorino; Francesco, Cabiddu; Marina, Gualco; Francesco, Spagnolo; Alberto, Ballestrero; Paola, Queirolo; Federica, Grillo; Luca, Mastracci; Paola, Ghiorzo

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high mutational somatic burden of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma (CMM) a thorough profiling of the driver mutations and their interplay is necessary to explain the timing of tumorigenesis or for the identification of actionable genetic events. The aim of this study was to establish the mutation rate of some of the key drivers in melanoma tumorigenesis combining molecular analyses and/or immunohistochemistry in 93 primary CMMs from an Italian cohort also characterized for germline status, and to investigate an interplay between germline and somatic variants. BRAF mutations were present in 68% of cases, while CDKN2A germline mutations were found in 16 % and p16 loss in tissue was found in 63%. TERT promoter somatic mutations were detected in 38% of cases while the TERT –245T>C polymorphism was found in 51% of cases. NRAS mutations were found in 39% of BRAF negative or undetermined cases. NF1 was expressed in all cases analysed. MC1R variations were both considered as a dichotomous variable or scored. While a positive, although not significant association between CDKN2A germline mutations, but not MC1R variants, and BRAF somatic mutation was found, we did not observe other associations between germline and somatic events. A yet undescribed inverse correlation between TERT –245T>C polymorphism and the presence of BRAF mutation was found. It is possible to hypothesize that –245T>C polymorphism could be included in those genotypes which may influence the occurrence of BRAF mutations. Further studies are needed to investigate the role of –245T>C polymorphism as a germline predictor of BRAF somatic mutation status. PMID:29464027

  13. Role of Vpma phase variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Baumgartner, Martina; Gamper, Erika; Innerebner, Carmen; Zimmermann, Martina; Schilcher, Franz; Tichy, Alexander; Winter, Petra; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Compared with other bacterial pathogens, the molecular mechanisms of mycoplasma pathogenicity are largely unknown. Several studies in the past have shown that pathogenic mycoplasmas are equipped with sophisticated genetic systems that allow them to undergo high-frequency surface antigenic variations. Although never clearly proven, these variable mycoplasma surface components are often implicated in host immune evasion and adaptation. Vpma surface lipoproteins of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplas...

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally L

    2005-01-01

    ... some of its racial/ethnic variation. Therefore, for a population-based series of post-menopausal white, black and Hispanic breast cancer cases and controls, we are determining HLA class I (A, B) and class II (DR, DO) genotypes...

  15. Glu-Ureido-Based Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen: Lessons Learned During the Development of a Novel Class of Low-Molecular-Weight Theranostic Radiotracers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopka, K.; Benesova, M.; Bařinka, Cyril; Haberkorn, U.; Babich, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl. 2 (2017), s. 17-26 ISSN 0161-5505 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : small-molecule PSMA inhibitors * theranostic PSMA radioligands * PSMA radiotracers Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 6.646, year: 2016

  16. Detection of antibody against antigen expressed by molecularly cloned hepatitis C virus cDNA: Application to diagnosis and blood screening for posttransfusion hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamura, Tatsuo; Saito, Izumu (National Institute of Health, Tokyo (Japan)); Katayama, Tohru (Tokyo National Chest Hospital (Japan)); Kikuchi, Shu; Tateda, Akira (Sendai National Hospital (Japan)); Houghton, M.; Choo, Quilim; Kuo, G. (Chiron Corporation, Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A cDNA clone has been derived from the plasma of a chimpanzee with chronic non-A, non-B viral hepatits (NANBH). The authors have assayed for antibodies reacting with the encoded antigen in sera from posttransfusion hepatitis patients (643 samples from 23 patients) and their corresponding donors collected during the past 10 years in Japan. The antibody was detected in 15 out of 17 (88.2%) posttransfusion NANBH (PT-NANBH) patients whose sera over time displayed multiple alanine aminotransferase (ALT) peaks. In general, the antibody was detected after several peaks of serum ALT elevations and, once detected, it persisted for years. Of the 15 well-defined cases of PT-NANBH that showed multiple ALT peaks and hepatitis C virus seroconversions, 11 (73.3%) were shown to be transfused with at least one unit of blood positive for the antibody. The retrospective analysis showed that all tested donor blood found to be positive for the antibody had been transfused to recipients who afterwards developed NANBH. These data strongly suggest that the cloned cDNA originated from an etiological agent of NANBH termed the hepatitis C virus. Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that had the screening been done with the anti-hepatitis C virus assay, 11 out of 17 (64.7%) cases of chronic PT-NANBH and 1 out of 6 (16.6%) acute PT-NANBH would have been prevented.

  17. A study of the uterine protein variations during the estrous cycle in the cow: molecular weights determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Asri-Rezai, S; Abshenas, J

    2008-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate molecular weights (MW) of the uterine protein content as the first step in their identification, and their variations during the estrous cycle as a part of the uterine adjustments for provision of an appropriate environment for physiological events in the bovine. Of the 24 pro-estrous, 21 estrous, 24 met-estrous and 46 diestrous uterine fluid samples prepared for our previous work, five samples in each phase were selected randomly and subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis in parallel with standard marker proteins to separate their protein content into fractions. By comparing these fractions with those of the standards, MWs of cycle with different densities, the higher values recorded in diestrus, pro- and met-estrus, respectively. Proteins with MW of 85 kDa were observed in all the phases but diestrus [9.8 mg/ml (10.5%), 8.6 mg/ml (9.5%) and 7.3 mg/ml (10.2%) for pro-estrus, estrus and met-estrus, respectively], and proteins with MW of 90 kDa were observed in estrus [20.0mg/ml (22.1%)] and diestrus [3.3mg/ml (4.6%)]. Proteins of 160 kDa fraction were observed in pro-estrus [9.8 mg/ml (10.5%)] and met-estrus [10.7 mg/ml (15%)], 200 kDa proteins were observed only in diestrus [6.3mg/ml (8.7%)]; finally, 210 and 270 kDa proteins were observed only in estrus [3.4 mg/ml (3.8%) and 2.0 mg/ml (2.2%), respectively]. It was concluded that protein profile of the bovine uterine lumen changes during the estrous cycle, both in quality and quantity, which may be a part of uterine adaptation for the physiological events. Further identification of these proteins would give us a better insight into their role in the bovine reproduction.

  18. Intra- and inter-isolate variation of ribosomal and protein-coding genes in Pleurotus: implications for molecular identification and phylogeny on fungal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Lan; Li, Qian; Peng, Wei-Hong; Zhou, Jie; Cao, Xue-Lian; Wang, Di; Huang, Zhong-Qian; Tan, Wei; Li, Yu; Gan, Bing-Cheng

    2017-06-26

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS), RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2), and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1α) are often used in fungal taxonomy and phylogenetic analysis. As we know, an ideal molecular marker used in molecular identification and phylogenetic studies is homogeneous within species, and interspecific variation exceeds intraspecific variation. However, during our process of performing ITS, RPB2, and EF1α sequencing on the Pleurotus spp., we found that intra-isolate sequence polymorphism might be present in these genes because direct sequencing of PCR products failed in some isolates. Therefore, we detected intra- and inter-isolate variation of the three genes in Pleurotus by polymerase chain reaction amplification and cloning in this study. Results showed that intra-isolate variation of ITS was not uncommon but the polymorphic level in each isolate was relatively low in Pleurotus; intra-isolate variations of EF1α and RPB2 sequences were present in an unexpectedly high amount. The polymorphism level differed significantly between ITS, RPB2, and EF1α in the same individual, and the intra-isolate heterogeneity level of each gene varied between isolates within the same species. Intra-isolate and intraspecific variation of ITS in the tested isolates was less than interspecific variation, and intra-isolate and intraspecific variation of RPB2 was probably equal with interspecific divergence. Meanwhile, intra-isolate and intraspecific variation of EF1α could exceed interspecific divergence. These findings suggested that RPB2 and EF1α are not desirable barcoding candidates for Pleurotus. We also discussed the reason why rDNA and protein-coding genes showed variants within a single isolate in Pleurotus, but must be addressed in further research. Our study demonstrated that intra-isolate variation of ribosomal and protein-coding genes are likely widespread in fungi. This has implications for studies on fungal evolution, taxonomy

  19. [Identification of low-molecular weight prostate-specific antigen(PSA) and lactoferrin in the prostatic secretion of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke-xin; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2006-12-18

    To investigate the expression of low-molecular-weight PSA(lw-PSA) and lactoferrin in the expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) from both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal prostate. Forty human EPS samples obtained from 20 BPH patients and 20 normal males were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was performed to confirm the nature of the secreted proteins in EPS. One uniquely expressed protein in BPH was detected and mass spectrometry determined its nature as lw-PSA (molecular weight 10x10(3), pI 8.5-9.3). More importantly, Western blotting analysis also revealed that lw-PSA detected in BPH-EPS, but was undetectable in BPH-free EPS. In addition, up-regulation of Lactoferrin (molecular weight 35x10(3), pI 7-7.5) in BPH-EPS, as compared with BPH-free EPS, was also observed. More interestingly, lactoferrin was absent in prostate cancer tissues. Our results indicate lw-PSA may be produced specifically by BPH epithelium and it has a potential to be used as a specific biological marker for the diagnosis of BPH. In addition, benign prostatic epithelium can produce more lactoferrin while prostate cancer tissues go without its lactoferrin secretion.

  20. Antigenic and genetic homogeneity of Streptococcus uberis strains from the bovine udder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groschup, M H; Hahn, G; Timoney, J F

    1991-10-01

    DNA- fingerprints (Hind III) of Streptococcus uberis field isolates from New York State and Europe showed substantial homogeneity, but were different to those of the type strain of the newly proposed psychrophilic species S. parauberis. S. uberis strains had major SDS-heat extracted antigens of molecular masses (Mr) less than 14, 40-41, 42-43, 59-61, 80-86 and 118-122 kDa following immunoblotting with rabbit hyperimmune sera. Bovine sera and milk reacted with the 40-41 and 118-122 kDa antigens. Variations in the Mr of particular bands were too unevenly distributed to permit formation of subgroups. Although cross reactive, the sizes of the antigens of S. parauberis strain NCDO 2020 were substantially different to those of S. uberis, the most prominent antigen having a Mr of 50 kDa. The antigenic and genetic data therefore strongly support the introduction of S. parauberis as a distinct species. S. uberis strains reacted with antiserum to Lancefield groups B, E, G and P, their grouping reactions showing no correlation with DNA and immunoblot fingerprints. Lancefield grouping of S. uberis therefore appears to have little value in identification.

  1. The Antigenic Structure Characterization of Oestrus Ovis Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Moţ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of proteic components definition from Oestrus ovis larvae, endowed with antigenic properties, able to induce immune responses in vivo and to react in vitro with induced molecular effectors were been performed: electrophoresis in poliacrilamid gel, western blot technique preceded by immunotransfer, immunoassay test. Total soluble larval antigens of O. ovis were been prepared through ultrasonic disintegration, from all three larval stages. Western blot technique allowed and emphasized the specific antigens with a superior sensitivity in comparison with SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. After antigenic characteristics demonstration of investigated larval antigens were been performed the immunoassay test to emphasized the antibodies dozes for O. ovis infestation diagnosis.

  2. [Allergy and autoimmunity: Molecular diagnostics, therapy, and presumable pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefieva, A S; Smoldovskaya, O V; Tikhonov, A A; Rubina, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Allergic and autoimmune diseases represent immunopathological reactions of an organism to antigens. Despite that the allergy is a result of exaggerated immune response to foreign antigens (allergens) and autoimmune diseases are characterized by the pathological response to internal antigens (autoantigens), the underlying mechanisms of these diseases are probably common. Thus, both types of diseases represent variations in the hypersensitivity reaction. A large percentage of both the adult and pediatric population is in need of early diagnostics of these pathologies of the immune system. Considering the diversity of antibodies produced in allergic and autoimmune disease and the difficulties accompanying clinical diagnosing, molecular diagnostics of these pathological processes should be carried out in several stages, including screening and confirmatory studies. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular diagnostics and therapy of allergic and autoimmune diseases and discuss the basic similarities and differences in the mechanisms of their development.

  3. Molecular Surveillance of Cronobacter spp. Isolated from a Wide Variety of Foods from 44 Different Countries by Sequence Typing of 16S rRNA, rpoB and O-Antigen Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Nancy; Banerjee, Pratik; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil; Sulaiman, Irshad M

    2017-05-11

    Cronobacter spp. are emerging infectious bacteria that can cause acute meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatal and immunocompromised individuals. Although this opportunistic human-pathogenic microorganism has been isolated from a wide variety of food and environmental samples, it has been primarily linked to foodborne outbreaks associated with powdered infant formula. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration use the presence of these microbes as one of the criteria to assess food adulteration and to implement regulatory actions. In this study, we have examined 195 aliquots of enrichments from the nine major categories of foods (including baby and medical food, dairy products, dried food, frozen food, pet food, produce, ready-to-eat snacks, seafood, and spices) from 44 countries using conventional microbiological and molecular techniques. The typical colonies of Cronobacter were then identified by VITEK2 and real-time PCR. Subsequently, sequence typing was performed on the 51 recovered Cronobacter isolates at the 16S rRNA, rpo B and seven O-antigen loci for species identification in order to accomplish an effective surveillance program for the control and prevention of foodborne illnesses.

  4. Clues to unraveling the coral species problem: distinguishing species from geographic variation in Porites across the Pacific with molecular markers and microskeletal traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zac Forsman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Morphological variation in the geographically widespread coral Porites lobata can make it difficult to distinguish from other massive congeneric species. This morphological variation could be attributed to geographic variability, phenotypic plasticity, or a combination of such factors. We examined genetic and microscopic morphological variability in P. lobata samples from the Galápagos, Easter Island, Tahiti, Fiji, Rarotonga, and Australia. Panamanian P. evermanni specimens were used as a previously established distinct outgroup against which to test genetic and morphological methods of discrimination. We employed a molecular analysis of variance (AMOVA based on ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS sequence, principal component analysis (PCA of skeletal landmarks, and Mantel tests to compare genetic and morphological variation. Both genetic and morphometric methods clearly distinguished P. lobata and P. evermanni, while significant genetic and morphological variance was attributed to differences among geographic regions for P. lobata. Mantel tests indicate a correlation between genetic and morphological variation for P. lobata across the Pacific. Here we highlight landmark morphometric measures that correlate well with genetic differences, showing promise for resolving species of Porites, one of the most ubiquitous yet challenging to identify architects of coral reefs.

  5. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses....... Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly...... expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of...

  6. Variations in calcite growth kinetics with surface topography: molecular dynamics simulations and process-based growth kinetics modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Zhimei; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cation dehydration is the rate-limiting step to crystal growth from aqueous solution. Here we employ classical molecular dynamics simulations to show that the water exchange frequency at structurally distinct calcium sites in the calcite surface varies by about two

  7. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, Burton

    1973-01-01

    An antigenic analysis of the alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from dental plaque was performed by use of antisera against a strain of Streptococcus sanguis (M-5) which was isolated from dental plaque. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony tests of Rantz and Randall extracts of 45 strains gave positive reactions with the M-5 antisera. These strains represented 60% of the strains tested. The number of antigens which could be identified in these extracts varied from one to five and were designated a to e. The a antigen was found in 36 of the strains tested, including reference strains of S. sanguis and the group H streptococci. The strains reacting with the M-5 antisera were divided into two majors types: type I consisted of 23 strains in which the a antigen was found alone or with one or more of the c, d, and e antigens; type II consisted of 13 strains in which both the a and b antigens were found with or without one or more of the c, d, and e antigens. The remaining strains contained, either singly or in combination, the b, c, d, and e antigens but not the a antigen. Biochemical tests of representatives of each serotype and reference strains indicated that strains reacting with M-5 antisera were S. sanguis. These findings suggest that S. sanguis strains share common physiological and serological properties. Images PMID:4633291

  8. Land snails of Leptopoma Pfeiffer, 1847 in Sabah, Northern Borneo (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae): an analysis of molecular phylogeny and geographical variations in shell form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Chee-Chean; Heng, Pooi-San; Liew, Thor-Seng

    2017-01-01

    Leptopoma is a species rich genus with approximately 100 species documented. Species-level identification in this group has been based on shell morphology and colouration, as well as some anatomical features based on small sample sizes. However, the implications of the inter- and intra-species variations in shell form to the taxonomy of Leptopoma species and the congruency of its current shell based taxonomy with its molecular phylogeny are still unclear. There are four Leptopoma species found in Sabah, Borneo, and their taxonomy status remains uncertain due to substantial variation in shell forms. This study focuses on the phylogenetic relationships and geographical variation in shell form of three Leptopoma species from Sabah. The phylogenetic relationship of these species was first estimated by performing Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analysis based on mitochondrial genes (16S rDNA and COI) and nuclear gene (ITS-1). Then, a total of six quantitative shell characters (i.e., shell height, shell width, aperture height, aperture width, shell spire height, and ratio of shell height to width) and three qualitative shell characters (i.e., shell colour patterns, spiral ridges, and dark apertural band) of the specimens were mapped across the phylogenetic tree and tested for phylogenetic signals. Data on shell characters of Leptopoma sericatum and Leptopoma pellucidum from two different locations (i.e., Balambangan Island and Kinabatangan) where both species occurred sympatrically were then obtained to examine the geographical variations in shell form. The molecular phylogenetic analyses suggested that each of the three Leptopoma species was monophyletic and indicated congruence with only one of the shell characters (i.e., shell spiral ridges) in the current morphological-based classification. Although the geographical variation analyses suggested some of the shell characters indicating inter-species differences between the two Leptopoma species, these also pointed to

  9. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    replication would lead to the production of various antigens. Today with BMT history of over 30 years, infection ... Study design: The study involved both retrospective and prospective laboratory-based analysis of ..... core protein of a molecular mass 19 x 103 Da, one picogram (pg) of virus core corresponds to 1.3 x. 105 HCV ...

  10. Molecular and Morphological Characterization of Xiphinema chambersi Population from Live Oak in Jekyll Island, Georgia, with Comments on Morphometric Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Carta, Lynn K.; Skantar, Andrea M.; Subbotin, Sergei A.; Fraedrich, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    A population of Xiphinema chambersi from the root zone around live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) trees on Jekyll Island, GA, is described using both morphological and molecular tools and compared with descriptions of type specimens. Initially, because of a few morphological differences, this nematode was thought to represent an undescribed species. However, on further examination, the morphometrics of the nematodes from live oak tend to agree with most of the morphometrics in the original de...

  11. New insights into sequence variation in the IGS region of 21 cyathostomin species and the implication for molecular identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiklinski, K; Kooyman, F N J; Van Doorn, D C K; Matthews, J B; Hodgkinson, J E

    2012-07-01

    Cyathostomins comprise a group of 50 species of parasitic nematodes that infect equids. Ribosomal DNA sequences, in particular the intergenic spacer (IGS) region, have been utilized via several methodologies to identify pre-parasitic stages of the commonest species that affect horses. These methods rely on the availability of accurate sequence information for each species, as well as detailed knowledge of the levels of intra- and inter-specific variation. Here, the IGS DNA region was amplified and sequenced from 10 cyathostomin species for which sequence was not previously available. Also, additional IGS DNA sequences were generated from individual worms of 8 species already studied. Comparative analysis of these sequences revealed a greater range of intra-specific variation than previously reported (up to 23%); whilst the level of inter-specific variation (3-62%) was similar to that identified in earlier studies. The reverse line blot (RLB) method has been used to exploit the cyathostomin IGS DNA region for species identification. Here, we report validation of novel and existing DNA probes for identification of cyathostomins using this method and highlight their application in differentiating life-cycle stages such as third-stage larvae that cannot be identified to species by morphological means.

  12. Large Variation in the Ratio of Mitochondrial to Nuclear Mutation Rate across Animals: Implications for Genetic Diversity and the Use of Mitochondrial DNA as a Molecular Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allio, Remi; Donega, Stefano; Galtier, Nicolas; Nabholz, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    It is commonly assumed that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolves at a faster rate than nuclear DNA (nuDNA) in animals. This has contributed to the popularity of mtDNA as a molecular marker in evolutionary studies. Analyzing 121 multilocus data sets and four phylogenomic data sets encompassing 4,676 species of animals, we demonstrate that the ratio of mitochondrial over nuclear mutation rate is highly variable among animal taxa. In nonvertebrates, such as insects and arachnids, the ratio of mtDNA over nuDNA mutation rate varies between 2 and 6, whereas it is above 20, on average, in vertebrates such as scaled reptiles and birds. Interestingly, this variation is sufficient to explain the previous report of a similar level of mitochondrial polymorphism, on average, between vertebrates and nonvertebrates, which was originally interpreted as reflecting the effect of pervasive positive selection. Our analysis rather indicates that the among-phyla homogeneity in within-species mtDNA diversity is due to a negative correlation between mtDNA per-generation mutation rate and effective population size, irrespective of the action of natural selection. Finally, we explore the variation in the absolute per-year mutation rate of both mtDNA and nuDNA using a reduced data set for which fossil calibration is available, and discuss the potential determinants of mutation rate variation across genomes and taxa. This study has important implications regarding DNA-based identification methods in predicting that mtDNA barcoding should be less reliable in nonvertebrates than in vertebrates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A nonself sugar mimic of the HIV glycan shield shows enhanced antigenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doores, Katie J.; Fulton, Zara; Hong, Vu; Patel, Mitul K.; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wormald, Mark R.; Finn, M.G.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Davis, Benjamin G. (Scripps); (Oxford)

    2011-08-24

    Antibody 2G12 uniquely neutralizes a broad range of HIV-1 isolates by binding the high-mannose glycans on the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120. Antigens that resemble these natural epitopes of 2G12 would be highly desirable components for an HIV-1 vaccine. However, host-produced (self)-carbohydrate motifs have been unsuccessful so far at eliciting 2G12-like antibodies that cross-react with gp120. Based on the surprising observation that 2G12 binds nonproteinaceous monosaccharide D-fructose with higher affinity than D-mannose, we show here that a designed set of nonself, synthetic monosaccharides are potent antigens. When introduced to the terminus of the D1 arm of protein glycans recognized by 2G12, their antigenicity is significantly enhanced. Logical variation of these unnatural sugars pinpointed key modifications, and the molecular basis of this increased antigenicity was elucidated using high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Virus-like particle protein conjugates containing such nonself glycans are bound more tightly by 2G12. As immunogens they elicit higher titers of antibodies than those immunogenic conjugates containing the self D1 glycan motif. These antibodies generated from nonself immunogens also cross-react with this self motif, which is found in the glycan shield, when it is presented in a range of different conjugates and glycans. However, these antibodies did not bind this glycan motif when present on gp120.

  14. Molecular and morphological variation of Paragonimus westermani in Vietnam with records of new second intermediate crab hosts and a new locality in a northern province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doanh, N Pham; Tu, A Luu; Bui, T Dung; Loan, T Ho; Nonaka, Nariaki; Horii, Yoichiro; Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2016-10-01

    Paragonimus westermani is one of the most medically important lung flukes and is widely distributed in Asia. It exhibits considerable variation in morphological, genetic and biological features. In central provinces of Vietnam, a high prevalence of metacercariae of this species has been reported from the crab intermediate host, Vietopotamon aluoiense. In this study, we detected P. westermani metacercariae in two additional crab hosts, Donopotamon haii in Quang Tri Province, central Vietnam and Indochinamon tannanti in Yen Bai Province in the north. The latter is a new locality for P. westermani in a northern region of Vietnam where P. heterotremus is the only species currently known to cause human paragonimiasis. Paragonimus westermani metacercariae found in Vietnam showed considerable morphological variation but slight genetic variation based on DNA sequences from the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region and the mitochondrial 16S gene. Co-infection of the same individual crabs with P. westermani and P. heterotremus and/or some other Paragonimus species was found frequently, suggesting potential for co-infection in humans. The findings of the present study emphasize the need for highly specific molecular and immunodiagnostic methods to differentially diagnose between P. westermani and P. heterotremus infections.

  15. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  16. The state of cell block variation and satisfaction in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Crapanzano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the recent past, algorithms and recommendations to standardize the morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular classification of lung cancers on cytology specimens have been proposed, and several organizations have recommended cell blocks (CBs as the preferred modality for molecular testing. Based on the literature, there are several different techniques available for CB preparation-suggesting that there is no standard. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of CB preparation techniques utilized in various practice settings and analyze current issues, if any. Materials and Methods: A single E-mail with a link to an electronic survey was distributed to members of the American Society of Cytopathology and other pathologists. Questions pertaining to the participants′ practice setting and CBs-volume, method, quality and satisfaction-were included. Results: Of 95 respondents, 90/95 (94% completed the survey and comprise the study group. Most participants practice in a community hospital/private practice (44% or academic center (41%. On average, 14 CBs (range 0-50; median 10 are prepared by a laboratory daily. Over 10 methods are utilized: Plasma thrombin (33%, HistoGel (27%, Cellient automated cell block system (8% and others (31% respectively. Forty of 90 (44% respondents are either unsatisfied or sometimes satisfied with their CB quality, with low-cellular yield being the leading cause of dissatisfaction. There was no statistical significance between the three most common CB preparation methods and satisfaction with quality. Discussion: Many are dissatisfied with their current method of CB preparation, and there is no consistent method to prepare CBs. In today′s era of personalized medicine with an increasing array of molecular tests being applied to cytological specimens, there is a need for a standardized protocol for CB optimization to enhance cellularity.

  17. Novel insights into the composition, variation, organization, and expression of the low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit gene family in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Liu, Dongcheng; Zhang, Jianghua; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Guangbin; Yang, Wenlong; Sun, Jiazhu; Tong, Yiping; Cui, Dangqun; Zhang, Aimin

    2013-04-01

    Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS), encoded by a complex multigene family, play an important role in the processing quality of wheat flour. Although members of this gene family have been identified in several wheat varieties, the allelic variation and composition of LMW-GS genes in common wheat are not well understood. In the present study, using the LMW-GS gene molecular marker system and the full-length gene cloning method, a comprehensive molecular analysis of LMW-GS genes was conducted in a representative population, the micro-core collections (MCC) of Chinese wheat germplasm. Generally, >15 LMW-GS genes were identified from individual MCC accessions, of which 4-6 were located at the Glu-A3 locus, 3-5 at the Glu-B3 locus, and eight at the Glu-D3 locus. LMW-GS genes at the Glu-A3 locus showed the highest allelic diversity, followed by the Glu-B3 genes, while the Glu-D3 genes were extremely conserved among MCC accessions. Expression and sequence analysis showed that 9-13 active LMW-GS genes were present in each accession. Sequence identity analysis showed that all i-type genes present at the Glu-A3 locus formed a single group, the s-type genes located at Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci comprised a unique group, while high-diversity m-type genes were classified into four groups and detected in all Glu-3 loci. These results contribute to the functional analysis of LMW-GS genes and facilitate improvement of bread-making quality by wheat molecular breeding programmes.

  18. Role of Vpma phase variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Baumgartner, Martina; Gamper, Erika; Innerebner, Carmen; Zimmermann, Martina; Schilcher, Franz; Tichy, Alexander; Winter, Petra; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Compared with other bacterial pathogens, the molecular mechanisms of mycoplasma pathogenicity are largely unknown. Several studies in the past have shown that pathogenic mycoplasmas are equipped with sophisticated genetic systems that allow them to undergo high-frequency surface antigenic variations. Although never clearly proven, these variable mycoplasma surface components are often implicated in host immune evasion and adaptation. Vpma surface lipoproteins of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae are encoded on a genomic pathogenicity island–like locus and are considered as one of the well-characterized model systems of mycoplasma surface antigenic variation. The present study assesses the role of these phase-variable Vpmas in the molecular pathogenesis of M. agalactiae by testing the wild-type strain PG2 in comparison with the xer1-disrupted Vpma ‘phase-locked’ mutants in sheep infection models. The data clearly illustrate that although Xer1 recombinase is not a virulence factor of M. agalactiae and Vpma phase variation is not necessary for establishing an infection, it might critically influence the survival and persistence of the pathogen under natural field conditions, mainly due to a better capacity for dissemination and evoking systemic responses. This is the first study where mycoplasma ‘phase-locked’ mutants are tested in vivo to elucidate the role of phase variation during infection. PMID:22809092

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of Robinia pseudoacacia seeds induced by short-term spaceflight based on two molecular marker systems and morphological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C Q; Li, Y F; Sun, P; Sun, Y H; Zhang, G J; Yang, M S; Zhang, Y Y; Li, Y; Wang, L

    2012-12-17

    The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a forest legume that is highly valued as a honey plant and for its wood. We explored the effect of short-term spaceflight on development of R. pseudoacacia seedlings derived from seeds that endured a 15-day flight; the genetic diversity and variation of plants sampled from space-mutagenized seeds were compared to plants from parallel ground-based control seeds using molecular markers and morphological traits. In the morphology analysis, the space-mutagenized group had apparent variation compared with the control group in morphological traits, including plant height, basal diameter, number of branches, branch stipular thorn length, branch stipular thorn middle width, leaflet vertex angle, and tippy leaf vertex angle. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular marker analyses showed a slightly higher levels of genetic diversity in the space-mutagenized group compared to the control group. In the SRAP analysis, the space-mutagenized group had 115 polymorphic bands vs 98 in the controls; 91.27% polymorphic loci vs 77.78% in the controls; 1.9127 ± 0.2834 alleles vs 1.7778 ± 0.4174 in the controls; Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.2930 ± 0.1631 vs 0.2688 ± 0.1862 in the controls, and the Shannon's information index (I) was 0.4452 ± 0.2177 vs 0.4031 ± 0.2596 in the controls. The number of alleles was significantly higher in the space-mutagenized group. In the SSR analysis, the space-mutagenized group also had more polymorphic bands (51 vs 46), a greater percentage of polymorphic loci (89.47% vs 80.70%); h was also higher (0.2534 ± 0.1533 vs 0.2240 ± 0.1743), as was I (0.3980 ± 0.2069 vs 0.3501 ± 0.2412). These results demonstrated that the range of genetic variation in the populations of R. pseudoacacia increased after spaceflight. It also suggested that the SSR and SRAP markers are effective markers for studying mutations and genetic diversity in R. pseudoacacia. The data

  20. Co-evolution of somatic variation in primary and metastatic colorectal cancer may expand biopsy indications in the molecular era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kim

    Full Text Available Metastasis is thought to be a clonal event whereby a single cell initiates the development of a new tumor at a distant site. However the degree to which primary and metastatic tumors differ on a molecular level remains unclear. To further evaluate these concepts, we used next generation sequencing (NGS to assess the molecular composition of paired primary and metastatic colorectal cancer tissue specimens.468 colorectal tumor samples from a large personalized medicine initiative were assessed by targeted gene sequencing of 1,321 individual genes. Eighteen patients produced genomic profiles for 17 paired primary:metastatic (and 2 metastatic:metastatic specimens.An average of 33.3 mutations/tumor were concordant (shared between matched samples, including common well-known genes (APC, KRAS, TP53. An average of 2.3 mutations/tumor were discordant (unshared among paired sites. KRAS mutational status was always concordant. The overall concordance rate for mutations was 93.5%; however, nearly all (18/19 (94.7% paired tumors showed at least one mutational discordance. Mutations were seen in: TTN, the largest gene (5 discordant pairs, ADAMTS20, APC, MACF1, RASA1, TP53, and WNT2 (2 discordant pairs, SMAD2, SMAD3, SMAD4, FBXW7, and 66 others (1 discordant pair.Whereas primary and metastatic tumors displayed little variance overall, co-evolution produced incremental mutations in both. These results suggest that while biopsy of the primary tumor alone is likely sufficient in the chemotherapy-naïve patient, additional biopsies of primary or metastatic disease may be necessary to precisely tailor therapy following chemotherapy resistance or insensitivity in order to adequately account for tumor evolution.

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  2. Variation of iron redox kinetics and its relation with molecular composition of standard humic substances at circumneutral pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ping Lee

    Full Text Available Oxidation and reduction kinetics of iron (Fe and proportion of steady-state Fe(II concentration relative to total dissolved Fe (steady-state Fe(II fraction were investigated in the presence of various types of standard humic substances (HS with particular emphasis on the photochemical and thermal reduction of Fe(III and oxidation of Fe(II by dissolved oxygen (O2 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at circumneutral pH (pH 7-8. Rates of Fe(III reduction were spectrophotometrically determined by a ferrozine method under the simulated sunlight and dark conditions, whereas rates of Fe(II oxidation were examined in air-saturated solution using luminol chemiluminescence technique. The reduction and oxidation rate constants were determined to substantially vary depending on the type of HS. For example, the first-order rate constants varied by up to 10-fold for photochemical reduction and 7-fold for thermal reduction. The degree of variation in Fe(II oxidation was larger for the H2O2-mediated reaction compared to the O2-mediated reaction (e.g., 15- and 3-fold changes for the former and latter reactions, respectively, at pH 8. The steady-state Fe(II fraction under the simulated sunlight indicated that the Fe(II fraction varies by up to 12-fold. The correlation analysis indicated that variation of Fe(II oxidation is significantly associated with aliphatic content of HS, suggesting that Fe(II complexation by aliphatic components accelerates Fe(II oxidation. The reduction rate constant and steady-state Fe(II fractions in the presence of sunlight had relatively strong positive relations with free radical content of HS, possibly due to the reductive property of radical semiquinone in HS. Overall, the findings in this study indicated that the Fe reduction and oxidation kinetics and resultant Fe(II formation are substantially influenced by chemical properties of HS.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants.

  4. Molecular phylogeny of Japanese Rhinolophidae based on variations in the complete sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takahiro; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Harada, Masashi; Kanoe, Masamitsu; Yoshiyuki, Mizuko; Yonekawa, Hiromichi

    2003-04-01

    Microchiroptera have diversified into many species whose size and the shapes of the complicated ear and nose have been adapted to their echolocation abilities. Their speciation processes, and intra- and interspecies relationships are still under discussion. Here we report on the geographical variation of Japanese Rhinolophus ferrumequinum and R. cornutus using the complete sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to clarify the phylogenetic positions of the 2 species as well as that of Rhinolophidae within the Microchiroptera. We have found that sequence divergence values within each of the 2 species are unexpectedly low (0.07%-0.94%). We have also found that there is no local specificity of their mtCytb alleles. On the other hand, the divergence values for Japanese Microchiroptera (12.7%-16.6%) are much higher than those for other mammalian genera. Similarly, the values among five genera of Vespertilionidae were 20.5%-27.3%. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the 2 species of family Rhinolophidae in the suborder Microchiroptera belong to the Megachiroptera cluster in the constructed maximum parsimony tree. These results suggest that the speciation of Rhinolophidae involved its divergence as an independent lineage from other Microchiroptera, and other microbats might be paraphyletic. In addition, the tree also shows that the order Chiroptera is monophylitic, and the closest group to Chiroptera is the ungulates.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of mangroves IV. nature and extent of intra-specific genetic variation and species diversity in mangroves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, A.; Parani, M.; Lakshmi, M.; Elango, S.; Ram, N.; Anuratha, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    Mangroves occupy estuarine ecosystems in the tropical regions of the world. Despite their highly productive nature and the protective roles they play in the coastal region, the ecosystem as a whole is under severe threat due to various climatic and anthropogenic factors. Therefore, the need for conservation of mangroves is widely emphasised. However, information on existing genetic diversity based on which a strategy for genetic conservation is to be drawn is not available for mangroves. This is primarily because conventional genetic analysis is difficult in these species for various reasons. Therefore, as an aid to our on-going conservation programme, efforts were made to assess the nature and extent of diversity in a number of mangrove species of the Indian coast using molecular markers. The nature and extent of intra-population diversity in sixteen mangrove species and detailed analysis of inter-population genetic polymorphism in four species, Acanthus ilicifolius, Excoecaria agallocha, Avicennia spp and Rhizophora (species and hybrid), is reported in the present communication. (author)

  6. Distinct Subfamilies of Odorant Binding Proteins in Locust (Orthoptera, Acrididae: Molecular Evolution, Structural Variation, and Sensilla-Specific Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingcong Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Odorant binding proteins (OBPs play an important role in insect olfaction, facilitating transportation of odorant molecules in the sensillum lymph. While most of the researches are concentrated on Lepidopteran and Dipteran species, our knowledge about Orthopteran species is still very limited. In this study, we have investigated OBPs of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, a representative Orthopteran species. We have identified 14 transcripts from a S. gregaria antennal transcriptome encoding SgreOBPs, and recapitulated the phylogenetic relationship of SgreOBPs together with OBPs from three other locust species. Two conserved subfamilies of classic OBPs have been identified, named I-A and II-A, exhibiting both common and subfamily-specific amino acid motifs. Distinct evolutionary features were observed for subfamily I-A and II-A OBPs. Surface topology and interior cavity were elucidated for OBP members from the two subfamilies. Antennal topographic expression revealed distinct sensilla- and cellular- specific expression patterns for SgreOBPs from subfamily I-A and II-A. These findings give first insight into the repertoire of locust OBPs with respect to their molecular and evolutionary features as well as their expression in the antenna, which may serve as an initial step to unravel specific roles of distinct OBP subfamilies in locust olfaction.

  7. Effect of age on bovine subcutaneous fat proteome: molecular mechanisms of physiological variations during beef cattle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romao, J M; He, M L; McAllister, T A; Guan, L L

    2014-08-01

    Fat deposition influences both meat quality and animal productivity. However, it is not clear how fat development is regulated in growing and fattening beef cattle. This study characterized proteomic changes in subcutaneous adipose tissue from steers fed a high-grain diet in an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms of fat development during feedlot production. Eight British-Continental crossbred steers had two subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies at 12 and 15 mo of age. Protein expression in fat samples was profiled using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). During the finishing period, steers increased subcutaneous adipose tissue mass with concomitant changes in the proteome profile, but the nature of these changes varied among steers. The expression of 123 out of 627 identified proteins differed (P bovine adipose tissue is regulated during growth, which might help the development in the future of new strategies to manipulate adiposity in beef cattle in a manner that improves meat quality and animal productivity.

  8. A molecular dynamics study of ambient and high pressure phases of silica: structure and enthalpy variation with molar volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Chitra; Sringeri, S Bhuvaneshwari; Subramanian, Yashonath; Gopalakrishnan, J

    2014-06-28

    Extensive molecular dynamics studies of 13 different silica polymorphs are reported in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble with the Parrinello-Rahman variable shape simulation cell. The van Beest-Kramer-van Santen (BKS) potential is shown to predict lattice parameters for most phases within 2%-3% accuracy, as well as the relative stabilities of different polymorphs in agreement with experiment. Enthalpies of high-density polymorphs - CaCl2-type, α-PbO2-type, and pyrite-type - for which no experimental data are available as yet, are predicted here. Further, the calculated enthalpies exhibit two distinct regimes as a function of molar volume-for low and medium-density polymorphs, it is almost independent of volume, while for high-pressure phases a steep dependence is seen. A detailed analysis indicates that the increased short-range contributions to enthalpy in the high-density phases arise not only from an increased coordination number of silicon but also shorter Si-O bond lengths. Our results indicate that amorphous phases of silica exhibit better optimization of short-range interactions than crystalline phases at the same density while the magnitude of Coulombic contributions is lower in the amorphous phase.

  9. Paramecium putrinum (Ciliophora, Protozoa): the first insight into the variation of two DNA fragments - molecular support for the existence of cryptic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Potekhin, Alexey; Sawka, Natalia; Beliavskaya, Alexandra; Kiselev, Andrey; Nekrasova, Irina; Przyboś, Ewa

    2014-04-01

    Paramecium putrinum (Claparede & Lachmann 1858) is one of the smallest (80-140 μm long) species of the genus Paramecium. Although it commonly occurs in freshwater reservoirs, no molecular studies of P. putrinum have been conducted to date. Herein we present an assessment of molecular variation in 27 strains collected from widely separated populations by using two selected DNA fragments (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA and COI mtDNA). Both the trees and haplotype networks reconstructed for both genome fragments show that the studied strains of P. putrinum form five main haplogroups. The mean distance between the studied strains is p-distance=0.007/0.068 (rDNA/COI) and exhibits similar variability as that between P. bursaria syngens. Based on these data, one could hypothesize that the clusters revealed in the present study may correspond to previously reported syngens and that there are at least five cryptic species within P. putrinum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular characterisation and genetic variation of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus infection in captive young Asian elephants in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripiboon, Supaphen; Jackson, Bethany; Ditcham, William; Holyoake, Carly; Robertson, Ian; Thitaram, Chatchote; Tankaew, Pallop; Letwatcharasarakul, Preeda; Warren, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV) is emerging as a new threat for elephant conservation, since being identified as the cause of severe, often fatal, haemorrhagic disease in young Asian elephants. To describe positive cases and the molecular relatedness of virus detected in elephants in Thailand, we re-examined all available of EEHV samples occurring in young elephants in Thailand between 2006 and 2014 (n=24). Results indicated 75% (18/24) of suspected cases were positive for EEHV by semi-nested PCR. Further gene analysis identified these positive cases as EEHV1A (72%, 13/18 cases), EEHV1B (11%, 2/18) and EEHV4 (17%, 3/18). This study is the first to phylogenetically analyse and provide an overview of most of the known EEHV cases that have occurred in Thailand. Positive individuals ranged in age from one to nine years, with no sex association detected, and occurred across geographical locations throughout the country. All individuals, except one, were captive-born. No history of direct contact among the cases was recorded, and this together with the fact that various subtype clusters of virus were found, implied that none of the positive cases were epidemiologically related. These results concur with the hypothesis that EEHV1 is likely to be an ancient endogenous pathogen in Asian elephants. It is recommended that active surveillance and routine monitoring for EEHV should be undertaken in all elephant range countries, to gain a better understanding of the epidemiology, transmission and prevention of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Flexibility of human cytochrome P450 enzymes: molecular dynamics and spectroscopy reveal important function-related variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrychová, Tereza; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Hudeček, Jiří; Skopalík, Josef; Lange, Reinhard; Hildebrandt, Peter; Otyepka, Michal; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    To gain more complete insight into flexibility and malleability of five forms of human liver cytochrome P450 enzymes, which play major roles in drug metabolism (CYPs 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4), we employed UV/VIS and resonance Raman spectroscopy in combination with all-atomic molecular dynamics simulations under normal and high pressure conditions (300 MPa). In general, the high pressure reduces the flexibility of CYPs, which become more dense and compact as their radii of gyration and temperature B-factors diminish. The flexibility of CYPs spans the regions, which are localized in solvent exposed loops. A considerable degree of flexibility is also observed at amino-acids making the pw2 and solvent channels, which are suggested to serve for substrate access and/or product release. The number of water molecules as well as the number of protein backbone atoms of the active site in close proximity of heme cofactor generally increases under high pressure. This finding provides new insights regarding the interpretation of pressure-related Soret band red shifts. Presented results also point towards considerable differences between the CYP forms studied: CYP2A6 and CYP1A2 have the least malleable active sites while those of CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 have considerably greater degrees of flexibility or malleability. In addition, the number of water molecules in the active site cavity of CYP3A4 anomalously decreases under high pressure due to opening of the active site. These results correlate with the known substrate promiscuity of the respective CYP forms, with CYP3A4 displaying the highest substrate promiscuity, corresponding to the most open and malleable active site, whereas CYP1A2 and CYP2A6 show a high substrate-specificity and have a small and rigid active sites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A cold-tolerant evergreen interspecific hybrid of Ocimum kilimandscharicum and Ocimum basilicum: analyzing trichomes and molecular variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Sunita Singh; Shukla, Preeti; Gupta, Pankhuri; Lal, R K

    2016-05-01

    Ocimum (Lamiaceae) is an important source of essential oils and aroma chemicals especially eugenol, methyl eugenol, linalool, methyl chavicol etc. An elite evergreen hybrid has been developed from Ocimum kilimandscharicum and Ocimum basilicum, which demonstrated adaptive behavior towards cold stress. A comparative molecular analysis has been done through RAPD, AFLP, and ISSR among O. basilicum and O. kilimandscharicum and their evergreen cold-tolerant hybrid. The RAPD and AFLP analyses demonstrated similar results, i.e., the hybrid of O. basilicum and O. kilimandscharicum shares the same cluster with O. kilimandscharicum, while O. basilicum behaves as an outgroup, whereas in ISSR analysis, the hybrid genotype grouped in the same cluster with O. basilicum. Ocimum genotypes were analyzed and compared for their trichome density. There were distinct differences on morphology, distribution, and structure between the two kinds of trichomes, i.e., glandular and non-glandular. Glandular trichomes contain essential oils, polyphenols, flavonoids, and acid polysaccharides. Hair-like trichomes, i.e., non-glandular trichomes, help in keeping the frost away from the living surface cells. O. basilicum showed less number of non-glandular trichomes on leaves compared to O. kilimandscharicum and the evergreen cold-tolerant hybrid. Trichomes were analyzed in O. kilimandscharicum, O. basilicum, and their hybrid. An increased proline content at the biochemical level represents a higher potential to survive in a stress condition like cold stress. In our analysis, the proline content is quite higher in tolerant variety O. kilimandscharicum, low in susceptible variety O. basilicum, and intermediate in the hybrid. Gene expression analysis was done in O. basilicum, O. kilimandscharicum and their hybrid for TTG1, GTL1, and STICHEL gene locus which regulates trichome development and its formation and transcription factors WRKY and MPS involved in the regulation of plant responses to freezing

  13. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  14. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W; Garland, Marc V

    2013-12-28

    The partial molar volumes, V(i), of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. V(i) is determined with the direct method, while the composition of V(i) is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated V(i) deviate only 3.4 cm(3) mol(-1) (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental V(i) variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of V(i) variations. In all solutions, larger V(i) are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus V(i). Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the V(i) trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute movement. This wake behind

  15. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W.; Garland, Marc V.

    2013-12-01

    The partial molar volumes, bar V_i, of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. bar V_i is determined with the direct method, while the composition of bar V_i is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated bar V_i deviate only 3.4 cm3 mol-1 (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental bar V_i variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of bar V_i variations. In all solutions, larger bar V_i are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus bar V_i. Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the bar V_i trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute

  16. Form, symmetry and packing of biomacromolecules. III. Antigenic, receptor and contact binding sites in picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A

    2011-03-01

    The relation between serotype differentiation and crystallographic symmetry, revealed by the contact fingerprint diagrams investigated in Part II [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 312-326] for the human rhinovirus, is extended to the Picornaviridae family. The approach, outlined in Part I [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 301-311] and Part II for biomacromolecules packed in a crystal and based on concepts such as packing lattice, kissing points and crystal-packing parameters, can directly be applied to the picornaviruses. In particular, the contact fingerprint diagrams of 20 different virus strains have been derived. In these cases, as for the rhinovirus, these diagrams are serotype/strain specific, justifying the name fingerprint. The molecular basis for the serotype variability, and the associated conservation requirements, is usually analysed by considering antigenic sites, where capsid residues bind with antibodies, and receptor sites, where other residues bind with molecular receptors of the host cell membrane. Both the antigenic variation and the receptor conservation allow repeated infection of the host cells of the given animals. The graphical description of these sites is usually done by footprints and roadmap diagrams, mapping properties of the capsid surface and using the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid. The alternative fingerprint diagrammatic description, based on the crystal symmetry, adopted in Part II for the contact sites, where a capsid is bound to the next one in the crystal packing, is extended to the antigenic and receptor binding sites. Again, the antigenic/receptor fingerprints are specific, at least for the nine picornaviruses investigated so far, despite the more than a factor of ten larger coarse graining with respect to the corresponding footprint and roadmap diagrams. The latter are based on a grid spacing of about 2 Å, whereas the spacing implied by the packing-lattice approximation adopted in fingerprints varies typically from 20 to

  17. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was effici...... peptide-MHC complexes may have broad significance in the biology of T cell responses, including generation of the T cell repertoire, the specificity of mixed lymphocyte responses, and the immune surveillance of self and nonself antigens in peripheral lymphoid tissues.......Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...

  18. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  19. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development.This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation, in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera.Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes.

  20. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  1. Molecular basis of two novel and related high-prevalence antigens in the Kell blood group system, KUCI and KANT, and their serologic and spatial association with K11 and KETI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliquette, Randall W; Hue-Roye, Kim; Lomas-Francis, Christine; Gillen, Barbara; Schierts, Jennifer; Gentzkow, Kristie; Peyrard, Thierry; von Zabern, Inge; Flegel, Willy A; Rodberg, Karen; Debnath, Asim K; Lee, Soohee; Reid, Marion E

    2013-11-01

    The numerous antigens in the Kell blood group system result from missense nucleotide changes in KEL. Antibodies to antigens in this system can be clinically important. We describe six probands whose plasma contained antibodies to high-prevalence Kell antigens and discuss their relationship. Polymerase chain reaction amplification, direct sequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, hemagglutination, flow cytometry, and protein modeling were performed by standard methods. Proband 1 (KUCI) and her serologically compatible sister were heterozygous for a nucleotide change in Exon 11 (KEL*1271C/T; Ala424Val). Proband 2 (KANT) was heterozygous for KEL*1283G/T (Arg428Leu) and KEL*1216C/T (Arg406Stop) in Exon 11. Red blood cells (RBCs) from Proband 1 and her sister were not agglutinated by plasma from Proband 2; however, RBCs from Proband 2 were agglutinated by plasma from Proband 1. Probands 3, 4, 5, and 6 had the KEL*1391C>T change associated with the previously reported KETI- phenotype. Proband 5 was also homozygous for KEL*905T>C encoding the K11-K17+ phenotype. Hemagglutination studies revealed an association between KUCI, KANT, KETI, and K11. Protein modeling indicated that whereas Ala424 and Arg428 are clustered, Val302 and Thr464 are not. Ala424 in the Kell glycoprotein is associated with the high-prevalence Kell antigen, KUCI (ISBT 006032), which is detected by the antibody of Proband 1. Arg428 is associated with the high-prevalence Kell antigen, KANT (ISBT 006033). The association between KUCI, KANT, KETI, and K11 and the results of protein modeling are discussed. © 2013 New York Blood Center. Transfusion © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  4. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  5. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  6. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  7. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  8. SPLEEN-CELLS FROM ANTIGEN-MINIMIZED MICE ARE SUPERIOR TO SPLEEN-CELLS FROM GERM-FREE AND CONVENTIONAL MICE IN THE STIMULATION OF PRIMARY IN-VITRO PROLIFERATIVE RESPONSES TO NOMINAL ANTIGENS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOOPER, DC; MOLOWITZ, EH; BOS, NA; PLOPLIS, VA; CEBRA, JJ

    T lymphocytes from mice reared under conditions of differential exposure to food, environmental and microbial antigens were compared for phenotypic shifts that may be associated with prior exposure to antigens as well as functional variations in the ability to respond to antigens ne novo. While the

  9. The Length of N-Glycans of Recombinant H5N1 Hemagglutinin Influences the Oligomerization and Immunogenicity of Vaccine Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Kopera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA is a principle influenza vaccine antigen. Recombinant HA-based vaccines become a potential alternative for traditional approach. Complexity and variation of HA N-glycosylation are considered as the important factors for the vaccine design. The number and location of glycan moieties in the HA molecule are also crucial. Therefore, we decided to study the effect of N-glycosylation pattern on the H5 antigen structure and its ability to induce immunological response. We also decided to change neither the number nor the position of the HA glycosylation sites but only the glycan length. Two variants of the H5 antigen with high mannose glycosylation (H5hm and with low-mannose glycosylation (H5Man5 were prepared utilizing different Pichia strains. Our structural studies demonstrated that only the highly glycosylated H5 antigen formed high molecular weight oligomers similar to viral particles. Further, the H5hm was much more immunogenic for mice than H5Man5. In summary, our results suggest that high mannose glycosylation of vaccine antigen is superior to the low glycosylation pattern. Our findings have strong implications for the recombinant HA-based influenza vaccine design.

  10. Caracterização antigênica e molecular de oito amostras do vírus da doença de Aujeszky isoladas no estado do Rio Grande do Sul em 2003 Antigenic and molecular characterization of eight samples of Aujeszky's disease virus isolated in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra D'Ávila da Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Aujeszky ou pseudoraiva (DA, causada pelo vírus da pseudoraiva (PRV é a maior preocupação na produção de suínos. No estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, a DA foi somente detectada em 1954, em bovino. Em 2003, ocorreram dois surtos de encefalite em granjas na região norte do estado, fronteira com o estado de Santa Catarina. O vírus da doença de Aujeszky (VDA foi isolado a partir de animais coletados em oito granjas distintas da região e submetido a análises antigênicas e moleculares. As amostras de VDA isoladas foram comparadas com as amostras padrão NIA-3 e NP. A caracterização antigênica dos mesmos foi realizada com testes de imunoperoxidase frente a um painel de anticorpos mono-clonais (Mabs preparado contra epitopos de glicoproteinas virais (gB, gC, gD e gE. A caracterização genômica foi realizada através da análise restrição enzimática (REA sobre o genoma total das amostras, com a enzima de restrição (REA Bam HI. O perfil antigênico das oito amostras isoladas no Rio Grande do Sul, bem como os apresentados pelas amostras padrão NIA-3 e NP, foram similares. A REA revelou que todos as oito amostras do Rio Grande do Sul apresentaram um arranjo genômico do tipo II, genótipo frequentemente encontrado em surtos prévios de DA em outros estados do Brasil. Os resultados aqui obtidos indicam que as oito amostras isoladas no Rio Grande do Sul são similares.Pseudorabies or Aujeszky's disease (AD, caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV is a major concern in swine production. In the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, AD was only detected in 1954, in cattle. In 2003 two outbreaks of encephalitis occurred on the northern region of the state, close to the border with the state of Santa Catarina. Pseudorabies virus (PRV was isolated from distinct farms within the region and subjected to antigenic and genomic analyses. These isolates were compared with prototype strains NIA-3 and NP. Antigenic characterization with a

  11. Establishment of a Molecular Serotyping Scheme and a Multiplexed Luminex-Based Array for Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Wang, Min; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yao; Chen, Tingting; Wu, Pan; Chen, Min; Liu, Bin; Feng, Lu

    2018-01-01

    Serotyping based on surface polysaccharide antigens is important for the clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance of pathogens. Polysaccharide gene clusters (PSgcs) are typically responsible for the diversity of bacterial surface polysaccharides. Through whole-genome sequencing and analysis, eight putative PSgc types were identified in 23 Enterobacter aerogenes strains from several geographic areas, allowing us to present the first molecular serotyping system for E. aerogenes . A conventional antigenic scheme was also established and correlated well with the molecular serotyping system that was based on PSgc genetic variation, indicating that PSgc-based molecular typing and immunological serology provide equally valid results. Further, a multiplex Luminex-based array was developed, and a double-blind test was conducted with 97 clinical specimens from Shanghai, China, to validate our array. The results of these analyses indicated that strains containing PSgc4 and PSgc7 comprised the predominant groups. We then examined 86 publicly available E. aerogenes strain genomes and identified an additional seven novel PSgc types, with PSgc10 being the most abundant type. In total, our study identified 15 PSgc types in E. aerogenes , providing the basis for a molecular serotyping scheme. From these results, differing epidemic patterns were identified between strains that were predominant in different regions. Our study highlights the feasibility and reliability of a serotyping system based on PSgc diversity, and for the first time, presents a molecular serotyping system, as well as an antigenic scheme for E. aerogenes , providing the basis for molecular diagnostics and epidemiological surveillance of this important emerging pathogen.

  12. c-Fos-related antigens in the central nervous system of an insect, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renucci, M; Tirard, A; Charpin, P; Augier, R; Strambi, A

    2000-12-01

    Fos-related antigens (Fra) were detected in the nuclei of neurones in young adult Acheta domesticus female crickets by immunohistochemical analysis, using an antibody that recognizes the amino-acid sequence 127-152 of c-Fos protein. Specificity of Fra immunoreactivity was confirmed by Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts from neural tissues. A major immunoreactive doublet with an apparent molecular mass of 52,000/54,000 Da was detected in nuclear extracts. Immunostaining of the 52,000/54,000 Da doublet showed variations in intensity during the first 5 days following the imaginal molt. Staining was more intense between day 2 and day 4 when ecdysteroid titers were high. Expression of Fra was low in allatectomized (i.e., deprived of juvenile hormone and ecdysteroids) and ovariectomized (i.e., deprived of ecdysteroids) females as compared to control females. These results show the involvement of hormone-regulated process in expression of Fra. The effect of nociceptive stimulation on Fra expression was tested. Twenty minutes after removal of the ovipositor, a supplementary band with an apparent molecular mass of 70,000 Da appeared in the nuclear extracts, then decreased and disappeared totally after 45 min. Several other Fos-related antigens with different temporal patterns of expression were also detected.

  13. Human platelet antigens - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2014-02-01

    To date, 33 human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) have been identified on six functionally important platelet glycoprotein (GP) complexes and have been implicated in alloimmune platelet disorders including foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and multitransfusion platelet refractoriness (MPR). The greatest number of recognized HPA (20 of 33) resides on the GPIIb/IIIa complex, which serves as the receptor for ligands important in mediating haemostasis and inflammation. These include HPA-1a, the most commonly implicated HPA in FNAIT and PTP in Caucasian populations. Other platelet GP complexes, GPIb/V/IX, GPIa/IIa and CD109, express the remaining 13 HPAs. Of the recognized HPAs, 12 occur as six serologically and genetically defined biallelic 'systems' where the -a form designates the higher frequency allele and the -b form, the lower. Twenty-one other HPAs are low-frequency or rare antigens for which postulated higher frequency -a alleles have not yet been identified as antibody specificities. In addition to the HPA markers, platelets also express ABO and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens; antibodies directed at the former are occasionally important in FNAIT, and to the latter, in MPR. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  14. Variações genéticas em populações de Eucalyptus spp. detectadas por meio de marcadores moleculares Genetic variations in Eucalyptus spp. genotypes detected by means of molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Pereira Caixeta

    2003-06-01

    can contribute significantly to a basic understanding of the crop and character investigated and help generate and develop improved products. The objective of this work is to utilize RAPD markers to detect and maximize the genetic variability in eucalyptus genotypes, identifying crossings favorable to a forest breeding program, aiming at multiple use. A total of 44 natural hybrid genotypes of the Eucalyptus genus, planted in northwestern Minas Gerais was analyzed. The RAPD molecular markers presented efficient discriminating power among the 44 evaluated genotypes, determining an average genetic distance among them of 54% and genetic divergence ranging from 24 to 73%. This shows that there is a wide genetic basis among the individuals analyzed, allowing a manipulation of this material in breeding programs. The genetic distance among the genotypes 5 and 9; 9 and 10; 9 and 19; 9 and 25; 9 and 33; 9 and 35; 9 and 36; 9 and 44; 10 and 33; 12 and 19; 12 and 33; 12 and 39 proved to be either greater or equal to 70%. Grouping analysis established by the UPGMA method, and the cut of 80% of the total genetic distance as a criterion allowed the formation of nine distinct groups. These groups presented an average genetic divergence superior to 60%. The highest mean of distance occurred between group I and the remaining groups, with 67%. The evaluation by RAPD molecular markers provided an indirect identification of the genetic variation of the genotypes and, in this sense, new crosses for the production of specific hybrids can be generated, increasing the genetic divergence and yield of wood products of superior quality for multiple uses in forest breeding programs.

  15. Towards patient-specific tumor antigen selection for vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Weinschenk, Toni; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Stevanović, Stefan

    2002-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the possibilities for combining the power of molecular analysis of the antigens expressed in a given individual tumor with the design of a tailored vaccine containing defined antigens. Step 1 is a differential gene expression analysis of tumor and corresponding normal tissue. Step 2 is the analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands on tumor cells. Step 3 is data mining with the aim to select those antigens that might be suitable for tumor attack by the adaptive immune system. Step 4 is the on-the-spot clinical grade production of the constituents of the patient tailored vaccine, e.g. peptides. Step 5 is then vaccination and monitoring. Although it will not be possible to cover all relevant antigens expressed in a tumor, the antigens that can be identified with our present technical possibilities might be enough for improved immunotherapy. The scope of the present review is to explore the possibilities and the formidable technical and logistical challenge for such individual patient-oriented antigen definition to be used for therapeutic immunization.

  16. Understanding the bacterial polysaccharide antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae versus Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Gonzalez-Outeiriño, Jorge; Foley, B Lachele; Beckham, Meredith L; Jennings, Harold J; Foote, Simon; Ford, Michael G; Woods, Robert J

    2006-05-23

    Bacterial surface capsular polysaccharides (CPS) that are similar in carbohydrate sequence may differ markedly in immunogenicity and antigenicity. The structural origin of these phenomena is poorly understood. Such a case is presented by the Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus; GBS) type III (GBSIII) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn) type 14 (Pn14), which share closely related CPS sequences. Nevertheless, antibodies (Abs) against GBSIII rarely cross-react with the CPS from Pn14. To establish the origin for the variation in CPS antigenicity, models for the immune complexes of CPS fragments from GBSIII and Pn14, with the variable fragment (Fv) of a GBS-specific mAb (mAb 1B1), are presented. The complexes are generated through a combination of comparative Ab modeling and automated ligand docking, followed by explicitly solvated 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. The relationship between carbohydrate sequence and antigenicity is further quantified through the computation of interaction energies using the Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) method, augmented by conformational entropy estimates. Despite the electrostatic differences between Pn14 and GBSIII CPS, analysis indicates that entropic penalties are primarily responsible for the loss of affinity of the highly flexible Pn14 CPS for mAb 1B1. The similarity of the solution conformation of the relatively rigid GBSIII CPS with that in the immune complex characterizes the previously undescribed 3D structure of the conformational epitope. The analysis provides a comprehensive interpretation for a large body of biochemical and immunological data related to Ab recognition of bacterial polysaccharides and should be applicable to other Ab-carbohydrate interactions.

  17. Use of Recombinant Antigens for the Diagnosis of Invasive Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laín

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive candidiasis is a frequent and often fatal complication in immunocompromised and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis remains difficult due to the lack of specific clinical symptoms and a definitive diagnostic method. The detection of antibodies against different Candida antigens may help in the diagnosis. However, the methods traditionally used for the detection of antibodies have been based on crude antigenic fungal extracts, which usually show low-reproducibility and cross-reactivity problems. The development of molecular biology techniques has allowed the production of recombinant antigens which may help to solve these problems. In this review we will discuss the usefulness of recombinant antigens in the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  18. Molecular alterations induced by a high-fat high-fiber diet in porcine adipose tissues: variations according to the anatomical fat location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondret, Florence; Vincent, Annie; Houée-Bigot, Magalie; Siegel, Anne; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Louveau, Isabelle; Causeur, David

    2016-02-18

    Changing the energy and nutrient source for growing animals may be an effective way of limiting adipose tissue expansion, a response which may depend on the genetic background of the animals. This study aims to describe the transcriptional modulations present in the adipose tissues of two pig lines divergently selected for residual feed intake which were either fed a high-fat high-fiber (HF) diet or an isocaloric low-fat high-starch diet (LF). Transcriptomic analysis using a porcine microarray was performed on 48 pigs (n = 12 per diet and per line) in both perirenal (PRAT) and subcutaneous (SCAT) adipose tissues. There was no interaction between diet and line on either adiposity or transcriptional profiles, so that the diet effect was inferred independently of the line. Irrespective of line, the relative weights of the two fat depots were lower in HF pigs than in LF pigs after 58 days on dietary treatment. In the two adipose tissues, the most apparent effect of the HF diet was the down-regulation of several genes associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which therefore may be associated with dietary-induced modulations in genes acting in apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory pathways. Genes involved in glucose metabolic processes were also down-regulated by the HF diet, with no significant variation or decreased expression of important lipid-related genes such as the low-density lipoprotein receptor and leptin in the two fat pads. The master regulators of glucose and fatty acid homeostasis SREBF1 and MLXIPL, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)δ and its heterodimeric partner RXRA were down-regulated by the HF diet. PPARγ which has pleiotropic functions including lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation, was however up-regulated by this diet in PRAT and SCAT. Dietary-related modulations in the expression of genes associated with immunity and inflammation were mainly revealed in PRAT. A high-fat high-fiber diet depressed glucose and

  19. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  20. Saposins utilize two strategies for lipid transfer and CD1 antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon, Luis; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Grenha, Rosa; Sun, Ying; Barral, Duarte C.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Bhowruth, Veemal; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Kasmar, Anne; Peng, Wei; Moody, D. Branch; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Transferring lipid antigens from membranes into CD1 antigen-presenting proteins represents a major molecular hurdle necessary for T-cell recognition. Saposins facilitate this process, but the mechanisms used are not well understood. We found that saposin B forms soluble saposin protein-lipid

  1. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhki, Naoya; O'Brien, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. The authors present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations

  2. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on

  3. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M

    1987-01-01

    -labeled chicken erythrocyte membranes (CEM) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and autoradiography. The B-G antigen had an approximate molecular mass of 46-48 kd in reduced samples, depending on the haplotype, and in unreduced samples contained either dimers (85 kd......-G to be synthesized as a monomer, with dimerization taking place after 20-30 min. No change in the monomer's molecular mass due to posttranslational modifications was revealed. The antigen was purified from detergent extract of CEM by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody, and then reduced and alkylated...... and affinity-purified once more. Finally, reverse-phase chromatography resulted in a pure product. The B-G antigen was identified in the various fractions by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The final product was more than 99% pure, as estimated by SDS-PAGE analysis followed by silver stain of proteins. The yield...

  4. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, M. E. A.

    2010-02-01

    approximately 30 KDa molecular weight. However, some tests were done to determine the specificity of the produced monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, breast cancer tissues are associated with abnormal antigens, but with low incidence rate, this strongly favors the individualization of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. (Author)

  5. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Engel, P.; Boumsell, L.; Balderas, R.; Gattei, V.; Hořejší, Václav; Jin, B.Q.; Malavasi, F.; Mortari, F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Stockinger, H.; van Zelm, M.C.; Zola, H.; Clark, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 10 (2015), s. 4555-4563 ISSN 0022-1767 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : CD nomenclature, , * leukocyte antigens * HLDA workshop Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.985, year: 2015

  6. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value...

  7. Application of recombinant antigen 5 allergens from seven allergy-relevant Hymenoptera species in diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiener, M; Eberlein, Bernadette; Moreno-Aguilar, C

    2017-01-01

    species can be a diagnostic challenge. To address immunological IgE cross-reactivity on molecular level, seven recombinant antigens 5 of the most important Vespoidea groups were assessed by different diagnostic setups. METHODS: The antigens 5 of yellow jackets, hornets, European and American paper wasps......-reactivity in various diagnostic settings, antigens 5 are inappropriate markers for differential sIgE diagnostics in vespid venom allergy. However, the newly available antigens 5 from further vespid species and the combination of recombinant allergen-based sIgE measurements with BAT represents a practicable way...

  8. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure

  9. Tumor markers cancer antigen 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen for monitoring metastatic breast cancer during first-line chemotherapy and follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    1996-01-01

    progressive disease, the median positive lead time was 35 days during therapy and 76 days during follow-up. Tumor marker assessment may document that a therapy is effective and ought to be continued in spite of adverse toxic effects, and that a treatment is ineffective and should be stopped to prevent......We investigated whether model systems integrating stochastic variation into criteria for marker assessment could be used for monitoring metastatic breast cancer. A total of 3989 serum samples was obtained from 204 patients receiving first-line chemotherapy and from 112 of these patients during...... follow-up. Each sample was analyzed for cancer antigen 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen. The efficiency for identifying progression and nonprogression was 94% during therapy and 85% during follow-up, with no false-positive marker results for progressive disease. At clinical...

  10. Determination of Diagnostic Antigens in Cattle Amphistomiasis Using Western Blotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Halajian

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Mixed infection with amphistomes seems common in native cattle of Iran. The aim of this study was to determine diagnostic antigens in cattle mixed amphistomiasis."nMethods: Specific antigens of Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Gastrothylax crumenifer and Paramphisto­mum cervi (mixed infection, the most common species, were collected from cattle was deter­mined. Adult trematodes were collected from the rumen of naturally infected cattle at meat inspec­tion. After their homogenization and centrifugation, somatic antigens were prepared and ana­lyzed by SDS-PAGE. Specific antigens were determinated by western blot with homologous and heterolo­gous sera. SDS-PAGE of whole worms extract was performed at different concentrations and subse­quent gels staining. Immunoblotting analysis using sera from cattle naturally infected with am­phistomes, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola spp. and hydatid cyst was performed."nResults: Electrophorese analysis of somatic antigens revealed the presence of 10 and 21 protein bands at 4 µgr/ml and 8 µgr/ml with molecular weights ranging from 25-120 and 25-150 kDa, respectively. The best result was taken at 8 mg/ml concentration. Although western blot of these proteins demon­strate 5 major antigenic polypeptides ranging from 50 to 100 kDa which were recognized by serum of cat­tle naturally infected with mixed amphistomes.

  11. The Anthrax Protective Antigen (PA63) Bound Conformation of a Peptide Inhibitor of the Binding of Lethal Factor to PA63: As Determined by trNOESY NMR and Molecular Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    correlation spectroscopy. of members of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides.2 .3 5 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1982, 104, 3731. Molecular Electrostatic Potentials...and antagonists of the mammalian tachykinin NK1 to skeletal troponium C. J. Mol. Biol. 1991, 222, 405. receptor. J. Med. Chem. 1998, 41, 1497-1506. (29

  12. Identification and localization of a soluble antigen, Ag2, of 136 kDa from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Grellier, P; Theander, T G

    1991-01-01

    The soluble antigens, antigen 2 (Ag2) and antigen 6 (Ag6), were copurified from supernatants of P. falciparum in vitro cultures by affinity chromatography and Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography. Rabbit antibodies to Ag2 were raised and characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Ag2 appeared...... as a duplet with molecular masses of 136 and 120 kDa when tested by immunoblotting. Immunoprecipitation experiments on Triton X-100 extracted antigens from synchronized cultures showed that the antigen was synthesized in the schizont stage. Ag2 was located near the surface of schizonts in the parasitophorous...

  13. The molecular genetics of clinal variation: a case study of ebony and thoracic trident pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telonis-Scott, Marina; Hoffmann, Ary A; Sgrò, Carla M

    2011-05-01

    Widespread pigmentation diversity coupled with a well-defined genetic system of melanin synthesis and patterning in Drosophila provides an excellent opportunity to study phenotypes undergoing evolutionary change. Pigmentation variation is highly correlated with different ecological variables and is thought to reflect adaptations to different environments. Several studies have linked candidate genes from Drosophila melanogaster to intra-population variation and interspecific morphological divergence, but less clearly to variation among populations forming pigmentation clines. We characterized a new thoracic trident pigmentation cline in D. melanogaster populations from eastern Australia, and applied a candidate gene approach to explain the majority of the geographically structured phenotypic variation. More melanized populations from higher latitudes tended to express less ebony than their tropical counterparts, and an independent artificial selection experiment confirmed this association. By partitioning temperature dependent effects, we showed that the genetic differences underlying clinal patterns for trident variation at 25 °C do not explain the patterns observed at 16 °C. Changes in thoracic trident pigmentation could be a common evolutionary response to climatically mediated environmental pressures. On the Australian east coast most of the changes appear to be associated with regulatory divergence of the ebony gene but this depends on temperature. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The relationship between molecular variation and variation in the wing shape of three aphid parasitoid species. Aphidius uzbekistanicus Luzhetzki, Aphidius rhopalosiphi De Stefani Perez and Aphidius avenaphis (Fitch) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanović, Ž.; Kos, K.; Petrović, A.; Starý, Petr; Kavallieratos, N. G.; Žikić, V.; Jakše, J.; Trdan, S.; Ivanović, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 1 (2013), s. 41-47 ISSN 0044-5231 Grant - others:The Ministry of Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia(RS) 43001; Slovenian Research Agency(SI) P4-0013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : ceral aphid parasitoid * Aphidius variation * mitochondrial COI gene Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.821, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0044523112000162

  15. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    -associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...... predominantly from differentiation and cancer-testis antigens. Notably, the majority of these responses were of low frequency and tumor-specific T-cell frequencies decreased during rapid expansion. A further notable observation was a large variation in the T-cell specificities detected in cultures established...

  16. Cross antigenicity of immunodominant polypeptides of somatic antigen of Oesophagostomum columbianum with other helminths by western blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Sunita; Prasad, Arvind; Nasir, Abdul; Saini, Vijesh Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Oesophagostomum columbianum in small ruminants in India is found as mixed infection commonly in sheep and goat. Haemonchus contortus, an abomasal nematode is found as concurrent infection with it. Eggs of Haemonchus and O. columbianum cannot be easily distinguished. Diagnosis of O. columbianum may only be possible if a non-cross antigenic polypeptide was available for immunodiagnosis. Somatic antigen (SoAg) of O. columbianum was fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunodominant polypeptides were identified by western blotting with homologous hyperimmune serum (HIS) and experimental sera of sheep or goat infected with other helminths. SoAg of O. columbianum was immunoaffinity purified. Sharp polypeptide bands of 130, 72 and 68 KDa were observed along with several faint bands of lower molecular weight. Western blot of purified SoAg of O. columbianum with homologous HIS showed reaction with all the protein bands of 17, 28, 30, 32, 35, 38, 50, 68, 100, 130, 150, and 170 kDa. For identification of non-cross antigenic polypeptide, immunoaffinity purified SoAg of O. columbianum was reacted to heterologous HIS against H. contortus, Paramphistomum epiclitum, and Fasciola gigantica in western blotting utilizing completely dry method (i-blot). Among high molecular weight polypeptides 100 and 150 kDa were non-cross antigenic and among low molecular weight except 50 kDa polypeptide, 17, 30, 32, 35, and 38 kDa of O. columbianum were not cross antigenic with other helminths. Hence, polypeptides of 17, 30, 32, 35 and 38 kDa as well as 100 and 150 kDa polypeptides of O. columbianum may be exploited for immunodiagnosis of the infection in sheep and goat with extensive studies on cross antigenicity.

  17. Genetic versus antigenic differences among highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses: Consequences for vaccine strain selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Ben; Reemers, Sylvia; Dortmans, Jos; de Vries, Erik; de Jong, Mart; van de Zande, Saskia; Rottier, Peter J M; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2017-03-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses display a remarkable genetic and antigenic diversity. We examined to what extent genetic distances between several H5N1 viruses from different clades correlate with antigenic differences and vaccine performance. H5-specific antisera were generated, and cross-reactivity and antigenic distances between 12 different viruses were determined. In general, antigenic distances increased proportional to genetic distances although notable exceptions were observed. Antigenic distances correlated better with genetic variation in 27 selected, antigenically-relevant H5 residues, than in the complete HA1 domain. Variation in these selected residues could accurately predict the antigenic distances for a novel H5N8 virus. Protection provided by vaccines against heterologous H5N1 challenge viruses indicated that cross-protection also correlates better with genetic variation in the selected antigenically-relevant residues than in complete HA1. When time is limited, variation at these selected residues may be used to accurately predict antigenic distance and vaccine performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antigenic variation of the dominant gp41 epitope in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. M.; Teeuwsen, V. J.; Boucher, C. A.; Vahlne, A.; Barin, F.; Tjong-A-Hung, S.; Dekker, J.; Parkhede, U.; de Wolf, F.; Goudsmit, J.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the value of (combinations of) synthetic peptides representing immunodominant sites on HIV-1/HIV-2 transmembrane proteins for the detection and discrimination between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection in various populations. Two 24-mer synthetic peptides derived from immunodominant sites on the

  19. Antigenic relationships among four herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, W T; Plummer, G

    1973-06-01

    Common viral antigens were detected, by fluorescent-antibody studies, in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1, squirrel monkey herpesvirus 1, bovine rhinotracheitis, and equine abortion viruses. The two primate viruses showed slight cross-neutralization.

  20. HLA-B27 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human leukocyte antigen B27; Ankylosing spondylitis-HLA; Psoriatic arthritis-HLA; Reactive arthritis-HLA ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ) Rheumatoid factor X-rays HLA testing is also used to match donated tissue ...

  1. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  2. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  3. Thermoresponsive Poly(2-oxazoline) Molecular Brushes by Living Ionic Polymerization: Kinetic Investigations of Pendant Chain Grafting and Cloud Point Modulation by Backbone and Side Chain Length Variation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-04-17

    Molecular brushes of poly(2-oxazoline)s were prepared by living anionic polymerization of 2-iso-propenyl-2-oxazoline to form the backbone and subsequent living cationic ring-opening polymerization of 2-n- or 2-iso-propyl-2-oxazoline for pendant chain grafting. In situ kinetic studies indicate that the initiation efficiency and polymerization rates are independent from the number of initiator functions per initiator molecule. This was attributed to the high efficiency of oxazolinium salt and the stretched conformation of the backbone, which is caused by the electrostatic repulsion of the oxazolinium moieties along the macroinitiator. The resulting molecular brushes showed thermoresponsive properties, that is, having a defined cloud point (CP). The dependence of the CP as a function of backbone and side chain length as well as concentration was studied. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains circulating in Indonesia using multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hananta, I Putu Yuda; van Dam, Alje Pieter; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten Franciscus; Dierdorp, Mirjam; Wind, Carolien Marleen; Soebono, Hardyanto; de Vries, Henry John Christiaan; Bruisten, Sylvia Maria

    2018-01-05

    Control of gonorrhea in resource-limited countries, such as Indonesia, is mostly unsuccessful. Examining Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) transmission networks using strain typing might help prioritizing public health interventions. In 2014, urogenital Ng strains were isolated from clients of sexually transmitted infection clinics in three Indonesian cities. Strains were typed using Multiple-Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) Analysis (MLVA) and Ng Multi-Antigen Sequence Typing (NG-MAST) at the Public Health Service, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and compared to Dutch strains collected from 2012 to 2015. Minimum spanning trees (MSTs) were constructed using MLVA profiles incorporating demographics and NG-MAST genogroups. A cluster was defined as ≥5 strains differing in ≤1 VNTR locus. The concordance between MLVA and NG-MAST was examined with the adjusted Wallace coefficients (AW). We collected a total of 78 Indonesian strains from Yogyakarta (n = 44), Jakarta (n = 25), and Denpasar (n = 9). Seven MLVA clusters and 16 non-clustered strains were identified. No cluster was specific for any geographic area, risk group or age group. Combined with 119 contemporary Dutch strains, 8 MLVA clusters were identified, being four clusters of Indonesian strains, two of Dutch strains, and two of both Indonesian and Dutch strains. Indonesian strains (79.5%) were more often clustered compared to Dutch strains (24.3%). The most prevalent NG-MAST genogroups among Indonesian strains was G1407 (51.3%) and among Dutch strains was G2992 (19.3%). In Indonesian strains, the AW [95% confidence interval] for MLVA to NG-MAST was 0.07 [0.00-0.27] and for NG-MAST to MLVA was 0.03 [0.00-0.12]. Indonesian Ng strains are more often clustered than Dutch strains, but show no relation with geographical area, risk group, or age group, suggesting a more clonal Ng epidemic in Indonesia. Some similar Ng strains circulate in both Indonesia and the Netherlands.

  5. ISOLATION OF ANTIGENIC MUTANTS OF TYPE 1 POLIOVIRUS : GROWING THE VIRUS IN THE PRESENCE OF HOMOLOGOUS ANTISERUM

    OpenAIRE

    HASHIMOTO, Nobuo

    1980-01-01

    The antigenic mutants, which were significantly different intra-typically from the parental Mahoney-1709 type 1 poliovirus, were repeatedly isolated after a number of serial virus passages in the presence of homologous anti-Mahoney sera. The levels of the antigenic variation of those mutant viruses varied, depending on the individual antiserum employed for mutant selection and the passage numbers with same antiserum. The susceptibility to certain serum inhibitors of the antigenic mutants vari...

  6. Identification and characterization of surface antigens in parasites, using radiolabelling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, R.

    1982-04-01

    Surface proteins of Schistosoma sp and Leishmania sp were studied using 125-Iodine as tracer. The surface proteins were labelled by the Lactoperoxidase method and the proteins then separated using SDS PAG electrophoresis and autoradiography. The possible immunogens were then separated using immunoprecipitation and Fluorescent Antibody techniques using sera from patients or from artificially immunized rabbits. Four common antigens were identified from the surfaces of male and female adult worms, cercariae and schistosomulae of S.mansoni. These antigens, which had molecular weights of 150,000, 78,000, 45,000, and 22,000 were also isolated from the surfaces of S.haematobium adults. The surface antigens on promastigotes of a Kenyan strain of Leishmania donovani were separated into three protein antigens with molecular weights of 66,000, 59,000 and 43,000 respectively. The 59,000 molecular weight antigen was a glycoprotein and was common to promastigotes of an American and Indian strain of L.donovani and to L.braziliensis mexicana. None of the isolated antigens have been shown to have a protective effect when vaccinated into mice, but the study illustrates the value of radionuclide tracers in the unravelling of the mosaic of antigens which parasites possess

  7. Lipophilic Muramyl Dipeptide-Antigen Conjugates as Immunostimulating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Marian M J H P; Zom, Gijs G; Meeuwenoord, Nico; Khan, Selina; Ossendorp, Ferry; Overkleeft, Herman S; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Filippov, Dmitri V; Codée, Jeroen D C

    2016-01-19

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is the smallest peptidoglycan fragment capable of triggering the innate immune system through interaction with the intracellular NOD2 receptor. To develop synthetic vaccine modalities composed of an antigenic entity (typically a small peptide) and a molecular adjuvant with well-defined activity, we previously assembled covalent MDP-antigen conjugates. Although these were found to be capable of stimulating the NOD2 receptor and were processed by dendritic cells (DCs) leading to effective antigen presentation, DC maturation--required for an apt immune response--could not be achieved with these conjugates. To improve the efficacy of these vaccine modalities, we equipped the MDP moiety with lipophilic tails, well-known modifications to enhance the immune-stimulatory activity of MDPs. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a lipophilic MDP-antigen conjugate and show that it is a promising vaccine modality capable of stimulating the NOD2 receptor, maturing DCs, and delivering antigen cargo into the MHC-I cross-presentation pathway. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Phase variable O antigen biosynthetic genes control expression of the major protective antigen and bacteriophage receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley D Seed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage.

  9. Phase Variable O Antigen Biosynthetic Genes Control Expression of the Major Protective Antigen and Bacteriophage Receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, Kimberley D.; Faruque, Shah M.; Mekalanos, John J.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Camilli, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage. PMID:23028317

  10. Human pathogen subversion of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, F M; Lem, L; Solache, A; Bennett, E M

    1999-04-01

    Many pathogens have co-evolved with their human hosts to develop strategies for immune evasion that involve disruption of the intracellular pathways by which antigens are bound by class I and class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) for presentation to T cells. Here the molecular events in these pathways are reviewed and pathogen interference is documented for viruses, extracellular and intracellular bacteria and intracellular parasites. In addition to a general review, data from our studies of adenovirus, Chlamydia trachomatis and Coxiella burnetii are summarized. Adenovirus E19 is the first viral gene product described that affects class I MHC molecule expression by two separate mechanisms, intracellular retention of the class I heavy chain by direct binding and by binding to the TAP transporter involved in class I peptide loading. Coxiella and Chlamydia both affect peptide presentation by class II MHC molecules as a result of their residence in endocytic compartments, although the properties of the parasitophorous vacuoles they form are quite different. These examples of active interference with antigen presentation by viral gene products and passive interference by rickettsiae and bacteria are typical of the strategies used by these different classes of pathogens, which need to evade different types of immune responses. Pathogen-host co-evolution is evident in these subversion tactics for which the pathogen crime seems tailored to fit the immune system punishment.

  11. Analysis of Genetic Variation of rs1542705 Marker in SMPD1 Gene Region as an Informative Marker for Molecular Diagnosis of Niemann-Pick Disease in Isfahan Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Ebrahimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Niemann-Pick disease (NPD refers to a group of lysosomal storage diseases that causes abnormal metabolism of lipids. One of the genes that play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease is SMPD1. To date, more than hundred disease- causing mutations have been identified in SMPD1 gene. Due to the large number of mutations in this gene, direct analysis of the mutations is costly and time-consuming. Therefore, indirect linkage analysis using polymorphic markers as an alternative method for molecular diagnosis of the mutations has been recommended. In the present study, allele frequency of rs1542705 genetic marker was analyzed in the Iranian population. The aim was to determine the polymorphic information content (PIC and the possibility of its application in indirect diagnosing of NPD. Materials and Methods: After bioinformatics analysis of the SMPD1 gene region, rs1542705 marker was selected for genotyping in Isfahan population. In order to calculate the allele and genotype frequency of the marker, molecular tests were done on 113 DNA samples of unrelated healthy individuals by using ARMS-PCR technique. Finally, the information related to the genotype of the individuals was statistically analyzed using Powermarker and Genepop software. Results: The analyses showed that the studied population was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Allele frequency of rs1542705 marker for T and C alleles was 71.24% and 28.76%, respectively, and the heterozygosity of the marker was 43.36%. Also, polymorphic information content (PIC was 0.325. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that rs1542705 marker could be considered as an informative marker for molecular diagnosis of Niemann- Pick disease using linkage analysis in the studied population.

  12. Highly accurate bound state calculations of the two-center molecular ions by using the universal variational expansion for three-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Alexei M.

    2018-03-01

    The universal variational expansion for the non-relativistic three-body systems is explicitly constructed. This universal expansion can be used to perform highly accurate numerical computations of the bound state spectra in various three-body systems, including Coulomb three-body systems with arbitrary particle masses and electric charges. Our main interest is related to the adiabatic three-body systems which contain one bound electron and two heavy nuclei of hydrogen isotopes: the protium p, deuterium d and tritium t. We also consider the analogous (model) hydrogen ion ∞H2+ with the two infinitely heavy nuclei.

  13. Mapping the antigenicity of the parasites in Leishmania donovani infection by proteome serology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Forgber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis defines a cluster of protozoal diseases with diverse clinical manifestations. The visceral form caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe. So far, no vaccines exist for visceral leishmaniasis despite indications of naturally developing immunity, and sensitive immunodiagnostics are still at early stages of development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Establishing a proteome-serological methodology, we mapped the antigenicity of the parasites and the specificities of the immune responses in human leishmaniasis. Using 2-dimensional Western blot analyses with sera and parasites isolated from patients in India, we detected immune responses with widely divergent specificities for up to 330 different leishmanial antigens. 68 antigens were assigned to proteins in silver- and fluorochrome-stained gels. The antigenicity of these proteins did not correlate with the expression levels of the proteins. Although some antigens are shared among different parasite isolates, there are extensive differences and no immunodominant antigens, but indications of antigenic drift in the parasites. Six antigens were identified by mass spectrometry. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proteomics-based dissection of the serospecificities of leishmaniasis patients provides a comprehensive inventory of the complexity and interindividual heterogeneity of the host-responses to and variations in the antigenicity of the Leishmania parasites. This information can be instrumental in the development of vaccines and new immune monitoring and diagnostic devices.

  14. Spinal cord injury, immunodepression, and antigenic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Katherine S; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    The inability to effectively control microbial infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals affected by spinal cord injury (SCI). Available evidence from clinical studies as well as animal models of SCI demonstrate that increased susceptibility to infection is derived from disruption of central nervous system (CNS) communication with the host immune system that ultimately leads to immunodepression. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing muted cellular and humoral responses that occur post-injury resulting in impaired host defense following infection is critical for improving the overall quality of life of individuals with SCI. This review focuses on studies performed using preclinical animal models of SCI to evaluate how injury impacts T and B lymphocyte responses following either viral infection or antigenic challenge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human sensitization to Ganoderma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Bell, B; Srinivasan, J; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1979-07-01

    Continuous air sampling with a Hirst volumetric spore trap over 3 yr has identified basidiospores of Ganoderma applanatum, a bracket fungus, as the most numerous fungal spores in two southern Ontario locations. The particle size is small and the calculated total spore mass approximates that of the spores of Cladosporium and Alternaria. Extracts of Ganoderma applanatum bracket fungus and spores in w/v, 1:10 concentration were prepared after collection of samples of the fungus from local woods. Skin prick tests with the extracts were performed in 294 consecutive children and adults attending two chest/allergy clinics. Of these patients, 182 (61.9%) reacted to 1 or more of the common inhalant allergen extracts and 24 (8.2%) reacted to Ganoderma antigen. There was no consistent relationship between reactivity to Ganoderma antigen and any of the common inhaled allergens. IgE-dependent sensitization to Ganoderma was confirmed by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Rabbit antisera to Ganoderma antigen preparations did not appear to cross-react with preparations of the various clinically important allergens. The findings indicate that Ganoderma antigen is commonly encountered, can induce human sensitization, and has unique antigenicity among common allergens of clinical importance.

  16. Antigenic cartography of H9N2 virus and its impact on the vaccine efficacy in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) is wide-spread in Asia and the Middle East. The efficacy of vaccines is enhanced by the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA) between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how antigenic variations affect the vaccine efficacy, speci...

  17. Identification and localization of a soluble antigen, Ag2, of 136 kDa from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Grellier, P; Theander, T G

    1991-01-01

    as a duplet with molecular masses of 136 and 120 kDa when tested by immunoblotting. Immunoprecipitation experiments on Triton X-100 extracted antigens from synchronized cultures showed that the antigen was synthesized in the schizont stage. Ag2 was located near the surface of schizonts in the parasitophorous...

  18. Lewis Y Antigen as a Target for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    M. A., Savio, A. and De , G. J. 1996. Potential role of molecular mimicry between Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide and host Lewis blood group...and Helicobacter pylori [27] and some human neoplasms, including certain breast, ovarian and prostate cancers [28]. Vaccinations with LeY-containing...expression) on tumor cells; (2) their function as differentiation antigens; and (3) their role in cell adhesion and motility underlying their metastatic

  19. Characteristics of the molecular diversity of the outer membrane protein A gene of Haemophilus parasuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Yue, Hua; Yang, Falong; Shao, Guoqing; Hai, Quan; Chen, Xiaofei; Guo, Dingqian

    2010-01-01

    The molecular diversity of the gene encoding the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Haemophilus parasuis has been unclear. In this study, the structural characteristics, sequence types, and genetic diversity of ompA were investigated in 15 H. parasuis reference strains of different serovars and 20 field isolates. Three nucleotide lengths of the complete open reading frame (ORF) of ompA were found: 1098 base pairs (bp), 1104 bp, and 1110 bp. The OmpA contained 4 hypervariable domains, mainly encoding the 4 putative surface-exposed loops, which makes it a potential molecular marker for genotyping. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant OmpAs of serovars 4 and 5 could cross-react with antiserum to all 15 serovars. Hence, although ompA of H. parasuis exhibited high variation among serovars, this variation did not seem to affect the strong antigenic characteristics of OmpA. PMID:20885850

  20. СAPSULAR ANTIGEN OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kadnikova

    2015-01-01

    . Molecular usher Caf1A responsible for capsular antigen anchoring on the surface of bacterial cell has a high affinity to human interleukin 1β. Caf1 can compete with interleukins 1α, 1β, and 1ra in binding to receptors on lymphoid cells preventing development of adequate immune response. Immunodiagnosis of plague is based on detection of Caf1 or anti-Caf1 antibodies since this Y. pestis antigen is species specific. Covering bacterial surfaces capsular antigen is also the paramount component of all modern plague vaccines. Its leading role in induction of intense immunity in mice, rats, monkeys, and men was shown clearly. However, non-capsulated (Caf1– variants of Y. pestis keeping their virulence at the level of the wild-type strains might be selected and accumulated in immune animals. This indicates inadmissibility of application of monoantigen plague vaccines and necessity for design of immunoprophylactic preparations aimed at two or three molecular targets. 

  1. Multicomponent Molecular Puzzles for Photofunction Design: Emission Color Variation in Lewis Acid-Base Pair Crystals Coupled with Guest-to-Host Charge Transfer Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Manabu; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2015-08-05

    Simple yet ubiquitous multimolecular assembly systems with color-tunable emissions are realized by cooperative electron donor-acceptor interactions, such as the boron-nitrogen (B-N) dative bond as a Lewis acid-base pair and charge transfer (CT) interactions. These are ternary-component systems consisting of a naphthalenediimide derivative (NDI), tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane (TPFB), and aromatic molecules (guest) with an NDI:TPFB:guest ratio of 1:2:2. The crystal shows guest-dependent color-tunable emissions such as deep blue to orange when a guest molecule of benzene is replaced with other π-conjugated systems. A good correlation between the emission wavelength and ionization potential of the guest and electronic structure calculations indicated that the emission is due to the CT transition from the guest to the NDI. The present study suggests that a rational solution of multcomponent molecular puzzles would be useful for obtaining novel photofunctional solid-state systems.

  2. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  3. Mass loading and episodic variation of molecular markers in PM2.5 aerosols over a rural area in eastern central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalkar, Jayant; Deshmukh, Dhananjay K.; Deb, Manas K.; Tsai, Ying I.; Sopajaree, Khajornsak

    2015-09-01

    The impact of biomass burning in atmospheric aerosols load is poorly known. We investigated the impact of biomass burning through molecular markers on the concentration of PM2.5 aerosol samples collected from a rural site in eastern central India during three episodic periods from October to November 2011. The collected PM2.5 samples were chemically quantified for potassium as well as sugars and dicarboxylic acids using ion chromatography. Levoglucosan and glucose were found as the most abundant sugar compounds and sugar-alcohols showed the predominance of mannitol whereas oxalic acid was the most abundant diacid followed by maleic acid in PM2.5 aerosols. Substantially enhanced concentrations of K+ as well as levoglucosan and glucose were observed in eastern central India. Analysis of the source specific molecular markers and ratios of sugars and diacids infer that combustion of biomass was the major emission sources of organic compounds associated with PM2.5 aerosols over eastern central India. We applied Spearman correlation analysis and principal component analysis to further investigate the sources of measured sugars and diacids. The concentrations of K+ and levoglucosan were significantly correlated with sugars and diacids that verifying their common sources from biomass burning emission. This study demonstrates that biomass burning for domestic heating and cooking purposes and agricultural activities significantly influence the air quality of eastern central India during the investigation period. The obtained data in this research is helpful for the global scientific community to assessments and remedial of air quality parameters in rural areas of developing countries under similar atmospheric circumstances.

  4. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  6. Prostate specific antigen doubling time calculation: not as easy as 1, 2, 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskivich, Timothy J; Regan, Meredith M; Oh, William K

    2006-11-01

    Although prostate specific antigen doubling time is widely used to predict outcomes such as time to progression and prostate cancer specific mortality, clinicians may be unaware of the impact of method on prostate specific antigen doubling time calculation. We present a critical review of the literature to assess the diversity of methods used to calculate prostate specific antigen doubling time. We then describe the need for methodological consistency with the literature by showing examples from our clinical experience at our institution. A comprehensive review of articles evaluating prostate specific antigen doubling time as a prognostic and predictive indicator in various prostate cancer disease states was performed using PubMed. Case examples were drawn from the prostate cancer database at our institution. The database is a registry of 4,651 patients with prostate cancer who have been seen at our institution since 1998. The methodology of prostate specific antigen doubling time calculation is inconsistent in the literature. Based on our experience and data presented in the literature the different methods in the literature are not always interchangeable. Small deviations from the methods outlined in a study can sometimes lead to wide variation in calculated prostate specific antigen doubling time. This variation of up to several months or longer is large enough to cause errors in assessment of prognosis and can even lead to incorrect management. The rules for prostate specific antigen doubling time calculation found in the literature can be categorized into 4 parameter groups, including method, calculation interval, data acquisition rules and data analysis rules. Case examples illustrate the importance of adherence to the literature with regard to each parameter. Consistency with the literature in methodological elements of prostate specific antigen doubling time calculation is essential for the accurate calculation of prostate specific antigen doubling time

  7. Molecular phylogeny and genetic variation in the genus Lilium native to China based on the internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yun-peng; He, Heng-bin; Wang, Zhong-xuan; Li, Shuang; Wei, Chi; Yuan, Xiao-na; Cui, Qi; Jia, Gui-xia

    2014-03-01

    We present a comprehensive phylogeny derived from nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) for 214 samples representing 98 species and five varieties, including 44 species and five varieties native to China. Our collection of 25 species and five varieties (44 samples) covering all five sections of the genus (Comber) distributed in China also were included in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) database. This study incorporates previous research with an emphasis on Chinese species, including the controversial subsection, Sinomartagon 5c Comber. In the phylogenetic tree obtained by maximum parsimony (PAUP) and maximum likelihood (RAxML) analyses, the samples were divided into four major groups. Our results suggest that the subsection (subsect.) 5c Comber should be classified into the true subsect. 5c and the section (sect.) Lophophorum. And the latter was divided into three subsections (subsect. Lophophorum I, subsect. Lophophorum II, and subsect. Lophophorum III). Based on molecular phylogenetic analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we report that L. henryi and L. rosthornii are closely related, and we propose their classification into subsect. Leucolirion 6a. Our results support Comber's subdivision of sect. Leucolirion, which was primarily based on bulb color. Chinese species were divided into five sections: sect. Martagon, sect. Archelirion, sect. Leucolirion, sect. Sinomartagon, and sect. Lophophorum. These findings contribute to our understanding of the phylogeny, origin, and classification of Lilium.

  8. Quasispecies variation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus during natural infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Tony L.; Lowe, James F.; Milburn, Suzanne M.; Firkins, Lawrence D.

    2003-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) displays notorious genetic, antigenic, and clinical variability. Little is known, however, about the nature and extent of viral variation present within naturally infected animals. By amplifying and cloning the open reading frame 5 gene from tonsils of naturally infected swine, and by sequencing individual clones, we characterized viral diversity in nine animals from two farms. All animals harbored multiple PRRSV variants at both the nucleic and the amino acid levels. Structural variation and rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution were no different within known epitopes than elsewhere. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that differences between farms, among animals within farms, and within individual animals accounted for 92.94, 3.84, and 3.22% of the total viral genetic variability observed, respectively. PRRSV exists during natural infection as a quasispecies distribution of related genotypes. Positive natural selection for immune evasiveness does not appear to maintain this diversity

  9. The Molecular Model Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Stephanie A.

    2003-04-01

    The Molecular Model Game is used to review Lewis structures and VSEPR theory. In this game, teams of students compete to complete problems quickly. Variations with other types of problems involving stoichiometry or equilibria are also possible.

  10. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  11. Antigenic profile, isolation and characterization of whole body extract of Paramphistomum gracile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuracpreeda, P; Chawengkirttikul, R; Sobhon, P

    2016-07-01

    An antigenic component of adult Paramphistomum gracile was characterized by means of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (indirect ELISA), sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from cattle naturally infected with P. gracile, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Fasciola gigantica, Moniezia benedeni, strongylids, Trichuris sp. and Strongyloides sp. The whole body (WB) extracts of P. gracile were fractionated by gel filtration chromatography in a Sephadex G-200 column. It was found that the WB extract fractions, F1-F3 were highly antigenic, F5 was moderately antigenic and F4 was poorly antigenic. For SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting, the antigenic molecules of WB extract and all five fractions were mostly at molecular weights (MW) ranging from 12 to 150 kDa. One antigenic protein of 16 kDa detected in WB extract and F1-F3 was found to give a consistent reaction with sera from infected cattle. The antigenicity of the purified 16 kDa protein was confirmed by immunoblotting and indirect ELISA using a pool of sera and individual serum samples from infected cattle (at 1 : 78 125 dilution) and hyperimmunized rabbit (at 1 : 390 625 dilution). This finding suggests that the 16 kDa protein may be a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of cattle paramphistomosis caused by P. gracile. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni candidate antigens for diagnosis of schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardenia Braz Figueiredo Carvalho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a more sensitive diagnostic test for schistosomiasis is needed to overcome the limitations of the use of stool examination in low endemic areas. Using parasite antigens in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a promising strategy, however a more rational selection of parasite antigens is necessary. In this study we performed in silico analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome, using SchistoDB database and bioinformatic tools for screening immunogenic antigens. Based on evidence of expression in all parasite life stage within the definitive host, extracellular or plasmatic membrane localization, low similarity to human and other helminthic proteins and presence of predicted B cell epitopes, six candidates were selected: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored 200 kDa protein, two putative cytochrome oxidase subunits, two expressed proteins and one hypothetical protein. The recognition in unidimensional and bidimensional Western blot of protein with similar molecular weight and isoelectric point to the selected antigens by sera from S. mansoni infected mice indicate a good correlation between these two approaches in selecting immunogenic proteins.

  13. Experimental Immunization Based on Plasmodium Antigens Isolated by Antibody Affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali N. Kamali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines blocking malaria parasites in the blood-stage diminish mortality and morbidity caused by the disease. Here, we isolated antigens from total parasite proteins by antibody affinity chromatography to test an immunization against lethal malaria infection in a murine model. We used the sera of malaria self-resistant ICR mice to lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii 17XL for purification of their IgGs which were subsequently employed to isolate blood-stage parasite antigens that were inoculated to immunize BALB/c mice. The presence of specific antibodies in vaccinated mice serum was studied by immunoblot analysis at different days after vaccination and showed an intensive immune response to a wide range of antigens with molecular weight ranging between 22 and 250 kDa. The humoral response allowed delay of the infection after the inoculation to high lethal doses of P. yoelii yoelii 17XL resulting in a partial protection against malaria disease, although final survival was managed in a low proportion of challenged mice. This approach shows the potential to prevent malaria disease with a set of antigens isolated from blood-stage parasites.

  14. Analysis of CTG repeat length variation in the DMPK gene in the general population and the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Kathlin K; Ishak, Taufik; Lian, Lay-Hoong; Goh, Khean-Jin; Wong, Kum-Thong; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-03-31

    The lack of epidemiological data and molecular diagnostic services in Malaysia has hampered the setting-up of a comprehensive management plan for patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), leading to delayed diagnosis, treatment and support for patients and families. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of DM1 in the 3 major ethnic groups in Malaysia and evaluate the feasibility of a single tube triplet-primed PCR (TP-PCR) method for diagnosis of DM1 in Malaysia. We used PCR to determine the size of CTG repeats in 377 individuals not known to be affected by DM and 11 DM1 suspected patients, recruited from a tertiary hospital in Kuala Lumpur. TP-PCR was performed on selected samples, followed by Southern blot hybridisation of PCR amplified fragments to confirm and estimate the size of CTG expansion. The number of individuals not known to be affected by DM with (CTG) >18 was determined according to ethnic group and as a whole population. The χ 2 test was performed to compare the distribution of (CTG) >18 with 12 other populations. Additionally, the accuracy of TP-PCR in detecting CTG expansion in 11 patients with DM1 was determined by comparing the results with that from Southern blot hybridisation. Of the 754 chromosomes studied, (CTG) >18 frequency of 3.60%, 1.57% and 4.00% in the Malay, Chinese and Indian subpopulations, respectively, was detected, showing similarities to data from Thai, Taiwanese and Kuwaiti populations. We also successfully detected CTG expansions in 9 patients using the TP-PCR method followed by the estimation of CTG expansion size via Southern blot hybridisation. The results show a low DM1 prevalence in Malaysia with the possibility of underdiagnosis and demonstrates the feasibility of using a clinical and TP-PCR-based approach for rapid and cost-effective DM1 diagnosis in developing countries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Screening Donors for Rare Antigen Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F

    2009-01-01

    SCREENING BLOOD DONORS FOR RARE ANTIGEN CONSTELLATIONS HAS BEEN IMPLEMENTED USING SIMPLE PCR METHODS: PCR with enzyme digestion has been used to type donor cohorts for Dombrock antigens, and PCR with sequence-specific priming to identify donors negative for antigens of high frequency. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods as well as their current state is discussed.

  16. Electrophoretic analysis of the "cross-class" interaction between novel inhibitory serpin, squamous cell carcinoma antigen-1 and cysteine proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, S; Nakamura, K; Tanaka, T; Numa, F; Suminami, Y; Tsunaga, N; Kakegawa, H; Katunuma, N; Kato, H

    1997-05-01

    We investigated the "cross-class" interaction between cysteine proteinases and a novel inhibitory serpin, recombinant squamous cell carcinoma (rSCC) antigen-1, which inhibits a serine proteinase, chymotrypsin. rSCC antigen-1 inhibited the cysteine proteinases, papain, papaya proteinase IV and cathepsin L. Interestingly, although rSCC antigen-1 formed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- and heat-stable complexes with chymotrypsin, rSCC antigen-1 gave the 40 kDa fragment and small molecular mass peptide by incubation with papain without forming an SDS- and heat-stable complex. The cleavage was observed between the Gly353-Ser354 bond, indicating that rSCC antigen-1 interacts with cysteine proteinases not at the predicted reactive site P1-P1' portion (Ser354-Ser355), but at the Gly353-Ser354 of the P2-P1 portion. These findings promote understanding of the "suicide inhibition" mechanism of SCC antigen-1 against cysteine proteinases.

  17. Applications of Pharmacogenetics in Revealing Variations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review article presents the latest findings of genetic variations in pharmacological targets related to disorders of major systems such as central nervous system, cardiovascular system, and the respiratory system especially in relation to asthma and the HLA antigen genotype in hypersensitivity reactions. East and Central ...

  18. Molecular distribution, seasonal variation, chemical transformation and sources of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols at remote marine Gosan site, Jeju Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, S.; Kawamura, K.; Lee, M.

    2009-12-01

    : A homologous series of C2-C12 α, ω-dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), pyruvic acid and α-dicarbonyls (C2-C3) were detected in atmospheric aerosols collected between April 2003 and April 2004 from remote marine Gosan site (33°29‧ N, 126°16‧ E) located in Jeju Island, South Korea. They were determined using a GC-FID and GC/MS. Total diacid concentration ranged from 130 to 1911 ng m-3 (av. 642 ng m-3), whereas total oxoacid concentration ranged from 7 to 155 ng m-3 (av. 43 ng m-3), and pyruvic acid and α-dicarbonyls ranged from 0.5 to 15 ng m-3 (av. 5 ng m-3) and 2-108 ng m-3 (av. 17.3 ng m-3), respectively. Oxalic (C2) acid was the most abundant in all seasons followed by malonic (C3) or succinic (C4) acid, and phthalic (Ph) acid. The concentration of diacids decreased with an increase in carbon number except for azelaic (C9) acid, which was more abundant than suberic (C8) acid. Glyoxylic acid was predominant ω-oxoacid contributing to 92% of total ω-oxoacid. Total diacids, oxoacids and dicarbonyls showed maximum concentrations in spring and occasionally in winter, while minimum concentrations were observed in summer. Air mass trajectory analysis suggests that either spring or winter maxima can be explained by strong continental outflow associated with cold front passages, while summer minima are associated with warm southerly flows, which transport clean marine air from low latitudes to Jeju Island. The comparison between total diacid concentration level of this study and other study results of urban and remote sites of East Asia reveals that Gosan site is more heavily influenced by the continental outflow from China. The seasonal variation of malonic/succinic (C3/C4), malic/succinic (hC4/C4), fumaric/maleic (F/M), oxalic/pyruvic (C2/Py) and oxalic/Glyoxal (C2/Gly) ratios showed maxima in summer due to an enhanced photo-production and degradation of diacids and related compounds. Throughout all seasons C3/C4 ratio at Gosan site, located

  19. Diurnal variations of organic molecular tracers and stable carbon isotopic compositions in atmospheric aerosols over Mt. Tai in North China Plain: an influence of biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, P. Q.; Kawamura, K.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Sun, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Tachibana, E.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Okuzawa, K.; Tanimoto, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2012-04-01

    aerosols was due to biomass burning in early June, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 4.3%). In contrast, isoprene SOC was the main contributor (6.6%) to OC, and only 3.0% of the OC was due to biomass burning in late June. In early June, δ13C of TC (-26.6‰ to -23.2‰, mean -25.0‰) were lower than those (-23.9‰ to -21.9‰, mean -22.9‰) in late June. In addition, a strong anti-correlation was found between levoglucosan and δ13C values. This study demonstrates that crop-residue burning activities can significantly enhance the organic aerosol loading and alter the organic molecular compositions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of aerosol particles in the troposphere over North China Plain.

  20. Antigenic profile of heat-killed versus thimerosal-treated Leishmania major using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania is a parasitic protozoan of trypanosomatidae family which causes a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from self-healing cutaneous lesions to deadly visceral forms. In endemic areas, field trials of different preparations of Leishmania total antigen were tested as leishmaniasis vaccine. Two preparations of killed Leishmania major were produced In Iran, which were heat-killed vaccine called autoclaved L. major (ALM and thimerosal-treated freeze-thawed vaccine called killed L. major (KLM. In this study, the protein content of both ALM and KLM were compared with that of freshly harvested intact L. major promastigotes using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Materials and Methods: L. major (MRHO/IR/75/ER from pre-infected Balb/c mice was isolated with modified Novy-MacNeal-Nicolle (NNN medium and then subcultured in liquid RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with fetal calf serum (FCS 20% for mass production. Two preparations of KLM and ALM were produced by Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Iran, under WHO/TDR supervision. Electrophoresis was performed by SDS-PAGE method and the gel was stained by Coomassie brilliant blue dye. The resultant unit bands were compared using standard molecular proteins. Results: Electrophoresis of the two preparations produced many bands from 10 kDa to 100 kDa. KLM bands were much like those of freshly harvested intact L. major. Conclusion: It is concluded that although there are similar bands in the three forms of Leishmania antigens, there are some variations which might be considered for identification and purification of protective immunogens in a total crude antigen, and detection of their stability is essential for the production and marketing of a putative vaccine.

  1. Identification of an Antigen from Normal Human Tissue That Crossreacts with the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, S. Von; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1972-01-01

    A glycoprotein present in normal human tissue is characterized that is neither organ- nor tumor-specific (nonspecific crossreacting antigen) and that crossreacts (by the Ouchterlony double-diffusion technique) with the carcinoembryonic antigen. This immunological relationship indicates common determinants on the molecules of both antigens. We demonstrate that the nonspecific crossreacting antigen is not a fragment of the carcinoembryonic antigen molecule. Images PMID:4115954

  2. Modeling Influenza Antigenic Shift and Drift with LEGO Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boriana Marintcheva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of antigenic shift and drift could be found in almost every microbiology and virology syllabus, usually taught in the context of Influenza virus biology. They are central to understanding viral diversity and evolution and have direct application to anti-flu vaccine design and effectiveness. To aid student understanding of the concepts, I have developed an exercise to visualize the mechanistic aspects of antigenic shift and drift using LEGO bricks. This hands-on/minds-on exercise asks students to replicate viruses taking into account the error-prone nature of Influenza RNA polymerase and to package model virions from a host cell infected with two different Influenza strains, while keeping track of the level of diversity of newly propagated viral particles. The exercise can be executed in any type of classroom for about 10 minutes and if desired, extended to emphasize quantitative skills, molecular biology concepts, or to trigger discussion of key issues in vaccine design.

  3. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, T.; Satake, M.; Robins, T.; Ito, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 10/sup 6/ cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture.

  4. Oral Vaccine Development by Molecular Display Methods Using Microbial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oral vaccines are easier to administer than injectable vaccines. To induce an adequate immune response using vaccines, antigenic proteins are usually combined with adjuvant materials. This chapter presents methodologies for the design of oral vaccines using molecular display technology. In molecular display technology, antigenic proteins are displayed on a microbial cell surface with adjuvant ability. This technology would provide a quite convenient process to produce oral vaccines when the DNA sequence of an efficient antigenic protein is available. As an example, oral vaccines against candidiasis were introduced using two different molecular display systems with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus casei.

  5. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-08-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement.

  6. Multivalent nanomaterials: learning from vaccines and progressing to antigen-specific immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Antunez, Lorena; Sullivan, Bradley P; Thati, Sharadvi; Sestak, Joshua O; Berkland, Cory

    2015-02-01

    Continued development of multivalent nanomaterials has provided opportunities for the advancement of antigen-specific immunotherapies. New insights emerge when considering the backdrop of vaccine design, which has long employed multivalent presentation of antigen to more strongly engage and enhance an immunogenic response. Additionally, vaccines traditionally codeliver antigen with adjuvant to amplify a robust antigen-specific response. Multivalent nanomaterials have since evolved for applications where immune tolerance is desired, such as autoimmune diseases or allergies. In particular, soluble, linear polymers may be tailored to direct antigen-specific immunogenicity or tolerance by modulating polymer length, ligand valency (number), and ligand density, in addition to incorporating secondary signals. Codelivery of a secondary signal may direct, amplify, or suppress the response to a given antigen. Although the ability of multivalent nanomaterials to enact an immune response through molecular mechanisms has been established, a transport mechanism for biodistribution must also be considered. Both mechanisms are influenced by ligand display and other physical properties of the nanomaterial. This review highlights multivalent ligand display on linear polymers, the complex interplay of physical parameters in multivalent design, and the ability to direct the immune response by molecular and transport mechanisms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Molecular Population Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  8. Molecular Population Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  9. An improved gold nanoparticle probe-based assay for HCV core antigen ultrasensitive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui-Qiong; Ji, Chang-Fu; Yang, Xi-Qin; Wang, Rui; Yang, Shu; Zhang, He-Qiu; Zhang, Jin-Gang

    2017-05-01

    A gold nanoparticle probe-based assay (GNPA) was developed for ultrasensitive detection of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen. In the GNPA, after anti-HCV core antigen polyclonal antibodies and single-stranded barcode signal DNA were labeled on gold nanoparticle probe (NP), DNA enzyme was used to degrade the unbound barcode DNAs. The anti-HCV core antigen monoclonal antibodies were coated on magnetic microparticles probe (MMP). Then the NP-HCV core antigen-MMP sandwich immuno-complex was formed when the target antigen protein was added and captured. Magnetically separated, the immuno-complex containing the single-stranded barcode signal DNA was characterized by TaqMan probe based real-time fluorescence PCR. A detection limit of 1 fg/ml was determined for the HCV core antigen which is magnitude greater than that of ELISA (2ng/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) of intra-assay and inter-assay respectively ranged from 0.22-2.62% and 1.92-3.01%. The improved GNPA decreased the interference of unbound barcode DNAs and may be an new way for HCV core antigen detection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Computational prediction of immunodominant antigenic regions & potential protective epitopes for dengue vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Karthikeyan; Gopinath, Krishnasamy; Nandhini, Dharmalingam

    2016-10-01

    Epitope-based vaccines (EVs) are specific, safe and easy to produce. However, vaccine failure has been frequently reported due to variation within epitopic regions. Therefore, development of vaccines based on conserved epitopes may prevent such vaccine failure. This study was undertaken to identify highly conserved antigenic regions in the four dengue serotypes to produce an epitope-based dengue vaccine. Polyprotein sequences of all four dengue serotypes were collected and aligned using MAFFT multiple sequence alignment plugin with Geneious Pro v6.1. Consensus sequences of the polyproteins for all four dengue serotypes were designed and screened against experimentally proven epitopes to predict potential antigenic regions that are conserved among all four dengue serotypes. The antigenic region VDRGWGNGCGLFGKG was 100 per cent conserved in the consensus polyprotein sequences of all four dengue serotypes. Fifteen experimentally proven epitopes were identical to the immunodominant antigenic region. Computationally predicted antigenic regions may be considered for use in the development of EVs for protection against dengue virus. Such vaccines would be expected to provide protection against dengue infections caused by all dengue serotypes because these would contain antigenic regions highly conserved across those serotypes. Therefore, the immunodominant antigenic region (VDRGWGNGCGLFGKG) and 15 potential epitopes may be considered for use in dengue vaccines.

  11. Characterization of entamoeba histolytica antigens in circulating immune complexes in sera of patients with amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, K; Ghosh, P K; Ganguly, S; Das, P; Maitra, T K; Jalan, K N

    2002-09-01

    Isolated circulating immune complexes (CICs) from sera of patients with amoebiasis were characterized to determine Entamoeba histolytica antigens that participate in the disease process. In total, 116 serum samples were collected before starting anti-amoebic therapy, and their CICs were isolated by differential polyethylene glycol precipitation. The presence of amoeba-specific antigens in CICs was detected by antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by immunoblot assay. Antigen capture ELISA showed significantly higher optical density (p amoebiasis than in the normal healthy controls and patients of non-amoebic hepatic disorder. Immunoblot assay detected amoeba-specific CICs in all 18 patients (100%) with confirmed amoebic liver abscess, 28 (80%) of 35 patients with clinically-suspected amoebic liver abscess, and 18 (78.26%) of 23 patients with amoebic colitis. No patients with non-amoebic hepatic disorders and healthy control subjects had any detectable level of amoebic antigens in CICs. Immunoblot assay revealed E. histolytica antigens of relative molecular masses of 35, 56, 70, and 90 kDa present in CICs of 64 of 76 patients with amoebiasis. The 35-kDa polypeptide was observed in 52 patients (81.25%). The results of the study suggest that the 35-kDa polypeptide antigen can be a diagnostic marker in active amoebiasis.

  12. The preparation of Dermatophilus congolensis antigen and its testing by means of immunodiffusion test and electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaenudin Gholib

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The filtrate antigen ofDermatophilus congolensis was prepared based on the Makinde method, whereas the whole cell antigen was based on the Bida and Kelley method. Filtrate antigen of Dermatophilus congolensis has been tested with positive serum from experimental animals, guinea pigs and sheep by means of immurrodiffitsion test and electrophoresis . Positive serum was produced by inoculation of whole cell antigen of D. congolensis to the animals . The results showed that the immunodiffusion test resulted in one and two precipitation lines with positive serum of sheep and guinea pigs respectively. Electrophoresis SDS-PAGE presented about 8 bands with molecular weight in the range from above 30 kD to more than 94 kD. The bands were then transferred into nitrocellulose membrane and gave positive reaction with positive serum from sheep.

  13. Expression of A, G and B melanoma antigen genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Shao, Jun-Bing; Wu, Wei

    2002-11-01

    To observe the expression of the A melanoma antigen (MAGE), G melanoma antigen (GAGE) and B melanoma antigen (BAGE) genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. The MAGE-1,MAGE-3,GAGE1-8,GAGE1-2 and BAGE mRNA lever in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines SMMC-7721, QQY-7701, BEL-7402 were studied by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with biopsied liver tissues. MAGE-1 and BAGE mRNA were expressed in SMMC-7721, MAGE-3 and BAGE in QGY-7701, MAGE-1 and GAGE1-2 in BEL-7402. None of these genes was expressed in biopsied liver tissues. MAGE-1, MAGE-3, GAGE1-8, GAGE1-2 and BAGE were expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, respectively. These tumor-specific antigens can be used as molecular markers and possible targets of immunotherapy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Elucidating the mechanisms of protein antigen adsorption to the CAF/NAF liposomal vaccine adjuvant systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamborg, Mette; Rose, Fabrice; Jorgensen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    is generally known about how antigens and adjuvants interact at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms of interactions between the equally sized, but oppositely charged model protein antigens α-lactalbumin and lysozyme, and i) the clinically tested cationic liposomal......The reverse vaccinology approach has recently resulted in the identification of promising protein antigens, which in combination with appropriate adjuvants can stimulate customized, protective immune responses. Although antigen adsorption to adjuvants influences vaccine efficacy and safety, little...... interaction with the zwitterionic liposomes. In contrast, the net cationic lysozyme showed very little interaction with either types of liposome. Adsorption of α-lactalbumin altered its tertiary structure, affected lipid membrane packing below and above the phase transition temperature, and neutralized...

  15. [Reaction of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana antigens by sera of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis from Sinaloa, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Mejía, Patricia Guadalupe; Tejeda-Aguirre, Celia Rosa; López-Moreno, Héctor Samuel

    2010-01-01

    To detect Leishmania mexicana antigens reacting with sera of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). A crude extract of L. mexicana was used as antigen for 2-D Western blot using sera from 5 patients with CL and controls from Sinaloa, Mexico during 2008. Five antigens were detected in the five infected patients analyzed; their molecular weights and isoelectric points were: 26 kDa (pI 7.8), 27 kDa (pI 8.1), 28 kDa (pI 8.6), 29 kDa (pI 8.5) and 31 kDa (pI 9.0). New potentially immunodominant L. mexicana antigens were detected, suggesting that this parasite could be the species responsible for human infection in Sinaloa.

  16. HIV immune evasion disruption of antigen presentation by the HIV Nef protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlich, Elizabeth R; Leonard, Jolie A; Collins, Kathleen L

    2011-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Nef protein is necessary for high viral loads and for timely progression to AIDS. Nef plays a number of roles, but its effect on antigen presentation and immune evasion are among the best characterized. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize and lyse virally infected cells by detecting viral antigens in complex with host major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on the infected cell surface. The HIV Nef protein disrupts antigen presentation at the cell surface by interfering with the normal trafficking pathway of MHC-I and thus reduces CTL recognition and lysis of infected cells. The molecular mechanism by which Nef causes MHC-I downmodulation is becoming more clear, but some questions remain. A better understanding of how Nef disrupts antigen presentation may lead to the development of drugs that enhance the ability of the anti-HIV CTLs to control HIV disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation between expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and that of antigen presenting machineries in carcinoma cell lines of the pancreas, biliary tract and colon

    OpenAIRE

    Imanishi, Tatsuya; Kamigaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsu; Hayashi, Shun; Yasuda, Takashi; Kawasaki, Kentaro; Takase, Shiro; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Kuroda, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    To elicit a tumor immune response, tumor antigens represented by majorhistocompatibility (MHC) class I complex on the cell surface is indispensable. Someinvestigators demonstrated that many cancer cells reduce expression ofβ2-microglobulin, a transporter of antigen presenting (TAP) or low molecular protein(LMP), due to the deletion mutant or point mutation. We investigated gene expressionlevels of antigen presenting machineries in 13 cell lines of the pancreas, biliary tractand colon cancer b...

  18. Molecular marker applications in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Alice C; Tollenaere, Reece; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Batley, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Individuals within a population of a sexually reproducing species will have some degree of heritable genomic variation caused by mutations, insertion/deletions (INDELS), inversions, duplications, and translocations. Such variation can be detected and screened using molecular, or genetic, markers. By definition, molecular markers are genetic loci that can be easily tracked and quantified in a population and may be associated with a particular gene or trait of interest. This chapter will review the current major applications of molecular markers in plants.

  19. Antigenicity of Dermatophilus congolensis hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalka, B; Pospísil, L

    1993-05-01

    The separated cell-free form of hemolytic exosubstance was obtained from five strains of Dermatophilus congolensis. Three strains produced exosubstance with high activity, two strains produced exosubstance with lower intensity of activity. The separated forms exhibited the same hemolytic interactions as the native forms produced by growing strains, namely the antagonism with staphylococcal beta hemolysin and the synergism with staphylococcal delta hemolysin, streptococcal CAMP factor and rhodococcal equi factor. Rabbit sera obtained after intravenous or intraperitoneal application of the separated forms contained precipitation and neutralization antibodies. Cross tests of precipitation and neutralization proved antigen identity of hemolysins of different D. congolensis, strains which makes the serodiagnostics of this species possible.

  20. Recent advances in the genomic and molecular biology of Giardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Pierres, M Guadalupe; Jex, Aaron R; Ansell, Brendan R E; Svärd, Staffan G

    2017-09-06

    Giardia duodenalis is the most common gastrointestinal protozoan parasite of humans and a significant contributor to the global burden of both diarrheal disease and post-infectious chronic disorders. Robust tools for analyzing gene function in this parasite have been developed and a range of genetic tools are now available. These together with public databases have provided insights on the function of different genes in Giardia. In this review we provide a current perspective on different molecular aspects of Giardia related to genomics, regulation of encystation, trophozoite transcriptional responses to physiological and xenobiotic (drug-induced) stress, and mechanisms of drug resistance. We also examine recent insights that have contributed to gain knowledge in the study of VSPs, antigenic variation, epigenetics, DNA repair and in the direct manipulation of gene function in Giardia, with a particular focus on the inducible Cre/loxP system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Isolation of Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyer, G V

    1980-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens were isolated from intact worms in the cold by using Nonidet P-40. Proof of the tegumental nature of the antigens was shown by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical technique at the light microscope level. The potential of F. hepatica tegument antigens for the immunodiagnosis of rabbit and human fascioliasis was shown by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, although cross-reactivity was evident in one of six serum samples from patients infected with Schi...

  2. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  3. New monoclonal antibodies to rat testicular antigen, TEC-21

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 180-182 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA204/00/0204; GA ČR GA310/00/0205; GA AV ČR IAA5052005; GA AV ČR IAA7052006; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : monoclonal antibody * GPI-anchored * testicular antigen Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  4. Identification and localization of a soluble antigen, Ag2, of 136 kDa from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Grellier, P; Theander, T G

    1991-01-01

    as a duplet with molecular masses of 136 and 120 kDa when tested by immunoblotting. Immunoprecipitation experiments on Triton X-100 extracted antigens from synchronized cultures showed that the antigen was synthesized in the schizont stage. Ag2 was located near the surface of schizonts in the parasitophorous...

  5. Shedding of leukemia-associated P24 antigen by lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Y; Ochiai, H; Shimizu, K; Azuma, E; Kamiya, H; Sakurai, M

    1987-12-01

    We report the development of a unique enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) which makes possible the detection of leukemia-associated P24 antigen, utilizing its ability to bind the Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1) and a monoclonal antibody, SJ-9A4 simultaneously. Using the RCA1/SJ-9A4-ELISA, P24 antigen, as few as 50 X 10(3) cells from a common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (C-ALL) cell line could be detected. The presence of D-galactose gave complete and specific inhibition of P24 antigen binding to RCA1. Matched concentrations of D-glucose and D-sucrose had no effect on binding. The release of the P24 antigen into the culture medium by a C-ALL cell line maintained at 37 degrees C could be detected; however, no P24 antigen was present in the culture medium when the cells were maintained at 4 degrees C. Sequential analysis of the culture medium for soluble P24 antigen revealed that release of the P24 antigen associated with cell growth. Molecular sieve chromatography of concentrated culture medium indicated that shed P24 antigen was eluted in the macromolecule fraction. P24 antigen was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of four patients with P24 positive ALL at the time of relapse of the central nervous system (CNS) and was undetectable while in complete remission. The CSF from three patients with P24 negative ALL and three patients with aseptic meningitis had no detectable activity.

  6. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from [ 35 S]methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of ≅72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO 4 /PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation

  7. Antigenically diverse swine-origin H1N1 variant influenza viruses exhibit differential ferret pathogenesis and transmission phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A; Jones, Joyce; Sun, Xiangjie; Jang, Yunho; Thor, Sharmi; Belser, Jessica A; Zanders, Natosha; Creager, Hannah M; Ridenour, Callie; Wang, Li; Stark, Thomas J; Garten, Rebecca; Chen, Li-Mei; Barnes, John; Tumpey, Terrence M; Wentworth, David E; Maines, Taronna R; Davis, C Todd

    2018-03-14

    Influenza A(H1) viruses circulating in swine represent an emerging virus threat as zoonotic infections occur sporadically following exposure to swine. A fatal infection caused by an H1N1 variant (H1N1v) virus was detected in a patient with reported exposure to swine and who presented with pneumonia, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest. To understand the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the virus, genome sequence analysis, antigenic characterization, and ferret pathogenesis and transmissibility experiments were performed. Antigenic analysis of the virus isolated from the fatal case, A/Ohio/09/2015, demonstrated significant antigenic drift away from classical swine H1N1 variant viruses and H1N1 pandemic 2009 viruses. A substitution in the H1 hemagglutinin (G155E) was identified that likely impacted antigenicity, and reverse genetics was employed to understand the molecular mechanism of antibody escape. Reversion of the substitution to 155G, in a reverse genetics A/Ohio/09/2015 virus, showed that this residue was central to the loss of hemagglutination inhibition by ferret antisera raised against a prototypical H1N1 pandemic 2009 virus (A/California/07/2009), as well as gamma lineage classical swine H1N1 viruses, demonstrating the importance of this residue for antibody recognition of this H1 lineage. When analyzed in the ferret model, A/Ohio/09/2015 and another H1N1v virus (A/Iowa/39/2015), as well as A/California/07/2009, replicated efficiently in the respiratory tract of ferrets. The two H1N1v viruses transmitted efficiently among cohoused ferrets, but respiratory droplet transmission studies showed that A/California/07/2009 transmitted through the air more efficiently. Pre-existing immunity to A/California/07/2009 did not fully protect ferrets from challenge with A/Ohio/09/2015. IMPORTANCE Human infections with classical swine influenza A(H1N1) viruses that circulate in pigs continue to occur in the United States following exposure to swine. To

  8. Variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  9. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the Parasite Surface Antigen-2 of Leishmania major

    OpenAIRE

    "AR Khabiri; F Bagheri; SR Naddaf; M Assmar; A Hosseini Taghavi"

    2004-01-01

    The Leishmania major Parasite surface Antigen-2 (PSA-2) is a family of glycoinositol phospholipids anchored glycoprotoins expressed in both promastigotes and amastigotes. Promastigote PSA-2 comprises three polypeptides with approximate molecular weight of 96, 80 and 50 kDa. Amastigote express a distinct but closely PSA-2 polypeptide with molecular weight of 50 kDa. In this study fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells with immunized mice spleenocytes infected with promastigotes of L. major intraperiton...

  10. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  11. Combination of cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen can improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease.......The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease....

  12. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bouchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN, were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA or pertussis toxin (PT deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells.

  13. Cell-wall composition and the grouping antigens of Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLADE, H D; SLAMP, W C

    1962-08-01

    Slade, Hutton D. (Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Ill.) and William C. Slamp. Cell-wall composition and grouping antigens of streptococci. J. Bacteriol. 84:345-351. 1962.-The carbohydrates present in the cell walls of streptococci belonging to serological groups A-H and K-S, and unclassifiable strains, have been identified. The sugars found were rhamnose, glucose, galactose, arabinose, and mannose. All sugars vary considerably in their distribution among the groups; glucose, galactose, and rhamnose occur most frequently. Strains were found which contained each of the latter sugars singly or in combination with one or both of the other sugars. Variation within a single group occurred in one-half of the groups. A strain containing only glucose and another only galactose were found. Except for groups A and C, in which only rhamnose is present in the great majority of strains, the presence or absence of the sugars does not aid in the identification of the groups. The cell walls of all groups examined also contained alanine, glutamic acid, lysine, glucosamine, galactosamine, and muramic acid. The cell walls of all groups, except D, agglutinated in the presence of specific group antisera, indicating the presence of the group antigen in the cell wall. Strains in groups F, K, and M gave a weak reaction. The structure and chemical composition of the group antigens of the streptococci are discussed.

  14. Coeliac disease and rheumatoid arthritis: similar mechanisms, different antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Frits; Thomas, Ranjeny; Rossjohn, Jamie; Toes, Rene E

    2015-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coeliac disease are inflammatory diseases that both have a strong association with class II HLAs: individuals carrying HLA-DQ2.5 and/or HLA-DQ8 alleles have an increased risk of developing coeliac disease, whereas those carrying HLA-DR shared epitope alleles exhibit an increased risk of developing RA. Although the molecular basis of the association with specific HLA molecules in RA remains poorly defined, an immune response against post-translationally modified protein antigens is a hallmark of each disease. In RA, understanding of the pathogenetic role of B-cell responses to citrullinated antigens, including vimentin, fibrinogen and α-enolase, is rapidly growing. Moreover, insight into the role of HLAs in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease has been considerably advanced by the identification of T-cell responses to deamidated gluten antigens presented in conjunction with predisposing HLA-DQ2.5 molecules. This article briefly reviews these advances and draws parallels between the immune mechanisms leading to RA and coeliac disease, which point to a crucial role for T-cell-B-cell cooperation in the development of full-blown disease. Finally, the ways in which these novel insights are being exploited therapeutically to re-establish tolerance in patients with RA and coeliac disease are described.

  15. Hepatitis B surface antigen variants in voluntary blood donors in Nanjing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-lin Yang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is still one of the serious infectious risks for the blood transfusion safety in China. One plausible reason is the emergence of the variants in the major antigenic alpha determinant within the major hydrophilic region (MHR of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, which have been assumed to evade the immune surveillance and pose a challenge to the disease diagnosis. It is well documented that some commercial ELISA kits could detect the wild-type but not the mutant viruses. The high prevalence of HBV in China also impaired the application of nucleic acid testing (NAT in the improvement of blood security. Molecular epidemiological study of HBsAg variations in China is still limited. This study was designed to identify the prevalence of mutations in the HBsAg in voluntary blood donors in Nanjing, China. Methods A total of 20,326 blood units were enrolled in this study, 39 donors were positive for HBV S gene in the nested-PCR. Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR; aa 99-169 were identified by direct sequencing of S region. Results Among of 20,326 blood units in the Red Cross Transfusion Center of Nanjing from October 2008 to April 2009, 296 samples (1.46%, 296/20,326 were HBsAg positive in the 2 successive rounds of the ELISA test. In these HBsAg positive units, HBV S gene could be successfully amplified from 39 donors (13.18%, 39/296 in the nested-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that 32 strains (82.1%, 32/39 belong to genotype B, 7 strains (17.9%, 7/39 to genotype C. Besides well known G145R, widely dispersed variations in the MHR of S region, were observed in 20 samples of all the strains sequenced. Conclusions HBV/B and HBV/C are dominant in Nanjing, China. The mutations in the MHR of HBsAg associated with disease diagnosis are common.

  16. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  17. Diagnostic Values of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cancer Antigen 15-3 and Cancer Antigen 125 Levels in Nipple Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Gai, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongmei; Liang, Weili; Gao, Haidong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Ma, Rong

    2015-12-31

    An expedient and cost-effective diagnostic tool is needed to complement galactography and exfoliative cytology for detection of benign or malignant breast diseases with nipple discharge. The aim of this prospective study is to explore the utility of carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 and cancer antigen 125 levels in nipple discharge for the diagnosis of various breast diseases. We evaluated the pre-operative tumor marker levels in 153 nipple discharge samples collected from one or both breasts of 142 women undergoing surgery. Patients with nipple discharge underwent auxiliary examination (ultrasonography, exfoliative cytology, ductoscopy and galactography). Statistically higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 were found in patients in the malignant group as compared to those in the benign group. No statistically significant difference in the level of cancer antigen 125 (P = 0.895). Sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 for diagnosing breast cancer were 74.42% and 58.14%, and specificities were 87.27% and 80.00% where as the cutoff values with max-sum of sensitivity and specificity were 224.3 ng/ml and 1368.2 U/ml, respectively. The following sensitivities for telling malignant from benign could be determined: exfoliative cytology 46.67%, ultrasonography 76.74%, galactography 75.00%, and ductoscopy 0%. Exfoliative cytology was found to be a valuable alternative method for differentiating benign from malignancy. Thus, tumor marker analysis of nipple discharge fluid for carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 would enhance the accurate assessment and treatment planning for patients with nipple discharge.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  19. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antigen level New England Journal of Medicine 2004;350(22):2239-2246. [PubMed Abstract] Barry ... antigen testing for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. New England Journal of Medicine 2001;344(18):1373-1377. [PubMed Abstract] Pinsky ...

  20. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    1. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a single test,. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antigens and antibodies, not ... considered above threshold of detection for antigen proteins suggested a lack of sensitivity by this assay ..... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (sinusoidal.

  1. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination

  2. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  3. Antigenic heterogeneity of capsid protein VP1 in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV serotype Asia1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam SM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available SM Sabbir Alam,1 Ruhul Amin,1 Mohammed Ziaur Rahman,2 M Anwar Hossain,1 Munawar Sultana11Department of Microbiology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, BangladeshAbstract: Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV, with its seven serotypes, is a highly contagious virus infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. The serotype Asia1 occurs mainly in Asian regions. An in-silico approach was taken to reveal the antigenic heterogeneities within the capsid protein VP1 of Asia1. A total of 47 VP1 sequences of Asia1 isolates from different countries of South Asian regions were selected, retrieved from database, and were aligned. The structure of VP1 protein was modeled using a homology modeling approach. Several antigenic sites were identified and mapped onto the three-dimensional protein structure. Variations at these antigenic sites were analyzed by calculating the protein variability index and finding mutation combinations. The data suggested that vaccine escape mutants have derived from only few mutations at several antigenic sites. Five antigenic peptides have been identified as the least variable epitopes, with just fewer amino acid substitutions. Only a limited number of serotype Asia1 antigenic variants were found to be circulated within the South Asian region. This emphasizes a possibility of formulating synthetic vaccines for controlling foot-and-mouth disease by Asia1 serotypes.Keywords: protein modeling, antigenic sites, sequence variation

  4. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  5. The antigenic identity of human class I MHC phosphopeptides is critically dependent upon phosphorylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Fiyaz; Stones, Daniel H; Zarling, Angela L; Willcox, Carrie R; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Cummings, Kara L; Hunt, Donald F; Cobbold, Mark; Engelhard, Victor H; Willcox, Benjamin E

    2017-08-15

    Dysregulated post-translational modification provides a source of altered self-antigens that can stimulate immune responses in autoimmunity, inflammation, and cancer. In recent years, phosphorylated peptides have emerged as a group of tumour-associated antigens presented by MHC molecules and recognised by T cells, and represent promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. However, the impact of phosphorylation on the antigenic identity of phosphopeptide epitopes is unclear. Here we examined this by determining structures of MHC-bound phosphopeptides bearing canonical position 4-phosphorylations in the presence and absence of their phosphate moiety, and examining phosphopeptide recognition by the T cell receptor (TCR). Strikingly, two peptides exhibited major conformational changes upon phosphorylation, involving a similar molecular mechanism, which focussed changes on the central peptide region most critical for T cell recognition. In contrast, a third epitope displayed little conformational alteration upon phosphorylation. In addition, binding studies demonstrated TCR interaction with an MHC-bound phosphopeptide was both epitope-specific and absolutely dependent upon phosphorylation status. These results highlight the critical influence of phosphorylation on the antigenic identity of naturally processed class I MHC epitopes. In doing so they provide a molecular framework for understanding phosphopeptide-specific immune responses, and have implications for the development of phosphopeptide antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy approaches.

  6. Association of Alport's syndrome with HLA-DR2 antigen in a group of unrelated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Donadi

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A few family studies have evaluated HLA antigens in Alport's syndrome; however, there are no large population studies. In the present report, we studied 40 unrelated white patients with Alport's syndrome seen at the Unit of Renal Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were typed using a complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxicity assay. A control white population (N = 403 from the same geographical area was also typed for HLA antigens. Although the frequencies of HLA-A and -B antigens of patients were not statistically different from controls, the frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen observed in patients (65% was significantly increased in relation to controls (26%; P<0.001. The relative risk and etiologic fraction for HLA-DR2 antigen were 5.2 and 0.525, respectively. Although few immunological abnormalities have been shown in Alport's syndrome, in this report we emphasize the association of HLA molecules and Alport's syndrome. Besides the well-known inherited molecular defects encoded by type IV collagen genes in Alport's syndrome, the major histocompatibility alleles may be in linkage disequilibrium with these defective collagen genes

  7. The effects of Ostertagia occidentalis somatic antigens on ovine TLR2 and TLR4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan BORJI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recognition of helminth-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, including toll like recep­tors (TLRs is the first step towards initiating anti–helminth immune re­sponses.Methods: Using somatic antigens of Ostertagia occidentalis, an important abomasal parasite of ruminants, the expression of ovine TLR2 and TLR4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was analyzed by real-time quatitative reverse-transcrip­tion polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis were prepared to stimulate ovine PBMCs in a time and dose dependent manner.Results: A high expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in PBMCs cultured with somatic antigens of the parasites specially when PBMCs were cultured with 100 µg/ml of somatic antigens and incubated for 2h. Up-regulation of TLR2 expres­sion was more pronounced and evident in our study.Conclsusion: Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis have immunostimulatory and domi­nant role on peripheral immune cells. This study provide for the first time evidence of induction of TLRs in ovine PBMCs by somatic antigen of O. occidentalis

  8. HA03 as an Iranian Candidate Concealed Antigen for Vaccination against Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum: Comparative Structural and In silico Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades researchers had focused on developing a vaccine against tick based on protective antigen. Recombinant vaccines based on concealed antigen from Boophilus microplus have been developed in Australia and Cuba by the name of TICKGARD and GAVAC (De La Fuente and Kocan, 2006. Further studies on this antigen have shown some extent of protection against other species (De Vos et al., 2001. In Iran most important species is Hyalomma anatolicum and limited information about its control are available. This paper reports structural and polymorphic analysis of HA03 as an Iranian candidate concealed antigen of H. a. anatolicum deposited in Gen-Bank .(Aghaeipour et al. GQ228820. The comparison between this antigen and other mid gut concealed antigen that their characteristics are available in GenBank showed there are high rate of similarity between them. The HA03 amino acid sequence had a homology of around 89%, 64%, 56% with HA98, BM86, BM95 respectively. Potential of MHC class I and II binding region indicated a considerable variation between BM86 antigen and its efficiency against Iranian H. a. anatolicum. In addition, predicted major of hydrophobisity and similarity in N-glycosylation besides large amount of cystein and seven EGF like regions presented in protein structure revealed that value of HA03 as a new protective antigen and the necessity of the development, BM86 homolog of H. a. anatolicum HA03 based recombinant vaccine.

  9. Evolutionary significance of epigenetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, C.L.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Bossdorf, O.; Wendel, J.F.; Greilhuber, J.; Dolezel, J.; Leitch, I.J.

    2012-01-01

    Several chapters in this volume demonstrate how epigenetic work at the molecular level over the last few decades has revolutionized our understanding of genome function and developmental biology. However, epigenetic processes not only further our understanding of variation and regulation at the

  10. Study of the antigenic cross reactivity between carcinoembryonic antigen and "nonspecific cross reacting antigens" (NCA and NCA 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, T.; Staebler, D.; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1975-01-01

    The immunochemical relationship between CEA, NCA and NCA 2 was studied in guinea-pigs. Strong cross reactions were found between these antigens, either in delayed or anaphylactic reactions. Some specific determinants for each antigen could still be demonstrated. Delayed hypersensitivity is likely to be due to the protein moiety of the molecules while anaphylactic reactivity could probably be related to their glucidic parts. Consequently, CEA and NCA have common antigenic determinants on their glucidic and peptidic moieties, perhaps more on the latter ones. PMID:50854

  11. HSP: bystander antigen in atopic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost A Aalberse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years insight in the complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity in the regulation of an inflammatory response has increased enormously. This has revived the interest in stress proteins; proteins that are expressed during cell stress. As these proteins can attract and trigger an immunological response they can act as important mediators in this interaction. In this respect, of special interest are proteins that may act as modulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are stress proteins that have these, and more, characteristics. More than two decades of studies on HSPs has revealed that they are part of intrinsic, natural mechanisms that steer inflammation. This has provoked comprehensive explorations of the role of HSPs in various human inflammatory diseases.Most studies have focused on classical autoimmune diseases. This has led to the development of clinical studies with HSPs that have shown promise in Phase II/III clinical trials. Remarkably, only very little is yet known of the role of HSPs in atopic diseases. In allergic disease a number of studies have investigated the possibility that allergen-specific regulatory T cell (Treg function is defective in individuals with allergic diseases. This raises the question whether methods can be identified to improve the Treg repertoire. Studies from other inflammatory diseases have suggested HSPs may have such a beneficial effect on the T cell repertoire. Based on the immune mechanisms of atopic diseases, in this review we will argue that, as in other human inflammatory conditions, understanding immunity to HSPs is likely also relevant for atopic diseases. Specifically, we will discuss why certain HSPs such as HSP60 connect the immune response to environmental antigens with regulation of the inflammatory response.Thus they provide a molecular link that may eventually even help to better understand the immune pathological basis of the hygiene

  12. Distinct patterns of blood-stage parasite antigens detected by plasma IgG subclasses from individuals with different level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Cathrine Holm; Brahimi, Karima; Vandahl, Brian

    2010-01-01

    then gradually develop into protective response dominated by cytophilic IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies. METHODS: Naturally occurring IgG antibodies against P. falciparum blood-stage antigens were analysed from plasma samples collected from four groups of individuals differing in age and level of exposure to P....... falciparum infections. Western Blot profiling of blood-stage parasite antigens displaying reactivity with individual plasma samples in terms of their subclass specificities was conducted. Parasite antigens detected by IgG were grouped based on their apparent molecular sizes resolved by SDS-PAGE as high...... groups of individuals with different levels of exposure to P. falciparum infections. RESULTS: IgG4 and IgM antibodies in plasma samples from all groups detected very few parasite antigens. IgG2 antibodies from all groups detected a common pattern of high molecular weight parasite antigens. Cytophilic Ig...

  13. Genetic and antigenic analysis of the G attachment protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvander, M.; Vilcek, S.; Baule, C.

    1998-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic studies of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were made on isolates obtained from three continents over 27 years. Antigenic variation between eight isolates was initially determined using protein G-specific monoclonal antibodies. Four distinct reaction patterns were...... of a 731 nucleotide fragment in the G protein gene. Nine of the BRSV strains were analysed by direct sequencing of RT-PCR amplicons whereas sequences of 18 BRSV and three human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were obtained from GenBank. The analysis revealed similarities of 88-100% among BRSV...

  14. Antigenic and genetic homogeneity of Streptococcus uberis strains from the bovine udder.

    OpenAIRE

    Groschup, M. H.; Hahn, G.; Timoney, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    DNA- fingerprints (Hind III) of Streptococcus uberis field isolates from New York State and Europe showed substantial homogeneity, but were different to those of the type strain of the newly proposed psychrophilic species S. parauberis. S. uberis strains had major SDS-heat extracted antigens of molecular masses (Mr) less than 14, 40-41, 42-43, 59-61, 80-86 and 118-122 kDa following immunoblotting with rabbit hyperimmune sera. Bovine sera and milk reacted with the 40-41 and 118-122 kDa antigen...

  15. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  17. Indirect haemagglutination reaction with Sarcocystis dispersa antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Cerná, Z

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the preparation of antigen from Sarcocystis dispersa cystozoites and the procedure of the indirect haemagglutination test (IHA). The antibodies against this antigen were detected in experimentally infected mice from day 20 p.i. (1: 640). In the following weeks the antibody titres reached the value of 1: 40,960. The sera of pigs, sheep and horses spontaneously infected with other Sarcocystis species reacted with this antigen in low titres only. The bovine sera gave negative reactions even in cases when Sarcocystis cysts were present in the muscles of the examined animals. A possible application of IHA for the research and diagnostic purposes is discussed.

  18. How T lymphocytes see antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2009-03-01

    Complex organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that enables us to do battle with diverse pathogens. This flexible system can also go awry, and many diseases are the direct consequence of the adaptive immune system failing to discriminate between markers of self and non-self. The orchestrators of adaptive immunity are a class of cells called T lymphocytes (T cells). T cells recognize minute numbers of molecular signatures of pathogens, and T cell recognition of these molecular markers of non-self is both specific and degenerate. The specific (yet, cross-reactive), diverse, and self-tolerant T cell repertoire is designed in the thymus. I will describe how an approach that brings together theoretical and computational studies (rooted in statistical physics) with experiments (carried out by key collaborators) has allowed us to shed light on the mechanistic principles underlying how T cells respond to pathogens in a digital fashion (``on'' or ``off''), and how this molecular machinery coupled with frustration (a la spin glasses) plays a key role in designing the special properties of the T cell repertoire during development in the thymus.

  19. A low molecular weight ES-20 protein released in vivo and in vitro with diagnostic potential in lymph node tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shende N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine role of antigens released in vivo and in vitro in immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. Methods: In vivo released circulating tuberculosis antigen (CTA was obtained from TB sera by ammonium sulphate precipitation and in vitro released excretory-secretory (ES antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate. CTA and ES antigens were fractionated by SDS-PAGE and electro-eluted gel fractions were analysed for antigen by ELISA. Results: Low molecular weight proteins CTA-9 and ES-9 showed high titre of antigen activity. To explore the diagnostic potential of low molecular weight ES antigen, M. tuberculosis ES antigen was further fractionated by gel filtration chromatography followed by purification on anion exchange column using fast protein liquid chromatography and a highly seroreactive ESG-5D (ES-20 antigen was obtained. Competitive inhibition showed that CTA-9 and ES-9 antigens inhibit the binding of ES-20 antigen to its antibody. Seroanalysis showed sensitivity of 83 and 80% for ES-20 antigen and antibody detection, respectively, in pulmonary TB and 90% in lymph node TB. Conclusions: Seroreactivity studies using M. tuberculosis ES-20 antigen showed usefulness in detection of TB; in particular, lymph node TB.

  20. Tissue polypeptide antigen activity in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, F; Söletormos, Georg; Dombernowsky, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue polypeptide antigen (TPpA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was measured in 59 consecutive breast cancer patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Subsequently, we determined that 13 patients had parenchymal brain metastases, 10 had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis...

  1. HLA antigens in three populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiha, S S; Wentzel, J; Shah, K C; Roberts, D F

    1989-01-01

    In blood samples from a Hindu population of Uttar Pradesh (North India) and from two Muslim groups, one from Andhra Pradesh (South India) and the other from Gujurat (West India), frequencies of 38 HLA-A, -B and -C antigens were investigated. Eight antigens - A23, A25, A29, A32, Bw45, B21, Bw22 and Bw53 - were absent in the Hindu population, four different antigens - A29, Bw52, B14 and Bw42 - were absent in Hyderabad Muslims, two antigens - A31 and Bw45 - were lacking in Surat Muslims. The three populations showed considerable genetic heterogeneity. The genetic difference between the two Muslim groups was small, but the Hindu population showed pronounced differences from each of the Muslim groups.

  2. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... determined by a colorimetric method. (2) The phenol content for Pullorum Tube Antigen shall be 0.55 ±0.05 percent as determined by direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution. (d) Sensitivity...

  3. Carcinoembryonic antigen in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissel, M.; Hoefer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the usefulness of determining the serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a specific tumor marker in thyroid cancer, CEA serum levels were measured (enzymeimmunoassay, Abbott-Kit) repeatedly at the routine followup checks performed at various intervals after total thyroidectomy, in 65 patients with papillary, 82 with follicular, 25 with mixed type (papillary/follicular), 8 with anaplastic, and in 18 patients with medullary thyroid cancer. The postoperative observation period of these patients ranged from 2 to 36 months. Calcitonin serum levels were additionally determined in patients with medullary carcinoma (radioimmunoassay kit of Immuno-Nuclear Corp.). In the family of one patient with medullary carcinoma we also had an opportunity to investigate, within the framework of family screening (pentagastrin tests, etc.), the value of preoperative CEA determination. In the patients with ''non-medullary'' histological types of thyroid cancer, the maximum CEA serum concentration was 9.8 ng/ml. 6% of the patients with papillary, 9% of the patients with follicular, and 8% of those with mixed type thyroid cancer had serum levels above the upper limit of our normal range (5 ng/ml). All patients with anaplastic carcinoma had values below 3 ng/ml. The values quoted represent maximal values and were confirmed at various follow-up checks. However, 1 year after thyroidectomy, a female patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma developed an adenocarcinoma of the rectum: The CEA levels measured in this patient were: 4.2 ng/ml 3 weeks after thyroidectomy, 8.4 ng/ml 6 months later, and 37 ng/ml 1 week before operation on the rectum. In none of the other patients with elevated CEA levels were metastases of thyroid cancer, or any other malignancy, detected. (orig.) [de

  4. Molecular phosphates and siloxanes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    which represent the building units in zeolites and molecular sieves. The similarities and the variations in these molecules which could lead to the formation of the materials and the presence of plausible reactive groups which make the compounds susceptible to various reaction conditions are discussed. References. 1.

  5. Allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article literature review of the causes of allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens are presented. It is shown that the ability to produce antierythrocyte antibodies is affected by many factors, principal of whom it is difficult to identify. For the allosensibilisation development requires genetically determined differences in erythrocyte antigens phenotypes of donor and recipient, mother and fetus, which can lead to immune response and antibodies production. The biochemical nature of erythrocyte antigens, antigen dose (the amount of transfused doses, the number of antigens determinants on donor and fetus erythrocytes, the number of pregnancies are important. Individual patient characteristics: age, gender, diseases, the use of immunosuppressive therapy and the presence of inflammatory processes, are also relevant. Note that antibody to one erythrocyte antigens have clinical value, and to the other – have no. The actual data about frequency of clinically significant antibodies contribute to the development of post-transfusion hemolytic complications prophylaxis as well as the improvement of laboratory diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the newborn in the presence of maternal antierythrocyte antibodies.

  6. [Antigenic relations of several strains of Naegleria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaur, E; Alonso, P

    1987-02-01

    In previous papers different aspects of one strain of Naegleria lovaniensis (Aq/9/1/45D) and two strains of N. gruberi (1518/le and 1518/lf) have been studied. From the results obtained it can be concluded that each strain behaves differently; no more similarities have been found between both N. gruberi strains, than between each of these and N. lovaniensis. Such an event has prompted us to characterize their antigenic relationships by means of an immunoprecipitation assay (double diffusion in plate). Each antiserum was tested against the different antigenic extracts. For N. lovaniensis, besides the whole extract, two fractions (particulate and soluble) and their respective antisera were assayed separately. No reaction occurred between any of the anti-N. lovaniensis sera and either of the two N. gruberi extracts. The antiserum to N. gruberi 1518/lf reacted only with its homologue and with N. lovaniensis antigens. Both N. lovaniensis fractions share some antigenic components being more complex the antigenic structure of the soluble fraction. Therefore no more similarities occur between both N. gruberi strains than between each one and N. lovaniensis, rather N. gruberi 1518/le exhibits more antigenic relationships with N. lovaniensis than with 1518/lf strains. In view of such results the species N. gruberi should be taxonomically reconsidered, criterium shared by other authors.

  7. Identification of Mycobacterium bovis antigens by analysis of bovine T-cell responses after infection with a virulent strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alito A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification and characterization of individual antigenic proteins are essential for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of mycobacteria and the immune response against them. In the present study, we used anion-exchange chromatography to fractionate cell extracts and culture supernatant proteins from Mycobacterium bovis to identify T-cell-stimulating antigens. These fractions were incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from M. bovis-infected cattle in lymphoproliferation assays. This procedure does not denature proteins and permits the testing of mixtures of potential antigens that could be later identified. We characterized protein fractions with high stimulation indices from both culture supernatants and cell extracts. Proteins were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by N-terminal sequencing or MALDI-TOF. Culture supernatant fractions containing low molecular weight proteins such as ESAT6 and CFP10 and other proteins (85B, MPB70, and the novel antigens TPX and TRB-B were associated with a high stimulation index. These results reinforce the concept that some low molecular weight proteins such as ESAT6 and CFP10 play an important role in immune responses. Also, Rv3747 and L7/L12 were identified in high stimulation index cell extract fractions. These data show that protein fractions with high lymphoproliferative activity for bovine PBMC can be characterized and antigens which have been already described and new protein antigens can also be identified in these fractions.

  8. Cancer vaccines: an update with special focus on ganglioside antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Roberto J; Guthmann, Marcel D; Gabri, Mariano R; Carnero, Ariel J L; Alonso, Daniel F; Fainboim, Leonardo; Gomez, Daniel E

    2002-01-01

    the Inmunologia Molecular> (CIM) from La Havana, Cuba, to developed new strategies for specific active immunotherapy. The project included two ganglioside based vaccines and one anti-idiotypic vaccine. We focused on two antigens: first GM3, an ubiquitous antigen which is over-expressed in several epithelial tumor types; and a second one, N-Glycolyl-GM3 a more molecule, not being expressed in normal tissues and recently found in several neoplastic cells, in particular breast, melanoma and neuroectodermal cancer cells. We developed two vaccines, one with each antigen, both using proteins derived from the outer membrane proteins (OMP) of Neisseria Meningitidis B, as carriers. We developed also the 1E10 vaccine; an anti-idiotype vaccine designed to mimic the N-Glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This monoclonal antibody is an Ab2-type-antibody which recognizes the Ab1 antibody called P3, the latter is a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes gangliosides as antigens. Since 1998 we initiated a clinical development program for these three compounds. Results of the phase I clinical trials proved that the three vaccines were safe and able to elicit specific antibody responses. In addition we were able to demonstrate the activation of the cellular arm of the immune response in patients treated with the GM3 vaccine. Although phase I trials are not designed to evaluate antitumor efficacy, it was encouraging to observe tumor shrinkage in some patients treated both with the GM3 and N-Glycolyl-GM3 vaccines. We have already begun a phase II program in several neoplastic diseases, with all three vaccines.

  9. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, B.

    1986-01-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with 35 S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants

  10. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A J; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A F

    1986-10-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous globular domain (NC1) of type IV collagen from normal human GBM, while FNS identified only the 26,000-mol wt monomer. FNS reacted with EBM of 12 controls and nine unaffected male kindred members but not EBM of eight affected males. Five affected females exhibited interrupted reactivity of FNS with EBM. GPS showed variable reactivity with EBM and was not discriminating with respect to Alport-type FN. FNS did not stain renal basement members of five affected males. However, the EBM, tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsules of affected males contained antigens reactive with GPS. These immunochemical studies suggest that the FNS antigen is distinct from Goodpasture antigen(s). The expression of FNS antigen located on the NC1 domain of type IV collagen is altered in basement membranes of patients with Alport-type FN, and the distribution of this antigenic anomaly within kindreds suggests X-linked dominant transmission of a defective gene.

  11. VaxiJen: a server for prediction of protective antigens, tumour antigens and subunit vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flower Darren R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine development in the post-genomic era often begins with the in silico screening of genome information, with the most probable protective antigens being predicted rather than requiring causative microorganisms to be grown. Despite the obvious advantages of this approach – such as speed and cost efficiency – its success remains dependent on the accuracy of antigen prediction. Most approaches use sequence alignment to identify antigens. This is problematic for several reasons. Some proteins lack obvious sequence similarity, although they may share similar structures and biological properties. The antigenicity of a sequence may be encoded in a subtle and recondite manner not amendable to direct identification by sequence alignment. The discovery of truly novel antigens will be frustrated by their lack of similarity to antigens of known provenance. To overcome the limitations of alignment-dependent methods, we propose a new alignment-free approach for antigen prediction, which is based on auto cross covariance (ACC transformation of protein sequences into uniform vectors of principal amino acid properties. Results Bacterial, viral and tumour protein datasets were used to derive models for prediction of whole protein antigenicity. Every set consisted of 100 known antigens and 100 non-antigens. The derived models were tested by internal leave-one-out cross-validation and external validation using test sets. An additional five training sets for each class of antigens were used to test the stability of the discrimination between antigens and non-antigens. The models performed well in both validations showing prediction accuracy of 70% to 89%. The models were implemented in a server, which we call VaxiJen. Conclusion VaxiJen is the first server for alignment-independent prediction of protective antigens. It was developed to allow antigen classification solely based on the physicochemical properties of proteins without

  12. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  13. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  14. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of surgery on release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (sVEGF) and the soluble inhibitory receptor (sVEGFR1) is unknown. The effect of major and minor surgery on variations in sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations in vivo was studied, and on bacterial antigen...... concentrations in plasma changed during surgery. In vitro stimulation of blood samples with bacteria-derived antigens resulted in a significant increase in sVEGF (p Bacterial antigen-induced release of sVEGF correlated...... significantly with neutrophil cell counts (0.53 Bacterial antigen-induced sVEGFR1 release did not correlate with cell counts. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sVEGF and sVEGFR1 concentrations did not change during surgery. In vitro bacterial stimulation led to increased release of sVEGF, which...

  15. Studies on the antigenic determinants in the self-association of IgG rheumatoid factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardella, FA; Teller, DC; Mannik, M

    1981-01-01

    The number, location, and other characteristics of the antigenic determinants for self-association of IgG-rheumatoid factors (IgG-RF) were examined using the IgG-RF isolated from the plasma of one patient as a model system. Affinity chromatography was employed for isolation of the IgG-RF. Sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation was used to study the various interactions. The antigenic valence of IgG-RF Fc, normal human Fc, and rabbit Fc fragments was two for the interaction with Fab fragments from IgG-RF, as might be expected from the molecular symmetry of IgG. The antigenic valence of intact normal IgG, however, was only one, indicating that when one of the available antigenic determinants interacted with the Fab fragment of IgG-RF, the other determinant becomes sterically inaccessible. Reduction and alkylation, known to increase the flexibility of the hinge region, did not alter the antigenic valence of IgG for Fab fragments of IgG-RF. The antigenic valence of IgG-RF in self-association could not be experimentally determined but must be two to permit the observed concentration-dependent further polymer formation of IgG-RF dimers. Unique antigenic determinants on the Fc fragments of IgG-RF were sought and not found, thus reaffirming the formation of two antigen-antibody bonds as the basis for dimerization of IgG-RF molecules. The pFc’ and Fc’ fragments, representing Cγ3 domains of IgG, failed to show significant interaction with Fab fragments of IgG-RF, indicating that the antigenic determinants were not expressed by the Cγ3 regions but are located either on Cγ2 region or require intact Cγ2 and Cγ3 regions for expression. These conclusions were corroborated by the antigenic valence of one for the Fc(i) fragment, a new papain-generated intermediate fragment of Fc, composed of two intact Cγ3 domains and one intact Cγ2 domain. Normal IgG, because of its valence of one for interaction with IgG-RF, would effectively terminate further polymerization of

  16. Specific and common antigens of Trichomonas vaginalis detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torian, B E; Connelly, R J; Stephens, R S; Stibbs, H H

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis were prepared by immunizing mice with a cloned isolate of T. vaginalis. Eight antibodies reacted with the same four isolates or strains but did not react with the other T. vaginalis strains or isolates tested. All eight antibodies reacted uniformly with both the body and flagella of T. vaginalis in the immunofluorescence assay but were unreactive by immunoblotting. The antigen(s) recognized by these antibodies was determined to be present on the surface membrane by indirect immunofluorescence assay of live organisms. The antigen(s) was found to be sensitive to periodate oxidation but resistant to pronase digestion. In addition, one monoclonal antibody was derived which reacted with all T. vaginalis isolates or strains tested, as well as with Trichomonas gallinae, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Giardia lamblia. This antibody reacted with the body but not the flagella of Formalin-fixed protozoa in the immunofluorescence assay but failed to react with live organisms. The antigen was found to be periodate resistant but pronase labile. In the immunoblot assay, this antibody detected a single T. vaginalis polypeptide with a molecular weight of 62,000. Images PMID:6360900

  17. Carbohydrates as T-cell antigens with implications in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lina; Middleton, Dustin R; Wantuch, Paeton L; Ozdilek, Ahmet; Avci, Fikri Y

    2016-10-01

    Glycosylation is arguably the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins in microbial and mammalian cells. During the past few years, there has been intensive research demonstrating that carbohydrates, either in pure forms or in conjunction with proteins or lipids, evoke and modulate adaptive immune responses. We now know that carbohydrates can be directly recognized by T cells or participate in T-cell stimulation as components of T-cell epitopes. T-cell recognition of carbohydrate antigens takes place via their presentation by major histocompatibility complex pathways on antigen-presenting cells. In this review, we summarize studies on carbohydrates as T-cell antigens modulating adaptive immune responses. Through discussion of glycan-containing antigens, such as glycoproteins, glycolipids, zwitterionic polysaccharides and carbohydrate-based glycoconjugate vaccines, we will illustrate the key molecular and cellular interactions between carbohydrate antigens and T cells and the implications of these interactions in health and disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Characterization of Tunga penetrans antigens in selected epidemic areas in Murang'a county in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamleck N Mwangi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tunga penetrans are fleas that cause tungiasis, a condition characterized by high transmission rate due to poor housing conditions, social neglect and inadequate health care in economically disadvantaged communities in developing countries. This study therefore aimed at characterizing jiggers antigens to identify immunodominant ones to help understand immunological behavior of the parasite that would otherwise be important in future control of the parasite. Samples were gravid fleas and blood samples from infested individuals in Kahuro and Murang'a East district in Murang'a County. Freeze and thaw was used to extract soluble proteins from the fleas. Ouchterlony Double immunodiffusion was used to assess antigen-antibody reactions between extracted soluble protein and the serum from immunized rats, Rattus norvegicus prior to analysis of human sera. These results were comparable to results of immunoelectrphoresis. Jigger protein isolates were analyzed in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis technique (SDS-PAGE, against Pharmacia standard protein markers. Further analysis of jigger antigens against pooled human sera from infested victims in Western blot revealed three immunodominant antigens. Using simple regression analysis molecular weights of the three immunodominant antigens were estimated as 51.795, 23.395 and 15.38 kDa respectively. These results are important since they would help understand immunological behavior of the parasites. This would help to create basis for designing and improving approaches against jiggers such as development of immune prophylaxis to complement social science approaches that is mainly concerned with maintenance of high standards of hygiene.

  19. Characterization of an atypical antigen from Sarcoptes scabiei containing an MADF domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunggren, E L; Bergström, K; Morrison, D A; Mattsson, J G

    2006-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA encoding a novel antigen from a Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari) cDNA library by immunoscreening with sera from S. scabiei-infected dogs. The antigen is encoded by a 2,157 bp mRNA with a predicted open reading frame of 719 amino acids (molecular weight 79 kDa). Our sequence analysis identified the presence of a MADF domain in the N-terminus, and downstream of this domain there was a region of low sequence complexity. This latter region contained several blocks of triplets and quadruplets of polar amino acids (Asn, Gln and Ser), and these 3 amino acids represented 39.7% of all amino acids. The antigen was named Atypical Sarcoptes Antigen 1 (ASA1) since the MADF domain normally is found in proteins involved in transcriptional regulation. In addition, 15 out of 62 S. scabiei-infected dogs reacted with a purified recombinant version of ASA1 in Western blot analysis. With immunohistochemistry we could show that ASA1 is expressed throughout the parasite, and that IgG specific for ASA1 binds to the inside wall of the mite's burrow. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an antigen containing an MADF domain.

  20. Intracellular Transport Routes for MHC I and Their Relevance for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Babdor, Joel; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Guermonprez, Pierre; Saveanu, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation, in which exogenous antigens are presented via MHC I complexes, is involved both in the generation of anti-infectious and anti-tumoral cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. While cross-presentation was described almost four decades ago and while it is now established that some dendritic cell (DC) subsets are better than others in processing and cross-presenting internalized antigens, the involved molecular mechanisms remain only partially understood. Some of the least explored molecular mechanisms in cross-presentation concern the origin of cross-presenting MHC I molecules and the cellular compartments where antigenic peptide loading occurs. This review focuses on MHC I molecules and their intracellular trafficking. We discuss the source of cross-presenting MHC I in DCs as well as the role of the endocytic pathway in their recycling from the cell surface. Next, we describe the importance of the TAP peptide transporter for delivering peptides to MHC I during cross-presentation. Finally, we highlight the impact of innate immunity mechanisms on specific antigen cross-presentation mechanisms in which TLR activation modulates MHC I trafficking and TAP localization. PMID:26191062

  1. Parallel detection of antigen-specific T cell responses by combinatorial encoding of MHC multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Kvistborg, Pia; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescently labeled multimeric complexes of peptide-MHC, the molecular entities recognized by the T cell receptor, have become essential reagents for detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells by flow cytometry. Here we present a method for high-throughput parallel detection of antigen-specif......(+) immune responses during cancer and infectious disease or after immunotherapy. One panel of 28 combinatorially encoded MHC multimers can be prepared in 4 h. Staining and detection takes a further 3 h.......Fluorescently labeled multimeric complexes of peptide-MHC, the molecular entities recognized by the T cell receptor, have become essential reagents for detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells by flow cytometry. Here we present a method for high-throughput parallel detection of antigen......-specific T cells by combinatorial encoding of MHC multimers. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by UV-mediated MHC peptide exchange and multimerized in the form of streptavidin-fluorochrome conjugates. Eight different fluorochromes are used for the generation of MHC multimers and, by a two...

  2. Nonstripping "Rainbow" and Multiple Antigen Detection (MAD) Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Stan Stanislaw; Tsukamoto, Michelle M; Huang, Xianshu; Krajewski, Sebastian B

    2015-01-01

    A variation of immunoblotting method (the "Rainbow Western"), permits sequential detection of multiple antigens (MAD) on a single protein blot without stripping off prior antibodies. Because no stripping is involved, immobilized proteins are not lost from the membrane, thus allowing for multiple reprobings of the same membrane with different primary antibodies (≥12), retaining strong signal intensities for all sequential antibody probings. The procedure utilizes horseradish peroxidase (HRPase)-based detection with both a chemiluminescent and colorimetric substrate. Initial incubation of the blot with secondary antibody followed by colorimetric development prior to probing the blot with primary antibodies markedly reduces background in ECL-based detection procedures and permits sequential use of antibodies derived from a single species. In the "Rainbow Western," four different HRPase-colorimetric substrates that produce black, brown, red, and green colors are employed sequentially for detection and simultaneous display of four different antigens on the same membrane. By allowing large amounts of data to be obtained from a single blot, the MAD-immunoblotting and Rainbow Western methods have the potential for researchers to compare the expression of several proteins within a single biological sample. Both techniques could be particularly valuable for analysis of cellular populations that are difficult to isolate in large numbers or of clinical specimens where the amounts of protein samples is minute or only available on a one-time basis.

  3. Functional role of BK virus tumor antigens in transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakshatri, H; Pater, M M; Pater, A

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the role of the human papovavirus BK virus (BKV) tumor (T) antigen(s) in the maintenance of transformation and have identified the domain of T antigen essential for transformation. BKV-transformed BHK 21 and NIH 3T3 cells expressing antisense T-antigen RNA lose their ability to grow in soft agar, indicating the need for the continued expression of T antigen for the maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Experiments using translation termination linker insertion and deletio...

  4. Antigenic proteins of Helicobacter pylori of potential diagnostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilpour, Akbar; Santhanam, Amutha; Wei, Lee Chun; Saadatnia, Geita; Velusamy, Nagarajan; Osman, Sabariah; Mohamad, Ahmad Munir; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antigen was prepared from an isolate from a patient with a duodenal ulcer. Serum samples were obtained from culture-positive H. pylori infected patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers and gastritis (n=30). As controls, three kinds of sera without detectable H. pylori IgG antibodies were used: 30 from healthy individuals without history of gastric disorders, 30 from patients who were seen in the endoscopy clinic but were H. pylori culture negative and 30 from people with other diseases. OFF-GEL electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and Western blots of individual serum samples were used to identify protein bands with good sensitivity and specificity when probed with the above sera and HRP-conjugated anti-human IgG. Four H. pylori protein bands showed good (≥ 70%) sensitivity and high specificity (98-100%) towards anti-Helicobacter IgG antibody in culture- positive patients sera and control sera, respectively. The identities of the antigenic proteins were elucidated by mass spectrometry. The relative molecular weights and the identities of the proteins, based on MALDI TOF/ TOF, were as follows: CagI (25 kDa), urease G accessory protein (25 kDa), UreB (63 kDa) and proline/pyrroline- 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (118 KDa). These identified proteins, singly and/or in combinations, may be useful for diagnosis of H. pylori infection in patients.

  5. Expression cloning of camelid nanobodies specific for Xenopus embryonic antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Itoh

    Full Text Available Developmental biology relies heavily on the use of conventional antibodies, but their production and maintenance involves significant effort. Here we use an expression cloning approach to identify variable regions of llama single domain antibodies (known as nanobodies, which recognize specific embryonic antigens. A nanobody cDNA library was prepared from lymphocytes of a llama immunized with Xenopus embryo lysates. Pools of bacterially expressed cDNAs were sib-selected for the ability to produce specific staining patterns in gastrula embryos. Three different nanobodies were isolated: NbP1 and NbP3 stained yolk granules, while the reactivity of NbP7 was predominantly restricted to the cytoplasm and the cortex. The isolated nanobodies recognized specific protein bands in immunoblot analysis. A reverse proteomic approach identified NbP1 target antigen as EP45/Seryp, a serine protease inhibitor. Given the unique stability of nanobodies and the ease of their expression in diverse systems, we propose that nanobody cDNA libraries represent a promising resource for molecular markers for developmental biology.

  6. Computational Identification of Antigenicity-Associated Sites in the Hemagglutinin Protein of A/H1N1 Seasonal Influenza Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Ren

    Full Text Available The antigenic variability of influenza viruses has always made influenza vaccine development challenging. The punctuated nature of antigenic drift of influenza virus suggests that a relatively small number of genetic changes or combinations of genetic changes may drive changes in antigenic phenotype. The present study aimed to identify antigenicity-associated sites in the hemagglutinin protein of A/H1N1 seasonal influenza virus using computational approaches. Random Forest Regression (RFR and Support Vector Regression based on Recursive Feature Elimination (SVR-RFE were applied to H1N1 seasonal influenza viruses and used to analyze the associations between amino acid changes in the HA1 polypeptide and antigenic variation based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI assay data. Twenty-three and twenty antigenicity-associated sites were identified by RFR and SVR-RFE, respectively, by considering the joint effects of amino acid residues on antigenic drift. Our proposed approaches were further validated with the H3N2 dataset. The prediction models developed in this study can quantitatively predict antigenic differences with high prediction accuracy based only on HA1 sequences. Application of the study results can increase understanding of H1N1 seasonal influenza virus antigenic evolution and accelerate the selection of vaccine strains.

  7. Chemiluminescence immunoassay for free prostate-specific antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuefeng; Liu Yibing; Xu Wenge; Li Ziying; Han Zhiquan; Liu Ting

    2008-01-01

    A sandwich chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) for serum free prostate-specific antigen (F-PSA) was developed. One antibody against total PSA was coated on the micro-plate, the other antibody against F-PSA was labeled with horseradish peroxidase. The detection limit is established as 0.01 ng/mL (n=10, mean of zero standard + 2SD) and the intra-and inter-assay coefficient s of variation (CV) is in the range of 31 8%-51 4% and 10.8%-17.7%, respectively. Compared with Mono bind F-PSA CLIA kits, the correlative equation is y= 0.72x- 0.22, and r = 0.90. The standard range for the method is 0.2-10 ng/mL, and it presents good linearity. (authors)

  8. Distinct patterns of blood-stage parasite antigens detected by plasma IgG subclasses from individuals with different level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Højrup Peter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In endemic regions naturally acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum develops as a function of age and exposure to parasite infections and is known to be mediated by IgG. The targets of protective antibodies remain to be fully defined. Several immunoepidemiological studies have indicated an association of cytophilic anti-parasite IgG with protection against malaria. It has been hypothesized that the initial antibody responses against parasite antigens upon first few Plasmodium falciparum infections is dominated by non-protective IgG2/IgG4 and IgM antibodies, which then gradually develop into protective response dominated by cytophilic IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies. Methods Naturally occurring IgG antibodies against P. falciparum blood-stage antigens were analysed from plasma samples collected from four groups of individuals differing in age and level of exposure to P. falciparum infections. Western Blot profiling of blood-stage parasite antigens displaying reactivity with individual plasma samples in terms of their subclass specificities was conducted. Parasite antigens detected by IgG were grouped based on their apparent molecular sizes resolved by SDS-PAGE as high molecular weight (≥ 70 kDa or low molecular weight (P. falciparum infections. Results IgG4 and IgM antibodies in plasma samples from all groups detected very few parasite antigens. IgG2 antibodies from all groups detected a common pattern of high molecular weight parasite antigens. Cytophilic IgG subclasses in plasma samples from individuals with higher levels of exposure to P. falciparum infections distinctly detected higher numbers of low molecular weight parasite antigens. Conclusions In the present study, there was no evidence for switching of antibody responses from non-cytophilic to cytophilic subclasses against blood-stage parasite antigens as a likely mechanism for induction of protective immunity against malaria.

  9. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  10. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Development of an enzyme immunoassay for poliovirus antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Hashimoto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An indirect solid-phase enzyme immunoassay (EIA was developed for the detection of poliovirus antigen. Virus antigen was obtained in LLC-MK2 cell cultures and used to prepare antibodies in rabbit and guinea pig. Antibodies were evaluated by double immunodiffusion and neutralization test. Optimal concentrations of guinea pig and rabbit immunoglobulins were determined by checkerboard titration. Microtitre plates were coated with 15.0 µg/ml guinea pig anti-polio immunoglobulin and rabbit anti-polio immunoglobulin at the concentration of 7.94 µg/ml was used as detecting antibody. The standard curve with eight different antigen concentrations in eight replicates resulted in a coefficient of variation (CV between 2.1% to 7.8%. The dose-response relationship was determined by simple linear regression with a coefficient of correlation (R² equal to 96.4%. The assay detected a minimum of 2.3 µg/ml poliovirus antigen.O trabalho apresenta o desenvolvimento de um ensaio imunoenzimático indireto para a detecção de antígeno de poliovírus. O antígeno viral foi obtido em cultura de células LLC-MK2 e usado para imunização de coelho e cobaia. Os soros hiperimunes foram avaliados por imunodifusão dupla e teste de neutralização. Após padronização, o soro de captura, produzido em cobaia, foi usado na concentração protéica de 15.0 µg/ml para sensibilizar microplacas de poliestireno e o soro de coelho (detector foi usado na concentração de 7.94 µg/ml. A curva padrão resultante da utilização de oito diferentes concentrações do antígeno padrão definiu um coeficiente de variação de 2.1% a 7.8%. A relação dose-resposta foi determinada por regressão linear simples com o estabelecimento do coeficiente de correlação (R² igual a 96.4%. O ensaio possibilitou a detecção mínima de 2.3 µg/ml de antígeno de poliovírus.

  12. Antigenic Determinants of the Bilobal Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfolk, Judith A; Glesner, Jill; Wright, Paul W; Kepley, Christopher L; Li, Mi; Himly, Martin; Muehling, Lyndsey M; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chapman, Martin D; Pomés, Anna

    2016-01-29

    Bla g 2 is a major indoor cockroach allergen associated with the development of asthma. Antigenic determinants on Bla g 2 were analyzed by mutagenesis based on the structure of the allergen alone and in complex with monoclonal antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding. The structural analysis revealed mechanisms of allergen-antibody recognition through cation-π interactions. Single and multiple Bla g 2 mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. The triple mutant K132A/K251A/F162Y showed an ∼100-fold reduced capacity to bind IgE, while preserving the native molecular fold, as proven by x-ray crystallography. This mutant was still able to induce mast cell release. T-cell responses were assessed by analyzing Th1/Th2 cytokine production and the CD4(+) T-cell phenotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. Although T-cell activating capacity was similar for the KKF mutant and Bla g 2 based on CD25 expression, the KKF mutant was a weaker inducer of the Th2 cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, this mutant induced IL-10 from a non-T-cell source at higher levels that those induced by Bla g 2. Our findings demonstrate that a rational design of site-directed mutagenesis was effective in producing a mutant with only 3 amino acid substitutions that maintained the same fold as wild type Bla g 2. These residues, which were involved in IgE antibody binding, endowed Bla g 2 with a T-cell modulatory capacity. The antigenic analysis of Bla g 2 will be useful for the subsequent development of recombinant allergen vaccines. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Role of CD5-negative CD8 T Cells in Adaptation to Antigenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of CD5-negative CD8. +. T Cells in Adaptation to. Antigenic Variation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Type 1. Xin-Yun Zhang1, Jian-Rong Zhao2, .... time point. The viral load was decreased to < 350 copies per mL at each of the follow-up time-points (Table 1). We also observed a remarkable change in the level of ...

  14. Prognostic value of the interaction between galectin-3 and antigen carbohydrate 125 in acute heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez, Julio; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sandino, Justo; Mainar, Luis; Palau Sampio, Patricia; Santas, Enrique; Villanueva, María Pilar; Núñez, Eduardo; Bodí, Vicent; Chorro, Francisco J.; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    AIM:Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) have emerged as robust prognostic biomarkers in heart failure. Experimental data have also suggested a potential molecular interaction between CA125 and Gal-3; however, the biological and clinical relevance of this interaction is still uncertain. We sought to evaluate, in patients admitted for acute heart failure, the association between plasma Gal-3 with all-cause mortality and the risk for rehospitalizations among high and low leve...

  15. HLA antigens, epilepsy and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, P; Morellini, M; Raucci, U; Cappellacci, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-one epileptic patients, selected from among 900 children with previous febrile convulsions and subsequent epilepsy, were typed for HLA antigens. In 16 of the 31 patients CMV was isolated from the urine shortly after the appearance of spontaneous fits; in the remaining 15 patients the virus was never detected. All the examined children were typed for 14 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B, 7 HLA-C and 9 HLA-DR specificities, and compared with a group of healthy subjects. The HLA-A11 antigen was present in 25% of the children with chronic CMV infection and epilepsy, and absent in patients with epilepsy but without CMV infection (p less than 0.02). The possibility that the A11 antigen is a marker of the predisposing genes for CMV infection in children with epilepsy following FC is proposed.

  16. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  17. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  18. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  19. [Molecular biology methods in immunohematology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournamille, C

    2013-05-01

    The molecular basis of almost all antigens of the 33 blood group systems are known. These knowledge and the advent of the PCR technology have allowed the DNA-based genotyping in order to predict the presence or absence of a blood group antigen on the cell membrane of red blood cells. DNA genotyping is required in cases where red blood cells patient cannot be used for serological typing either after a recent transfusion or because of the presence of autoantibodies on the red blood cells. Numerous DNA assays are available to detect any nucleotide polymorphism on the genes encoding blood group antigens. The technologies have improved to answer quickly to any case of transfusion emergency and to limit the risk of DNA contamination in a molecular diagnostic laboratory. Some technologies are ready for high-throughput blood group genotyping. They will be used in the future to obtain a fully typed blood group card of each donor but also to detect blood donors with rare phenotypes to register them to the Banque Nationale de Sang de Phénotype Rare (BNSPR). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Osteopontin promotes dendritic cell maturation and function in response to HBV antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui GY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guangying Cui,1,2 Jianing Chen,1,2 Jianqin He,1,2 Chong Lu,1,2 Yingfeng Wei,1,2 Lin Wang,1,2 Xuejun Xu,3 Lanjuan Li,1,2 Toshimitsu Uede,4 Hongyan Diao1,2 1State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 2Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 3Department of Oral Orthodontics, Affiliated Stomatology Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 4Molecular Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Purpose: Dendritic cells (DCs play critical roles in promoting innate and adaptive immunity in microbial infection. Functional impairment of DCs may mediate the suppression of viral-specific T-cell immune response in chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients. Osteopontin (OPN is involved in several liver diseases and infectious diseases. However, whether OPN affects DC function in hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is unknown.Methods: Twenty CHB patients and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited. OPN secreted by DCs was compared. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with OPN antibody were examined to study the costimulatory molecular expression and interleukin (IL-12 production of DCs after HBV antigenic stimulation. OPN-deficient mice were used to investigate the influence of OPN on DC maturation and function after HBV antigenic stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous OPN was administrated to further verify the functioning of DCs from CHB patients upon HBV antigenic stimulation.Results: We found that OPN production of DCs from CHB patients was significantly lower than those from healthy volunteers. The absence of OPN impaired IL-12 production and costimulatory molecular expression of DCs upon stimulation with HBV antigens. Defective DC function led to reduced activation of Th1 response to

  1. Antigen-affinity controls pregerminal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn H. A.; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well

  2. Original antigenic sin: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatti, Anup; Monsalve, Diana M; Pacheco, Yovana; Chang, Christopher; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gershwin, M Eric

    2017-09-01

    The concept of "original antigenic sin" was first proposed by Thomas Francis, Jr. in 1960. This phenomenon has the potential to rewrite what we understand about how the immune system responds to infections and its mechanistic implications on how vaccines should be designed. Antigenic sin has been demonstrated to occur in several infectious diseases in both animals and humans, including human influenza infection and dengue fever. The basis of "original antigenic sin" requires immunological memory, and our immune system ability to autocorrect. In the context of viral infections, it is expected that if we are exposed to a native strain of a pathogen, we should be able to mount a secondary immune response on subsequent exposure to the same pathogen. "Original antigenic sin" will not contradict this well-established immunological process, as long as the subsequent infectious antigen is identical to the original one. But "original antigenic sin" implies that when the epitope varies slightly, then the immune system relies on memory of the earlier infection, rather than mount another primary or secondary response to the new epitope which would allow faster and stronger responses. The result is that the immunological response may be inadequate against the new strain, because the immune system does not adapt and instead relies on its memory to mount a response. In the case of vaccines, if we only immunize to a single strain or epitope, and if that strain/epitope changes over time, then the immune system is unable to mount an accurate secondary response. In addition, depending of the first viral exposure the secondary immune response can result in an antibody-dependent enhancement of the disease or at the opposite, it could induce anergy. Both of them triggering loss of pathogen control and inducing aberrant clinical consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in characterization of Echinococcus antigen B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuti, Wulamu; Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Xiao, Ning; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Yuji; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Lightowlers, Marshall W; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Antigen B (AgB) in hydatid cyst fluid of Echinococcus granulosus is a polymeric lipoprotein of 160 kDa and a highly immunogenic major antigen in echinococcal infection. The antigen is comprised of a group of subunit monomers of approximately 8 kDa in molecular size. Recent studies have revealed that the E. granulosus AgB (EgAgB) shows a high degree of genetic variability and the genes encoding the EgAgB 8-kDa subunit monomers that have been identified to date could be grouped into four clades, corresponding to the genes EgAgB8/1, EgAgB8/2, EgAgB8/3 and EgAgB8/4. It has been suggested that the recombinant EgAgB8/2 (rEgAgB8/2) provides better performance in serodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) than does the recombinant EgAgB8/1 (rEgAgB8/1). The EgAgB has been identified as a protease inhibitor with an ability to inhibit recruitment of neutrophils and exploit activation of T helper cells by eliciting a non-protective Th2 cell response, predominantly in patients with progressive CE. Recently it has been revealed that AgB also exists in the cyst fluid of Echinococcus multilocularis. Five different cDNAs encoding the EgAgB homologues have been identified in vesicles, protoscoleces and/or immature adult worms of E. multilocularis and named as EmAgB8/1, EmAgB8/2, EmAgB8/3, EmAgB8/4 and EmAgB8/5. These genes appeared to be expressed in a developmentally regulated manner in the parasite life cycle. This review focuses on recent advances in molecular biological and immunological characterization of AgB from both of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis.

  4. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  5. Outer membrane protein antigens of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostle, A G; Rosenbusch, R F

    1986-07-01

    Outer membranes were isolated from bovine isolates and type strains of Moraxella bovis, M phenylpyruvica, M lacunata, and M ovis by sodium N lauroyl sarcosinate extraction and differential centrifugation. Analysis of outer membranes from these organisms by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that all M bovis isolates shared a common polypeptide pattern that was readily distinguishable from other Moraxella spp. Nine major outer membrane protein bands were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis analysis of M bovis. Immunoblotting of protein antigens of M bovis revealed several outer membrane proteins that seemed to be common antigens of all M bovis isolates.

  6. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  7. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  9. The molecular basis of livestock disease as illustrated by African trypanosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donelson, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    African trypanosomes are protozoan parasites, most species of which are transmitted by tsetse flies. They reside in the mammalian bloodstream and evade the immune system by periodically switching the major protein on their surface - a phenomenon called antigenic variation, mediated by gene rearrangements in the trypanosome genome. The trypanosomes eventually enter the central nervous system and cause a fatal disease, commonly called ngana in domestic cattle and sleeping sickness in humans. Two sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei infect humans (T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense) and one sub-species does not survive in humans (T. b. brucei) because it is lysed by the human-specific serum protein, apolipoprotein L-I. Wild animals in Africa have other (less well understood) molecular mechanisms of suppressing the number of African trypanosomes in the blood, and some indigenous breeds of African cattle also display a partial 'trypanotolerance' whose genetic loci have recently been mapped. (author)

  10. Targeted molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. Edmund

    2003-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to visualize the cellular and molecular processes occurring in living tissues, and for the imaging of specific molecules in vivo, the development of reporter probes and dedicated imaging equipment is most important. Reporter genes can be used to monitor the delivery and magnitude of therapeutic gene transfer, and the time variation involved. Imaging technologies such as micro-PET, SPECT, MRI and CT, as well as optical imaging systems, are able to non-invasively detect, measure, and report the simultaneous expression of multiple meaningful genes. It is believed that recent advances in reporter probes, imaging technologies and gene transfer strategies will enhance the effectiveness of gene therapy trials

  11. Isolation and characterization of the normal crossreacting antigen: homology of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence with that of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E; Shively, J E; Wrann, M

    1978-01-01

    The normal antigen, NCA, which crossreacts with the carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA, was purified from normal spleen tissue by an immunochemical purification method using insolubilized antibodies to either CEA or NCA. The highly purified NCA obtained was extensively characterized by immunological tests. The molecular weight of NCA determined by chromatography on Sephadex G-200 was approximately 100,000. The total amount of carbohydrate in NCA was 30%, compared to 60% in CEA. NCA and CEA also differed in sugar composition. The amino acid composition of NCA was nearly identical to that of CEA, except for the apparent presence of methionine in NCA but not in CEA. The sequence of the first 26 NH2-terminal amino acids in NCA was identical to that of CEA except at position 21, where alanine was found in NCA instead of valine in CEA. Images PMID:77016

  12. Heritability of antibody isotype and subclass responses to Plasmodium falciparum antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy O Duah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the extent to which genetic factors regulate acquired immunity to common infections. A classical twin study design is useful to estimate the heritable component of variation in measurable immune parameters.This study assessed the relative heritability of different plasma antibody isotypes and subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM, IgA and IgE naturally acquired to P. falciparum blood stage antigens AMA1, MSP1-19, MSP2 (two allelic types and MSP3 (two allelic types. Separate analyses were performed on plasma from 213 pairs of Gambian adult twins, 199 child twin pairs sampled in a dry season when there was little malaria transmission, and another set of 107 child twin pairs sampled at the end of the annual wet season when malaria was common. There were significantly positive heritability (h(2 estimates for 48% (20/42 of the specific antibody assays (for the seven isotypes and subclasses to the six antigens tested among the adults, 48% (20/42 among the children in the dry season and 31% (13/42 among the children in the wet season. In children, there were significant heritability estimates for IgG4 reactivity against each of the antigens, and this subclass had higher heritability than the other subclasses and isotypes. In adults, 75% (15/20 of the significantly heritable antigen-specific isotype responses were attributable to non-HLA class II genetic variation, whereas none showed a significant HLA contribution.Genome-wide approaches are now warranted to map the major genetic determinants of variable antibody isotype and subclass responses to malaria, alongside evaluation of their impact on infection and disease. Although plasma levels of IgG4 to malaria antigens are generally low, the exceptionally high heritability of levels of this subclass in children deserves particular investigation.

  13. Variation in concentrations of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits and macropolymers in wheat grains of a recombinant inbred lines population and in two contrasting eco-sites in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concentrations of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits andmacropolymers in wheat grains are important indicators of grain quality, which are genetically determined and affected by environmental factors. The 6 VS·6AL translocation chromosome segment is reported to own high powdery m...

  14. Transcriptional phase variation of a type III restriction-modification system in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Vries (Nicolette); D. Duinsbergen; E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); R.G. Pot (Raymond); P. Wiesenekker; C.W. Penn (Charles); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPhase variation is important in bacterial pathogenesis, since it generates antigenic variation for the evasion of immune responses and provides a strategy for quick adaptation to environmental changes. In this study, a Helicobacter pylori clone, designated MOD525, was

  15. Performance Assessment of a Trypanosoma cruzi Chimeric Antigen in Multiplex Liquid Microarray Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Leitolis, Amanda; Crestani, Sandra; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) requires antibody-antigen detection methods, which are traditionally based on enzymatic assay techniques whose performance depend on the type and quality of antigen used. Previously, 4 recombinant chimeric proteins from the Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Paraná (IBMP-8.1 to 8.4) comprising immuno-dominant regions of diverse Trypanosoma cruzi antigens showed excellent diagnostic performance in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Considering that next-generation platforms offer improved CD diagnostic accuracy with different T. cruzi -specific recombinant antigens, we assessed the performance of these chimeras in liquid microarrays (LMAs). The chimeric proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Sera from 653 chagasic and 680 healthy individuals were used to assess the performance of these chimeras in detecting specific anti- T. cruzi antibodies. Accuracies ranged from 98.1 to 99.3%, and diagnostic odds ratio values were 3,548 for IBMP-8.3, 4,826 for IBMP-8.1, 7,882 for IBMP-8.2, and 25,000 for IBMP-8.4. A separate sera bank (851 samples) was employed to assess cross-reactivity with other tropical diseases. Leishmania , a pathogen with high similarity to T. cruzi , showed cross-reactivity rates ranging from 0 to 2.17%. Inconclusive results were negligible (0 to 0.71%). Bland-Altman and Deming regression analysis based on 200 randomly selected CD-positive and negative samples demonstrated interchangeability with respect to CD diagnostic performance in both singleplex and multiplex assays. Our results suggested that these chimeras can potentially replace antigens currently used in commercially available assay kits. Moreover, the use of multiplex platforms, such as LMA assays employing 2 or more IBMP antigens, would abrogate the need for 2 different testing techniques when diagnosing CD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Thyroid Autoantibodies Display both “Original Antigenic Sin” and Epitope Spreading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. McLachlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for original antigenic sin in spontaneous thyroid autoimmunity is revealed by autoantibody interactions with immunodominant regions on thyroid autoantigens, thyroglobulin (Tg, thyroid peroxidase (TPO, and the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR A-subunit. In contrast, antibodies induced by immunization of rabbits or mice recognize diverse epitopes. Recognition of immunodominant regions persists despite fluctuations in autoantibody levels following treatment or over time. The enhancement of spontaneously arising pathogenic TSHR antibodies in transgenic human thyrotropin receptor/NOD.H2h4 mice by injecting a non-pathogenic form of TSHR A-subunit protein also provides evidence for original antigenic sin. From other studies, antigen presentation by B cells, not dendritic cells, is likely responsible for original antigenic sin. Recognition of restricted epitopes on the large glycosylated thyroid autoantigens (60-kDa A-subunit, 100-kDa TPO, and 600-kDa Tg facilitates exploring the amino acid locations in the immunodominant regions. Epitope spreading has also been revealed by autoantibodies in thyroid autoimmunity. In humans, and in mice that spontaneously develop autoimmunity to all three thyroid autoantigens, autoantibodies develop first to Tg and later to TPO and the TSHR A-subunit. The pattern of intermolecular epitope spreading is related in part to the thyroidal content of Tg, TPO and TSHR A-subunit and to the molecular sizes of these proteins. Importantly, the epitope spreading pattern provides a rationale for future antigen-specific manipulation to block the development of all thyroid autoantibodies by inducing tolerance to Tg, first in the autoantigen cascade. Because of its abundance, Tg may be the autoantigen of choice to explore antigen-specific treatment, preventing the development of pathogenic TSHR antibodies.

  17. Lectin binding patterns and immunohistochemical antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... examined by histological, lectin-histochemical, immunohistochemical and cultural techniques. B. abortus antigens were immunohistochemically detected in fetal lungs and placenta. An increase in the labeling with UEA-1, DBA,. PNA, RCA-1 and SBA was found in the lungs and an increase in the labeling ...

  18. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  19. A NEW SYNTHETIC FUNCTIONALIZED ANTIGEN CARRIER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRIJFHOUT, JW; BLOEMHOFF, W

    A new synthetic functionalized antigen carrier is described. It consists of a core of seven branched lysine residues, of which each of the four N-terminal lysine residues contains two N-(S-acetylmercaptoacetyl)-glutamyl residues. After removal of the protecting S-acetyl groups affording eight thiol

  20. Non-lineage antigens: section report

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Ondřej; Drbal, Karel; Angelisová, Pavla; Hilgert, Ivan; Hořejší, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 236, 1-2 (2005), s. 42-47 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : non-lineage antigens * cytofluorometry * CD molecules Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.558, year: 2005

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen and head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, D. A.; van Kamp, G. J.; Balm, A. J.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Snow, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentrations were determined in the sera of 45 patients with a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and of 13 controls. In 13 patients serial CEA measurements were made during the follow-up period. In 38% of the patients the serum CEA level was slightly elevated

  2. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  3. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus pyogenes produce an extracellular hyaluronidase which is associated with the spread of the organism during infection. Enzyme hyaluronidase is capable of degrading hyaluronic acid. The aim of the present study was to clone and express antigenic regions of the hylA of S.pyogenes in Escherichia coli.

  4. Antigenic and genetic variability of human metapneumoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herfst (Sander); L. Sprong; P.A. Cane; E. Forleo-Neto; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); R.L. de Swart (Rik); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHuman metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a member of the subfamily Pneumovirinae within the family Paramyxo- viridae. Other members of this subfamily, respiratory syncytial virus and avian pneumovirus, can be divided into subgroups on the basis of genetic or antigenic differences or both. For

  5. Defined carriers for synthetic antigens: Hinge Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Jan; Niederhafner, Petr; Gut, Vladimír; Hulačová, Hana; Maloň, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 68 ISSN 0939-4451. [International Congress on Amino Acids and Proteins /9./. 08.08.2005-12.08.2005, Gert Lubec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthetic carrier * antigen * hinge peptide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  6. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  7. Lysine acetylation of major Chlamydia trachomatis antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mihailovic

    2016-03-01

    Our data show that important Ct antigens could be post-translationally modified by acetylation of lysine residues at multiple sites. Further studies are needed to investigate total acetylome of Ct and the impact PTMs might have on Ct biology and pathogenicity.

  8. Molecular hematology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Provan, Drew; Gribben, John

    2010-01-01

    ... The molecular basis of hemophilia, 219 Paul LF Giangrande 4 The genetics of acute myeloid leukemias, 42 Carolyn J Owen & Jude Fitzgibbon 19 The molecular basis of von Willebrand disease, 233 Luciano Baronc...

  9. Genetic variations in the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus isolated from children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangpeng; Xu, Baoping; Guo, Jiayun; Li, Changchong; An, Shuhua; Zhou, Yunlian; Chen, Aihuan; Deng, Li; Fu, Zhou; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Chunyan; Xu, Lili; Wang, Wei; Shen, Kunling; Xie, Zhengde

    2018-03-14

    To identify the variations in fusion (F) protein gene of RSV in China, a molecular epidemiological study was conducted. A total of 553 RSV positive specimens were collected from 2338 pediatric patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia during a multi-center study conducted during 2014-2016. A total of 252 samples (183 RSV A, 69 RSV B) were selected for F gene sequencing, and analyzed together with 142 F gene sequences downloaded from GenBank. The result showed that all the Chinese RSV A and RSV B strains could be divided respectively into three branches. Compared with RSV A/B prototype sequences respectively, there were significant amino acid (AA) mutations at multiple antigenic sites. For RSV A, changes were found at AA residues 122, 124, 125, 276 and 384, and for RSV B at AA residues 45, 116, 125, 172, 173 and 202. Variations in human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-restricted CTL epitopes were also observed. In total, 56 amino acid differences for the complete F protein were found between the RSV A and B groups in China, while several mutations were only found in the RSV B strains during 2015-2016. The RSV F gene is relatively conserved in China, however, limited mutations are still occurring with time.

  10. Rapid and specific biotin labelling of the erythrocyte surface antigens of both cultured and ex-vivo Plasmodium parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Joanne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitive detection of parasite surface antigens expressed on erythrocyte membranes is necessary to further analyse the molecular pathology of malaria. This study describes a modified biotin labelling/osmotic lysis method which rapidly produces membrane extracts enriched for labelled surface antigens and also improves the efficiency of antigen recovery compared with traditional detergent extraction and surface radio-iodination. The method can also be used with ex-vivo parasites. Methods After surface labelling with biotin in the presence of the inhibitor furosemide, detergent extraction and osmotic lysis methods of enriching for the membrane fractions were compared to determine the efficiency of purification and recovery. Biotin-labelled proteins were identified on silver-stained SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Results Detergent extraction and osmotic lysis were compared for their capacity to purify biotin-labelled Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium chabaudi erythrocyte surface antigens. The pellet fraction formed after osmotic lysis of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes is notably enriched in suface antigens, including PfEMP1, when compared to detergent extraction. There is also reduced co-extraction of host proteins such as spectrin and Band 3. Conclusion Biotinylation and osmotic lysis provides an improved method to label and purify parasitised erythrocyte surface antigen extracts from both in vitro and ex vivo Plasmodium parasite preparations.

  11. Human Tregs Made Antigen Specific by Gene Modification: The Power to Treat Autoimmunity and Antidrug Antibodies with Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Adair

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs are potent immunosuppressive lymphocytes responsible for immune tolerance and homeostasis. Since the seminal reports identifying Tregs, vast research has been channeled into understanding their genesis, signature molecular markers, mechanisms of suppression, and role in disease. This research has opened the doors for Tregs as a potential therapeutic for diseases and disorders such as multiple sclerosis, type I diabetes, transplantation, and immune responses to protein therapeutics, like factor VIII. Seminal clinical trials have used polyclonal Tregs, but the frequency of antigen-specific Tregs among polyclonal populations is low, and polyclonal Tregs may risk non-specific immunosuppression. Antigen-specific Treg therapy, which uses genetically modified Tregs expressing receptors specific for target antigens, greatly mitigates this risk. Building on the principles of T-cell receptor cloning, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, and a novel CAR derivative, called B-cell antibody receptors, our lab has developed different types of antigen-specific Tregs. This review discusses the current research and optimization of gene-modified antigen-specific human Tregs in our lab in several disease models. The preparations and considerations for clinical use of such Tregs also are discussed.

  12. Increasing vaccine potency through exosome antigen targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Zachary C; Wei, Junping; Glass, Oliver K; Guo, Hongtao; Lei, Gangjun; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Osada, Takuya; Hobeika, Amy; Delcayre, Alain; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Morse, Michael A; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, Herbert K

    2011-11-21

    While many tumor associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified in human cancers, efforts to develop efficient TAA "cancer vaccines" using classical vaccine approaches have been largely ineffective. Recently, a process to specifically target proteins to exosomes has been established which takes advantage of the ability of the factor V like C1C2 domain of lactadherin to specifically address proteins to exosomes. Using this approach, we hypothesized that TAAs could be targeted to exosomes to potentially increase their immunogenicity, as exosomes have been demonstrated to traffic to antigen presenting cells (APC). To investigate this possibility, we created adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain (ECD) of two non-mutated TAAs often found in tumors of cancer patients, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and HER2, and coupled them to the C1C2 domain of lactadherin. We found that these C1C2 fusion proteins had enhanced expression in exosomes in vitro. We saw significant improvement in antigen specific immune responses to each of these antigens in naïve and tolerant transgenic animal models and could further demonstrate significantly enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects in a human HER2+ transgenic animal model. These findings demonstrate that the mode of secretion and trafficking can influence the immunogenicity of different human TAAs, and may explain the lack of immunogenicity of non-mutated TAAs found in cancer patients. They suggest that exosomal targeting could enhance future anti-tumor vaccination protocols. This targeting exosome process could also be adapted for the development of more potent vaccines in some viral and parasitic diseases where the classical vaccine approach has demonstrated limitations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to use phage antibody libraries to identify novel breast tumor antigens The antibodies could be used for breast cancer immunotherapy and the antigens could be used as cancer vaccines...

  14. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  15. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Katzelnick (Leah); J.M. Fonville (Judith); G.D. Gromowski (Gregory D.); J.B. Arriaga (Jose Bustos); A. Green (Angela); S.L. James (Sarah ); L. Lau (Louis); M. Montoya (Magelda); C. Wang (Chunling); L.A. Van Blargan (Laura A.); C.A. Russell (Colin); H.M. Thu (Hlaing Myat); T.C. Pierson (Theodore C.); P. Buchy (Philippe); J.G. Aaskov (John G.); J.L. Muñoz-Jordán (Jorge L.); N. Vasilakis (Nikos); R.V. Gibbons (Robert V.); R.B. Tesh (Robert B.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Durbin (Anna); C.P. Simmons (Cameron P.); E.C. Holmes (Edward C.); E. Harris (Eva); S.S. Whitehead (Stephen S.); D.J. Smith (Derek James)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution.We scharacterized antigenic diversity

  16. Antigenic relationships among porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and transmissible gastroenteritis virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ming; Gao, Xiang; Oka, Tomoichiro; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Esseili, Malak A; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda J

    2015-03-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) are economically important swine enteropathogenic coronaviruses. These two viruses belong to two distinct species of the Alphacoronavirus genus within Coronaviridae and induce similar clinical signs and pathological lesions in newborn piglets, but they are presumed to be antigenically distinct. In the present study, two-way antigenic cross-reactivity examinations between the prototype PEDV CV777 strain, three distinct U.S. PEDV strains (the original highly virulent PC22A, S indel Iowa106, and S 197del PC177), and two representative U.S. TGEV strains (Miller and Purdue) were conducted by cell culture immunofluorescent (CCIF) and viral neutralization (VN) assays. None of the pig TGEV antisera neutralized PEDV and vice versa. One-way cross-reactions were observed by CCIF between TGEV Miller hyperimmune pig antisera and all PEDV strains. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies and Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant PEDV and TGEV nucleocapsid (N) proteins, and sequence analysis suggested at least one epitope on the N-terminal region of PEDV/TGEV N protein that contributed to this cross-reactivity. Biologically, PEDV strain CV777 induced greater cell fusion in Vero cells than did U.S. PEDV strains. Consistent with the reported genetic differences, the results of CCIF and VN assays also revealed higher antigenic variation between PEDV CV777 and U.S. strains. Evidence of antigenic cross-reactivity between porcine enteric coronaviruses, PEDV and TGEV, in CCIF assays supports the idea that these two species are evolutionarily related, but they are distinct species defined by VN assays. Identification of PEDV- or TGEV-specific antigenic regions allows the development of more specific immunoassays for each virus. Antigenic and biologic variations between the prototype and current PEDV strains could explain, at least partially, the recurrence of PEDV

  17. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  18. Heat shock protein-90 inhibitors enhance antigen expression on melanomas and increase T cell recognition of tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Haggerty

    Full Text Available In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90 share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer.

  19. Transcriptome Profiling and Molecular Pathway Analysis of Genes in Association with Salinity Adaptation in Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhixin; Gan, Lei; Li, Tongyu; Xu, Chang; Chen, Ke; Wang, Xiaodan; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao; Li, Erchao

    2015-01-01

    Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus is a freshwater fish but can tolerate a wide range of salinities. The mechanism of salinity adaptation at the molecular level was studied using RNA-Seq to explore the molecular pathways in fish exposed to 0, 8, or 16 (practical salinity unit, psu). Based on the change of gene expressions, the differential genes unions from freshwater to saline water were classified into three categories. In the constant change category (1), steroid biosynthesis, steroid hormone biosynthesis, fat digestion and absorption, complement and coagulation cascades were significantly affected by salinity indicating the pivotal roles of sterol-related pathways in response to salinity stress. In the change-then-stable category (2), ribosomes, oxidative phosphorylation, signaling pathways for peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, and fat digestion and absorption changed significantly with increasing salinity, showing sensitivity to salinity variation in the environment and a responding threshold to salinity change. In the stable-then-change category (3), protein export, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, tight junction, thyroid hormone synthesis, antigen processing and presentation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis-keratan sulfate were the significantly changed pathways, suggesting that these pathways were less sensitive to salinity variation. This study reveals fundamental mechanism of the molecular response to salinity adaptation in O. niloticus, and provides a general guidance to understand saline acclimation in O. niloticus.

  20. Transcriptome Profiling and Molecular Pathway Analysis of Genes in Association with Salinity Adaptation in Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Xu

    Full Text Available Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus is a freshwater fish but can tolerate a wide range of salinities. The mechanism of salinity adaptation at the molecular level was studied using RNA-Seq to explore the molecular pathways in fish exposed to 0, 8, or 16 (practical salinity unit, psu. Based on the change of gene expressions, the differential genes unions from freshwater to saline water were classified into three categories. In the constant change category (1, steroid biosynthesis, steroid hormone biosynthesis, fat digestion and absorption, complement and coagulation cascades were significantly affected by salinity indicating the pivotal roles of sterol-related pathways in response to salinity stress. In the change-then-stable category (2, ribosomes, oxidative phosphorylation, signaling pathways for peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, and fat digestion and absorption changed significantly with increasing salinity, showing sensitivity to salinity variation in the environment and a responding threshold to salinity change. In the stable-then-change category (3, protein export, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, tight junction, thyroid hormone synthesis, antigen processing and presentation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis-keratan sulfate were the significantly changed pathways, suggesting that these pathways were less sensitive to salinity variation. This study reveals fundamental mechanism of the molecular response to salinity adaptation in O. niloticus, and provides a general guidance to understand saline acclimation in O. niloticus.

  1. Characterization of antigenic variants of hepatitis C virus in immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jane H; Pianko, Matthew J; Ke, Xiaogang; Herskovic, Alex; Hershow, Ronald; Cotler, Scott J; Chen, Weijin; Chen, Zheng W; Rong, Lijun

    2011-07-29

    Antigenic variation is an effective way by which viruses evade host immune defense leading to viral persistence. Little is known about the inhibitory mechanisms of viral variants on CD4 T cell functions. Using sythetic peptides of a HLA-DRB1*15-restricted CD4 epitope derived from the non-structural (NS) 3 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and its antigenic variants and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from six HLA-DRB1*15-positive patients chronically infected with HCV and 3 healthy subjects, the in vitro immune responses and the phenotypes of CD4+CD25+ cells of chronic HCV infection were investigated. The variants resulting from single or double amino acid substitutions at the center of the core region of the Th1 peptide not only induce failed T cell activation but also simultaneously up-regulate inhibitory IL-10, CD25-TGF-β+ Th3 and CD4+IL-10+ Tr1 cells. In contrast, other variants promote differentiation of CD25+TGF-β+ Th3 suppressors that attenuate T cell proliferation. Naturally occuring HCV antigenic mutants of a CD4 epitope can shift a protective peripheral Th1 immune response into an inhibitory Th3 and/or Tr1 response. The modulation of antigenic variants on CD4 response is efficient and extensive, and is likely critical in viral persistence in HCV infection.

  2. Characterization of antigenic variants of hepatitis C virus in immune evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershow Ronald

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigenic variation is an effective way by which viruses evade host immune defense leading to viral persistence. Little is known about the inhibitory mechanisms of viral variants on CD4 T cell functions. Results Using sythetic peptides of a HLA-DRB1*15-restricted CD4 epitope derived from the non-structural (NS 3 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV and its antigenic variants and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from six HLA-DRB1*15-positive patients chronically infected with HCV and 3 healthy subjects, the in vitro immune responses and the phenotypes of CD4+CD25+ cells of chronic HCV infection were investigated. The variants resulting from single or double amino acid substitutions at the center of the core region of the Th1 peptide not only induce failed T cell activation but also simultaneously up-regulate inhibitory IL-10, CD25-TGF-β+ Th3 and CD4+IL-10+ Tr1 cells. In contrast, other variants promote differentiation of CD25+TGF-β+ Th3 suppressors that attenuate T cell proliferation. Conclusions Naturally occuring HCV antigenic mutants of a CD4 epitope can shift a protective peripheral Th1 immune response into an inhibitory Th3 and/or Tr1 response. The modulation of antigenic variants on CD4 response is efficient and extensive, and is likely critical in viral persistence in HCV infection.

  3. Excretory-secretory antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus recognized by infected human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleewong, W; Wongkham, C; Intapan, P; Pariyanonda, S; Morakote, N

    1992-01-01

    Antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus metabolic products were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis of sera from patients with P. heterotremus infection, from patients with other illnesses, and from healthy adults. By SDS-PAGE, it was found that the metabolic products comprised more than eight major polypeptides. Immunoblot analysis revealed 11 components which were strongly recognized by paragonimiasis antisera. These antigenic components had molecular masses ranging from less than 12.3 kDa to 144 kDa. One antigenic band of 31.5 kDa was found to give a consistent reaction with paragonimiasis antisera (97% sensitivity). Of the other patient sera, only sera from patients with Fasciola sp. infection reacted with antigenic bands of 56, 38, and 18.5 kDa. The present findings suggest that the 31.5-kDa component is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of human P. heterotremus paragonimiasis. Images PMID:1500515

  4. Structural and Computational Biology in the Design of Immunogenic Vaccine Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Liljeroos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is historically one of the most important medical interventions for the prevention of infectious disease. Previously, vaccines were typically made of rather crude mixtures of inactivated or attenuated causative agents. However, over the last 10–20 years, several important technological and computational advances have enabled major progress in the discovery and design of potently immunogenic recombinant protein vaccine antigens. Here we discuss three key breakthrough approaches that have potentiated structural and computational vaccine design. Firstly, genomic sciences gave birth to the field of reverse vaccinology, which has enabled the rapid computational identification of potential vaccine antigens. Secondly, major advances in structural biology, experimental epitope mapping, and computational epitope prediction have yielded molecular insights into the immunogenic determinants defining protective antigens, enabling their rational optimization. Thirdly, and most recently, computational approaches have been used to convert this wealth of structural and immunological information into the design of improved vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the growing power of combining sequencing, structural and computational approaches, and we discuss how this may drive the design of novel immunogens suitable for future vaccines urgently needed to increase the global prevention of infectious disease.

  5. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product...

  6. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Daemen, Toos; Helfrich, Wijnand; Boezen, H. Marike; Cohlen, Ben J.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Nijman, Hans W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of antigen-specific

  7. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Daemen, T.; Helfrich, W.; Boezen, H. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Melief, Cornelis; Nijman, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce a tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of antigen-specific

  8. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Immunogenetic studies in various diseases provide potential genetic markers. We have studied the incidence of HLA A, B, C, DR and DQ loci antigen in Rh (D) antigen isoimmunized mothers compared to those nonimmunized isoimmunized Rh negative mothers. Seventy six mothers who were immunized to Rh (D) antigen ...

  9. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  10. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy

  11. Antigenic Determinants of the Bilobal Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfolk, Judith A.; Glesner, Jill; Wright, Paul W.; Kepley, Christopher L.; Li, Mi; Himly, Martin; Muehling, Lyndsey M.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chapman, Martin D.; Pomés, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Bla g 2 is a major indoor cockroach allergen associated with the development of asthma. Antigenic determinants on Bla g 2 were analyzed by mutagenesis based on the structure of the allergen alone and in complex with monoclonal antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding. The structural analysis revealed mechanisms of allergen-antibody recognition through cation-π interactions. Single and multiple Bla g 2 mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. The triple mutant K132A/K251A/F162Y showed an ∼100-fold reduced capacity to bind IgE, while preserving the native molecular fold, as proven by x-ray crystallography. This mutant was still able to induce mast cell release. T-cell responses were assessed by analyzing Th1/Th2 cytokine production and the CD4+ T-cell phenotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. Although T-cell activating capacity was similar for the KKF mutant and Bla g 2 based on CD25 expression, the KKF mutant was a weaker inducer of the Th2 cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, this mutant induced IL-10 from a non-T-cell source at higher levels that those induced by Bla g 2. Our findings demonstrate that a rational design of site-directed mutagenesis was effective in producing a mutant with only 3 amino acid substitutions that maintained the same fold as wild type Bla g 2. These residues, which were involved in IgE antibody binding, endowed Bla g 2 with a T-cell modulatory capacity. The antigenic analysis of Bla g 2 will be useful for the subsequent development of recombinant allergen vaccines. PMID:26644466

  12. Quantitative and qualitative characterization of human cancer-associated serum glycoprotein antigens expressing epitopes consisting of sialyl or sialyl-fucosyl type 1 chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannagi, R; Kitahara, A; Itai, S; Zenita, K; Shigeta, K; Tachikawa, T; Noda, A; Hirano, H; Abe, M; Shin, S

    1988-07-01

    The levels of carbohydrate antigens having epitopes consisting of type 1 chain (R----Gal beta 1----GlcNAc beta 1----3Gal beta 1----R) in the sera of patients with various malignant and nonmalignant disorders have been investigated with the use of three monoclonal antibodies, N-19-9, FH-7, and FH-9. Serum levels of 2----3 sialylated Lea antigen and 2----6 sialylated Lea antigen, defined respectively by antibodies N-19-9 and FH-7, were found to be frequently high in patients with cancer of the digestive system, particularly pancreatic cancer. High levels of 2----3,2----6 disialylated Lc4 antigen, defined by antibody FH-9, were less frequent in cancer patients when compared with the other two antigens. In patients with nonmalignant disorders, especially renal and autoimmune diseases, serum levels of the two type 1 chain antigens defined by FH-7 and FH-9 were more frequently high than that defined by N-19-9. Molecular weights and other general biochemical characteristics of serum mucin carrying the type 1 chain determinants were not significantly different in cancer patients as compared with patients with nonmalignant disorders. However, the degree of glycosylation of the antigen, as assessed by its solubility in perchloric acid, showed significant differences; i.e., the mucin antigen carrying 2----6 sialylated Lea determinant in the sera of patients with nonmalignant disorders had the highest carbohydrate/protein ratio, followed by the mucin carrying the same determinant in the sera of cancer patients. Mucin antigen carrying 2----3 sialylated Lea antigen or 2----3, 2----6 disialylated Lc4 antigen in cancer patients had the lowest carbohydrate/protein ratio among the four groups tested. Thus, the carbohydrate/protein ratio in the type 1 chain mucin antigens in sera of normal subjects is higher than that in sera of cancer patients (P less than 0.05). This finding is in contrast to previous findings on the mucin antigens carrying the type 2 chain determinant (R. Kannagi

  13. Interpretation of results for tumor markers on the basis of analytical imprecision and biological variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Schiøler, V; Nielsen, D

    1993-01-01

    Interpretation of results for CA 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) during breast cancer monitoring requires data on intra- (CVP) and inter- (CVG) individual biological variation, analytical imprecision (CVA), and indices of individuality. The average CVP a....... Consequently, both CVP and CVA should be considered in criteria for marker evaluation. Because of low indices of individuality, conventional cutoff limits are inappropriate both for initial identification and for follow-up of breast cancer....

  14. An O antigen capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboni, Mariaelena; Pédron, Thierry; Rossi, Omar; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Citiulo, Francesco; MacLennan, Calman A; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R; Saul, Allan; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment.

  15. An O antigen capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaelena Caboni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment.

  16. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.Y.G. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada); Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  17. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M

    1987-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies with B-G antigen (major histocompatibility complex class IV) specificity were obtained after immunization with erythrocytes or partially purified B-G antigen. The specificities of the hybridoma antibodies were determined by precipitation of B-G antigens from 125I-label...

  18. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However......, the barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  19. Radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsenfeld, O.; Parrott, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of tests using radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological surveys was studied, with particular attention to the likely availability of facilities and personnel in the tropics and arctics, where measurements may be disturbed by climatic influences. The methodology required was to be simple, rapid and suitable for examining large numbers of sera, as for epidemological surveys. In the introduction, limitations of labelled antigen tests are discussed, the choice of radionuclide and measurement methods, test procedures and evaluation of results. Collection, preservation and shipment of speciments (serum, faeces, cerebrospinal fluid, sputum, etc.) are described. Experiments with bacteria and bacterial toxins (Enterobacteriaceae, vibrios, staphylococci, meningococci, etc.), with protozoa and metazoa (Entamoeba hystolytica, Schistosoma mansoni, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodia and other parasites), with viruses (vaccinia, adeno-, polio-, and influenza viruses, etc.), and with fungi are discussed

  20. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Tallóczy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (Meth is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.