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Sample records for antigen-presenting cells measured

  1. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

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    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  2. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

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    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  3. The antigen presenting cells instruct plasma cell differentiation.

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    Xu, Wei; Banchereau, Jacques

    2014-01-06

    The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but non-specific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells (PCs), which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only "signal 1" (the antigen), but also "signal 2" to directly instruct the differentiation process of PCs in a T-cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching, and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  4. Effective antigen presentation to helper T cells by human eosinophils.

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    Farhan, Ruhaifah K; Vickers, Mark A; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Hall, Andrew M; Barker, Robert N; Walsh, Garry M

    2016-12-01

    Although eosinophils are inflammatory cells, there is increasing attention on their immunomodulatory roles. For example, murine eosinophils can present antigen to CD4 + T helper (Th) cells, but it remains unclear whether human eosinophils also have this ability. This study determined whether human eosinophils present a range of antigens, including allergens, to activate Th cells, and characterized their expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules required for effective presentation. Human peripheral blood eosinophils purified from non-allergic donors were pulsed with the antigens house dust mite extract (HDM), Timothy Grass extract (TG) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD), before co-culture with autologous CD4 + Th cells. Proliferative and cytokine responses were measured, with eosinophil expression of HLA-DR/DP/DQ and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 determined by flow cytometry. Eosinophils pulsed with HDM, TG or PPD drove Th cell proliferation, with the response strength dependent on antigen concentration. The cytokine responses varied with donor and antigen, and were not biased towards any particular Th subset, often including combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Eosinophils up-regulated surface expression of HLA-DR/DP/DQ, CD80, CD86 and CD40 in culture, increases that were sustained over 5 days when incubated with antigens, including HDM, or the major allergens it contains, Der p I or Der p II. Human eosinophils can, therefore, act as effective antigen-presenting cells to stimulate varied Th cell responses against a panel of antigens including HDM, TG or PPD, an ability that may help to determine the development of allergic disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Bioengineering of Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells and Lymphoid Organs.

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    Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Ye, Yanqi; Bomba, Hunter N; Gu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The immune system protects the body against a wide range of infectious diseases and cancer by leveraging the efficiency of immune cells and lymphoid organs. Over the past decade, immune cell/organ therapies based on the manipulation, infusion, and implantation of autologous or allogeneic immune cells/organs into patients have been widely tested and have made great progress in clinical applications. Despite these advances, therapy with natural immune cells or lymphoid organs is relatively expensive and time-consuming. Alternatively, biomimetic materials and strategies have been applied to develop artificial immune cells and lymphoid organs, which have attracted considerable attentions. In this review, we survey the latest studies on engineering biomimetic materials for immunotherapy, focusing on the perspectives of bioengineering artificial antigen presenting cells and lymphoid organs. The opportunities and challenges of this field are also discussed.

  6. Granulocytes: New Members of the Antigen-Presenting Cell Family

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    Ang Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytes, the most abundant types of leukocytes, are the first line of defense against pathogen invasion. However, the plasticity and diversity of granulocytes have been increasingly revealed, especially with regard to their versatile functions in orchestrating adaptive immune responses. A substantial body of recent evidence demonstrates that granulocytes can acquire the function as antigen-presenting cells under pathological or inflammatory conditions. In addition, they can acquire surface expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules as well as T cell stimulatory behavior when cultured with selected cytokines. The classic view of granulocytes as terminally differentiated, short-lived phagocytes is therefore changing to phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous cells that are engaged in cross-talk with other leukocyte populations and provide an additional link between innate and adaptive immunity. In this brief review, we summarize the current knowledge on the antigen-presenting capacity of granulocyte subsets (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Underlying mechanisms, relevant physiological significance and potential controversies are also discussed.

  7. Modulation of antigen presenting cell functions during chronic HPV infection

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    Abate Assefa Bashaw

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV infect basal keratinocytes, where in some individuals they evade host immune responses and persist. Persistent HR-HPV infection of the cervix causes precancerous neoplasia that can eventuate in cervical cancer. Dendritic cells (DCs are efficient in priming/cross-priming antigen-specific T cells and generating antiviral and antitumor cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, HR-HPV have adopted various immunosuppressive strategies, with modulation of DC function crucial to escape from the host adaptive immune response. HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter recruitment and localization of epidermal DCs, while soluble regulatory factors derived from HPV-induced hyperplastic epithelium change DC development and influence initiation of specific cellular immune responses. This review focuses on current evidence for HR-HPV manipulation of antigen presentation in dendritic cells and escape from host immunity.

  8. Antigen presentation by resting B cells. Radiosensitivity of the antigen-presentation function and two distinct pathways of T cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; DeFranco, A.L.; Paul, W.E.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this report we have examined the ability of small resting B cells to act as antigen-presenting cells (APC) to antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cells as assessed by either T cell proliferation or T cell-dependent B cell stimulation. We found that 10 of 14 in vitro antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cell clones and lines and three of four T cell hybridomas could be induced to either proliferate or secrete IL-2 in the presence of lightly irradiated (1,000 rads) purified B cells and the appropriate foreign antigen. All T cell lines and hybridomas were stimulated to proliferate or make IL-2 by macrophage- and dendritic cell-enriched populations and all T cells tested except one hybridoma caused B cell activation when stimulated with B cells as APC. Furthermore, lightly irradiated, highly purified syngeneic B cells were as potent a source of APC for inducing B cell activation as were low density dendritic and macrophage-enriched cells. Lymph node T cells freshly taken from antigen-primed animals were also found to proliferate when cultured with purified B cells and the appropriate antigen. This APC function was easily measured when the cells were irradiated with 1,000 rads, but was greatly diminished or absent when they were irradiated with 3,300 rads. In addition, this radiosensitivity allowed us to easily distinguish B cell antigen presentation from presentation by the dendritic cell and macrophage, as the latter was resistant to 3,300 rads. Finally, one T cell clone that failed to proliferate when B cells were used as APC was able to recruit allogeneic B cells to proliferate in the presence of syngeneic B cells and the appropriate antigen. This result suggests that there are at least two distinct pathways of activation in T cells, one that leads to T cell proliferation and one that leads to the secretion of B cell recruitment factor(s)

  9. Single cell biochemistry to visualize antigen presentation and drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griekspoor, Alexander Christiaan

    2006-01-01

    Many cellular processes are studied by biochemical techniques. Usually, this involves experiments where large number of cells are lysed, protein content is subsequently isolated and studied using antibodies to detect changes in protein levels, post-translational modifications, pairing with partner

  10. Skewing to the LFA-3 adhesion pathway by influenza infection of antigen-presenting cells

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    van Kemenade, F. J.; Kuijpers, K. C.; de Waal-Malefijt, R.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of influenza (FLU) infection on heterotypic conjugate formation between antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes has been studied with FLU-specific T cell clones and FLU-infected B-lymphoblastoid cells (B-LCL). Conjugate formation between FLU-infected B-LCL (FLU+ B-LCL) and T cells was

  11. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

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    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  12. Impact of aging on antigen presentation cell function of dendritic cells.

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    Wong, Christine; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2013-08-01

    Older people exhibit increased mortality to infections and cancer as compared to younger people, indicating that aging impairs immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key for bridging the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system by priming antigen specific T cells. Discerning how aging impacts DC function to initiate adaptive immune responses is of great biomedical importance as this could lead to the development of novel therapeutics to enhance immunity with aging. This review details reports indicating that aging impairs the antigen presenting function of DCs but highlights other studies indicating preserved DC function with aging. How aging impacts antigen presentation by DCs is complex and without a clear unifying biological underpinning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Modulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Responses to Bacterial DNA

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    Campeau, J. L.; Salim, S. Y.; Albert, E. J.; Hotte, N.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells and antigen-presenting cells orchestrate mucosal innate immunity. This study investigated the role of bacterial DNA in modulating epithelial and bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells (BM-APCs) and subsequent T-lymphocyte responses. Murine MODE-K epithelial cells and BM-APCs were treated with DNA from either Bifidobacterium breve or Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin directly and under coculture conditions with CD4+ T cells. Apical stimulation of MODE-K cells with S. Dublin DNA enhanced secretion of cytokines from underlying BM-APCs and induced interleukin-17 (IL-17) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion from CD4+ T cells. Bacterial DNA isolated from either strain induced maturation and increased cytokine secretion from BM-APCs. Conditioned medium from S. Dublin-treated MODE-K cells elicited an increase in cytokine secretion similar to that seen for S. Dublin DNA. Treatment of conditioned medium from MODE-K cells with RNase and protease prevented the S. Dublin-induced increased cytokine secretion. Oral feeding of mice with B. breve DNA resulted in enhanced levels of colonic IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) compared with what was seen for mice treated with S. Dublin DNA. In contrast, feeding mice with S. Dublin DNA increased levels of colonic IL-17 and IL-12p70. T cells from S. Dublin DNA-treated mice secreted high levels of IL-12 and IFN-γ compared to controls and B. breve DNA-treated mice. These results demonstrate that intestinal epithelial cells are able to modulate subsequent antigen-presenting and T-cell responses to bacterial DNA with pathogenic but not commensal bacterial DNA inducing effector CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:22615241

  14. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

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    Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2013-01-01

    receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells...

  15. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

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    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal g...... for MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  16. Adoptive cancer immunotherapy using DNA-demethylated T helper cells as antigen-presenting cells

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    Kirkin, Alexei F.; Dzhandzhugazyan, Karine N.; Guldberg, Per

    2018-01-01

    In cancer cells, cancer/testis (CT) antigens become epigenetically derepressed through DNA demethylation and constitute attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Here we report that activated CD4+ T helper cells treated with a DNA-demethylating agent express a broad repertoire of endogenous CT...... antigens and can be used as antigen-presenting cells to generate autologous cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer cells. In vitro, activated CTLs induce HLA-restricted lysis of tumor cells of different histological types, as well as cells expressing single CT antigens. In a phase 1 trial of 25...... patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme, cytotoxic lymphocytes homed to the tumor, with tumor regression ongoing in three patients for 14, 22, and 27 months, respectively. No treatment-related adverse effects were observed. This proof-of-principle study shows that tumor-reactive effector cells can...

  17. Antigen presentation and MHC class II expression by human esophageal epithelial cells: role in eosinophilic esophagitis.

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    Mulder, Daniel J; Pooni, Aman; Mak, Nanette; Hurlbut, David J; Basta, Sameh; Justinich, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses. Under pathological conditions, epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces act as nonprofessional APCs, thereby regulating immune responses at the site of exposure. Epithelial cells in the esophagus may contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) by presenting antigens on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Our goal was to demonstrate the ability of esophageal epithelial cells to process and present antigens on the MHC class II system and to investigate the contribution of epithelial cell antigen presentation to EoE. Immunohistochemistry detected HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86 expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected interferon-γ (IFNγ) in esophageal biopsies. Antigen presentation was studied using the human esophageal epithelial cell line HET-1A by reverse transcriptase-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. T helper cell lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and IL-2 secretion. IFNγ and MHC class II were increased in mucosa of patients with EoE. IFNγ increased mRNA of HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, HLA-DR, and CIITA in HET-1A cells. HET-1A engulfed cell debris and processed ovalbumin. HET-1A cells expressed HLA-DR after IFNγ treatment. HET-1A stimulated T helper cell activation. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of esophageal epithelial cells to act as nonprofessional APCs in the presence of IFNγ. Esophageal epithelial cell antigen presentation may contribute to the pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

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    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  19. Interaction of Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) Nanoparticles with Antigen Presenting Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Rae, Chris S.; Manchester, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant viruses such as Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are increasingly being developed for applications in nanobiotechnology including vaccine development because of their potential for producing large quantities of antigenic material in plant hosts. In order to improve efficacy of viral nanoparticles in these types of roles, an investigation of the individual cell types that interact with the particles is critical. In particular, it is important to understand the interactions of a potential vaccine with antigen presenting cells (APCs) of the immune system. CPMV was previously shown to interact with vimentin displayed on cell surfaces to mediate cell entry, but the expression of surface vimentin on APCs has not been characterized. Methodology The binding and internalization of CPMV by several populations of APCs was investigated both in vitro and in vivo by flow cytometry and fluorescence confocal microscopy. The association of the particles with mouse gastrointestinal epithelium and Peyer's patches was also examined by confocal microscopy. The expression of surface vimentin on APCs was also measured. Conclusions We found that CPMV is bound and internalized by subsets of several populations of APCs both in vitro and in vivo following intravenous, intraperitoneal, and oral administration, and also by cells isolated from the Peyer's patch following gastrointestinal delivery. Surface vimentin was also expressed on APC populations that could internalize CPMV. These experiments demonstrate that APCs capture CPMV particles in vivo, and that further tuning the interaction with surface vimentin may facilitate increased uptake by APCs and priming of antibody responses. These studies also indicate that CPMV particles likely access the systemic circulation following oral delivery via the Peyer's patch. PMID:19956734

  20. Antigen presenting cells costimulatory signaling during pre-implantation pregnancy 

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    Anna Sławek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Success of pregnancy depends on many factors. Three phenomena inducing immune tolerance against semi-allogeneic conceptus may play a crucial role in the pre-implantation period of pregnancy: influence of sex hormones in sex cycle, presence of oocyte or embryo and the presence of semen in the female reproductive tract. On the other hand dendritic cells are the most effective antigen-presenting cells in regulation of immune phenomena and also are considered as potent participants in inducing immune tolerance in the pregnancy. They communicate with T cells in cell contact-dependent manner or via cytokines. During cell-cell contacts, costimulatory molecules play a key role and their expression is often dependent on cytokines milieu. Both costimulatory molecules and cytokines influence generation of T regulatory cells. Interactions of these molecules are closely related. In this paper we would like to pay attention to the importance of antigen presenting cells costimulatory potency in immune regulation during a pre-implantation period of pregnancy.

  1. A population dynamics analysis of the interaction between adaptive regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells.

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    David Fouchet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks that can be accomplished by a network. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model to describe a interaction network of adaptive regulatory T cells, in which mature precursor T cells may differentiate into either adaptive regulatory T cells or effector T cells, depending on the activation state of the cell by which the antigen was presented. Using an equilibrium analysis of the mathematical model we show that, for some parameters, the network has two stable equilibrium states: one in which effector T cells are strongly regulated by regulatory T cells and another in which effector T cells are not regulated because the regulatory T cell population is vanishingly small. We then simulate different types of perturbations, such as the introduction of an antigen into a virgin system, and look at the state into which the system falls. We find that whether or not the interaction network switches from the regulated (tolerant state to the unregulated state depends on the strength of the antigenic stimulus and the state from which the network has been perturbed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the interaction network studied in this paper plays an essential part in generating and maintaining tolerance against allergens and self-antigens.

  2. Activation of professional antigen presenting cells by acharan sulfate isolated from giant African snail, Achatina fulica.

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    Kim, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Young-Ran; Im, Sun-A; Lee, Jae-Kwon; Kim, Yeong Shik; Sim, Joon-Soo; Choi, Hyung Seok; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2007-07-01

    Acharan sulfate isolated from the giant African snail, Achatina fulica, has been reported to have antitumor activity in vivo. In an effort to determine the mechanisms of its antitumor activity, we examined the effects of acharan sulfate on professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Acharan sulfate increased the phagocytic activity, the production of cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and the release of nitric oxide on a macrophage cell line, Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, acharan sulfate induced phenotypic and functional maturation of immature dendritic cells (DCs). Immature DCs cultured with acharan sulfate expressed higher levels of class II MHC molecules and major co-stimulatory molecules such as B7-1, B7-2, and CD40. Functional maturation of immature DCs cultured in the presence of acharan sulfate was confirmed by the increased allostimulatory capacity and IL-12 production. These results suggest that the antitumor activity of acharan sulfate is partly due to the activation of professional antigen presenting cells.

  3. Activation of nickel-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells.

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    Nasorri, Francesca; Sebastiani, Silvia; Mariani, Valentina; De Pità, Ornella; Puddu, Pietro; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Cavani, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis ensues from exaggerated T cell responses to haptens. Dendritic cells are required for the initiation of hapten sensitization, but they may not be necessary for disease expression. Here we investigated the antigen-presenting cell requirement of nickel-specific CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from the blood of six allergic individuals. A significant proportion (42 out of 121; 35%) of the T cell clones proliferated in vitro to nickel also in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells, suggesting a direct T-T hapten presentation. Antigen-presenting-cell-independent T cells showed a predominant T helper 1 phenotype. Nickel recognition by these T cells was major histocompatibility complex class II restricted, not influenced by CD28 triggering, independent from their state of activation, and did not require processing. The capacity of this T cell subset to be directly stimulated by nickel was not due to unique antigen-presenting properties, as both antigen-presenting-cell-dependent and antigen-presenting-cell-independent clones displayed comparable levels of HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86, and were equally capable of presenting nickel to antigen-presenting-cell-independent clones. In contrast, neither T cell types activated antigen-presenting-cell-dependent T lymphocytes. T-T presentation induced T cell receptor downregulation, CD25, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR upregulation, and interferon-gamma release, although to a lesser extent compared to those induced by dendritic cell-T presentation. Following T-T presentation, the clones did not undergo unresponsiveness and maintained the capacity to respond to dendritic cells pulsed with antigen. In aggregate, our data suggest that antigen-presenting-cell-independent T cell activation can effectively amplify hapten- specific immune responses.

  4. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

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    Botros B. Shenoda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages.

  5. Rational design of nanoparticles towards targeting antigen-presenting cells and improved T cell priming.

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    Zupančič, Eva; Curato, Caterina; Paisana, Maria; Rodrigues, Catarina; Porat, Ziv; Viana, Ana S; Afonso, Carlos A M; Pinto, João; Gaspar, Rogério; Moreira, João N; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Jung, Steffen; Florindo, Helena F

    2017-07-28

    Vaccination is a promising strategy to trigger and boost immune responses against cancer or infectious disease. We have designed, synthesized and characterized aliphatic-polyester (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to investigate how the nature of protein association (adsorbed versus entrapped) and polymer/surfactant concentrations impact on the generation and modulation of antigen-specific immune responses. The ability of the NP formulations to target dendritic cells (DC), be internalized and activate the T cells was characterized and optimized in vitro and in vivo using markers of DC activation and co-stimulatory molecules. Ovalbumin (OVA) was used as a model antigen in combination with the engraftment of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, carrying a transgenic OVA-responding T cell receptor (TCR), to trace and characterize the activation of antigen-specific CD4 + and CD8 + lymph node T cells upon NP vaccination. Accordingly, the phenotype and frequency of immune cell stimulation induced by the NP loaded with OVA, isolated or in combination with synthetic unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) motifs, were characterized. DC-NP interactions increased with incubation time, presenting internalization values between 50 and 60% and 30-40%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Interestingly, animal immunization with antigen-adsorbed NP up-regulated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (MHCII), while NP entrapping the antigen up-regulated MHCI, suggesting a more efficient cross-presentation. On the other hand, rather surprisingly, the surfactant used in the NP formulation had a major impact on the activation of antigen presenting cells (APC). In fact, DC collected from lymph nodes of animals immunized with NP prepared using poly(vinil alcohol) (PVA), as a surfactant, expressed significantly higher levels of CD86, MHCI and MHCII. In addition, those NP prepared with PVA and co-entrapping OVA and the toll

  6. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

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    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  7. Comparison of microglia and infiltrating CD11c+ cells as antigen presenting cells for T cell proliferation and cytokine response

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    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Løbner, Morten; Cédile, Oriane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue-resident antigen-presenting cells (APC) exert a major influence on the local immune environment. Microglia are resident myeloid cells in the central nervous system (CNS), deriving from early post-embryonic precursors, distinct from adult hematopoietic lineages. Dendritic cells...... (DC) and macrophages infiltrate the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Microglia are not considered to be as effective APC as DC or macrophages. METHODS: In this work we compared the antigen presenting capacity of CD11c+ and CD11c- microglia subsets with infiltrating CD11c......+ APC, which include DC. The microglial subpopulations (CD11c- CD45dim CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD45dim CD11b+) as well as infiltrating CD11c+ CD45high cells were sorted from CNS of C57BL/6 mice with EAE. Sorted cells were characterised by flow cytometry for surface phenotype and by quantitative real-time PCR...

  8. The activation of the adaptive immune system: cross-talk between antigen-presenting cells, T cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, Joke M M; Arens, Ramon; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of T and B cells that express clonally distributed antigen receptors. To achieve functional adaptive immune responses, antigen-specific T cell populations are stimulated by professional antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DCs), which provide crucial stimulatory signals for efficient expansion and development of effector functions. Antigen-specific B cells receive costimulatory signals from helper T cells to stimulate affinity maturation and isotype switching. Here we elaborate on the interactions between DCs, T cells and B cells, and on the important signals for efficient induction of adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2005-01-01

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV WSU5 infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with 51 Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection

  10. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies.

  11. A sub-population of circulating porcine gammadelta T cells can act as professional antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, H-H; Denyer, M S; Wileman, T E

    2002-09-10

    A sub-population of circulating porcine gammadelta T cells express cell surface antigens associated with antigen presenting cells (APCs), and are able to take up soluble antigen very effectively. Functional antigen presentation by gammadelta T cells to memory helper T cells was studied by inbred pig lymphocytes immunised with ovalbumin (OVA). After removing all conventional APCs from the peripheral blood of immunised pigs, the remaining lymphocytes still proliferated when stimulated with OVA. When gammadelta T cells were further depleted, OVA specific proliferation was abolished, but reconstitution with gammadelta T cells restored proliferation. The proliferation was blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against MHC class II or CD4, and by pre-treatment of gammadelta T cells with chloroquine. These results indicate that a sub-population of circulating porcine gammadelta T cells act as APCs and present antigen via MHC class II.

  12. Generation of competent bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells from the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell Regina M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infections with Sin Nombre virus (SNV and related New World hantaviruses often lead to hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, a sometimes fatal illness. Lungs of patients who die from HCPS exhibit cytokine-producing mononuclear infiltrates and pronounced pulmonary inflammation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the principal natural hosts of SNV, in which the virus establishes life-long persistence without conspicuous pathology. Little is known about the mechanisms SNV employs to evade the immune response of deer mice, and experimental examination of this question has been difficult because of a lack of methodologies for examining such responses during infection. One such deficiency is our inability to characterize T cell responses because susceptible syngeneic deer mice are not available. Results To solve this problem, we have developed an in vitro method of expanding and generating competent antigen presenting cells (APC from deer mouse bone marrow using commercially-available house mouse (Mus musculus granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. These cells are capable of processing and presenting soluble protein to antigen-specific autologous helper T cells in vitro. Inclusion of antigen-specific deer mouse antibody augments T cell stimulation, presumably through Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. Conclusions The use of these APC has allowed us to dramatically expand deer mouse helper T cells in culture and should permit extensive characterization of T cell epitopes. Considering the evolutionary divergence between deer mice and house mice, it is probable that this method will be useful to other investigators using unconventional models of rodent-borne diseases.

  13. Engineered artificial antigen presenting cells facilitate direct and efficient expansion of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coukos George

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of a standardized platform for the rapid expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs with anti-tumor function from patients with limited TIL numbers or tumor tissues challenges their clinical application. Methods To facilitate adoptive immunotherapy, we applied genetically-engineered K562 cell-based artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs for the direct and rapid expansion of TILs isolated from primary cancer specimens. Results TILs outgrown in IL-2 undergo rapid, CD28-independent expansion in response to aAPC stimulation that requires provision of exogenous IL-2 cytokine support. aAPCs induce numerical expansion of TILs that is statistically similar to an established rapid expansion method at a 100-fold lower feeder cell to TIL ratio, and greater than those achievable using anti-CD3/CD28 activation beads or extended IL-2 culture. aAPC-expanded TILs undergo numerical expansion of tumor antigen-specific cells, remain amenable to secondary aAPC-based expansion, and have low CD4/CD8 ratios and FOXP3+ CD4+ cell frequencies. TILs can also be expanded directly from fresh enzyme-digested tumor specimens when pulsed with aAPCs. These "young" TILs are tumor-reactive, positively skewed in CD8+ lymphocyte composition, CD28 and CD27 expression, and contain fewer FOXP3+ T cells compared to parallel IL-2 cultures. Conclusion Genetically-enhanced aAPCs represent a standardized, "off-the-shelf" platform for the direct ex vivo expansion of TILs of suitable number, phenotype and function for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

  14. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Human Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Respond to Antigen-Presenting Cells Exposed to Lipids from Olea europaea Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abos Gracia, Beatriz; López Relaño, Juan; Revilla, Ana; Castro, Lourdes; Villalba, Mayte; Martín Adrados, Beatriz; Regueiro, Jose Ramon; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Martínez Naves, Eduardo; Gómez Del Moral, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Allergic sensitization might be influenced by the lipids present in allergens, which can be recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of olive pollen lipids in human APCs, including monocytes as well as monocyte-derived macrophages (Mϕ) and dendritic cells (DCs). Lipids were extracted from olive (Olea europaea) pollen grains. Invariant (i)NKT cells, monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs were obtained from buffy coats of healthy blood donors, and their cell phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. iNKT cytotoxicity was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Gene expression of CD1A and CD1D was performed by RT-PCR, and the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α cytokines by monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that monocytes and monocyte-derived Mϕ treated with olive pollen lipids strongly activate iNKT cells. We observed several phenotypic modifications in the APCs upon exposure to pollen-derived lipids. Both Mϕ and monocytes treated with olive pollen lipids showed an increase in CD1D gene expression, whereas upregulation of cell surface CD1d protein occurred only in Mϕ. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of human serum enhance their surface CD1d expression when exposed to olive pollen lipids. Finally, olive pollen lipids were able to stimulate the production of IL-6 but downregulated the production of lipopolysaccharide- induced IL-10 by Mϕ. Olive pollen lipids alter the phenotype of monocytes, Mϕ, and DCs, resulting in the activation of NKT cells, which have the potential to influence allergic immune responses. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Despite disorganized synapse structure, Th2 cells maintain directional delivery of CD40L to antigen-presenting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardell, Jennifer L; Parker, David C

    2017-01-01

    Upon recognition of peptide displayed on MHC molecules, Th1 and Th2 cells form distinct immunological synapse structures. Th1 cells have a bull's eye synapse structure with TCR/ MHC-peptide interactions occurring central to a ring of adhesion molecules, while Th2 cells have a multifocal synapse with small clusters of TCR/MHC interactions throughout the area of T cell/antigen-presenting cell interaction. In this study, we investigated whether this structural difference in the immunological synapse affects delivery of T cell help. The immunological synapse is thought to ensure antigen-specific delivery of cytolytic granules and killing of target cells by NK cells and cytolytic T cells. In helper T cells, it has been proposed that the immunological synapse may direct delivery of other effector molecules including cytokines. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a membrane-bound cytokine essential for antigen-specific T cell help for B cells in the antibody response. We incubated Th1 and Th2 cells overnight with a mixture of antigen-presenting and bystander B cells, and the delivery of CD40L to B cells and subsequent B cell responses were compared. Despite distinct immunological synapse structures, Th1 and Th2 cell do not differ in their ability to deliver CD40L and T cell help in an antigen-specific fashion, or in their susceptibility to inhibition of help by a blocking anti-CD40L antibody.

  17. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P[2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells

  18. Interleukin production by neonatal spleen cells during and as a result of antigen presentation: The effect of ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, D.; Gershon, H.

    1989-01-01

    Antigen presentation by neonatal murine spleen cells and the production of lymphokines and interleukins involved in the stimulation of a T-helper-2 (TH2) cell line (D10-G4.1) were studied as were the effects of ultra violet (UV)-irradiation on this system. Neonatal spleen cells are less capable than adult cells of performing the initial steps of the immune response required for antigen dependent activation of TH2 cells. These steps include soluble antigen processing and presentation and as a result reduced production of IL-4 and IL-1-Inducer Factor (IL-1-IF) by the T-helper cells and reduced production of IL-1 and IL-2 by the antigen presenting cell population. Spontaneous membrane IL-1 activity is low in the neonate, however, when exposed to IL-1-IF they can express adult levels. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the antigen presenting population has a damaging effect on all the above mentioned processes. Antigen processing and presentation, induction of D10 IL-4 production and proliferation, and IL-2 production demonstrate two different age related patterns of UV-irradiation induced damage: a dose dependent inhibition when adult cells are irradiated and an inverse effect in which low doses of irradiation were more inhibitory than higher doses when neonatal cells are irradiated. However, the secretion and membrane expression of IL-1 by both age groups are directly and totally inhibited by the range of UV-irradiation doses used and cannot be reinduced with a supplement of a crude IL-1-IF. While the capacity to produced IL-1 is totally destroyed by UV-irradiation, the ability to produce IL-2 remains intact and remains responsive to an IL-2-Inducer activity during proper antigen presentation. The low responses of neonatal antigen presenting spleen cell populations and the damaging effect of UV on both neonatal and adult responses are not due to the induction of suppressor factors

  19. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP) : a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lord, Phillip; Aguillon, Juan C; Anderson, Amy E; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A; Hutchinson, James A; Isaacs, John D; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making

  20. Probiotic metabolites from Bacillus coagulans GanedenBC30TM support maturation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Kathleen F; Redman, Kimberlee A; Carter, Steve G; Keller, David; Farmer, Sean; Endres, John R; Jensen, Gitte S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of probiotic metabolites on maturation stage of antigen-presenting immune cells. METHODS: Ganeden Bacillus coagulans 30 (GBC30) bacterial cultures in log phase were used to isolate the secreted metabolite (MET) fraction. A second fraction was made to generate a crude cell-wall-enriched fraction, by centrifugation and lysis, followed by washing. A preparation of MET was subjected to size exclusion centrifugation, generating three fractions: < 3 kDa, 3-30 kDa, and 30-200 kDa and activities were tested in comparison to crude MET and cell wall in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) as a source of antigen-presenting mononuclear phagocytes. The maturation status of mononuclear phagocytes was evaluated by staining with monoclonal antibodies towards CD14, CD16, CD80 and CD86 and analyzed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Treatment of PBMC with MET supported maturation of mononuclear phagocytes toward both macrophage and dendritic cell phenotypes. The biological activity unique to the metabolites included a reduction of CD14+ CD16+ pro-inflammatory cells, and this property was associated with the high molecular weight metabolite fraction. Changes were also seen for the dendritic cell maturation markers CD80 and CD86. On CD14dim cells, an increase in both CD80 and CD86 expression was seen, in contrast to a selective increase in CD86 expression on CD14bright cells. The co-expression of CD80 and CD86 indicates effective antigen presentation to T cells and support of T helper cell differentiation. The selective expression of CD86 in the absence of CD80 points to a role in generating T regulatory cells. CONCLUSION: The data show that a primary mechanism of action of GBC30 metabolites involves support of more mature phenotypes of antigen-presenting cells, important for immunological decision-making. PMID:22563167

  1. Direct stimulation of T cells by membrane vesicles from antigen-presenting cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovář, Marek; Boyman, O.; Shen, X.; Hwang, I.; Kohler, R.; Sprent, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 31 (2006), s. 11671-11676 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : immunotherapy * t cell priming * tumors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.643, year: 2006

  2. Loss of Proliferation and Antigen Presentation Activity following Internalization of Polydispersed Carbon Nanotubes by Primary Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mandavi; Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells) were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells. PMID:22384094

  3. Repopulated antigen presenting cells induced an imbalanced differentiation of the helper T cells in whole body gamma irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Ran; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Kee [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic irradiation of cancer patients, although it may be protected by several antioxidant agents against free radicals, often induces chronic sequelae such as inflammation (allergic inflammation). This is a limiting factor for radiotherapy. Following radiotherapy, the inflammation or injury can occur in any organ with a high radiosensitivity such as the lung, bladder, kidney, liver, stomach and intestine. The mechanism by which ionizing radiation initiates inflammation is, however, poorly understood. In recent studies, it was suggested that a factor for irradiation-induced inflammation might be the over production of IL-4 that enhances fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. During the early stages after irradiation, type 2 of the helper T cells might be the major source of IL-4, and later on there seems to be an activation of the other IL-4 producing cell types, e.q. macrophages or mast cells. This is interesting because inflammation is classically seen to be dominated by Th1 cells secreting IFN-{gamma}. In the previous study, we were interested in the enhancement of the IL-4 and the IgE production during the development of immune cells after {gamma}-irradiation. We were able to deduce that IL-4 production was increased because of the shifted differentiation of the naive Th cells by the repopulated antigen presenting cells after irradiation. The aim of the present study was to precisely define whether antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of whole body irradiation-treated mice could influence the shifted differentiation of the Th cells. This view can be demonstrated by confirming that the shifted functional status of the Th cells is induced by the altered function of the repopulated macrophages after whole body irradiation (WBI)

  4. Immunologic effects of whole body ultraviolet (uv) irradiation. II. Defect in splenic adherent cell antigen presentation for stimulation of T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Fox, I.J.; Greene, M.I.; Benacerraf, B.; Germain, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation has been shown to alter many parameters of the immunologic reactivity of mice. The altered responsiveness of uv-irradiated mice, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and primary in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses to T-dependent antigens, has recently been correlated with a functional defect in the splenic adherent cell population of these animals. The present studies describe a model of this altered responsiveness, which allows further clarification of the effects of external uv irradiation on the splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) in its interactions with T cells

  5. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Bone marrow-derived thymic antigen-presenting cells determine self-recognition of Ia-restricted T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, D.L.; Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors previously have demonstrated that in radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, T-cell self-Ia restriction specificity appeared to correlate with the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting (or dendritic) cell in the thymus during T-cell development. However, these correlations were necessarily indirect because of the difficulty in assaying thymic function directly by adult thymus transplant, which has in the past been uniformly unsuccessful. They now report success in obtaining functional T cells from nude mice grafted with adult thymuses reduced in size by treatment of the thymus donor with anti-thymocyte globulin and cortisone. When (B10 Scn X B10.D2)F1 nude mice (I-Ab,d) are given parental B10.D2 (I-Ad) thymus grafts subcutaneously, their T cells are restricted to antigen recognition in association with I-Ad gene products but not I-Ab gene products. Furthermore, thymuses from (B10 X B10.D2)F1 (I-Ab,d)----B10 (I-Ab) chimeras transplanted 6 months or longer after radiation (a time at which antigen-presenting cell function is of donor bone marrow phenotype) into (B10 X B10.D2)F1 nude mice generate T cells restricted to antigen recognition in association with both I-Ad and I-Ab gene products. Thymuses from totally allogeneic bone marrow chimeras appear to generate T cells of bone marrow donor and thymic host restriction specificity. Thus, when thymus donors are radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, the T-cell I-region restriction of the nude mice recipients is determined at least in part by the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived thymic antigen presenting cells or dendritic cells in the chimeric thymus

  7. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  8. Interferon-β Suppresses Murine Th1 Cell Function in the Absence of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Nicolas; Baillargeon, Joanie; Doss, Prenitha Mercy Ignatius Arokia; Roy, Andrée-Pascale; Rangachari, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β is a front-line therapy for the treatment of the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis. However, its immunosuppressive mechanism of function remains incompletely understood. While it has been proposed that IFN-β suppresses the function of inflammatory myelin antigen-reactive T cells by promoting the release of immunomodulatory cytokines such as IL-27 from antigen-presenting cells (APCs), its direct effects on inflammatory CD4+ Th1 cells are less clear. Here, we establish that IFN-β inhibits mouse IFN-γ+ Th1 cell function in the absence of APCs. CD4+ T cells express the type I interferon receptor, and IFN-β can suppress Th1 cell proliferation under APC-free stimulation conditions. IFN-β-treated myelin antigen-specific Th1 cells are impaired in their ability to induce severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) upon transfer to lymphocyte-deficient Rag1-/- mice. Polarized Th1 cells downregulate IFN-γ and IL-2, and upregulate the negative regulatory receptor Tim-3, when treated with IFN-β in the absence of APCs. Further, IFN-β treatment of Th1 cells upregulates phosphorylation of Stat1, and downregulates phosphorylation of Stat4. Our data indicate that IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells are directly responsive to IFN-β and point to a novel mechanism of IFN-β-mediated T cell suppression that is independent of APC-derived signals. PMID:25885435

  9. Prolonged antigen presentation is required for optimal CD8+ T cell responses against malaria liver stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A Cockburn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunization with irradiated sporozoites is currently the most effective vaccination strategy against liver stages of malaria parasites, yet the mechanisms underpinning the success of this approach are unknown. Here we show that the complete development of protective CD8+ T cell responses requires prolonged antigen presentation. Using TCR transgenic cells specific for the malaria circumsporozoite protein, a leading vaccine candidate, we found that sporozoite antigen persists for over 8 weeks after immunization--a remarkable finding since irradiated sporozoites are incapable of replication and do not differentiate beyond early liver stages. Persisting antigen was detected in lymphoid organs and depends on the presence of CD11c+ cells. Prolonged antigen presentation enhanced the magnitude of the CD8+ T cell response in a number of ways. Firstly, reducing the time primed CD8+ T cells were exposed to antigen in vivo severely reduced the final size of the developing memory population. Secondly, fully developed memory cells expanded in previously immunized mice but not when transferred to naïve animals. Finally, persisting antigen was able to prime naïve cells, including recent thymic emigrants, to become functional effector cells capable of eliminating parasites in the liver. Together these data show that the optimal development of protective CD8+ T cell immunity against malaria liver stages is dependent upon the prolonged presentation of sporozoite-derived antigen.

  10. Protein-scaffold Directed Nanoscale Assembly of T Cell Ligands: Artificial Antigen Presentation with Defined Valency, Density and Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mason R; Tolbert, Stephanie V; Wen, Fei

    2018-05-07

    Tuning antigen presentation to T cells is a critical step in investigating key aspects of T cell activation. However, existing technologies have limited ability to control the spatial and stoichiometric organization of T cell ligands on 3D surfaces. Here, we developed an artificial antigen presentation platform based on protein-scaffold directed assembly that allows fine control over the spatial and stoichiometric organization of T cell ligands on a 3D yeast-cell surface. Using this system, we observed that the T cell activation threshold on a 3D surface is independent of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) valency, but instead determined by the overall pMHC surface density. When intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was co-assembled with pMHC, it enhanced antigen recognition sensitivity by 6-fold. Further, T cells responded with different magnitudes to varying ratios of pMHC and ICAM-1 and exhibited a maximum response at a ratio of 15% pMHC and 85% ICAM-1, introducing an additional parameter for tuning T cell activation. This protein-scaffold directed assembly technology is readily transferrable to acellular surfaces for translational research as well as large-scale T-cell manufacturing.

  11. Peripheral blood antigen presenting cell responses in otitis-prone and non-otitis-prone infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Naveen; Nicolosi, Ted; Kaur, Ravinder; Pichichero, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) children represent a new classification of the otitis-prone condition. Previous studies showed dysfunction in Ab, B-cell memory and T-cell memory responses. We sought to determine whether there are defects in numbers, phenotype and/or function of professional APC in the peripheral blood of sOP infants. APC phenotypic counts, MHC II expression and intracellular cytokine levels were determined in response to TLR7/8 (R848) stimulation by flow cytometry. Innate immune mRNA expression was measured using RT-PCR and cytokines were measured using Luminex technology. Significant (P otitis-prone (NOP) age-matched infants. No significant differences in APC activation or function were observed. Expression of various TLRs, intracellular signaling molecules and downstream cytokines was also not found to be significantly different between sOP and NOP infants. Higher numbers of APCs in sOP infants suggest the possibility of a persistent mucosal inflammatory status. Transcriptional and cytokine profiles of PBMCs among sOP infants suggest their systemic innate responses are not different compared to NOP infants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Deletion of Batf3-dependent antigen-presenting cells does not affect atherosclerotic lesion formation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gil-Pulido

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main underlying cause for cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke and its development might be influenced by immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs bridge innate and adaptive immune responses by presenting antigens to T cells and releasing a variety of cytokines. Several subsets of DCs can be discriminated that engage specific transcriptional pathways for their development. Basic leucine zipper transcription factor ATF-like 3 (Batf3 is required for the development of classical CD8α+ and CD103+ DCs. By crossing mice deficient in Batf3 with atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr-/--deficient mice we here aimed to further address the contribution of Batf3-dependent CD8α+ and CD103+ antigen-presenting cells to atherosclerosis. We demonstrate that deficiency in Batf3 entailed mild effects on the immune response in the spleen but did not alter atherosclerotic lesion formation in the aorta or aortic root, nor affected plaque phenotype in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice fed a high fat diet. We thus provide evidence that Batf3-dependent antigen-presenting cells do not have a prominent role in atherosclerosis.

  13. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self ...

  14. Effector CD4+ T cells recognize intravascular antigen presented by patrolling monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhorpe, Clare L V; Norman, M Ursula; Hall, Pam; Snelgrove, Sarah L; Finsterbusch, Michaela; Li, Anqi; Lo, Camden; Tan, Zhe Hao; Li, Songhui; Nilsson, Susan K; Kitching, A Richard; Hickey, Michael J

    2018-02-21

    Although effector CD4 + T cells readily respond to antigen outside the vasculature, how they respond to intravascular antigens is unknown. Here we show the process of intravascular antigen recognition using intravital multiphoton microscopy of glomeruli. CD4 + T cells undergo intravascular migration within uninflamed glomeruli. Similarly, while MHCII is not expressed by intrinsic glomerular cells, intravascular MHCII-expressing immune cells patrol glomerular capillaries, interacting with CD4 + T cells. Following intravascular deposition of antigen in glomeruli, effector CD4 + T-cell responses, including NFAT1 nuclear translocation and decreased migration, are consistent with antigen recognition. Of the MHCII + immune cells adherent in glomerular capillaries, only monocytes are retained for prolonged durations. These cells can also induce T-cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, monocyte depletion reduces CD4 + T-cell-dependent glomerular inflammation. These findings indicate that MHCII + monocytes patrolling the glomerular microvasculature can present intravascular antigen to CD4 + T cells within glomerular capillaries, leading to antigen-dependent inflammation.

  15. B lymphocytes as natural antigen-presenting cells (APC) of their own Ig receptor determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurin, V.L.; Rudensky, A.Yu.; Rabinovich, O.R.; Kulakova, O.G.; Bobreneva, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors use Igk-lb allotype-specific rat T cell proliferation(Pr) in vitro as a model of natural Ig determinants B cell presentation in Ig-specific T-B cell interactions. As shown before Igk-lb-specific responsiveness of AUG(RT-l/sup c/, Igk-la) and WAG (RT-l, Igk-la) rats is controlled by dominant Ir gene, linked to RT-l/sup c/. Only IgG(Igk-lb)-pulsed splenic APC of AUG(responder) but not WAG(non-responder) origin induce specific F 1 (WAGxAUG) T cell Pr. The same restriction was observed if purified B cells from Igk-l congeneic AUG-lb and WAG-lb rats were used as APC. B cell presentation was found to be sensitive to high irradiation dose(2000 rad). Anti-RT-l monoclonal antibody inhibition studies suggested RT-lB(I-A) molecule as a main restricting element of Igk-lb T cell recognition. B cell and splenic APC presentation of Igk-lb allotype was not inhibited by poly- and monoclonal anti-Igk-lb antibodies. Allelic exclusion of Igk-lb presentation by B cells from heterozygous F 1 (WAG-lbx AUG) rats was demonstrated by panning with antiallotypic reagents. Important, that irradiated anti-Igk-lb T cells induce specific Pr of normal Igk-lb-positive B cells. The data demonstrate MHC-restricted B cell presentation of their own receptor determinants, distinct from serologically-defined epitopes. T cell recognition of these determinants induce specific Pr of Ig-recognizing T cells and Ig-presenting B lymphocytes

  16. Clinical-scale elutriation as a means of enriching antigen-presenting cells and manipulating alloreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Garvin, Frances M; Kariotis, Melina R; Yee, Leng L; Hansen, Anna M; Antonenas, Vicki; Sartor, Mary M; Turtle, Cameron J; Gottlieb, David J

    2009-01-01

    Clinical-scale elutriation using the Elutra(c) has been shown to enrich monocytes reliably for immunotherapy protocols. Until now, a detailed assessment of the four (F1-F4) non-monocyte fractions derived from this process has not been performed. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), we performed phenotypic analyses to investigate the possible enrichment of T, B, natural killer (NK) and dendritic cells (DC) or their subsets in one or more Elutra fractions. Blood DC were enriched up to 10-fold in some fractions (F3 and F4) compared with the pre-elutriation apheresis product. This increased the number of DC that could be isolated from a given cell number by immunomagnetic separation. It was also found that CD62L(-) effector memory CD4(+) T cells were enriched in later fractions. In four of five cases tested, cells from F3 demonstrated decreased alloreactive proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction compared with cells from the apheresis product. B cells were enriched in F1 compared with the apheresis product. In addition to providing enrichment of monocytes for the generation of DC, the Elutra enriches cell subsets that may be incorporated into and enhance existing immunotherapy and stem cell transplantation protocols.

  17. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania...

  18. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Furusawa

    Full Text Available The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification.

  19. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification.

  20. Defects in Antigen-Presenting Cells in the BB-DP Rat Model of Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sommandas (Vinod)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractType-1 diabetes is the result of a T cell mediated immune response against the insulin-producing β cells in the islet of Langerhans. In humans, until now, the disease is only clearly detectable at the onset of the disease. Therefore studies to identify initial factors involved in

  1. Microdomains in the membrane landscape shape antigen-presenting cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidscherwoude, M.; Winde, C.M. de; Cambi, A.; Spriel, A.B. van

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane of immune cells is a highly organized cell structure that is key to the initiation and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. It is well-established that immunoreceptors embedded in the plasma membrane have a nonrandom spatial distribution that is important for

  2. Pityriasis rosea (Gibert): abnormal distribution pattern of antigen presenting cells in situ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. D.; Huisman, P. M.; Krieg, S. R.; Faber, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Pityriasis rosea is a skin disease which is obscure in its etiology and pathogenesis. We studied its immunopathology by immunophenotyping the inflammatory cells in situ using monoclonal antibodies that define leukocyte subsets. Findings as to T-cells and their major subsets did not reveal

  3. The effect of interferons and viral proteins on antigen-presenting cells in chronic hepatitis B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boltjes (Arjan)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The innate immune system forms the so-called first line of defense against invading pathogens like viruses. Innate immune cells include phagocytes like monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). Phagocytes sample their environments, binding and taking up viral

  4. Comparing Proteolytic Fingerprints of Antigen-Presenting Cells during Allergen Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Heidi; Weidinger, Tamara; Briza, Peter; Asam, Claudia; Wolf, Martin; Twaroch, Teresa E; Stolz, Frank; Neubauer, Angela; Dall, Elfriede; Hammerl, Peter; Jacquet, Alain; Wallner, Michael

    2017-06-08

    Endolysosomal processing has a critical influence on immunogenicity as well as immune polarization of protein antigens. In industrialized countries, allergies affect around 25% of the population. For the rational design of protein-based allergy therapeutics for immunotherapy, a good knowledge of T cell-reactive regions on allergens is required. Thus, we sought to analyze endolysosomal degradation patterns of inhalant allergens. Four major allergens from ragweed, birch, as well as house dust mites were produced as recombinant proteins. Endolysosomal proteases were purified by differential centrifugation from dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells, and combined with allergens for proteolytic processing. Thereafter, endolysosomal proteolysis was monitored by protein gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We found that the overall proteolytic activity of specific endolysosomal fractions differed substantially, whereas the degradation patterns of the four model allergens obtained with the different proteases were extremely similar. Moreover, previously identified T cell epitopes were assigned to endolysosomal peptides and indeed showed a good overlap with known T cell epitopes for all four candidate allergens. Thus, we propose that the degradome assay can be used as a predictor to determine antigenic peptides as potential T cell epitopes, which will help in the rational design of protein-based allergy vaccine candidates.

  5. Microdomains in the membrane landscape shape antigen-presenting cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidscherwoude, Malou; de Winde, Charlotte M; Cambi, Alessandra; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2014-02-01

    The plasma membrane of immune cells is a highly organized cell structure that is key to the initiation and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. It is well-established that immunoreceptors embedded in the plasma membrane have a nonrandom spatial distribution that is important for coupling to components of intracellular signaling cascades. In the last two decades, specialized membrane microdomains, including lipid rafts and TEMs, have been identified. These domains are preformed structures ("physical entities") that compartmentalize proteins, lipids, and signaling molecules into multimolecular assemblies. In APCs, different microdomains containing immunoreceptors (MHC proteins, PRRs, integrins, among others) have been reported that are imperative for efficient pathogen recognition, the formation of the immunological synapse, and subsequent T cell activation. In addition, recent work has demonstrated that tetraspanin microdomains and lipid rafts are involved in BCR signaling and B cell activation. Research into the molecular mechanisms underlying membrane domain formation is fundamental to a comprehensive understanding of membrane-proximal signaling and APC function. This review will also discuss the advances in the microscopy field for the visualization of the plasma membrane, as well as the recent progress in targeting microdomains as novel, therapeutic approach for infectious and malignant diseases.

  6. Bovine lactoferrin counteracts Toll-like receptor mediated activation signals in antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Puddu

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (LF, a key element in mammalian immune system, plays pivotal roles in host defence against infection and excessive inflammation. Its protective effects range from direct antimicrobial activities against a large panel of microbes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, to antinflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs generated in the presence of bovine LF (bLF fail to undergo activation by up-modulating CD83, co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules, and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Moreover, these cells are weak activators of T cell proliferation and retain antigen uptake activity. Consistent with an impaired maturation, bLF-MD-DC primed T lymphocytes exhibit a functional unresponsiveness characterized by reduced expression of CD154 and impaired expression of IFN-γ and IL-2. The observed imunosuppressive effects correlate with an increased expression of molecules with negative regulatory functions (i.e. immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death ligand 1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3. Interestingly, bLF-MD-DCs produce IL-6 and exhibit constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Conversely, bLF exposure of already differentiated MD-DCs completely fails to induce IL-6, and partially inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR agonist-induced activation. Cell-specific differences in bLF internalization likely account for the distinct response elicited by bLF in monocytes versus immature DCs, providing a mechanistic base for its multiple effects. These results indicate that bLF exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by skewing monocyte differentiation into DCs with impaired capacity to undergo activation and to promote Th1 responses. Overall, these bLF-mediated effects may represent a strategy to block excessive DC activation upon TLR-induced inflammation, adding

  7. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. → An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. → Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. → This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  8. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hui [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Peng, Ji-Run, E-mail: pengjr@medmail.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Qiao, Shi-Shi [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Leng, Xi-Sheng, E-mail: lengxs2003@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of the Activation and Proliferation Kinetics and Effector Functions of Human Lymphocytes, and Antigen Presentation Capacity of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Xenogeneic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sato, Kazuya; Hayakawa, Hiroko; Takayama, Norihito; Nakano, Hirofumi; Ito, Ryoji; Mashima, Kiyomi; Oh, Iekuni; Minakata, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Morita, Kaoru; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Ohmine, Ken; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2018-04-17

    Xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) models in highly immunodeficient mice are currently being used worldwide to investigate human immune responses against foreign antigens in vivo. However, the individual roles of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, and donor/host hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the induction and development of GVHD have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we comprehensively investigated the immune responses of human T cells and the antigen presentation capacity of donor/host hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic APCs in xenogeneic GVHD models using nonobese diabetic/Shi-scid-IL2rg null mice. CD4 + T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD8 + T cells individually mediated potentially lethal GVHD. In addition to inflammatory cytokine production, CD4 + T cells also supported the activation and proliferation of CD8 + T cells. Using bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrated that host hematopoietic, but not nonhematopoietic, APCs play a critical role in the development of CD4 + T cell-mediated GVHD. During early GVHD, we detected 2 distinct populations in memory CD4 + T cells. One population was highly activated and proliferated in major histocompatibility complex antigen (MHC) +/+ mice but not in MHC -/- mice, indicating alloreactive T cells. The other population showed a less activated and slowly proliferative status regardless of host MHC expression, and was associated with higher susceptibility to apoptosis, indicating nonalloreactive T cells in homeostasis-driven proliferation. These observations are clinically relevant to donor T cell response after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our findings provide a better understanding of the immunobiology of humanized mice and support the development of novel options for the prevention and treatment for GVHD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  11. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4 + IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4 + IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4 + IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4 + IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4 + LPLs and primed splenic CD4 + T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4 + IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  12. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  13. Changes in antigen-presenting cell function in the spleen and lymph nodes of ultraviolet-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurish, M.F.; Lynch, D.H.; Daynes, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    It has been previously reported that mice exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation exhibit a decrease in splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) function. The results presented here confirm this observation and further demonstrate that animals exposed daily to UV for extended periods of time (5 weeks instead of 6 days) no longer exhibit this depressed capability. In spite of the depression in splenic APC activity found in 6-day UV-irradiated mice, lymph node APC function from these same animals was elevated compared with that found in the lymph nodes from normal animals. Lymph node APC activity in animals that were splenectomized prior to the UV irradiation, however, was not enhanced over controls. Treatment of animals with a chemical irritant (turpentine) also caused a depression in splenic APC function without modifying lymph node activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that the observed decrease in splenic APC activity, found after the first week of UV exposures, may be attributable to the migration of splenic APC to peripheral lymphoid tissue which drain the site of epidermal inflammation

  14. Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Apoptotic Bodies Contain Altered Self-Antigens that are Phagocytosed by Antigen Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasri, Kanoktip; Rauhamäki, Sanna; Wang, Liping; Filippou, Artemis; Kivovich, Violetta; Marjomäki, Varpu; Naides, Stanley J.; Gilbert, Leona

    2013-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) from the erythrovirus genus is known to be a pathogenic virus in humans. Prevalence of B19V infection has been reported worldwide in all seasons, with a high incidence in the spring. B19V is responsible for erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) commonly seen in children. Its other clinical presentations include arthralgia, arthritis, transient aplastic crisis, chronic anemia, congenital anemia, and hydrops fetalis. In addition, B19V infection has been reported to trigger autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the mechanisms of B19V participation in autoimmunity are not fully understood. B19V induced chronic disease and persistent infection suggests B19V can serve as a model for viral host interactions and the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here we investigate the involvement of B19V in the breakdown of immune tolerance. Previously, we demonstrated that the non-structural protein 1 (NS 1) of B19V induces apoptosis in non-permissive cells lines and that this protein can cleave host DNA as well as form NS1-DNA adducts. Here we provide evidence that through programmed cell death, apoptotic bodies (ApoBods) are generated by B19V NS1 expression in a non-permissive cell line. Characterization of purified ApoBods identified potential self-antigens within them. In particular, signature self-antigens such as Smith, ApoH, DNA, histone H4 and phosphatidylserine associated with autoimmunity were present in these ApoBods. In addition, when purified ApoBods were introduced to differentiated macrophages, recognition, engulfment and uptake occurred. This suggests that B19V can produce a source of self-antigens for immune cell processing. The results support our hypothesis that B19V NS1-DNA adducts, and nucleosomal and lysosomal antigens present in ApoBods created in non-permissive cell lines, are a source of self-antigens. PMID:23776709

  15. Recipient dendritic cells, but not B cells, are required antigen-presenting cells for peripheral alloreactive CD8+ T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, J L; Lucas, C L; Haspot, F; Gaspar, J Kurtz C; Guzman, A; Sykes, M

    2010-03-01

    Induction of mixed allogeneic chimerism is a promising approach for achieving donor-specific tolerance, thereby obviating the need for life-long immunosuppression for solid organ allograft acceptance. In mice receiving a low dose (3Gy) of total body irradiation, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation combined with anti-CD154 tolerizes peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells, allowing achievement of mixed chimerism with specific tolerance to donor. With this approach, peripheral CD8 T-cell tolerance requires recipient MHC class II, CD4 T cells, B cells and DCs. Recipient-type B cells from chimeras that were tolerant to donor still promoted CD8 T-cell tolerance, but their role could not be replaced by donor-type B cells. Using recipients whose B cells or DCs specifically lack MHC class I and/or class II or lack CD80 and CD86, we demonstrate that dendritic cells (DCs) must express CD80/86 and either MHC class I or class II to promote CD8 tolerance. In contrast, B cells, though required, did not need to express MHC class I or class II or CD80/86 to promote CD8 tolerance. Moreover, recipient IDO and IL-10 were not required. Thus, antigen presentation by recipient DCs and not by B cells is critical for peripheral alloreactive CD8 T cell tolerance.

  16. Antigen Presenting Cells and Stromal Cells Trigger Human Natural Killer Lymphocytes to Autoreactivity: Evidence for the Involvement of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR and NKG2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Poggi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human natural killer (NK lymphocytes should not damage autologous cells due to the engagement of inhibitory receptor superfamily (IRS members by HLA-I. Nevertheless, NK cells kill self cells expressing low levels or lacking HLA-I, as it may occur during viral infections (missing-self hypothesis. Herein, we show that human NK cells can be activated upon binding with self antigen presenting cells or stromal cells despite the expression of HLA-I. Indeed, NK cells can kill and produce pro-inflammatory and regulating cytokines as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL10 during interaction with autologous dendritic cells or bone marrow stromal cells or skin fibroblasts. The killing of antigen presenting and stromal cells is dependent on LFA1/ICAM1 interaction. Further, the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR NKp30 and NKp46 are responsible for the delivery of lethal hit to DC, whereas NKG2D activating receptor, the ligand of the MHC-related molecule MIC-A and the UL16 binding protein, is involved in stromal cell killing. These findings indicate that different activating receptors are involved in cell to self cell interaction. Finally, NK cells can revert the veto effect of stromal cells on mixed lymphocyte reaction further supporting the idea that NK cells may alter the interaction between T lymphocytes and microenvironment leading to autoreactivity.

  17. Dynamics of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells and of Treg induction upon hepatic AAV gene transfer

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    George Q Perrin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tolerogenic hepatic microenvironment impedes clearance of viral infections but is an advantage in viral vector gene transfer, which often results in immune tolerance induction to transgene products. Although the underlying tolerance mechanism has been extensively studied, our understanding of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells remains limited. To address this, we administered hepatotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV8 vector expressing cytoplasmic ovalbumin (OVA into wt mice followed by adoptive transfer of transgenic OVA-specific T cells. We find that that the liver-draining lymph nodes (celiac and portal are the major sites of MHC II presentation of the virally encoded antigen, as judged by in vivo proliferation of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells (requiring professional antigen-presenting cells, e.g., macrophages and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg induction. Antigen presentation in the liver itself contributes to activation of CD4+ T cells egressing from the liver. Hepatic-induced Treg rapidly disseminate through the systemic circulation. By contrast, a secreted OVA transgene product is presented in multiple organs, and OVA-specific Treg emerge in both the thymus and periphery. In summary, liver draining lymph nodes play an integral role in hepatic antigen presentation and peripheral Treg induction, which results in systemic regulation of the response to viral gene products.

  18. Cholera Toxin Promotes Th17 Cell Differentiation by Modulating Expression of Polarizing Cytokines and the Antigen-Presenting Potential of Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ok; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), an exotoxin produced by Vibrio cholera, acts as a mucosal adjuvant. In a previous study, we showed that CT skews differentiation of CD4 T cells to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Here, we found that intranasal administration of CT induced migration of migratory dendritic cell (DC) populations, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhi DCs, to the lung draining mediastinal lymph nodes (medLN). Among those DC subsets, CD11bhi DCs that were relatively immature had a major role in Th17 cell differentiation after administration of CT. CT-treated BMDCs showed reduced expression of MHC class II and CD86, similar to CD11bhi DCs in medLN, and these BMDCs promoted Th17 cell differentiation more potently than other BMDCs expressing higher levels of MHC class II and CD86. By analyzing the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CD69, proliferation and IL-2 production, we determined that CT-treated BMDCs showed diminished antigen-presenting potential to CD4+ T cells compared with normal BMDCs. We also found that CT-stimulated BMDCs promote activin A expression as well as IL-6 and IL-1β, and activin A had a synergic role with TGF-β1 in CT-mediated Th17 cell differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that CT-stimulated DCs promote Th17 cell differentiation by not only modulating antigen-presenting potential but also inducing Th polarizing cytokines.

  19. Analysis of detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from CD4+ T cell line: interaction with antigen presenting cells promotes coalescing of lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Colleen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid rafts present on the plasma membrane play an important role in spatiotemporal regulation of cell signaling. Physical and chemical characterization of lipid raft size and assessment of their composition before, and after cell stimulation will aid in developing a clear understanding of their regulatory role in cell signaling. We have used visual and biochemical methods and approaches for examining individual and lipid raft sub-populations isolated from a mouse CD4+ T cell line in the absence of detergents. Results Detergent-free rafts were analyzed before and after their interaction with antigen presenting cells. We provide evidence that the average diameter of lipid rafts isolated from un-stimulated T cells, in the absence of detergents, is less than 100 nm. Lipid rafts on CD4+ T cell membranes coalesce to form larger structures, after interacting with antigen presenting cells even in the absence of a foreign antigen. Conclusions Findings presented here indicate that lipid raft coalescence occurs during cellular interactions prior to sensing a foreign antigen.

  20. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  1. Replication-deficient mutant Herpes Simplex Virus-1 targets professional antigen presenting cells and induces efficient CD4+ T helper responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorentini, Simona; Marconi, Peggy; Avolio, Manuela; Marini, Elena; Garrafa, Emirena; Caracciolo, Sonia; Rossi, Daniele; Bozac, Alexandra; Becker, Pablo D; Gentili, Francesca; Facchetti, Fabio; Guzman, Carlos A; Manservigi, Roberto; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2007-01-01

    Both neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T-cells are necessary to control a viral infection. However, vigorous T helper responses are essential for their elicitation and maintenance. Here we show that a recombinant replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 vector encoding the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 matrix protein p17 (T0-p17) was capable of infecting professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) in vitro and in vivo. The injection of T0-p17 in the mouse dermis generate...

  2. Distinct Gut-Derived Bacteria Differentially Affect Three Types of Antigen-Presenting Cells and Impact on NK- and T-Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Hansen, Anne Marie Valentin; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Objectives Gut bacteria are assumed essential for development and maintenance of a balanced immune system. Specifically, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by gut bacteria is important for polarisation of the immune response. This experiment was designed to reveal similarities...... and differences between the reaction patterns of three types of human APCs when stimulated with intestinal bacteria. Furthermore, the effect of these APCs on NK-cells and T-cells was examined. Methodology The APCs used in this study were blood monocytes, blood dendritic cells, and dendritic cells differentiated...... from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells constitute a commonly used model of dendritic cell function. The APCs were cultured for 18 h with four different gut bacteria: Lactobacillus acidophilus X37, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 12246, E. coli Nissle 1917 or Bifidobacterium longum Q46. Results...

  3. Acquired Protective Immunity in Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar against the Myxozoan Kudoa thyrsites Involves Induction of MHIIβ+ CD83+ Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Laura M; Rasmussen, Karina J; Purcell, Sara L; Ellis, Lauren; Mahony, Amelia; Cho, Steven; Whyte, Shona K; Jones, Simon R M; Fast, Mark D

    2018-01-01

    The histozoic myxozoan parasite Kudoa thyrsites causes postmortem myoliquefaction and is responsible for economic losses to salmon aquaculture in the Pacific Northwest. Despite its importance, little is known about the host-parasite relationship, including the host response to infection. The present work sought to characterize the immune response in Atlantic salmon during infection, recovery, and reexposure to K. thyrsites After exposure to infective seawater, infected and uninfected smolts were sampled three times over 4,275 degree-days. Histological analysis revealed infection severity decreased over time in exposed fish, while in controls there was no evidence of infection. Following a secondary exposure of all fish, severity of infection in the controls was similar to that measured in exposed fish at the first sampling time but was significantly reduced in reexposed fish, suggesting the acquisition of protective immunity. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected a population of MHIIβ + cells in infected muscle that followed a pattern of abundance concordant with parasite prevalence. Infiltration of these cells into infected myocytes preceded destruction of the plasmodium and dissemination of myxospores. Dual labeling indicated a majority of these cells were CD83 + /MHIIβ + Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, we detected significant induction of cellular effectors, including macrophage/dendritic cells ( mhii / cd83 / mcsf ), B cells ( igm / igt ), and cytotoxic T cells ( cd8 / nkl ), in the musculature of infected fish. These data support a role for cellular effectors such as antigen-presenting cells (monocyte/macrophage and dendritic cells) along with B and T cells in the acquired protective immune response of Atlantic salmon against K. thyrsites . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C.; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such “tonic” activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  5. Dynamic imaging of experimental Leishmania donovani-induced hepatic granulomas detects Kupffer cell-restricted antigen presentation to antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Beattie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs represent the major phagocytic population within the liver and provide an intracellular niche for the survival of a number of important human pathogens. Although KCs have been extensively studied in vitro, little is known of their in vivo response to infection and their capacity to directly interact with antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells. Here, using a combination of approaches including whole mount and thin section confocal microscopy, adoptive cell transfer and intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that KCs represent the only detectable population of mononuclear phagocytes within granulomas induced by Leishmania donovani infection that are capable of presenting parasite-derived peptide to effector CD8(+ T cells. This restriction of antigen presentation to KCs within the Leishmania granuloma has important implications for the identification of new candidate vaccine antigens and for the design of novel immuno-therapeutic interventions.

  6. Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Peng; Jiang Qisheng; Li Fengsheng; He Rui; Wang Cuilan; Li Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro. Methods: The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro. The DCs were divided into 3 groups, group A: DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B: DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture, the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR (mixed lymphocyte reaction), and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated. MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells. IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA. Results: After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays, the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t=2.79 and 3.71, P<0.05), but significantly increased in group B (t=3.60 and 3.11, P<0.05). The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t=2.89 and 2.91, P<0.05), but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t=2.91 and 2.82, P<0.05). Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t=4.44 and 6.93, P<0.05), but was increased in group B (t=3.51 and 4.12, P<0.05). Conclusions: The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose (<0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs, but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture. (authors)

  7. Expression of cathepsins B, L, S, and D by gastric epithelial cells implicates them as antigen presenting cells in local immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, C; Ye, G; Espejo, R; Gunasena, S; Almanza, R; Leary, J; Crowe, S; Ernst, P; Reyes, V E

    2001-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma. During H. pylori infection, class II MHC expression by the gastric epithelium increases, as does the number of local CD4(+) T cells, which appear to be important in the associated pathogenesis. These observations suggested that the epithelium might present antigens to T cells. Thus, we sought to determine whether gastric epithelial cells process antigens to establish their function as local antigen presenting cells (APC). We examined a panel of gastric epithelial cell lines for expression of the antigen processing cathepsins B (CB), L (CL), S (CS), and D (CD). The mRNA for these enzymes were detected by RT-PCR and the enzymes in the gastric epithelial cells were identified by various independent methods. We corroborated the expression of CB and CD on gastric epithelial cells from human biopsy samples. The functions of these proteases were confirmed by assessing their ability to digest ovalbumin, a conventional dietary antigen, and proteins from H. pylori. In summary, multiple lines of evidence suggest gastric epithelial cells process antigens for presentation to CD4(+) T cells. To our knowledge, these are the first studies to document the antigen processing capacity of human gastric epithelial cells.

  8. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Maj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice’s (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb1100Mjb/J spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU, activation of these cells (flow cytometry, cytokine profile (ELISA, and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear.

  9. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  10. The Hsc/Hsp70 co-chaperone network controls antigen aggregation and presentation during maturation of professional antigen presenting cells.

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    Nadja Kettern

    Full Text Available The maturation of mouse macrophages and dendritic cells involves the transient deposition of ubiquitylated proteins in the form of dendritic cell aggresome-like induced structures (DALIS. Transient DALIS formation was used here as a paradigm to study how mammalian cells influence the formation and disassembly of protein aggregates through alterations of their proteostasis machinery. Co-chaperones that modulate the interplay of Hsc70 and Hsp70 with the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and the autophagosome-lysosome pathway emerged as key regulators of this process. The chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase CHIP and the ubiquitin-domain protein BAG-1 are essential for DALIS formation in mouse macrophages and bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. CHIP also cooperates with BAG-3 and the autophagic ubiquitin adaptor p62 in the clearance of DALIS through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA. On the other hand, the co-chaperone HspBP1 inhibits the activity of CHIP and thereby attenuates antigen sequestration. Through a modulation of DALIS formation CHIP, BAG-1 and HspBP1 alter MHC class I mediated antigen presentation in mouse BMDCs. Our data show that the Hsc/Hsp70 co-chaperone network controls transient protein aggregation during maturation of professional antigen presenting cells and in this way regulates the immune response. Similar mechanisms may modulate the formation of aggresomes and aggresome-like induced structures (ALIS in other mammalian cell types.

  11. B7.1 expression on tumor cells circumvents the need of professional antigen presentation for in vitro propagation of cytotoxic T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzi, G; Protti, M P; Rugarli, C; Bellone, M

    1996-01-01

    In vitro propagation of tumor-specific CTLs, to be used for identification of tumor antigens (Ag) and/or adoptive immunotherapy, is hampered by the need of large amounts of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) used for periodical cycles of restimulation. We evaluated whether RMA T lymphoma cells, stably transfected with the cDNA encoding for the B7.1 costimulatory molecule, provided the activation signals to CD8+ T lymphocytes in the absence of professional APC and CD4+ helper cells. We demonstrate here that long-term CD8+ cell lines can be efficiently propagated in vitro by repeated cycles of stimulation with tumor cells stably expressing B7.1. Professional APC and CD4+ helper cells are not required as far as interleukin 2 is exogenously provided. Furthermore, CD8+ blasts needed both signal 1 (Ag in the contest of the MHC molecule) and signal 2 (interaction of costimulatory molecules) for restimulation. T cell blasts in the presence of signal 1 or 2 only still retained their effector potential but did not undergo clonal expansion. These results are very promising for further applications of specific immunotherapies in humans.

  12. Antigen-presenting cells represent targets for R5 HIV-1 infection in the first trimester pregnancy uterine mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Marlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the first trimester of pregnancy, HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission is relatively rare despite the permissivity of placental cells to cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. The placenta interacts directly with maternal uterine cells (decidual cells but the physiological role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission and whether decidua could be a source of infected cells is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To answer to this question, decidual mononuclear cells were exposed to HIV-1 in vitro. Decidual cells were shown to be more susceptible to infection by an R5 HIV-1, as compared to an X4 HIV-1. Infected cells were identified by flow cytometry analysis. The results showed that CD14(+ cells were the main targets of HIV-1 infection in the decidua. These infected CD14(+ cells expressed DC-SIGN, CD11b, CD11c, the Fc gamma receptor CD16, CD32 and CD64, classical MHC class-I and class-II and maturation and activation molecules CD83, CD80 and CD86. The permissivity of decidual tissue was also evaluated by histoculture. Decidual tissue was not infected by X4 HIV-1 but was permissive to R5 HIV-1. Different profiles of infection were observed depending on tissue localization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of HIV-1 target cells in the decidua in vitro and the low rate of in utero mother-to-child transmission during the first trimester of pregnancy suggest that a natural control occurs in vivo limiting cell-to-cell infection of the placenta and consequently infection of the fetus.

  13. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-04-05

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages.

  14. Inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, A.A.; Roza, L.; Moodycliffe, A.M.; Shreedhar, V.

    1997-01-01

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase, which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosomes treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function

  15. Airway eosinophils accumulate in the mediastinal lymph nodes but lack antigen-presenting potential for naive T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijt, Leonie S.; Vos, Nanda; Hijdra, Daniëlle; de Vries, Victor C.; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Lambrecht, Bart N.

    2003-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with eosinophils. Although eosinophils are considered to be effector cells, recent studies have reported their ability to activate primed Th2 cells. In this study, we investigated whether eosinophils are capable of presenting Ag to unprimed

  16. Amelioration of renal ischaemia-reperfusion injury by liposomal delivery of curcumin to renal tubular epithelial and antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, N M; Stephenson, M D; Kitching, A R; Horowitz, J D; Coates, P T H

    2012-05-01

    Renal ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is an inevitable consequence of renal transplantation, causing significant graft injury, increasing the risk of rejection and contributing to poor long-term graft outcome. Renal injury is mediated by cytokine and chemokine synthesis, inflammation and oxidative stress resulting from activation of the NF-κB pathway. We utilized liposomal incorporation of a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway, curcumin, to target delivery to renal tubular epithelial and antigen-presenting cells. Liposomes containing curcumin were administered before bilateral renal ischaemia in C57/B6 mice, with subsequent reperfusion. Renal function was assessed from plasma levels of urea and creatinine, 4 and 24 h after reperfusion. Renal tissue was examined for NF-κB activity and oxidative stress (histology, immunostaining) and for apoptosis (TUNEL). Cytokines and chemokines were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Liposomal curcumin significantly improved serum creatinine, reduced histological injury and cellular apoptosis and lowered Toll-like receptor-4, heat shock protein-70 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Liposomal curcumin also reduced neutrophil infiltration and diminished inflammatory chemokine expression. Curcumin liposomes reduced intracellular superoxide generation and increased superoxide dismutase levels, decreased inducible NOS mRNA expression and 3-nitrotyrosine staining consistent with limitations in nitrosative stress and inhibited renal tubular mRNA and protein expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein. These actions of curcumin were mediated by inhibition of NF-κB, MAPK and phospho-S6 ribosomal protein. Liposomal delivery of curcumin promoted effective, targeted delivery of this non-toxic compound that provided cytoprotection via anti-inflammatory and multiple antioxidant mechanisms following renal IR injury. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris J Gonzalez-Leal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb and L (Ctsl play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC and macrophages (BMM from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression.

  18. Upregulation of immunoproteasome subunits in myositis indicates active inflammation with involvement of antigen presenting cells, CD8 T-cells and IFNΓ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetam Ghannam

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM infiltration of immune cells into muscle and upregulation of MHC-I expression implies increased antigen presentation and involvement of the proteasome system. To decipher the role of immunoproteasomes in myositis, we investigated individual cell types and muscle tissues and focused on possible immune triggers. METHODS: Expression of constitutive (PSMB5, -6, -7 and corresponding immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8, -9, -10 was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in muscle biopsies and sorted peripheral blood cells of patients with IIM, non-inflammatory myopathies (NIM and healthy donors (HD. Protein analysis in muscle biopsies was performed by western blot. Affymetrix HG-U133 platform derived transcriptome data from biopsies of different muscle diseases and from immune cell types as well as monocyte stimulation experiments were used for validation, coregulation and coexpression analyses. RESULTS: Real-time RT-PCR revealed significantly increased expression of immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8/-9/-10 in DC, monocytes and CD8+ T-cells in IIM. In muscle biopsies, the immunosubunits were elevated in IIM compared to NIM and exceeded levels of matched blood samples. Proteins of PSMB8 and -9 were found only in IIM but not NIM muscle biopsies. Reanalysis of 78 myositis and 20 healthy muscle transcriptomes confirmed these results and revealed involvement of the antigen processing and presentation pathway. Comparison with reference profiles of sorted immune cells and healthy muscle confirmed upregulation of PSMB8 and -9 in myositis biopsies beyond infiltration related changes. This upregulation correlated highest with STAT1, IRF1 and IFNγ expression. Elevation of T-cell specific transcripts in active IIM muscles was accompanied by increased expression of DC and monocyte marker genes and thus reflects the cell type specific involvement observed in peripheral blood. CONCLUSIONS: Immunoproteasomes seem to indicate

  19. Upregulation of Immunoproteasome Subunits in Myositis Indicates Active Inflammation with Involvement of Antigen Presenting Cells, CD8 T-Cells and IFNγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khetam; Martinez-Gamboa, Lorena; Spengler, Lydia; Krause, Sabine; Smiljanovic, Biljana; Bonin, Marc; Bhattarai, Salyan; Grützkau, Andreas; Burmester, Gerd-R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) infiltration of immune cells into muscle and upregulation of MHC-I expression implies increased antigen presentation and involvement of the proteasome system. To decipher the role of immunoproteasomes in myositis, we investigated individual cell types and muscle tissues and focused on possible immune triggers. Methods Expression of constitutive (PSMB5, -6, -7) and corresponding immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8, -9, -10) was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in muscle biopsies and sorted peripheral blood cells of patients with IIM, non-inflammatory myopathies (NIM) and healthy donors (HD). Protein analysis in muscle biopsies was performed by western blot. Affymetrix HG-U133 platform derived transcriptome data from biopsies of different muscle diseases and from immune cell types as well as monocyte stimulation experiments were used for validation, coregulation and coexpression analyses. Results Real-time RT-PCR revealed significantly increased expression of immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8/-9/-10) in DC, monocytes and CD8+ T-cells in IIM. In muscle biopsies, the immunosubunits were elevated in IIM compared to NIM and exceeded levels of matched blood samples. Proteins of PSMB8 and -9 were found only in IIM but not NIM muscle biopsies. Reanalysis of 78 myositis and 20 healthy muscle transcriptomes confirmed these results and revealed involvement of the antigen processing and presentation pathway. Comparison with reference profiles of sorted immune cells and healthy muscle confirmed upregulation of PSMB8 and -9 in myositis biopsies beyond infiltration related changes. This upregulation correlated highest with STAT1, IRF1 and IFNγ expression. Elevation of T-cell specific transcripts in active IIM muscles was accompanied by increased expression of DC and monocyte marker genes and thus reflects the cell type specific involvement observed in peripheral blood. Conclusions Immunoproteasomes seem to indicate IIM activity and

  20. Freezing and thawing of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells does not later their immunophenotype and antigen presentation characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendoza, Luis; Bubeník, Jan; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Vonka, V.; Šímová, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2002), s. 242-245 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA7052002; GA AV ČR IAA5052203 Grant - others:Liga proti rakovině(CZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumour lysate * DC priming Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  1. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...... recipients but not into non-transgenic recipients. These data provide evidence that B7/CD28 interactions within the nervous tissue are critical determinants of disease development. Our findings have important implications for understanding the etiology of nervous system autoimmune diseases such as multiple...

  2. EFFECT OF LIPOSOMAL CLODRONATE-DEPENDENT DEPLETION OF PROFESSIONAL ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELLS ON NUMBERS AND PHENOTYPE OF CANINE CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ REGULATORY T CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kriston F.; Stokes, John V.; Gunnoe, Sagen A.; Follows, Joyce S.; Shafer, Lydia; Ammari, Mais G.; Archer, Todd M.; Thomason, John M.; Mackin, Andrew J.; Pinchuk, Lesya M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to control autoreactivity during and subsequent to the development of the peripheral immune system. Professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes, have an important role in inducing Tregs. For the first time, this study evaluated proportions and phenotypes of Tregs in canine peripheral blood depleted of professional APCs, utilizing liposomal clodronate (LC) and multicolor flow cytometry analysis. Our results demonstrate that LC exposure promoted short term decreases followed by significant increases in the proportions or absolute numbers of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs in dogs. In general, the LC-dependent Treg fluctuations were similar to the changes in the levels of CD14+ monocytes in Walker hounds. However, the proportions of monocytes showed more dramatic changes compared to the proportions of Tregs that were visually unchanged after LC treatment over the study period. At the same time, absolute Treg numbers showed, similarly to the levels of CD14+ monocytes, significant compensatory gains as well as the recovery during the normalization period. We confirm the previous data that CD4+ T cells with the highest CD25 expression were highly enriched for FOXP3. Furthermore, for the first time, we report that CD4+CD25lowFOXP3+ is the major regulatory T cell subset affected by LC exposure. The increases within the lowest CD25 expressers of CD4+FOXP3+ cells together with compensatory gains in the proportion of CD14+ monocytes during compensatory and normalization periods suggest the possible direct or indirect roles of monocytes in active recruitment and generation of Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells. PMID:25950023

  3. Replication-deficient mutant Herpes Simplex Virus-1 targets professional antigen presenting cells and induces efficient CD4+ T helper responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Simona; Marconi, Peggy; Avolio, Manuela; Marini, Elena; Garrafa, Emirena; Caracciolo, Sonia; Rossi, Daniele; Bozac, Alexandra; Becker, Pablo D; Gentili, Francesca; Facchetti, Fabio; Guzman, Carlos A; Manservigi, Roberto; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2007-07-01

    Both neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T-cells are necessary to control a viral infection. However, vigorous T helper responses are essential for their elicitation and maintenance. Here we show that a recombinant replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 vector encoding the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 matrix protein p17 (T0-p17) was capable of infecting professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) in vitro and in vivo. The injection of T0-p17 in the mouse dermis generated a strong p17-specific CD4+ T helper response preceding both p17-specific humoral and effector T cell responses. Moreover, we show that T0-p17 infection did not interfere with the endogenous processing of the transgene encoded antigen, since infected APCs were able to evoke a strong recall response in vitro. Our results demonstrate that replication-deficient HSV vectors can be appealing candidates for the development of vaccines able to trigger T helper responses.

  4. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and dendritic cells (MoDC from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  5. A novel strategy to improve antigen presentation for active immunotherapy in cancer. Fusion of the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 antigen to a cell penetrating peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granadillo, Milaid; Torrens, Isis; Guerra, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    Facilitating the delivery of exogenous antigens to antigen-presenting cells, ensuing processing and presentation via the major histocompatibility complex class I and induction of an effective immune response are fundamental for an effective therapeutic cancer vaccine. In this regard, we propose the use of cell-penetrating peptides fused to a tumor antigen. To demonstrate this concept we designed a fusion protein comprising a novel cell-penetrating and immunostimulatory peptide corresponding to residues 32 to 51 of the Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide factor protein (LALF 32-51 ) linked to human papillomavirus 16 E7 antigen (LALF 32-51 -E7). In this work, we demonstrated that the immunization with LALF 32-51 -E7 using the TC-1 mouse model induces a potent and long-lasting anti-tumor response supported on an effective E7-specific CD8 +T -cell response. The finding that therapeutic immunization with LALF 32-51 or E7 alone, or an admixture of LALF32-51 and E7, does not induce significant tumor reduction indicates that covalent linkage between LALF 32-51 and E7 is required for the anti-tumor effect. These results support the use of this novel cell-penetrating peptide as an efficient means for delivering therapeutic targets into cellular compartments with the induction of a cytotoxic CD8 +T lymphocyte immune response. This approach is promissory for the treatment of tumors associated with the human papillomavirus 16, which is responsible for the 50% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and other malignancies. Furthermore, protein-based vaccines can circumvent the major histocompatibility complex specificity limitation associated with peptide vaccines providing a greater extent in their application

  6. An Antigen-Presenting and Apoptosis-Inducing Polymer Microparticle Prolongs Alloskin Graft Survival by Selectively and Markedly Depleting Alloreactive CD8+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selectively depleting the pathogenic T cells is a fundamental strategy for the treatment of allograft rejection and autoimmune disease since it retains the overall immune function of host. The concept of killer artificial antigen-presenting cells (KaAPCs has been developed by co-coupling peptide–major histocompatibility complex (pMHC multimer and anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb onto the polymeric microparticles (MPs to induce the apoptosis of antigen-specific T cells. But little information is available about its in vivo therapeutic potential and mechanism. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI-coated poly lactic-co-glycolic acid microparticle (PLGA MP was fabricated as a cell-sized scaffold to covalently co-couple H-2Kb-Ig dimer and anti-Fas mAb for the generation of alloantigen-presenting and apoptosis-inducing MPs. Intravenous infusions of the biodegradable KaAPCs prolonged the alloskin graft survival for 43 days in a single MHC-mismatched murine model, depleted the most of H-2Kb-alloreactive CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood, spleen, and alloskin graft in an antigen-specific manner and anti-Fas-dependent fashion. The cell-sized KaAPCs circulated throughout vasculature into liver, kidney, spleen, lymph nodes, lung, and heart, but few ones into local allograft at early stage, with a retention time up to 36 h in vivo. They colocalized with CD8+ T cells in secondary lymphoid organs while few ones contacted with CD4+ T cells, B cells, macrophage, and dendritic cells, or internalized by phagocytes. Importantly, the KaAPC treatment did not significantly impair the native T cell repertoire or non-pathogenic immune cells, did not obviously suppress the overall immune function of host, and did not lead to visible organ toxicity. Our results strongly document the high potential of PLGA MP-based KaAPCs as a novel antigen-specific immunotherapy for allograft rejection and autoimmune disorder. The in vivo mechanism of alloinhibition, tissue

  7. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pecora

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2 was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 µg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle.

  8. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, Andrea; Malacari, Darío A; Pérez Aguirreburualde, María S; Bellido, Demian; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María J; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2) was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 μg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Varani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus (TOSV is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  10. Microneedle arrays coated with charge reversal pH-sensitive copolymers improve antigen presenting cells-homing DNA vaccine delivery and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Kim, Nak Won; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Giang Phan, V H; Lee, Min Sang; Yin, Yue; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Doo Sung

    2018-01-10

    Successful delivery of a DNA vaccine to antigen-presenting cells and their subsequent stimulation of CD4 + and CD8 + T cell immunity remains an inefficient process. In general, the delivery of prophylactic vaccines is mainly mired by low transfection efficacy, poor immunogenicity, and safety issues from the materials employed. Currently, several strategies have been exploited to improve immunogenicity, but an effective strategy for safe and pain-free delivery of DNA vaccines is complicated. Herein, we report the rapid delivery of polyplex-based DNA vaccines using microneedle arrays coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly of charge reversal pH-responsive copolymer and heparin. The charge reversal pH-responsive copolymer, composed of oligo(sulfamethazine)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(amino urethane) (OSM-b-PEG-b-PAEU), was used as a triggering layer in the polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly on microneedles. Charge reversal characteristics of this copolymer, that is, the OSM-b-PEG-b-PAEU copolymer exhibit, positive charge at low pH (pH4.03) and becoming negative charge when exposed to physiological pH conditions (pH7.4), allowing the facile assembly and disassembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers. The electrostatic repulsion between heparin and OSM-b-PEG-b-PAEU charge reversal copolymer triggered the release of DNA vaccines. DNA vaccines laden on microneedles are effectively transfected into RAW 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice by DNA vaccine-loaded microneedle arrays coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer generated antigen-specific robust immune responses. These findings provide potential strategy of charge reversal pH-responsive copolymers coated microneedles for DNA vaccine delivery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Increase in a distinct pulmonary macrophage subset possessing an antigen-presenting cell phenotype and in vitro APC activity following silica exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliaccio, Christopher T.; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Holian, Andrij

    2005-01-01

    Silica inhalation results in chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. While the role of the alveolar macrophage (AM) is considered key to the effects of silica on lung pathology, the etiology is not completely understood. Evidence suggests an increase in antigen presenting cell (APC) activity as a contributing factor to this process, as well as potential roles for both AM and interstitial macrophages (IM) in silicosis. In order to study the effects of crystalline silica on the APC activity of pulmonary macrophages, mice were exposed intranasally and changes in pulmonary macrophage populations were assessed using flow cytometry. Following intranasal instillation of silica, a significant increase in the APC activity of AM was observed, as well as a significant increase in a subset of IM expressing classic APC markers (MHC class II, CD11c). In addition, an in vitro system using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was generated to assess the effects of silica on the APC activity of macrophages in vitro. Data using BMDM in the in vitro APC assay demonstrated a significant increase in APC activity following silica exposure, but not following exposure to saline or a control particle (TiO 2 ). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments, the current study describes a significant increase in an interstitial macrophage subset with an APC phenotype, as well as an increase in the APC activity of both AM and BMDM, as a direct result of exposure to crystalline silica. These studies suggest a specific mechanism, macrophage subset activation, by which crystalline silica exposure results in chronic pulmonary inflammation and, eventually, fibrosis

  12. Antigen Presentation Keeps Trending in Immunotherapy Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbasi, Anusha; Ribas, Antoni

    2018-04-19

    Through a gain-of-function kinome screen, MEX3B was identified as a mediator of resistance to T-cell immunotherapy not previously identified using CRISPR-based screens. MEX3B is a posttranscriptional regulator of HLA-A, validating the critical role of tumor-intrinsic antigen presentation in T-cell immunotherapy and indicating a new putative molecular target. Clin Cancer Res; 24(14); 1-3. ©2018 AACR. See related article by Huang et al., p. xxxx . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  14. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Djekic, Aleksandra; M?ller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirect...

  15. Autoreactive T cells in MRL/Mpr-lpr/lpr mice. Characterization of the lymphokines produced and analysis of antigen-presenting cells required

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, K.M.; Ju, S.T.; Lu, C.Y.; Sy, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lymph node cells from 4-wk-old MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice, but not from MRL/Mp-+/+ mice, when cultured in vitro for 5 to 7 days, will spontaneously proliferate and produce IL-2. We examined the expression of several cell surface Ag on lymph node cells from MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice before and after in vitro culture. There is an increase in the expression of Thy-1, L3T4, IL-2R, T cell activating protein, T cell receptor, and T3 complex on the surface of cultured cells. Cultured cells produced IL-3, IFN-gamma, and small but detectable amounts of IL-1 in addition to IL-2. Gamma irradiation of APC from young MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice or treatment of APC with a mAb (J11D) and C, completely abrogated their stimulatory capacity. These experiments suggest that B cells are the predominant APC responsible in the activation of autoreactive T cells in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice. Lymph node cells from C57BL/6-lpr/lpr or C3H-lpr/lpr mice were unable to spontaneously proliferate or produce IL-2. Lymph node cells from (MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr x C57BL/6-lpr/lpr) F1 mice or (C3H-lpr/lpr x MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr) F1 mice did proliferate and produced IL-2 after in vitro culture. Using T cells from these F1 animals and APC from each parental haplotype, we found that APC from MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice induced more proliferation and greater amounts of IL-2, when compared to APC from F1 animals. APC from C57BL6-lpr/lpr mice or C3H-lpr/lpr were unable to induce spontaneous proliferation and IL-2 production. Therefore, B cells from MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice appear to possess unique features that enable them to activate autoreactive T cells more effectively than B cells from other mice bearing the lpr/lpr gene

  16. Modulation of interferon-γ synthesis by the effects of lignin-like enzymatically polymerized polyphenols on antigen-presenting cell activation and the subsequent cell-to-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Motoi, Masuro; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Miura, Noriko N; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2013-12-15

    Lignin-like polymerized polyphenols strongly activate lymphocytes and induce cytokine synthesis. We aimed to characterise the mechanisms of action of polymerized polyphenols on immunomodulating functions. We compared the reactivity of leukocytes from various organs to that of polymerized polyphenols. Splenocytes and resident peritoneal cavity cells (PCCs) responded to polymerized polyphenols and released several cytokines, whereas thymocytes and bone-marrow cells showed no response. Next, we eliminated antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from splenocytes to study their involvement in cytokine synthesis. We found that APC-negative splenocytes showed significantly reduced cytokine production induced by polymerized polyphenols. Additionally, adequate interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induction by polymerized polyphenols was mediated by the coexistence of APCs and T cells because the addition of T cells to PCCs increased IFN-γ production. Furthermore, inhibition of the T cell-APC interaction using neutralising antibodies significantly decreased cytokine production. Thus, cytokine induction by polymerized polyphenols was mediated by the interaction between APCs and T cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultraviolet light-induced suppression of antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Tomasi, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of animals results in the development of specific T suppressor cells that inhibit antitumor immune responses. It is thought that suppression may arise as a consequence of altered antigen presentation by UV-irradiated epidermal cells. This hypothesis is based on evidence demonstrating that specific lymphoid tissues from UV-irradiated hosts exhibit impaired antigen-presenting function and that animals cannot be contact sensitized when antigens are applied to a UV-irradiated skin site. Langerhans cells of the skin are likely candidates as targets of UV-induced defects in antigen presentation as they bear Fc and C3b receptors, express Ia antigens, are of bone marrow origin, and are capable of presenting antigen in vitro. We speculate on the possible clinical usefulness of UV-induced tolerance to specific antigens such as those encountered in monoclonal antibody therapy and tissue transplantation

  18. Calcipotriol inhibits the proliferation of hyperproliferative CD29 positive keratinocytes in psoriatic epidermis in the absence of an effect on the function and number of antigen-presenting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A.M.; Llado, Minna Fyhn Lykke; Skov, L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate some of the possible mechanisms of action of the vitamin D analogue calcipotriol in vivo. Calcipotriol is finding increasing use in the treatment of psoriasis, but the primary target cell in vivo has not yet been identified. We treated psoriatic patients...... psoriatic and normal skin, calcipotriol treatment did not alter the capacity of epidermal antigen-presenting cells to stimulate the proliferation of autologous T cells, either in the absence or in the presence of exogenous antigen. Epidermal cell suspensions were analysed further by staining...... for infiltrating leucocytes (CD45+) and Langerhans cells (CD1a+). Flow cytometric analysis showed that calcipotriol did not alter the number of CD45+ cells or Langerhans cells in psoriatic skin. These results indicate that calcipotriol does not alter either the number of the function of epidermal antigen...

  19. Intersection of autophagy with pathways of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Natalie L; Mintern, Justine D

    2012-12-01

    Traditionally, macroautophagy (autophagy) is viewed as a pathway of cell survival. Autophagy ensures the elimination of damaged or unwanted cytosolic components and provides a source of cellular nutrients during periods of stress. Interestingly, autophagy can also directly intersect with, and impact, other major pathways of cellular function. Here, we will review the contribution of autophagy to pathways of antigen presentation. The autophagy machinery acts to modulate both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation. As such autophagy is an important participant in pathways that elicit host cell immunity and the elimination of infectious pathogens.

  20. Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells by altering CD1d trafficking through the endocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Carey, Gregory B; Webb, Tonya J

    2014-09-01

    NKT cells are a unique subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid Ags presented in the context of CD1d molecules. NKT cells mount strong antitumor responses and are a major focus in developing effective cancer immunotherapy. It is known that CD1d molecules are constantly internalized from the cell surface, recycled through the endocytic compartments, and re-expressed on the cell surface. However, little is known about the regulation of CD1d-mediated Ag processing and presentation in B cell lymphoma. Prosurvival factors of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-xL, are often upregulated in B cell lymphomas and are intimately linked to sphingolipid metabolism, as well as the endocytic compartments. We hypothesized that Bcl-xL can regulate CD1d-mediated Ag presentation to NKT cells. We found that overexpression or induction of Bcl-xL led to increased Ag presentation to NKT cells. Conversely, the inhibition or knockdown of Bcl-xL led to decreased NKT cell activation. Furthermore, knockdown of Bcl-xL resulted in the loss of CD1d trafficking to lysosome-associated membrane protein 1(+) compartments. Rab7, a late endosomal protein, was upregulated and CD1d molecules accumulated in the Rab7(+) late endosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated Ag processing and presentation to NKT cells by altering the late endosomal compartment and changing the intracellular localization of CD1d. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Increased antigen presentation but impaired T cells priming after upregulation of interferon-beta induced by lipopolysaccharides is mediated by upregulation of B7H1 and GITRL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are able to present Ag-derived peptides on MHC class I and II molecules and induce T cells priming. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, an activator of Toll-like 4 receptor (TLR4 signaling, has been demonstrated to facilitate Ag-presentation, up-regulate surface molecules expression but impair T cells priming. In this study, we investigated the effect of LPS on nicotine-enhanced DCs-dependent T cells priming and the mechanisms of LPS orchestrating the immunosuppressive program. We could demonstrate that the treatment with LPS resulted in increased surface molecules expression, enhanced Ag-presentation, up-regulated release of TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IFN-beta. Concomititantly, the upregulation of IFN-beta in DCs induces the up-regulation of coinhibitory molecules B7H1 and GITRL, which cause an impaired activation of naïve Ag-specific T cells and the induction of T cell tolerance by enhancing B7H1-PD-1 interactions and promoting GITRL-GITL facilitated Treg generation, respectively. These data provide a mechanistic basis for the immunomodulatory action of IFN-beta which might open new possibilities in the development of therapeutic approaches aimed at the control of excessive immune response and persistent infection.

  2. Interleukin-19: a constituent of the regulome that controls antigen presenting cells in the lungs and airway responses to microbial products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Hoffman

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+ alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells.IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/- mice were studied at baseline (naïve and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2 expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13.Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T lymphocytes and Notch2 determines cell fate decisions, our studies suggest that

  3. Hepatitis B virus induces IL-23 production in antigen presenting cells and causes liver damage via the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghong Wang

    Full Text Available IL-23 regulates myriad processes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and is a critical mediator of the proinflammatory effects exerted by Th17 cells in many diseases. In this study, we investigated whether and how hepatitis B virus (HBV causes liver damage directly through the IL-23 signaling pathway. In biopsied liver tissues from HBV-infected patients, expression of both IL-23 and IL-23R was remarkably elevated. In vivo observations also indicated that the main sources of IL-23 were myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and macrophages. Analysis of in vitro differentiated immature DCs and macrophages isolated from healthy donors revealed that the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg efficiently induces IL-23 secretion in a mannose receptor (MR-dependent manner. Culture with an endosomal acidification inhibitor and the dynamin inhibitor showed that, upon binding to the MR, the HBsAg is taken up by mDCs and macrophages through an endocytosis mechanism. In contrast, although the HBV core antigen (HBcAg can also stimulate IL-23 secretion from mDCs, the process was MR- and endocytosis-independent. In addition, IL-23 was shown to be indispensible for HBsAg-stimulated differentiation of naïve CD4(+ T cells into Th17 cells, which were determined to be the primary source of IL-17 in HBV-infected livers. The cognate receptor, IL-17R, was found to exist on the hepatic stellate cells and mDCs, both of which might represent the potential target cells of IL-17 in hepatitis B disease. These data provide novel insights into a yet unrecognized mechanism of HBV-induced hepatitis, by which increases in IL-23 expression, through an MR/endocytosis-dependent or -independent manner, produce liver damage through the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  4. The neck region of the C-type lectin DC-SIGN regulates its surface spatiotemporal organization and virus-binding capacity on antigen presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzo, C.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Joosten, B.; Reinieren-Beeren, I.; Gualda, E.J.; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Figdor, Carl; Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and

  5. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzo, C.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Joosten, B.; Reinieren-Beeren, I.; Gualda, E.J.; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Figdor, C.G.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and

  6. Effect of BSA Antigen Sensitization during the Acute Phase of Influenza A Viral Infection on CD11c+ Pulmonary Antigen Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Sato

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: BSA antigen sensitization during the acute phase of influenza A viral infection enhanced IL-10 production from naive CD4+ T cell interaction with CD11c+ pulmonary APCs. The IL-10 secretion evoked Th2 responses in the lungs with downregulation of Th1 responses and was important for the eosinophil recruitment into the lungs after BSA antigen challenge.

  7. Additional file 4: of MHC class II expression and potential antigen-presenting cells in the retina during experimental autoimmune uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lipski, Deborah; Dewispelaere, RÊmi; Foucart, Vincent; Caspers, Laure; Defrance, Matthieu; Bruyns, Catherine; Willermain, François

    2017-01-01

    Figure S4. MHC class II expression in the retina during classical EAU. Three weeks after immunization, eye cryosections were prepared and stained for MHC class II (green) and IBA1 (red) or endoglin (magenta) detection. Cell nuclei were stained with Hoechst (blue). Each picture was chosen as representative of an experiment conducted on six or more animals. A. MHC class II and IBA1 expression. B. MHC class II and endoglin expression. (PPTX 7276 kb)

  8. The systems biology of MHC class II antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility class II molecules (MHC class II) are one of the key regulators of adaptive immunity because of their specific expression by professional antigen presenting cells (APC). They present peptides derived from endocytosed material to T helper lymphocytes. Consequently, MHC class

  9. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smanla Tundup

    Full Text Available The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 "favoring" chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 "favoring" chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1-3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1-3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo

  10. Native IgG2a(b) is barely antigenic to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T cells owing to inefficient internalization by professional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnes, K; Hannestad, K

    2000-04-01

    Peptide epitopes derived from immunoglobulin variable regions represent tumour-specific antigens on B-cell neoplasms and can be recognized by syngeneic, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells. Immunoglobulin peptide/MHC class II complexes may also be involved in autoimmunity and CD4+ T-cell-mediated B-cell regulation. Thus, the IgG2a(b) H-chain allopeptide gamma2a(b) 435-451 presented on I-Ad mimics the epitope implicated in herpes simplex virus-induced autoimmune stromal keratitis and is the target of T helper 1 (Th1) clones that suppress IgG2a(b) production in vivo. We here report that spleen and thymus cells constitutively present the autologous gamma2a(b) epitope to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma as a function of the animal housing conditions (specific pathogen-free or not) and the serum levels of IgG2a(b). Constitutive presentation in the spleen was predominantly performed by dendritic cells. Whereas spleen cells poorly presented native IgG2a(b) to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma, IgG2a(b) in the form of immune complexes were presented > 200-fold more efficiently owing to internalization via low-affinity FcgammaR on macrophages. The antigenicity could also be improved by homotypic aggregation and by targeting IgG2a(b) to complement receptors on the A20 B-cell lymphoma. Mice without detectable IgG2a(b)-containing immune complexes typically exhibited minimal constitutive presentation. Nevertheless, native IgG2a(b) can sensitize antigen-presenting cells in vivo, as mice that were devoid of immune complexes and carried an IgG2a(b)-producing tumour did present constitutively, even at physiological IgG2a(b) serum levels. Whereas the amounts of IgG released from most B-cell lymphomas may be too low to allow spontaneous priming of tumour-specific MHC class II-restricted T cells, administration of tumour immunoglobulin in aggregated form might improve the efficacy of idiotype vaccination.

  11. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  12. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

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    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  13. Modulation of Th1/Th2 Immune Responses by Killed Propionibacterium acnes and Its Soluble Polysaccharide Fraction in a Type I Hypersensitivity Murine Model: Induction of Different Activation Status of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cristina Squaiella-Baptistão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS, extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs. We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model.

  14. Efficient Capsid Antigen Presentation From Adeno-Associated Virus Empty Virions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaolei; Earley, Lauriel Freya; He, Yi; Chen, Xiaojing; Hall, Nikita Elexa; Samulski, Richard Jude; Li, Chengwen

    2018-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been successfully applied in clinical trials for hemophilic patients. Although promising, the clinical results suggest that the capsid-specific CD8+T cell response has a negative effect on therapeutic success. In an in vitro analysis using an engineered AAV virus carrying immune-dominant SIINFEKL peptide in the capsid backbone, we have previously demonstrated that capsid antigen presentation from full (genome containing) AAV capsids requires endosome escape and is proteasome dependent and that no capsid antigen presentation is induced from empty virions. In the present study, we examined capsid antigen presentation from administration of empty virions in animal models. In wild-type mice, similar to AAV full particles, capsid antigen presentation from AAV empty virion infection was dose dependent, and the kinetics studies showed that antigen presentation was detected from 2 to 40 days after AAV empty virion administration. In the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 deficient (TAP-/-) mice, capsid antigen presentation was inhibited from both AAV full and empty virions, but higher inhibition was achieved from AAV full particle administration than that from empty virions. This indicates that the pathway of capsid antigen presentation from AAV transduction is dependent on proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV capsids (mainly for full particles) and that the endosomal pathway may also play a role in antigen presentation from empty particles but not full virions. The capsid antigen presentation efficiency from AAV preparations was positively correlated with the amount of empty virions contaminated with full particles. Collectively, the results indicate that contamination of AAV empty virions induces efficient antigen presentation in vivo and the mechanism of capsid antigen presentation from empty virions involves both endosomal and proteasomal pathways. The elucidation of capsid antigen presentation from AAV empty

  15. Recombinant Nonstructural 3 Protein, rNS3, of Hepatitis C Virus Along With Recombinant GP96 Induce IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Mokarram, Pooneh; Kamali sarvestani, Eskandar; Bolhassani, Azam; Mostafavi Pour, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease and to date there has been no vaccine development to prevent this infection. Among non-structural HCV proteins, NS3 protein is an excellent goal for a therapeutic vaccine, due to its large size and less variation in conserved regions. The immunogenic properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) for instance GP96 have prompted investigations into their function as strong adjuvant to improve innate and adaptive immunity. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine additive effects of recombinant GP96 (rGP96) fragments accompanied by rNS3 on expression levels of α5integrin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12 and TNFα, in Antigen Presenting Cells (APCs). Materials and Methods Recombinant viral proteins (rNS3 and rRGD-NS3), N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of GP96 were produced and purified from E. coli in order to treat the cells; mouse spleen Dendritic Cells (DCs) and THP-1 macrophages. Results Our results showed that rNT-GP96 alone significantly increases the expression level of IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin in THP-1 macrophages and DCs, while IL-12 and TNFα expression levels were unaffected by either rNS3 or rRGD-NS3. Interestingly, the co-addition of these recombinant proteins with rNT-GP96 increased IL-12, TNFα and α5integrin expression. Pearson Correlation showed a direct association between α5integrin with IL-12 and TNF-α expression. Conclusions we have highlighted the role of rNS3 plus rNT-GP96 mediated by α5integrin in producing IL-12 and TNFα. It can be suggested that rNT-GP96 could enhance immunity characteristic of rNS3 protein via production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24032046

  16. Phase I study utilizing a novel antigen-presenting cell-targeted vaccine with Toll-like receptor stimulation to induce immunity to self-antigens in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Chapman, Robert; Powderly, John; Blackwell, Kimberly; Keler, Tibor; Green, Jennifer; Riggs, Renee; He, Li-Zhen; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; Zhao, Biwei; Butler, Stephen A; Hobeika, Amy; Osada, Takuya; Davis, Thomas; Clay, Timothy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-07-15

    The use of tumor-derived proteins as cancer vaccines is complicated by tolerance to these self-antigens. Tolerance may be broken by immunization with activated, autologous, ex vivo generated and antigen-loaded, antigen-presenting cells (APC); however, targeting tumor antigen directly to APC in vivo would be a less complicated strategy. We wished to test whether targeted delivery of an otherwise poorly immunogenic, soluble antigen to APC through their mannose receptors (MR) would induce clinically relevant immunity. Two phase I studies were conducted with CDX-1307, a vaccine composed of human chorionic gonadotropin beta-chain (hCG-β) fused to an MR-specific monoclonal antibody, administered either locally (intradermally) or systemically (intravenously) in patients with advanced epithelial malignancies. An initial dose escalation of single-agent CDX-1307 was followed by additional cohorts of CDX-1307 combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 agonist polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly-ICLC) and TLR7/8 agonist resiquimod to activate the APC. CDX-1307 induced consistent humoral and T-cell responses to hCG-β when coadministered with TLR agonists. Greater immune responses and clinical benefit, including the longest duration of stable disease, were observed with immunization combined with local TLR agonists. Immune responses were induced equally efficiently in patients with elevated and nonelevated levels of serum hCG-β. Antibodies within the serum of vaccinated participants had tumor suppressive function in vitro. Toxicity consisted chiefly of mild injection site reactions. APC targeting and activation induce adaptive immunity against poorly immunogenic self-antigens which has implications for enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama

    2006-01-01

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine

  18. Role of interleukin-1 in antigen presentation by normal articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiku, M.L.; Liu, S.; Tiku, K.

    1986-01-01

    Recently the authors have described that normal articular chondrocytes of rabbits present antigen to immune T cells. In the present study the authors investigated the role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on antigen presentation by chondrocytes. For these experiments the antigen pulsed chondroyctes were either untreated or fixed with paraformaldehyde and then co-cultured with immune T cells. T cell proliferation was measured by 3 H-thymidine incorporation. Pulsed non-fixed chondrocytes presented antigen, as expected, but pulsed and fixed cells failed to present antigen to T cells. The 3 H-TdR incorporation was partially restored by addition of purified human IL-1. Next, IL-1 activity was measured in primary chondrocyte culture supernatants stimulated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comitogen thymocyte assay. No activity was detected in chondrocyte supernatants. Propagated chondrocyte culture supernatants also lacked IL-1 activity when stimulated with LPS in the presence of increasing concentration of indomethacin. On the other hand the authors observed that chondrocyte culture supernatants in a dose dependent manner inhibited human IL-1 induced 3 H-TdR incorporation of murine thymocytes. This suggested that these cells may produce an inhibitor of IL-1 and IL-1 production by chondrocytes may be essential for T cell proliferation by these cells. Inability to detect IL-1 in chondrocyte supernatants may be due to the presence of an inhibitor to IL-1. These findings may help in elucidating the immunological mechanisms in situations where chondrocytes and T cell interact, such as in arthritis

  19. Current status of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: Application of organic and inorganic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi Hiroaki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies are currently investigating the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent various infectious diseases. Multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems have been developed to avoid the adverse effects associated with conventional vaccines (i.e., live-attenuated, killed or inactivated pathogens, carrier proteins and cytotoxic adjuvants. Recently, two main approaches have been used to develop multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: (1 the addition of functional components, e.g., T-cell epitopes, cell-penetrating peptides, and lipophilic moieties; and (2 synthetic approaches using size-defined nanomaterials, e.g., self-assembling peptides, non-peptidic dendrimers, and gold nanoparticles, as antigen-displaying platforms. This review summarizes the recent experimental studies directed to the development of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems.

  20. A Genome-wide multidimensional RNAi screen reveals pathways controlling MHC class II antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Petra; van den Hoorn, Tineke; Jongsma, Marlieke L. M.; Bakker, Mark J.; Hengeveld, Rutger; Janssen, Lennert; Cresswell, Peter; Egan, David A.; van Ham, Marieke; ten Brinke, Anja; Ovaa, Huib; Beijersbergen, Roderick L.; Kuijl, Coenraad; Neefjes, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    MHC class II molecules (MHC-II) present peptides to T helper cells to facilitate immune responses and are strongly linked to autoimmune diseases. To unravel processes controlling MHC-II antigen presentation, we performed a genome-wide flow cytometry-based RNAi screen detecting MHC-II expression and

  1. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from [ 35 S]methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of ≅72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO 4 /PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation

  2. Development of Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schneck, Jonathan P; Oelke, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    While adoptive immunotherapy holds promise as a treatment for cancer, development of adoptive immunotherapy has been impeded by the lack of a reproducible and economically viable method for generating...

  3. Resistance to checkpoint blockade therapy through inactivation of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade-Feldman, Moshe; Jiao, Yunxin J; Chen, Jonathan H; Rooney, Michael S; Barzily-Rokni, Michal; Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Bjorgaard, Stacey L; Hammond, Marc R; Vitzthum, Hans; Blackmon, Shauna M; Frederick, Dennie T; Hazar-Rethinam, Mehlika; Nadres, Brandon A; Van Seventer, Emily E; Shukla, Sachet A; Yizhak, Keren; Ray, John P; Rosebrock, Daniel; Livitz, Dimitri; Adalsteinsson, Viktor; Getz, Gad; Duncan, Lyn M; Li, Bo; Corcoran, Ryan B; Lawrence, Donald P; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Boland, Genevieve M; Landau, Dan A; Flaherty, Keith T; Sullivan, Ryan J; Hacohen, Nir

    2017-10-26

    Treatment with immune checkpoint blockade (CPB) therapies often leads to prolonged responses in patients with metastatic melanoma, but the common mechanisms of primary and acquired resistance to these agents remain incompletely characterized and have yet to be validated in large cohorts. By analyzing longitudinal tumor biopsies from 17 metastatic melanoma patients treated with CPB therapies, we observed point mutations, deletions or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), an essential component of MHC class I antigen presentation, in 29.4% of patients with progressing disease. In two independent cohorts of melanoma patients treated with anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1, respectively, we find that B2M LOH is enriched threefold in non-responders (~30%) compared to responders (~10%) and associated with poorer overall survival. Loss of both copies of B2M is found only in non-responders. B2M loss is likely a common mechanism of resistance to therapies targeting CTLA4 or PD1.

  4. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-01-01

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with 125 I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized

  5. Effect of cold nerve allograft preservation on antigen presentation and rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Kale, Santosh S.; Kasukurthi, Rahul; Papp, Esther M.; Johnson, Philip J.; Santosa, Katherine B.; Yan, Ying; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Tung, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Object Nerve allotransplantation provides a temporary scaffold for host nerve regeneration and allows for the reconstruction of significant segmental nerve injuries. The need for systemic the current clinical utilization of nerve allografts, although this need is reduced by the practice of cold nerve allograft preservation. Activation of T cells in response to alloantigen presentation occurs in the context of donor antigen presenting cells (direct pathway) or host antigen-presenting cells (indirect pathway). The relative role of each pathway in eliciting an alloimmune response and its potential for rejection of the nerve allograft model has not previously been investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the effect of progressive periods of cold nerve allograft preservation on antigen presentation and the alloimmune response. Methods The authors used wild type C57Bl/6 (B6), BALB/c, and major histocompatibility Class II–deficient (MHC−/−) C57Bl/6 mice as both nerve allograft recipients and donors. A nonvascularized nerve allograft was used to reconstruct a 1-cm sciatic nerve gap. Progressive cold preservation of donor nerve allografts was used. Quantitative assessment was made after 3 weeks using nerve histomorphometry. Results The donor-recipient combination lacking a functional direct pathway (BALB/c host with MHC−/− graft) rejected nerve allografts as vigorously as wild-type animals. Without an intact indirect pathway (MHC−/− host with BALB/c graft), axonal regeneration was improved (p < 0.052). One week of cold allograft preservation did not improve regeneration to any significant degree in any of the donor-recipient preservation did improve regeneration significantly (p < 0.05) for all combinations compared with wild-type animals without pretreatment. However, only in the presence of an intact indirect pathway (no direct pathway) did 4 weeks of cold preservation improve regeneration significantly compared with 1 week and no

  6. Antigen presentation by hapten-specific B lymphocytes. II. Specificity and properties of antigen-presenting B lymphocytes, and function of immunoglobulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.K.; Haber, S.; Rock, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were designed to examine the ability of hapten-binding murine B lymphocytes to present hapten-protein conjugates to protein antigen-specific, Ia-restricted T cell hybridomas. BALB/c B cells specific for TNP or FITC presented hapten-modified proteins (TNP-G1 phi, TNP-OVA, or FITC-OVA) to the relevant T cell hybridomas at concentrations below 0.1 microgram/ml. Effective presentation of the same antigens by B lymphocyte-depleted splenocytes, and of unmodified proteins by either hapten-binding B cells or Ig spleen cells, required about 10(3)-to 10(4)-fold higher concentrations of antigen. The use of two different haptens and two carrier proteins showed that this extremely efficient presentation of antigen was highly specific, with hapten specificity being a property of the B cells and carrier specificity of the responding T cells. The presentation of hapten-proteins by hapten-binding B lymphocytes was radiosensitive and was not affected by the depletion of plastic-adherent cells, suggesting that conventional APCs (macrophages or dendritic cells) are not required in this phenomenon. Antigen-pulsing and antibody-blocking experiments showed that this hapten-specific antigen presentation required initial binding of antigen to surface Ig receptors. Moreover, linked recognition of hapten and carrier determinants was required, but these recognition events could be temporally separated. Finally, an antigen-processing step was found to be necessary, and this step was disrupted by ionizing radiation. These data suggest a role for B cell surface Ig in providing a specific high-affinity receptor to allow efficient uptake or focusing of antigen for its subsequent processing and presentation to T lymphocytes

  7. Unusual antigen presentation offers new insight into HIV vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J; Picker, Louis J

    2017-06-01

    Recent findings with a rhesus monkey cytomegalovirus based simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine have identified strong CD8+ T cell responses that are restricted by MHC-E. Also mycobacteria specific CD8+ T cells, that are MHC-E restricted, have been identified. MHC-E therefore can present a wide range of epitope peptides to CD8+ T cells, alongside its well defined role in presenting a conserved MHC-class I signal peptide to the NKG2A/C-CD94 receptor on natural killer cells. Here we explore the antigen processing pathways involved in these atypical T cell responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S; Kastrinsky, David B; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-02-19

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  10. Crystal structure of a TAPBPR–MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiansheng; Natarajan, Kannan; Boyd, Lisa F.; Morozov, Giora I.; Mage, Michael G.; Margulies, David H. (NIH); (Hebrew)

    2017-10-12

    Central to CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of MHC I in complex with the peptide editor TAPBPR (TAP-binding protein–related), a tapasin homolog. TAPBPR remodels the peptide-binding groove of MHC I, resulting in the release of low-affinity peptide. Changes include groove relaxation, modifications of key binding pockets, and domain adjustments. This structure captures a peptide-receptive state of MHC I and provides insights into the mechanism of peptide editing by TAPBPR and, by analogy, tapasin.

  11. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP

  12. The Role of Multiscale Protein Dynamics in Antigen Presentation and T Lymphocyte Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Charlotte Eccleston

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes are stimulated when they recognize short peptides bound to class I proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC protein, as peptide–MHC complexes. Due to the diversity in T-cell receptor (TCR molecules together with both the peptides and MHC proteins they bind to, it has been difficult to design vaccines and treatments based on these interactions. Machine learning has made some progress in trying to predict the immunogenicity of peptide sequences in the context of specific MHC class I alleles but, as such approaches cannot integrate temporal information and lack explanatory power, their scope will always be limited. Here, we advocate a mechanistic description of antigen presentation and TCR activation which is explanatory, predictive, and quantitative, drawing on modeling approaches that collectively span several length and time scales, being capable of furnishing reliable biological descriptions that are difficult for experimentalists to provide. It is a form of multiscale systems biology. We propose the use of chemical rate equations to describe the time evolution of the foreign and host proteins to explain how the original proteins end up being presented on the cell surface as peptide fragments, while we invoke molecular dynamics to describe the key binding processes on the molecular level, including those of peptide–MHC complexes with TCRs which lie at the heart of the immune response. On each level, complementary methods based on machine learning are available, and we discuss the relationship between these divergent approaches. The pursuit of predictive mechanistic modeling approaches requires experimentalists to adapt their work so as to acquire, store, and expose data that can be used to verify and validate such models.

  13. Enhancement of MHC-I antigen presentation via architectural control of pH-responsive, endosomolytic polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John T; Postma, Almar; Keller, Salka; Convertine, Anthony J; Moad, Graeme; Rizzardo, Ezio; Meagher, Laurence; Chiefari, John; Stayton, Patrick S

    2015-03-01

    Protein-based vaccines offer a number of important advantages over organism-based vaccines but generally elicit poor CD8(+) T cell responses. We have previously demonstrated that pH-responsive, endosomolytic polymers can enhance protein antigen delivery to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigen presentation pathways thereby augmenting CD8(+) T cell responses following immunization. Here, we describe a new family of nanocarriers for protein antigen delivery assembled using architecturally distinct pH-responsive polymers. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was used to synthesize linear, hyperbranched, and core-crosslinked copolymers of 2-(N,N-diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) that were subsequently chain extended with a hydrophilic N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) segment copolymerized with thiol-reactive pyridyl disulfide (PDS) groups. In aqueous solution, polymer chains assembled into 25 nm micellar nanoparticles and enabled efficient and reducible conjugation of a thiolated protein antigen, ovalbumin. Polymers demonstrated pH-dependent membrane-destabilizing activity in an erythrocyte lysis assay, with the hyperbranched and cross-linked polymer architectures exhibiting significantly higher hemolysis at pH ≤ 7.0 than the linear diblock. Antigen delivery with the hyperbranched and cross-linked polymer architecture enhanced in vitro MHC-I antigen presentation relative to free antigen, whereas the linear construct did not have a discernible effect. The hyperbranched system elicited a four- to fivefold increase in MHC-I presentation relative to the cross-linked architecture, demonstrating the superior capacity of the hyperbranched architecture in enhancing MHC-I presentation. This work demonstrates that the architecture of pH-responsive, endosomolytic polymers can have dramatic effects on intracellular antigen delivery, and offers a promising strategy for enhancing CD8(+) T cell

  14. Papaya ringspot virus coat protein gene for antigen presentation Escherichia coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chatchen, S.; Juříček, Miloslav; Rueda, P.; Kertbundit, Sunee

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2006), s. 16-21 ISSN 1225-8687 Grant - others:Thai Research Fund(TH) BT-B-06-PG-14-4503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : antigen presentation * canine parvo virus * epitope * papaya ringspot virus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.465, year: 2006 http://www.jbmb.or.kr/view_article.php3?cont=jbmb&kid=174&mid=3&pid=3

  15. Identification of immunogenic hot spots within plum pox potyvirus capsid protein for efficient antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-12-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-gamma, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence.

  16. Collective Genetic Interaction Effects and the Role of Antigen Presenting Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. Data Availability Statement: Data used...Schulman BA, Alexander WS, Nicola NA, Martin HM, Hilton DJ. The SOCS box: a tale of destruction and degradation. Trends Biochem Sci. 2002; 27(5):235–41

  17. SILICA AND PM1648 MODIFY HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELL ACTIVITY IN VITRO. (R826782)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. MERS-CoV and H5N1 influenza virus antagonize antigen presentation by altering the epigenetic landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Schafer, Alexandra; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld-Fenney, Amie J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Casey, Cameron P.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Weitz, Karl K.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Gralinski, Lisa; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sims, Amy C.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph

    2018-01-16

    Convergent evolution dictates that diverse groups of viruses will target both similar and distinct host pathways in order to manipulate the immune response and improve infection. In this study, we sought to leverage this uneven viral antagonism to identify critical host factors that govern disease outcome. Utilizing a systems based approach, we examined differential regulation of IFNγ dependent genes following infection with highly pathogenic viruses including influenza (H5N1-VN1203, H1N1-CA04) and coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV). Categorizing by function, we observed down regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation following both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Further examination revealed global down regulation of antigen presentation genes and was confirmed by proteomics for both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Importantly, epigenetic analysis suggested that DNA methylation rather than histone modification plays a crucial role in MERS-CoV mediated antagonism of antigen presentation genes; in contrast, H5N1-VN1203 likely utilizes a combination of epigenetic mechanisms to target antigen presentation. Together, the results indicate a common approach utilized by H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV to modulate antigen presentation and the host adaptive immune response.

  19. Solar cell efficiency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostoja, P.

    1989-01-01

    Solar cells (and solar modules) have to be tested for their performance by means of sound reliable measurement procedures. The need for such measurements arises at various stages of research, of production, and of photovoltaic systems sizing and dimensioning. In fact, accurate measurements are necessary to the researcher, who studies new materials and new processes, to the manufacturer, who has to control his product and, finally, to the user, who needs sound measurements, in order to be in a position to make effective decisions about what kink of product will be needed and with what critical characteristics. In short, standard measurements that allow cells and modules to be characterized serve as a common language, allowing effective communication about products and requirements. 3 refs

  20. Contribution of enhanced engagement of antigen presentation machinery to the clinical immunogenicity of a human interleukin (IL)-21 receptor-blocking therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L; Hickling, T; Song, R; Nowak, J; Rup, B

    2016-01-01

    Reliable risk assessment for biotherapeutics requires accurate evaluation of risk factors associated with immunogenicity. Immunogenicity risk assessment tools were developed and applied to investigate the immunogenicity of a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody, ATR-107 [anti-interleukin (IL)-21 receptor] that elicited anti-drug antibodies (ADA) in 76% of healthy subjects in a Phase 1 study. Because the ATR-107 target is expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), the immunogenicity risk related to engagement with DC and antigen presentation pathways was studied. Despite the presence of IL-21R on DCs, ATR-107 did not bind to the DCs more extensively than the control therapeutic antibody (PF-1) that had elicited low clinical ADA incidence. However, ATR-107, but not the control therapeutic antibody, was translocated to the DC late endosomes, co-localized with intracellular antigen-D related (HLA-DR) molecules and presented a dominant T cell epitope overlapping the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR2) of the light chain. ATR-107 induced increased DC activation exemplified by up-regulation of DC surface expression of CD86, CD274 (PD-L1) and CD40, increased expansion of activated DC populations expressing CD86(hi), CD40(hi), CD83(hi), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)(hi), HLA-DR(hi) or CCR7(hi), as well as elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by DCs. DCs exposed to ATR-107 stimulated an autologous T cell proliferative response in human donor cells, in concert with the detection of immunoglobulin (Ig)G-type anti-ATR-107 antibody response in clinical samples. Collectively, the enhanced engagement of antigen presentation machinery by ATR-107 was suggested. The approaches and findings described in this study may be relevant to identifying lower immunogenicity risk targets and therapeutic molecules. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Antigen-presenting properties of gingival fibroblasts in chronic adult periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, A.; Snijders, A.; Abraham-Inpijn, L.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Kievits, F.

    1997-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is characterized by dense infiltrations of T lymphocytes in the connective tissue, which consists mainly of gingival fibroblasts. It is becoming increasingly clear that T lymphocytes and gingival fibroblasts are capable of influencing each other. For example, the T cell

  2. New design of MHC class II tetramers to accommodate fundamental principles of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, Elise; Romagnoli, Pablo A; Corper, Adam L; Shires, John; Altman, John D; Wilson, Ian A; Garcia, K Christopher; Teyton, Luc

    2009-12-15

    Direct identification and isolation of Ag-specific T cells became possible with the development of MHC tetramers, based on fluorescent avidins displaying biotinylated peptide-MHC complexes. This approach, extensively used for MHC class I-restricted T cells, has met very limited success with class II peptide-MHC complex tetramers (pMHCT-2) for the detection of CD4(+)-specific T cells. In addition, a very large number of these reagents, although capable of specifically activating T cells after being coated on solid support, is still unable to stain. To try to understand this puzzle and design usable tetramers, we examined each parameter critical for the production of pMHCT-2 using the I-A(d)-OVA system as a model. Through this process, the geometry of peptide-MHC display by avidin tetramers was examined, as well as the stability of rMHC molecules. However, we discovered that the most important factor limiting the reactivity of pMHCT-2 was the display of peptides. Indeed, long peptides, as presented by MHC class II molecules, can be bound to I-A/HLA-DQ molecules in more than one register, as suggested by structural studies. This mode of anchorless peptide binding allows the selection of a broader repertoire on single peptides and should favor anti-infectious immune responses. Thus, beyond the technical improvements that we propose, the redesign of pMHCT-2 will give us the tools to evaluate the real size of the CD4 T cell repertoire and help us in the production and testing of new vaccines.

  3. The hemochromatosis protein HFE 20 years later: An emerging role in antigen presentation and in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, Alexandre; Chung, Jacqueline W; Lapointe, Réjean; Santos, Manuela M

    2017-09-01

    Since its discovery, the hemochromatosis protein HFE has been primarily defined by its role in iron metabolism and homeostasis, and its involvement in the genetic disease termed hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). While HH patients are typically afflicted by dysregulated iron levels, many are also affected by several immune defects and increased incidence of autoimmune diseases that have thereby implicated HFE in the immune response. Growing evidence has supported an immunological role for HFE with recent studies describing HFE specifically as it relates to MHC I antigen presentation. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the relationship between iron metabolism, HFE, and the immune system to better understand the origin and cause of immune defects in HH patients. We further describe the role of HFE in MHC I antigen presentation and its potential to impair autoimmune responses in homeostatic conditions, a mechanism which may be exploited by tumors to evade immune surveillance. Overall, this increased understanding of the role of HFE in the immune response sets the stage for better treatment and management of HH and other iron-related diseases, as well as of the immune defects related to this condition. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of gamma radiation on resting B lymphocytes. II. Functional characterization of the antigen-presentation defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; Jenkins, M.K.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radiation on three discrete Ag-presentation functions in resting B cells was examined: 1) Ag uptake and processing, 2) expression of processed Ag in the context of functional class II molecules, and 3) provision of necessary co-stimulatory, or second, signals. Analysis of radiation's effect on B cell presentation of intact vs fragmented Ag or its effect on presentation by Ag-pulsed B cells indicated that damage to Ag uptake and processing could not account for the bulk of the radiation-induced Ag-presentation defect. Experiments with phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis as an indirect measure of TCR occupancy suggested that irradiation caused a fairly rapid (within 1 to 2 h) decrease in the ability of the B cell APC to display a stimulatory combination of Ag and class II molecule. Ag dose-response analyses demonstrated that when presenting a fragment of the Ag pigeon cytochrome c to a T cell clone, 3000 rad-treated B cell APC were able to stimulate approximately 50% as much phosphatidylinositol turnover as unirradiated B cells. It was also found that, in contrast to their inability to initiate T cell proliferation, and similarly to chemically cross-linked splenocytes, heavily irradiated resting B cells plus Ag induced a state of Ag hyporesponsiveness in T cell clones. This effect on T cells had the same Ag- and MHC-specificity as did receptor occupancy required for proliferation, indicating that heavily irradiated resting B cells bear functional class II molecules. Co-culture of T cells with allogeneic B cells and syngeneic heavily irradiated B cells or chemically cross-linked splenic APC plus Ag resulted in T cell proliferation and interfered with the induction of the hyporesponsive state. This co-stimulatory function was radiosensitive in resting allogeneic B cells

  5. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P immersion, notably 50‰ salinity significantly enhanced antigen uptake and the expression of selected genes associated with antigen presentation, providing evidence for an enhanced immune activation of the fish's immune response by the hyperosmotic immersion treatment prior to vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Migration of human antigen-presenting cells in a human skin graft onto nude mice model after contact sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefakker, S.; Balk, H.P.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Joost, T. van; Notten, W.R.F.; Claassen, E.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent contact chemical allergens provoke sensitization after application on both syngeneic and allogeneic skin grafts in mice. We attempted to determine whether the functional activity in a contact sensitization response of human skin graft was affected at the level of antigen uptake and

  7. Fatal Attraction: Interactions between antigen-presenting cells and islets of Langerhans in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. Rosmalen (Judith)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe onset of diabetes mellitus is characterized by various symptoms, all the result of a disturbed glucose metabolism. The main symptoms are thirst and an excessive production of urine. The disturbed glucose metabolism underlying these symptoms is due to an absolute deficiency of insulin

  8. Measuring single-cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Diez-Silva, Monica; Suresh, Subra; Higgins, John M; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-07-05

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of approximately 500 cells per hour with a density precision of 0.001 g mL(-1). We observe that the intrinsic cell-to-cell variation in density is nearly 100-fold smaller than the mass or volume variation. As a result, we can measure changes in cell density indicative of cellular processes that would be otherwise undetectable by mass or volume measurements. Here, we demonstrate this with four examples: identifying Plasmodium falciparum malaria-infected erythrocytes in a culture, distinguishing transfused blood cells from a patient's own blood, identifying irreversibly sickled cells in a sickle cell patient, and identifying leukemia cells in the early stages of responding to a drug treatment. These demonstrations suggest that the ability to measure single-cell density will provide valuable insights into cell state for a wide range of biological processes.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Reveals Changes in MHC I Antigen Presentation After Lentivector Expression of a Gene Regulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Vogel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapamycin-inducible gene regulation system was designed to minimize immune reactions in man and may thus be suited for gene therapy. We assessed whether this system indeed induces no immune responses. The protein components of the regulation system were produced in the human cell lines HEK 293T, D407, and HER 911 following lentiviral transfer of the corresponding genes. Stable cell lines were established, and the peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I molecules on transduced and wild-type (wt cells were compared by differential mass spectrometry. In all cell lines examined, expression of the transgenes resulted in prominent changes in the repertoire of MHC I-presented self-peptides. No MHC I ligands originating from the transgenic proteins were detected. In vitro analysis of immunogenicity revealed that transduced D407 cells displayed slightly higher capacity than wt controls to promote proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. These results indicate that therapeutic manipulations within the genome of target cells may affect pathways involved in the processing of peptide antigens and their presentation by MHC I. This makes the genomic modifications visible to the immune system which may recognize these events and respond. Ultimately, the findings call attention to a possible immune risk.

  10. Complex antigen presentation pathway for an HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope from Chikungunya 6K protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; García-Arriaza, Juan; Lemonnier, François A; Esteban, Mariano; López, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The adaptive cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune response is critical for clearance of many viral infections. These CTL recognize naturally processed short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on the surface of infected cells. This specific recognition allows the killing of virus-infected cells. The T cell immune T cell response to Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-borne Alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for severe musculoskeletal disorders, has not been fully defined; nonetheless, the importance of HLA class I-restricted immune response in this virus has been hypothesized. By infection of HLA-A*0201-transgenic mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the CHIKV structural polyprotein (rVACV-CHIKV), we identified the first human T cell epitopes from CHIKV. These three novel 6K transmembrane protein-derived epitopes are presented by the common HLA class I molecule, HLA-A*0201. One of these epitopes is processed and presented via a complex pathway that involves proteases from different subcellular locations. Specific chemical inhibitors blocked these events in rVACV-CHIKV-infected cells. Our data have implications not only for the identification of novel Alphavirus and Togaviridae antiviral CTL responses, but also for analyzing presentation of antigen from viruses of different families and orders that use host proteinases to generate their mature envelope proteins.

  11. MHC class II-derived peptides can bind to class II molecules, including self molecules, and prevent antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosloniec, E F; Vitez, L J; Buus, S

    1990-01-01

    the alpha k-3 peptide binds slightly less well. These combined data, suggesting that class II-derived peptides can bind to MHC class II molecules, including the autologous molecule from which they are derived, have important implications for the molecular basis of alloreactivity and autoreactivity. Further...... found in the first and third polymorphic regions (PMR) of the A alpha k chain (alpha k-1 and alpha k-3) were capable of inhibiting the presentation of three different HEL-derived peptide antigens to their appropriate T cells. In addition, the alpha k-1 peptide inhibited the presentation of the OVA(323......-339) immunodominant peptide to the I-Ad-restricted T cell hybridomas specific for it. Prepulsing experiments demonstrated that the PMR peptides were interacting with the APC and not with the T cell hybridomas. These observations were confirmed and extended by the demonstration that the alpha k-1 and alpha k-3...

  12. Tolerance induction to cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase by hepatic AAV gene transfer: implications for antigen presentation and immunotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley T Martino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic gene transfer, in particular using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, has been shown to induce immune tolerance to several protein antigens. This approach has been exploited in animal models of inherited protein deficiency for systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. Adequate levels of transgene expression in hepatocytes induce a suppressive T cell response, thereby promoting immune tolerance. This study addresses the question of whether AAV gene transfer can induce tolerance to a cytoplasmic protein.AAV-2 vector-mediated hepatic gene transfer for expression of cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase (beta-gal was performed in immune competent mice, followed by a secondary beta-gal gene transfer with E1/E3-deleted adenoviral Ad-LacZ vector to provoke a severe immunotoxic response. Transgene expression from the AAV-2 vector in approximately 2% of hepatocytes almost completely protected from inflammatory T cell responses against beta-gal, eliminated antibody formation, and significantly reduced adenovirus-induced hepatotoxicity. Consequently, approximately 10% of hepatocytes continued to express beta-gal 45 days after secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer, a time point when control mice had lost all Ad-LacZ derived expression. Suppression of inflammatory T cell infiltration in the liver and liver damage was linked to specific transgene expression and was not seen for secondary gene transfer with Ad-GFP. A combination of adoptive transfer studies and flow cytometric analyses demonstrated induction of Treg that actively suppressed CD8(+ T cell responses to beta-gal and that was amplified in liver and spleen upon secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer.These data demonstrate that tolerance induction by hepatic AAV gene transfer does not require systemic delivery of the transgene product and that expression of a cytoplasmic neo-antigen in few hepatocytes can induce Treg and provide long-term suppression of inflammatory responses and immunotoxicity.

  13. Large, but not small, antigens require time- and temperature-dependent processing in accessory cells before they can be recognized by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    We have studied if antigens of different size and structure all require processing in antigen-presenting cells of guinea-pigs before they can be recognized by T cells. The method of mild paraformaldehyde fixation was used to stop antigen-processing in the antigen-presenting cells. As a measure...... of antigen presentation we used the proliferative response of appropriately primed T cells during a co-culture with the paraformaldehyde-fixed and antigen-exposed presenting cells. We demonstrate that the large synthetic polypeptide antigen, dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine, requires processing. After an initial......-dependent and consequently energy-requiring. Processing is strongly inhibited by the lysosomotrophic drug, chloroquine, suggesting a lysosomal involvement in antigen processing. The existence of a minor, non-lysosomal pathway is suggested, since small amounts of antigen were processed even at 10 degrees C, at which...

  14. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  15. RIP2 Is a Critical Regulator for NLRs Signaling and MHC Antigen Presentation but Not for MAPK and PI3K/Akt Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao Man; Chen, Wen Qin; Hu, Yi Wei; Cao, Lu; Nie, Pin; Chang, Ming Xian

    2018-01-01

    RIP2 is an adaptor protein which is essential for the activation of NF-κB and NOD1- and NOD2-dependent signaling. Although NOD-RIP2 axis conservatively existed in the teleost, the function of RIP2 was only reported in zebrafish, goldfish, and rainbow trout in vitro . Very little is known about the role and mechanisms of piscine NOD-RIP2 axis in vivo . Our previous study showed the protective role of zebrafish NOD1 in larval survival through CD44a-mediated activation of PI3K-Akt signaling. In this study, we examined whether RIP2 was required for larval survival with or without pathogen infection, and determined the signaling pathways modulated by RIP2. Based on our previous report and the present study, our data demonstrated that NOD1-RIP2 axis was important for larval survival in the early ontogenesis. Similar to NOD1, RIP2 deficiency significantly affected immune system processes. The significantly enriched pathways were mainly involved in immune system, such as "Antigen processing and presentation" and "NOD-like receptor signaling pathway" and so on. Furthermore, both transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR revealed that RIP2 was a critical regulator for expression of NLRs (NOD-like receptors) and those genes involved in MHC antigen presentation. Different from NOD1, the present study showed that NOD1, but not RIP2 deficiency significantly impaired protein levels of MAPK pathways. Although RIP2 deficiency also significantly impaired the expression of CD44a, the downstream signaling of CD44a-Lck-PI3K-Akt pathway remained unchanged. Collectively, our works highlight the similarity and discrepancy of NOD1 and RIP2 in the regulation of immune signaling pathways in the zebrafish early ontogenesis, and confirm the crucial role of RIP2 in NLRs signaling and MHC antigen presentation, but not for MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  16. Antigen-presenting cells exposed to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-98, and BI-504 reduce regulatory T cell activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Jensen, Simon Skjøde

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The effect in vitro of six different probiotic strains including Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei YS8866441, Lactobacillus plantarum Lp-115, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-504 and BI-98 was studied on splenic...

  17. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vi...

  18. Radioimmunoassay to quantitatively measure cell surface immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishman, E.C.; Jewell, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay techniques developed to quantitatively measure the presence of immunoglobulins on the surface of cells, is described. The amount of immunoglobulins found on different tumor cells varied from 200 to 1140 ng/10 6 cells. Determination of immunoglobulins on the peripheral lymphocytes obtained from different cancer patients varied between 340 to 1040 ng/10 6 cells. Cultured tumor cells, on the other hand, were found to contain negligible quantities of human IgG [pt

  19. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Caprio, Di; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system....

  20. Measuring The Contact Resistances Of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simple method devised to measure contact resistances of photovoltaic solar cells. Method uses readily available equipment and applicable at any time during life of cell. Enables evaluation of cell contact resistance, contact-end resistance, contact resistivity, sheet resistivity, and sheet resistivity under contact.

  1. Cell Measurements | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    standard AM1.5 Global reference spectrum (IEC 60904-3 edition 2). The irradiance is adjustable from 0.2 to light. A 1-ms shutter is used to measure open-circuit voltage (Voc) prior to heating, allowing the stage adjustable; ~1-ms flash; minimal heating; dedicated spectroradiometer 2 Xe flash lamps 30 cm long with mirror

  2. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Jana; Kamanová, Jana; Jelínek, J.; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Kosová, Martina; Staněk, Ondřej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michálek, J.; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2012), s. 1181-1192 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : MHC CLASS-I * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * PRESENTATION PATHWAY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.074, year: 2012

  3. Comparative potency of different UV sources in reducing the density and antigen-presenting capacity of Langerhans cells in C3H mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Although broadband UV.B irradiation has been shown to induce selective immunosuppression in a variety of experimental systems, the wavelength dependence of the immunornodulation and the initial events in the skin remain unclear. In the present study three UV lamps werc used at suberythermal doses on

  4. Epigenetic regulations in the IFNγ signalling pathway: IFNγ-mediated MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells is associated with DNA demethylation of antigen-presenting machinery genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlková, Veronika; Štěpánek, Ivan; Hrušková, Veronika; Šenigl, Filip; Mayerová, Veronika; Šrámek, Martin; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Hejhal, Tomáš; Dérian, N.; Klatzmann, D.; Six, A.; Reiniš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 16 (2014), s. 6923-35 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/10/2174; GA MZd NT14461 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Grant - others:French state funds within the Investissements d’Avenir program(FR) ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : IFNγ signalling pathway * DNA demethylation * tumour Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.359, year: 2014

  5. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  6. Diagnostic value of tolerance-related gene expression measured in the recipient alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Gyun; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Jeong, Seong-Hee; Kim, Song-Cheol

    2013-08-01

    The efficient development of tolerance-inducing therapies and safe reduction of immunosuppression should be supported by early diagnosis and prediction of tolerance in transplantation. Using mouse models of donor-specific tolerance to allogeneic skin and islet grafts we tested whether measurement of tolerance-related gene expression in their alloantigen-reactive peripheral T cell fraction efficiently reflected the tolerance status of recipients. We found that Foxp3, Nrn1, and Klrg1 were preferentially expressed in conditions of tolerance compared with rejection or unmanipulated controls if their expression is measured in CD69(+) T cells prepared from coculture of recipient peripheral T cells and donor antigen-presenting cells. The same pattern of gene expression was observed in recipients grafted with either skin or islets, recipients of different genetic origins, and even those taking immunosuppressive drugs. These findings suggest that the expression of tolerance-related genes in the alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction could be used to detect tolerance in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Customizable Chamber for Measuring Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Aniqa N; Vo, Huu Tri; Olang, Sharon; Mappus, Elliott; Peterson, Brian; Hlavac, Nora; Harvey, Tyler; Dean, Delphine

    2017-03-12

    Cell migration is a vital part of immune responses, growth, and wound healing. Cell migration is a complex process that involves interactions between cells, the extracellular matrix, and soluble and non-soluble chemical factors (e.g., chemoattractants). Standard methods for measuring the migration of cells, such as the Boyden chamber assay, work by counting cells on either side of a divider. These techniques are easy to use; however, they offer little geometric modification for different applications. In contrast, microfluidic devices can be used to observe cell migration with customizable concentration gradients of soluble factors 1 , 2 . However, methods for making microfluidics based assays can be difficult to learn. Here, we describe an easy method for creating cell culture chambers to measure cell migration in response to chemical concentration gradients. Our cell migration chamber method can create different linear concentration gradients in order to study cell migration for a variety of applications. This method is relatively easy to use and is typically performed by undergraduate students. The microchannel chamber was created by placing an acrylic insert in the shape of the final microchannel chamber well into a Petri dish. After this, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was poured on top of the insert. The PDMS was allowed to harden and then the insert was removed. This allowed for the creation of wells in any desired shape or size. Cells may be subsequently added to the microchannel chamber, and soluble agents can be added to one of the wells by soaking an agarose block in the desired agent. The agarose block is added to one of the wells, and time-lapse images can be taken of the microchannel chamber in order to quantify cell migration. Variations to this method can be made for a given application, making this method highly customizable.

  8. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-08-11

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2-3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability.

  9. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  10. Measurements of magnetic anisotropy in sickle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvo Souza, L.H. de.

    1982-03-01

    Room temperature magnetic measurements in deoxigenated sickle cells showed the existence of magnetic anisotropy, Δchi=1,29 x 10 -3 . This effect was supposed paramagnetic and considered to be due to the iron atoms of the hemoglobin molecules which are one over the other, forming ordered chains inside the erythrocytes. Low temperature (liquid He - 4,2K) measurements of the magnetic anisotropy of sickle cells and normal red blood cells diluted in a cryoprotector was made to confirm the paramagnetic origin of the fenomena. For that purpose it was used a superconductor magnetometer coupled to a SQUID, developed in the 'Laboratorio do Estado Solido do Departamento de Fisica da PUC-RJ'. The results obtained seem to confirm the expected paramagnetic anisotropy and, furthermore, suggest the presence of magnetic interactions among the iron atoms in the sickle cells samples. (Author) [pt

  11. The Ia.2 Epitope Defines a Subset of Lipid Raft Resident MHC Class II Molecules Crucial to Effective Antigen Presentation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen; Sargent, Elizabeth; Harton, Jonathan A.; Drake, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that binding of the 11-5.2 anti-I-Ak mAb, which recognizes the Ia.2 epitope on I-Ak class II molecules, elicits MHC class II signaling, whereas binding of two other anti-I-Ak mAb that recognize the Ia.17 epitope fail to elicit signaling. Using a biochemical approach, we establish that the Ia.2 epitope recognized by the widely used 11-5.2 mAb defines a subset of cell surface I-Ak molecules predominantly found within membrane lipid rafts. Functional studies demonstrate that the Ia.2 bearing subset of I-Ak class II molecules is critically necessary for effective B cell–T cell interactions especially at low antigen doses, a finding consistent with published studies on the role of raft-resident class II molecules in CD4 T cell activation. Interestingly, B cells expressing recombinant I-Ak class II molecules possessing a β chain-tethered HEL peptide lack the Ia.2 epitope and fail to partition into lipid rafts. Moreover, cells expressing Ia.2 negative tethered peptide-class II molecules are severely impaired in their ability to present both tethered peptide or peptide derived from exogenous antigen to CD4 T cells. These results establish the Ia.2 epitope as defining a lipid raft-resident MHC class II confomer vital to the initiation of MHC class II restricted B cell–T cell interactions. PMID:21543648

  12. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goff Julie

    2005-04-01

    objects, and uncertainty in the outlining and positioning of cells by automated image analysis. Exponential growth, as monitored by total cell area, did not linearly correlate with absolute cell number, but proved valuable for selection of reliable tracking data and for disclosing between-experiment variations in cell growth. Conclusion These results demonstrate the applicability of a system that uses fully automated image acquisition and analysis to study cell motility and growth. Cellular motility response is determined in an unbiased and comparatively high throughput manner. Abundant ancillary data provide opportunities for uniform filtering according to criteria that select for biological relevance and for providing insight into features of system performance. Data quality measures have been developed that can serve as a basis for the design and quality control of experiments that are facilitated by automation and the 384 well plate format. This system is applicable to large-scale studies such as drug screening and research into effects of complex combinations of factors and matrices on cell phenotype.

  13. The 2.5 Å Structure of CD1c in Complex with a Mycobacterial Lipid Reveals an Open Groove Ideally Suited for Diverse Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Louise; Li, Nan-Sheng; Hawk, Andrew J.; Garzón, Diana; Zhang, Tejia; Fox, Lisa M.; Kazen, Allison R.; Shah, Sneha; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Saghatelian, Alan; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Adams, Erin J. (Harvard); (UC); (MXPL-G); (UW-MED)

    2011-08-24

    CD1 molecules function to present lipid-based antigens to T cells. Here we present the crystal structure of CD1c at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, in complex with the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen mannosyl-{beta}1-phosphomycoketide (MPM). CD1c accommodated MPM's methylated alkyl chain exclusively in the A pocket, aided by a unique exit portal underneath the {alpha}1 helix. Most striking was an open F pocket architecture lacking the closed cavity structure of other CD1 molecules, reminiscent of peptide binding grooves of classical major histocompatibility complex molecules. This feature, combined with tryptophan-fluorescence quenching during loading of a dodecameric lipopeptide antigen, provides a compelling model by which both the lipid and peptide moieties of the lipopeptide are involved in CD1c presentation of lipopeptides.

  14. Cross–dressers turn on T cells

    OpenAIRE

    YEWDELL, JONATHAN W.; DOLAN, BRIAN P.

    2011-01-01

    Memory T cells remember viruses from previous infections, providing immunity by facilitating the killing of infected cells. For this, they exploit cross-dressing, the transfer of antigens between antigen-presenting cells.

  15. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Christina M; Comrie, William A; Hyun, Young-Min

    2012-01-01

    T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells...

  16. A photoacoustic technique to measure the properties of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to non-invasively determine the diameter and sound speed of single cells using a combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic technique. Two cell lines, B16-F1 melanoma cells and MCF7 breast cancer cells were examined using this technique. Using a 200 MHz transducer, the ultrasound backscatter from a single cell in suspension was recorded. Immediately following, the cell was irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the resulting photoacoustic wave recorded by the same transducer. The melanoma cells contain optically absorbing melanin particles, which facilitated photoacoustic wave generation. MCF7 cells have negligible optical absorption at 532 nm; the cells were permeabilized and stained with trypan blue prior to measurements. The measured ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectra were compared to theoretical equations with the cell diameter and sound speed as variables (Anderson scattering model for ultrasound, and a thermoelastic expansion model for photoacoustics). The diameter and sound speed were extracted from the models where the spectral shape matched the measured signals. However the photoacoustic spectrum for the melanoma cell did not match theory, which is likely because melanin particles are located around the cytoplasm, and not within the nucleus. Therefore a photoacoustic finite element model of a cell was developed where the central region was not used to generate a photoacoustic wave. The resulting power spectrum was in better agreement with the measured signal than the thermoelastic expansion model. The MCF7 cell diameter obtained using the spectral matching method was 17.5 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 16 μm, while the melanoma cell diameter obtained was 22 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 21 μm. The sound speed measured from the MCF7 and melanoma cell was 1573 and 1560 m/s, respectively, which is within acceptable values that have been published in literature.

  17. Colour measurement and white blood cell recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gelsema, E S

    1972-01-01

    As a part of a collaboration with NEMCH aimed at the automation of the differential white blood cell count, studies have been made of the different possibilities for using colour to help in the recognition process. Results are presented comparing data obtained with a microspectrophotometer and with a simulated three-colour scanner.

  18. Radiation protection measures for hot cell sanitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.U.; Burck, W.; Dilger, H.

    1983-01-01

    The cell 5 of the Hot Cell Facility of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (KfK) was to be restored and reequipped after 12 years of operation. The decontamination work was first done remotely controlled and afterwards by 38 persons entering the cell, which took about 2 months. The radiation protection methods and personal dosimetry systems are described. At the beginning of the work the γ-dose rate amounted up to 900 mSv/h. After completion of the remotely controlled decontamination work the γ-dose rate decreased to 1.5 mSv/h. At that time the (α+β-contamination was 10 5 Bq/cm 2 . Till the end of the work the removable activity dropped to 10 2 - 10 3 Bq/cm 2 for β-radiation, to 0.3 - 30 Bq/cm 2 for α-radiation and the local dose rate to about 0.03 mSv/h. During the work the accumulated collective doses were listed for breast, hand, head, gonads and foot. In the figure the development with the time of the doses for breast and hand is shown. During restoration work of the cell the accumulated collective whole-body dose amounted to 30 mSv. (orig.) [de

  19. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Chiappini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1 there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells and (2 they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC.

  20. Measurement of Heme Synthesis Levels in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Alam, Maksudul; Zhang, Li

    2015-07-09

    Heme serves as the prosthetic group for a wide variety of proteins known as hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochromes. It is involved in various molecular and cellular processes such as gene transcription, translation, cell differentiation and cell proliferation. The biosynthesis levels of heme vary across different tissues and cell types and is altered in diseased conditions such as anemia, neuropathy and cancer. This technique uses [4-(14)C] 5-aminolevulinic acid ([(14)C] 5-ALA), one of the early precursors in the heme biosynthesis pathway to measure the levels of heme synthesis in mammalian cells. This assay involves incubation of cells with [(14)C] 5-ALA followed by extraction of heme and measurement of the radioactivity incorporated into heme. This procedure is accurate and quick. This method measures the relative levels of heme biosynthesis rather than the total heme content. To demonstrate the use of this technique the levels of heme biosynthesis were measured in several mammalian cell lines.

  1. Measuring bacterial cells size with AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Osiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria revealing surface details and cell integrity. During scanning however, the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane results in distortion of the images. Such distortions or artifacts are the result of geometrical effects related to bacterial cell height, specimen curvature and the AFM probe geometry. The most common artifact in imaging is surface broadening, what can lead to errors in bacterial sizing. Several methods of correction have been proposed to compensate for these artifacts and in this study we describe a simple geometric model for the interaction between the tip (a pyramidal shaped AFM probe and the bacterium (Escherichia coli JM-109 strain to minimize the enlarging effect. Approaches to bacteria immobilization and examples of AFM images analysis are also described.

  2. Delivery of CD8+ T-cell epitopes into major histocompatibility complex class I antigen presentation pathway by Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase:delineation of cell invasive structures and permissive insertion sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osička, Radim; Osičková, Adriana; Basar, T.; Guermonprez, P.; Rojas, M.; Leclerc, C.; Šebo, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2000), s. 247-256 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk VS96149; GA MŠk ME 167 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.204, year: 2000

  3. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  4. Energy storage cell impedance measuring apparatus, methods and related systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.

    2017-12-26

    Energy storage cell impedance testing devices, circuits, and related methods are disclosed. An energy storage cell impedance measuring device includes a sum of sinusoids (SOS) current excitation circuit including differential current sources configured to isolate a ground terminal of the differential current sources from a positive terminal and a negative terminal of an energy storage cell. A method includes applying an SOS signal comprising a sum of sinusoidal current signals to the energy storage cell with the SOS current excitation circuit, each of the sinusoidal current signals oscillating at a different one of a plurality of different frequencies. The method also includes measuring an electrical signal at a positive terminal and a negative terminal of the energy storage cell, and computing an impedance of the energy storage cell at each of the plurality of different frequencies using the measured electrical signal.

  5. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages. (topical review)

  6. Rainfall measurement using cell phone links

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schip, van het T.I.; Overeem, A.; Leijnse, H.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Meirink, J.F.; Delden, van A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Commercial cellular telecommunication networks can be used for rainfall estimation by measuring the attenuation of electromagnetic signals transmitted between antennas from microwave links. However, as the received link signal may also decrease during dry periods, a method to separate wet and dry

  7. Linear thermal expansion coefficient measurement technology in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Gyu; Choo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, K. S.

    1998-06-01

    To establish linear thermal expansion coefficient measurement technology in hot cell, we reviewed and evaluated various measuring technology by paper and these were compared with the data produced with pre-installed dilatometer in hot cell. Detailed contents are as follows; - The theory of test. - Review of characteristics for various measurement technology and compatibility with hot cell. - Review of standard testing regulations(ASTM). - System calibration of pre-installed dilatometer. - Performance test of pre-installed dilatometer. (author). 12 refs., 15 tabs., 8 figs

  8. Red blood cell-deformability measurement: review of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, M

    2009-01-01

    Cell-deformability characterization involves general measurement of highly complex relationships between cell biology and physical forces to which the cell is subjected. The review takes account of the modern technical solutions simulating the action of the force applied to the red blood cell in macro- and microcirculation. Diffraction ektacytometers and rheoscopes measure the mean deformability value for the total red blood cell population investigated and the deformation distribution index of individual cells, respectively. Deformation assays of a whole single cell are possible by means of optical tweezers. The single cell-measuring setups for micropipette aspiration and atomic force microscopy allow conducting a selective investigation of deformation parameters (e.g., cytoplasm viscosity, viscoelastic membrane properties). The distinction between instrument sensitivity to various RBC-rheological features as well as the influence of temperature on measurement are discussed. The reports quoted confront fascinating possibilities of the techniques with their medical applications since the RBC-deformability has the key position in the etiology of a wide range of conditions.

  9. Measuring the acoustophoretic contrast factor of living cells in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Grenvall, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method, which allows for accurate measurement of the acostophoretic contrast factor Φ of different cell types, an acousto-physical parameter of fundamental importance in microchip acoustophoresis. As a test case the Φ factor is measured for undifferentiated and four-days different......We report a new method, which allows for accurate measurement of the acostophoretic contrast factor Φ of different cell types, an acousto-physical parameter of fundamental importance in microchip acoustophoresis. As a test case the Φ factor is measured for undifferentiated and four...

  10. Polymorphisms of transporter associated with antigen presentation, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 and their implications for protection and susceptibility to severe forms of dengue fever in patients in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anira N Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To date, a clear understanding of dengue disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Some infected individuals display no symptoms while others develop severe life-threatening forms of the disease. It is widely believed that host genetic factors influence dengue severity. Aims: This study evaluates the relationship between certain polymorphisms and dengue severity in Sri Lankan patients. Settings and Design: Polymorphism studies are carried out on genes for; transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP, promoter of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and promoter of interleukin-10 (IL-10. In other populations, TAP1 (333, TAP2 (379, TNF-α (−308, and IL-10 (−1082, −819, −592 have been associated with dengue and a number of different diseases. Data have not been collected previously for these polymorphisms for dengue patients in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: The polymorphisms were typed by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction in 107 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients together with 62 healthy controls. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson′s Chi-square contingency table analysis with Yates′ correction. Results: Neither the TAP nor the IL-10 polymorphisms considered individually can define dengue disease outcome with regard to severity. However, the genotype combination, IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 CCA/ATA was significantly associated with development of severe dengue in these patients, suggesting a risk factor to developing DHF. Also, identified is the genotype combination IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 ATA/ATG which suggested a possibility for protection from DHF. The TNF-α (−308 GG genotype was also significantly associated with severe dengue, suggesting a significant risk factor. Conclusions: The results reported here are specific to the Sri Lankan population. Comparisons with previous reports imply that data may vary from population to population.

  11. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of potentially self-reactive circulating B cells and T cells remain unclear. We measured the uptake of a self-antigen, thyroglobulin, by antigen presenting cells, and the subsequent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells from healthy controls and patients...... with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4(+) T cells...... and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  12. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination...... concentrations of the fluorophore calcein suitable for measurement of changes in cell water volume by self-quenching. The relationship between calcein fluorescence intensity, when excited at 490 nm (its excitation maximum), and calcein concentration was investigated in vitro and in various cultured cell types...... to a decrease in calcein fluorescence with high signal-to-noise ratio (>15). Similar results were obtained with the fluorophore BCECF when excited at its isosbestic wavelength (436 nm). The present results demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence self-quenching to measure rapid changes in cell water volume....

  13. Radioimmunological measurements of total LH in sheep pituitary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, R.P.; McIntosh, J.E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Procedures commonly used to extract LH from pituitary cells in order to measure total cell content were compared in four cell preparations. It was shown in 81 samples of cells suspended in 1 mM EDTA or 50 mM NaHCO 3 that after freezing and thawing folloqwed by any of a variety of treatments, there were no significant differences in the amounts of LH measured by RIA relative to the arbitrarily chosen reference treatment of vigorous pipetting. The additional treatments were multiple freezing and thawing, homogenisation, sonication, homogenisation in 25-100 mM Na 2 CO 3 folloqwed by rapid neutralisation, or none. The consistency of the results suggested that the same cellular pools of LH were being made accessible for measurement with all treatments. However, use of the more vigorous conditions of 1-2.5 M urea, 1% Triton X-100, or sonication on ice in 100 mM Na 2 CO 3 decreased the amount of measurable hormone presumably due to its modification. In two cell preparations, homogenisation of cells in 100 mM Na 2 CO 3 produced and additional 45% of measurable LH not accessible using other treatments nor from the source material in two other preparations. (author)

  14. Techniques for measuring red cell, platelet, and WBC survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, K.; Freeman, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Blood cell survival studies yield valuable information concerning production and destruction of cells circulating in the bloodstream. Methodologies for the measurement of red cell survival include nonisotopic methods such as differential agglutination and hemolysis. The isotopic label may be radioactive or, if not, will require availability of a mass spectrograph. These methods fall into two categories, one where red cells of all ages are labeled ( 51 Cr, DFP32, etc.) and those employing a cohort label of newly formed cells ( 14 C glycine, 75 Se methionine, etc.). Interpretation of results for methodology employed and mechanism of destruction, random or by senescence, are discussed. A similar approach is presented for platelet and leukocyte survival studies. The inherent difficulties and complications of sequestration, storage, and margination of these cells are emphasized and discussed. 38 references

  15. Pathogen reduction by ultraviolet C light effectively inactivates human white blood cells in platelet products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohler, Petra; Müller, Meike; Winkler, Carla; Schaudien, Dirk; Sewald, Katherina; Müller, Thomas H; Seltsam, Axel

    2015-02-01

    Residual white blood cells (WBCs) in cellular blood components induce a variety of adverse immune events, including nonhemolytic febrile transfusion reactions, alloimmunization to HLA antigens, and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). Pathogen reduction (PR) methods such as the ultraviolet C (UVC) light-based THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system were developed to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection. As UVC light targets nucleic acids, it interferes with the replication of both pathogens and WBCs. This preclinical study aimed to evaluate the ability of UVC light to inactivate contaminating WBCs in platelet concentrates (PCs). The in vitro and in vivo function of WBCs from UVC-treated PCs was compared to that of WBCs from gamma-irradiated and untreated PCs by measuring cell viability, proliferation, cytokine secretion, antigen presentation in vitro, and xenogeneic GVHD responses in a humanized mouse model. UVC light was at least as effective as gamma irradiation in preventing GVHD in the mouse model. It was more effective in suppressing T-cell proliferation (>5-log reduction in the limiting dilution assay), cytokine secretion, and antigen presentation than gamma irradiation. The THERAFLEX UV-Platelets (MacoPharma) PR system can substitute gamma irradiation for TA-GVHD prophylaxis in platelet (PLT) transfusion. Moreover, UVC treatment achieves suppression of antigen presentation and inhibition of cytokine accumulation during storage of PCs, which has potential benefits for transfusion recipients. © 2014 AABB.

  16. Coupling Bacterial Activity Measurements with Cell Sorting by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servais; Courties; Lebaron; Troussellier

    1999-08-01

    > Abstract A new procedure to investigate the relationship between bacterial cell size and activity at the cellular level has been developed; it is based on the coupling of radioactive labeling of bacterial cells and cell sorting by flow cytometry after SYTO 13 staining. Before sorting, bacterial cells were incubated in the presence of tritiated leucine using a procedure similar to that used for measuring bacterial production by leucine incorporation and then stained with SYTO 13. Subpopulations of bacterial cells were sorted according to their average right-angle light scatter (RALS) and fluorescence. Average RALS was shown to be significantly related to the average biovolume. Experiments were performed on samples collected at different times in a Mediterranean seawater mesocosm enriched with nitrogen and phosphorus. At four sampling times, bacteria were sorted in two subpopulations (cells smaller and larger than 0.25 µm(3)). The results indicate that, at each sampling time, the growth rate of larger cells was higher than that of smaller cells. In order to confirm this tendency, cell sorting was performed on six subpopulations differing in average biovolume during the mesocosm follow-up. A clear increase of the bacterial growth rates was observed with increasing cell size for the conditions met in this enriched mesocosm.http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00248/bibs/38n2p180.html

  17. Nitric Oxide (NO) Measurements in Stomatal Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurla, Srinivas; Gayatri, Gunja; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells acquired great importance, in view of the multifaceted function and involvement of NO as a signal in various plant processes. Monitoring of NO in guard cells is quite simple because of the large size of guard cells and ease of observing the detached epidermis under microscope. Stomatal guard cells therefore provide an excellent model system to study the components of signal transduction. The levels and functions of NO in relation to stomatal closure can be monitored, with the help of an inverted fluorescence or confocal microscope. We can measure the NO in guard cells by using flouroprobes like 4,5-diamino fluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA). This fluorescent dye, DAF-2DA, is cell permeable and after entry into the cell, the diacetate group is removed by the cellular esterases. The resulting DAF-2 form is membrane impermeable and reacts with NO to generate the highly fluorescent triazole (DAF-2T), with excitation and emission wavelengths of 488 and 530 nm, respectively. If time-course measurements are needed, the epidermis can be adhered to a cover-glass or glass slide and left in a small petri dishes. Fluorescence can then be monitored at required time intervals; with a precaution that excitation is done minimally, only when a fluorescent image is acquired. The present method description is for the epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum and should work with most of the other dicotyledonous plants.

  18. Characterization of perovskite solar cells: Towards a reliable measurement protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Zimmermann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead halide perovskite solar cells have shown a tremendous rise in power conversion efficiency with reported record efficiencies of over 20% making this material very promising as a low cost alternative to conventional inorganic solar cells. However, due to a differently severe “hysteretic” behaviour during current density-voltage measurements, which strongly depends on scan rate, device and measurement history, preparation method, device architecture, etc., commonly used solar cell measurements do not give reliable or even reproducible results. For the aspect of commercialization and the possibility to compare results of different devices among different laboratories, it is necessary to establish a measurement protocol which gives reproducible results. Therefore, we compare device characteristics derived from standard current density-voltage measurements with stabilized values obtained from an adaptive tracking of the maximum power point and the open circuit voltage as well as characteristics extracted from time resolved current density-voltage measurements. Our results provide insight into the challenges of a correct determination of device performance and propose a measurement protocol for a reliable characterisation which is easy to implement and has been tested on varying perovskite solar cells fabricated in different laboratories.

  19. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Hsing [Division of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chang-Hsiang [Department of Dentistry, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsi-Hsin, E-mail: mhho@mail.ntust.edu.t [Deputy Superintendent, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  20. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Li, Chung-Hsing; Hung, Chang-Hsiang; Li, Hsi-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  1. Cell cycle variation in x-ray survival for cells from spheroids measured by volume cell sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, J.P.; Wilder, M.E.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable work has been done studying the variation in cell survival as a function of cell cycle position for monolayers or single cells exposed to radiation. Little is known about the effects of multicellular growth on the relative radiation sensitivity of cells in different cell cycle stages. The authors have developed a new technique for measuring the response of cells, using volume cell sorting, which is rapid, non-toxic, and does not require cell synchronization. By combining this technique with selective spheroid dissociation,they have measured the age response of cells located at various depths in EMT6 and Colon 26 spheroids. Although cells in the inner region had mostly G1-phase DNA contents, 15-20% had S- and G2-phase DNA contents. Analysis of these cells using BrdU labeling and flow cytometric analysis with a monoclonal antibody to BrdU indicated that the inner region cells were not synthesizing DNA. Thus, the authors were able to measure the radiation response of cells arrested in G1, S and G2 cell cycle phases. Comparison of inner and outer spheroid regions, and monolayer cultures, indicates that it is improper to extrapolate age response data in standard culture conditions to the situation in spheroids

  2. Delivery of a MalE CD4+-T-Cell Epitope into the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation Pathway by Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase ral NPKSupply

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loucká, Jiřina; Schlecht, G.; Vojtová, Jana; Leclerc, C.; Šebo, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2002), s. 1002-1005 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/01/0934; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk ME 167 Grant - others:QLK2-CT(US) 00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : delivery * epitope * complex Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.039, year: 2002

  3. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    A new design is presented for a gas flow cell for reactive gases at high temperatures. The design features three heated sections that are separated by flow windows. This design avoids the contact of reactive gases with the material of the exchangeable optical windows. A gas cell with this design ......-resolution measurements are presented for the absorption cross-section of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the UV range up to 773 K (500 degrees C)...

  4. Microfluidic device for cell capture and impedance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Wang, Min-How

    2007-10-01

    This work presents a microfluidic device to capture physically single cells within microstructures inside a channel and to measure the impedance of a single HeLa cell (human cervical epithelioid carcinoma) using impedance spectroscopy. The device includes a glass substrate with electrodes and a PDMS channel with micro pillars. The commercial software CFD-ACE+ is used to study the flow of the microstructures in the channel. According to simulation results, the probability of cell capture by three micro pillars is about 10%. An equivalent circuit model of the device is established and fits closely to the experimental results. The circuit can be modeled electrically as cell impedance in parallel with dielectric capacitance and in series with a pair of electrode resistors. The system is operated at low frequency between 1 and 100 kHz. In this study, experiments show that the HeLa cell is successfully captured by the micro pillars and its impedance is measured by impedance spectroscopy. The magnitude of the HeLa cell impedance declines at all operation voltages with frequency because the HeLa cell is capacitive. Additionally, increasing the operation voltage reduces the magnitude of the HeLa cell because a strong electric field may promote the exchange of ions between the cytoplasm and the isotonic solution. Below an operating voltage of 0.9 V, the system impedance response is characteristic of a parallel circuit at under 30 kHz and of a series circuit at between 30 and 100 kHz. The phase of the HeLa cell impedance is characteristic of a series circuit when the operation voltage exceeds 0.8 V because the cell impedance becomes significant.

  5. What do we measure when we measure cell-associated HIV RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Alexander O; Berkhout, Ben

    2018-01-29

    Cell-associated (CA) HIV RNA has received much attention in recent years as a surrogate measure of the efficiency of HIV latency reversion and because it may provide an estimate of the viral reservoir size. This review provides an update on some recent insights in the biology and clinical utility of this biomarker. We discuss a number of important considerations to be taken into account when interpreting CA HIV RNA measurements, as well as different methods to measure this biomarker.

  6. Solar cell junction temperature measurement of PV module

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study develops a simple non-destructive method to measure the solar cell junction temperature of PV module. The PV module was put in the environmental chamber with precise temperature control to keep the solar PV module as well as the cell junction in thermal equilibrium with the chamber. The open-circuit voltage of PV module Voc is then measured using a short pulse of solar irradiation provided by a solar simulator. Repeating the measurements at different environment temperature (40-80°C) and solar irradiation S (200-1000W/m2), the correlation between the open-circuit voltage Voc, the junction temperature Tj, and solar irradiation S is derived.The fundamental correlation of the PV module is utilized for on-site monitoring of solar cell junction temperature using the measured Voc and S at a short time instant with open circuit. The junction temperature Tj is then determined using the measured S and Voc through the fundamental correlation. The outdoor test results show that the junction temperature measured using the present method, Tjo, is more accurate. The maximum error using the average surface temperature Tave as the junction temperature is 4.8 °C underestimation; while the maximum error using the present method is 1.3 °C underestimation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Solar cell junction temperature measurement of PV module

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.; Yang, P.E.; Lin, Y.P.; Lin, B.Y.; Chen, H.J.; Lai, R.C.; Cheng, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study develops a simple non-destructive method to measure the solar cell junction temperature of PV module. The PV module was put in the environmental chamber with precise temperature control to keep the solar PV module as well

  8. Electrode-less measurement of cell layers impedance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krůšek, Jan; Ďaďo, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 6 (2014), s. 705-711 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cell impedance measurement * transepithelial resistance Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  9. Single-cell LEP-type cavity on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    A single-cell cavity, made of copper, with tapered connectors for impedance measurements. It was used as a model of LEP-type superconducting cavities, to investigate impedance and higher-order modes and operated at around 600 MHz (the LEP acceleration frequency was 352.2 MHz). See 8202500.

  10. DNA Measurement of Overlapping Cell Nuclei in Thick Tissue Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an improved image analysis procedure for measuring the DNA content of cell nuclei in thick sections of liver tissue by absorption densitometry. Whereas previous methods only permitted the analysis of isolated nuclei, the new technique enables both isolated and overlapping nuclei to be measured. A 3D segmentation procedure determines whether each object is an isolated nucleus or a pair of overlapping nuclei; in the latter case the combined optical density is redistributed to the individual nuclei. A selection procedure ensures that only complete nuclei are measured.

  11. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  12. Measurement of blowdown flow rates using load cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolas, P.K.; Venkat Raj, V.; Ghosh, A.K.; Murty, L.G.K.; Muralidhar Rao, S.

    1980-01-01

    To establish a reliable method for measuring two-phase flow, experiments were planned for measurement of transient single phase flow rates from vessels using load cells. Suitability of lead-zirconate-titanate piezoelectric ceramic discs was examined. Discharge time constant of the disc used was low, leading to large measurement errors. Subsequently, experiments were carried out using strain gauge load cells and these were found satisfactory. The unsteady flow equation has been derived for the system under investigation. The equation has been solved numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method and also by integrating it analytically. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical results and presented in this report. (auth.)

  13. Geometry sensing by dendritic cells dictates spatial organization and PGE(2)-induced dissolution of podosomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, K. van den; Helden, S.F.G. van; Riet, J.T. te; Diez-Ahedo, R.; Manzo, C.; Oud, M.M.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Brock, R.E.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Assembly and disassembly of adhesion structures such as focal adhesions (FAs) and podosomes regulate cell adhesion and differentiation. On antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), acquisition of a migratory and immunostimulatory phenotype depends on podosome dissolution by prostaglandin E(2)

  14. Measuring T cell-mediated cytotoxicity using fluorogenic caspase substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahroudi, A; Silvestri, G; Feinberg, M B

    2003-10-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a major role in the immune response against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. In addition, CTLs are implicated in the control of tumor cells in certain settings. Accurate measures of CTL function are of critical importance to study the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and to evaluate the efficacy of new vaccines and immunotherapies. To this end, we have recently developed a flow cytometry-based CTL (FCC) assay that measures the CTL-induced caspase activation within target cells using cell permeable fluorogenic caspase substrates. This novel assay reliably detects, by flow cytometry or fluorescence/confocal microscopy, antigen-specific CTLs in a wide variety of human and murine systems, and is safer and more informative than the standard 51Cr-release assay. In addition, the flow cytometric CTL (FCC) assay provides an alternative method that is often more sensitive and physiologically informative when compared to previously described FCC assays, as it measures a biological indicator of apoptosis within the target cell. The FCC assay may thus represent a useful tool to further understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie CTL-mediated killing during tumorigenesis or following infection with viruses or other intracellular pathogens.

  15. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepa, M. W., E-mail: mkepa@staffmail.ed.ac.uk; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe{sub 2}.

  16. The Innovative Design of Lucas Cell for Radon Gas Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanabongse, Paitoon; Rattanabussayaporn, Sakon; Sriya, Maitree; Sola, Banthom

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Lucas scintillation cell has been widely used for radon gas measurement. They are commercially available but usually with a rather high price, therefore, four cells were developed and built in house. The invented radon gas detector has a special feature; the circumference of the upper part of the cylindrical detector is larger than the lower part. The purpose of this is to allow the light sensing device coupled at the lower end can better detect the phosphorescence light occurred inside. The result is that the invented detector yields higher detection efficiency. This special feature also allows us to increase the volume of the detector which results in higher detection sensitivity

  17. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... by autocrine or paracrine systems can reduce antigen present- ing capacity of immune cells, ... polypeptide (GNAQ), glycosylphosphatidylinositol specific phosphorlipase C ...... profiling of prostate cancer. BMC Mol. Biol. 8, 25.

  18. Real cell overlay measurement through design based metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Gyun; Kim, Jungchan; Park, Chanha; Lee, Taehyeong; Ji, Sunkeun; Jo, Gyoyeon; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Maruyama, Kotaro; Park, Byungjun

    2014-04-01

    Until recent device nodes, lithography has been struggling to improve its resolution limit. Even though next generation lithography technology is now facing various difficulties, several innovative resolution enhancement technologies, based on 193nm wavelength, were introduced and implemented to keep the trend of device scaling. Scanner makers keep developing state-of-the-art exposure system which guarantees higher productivity and meets a more aggressive overlay specification. "The scaling reduction of the overlay error has been a simple matter of the capability of exposure tools. However, it is clear that the scanner contributions may no longer be the majority component in total overlay performance. The ability to control correctable overlay components is paramount to achieve the desired performance.(2)" In a manufacturing fab, the overlay error, determined by a conventional overlay measurement: by using an overlay mark based on IBO and DBO, often does not represent the physical placement error in the cell area of a memory device. The mismatch may arise from the size or pitch difference between the overlay mark and the cell pattern. Pattern distortion, caused by etching or CMP, also can be a source of the mismatch. Therefore, the requirement of a direct overlay measurement in the cell pattern gradually increases in the manufacturing field, and also in the development level. In order to overcome the mismatch between conventional overlay measurement and the real placement error of layer to layer in the cell area of a memory device, we suggest an alternative overlay measurement method utilizing by design, based metrology tool. A basic concept of this method is shown in figure1. A CD-SEM measurement of the overlay error between layer 1 and 2 could be the ideal method but it takes too long time to extract a lot of data from wafer level. An E-beam based DBM tool provides high speed to cover the whole wafer with high repeatability. It is enabled by using the design as a

  19. Quantitative analysis of impact measurements using dynamic load cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent J. Maranzano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is used to estimate material properties from a short duration transient impact force measured by dropping spheres onto rectangular coupons fixed to a dynamic load cell. The contact stress between the dynamic load cell surface and the projectile are modeled using Hertzian contact mechanics. Due to the short impact time relative to the load cell dynamics, an additional Kelvin–Voigt element is included in the model to account for the finite response time of the piezoelectric crystal. Calculations with and without the Kelvin–Voigt element are compared to experimental data collected from combinations of polymeric spheres and polymeric and metallic surfaces. The results illustrate that the inclusion of the Kelvin–Voigt element qualitatively captures the post impact resonance and non-linear behavior of the load cell signal and quantitatively improves the estimation of the Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. Mathematically, the additional KV element couples one additional differential equation to the Hertzian spring-dashpot equation. The model can be numerically integrated in seconds using standard numerical techniques allowing for its use as a rapid technique for the estimation of material properties. Keywords: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Dynamic load cell

  20. New insights into the nanometer-scaled cell-surface interspace by cell-sensor measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Mirko; Baumann, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The culture of adherent cells on solid surfaces is an established in vitro method, and the adhesion process of a cell is considered as an important trigger for many cellular processes (e.g., polarity and tumor genesis). However, not all of the eliciting biochemical or biophysical reactions are yet understood. Interestingly, there are not much experimental data about the impact that the interspace between an adherent cell and the (solid) substrate has on the cell's behavior. This interspace is mainly built by the basolateral side of epithelial cells and the substrate. This paper gives some new results of non-invasive and non-optical measurements in the interspace. The measurements were made with silicon cell-sensor hybrids. Measurements of acidification, adhesion, and respiration are analyzed in view of the situation in the interspace. The results show that, in general, the release of an ion or molecule on the basolateral side can have much more influence on the biophysical situation than a release of an ion or molecule on the apical side. In particular, the apical acidification (i.e., amount of extruded protons) of, e.g., epithelial tumor cells is several orders of magnitude higher than the basolateral acidification. These experimental results are a simple consequence of the fact that the basolateral volume of the interspace is several orders of magnitudes smaller than the apical volume. These results have the following consequences for the cell adhesion:a)static situation: if a cell is already adhered to a solid substrate, the basolateral and apical release and uptake of molecules have to be considered in a very differentiated way; b)dynamic situation: if the cell is adhering to the substrate, the then built basolateral side changes in a much stronger way than the apical side. This effect is here discussed as a possible eliciting and general mechanism for essential intracellular changes

  1. Tumour cell lysate-loaded dendritic cell vaccine induces biochemical and memory immune response in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D; Salazar, L; Espinoza, E; Pereda, C; Castellón, E; Valdevenito, R; Huidobro, C; Inés Becker, M; Lladser, A; López, M N; Salazar-Onfray, F

    2013-09-17

    Recently, we produced a tumour antigen-presenting cells (TAPCells) vaccine using a melanoma cell lysate, called TRIMEL, as an antigen source and an activation factor. Tumour antigen-presenting cells induced immunological responses and increased melanoma patient survival. Herein, we investigated the effect of TAPCells loaded with prostate cancer cell lysates (PCCL) as an antigen source, and TRIMEL as a dendritic cell (DC) activation factor; which were co-injected with the Concholepas concholepas haemocyanin (CCH) as an adjuvant on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. The lysate mix capacity, for inducing T-cell activation, was analysed by flow cytometry and Elispot. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction against PCCL, frequency of CD8(+) memory T cells (Tm) in blood and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in serum were measured in treated patients. The lysate mix induced functional mature DCs that were capable of activating PCCL-specific T cells. No relevant adverse reactions were observed. Six out of 14 patients showed a significant decrease in levels of PSA. DTH(+) patients showed a prolonged PSA doubling-time after treatment. Expansion of functional central and effector CD8(+) Tm were detected. Treatment of CRPC patients with lysate-loaded TAPCells and CCH as an adjuvant is safe: generating biochemical and memory immune responses. However, the limited number of cases requires confirmation in a phase II clinical trial.

  2. Measurement of thermal neutron distributions in a variety of reactor cells by the cell perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takac, S M; Krcevinac, S B [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-07-15

    Measurements of thermal neutron density distributions were carried out in a variety of reactor cells by the newly developed cell perturbation method. The big geometrical and nuclear differences between the considered cells served as a very good testing ground for both the theory and experiments. The final experimental results are compared with a 'THERMOS'-type of calculation and in one case with the K-7 TRANSPO. In lattices L-1, L-2 and L-3 a very good agreement was reached with the results of K-7 THERMOS, while in lattice L-4, because of its complexity, the agreement was within the quoted errors (author)

  3. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM, and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM.

  4. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  5. Measurement of radon concentration in water with Lucas cell detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.; Pienkos, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the measurement of radon concentration in water is presented based on flushing a water sample with air in a closed loop with the Lucas cell as alpha radiation detector. The main feature of the method is washing radon away from the larger sample of water (0.75 l) to a small volume of air, approximately 0.5 l, thanks to which a high radon concentration in air and a considerable sensitivity of measurement is achieved. Basic relations and results of measurements of a model of a gauge is given. The estimated measuring sensitivity (S) is 8.5 (cpm)/(Bq/l). The random error due to the statistical fluctuations of count rate at radon concentrations 1,10, 100, 1000, 10000 Bq/l is 11, 3.6, 1.1, 0.4, 0.1% correspondingly at a counting (measuring) time of 10 min. The minimum detectable radon concentration in water is 0.11 Bq/l. (author)

  6. Identifying biological landmarks using a novel cell measuring image analysis tool: Cell-o-Tape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Andrew P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to quantify the geometry of plant organs at the cellular scale can provide novel insights into their structural organization. Hitherto manual methods of measurement provide only very low throughput and subjective solutions, and often quantitative measurements are neglected in favour of a simple cell count. Results We present a tool to count and measure individual neighbouring cells along a defined file in confocal laser scanning microscope images. The tool allows the user to extract this generic information in a flexible and intuitive manner, and builds on the raw data to detect a significant change in cell length along the file. This facility can be used, for example, to provide an estimate of the position of transition into the elongation zone of an Arabidopsis root, traditionally a location sensitive to the subjectivity of the experimenter. Conclusions Cell-o-tape is shown to locate cell walls with a high degree of accuracy and estimate the location of the transition feature point in good agreement with human experts. The tool is an open source ImageJ/Fiji macro and is available online.

  7. Nanog Fluctuations in Embryonic Stem Cells Highlight the Problem of Measurement in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Stumpf, Patrick S; Ridden, Sonya J; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Harrington, Heather A; MacArthur, Ben D

    2017-06-20

    A number of important pluripotency regulators, including the transcription factor Nanog, are observed to fluctuate stochastically in individual embryonic stem cells. By transiently priming cells for commitment to different lineages, these fluctuations are thought to be important to the maintenance of, and exit from, pluripotency. However, because temporal changes in intracellular protein abundances cannot be measured directly in live cells, fluctuations are typically assessed using genetically engineered reporter cell lines that produce a fluorescent signal as a proxy for protein expression. Here, using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we show that there are unforeseen ways in which widely used reporter strategies can systematically disturb the dynamics they are intended to monitor, sometimes giving profoundly misleading results. In the case of Nanog, we show how genetic reporters can compromise the behavior of important pluripotency-sustaining positive feedback loops, and induce a bifurcation in the underlying dynamics that gives rise to heterogeneous Nanog expression patterns in reporter cell lines that are not representative of the wild-type. These findings help explain the range of published observations of Nanog variability and highlight the problem of measurement in live cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of dihydroxyacetone-phosphate acyltransferase (DHAPAT) in chorionic villous samples, blood cells and cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Ofman, R.; Romeijn, G. J.; Schutgens, R. B.; Mooijer, P. A.; Dekker, C.; van den Bosch, H.

    1995-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone-phosphate acyltransferase (DHAPAT) is a peroxisomal enzyme catalysing the first step in ether-phospholipid biosynthesis. DHAPAT is deficient in cells from patients suffering from a variety of peroxisomal disorders. Accurate measurement of the activity of this enzyme is of great

  9. Cell growth, intracellular calcium concentration and metabolic cooperation measured in cells exposed to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skauli, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    Colony-forming efficiency, DNA/protein and DNA/cell were measured in cells exposed to magnetic fields of 0.2 and 1 mT at a frequency of 50 Hz. Intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in cells exposed to 0.3 and 1 mT at 50 Hz. Metabolic cooperation was measured in cells exposed to 1 mT at 50 Hz. No significant effects of the fields were observed. 20 refs., 10 figs

  10. Distributed solar radiation fast dynamic measurement for PV cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Yang, Yi; Cui, Jian; Du, Xingjing; Zheng, Tao; Sardar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-10-01

    To study the operating characteristics about PV cells, attention must be given to the dynamic behavior of the solar radiation. The dynamic behaviors of annual, monthly, daily and hourly averages of solar radiation have been studied in detail. But faster dynamic behaviors of solar radiation need more researches. The solar radiation random fluctuations in minute-long or second-long range, which lead to alternating radiation and cool down/warm up PV cell frequently, decrease conversion efficiency. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation are mainly relevant to stochastic moving of clouds. Even in clear sky condition, the solar irradiations show a certain degree of fast variation. To evaluate operating characteristics of PV cells under fast dynamic irradiation, a solar radiation measuring array (SRMA) based on large active area photodiode, LoRa spread spectrum communication and nanoWatt MCU is proposed. This cross photodiodes structure tracks fast stochastic moving of clouds. To compensate response time of pyranometer and reduce system cost, the terminal nodes with low-cost fast-responded large active area photodiode are placed besides positions of tested PV cells. A central node, consists with pyranometer, large active area photodiode, wind detector and host computer, is placed in the center of the central topologies coordinate to scale temporal envelope of solar irradiation and get calibration information between pyranometer and large active area photodiodes. In our SRMA system, the terminal nodes are designed based on Microchip's nanoWatt XLP PIC16F1947. FDS-100 is adopted for large active area photodiode in terminal nodes and host computer. The output current and voltage of each PV cell are monitored by I/V measurement. AS62-T27/SX1278 LoRa communication modules are used for communicating between terminal nodes and host computer. Because the LoRa LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Network) specification provides seamless interoperability among Smart Things without the

  11. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release

  12. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  13. Measurement of relative permeability of fuel cell diffusion media

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented and new correlations for in-plane relative permeability of water and air are established. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammink, R.; Mandal, S.; Eggermont, L.J.; Nooteboom, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Tel, J.; Rowan, A.E.; Figdor, C.G.; Blank, K.G.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we

  15. Heavy ion effects on mammalian cells: Inactivation measurements with different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, H.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Miltenburger, H.G.; Kraft, G.

    1985-07-01

    In track segment experiments, the inactivation of different mammalian cells by heavy charged particles between helium and uranium in the energy range between 1 and 1000 MeV/u has been measured at the heavy ion accelerator Unilac, Darmstadt, the Tandem Van de Graaf, Heidelberg and the Bevalac, Berkeley. The inactivation cross sections calculated from the final slope of the dose effect curves are given as a function of the particle energy and the LET. (orig.)

  16. A Phosphorylcholine-Containing Glycolipid-like Antigen Present on the Surface of Infective Stage Larvae of Ascaris spp. Is a Major Antibody Target in Infected Pigs and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Vlaminck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pig parasite Ascaris suum plays and important role in veterinary medicine and represents a suitable model for A. lumbricoides, which infects over 800 million people. In pigs, continued exposure to Ascaris induces immunity at the level of the gut, protecting the host against migrating larvae. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize parasite antigens targeted by this local immune response that may be crucial for parasite invasion and establishment and to evaluate their protective and diagnostic potential.Pigs were immunized by trickle infection for 30 weeks, challenged with 2,000 eggs at week 32 and euthanized two weeks after challenge. At necropsy, there was a 100% reduction in worms recovered from the intestine and a 97.2% reduction in liver white spots in comparison with challenged non-immune control animals. Antibodies purified from the intestinal mucus or from the supernatant of cultured antibody secreting cells from mesenteric lymph nodes of immune pigs were used to probe L3 extracts to identify antibody targets. This resulted in the recognition of a 12kDa antigen (As12 that is actively shed from infective Ascaris L3. As12 was characterized as a phosphorylcholine-containing glycolipid-like antigen that is highly resistant to different enzymatic and chemical treatments. Vaccinating pigs with an As12 fraction did not induce protective immunity to challenge infection. However, serological analysis using sera or plasma from experimentally infected pigs or naturally infected humans demonstrated that the As12 ELISA was able to detect long-term exposure to Ascaris with a high diagnostic sensitivity (98.4% and 92%, respectively and specificity (95.5% and 90.0% in pigs and humans, respectively.These findings show the presence of a highly stage specific, glycolipid-like component (As12 that is actively secreted by infectious Ascaris larvae and which acts as a major antibody target in infected humans and pigs.

  17. Cytotoxic human CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Berg, Pablo J.; van Leeuwen, Ester M.; ten Berge, Ineke J.; van Lier, Rene

    2008-01-01

    The induction of adaptive immune responses critically depends on helper signals provided by CD4(+) T cells. These signals not only license antigen presenting cells (APC) to activate naïve CD8(+) T cells leading to the formation of vast numbers of cytotoxic T lymphocytes but also support the

  18. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell ...

  19. Comorbidity measurement in patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mario A F; Dedivitis, Rogério A; Ribeiro, Karina C B

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of a cancer patient can be affected by many factors. Cancer patients often have other diseases or medical conditions in addition to their cancer. These conditions are referred to as comorbidities. They can influence the treatment option, the rate of complications, the outcome, and can confound the survival analysis. It was the aim of this study to measure comorbidities in patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Ninety adult patients treated for newly diagnosed laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were studied. We measured comorbid illness applying the following validated scales: the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS), the Kaplan-Feinstein Classification (KFC), the Charlson index, the Index of Coexistent Disease (ICED), the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 (ACE-27), the Alcohol-Tobacco-Related Comorbidities Index (ATC), and the Washington University Head and Neck Comorbidity Index (WUHNCI). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method (with the log-rank test value being used to compare groups). The Cox proportional hazards model was chosen to identify independent prognostic factors. The mean age was 62.3 years. The majority of patients (36.7%) had early tumors. Forty patients were treated by surgery only, while the remaining 49 patients also received postoperative radiation therapy. Only 5 patients (5.6%) were lost to follow-up. Median follow-up time was 42.5 months. The 4-year overall survival was 63%. There was a statistically significant difference between survival rates according to clinical stage (CS I 87.3%, CS II 48.9%, CS III 74.7%, CS IV 23.9%; p KFC (p = 0.001), and ICED (p = 0.010). However, in the multivariate analysis, only CIRS and TNM staging were identified as independent prognostic factors. The comorbidity is an independent prognostic factor in patients with surgically treated laryngeal cancer. In the univariate analysis, all indexes were able to stratify patients. However, in the multiple analysis, only the

  20. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment.

  1. Measuring histamine and cytokine release from basophils and mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Falkencrone, Sidsel; Skov, Per S

    2014-01-01

    Basophils and mast cells are known for their capability to release both preformed and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. In this chapter we describe how to stimulate and detect histamine released from basophils in whole blood, purified basophils, in vitro cultured mast cells, and in situ...... skin mast cells. We also give an example of an activation protocol for basophil and mast cell cytokine release and discuss approaches for cytokine detection....

  2. Measurements of a vortex transitional ndro Josephson memory cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, S.; Ishida, I.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Ajisawa, Y.; Wada, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A novel vortex transitional NDRO Jospehson memory cell has been successfully fabricated and tested. The memory cell consists of two superconducting loops and a two-junction interferometer gate as a sense gate. The superconducting loop contains one Josephson junction and inductances, and stores single flux quantum. The memory cell employs vortex transitions in the superconducting loops for writing and reading data. The memory cell chips have been fabricated using niobium planarization process. The +-21 percent address signal current margin and the +-33 percent sense gate current margin have been obtained experimentally. The memory operation of the cell driven by the two-junction interferometer gates has been accurately demonstrated

  3. Measuring the elasticity of plant cells with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of biological materials impact their functions. This is most evident in plants where the cell wall contains each cell's contents and connects each cell to its neighbors irreversibly. Examining the physical properties of the plant cell wall is key to understanding how plant cells, tissues, and organs grow and gain the shapes important for their respective functions. Here, we present an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation method for examining the elasticity of plant cells at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level. We describe the important areas of experimental design to be considered when planning and executing these types of experiments and provide example data as illustration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunologic glycosphingolipidomics and NKT cell development in mouse thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Thapa, Prakash; Hawke, David

    2009-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are a hybrid cell type of Natural Killer cells and T cells, whose development is dependent on thymic positive selection mediated by double positive thymocytes through their recognition of natural ligands presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, non-MHC, MHC-like antigen presenting...

  5. Measuring osmosis and hemolysis of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhead, Lauren K; MacMillan, Frances M

    2017-06-01

    Since the discovery of the composition and structure of the mammalian cell membrane, biologists have had a clearer understanding of how substances enter and exit the cell's interior. The selectively permeable nature of the cell membrane allows the movement of some solutes and prevents the movement of others. This has important consequences for cell volume and the integrity of the cell and, as a result, is of utmost clinical importance, for example in the administration of isotonic intravenous infusions. The concepts of osmolarity and tonicity are often confused by students as impermeant isosmotic solutes such as NaCl are also isotonic; however, isosmotic solutes such as urea are actually hypotonic due to the permeant nature of the membrane. By placing red blood cells in solutions of differing osmolarities and tonicities, this experiment demonstrates the effects of osmosis and the resultant changes in cell volume. Using hemoglobin standard solutions, where known concentrations of hemoglobin are produced, the proportion of hemolysis and the effect of this on resultant hematocrit can be estimated. No change in cell volume occurs in isotonic NaCl, and, by placing blood cells in hypotonic NaCl, incomplete hemolysis occurs. By changing the bathing solution to either distilled water or isosmotic urea, complete hemolysis occurs due to their hypotonic effects. With the use of animal blood in this practical, students gain useful experience in handling tissue fluids and calculating dilutions and can appreciate the science behind clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmanis, Spyros; Gallant, Caroline Julie; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Niklasson, Mia; Segerman, Anna; Flamourakis, Georgios; Fredriksson, Simon; Assarsson, Erika; Lundberg, Martin; Nelander, Sven; Westermark, Bengt; Landegren, Ulf

    2016-01-12

    Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell's phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dielectric spectroscopy platform to measure MCF10A epithelial cell aggregation as a model for spheroidal cell cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heileman, K L; Tabrizian, M

    2017-05-02

    3-Dimensional cell cultures are more representative of the native environment than traditional cell cultures on flat substrates. As a result, 3-dimensional cell cultures have emerged as a very valuable model environment to study tumorigenesis, organogenesis and tissue regeneration. Many of these models encompass the formation of cell aggregates, which mimic the architecture of tumor and organ tissue. Dielectric impedance spectroscopy is a non-invasive, label free and real time technique, overcoming the drawbacks of established techniques to monitor cell aggregates. Here we introduce a platform to monitor cell aggregation in a 3-dimensional extracellular matrix using dielectric spectroscopy. The MCF10A breast epithelial cell line serves as a model for cell aggregation. The platform maintains sterile conditions during the multi-day assay while allowing continuous dielectric spectroscopy measurements. The platform geometry optimizes dielectric measurements by concentrating cells within the electrode sensing region. The cells show a characteristic dielectric response to aggregation which corroborates with finite element analysis computer simulations. By fitting the experimental dielectric spectra to the Cole-Cole equation, we demonstrated that the dispersion intensity Δε and the characteristic frequency f c are related to cell aggregate growth. In addition, microscopy can be performed directly on the platform providing information about cell position, density and morphology. This platform could yield many applications for studying the electrophysiological activity of cell aggregates.

  8. Adoptive T cell cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhandzhugazyan, Karine N.; Guldberg, Per; Kirkin, Alexei F.

    2018-06-01

    Tumour heterogeneity and off-target toxicity are current challenges of cancer immunotherapy. Karine Dzhandzhugazyan, Per Guldberg and Alexei Kirkin discuss how epigenetic induction of tumour antigens in antigen-presenting cells may form the basis for multi-target therapies.

  9. Measurement of relative permeability of fuel cell diffusion media

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.; Wang, C.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions

  10. Rating PV Power and Energy: Cell, Module, and System Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, Keith

    2016-06-02

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current vs. voltage measurement theory including basic PV operation, equivalent circuit, and concept of spectral error; PV power performance including PV irradiance sensors, simulators and commercial and generic I-V systems; PV measurement artifacts, intercomparisons, and alternative rating methods.

  11. Ultrasound Characterization of Microbead and Cell Suspensions by Speed of Sound Measurements of Neutrally Buoyant Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cushing, Kevin W.; Garofalo, Fabio; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    . The density of the microparticles is determined by using a neutrally buoyant selection process that involves centrifuging of microparticles suspended in different density solutions, CsCl for microbeads and Percoll for cells. The speed of sound at 3 MHz in the neutrally buoyant suspensions is measured...... and fixed cells, such as red blood cells, white blood cells, DU-145 prostate cancer cells, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and LU-HNSCC-25 head and-neck squamous carcinoma cells in phosphate buffered saline. The results show agreement with published data obtained by other methods....

  12. Conductive Polymer Microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of transmitter release from living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Matteucci, Marco; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2012-01-01

    driven cell trapping inside closed chip devices. Conductive polymer microelectrodes were used to measure transmitter release using electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry and constant potential amperometry. By measuring the oxidation current at a cyclic voltammogram, the concentration...

  13. Compact Electro-Permeabilization System for Controlled Treatment of Biological Cells and Cell Medium Conductivity Change Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novickij Vitalij

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Subjection of biological cells to high intensity pulsed electric field results in the permeabilization of the cell membrane. Measurement of the electrical conductivity change allows an analysis of the dynamics of the process, determination of the permeabilization thresholds, and ion efflux influence. In this work a compact electro-permeabilization system for controlled treatment of biological cells is presented. The system is capable of delivering 5 μs - 5 ms repetitive square wave electric field pulses with amplitude up to 1 kV. Evaluation of the cell medium conductivity change is implemented in the setup, allowing indirect measurement of the ion concentration changes occurring due to the cell membrane permeabilization. The simulation model using SPICE and the experimental data of the proposed system are presented in this work. Experimental data with biological cells is also overviewed

  14. The immunoregulatory role of CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells in disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van der HJ; Molling, J.W.; Blomberg - van der Flier, von B.M.E.; Nishi, N.; Kolgen, W; Eertwegh, van den A.J.M.; Pinedo, H.M.; Giaccone, G.; Scheper, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells constitute a T cell subpopulation that shares several characteristics with NK cells. NKT cells are characterized by a narrow T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire, recognize glycolipid antigen in the context of the monomorphic CD1d antigen-presenting molecule, and

  15. Study on photoelectric parameter measurement method of high capacitance solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junchao; Xiong, Limin; Meng, Haifeng; He, Yingwei; Cai, Chuan; Zhang, Bifeng; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Changshi

    2018-01-01

    The high efficiency solar cells usually have high capacitance characteristic, so the measurement of their photoelectric performance usually requires long pulse width and long sweep time. The effects of irradiance non-uniformity, probe shielding and spectral mismatch on the IV curve measurement are analyzed experimentally. A compensation method for irradiance loss caused by probe shielding is proposed, and the accurate measurement of the irradiance intensity in the IV curve measurement process of solar cell is realized. Based on the characteristics that the open circuit voltage of solar cell is sensitive to the junction temperature, an accurate measurement method of the temperature of solar cell under continuous irradiation condition is proposed. Finally, a measurement method with the characteristic of high accuracy and wide application range for high capacitance solar cell is presented.

  16. Characterization of Platinum Electrodes and In-situ Cell Confluency Measurement Based on Current Changes of Cell-Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Fhong SOON

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at the development of a biosensor to examine the growth confluency of human derived keratinocytes (HaCaT cell lines in-situ. The biosensor consists of a sputter- coated glass substrate with platinum patterns. Cells were grown on the conductive substrates and the confluency of the cells were monitored in-situ based on the conductivity changes of the substrates. Characterization of the cell proliferation and confluency were interrogated using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS techniques and current change of cells using a pico-ammeter. The investigation was followed by the electrical characterization of the platinum electrode (PE using a two probe I-V measurement system. The surface morphology of platinum electrodes were studied using an atomic force microscopy (AFM and the HaCaT cell morphology was studied using Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM. The microscopy results showed that the cells coupled and proliferated on the platinum electrodes. For monitoring the conductivity and impedance changes of the cell-electrode in-situ, the cover of a Petri dish was inserted with pogo pins to be in contact with the platinum electrodes. The impedance was sampled using the ECIS technique at a twenty-four hour interval. In our findings, the cell proliferation rate can be measured by observing the changes in capacitance or impedance measured at low ac frequencies ranged from 10 - 1 kHz. In good agreement, the current measured at micro-ampere range by the biosensor decreased as the cell coverage area increased over the time. Thus, the percent of cell confluence was shown inversely proportional to the current changes.

  17. Direct measurement of helical cell motion of the spirochete leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Leshansky, Alexander; Magariyama, Yukio; Namba, Keiichi; Kudo, Seishi

    2014-01-07

    Leptospira are spirochete bacteria distinguished by a short-pitch coiled body and intracellular flagella. Leptospira cells swim in liquid with an asymmetric morphology of the cell body; the anterior end has a long-pitch spiral shape (S-end) and the posterior end is hook-shaped (H-end). Although the S-end and the coiled cell body called the protoplasmic cylinder are thought to be responsible for propulsion together, most observations on the motion mechanism have remained qualitative. In this study, we analyzed the swimming speed and rotation rate of the S-end, protoplasmic cylinder, and H-end of individual Leptospira cells by one-sided dark-field microscopy. At various viscosities of media containing different concentrations of Ficoll, the rotation rate of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed a clear correlation with the swimming speed, suggesting that these two helical parts play a central role in the motion of Leptospira. In contrast, the H-end rotation rate was unstable and showed much less correlation with the swimming speed. Forces produced by the rotation of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed that these two helical parts contribute to propulsion at nearly equal magnitude. Torque generated by each part, also obtained from experimental motion parameters, indicated that the flagellar motor can generate torque >4000 pN nm, twice as large as that of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the S-end torque was found to show a markedly larger fluctuation than the protoplasmic cylinder torque, suggesting that the unstable H-end rotation might be mechanically related to changes in the S-end rotation rate for torque balance of the entire cell. Variations in torque at the anterior and posterior ends of the Leptospira cell body could be transmitted from one end to the other through the cell body to coordinate the morphological transformations of the two ends for a rapid change in the swimming direction. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc

  18. FORMING SELF-ASSEMBLED CELL ARRAYS AND MEASURING THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION RATE OF A SINGLE LIVE CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzkorn, James R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Anderson, Judy B; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Parviz, Babak A

    2009-06-01

    We report a method for forming arrays of live single cells on a chip using polymer micro-traps made of SU8. We have studied the toxicity of the microfabricated structures and the associated environment for two cell lines. We also report a method for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using optical interrogation of molecular oxygen sensors placed in micromachined micro-wells by temporarily sealing the cells in the micro-traps. The new techniques presented here add to the collection of tools available for performing "single-cell" biology. A single-cell self-assembly yield of 61% was achieved with oxygen draw down rates of 0.83, 0.82, and 0.71 fmol/minute on three isolated live A549 cells.

  19. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...

  20. Bioinformatics Tools for the Prediction of T-Cell Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    T-cell responses are activated by specific peptides, called epitopes, presented on the cell surface by MHC molecules. Binding of peptides to the MHC is the most selective step in T-cell antigen presentation and therefore an essential factor in the selection of potential epitopes. Several in-vitro...

  1. Measurement of electromagnetic activity of Yeast cells at 42 GHz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, František; Šaroch, Jaroslav; Kučera, O.; Hašek, Jiří; Pokorný, Jiří; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.; Ponsonnet, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 36-39 ISSN 1210-2512 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 281.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : millimetre wave measurement * electromagnetic waves * cellular biophysics * field strenght measurement Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  2. Dynamic single-cell NAD(P)H measurement reveals oscillatory metabolism throughout the E. coli cell division cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Heinemann, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Recent work has shown that metabolism between individual bacterial cells in an otherwise isogenetic population can be different. To investigate such heterogeneity, experimental methods to zoom into the metabolism of individual cells are required. To this end, the autofluoresence of the redox cofactors NADH and NADPH offers great potential for single-cell dynamic NAD(P)H measurements. However, NAD(P)H excitation requires UV light, which can cause cell damage. In this work, we developed a method for time-lapse NAD(P)H imaging in single E. coli cells. Our method combines a setup with reduced background emission, UV-enhanced microscopy equipment and optimized exposure settings, overall generating acceptable NAD(P)H signals from single cells, with minimal negative effect on cell growth. Through different experiments, in which we perturb E. coli's redox metabolism, we demonstrated that the acquired fluorescence signal indeed corresponds to NAD(P)H. Using this new method, for the first time, we report that intracellular NAD(P)H levels oscillate along the bacterial cell division cycle. The developed method for dynamic measurement of NAD(P)H in single bacterial cells will be an important tool to zoom into metabolism of individual cells.

  3. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K.; MacCuspie, Robert I.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2015-01-01

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum (∼ 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate

  4. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States); MacCuspie, Robert I. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Materials Measurement Science Division (United States); Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum (∼ 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate

  5. Simultaneous determination of size and refractive index of red blood cells by light scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, N.; Buddhiwant, P.; Uppal, A.; Majumder, S.K.; Patel, H.S.; Gupta, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    We present a fast and accurate approach for simultaneous determination of both the mean diameter and refractive index of a collection of red blood cells (RBCs). The approach uses the peak frequency of the power spectrum and the corresponding phase angle obtained by performing Fourier transform on the measured angular distribution of scattered light to determine these parameters. Results on the measurement of two important clinical parameters, the mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin concentration of a collection of RBCs, are presented

  6. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell-protein or cell-cell contact was also demonstrated.

  7. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  8. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  9. High pressure cells for magnetic measurements - destruction and functional tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamarád, Jiří; Machátová, Zuzana; Arnold, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 11 (2004), s. 5022-5025 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739; GA AV ČR IAA1010315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : pressure cells * pressure transmitting media * CuBe * MP35N Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  10. Ionization cell for sensing and measuring gaseous impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelman, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    An improved gas ionization cell is described with compensation for variations in flow rate of the gas and variations in radioactive source intensity. A gas sample is directed past a source of ionizing radiation and through a recombination region to an ion collection screen, where output current is monitored to give an indication of trace gases or vapors present in the gas under surveillance. Compensation for changes in gas flow rate and source intensity is provided by taking a portion of the gas subjected to the ionizing radiation and directing that portion of the gas through a channel by-passing the recombination region of the cell and past a pair of conductive probes. The first probe of the pair is biased at a predetermined voltage, while electric current is monitored at the second probe spaced downstream from the first probe. The current generated at the second probe, which is for all practical purposes a function of only the rate of gas flow and the source intensity, provides the compensation signal for the ionization cell. 4 claims, 8 figures

  11. Lack of T cell dysfunction and programmed cell death in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected chimpanzees correlates with absence of monocytotropic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, H.; Meyaard, L.; Kootstra, N. A.; Dubbes, R.; Otto, S. A.; Tersmette, M.; Heeney, J. L.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    In asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans, disturbed T cell functions such as anergy and programmed cell death, thought to result from inappropriate signaling by antigen-presenting cells due to HIV infection, precede increase in virus load, decline in CD4+ T cell

  12. IMMUNOGENICITY OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN HLA-CLASS I RESTRICTED T CELL RESPONSES AGAINST VIRAL OR TUMOR-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS

    OpenAIRE

    Morandi, Fabio; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Meloni, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Millo, Enrico; Ferrone, Soldano; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Pistoia, Vito

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are immunosuppressive and poorly immunogenic, but may act as antigen-presenting cells (APC) for CD4+ T cell responses; here we have investigated their ability to serve as APC for in vitro CD8+ T cell responses.

  13. New method for exact measurement of thermal neutron distribution in elementary cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takac, S.M.; Krcevinac, S.B.

    1966-06-01

    Exact measurement of thermal neutron density distribution in an elementary cell necessitates the knowledge of the perturbations involved in the cell by the measuring device. A new method has been developed in which a special stress is made to evaluate these perturbations by measuring the response from the perturbations introduced in the elementary cell. The unperturbed distribution was obtained by extrapolation to zero perturbation. The final distributions for different lattice pitches were compared with a THERMOS-type calculation. As a pleasing fact a very good agreement has been reached, which dissolves the long existing disagreement between THERMOS calculations and measured density distribution (author)

  14. New method for exact measurement of thermal neutron distribution in elementary cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takac, S M; Krcevinac, S B [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-06-15

    Exact measurement of thermal neutron density distribution in an elementary cell necessitates the knowledge of the perturbations involved in the cell by the measuring device. A new method has been developed in which a special stress is made to evaluate these perturbations by measuring the response from the perturbations introduced in the elementary cell. The unperturbed distribution was obtained by extrapolation to zero perturbation. The final distributions for different lattice pitches were compared with a THERMOS-type calculation. As a pleasing fact a very good agreement has been reached, which dissolves the long existing disagreement between THERMOS calculations and measured density distribution (author)

  15. Single cell adhesion force measurement for cell viability identification using an AFM cantilever-based micro putter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Kojima, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-11-01

    Fast and sensitive cell viability identification is a key point for single cell analysis. To address this issue, this paper reports a novel single cell viability identification method based on the measurement of single cell shear adhesion force using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever-based micro putter. Viable and nonviable yeast cells are prepared and put onto three kinds of substrate surfaces, i.e. tungsten probe, gold and ITO substrate surfaces. A micro putter is fabricated from the AFM cantilever by focused ion beam etching technique. The spring constant of the micro putter is calibrated using the nanomanipulation approach. The shear adhesion force between the single viable or nonviable cell and each substrate is measured using the micro putter based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The adhesion force is calculated based on the deflection of the micro putter beam. The results show that the adhesion force of the viable cell to the substrate is much larger than that of the nonviable cell. This identification method is label free, fast, sensitive and can give quantitative results at the single cell level.

  16. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    role of dendritic cells in pancreatitis. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells which initiate innate and adaptive immune... Lymphoid -tissue-specific homing of bone- marrow-derived dendritic cells . Blood. 113:6638–6647. http://dx.doi .org/10.1182/blood-2009-02-204321 Dapito...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0313 TITLE: Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. George Miller

  17. Measurement of diffuse and specular reflections through single cell layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ) • On average 50 000 new cases/year • LR at least • Male: 1 in 6 • Female: 1 in 7 Slide 4 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Background • Diabetes • High prevalence in SA • Not a notifiable disease • Indian: Av. 17% (11% - 30%) • Black...: 8% • White: 6% • Type II diabetes on the increase • Limp amputation • Research aimed at PDT and accelerated wound healing Slide 5 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Experimental work at UJ WS1Cell line Induce wound: sterile...

  18. Study on activity measurement of Nostoc flagelliforme cells based on color identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhong; Su, Jianyu; Liu, Tiegen; Kong, Fanzhi; Jia, Shiru

    2008-12-01

    In order to measure the activities of Nostoc flagelliforme cells, a new method based on color identification was proposed in this paper. N. flagelliforme cells were colored with fluoreseein diaeetate. Then, an image of colored N. flagelliforme cells was taken, and changed from RGB model to HIS model. Its histogram of hue H was calculated, which was used as the input of a designed BP network. The output of the BP network was the description of measured activity of N. flagelliforme cells. After training, the activity of N. flagelliforme cells was identified by the BP network according to the histogram of H of their colored image. Experiments were conducted with satisfied results to show the feasibility and usefulness of activity measurement of N. flagelliforme cells based on color identification.

  19. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  20. Simultaneous Measurement of Multiple Mechanical Properties of Single Cells Using AFM by Indentation and Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Shi, Jialin; Wang, Wenxue; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2017-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells, which are the main characteristics determining their physical performance and physiological functions, have been actively studied in the fields of cytobiology and biomedical engineering and for the development of medicines. In this study, an indentation-vibration-based method is proposed to simultaneously measure the mechanical properties of cells in situ, including cellular mass (m), elasticity (k), and viscosity (c). The proposed measurement method is implemented based on the principle of forced vibration stimulated by simple harmonic force using an atomic force microscope (AFM) system integrated with a piezoelectric transducer as the substrate vibrator. The corresponding theoretical model containing the three mechanical properties is derived and used to perform simulations and calculations. Living and fixed human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells were subjected to indentation and vibration to measure and compare their mechanical parameters and verify the proposed approach. The results that the fixed sample cells are more viscous and elastic than the living sample cells and the measured mechanical properties of cell are consistent within, but not outside of the central region of the cell, are in accordance with the previous studies. This work provides an approach to simultaneous measurement of the multiple mechanical properties of single cells using an integrated AFM system based on the principle force vibration and thickness-corrected Hertz model. This study should contribute to progress in biomedical engineering, cytobiology, medicine, early diagnosis, specific therapy and cell-powered robots.

  1. Measurement of cell respiration and oxygenation in standard multichannel biochips using phosphorescent O2-sensitive probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashina, Alina V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Dmitriev, Ruslan I

    2013-09-07

    Measurement of cell oxygenation and oxygen consumption is useful for studies of cell bioenergetics, metabolism, mitochondrial function, drug toxicity and common pathophysiological conditions. Here we present a new platform for such applications which uses commercial multichannel biochips (μ-slides, Ibidi) and phosphorescent O2 sensitive probes. This platform was evaluated with both extracellular and intracellular O2 probes, several different cell types and treatments including mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition, depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) and inhibition of V-ATPase and histone deacetylases. The results show that compared to the standard microwell plates currently used, the μ-slide platform provides facile O2 measurements with both suspension and adherent cells, higher sensitivity and reproducibility, and faster measurement time. It also allows re-perfusion and multiple treatments of cells and multi-parametric analyses in conjunction with other probes. Optical measurements are conducted on standard fluorescence readers and microscopes.

  2. Maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells with Toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 ligands combined with prostaglandin E2 results in high interleukin-12 production and cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boullart, A. C. Inge; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Verdijk, Pauline; Jacobs, Joannes F. M.; Schuurhuis, Danita H.; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Schreibelt, Gerty; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek; Kramer, Matthijs; Figdor, Carl G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Adema, Gosse J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system that play a key role in regulating T cell-based immunity. In vivo, the capacity of DC to activate T cells depends on their ability to migrate to the T cell areas of lymph nodes as well as on their maturation state.

  3. Maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells with Toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 ligands combined with prostaglandin E2 results in high interleukin-12 production and cell migration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boullart, I.; Aarntzen, E.H.J.G.; Verdijk, P.; Jacobs, J.F.M.; Schuurhuis, D.H.; Benitez-Ribas, D.; Schreibelt, G.; Rakt, M.W.M.M. van de; Scharenborg, N.M.; Boer, A.J. de; Kramer, M.; Figdor, C.G.; Punt, C.J.A.; Adema, G.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system that play a key role in regulating T cell-based immunity. In vivo, the capacity of DC to activate T cells depends on their ability to migrate to the T cell areas of lymph nodes as well as on their maturation state.

  4. Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, Terese L; Oliveri, Roberto S; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided...... of serum HIV RNA (p normal allele (p

  5. Human antibodies to dendritic cells : generation, analysis and use in vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are widely recognized as professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that play a pivotal role in directing the immune response. DCs are a heterogeneous cell population that continuously derive from bone marrow cells and reside as sentinels in an immature stage in the

  6. Note: Photoluminescence measurement system for multi-junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trespidi, F; Malchiodi, A; Farina, F

    2017-05-01

    We describe a photoluminescence spectroscopy system developed for studying phenomena of optical coupling in multiple-junction solar cells and processed/unprocessed wafers, under the high solar concentration levels typical of HCPV (High Concentration PhotoVoltaic) systems. The instrument operates at room temperature over two spectral ranges: 475 nm-1100 nm and 950 nm-1650 nm. Power densities exceeding 10 000 suns can be obtained on the sample. The system can host up to four compact focusable solid state laser sources, presently only three are mounted and operated at 450 nm, 520 nm, and 785 nm; they provide overlapped beams on the sample surface and can shine simultaneously the sample to study possible mutual interaction between the different junctions.

  7. 3D measurements of live cells via digital holographic microscopy and terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Yong; Oser, Dorian; Iapozzuto, Peter; Norbury, Sean; Mahajan, Supriya; Khmaladze, Alexander; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This is a study of the central nervous system (CNS) cells, including brain micro vascular endothelial cells (BMV) that constitute the blood brain barrier, and C6 glial cells that are the predominant cell in the brain. The cells are exposed to various chemicals by non-invasive, label-free methods. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a technique that records an interference pattern between an object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information, and 3D images are obtained. The measurement of cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell death mechanisms, since these processes are correlated with individual cell volume. Our in-house DHM combines a visible (red) laser source with a conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. Terahertz spectral signatures are associated with structural changes in molecules and provide complementary information about cells. Both CNS cells BMV and C6 cells are treated with the drug "Methamphetamine" (METH), which induces apoptosis in neuronal cells and exhibits decrease in cell volume, a characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis (induced cell death). METH can cause CNS cell death by cross-talk between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum-, and receptor-mediated apoptotic events, all of which results in drug induced changes in neuroplasticity and significant neuropathology. Doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, is used as a control. We observe that METH treatment resulted in more pronounced cell volume shrinkage in both the BMV and C6 cells, as compared to DOX-induced cell apoptosis.

  8. DNA measurements on cell nuclei of normal, proliferating and neoplastic thyroid tissues in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christov, K.; Thomas, C.; Sandritter, W.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content was measured in 3 normal, 9 hyperplastic and 16 neoplastic rat thyroid glands. Thyroid hyperplasia and tumor growth were induced after treatment of the animals with X rays and methylthiouracil. In the control animals only diploid thyroid epithelial cells were observed. In stages of diffuse and nodular thyroid hyperplasia, the total DNA content per nucleus indicated that most chromosomes were diploid; only a few cells were hyperdiploid. In thyroid adenomas and carcinomas scattering of the diploid region and an increased number of hyperdiploid cells were found. Among the various types of thyroid tumors neither a difference in the number of hyperdiploid cells, nor the typical pattern of the distribution of these cells in a histogram was found. The increased number of hyperdiploid cells in hyperplastic and neoplastic thyroids only suggested an increase in the proportion of cells entering the cell cycle and not an appearance of a neoplastic strain. (author)

  9. DNA measurements on cell nuclei of normal, proliferating and neoplastic thyroid tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, K [National Center of Oncology, Academy of Medicine, Sofia-56 (Bulgaria); Thomas, C; Sandritter, W [Freiburg Univ. (F.R. Germany). Pathologisches Inst.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content was measured in 3 normal, 9 hyperplastic and 16 neoplastic rat thyroid glands. Thyroid hyperplasia and tumor growth were induced after treatment of the animals with X rays and methylthiouracil. In the control animals only diploid thyroid epithelial cells were observed. In stages of diffuse and nodular thyroid hyperplasia, the total DNA content per nucleus indicated that most chromosomes were diploid; only a few cells were hyperdiploid. In thyroid adenomas and carcinomas scattering of the diploid region and an increased number of hyperdiploid cells were found. Among the various types of thyroid tumors neither a difference in the number of hyperdiploid cells, nor the typical pattern of the distribution of these cells in a histogram was found. The increased number of hyperdiploid cells in hyperplastic and neoplastic thyroids only suggested an increase in the proportion of cells entering the cell cycle and not an appearance of a neoplastic strain.

  10. A plate reader-based method for cell water permeability measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenton, Robert A.; Moeller, H B; Nielsen, S

    2010-01-01

    Cell volume and water permeability measurements in cultured mammalian cells are typically conducted under a light microscope. Many of the employed approaches are time consuming and not applicable to a study of confluent epithelial cell monolayers. We present here an adaptation of a calcein......: AQP2-S256D > AQP2 wild-type > AQP2-S256A. We propose that the method can be applied to study AQP function and more generally to study cell volume changes in adherent cell lines. Furthermore, it should be adaptable for AQP inhibitor screening in chemical compound libraries....

  11. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients...... of a CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated...

  12. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for the determination of density and compressibility of individual particles and cells undergoing microchannel acoustophoresis in an arbitrary 2D acoustic field. Our method is a critical advancement within acoustophoretic separation of biological cells, as the ability to...

  13. Using micro-patterned sensors and cell self-assembly for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etzkorn, James R; Parviz, Babak A; Wu, Wen-Chung; Tian, Zhiyuan; Kim, Prince; Jang, Sei-Hum; Jen, Alex K-Y; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for self-assembling arrays of live single cells on a glass chip using a photopatternable polymer to form micro-traps. We have studied the single-cell self-assembly method and optimized the process to obtain a 52% yield of single-trapped cells. We also report a method to measure the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using micro-patterned sensors. These molecular oxygen sensors were fabricated around each micro-trap allowing optical interrogation of oxygen concentration in the immediate environment of the trapped cell. Micromachined micro-wells were then used to seal the trap, sensor and cell in order to determine the oxygen consumption rate of single cells. These techniques reported here add to the collection of tools for performing 'singe-cell' biology. An oxygen consumption rate of 1.05 ± 0.28 fmol min −1 was found for a data set consisting of 25 single A549 cells.

  14. Design and construction of a strain gage compression load cell to measure rolling forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeffer, L.; Borchardt, I.G.; Carvalho, L.F.A.

    1978-05-01

    A complete detailed mechanical desion of a strain gauge compression load cell is presented. This cell was specialy designed to measure rolling forces at conventional duo or trio industrial roughing stands. The stands, in general, have little space (height) to adjust to the cells. Moreover the contact stands surfaces are very rough. Do to this facts, load cells of elastic cilindrical geometries are not recommended for accuracies better than 8%. This work describes the complete design and the construction of a circular (membrane) steel plate load cell. A prototype of 300 KN (approximately 30t) capacity, with 2% accuracies and with a height of 6 cm was constructed and tested. The design proposed is a general one and permits the construction of small load cells to measure any compression load [pt

  15. Analytical errors in measuring radioactivity in cell proteins and their effect on estimates of protein turnover in L cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.A.; Mehta, J.; Brocher, S.; Amenta, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies on protein turnover in 3 H-labelled L-cell cultures have shown recovery of total 3 H at the end of a three-day experiment to be always significantly in excess of the 3 H recovered at the beginning of the experiment. A number of possible sources for this error in measuring radioactivity in cell proteins has been reviewed. 3 H-labelled proteins, when dissolved in NaOH and counted for radioactivity in a liquid-scintillation spectrometer, showed losses of 30-40% of the radioactivity; neither external or internal standardization compensated for this loss. Hydrolysis of these proteins with either Pronase or concentrated HCl significantly increased the measured radioactivity. In addition, 5-10% of the cell protein is left on the plastic culture dish when cells are recovered in phosphate-buffered saline. Furthermore, this surface-adherent protein, after pulse labelling, contains proteins of high radioactivity that turn over rapidly and make a major contribution to the accumulating radioactivity in the medium. These combined errors can account for up to 60% of the total radioactivity in the cell culture. Similar analytical errors have been found in studies of other cell cultures. The effect of these analytical errors on estimates of protein turnover in cell cultures is discussed. (author)

  16. Microscopic optical path length difference and polarization measurement system for cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, H.; Ikeda, K.; Kowa, H.; Hoshiba, T.; Watanabe, E.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, noninvasive, nonstaining, and nondestructive quantitative cell measurement techniques have become increasingly important in the medical field. These cell measurement techniques enable the quantitative analysis of living cells, and are therefore applied to various cell identification processes, such as those determining the passage number limit during cell culturing in regenerative medicine. To enable cell measurement, we developed a quantitative microscopic phase imaging system based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that measures the optical path length difference distribution without phase unwrapping using optical phase locking. The applicability of our phase imaging system was demonstrated by successful identification of breast cancer cells amongst normal cells. However, the cell identification method using this phase imaging system exhibited a false identification rate of approximately 7%. In this study, we implemented a polarimetric imaging system by introducing a polarimetric module to one arm of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer of our conventional phase imaging system. This module was comprised of a quarter wave plate and a rotational polarizer on the illumination side of the sample, and a linear polarizer on the optical detector side. In addition, we developed correction methods for the measurement errors of the optical path length and birefringence phase differences that arose through the influence of elements other than cells, such as the Petri dish. As the Petri dish holding the fluid specimens was transparent, it did not affect the amplitude information; however, the optical path length and birefringence phase differences were affected. Therefore, we proposed correction of the optical path length and birefringence phase for the influence of elements other than cells, as a prerequisite for obtaining highly precise phase and polarimetric images.

  17. Measuring cell cycle progression kinetics with metabolic labeling and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisig, Helen; Wong, Judy

    2012-05-22

    metabolic processes for each cell cycle stage are useful in blocking the progression of the cell cycle to the next stage. For example, the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea halts cells at the G1/S juncture by limiting the supply of deoxynucleotides, the building blocks of DNA. Other notable chemicals include treatment with aphidicolin, a polymerase alpha inhibitor for G1 arrest, treatment with colchicine and nocodazole, both of which interfere with mitotic spindle formation to halt cells in M phase and finally, treatment with the DNA chain terminator 5-fluorodeoxyridine to initiate S phase arrest. Treatment with these chemicals is an effective means of synchronizing an entire population of cells at a particular phase. With removal of the chemical, cells rejoin the cell cycle in unison. Treatment of the test agent following release from the cell cycle blocking chemical ensures that the drug response elicited is from a uniform, cell cycle stage-specific population. However, since many of the chemical synchronizers are known genotoxic compounds, teasing apart the participation of various response pathways (to the synchronizers vs. the test agents) is challenging. Here we describe a metabolic labeling method for following a subpopulation of actively cycling cells through their progression from the DNA replication phase, through to the division and separation of their daughter cells. Coupled with flow cytometry quantification, this protocol enables for measurement of kinetic progression of the cell cycle in the absence of either mechanically- or chemically- induced cellular stresses commonly associated with other cell cycle synchronization methodologies. In the following sections we will discuss the methodology, as well as some of its applications in biomedical research.

  18. On-Orbit Measurement of Next Generation Space Solar Cell Technology on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, David S.; Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies, William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is in the process of measuring several solar cells in a supplemental experiment on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4). Four industry and government partners have provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment will be on-orbit for approximately 18 months. It is completely self-contained and will provide its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four- junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) cells will be evaluated and the results compared to ground-based measurements.

  19. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1–200 bar and temperature range 300–1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients of a CO_2–N_2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated spectra, as well as published experimental data. - Highlights: • A ceramic gas cell designed for gas measurements up to 1300 K and 200 bar. • The first recorded absorption spectrum of CO_2 at 1000 K and 101 bar is presented. • Voigt profiles might suffice in the modeling of radiation from CO_2 in combustion.

  20. Implications of progesterone metabolism in MA-10 cells for accurate measurement of the rate of steroidogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.F.G. Rommerts (Focko); S.R. King (Steven); P.N. Span (Paul)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn virtually all studies with MA-10 cells, progesterone RIAs have been used to measure steroid synthesis. To test whether progesterone is a stable end product, we investigated the metabolism of added tritiated progesterone and pregnenolone in MA-10 cells over a period

  1. Implications of progesterone metabolism in MA-10 cells for accurate measurement of the rate of steroidogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommerts, F.F.; King, S.R.; Span, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    In virtually all studies with MA-10 cells, progesterone RIAs have been used to measure steroid synthesis. To test whether progesterone is a stable end product, we investigated the metabolism of added tritiated progesterone and pregnenolone in MA-10 cells over a period of 3 h. Steroids were then

  2. Quantification of in situ temperature measurements on a PBI-based high temperature PEMFC unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Ali, Syed Talat; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    The temperature is a very important operating parameter for all types of fuel cells. In the present work distributed in situ temperature measurements are presented on a polybenzimidazole based high temperature PEM fuel cell (HT-PEM). A total of 16 T-type thermocouples were embedded on both the an...

  3. Diffusivity measurements in some organic solvents by a gas-liquid diaphragm cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littel, R.J.; Littel, R.J.; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1992-01-01

    A diaphragm cell has been developed for the measurement of diffusion coefficients of gases In liquids. The diaphragm cell is operated batchwise with respect to both gas and liquid phases, and the diffusion process Is followed by means of the gas pressure decrease which is recorded by means of a

  4. Diffusivity Measurements in Some Organic Solvents by a Gas-Liquid Diaphragm Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littel, Rob J.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A diaphragm cell has been developed for the measurement of diffusion coefficients of gases in liquids. The diaphragm cell is operated batchwise with respect to both gas and liquid phases, and the diffusion process is followed by means of the gas pressure decrease which is recorded by means of a

  5. Results of the round robin exercise on IV-measurements of classic Si-solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Borg, N.J.C.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    A round robin exercise was performed on IV measurements and spectral response measurements of solar cells. Seven partners participated in the exercise. The aim of the round robin was to enable the verification of their measurement facilities and procedures for IV-measurements on 'classic' Si-solar cells by comparing their measurement data with the other participants. In this way possible flaws in the equipment or procedures can be found and corrected for or the measurement uncertainties can be reassessed. The differences between the measurement results of the various partners were more or less within the expected measurement uncertainty although one or more partners may decide to use the results to reexamine their facilities or procedures.

  6. Oral myeloid cells uptake allergoids coupled to mannan driving Th1/Treg responses upon sublingual delivery in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, I; López-Relaño, J; Viñuela, M; Tudela, J-I; Angelina, A; Benito-Villalvilla, C; Díez-Rivero, C M; Cases, B; Manzano, A I; Fernández-Caldas, E; Casanovas, M; Palomares, O; Subiza, J L

    2018-04-01

    Polymerized allergoids coupled to nonoxidized mannan (PM-allergoids) may represent novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells (DCs). PM-allergoids are better captured by DCs than native allergens and favor Th1/Treg cell responses upon subcutaneous injection. Herein we have studied in mice the in vivo immunogenicity of PM-allergoids administered sublingually in comparison with native allergens. Three immunization protocols (4-8 weeks long) were used in Balb/c mice. Serum antibody levels were tested by ELISA. Cell responses (proliferation, cytokines, and Tregs) were assayed by flow cytometry in spleen and lymph nodes (LNs). Allergen uptake was measured by flow cytometry in myeloid sublingual cells. A quick antibody response and higher IgG2a/IgE ratio were observed with PM-allergoids. Moreover, stronger specific proliferative responses were seen in both submandibular LNs and spleen cells assayed in vitro. This was accompanied by a higher IFNγ/IL-4 ratio with a quick IL-10 production by submandibular LN cells. An increase in CD4 + CD25 high FOXP3 + Treg cells was detected in LNs and spleen of mice treated with PM-allergoids. These allergoids were better captured than native allergens by antigen-presenting (CD45 + MHC-II + ) cells obtained from the sublingual mucosa, including DCs (CD11b + ) and macrophages (CD64 + ). Importantly, all the differential effects induced by PM-allergoids were abolished when using oxidized instead of nonoxidized PM-allergoids. Our results demonstrate for the first time that PM-allergoids administered through the sublingual route promote the generation of Th1 and FOXP3 + Treg cells in a greater extent than native allergens by mechanisms that might well involve their better uptake by oral antigen-presenting cells. © 2018 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Determination of Orbiter and Carrier Aerodynamic Coefficients from Load Cell Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    A method of determining orbiter and carrier total aerodynamic coefficients from load cell measurements is required to support the inert and the captive active flights of the ALT program. A set of equations expressing the orbiter and carrier total aerodynamic coefficients in terms of the load cell measurements, the sensed dynamics of the Boeing 747 (carrier) aircraft, and the relative geometry of the orbiter/carrier is derived.

  8. Measurements of the fundamental thermodynamic parameters of Li/BCX and Li/SOCl2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, E. E.; White, R. E.; Darcy, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    Two experimental techniques - equilibrium or reversible cell discharge and measurement of open circuit potential as a function of temperature - are used to determine the thermodynamic data needed to estimate the heat generation characteristics of Li/BCX and Li/SOCl2 cells. The results obtained showed that the reversible cell potential, the temperature dependence of the reversible cell potential, and the thermoneutral potential of the BCX cell were 3.74 V, -0.857 +/- 0.198 mV/K, and 3.994 +/- 0.0603 V, respectively. The respective values obtained for the Li/SOCl2 cell were 3.67 V, -0.776 +/- 0.255 mV/K, and 3.893 +/- 0.0776 V. The difference between the thermoneutral potential of Li/BCX and Li/SCl2 cells is attributable to the difference in their electroactive components.

  9. Relating Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance to Measurements in a Liquid Half Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Tynelius, Oskar; Lund-Olesen, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) could act as a replacement for batteries in low power electronics. For instance, micro—DMFC’s could be used to power hearing instruments[1]. The power output of a DMFC is limited by the sluggish kinetics of both the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on the anode ...... Cells Bull. 2012 (2012) 12–16. doi:10.1016/S1464-2859(12)70367-X....

  10. Characterization of two subsets of human T gamma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Griend, R. J.; ten Berge, I.; Tanke, H. J.; Roos, D.; Schellekens, P. T.; Melief, C. J.; Zeijlemaker, W. P.; Astaldi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Normal human E rosette-forming, Fc-IgG receptor-bearing cells (so-called T gamma cells) were separated into two functionally different subpopulations. Both subpopulations bind the monoclonal antibody OKM1 (directed against an antigen present also on monocytes and granulocytes). The first

  11. Identification of human tissue cross-presenting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew; Ginhoux, Florent

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of functionally specialized antigen-presenting cells. We recently characterized the human tissue cross-presenting DCs and aligned the human and mouse DC subsets. Our findings will facilitate the translation of murine DC studies to the human setting and aid the design of DC-based vaccine strategies for infection and cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Results from an International Measurement Round Robin of III-V Triple Junction Solar Cells under Air Mass Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Chris; Goodbody, Chris; Baur, Carsten; Sharps, Paul; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Yoo, Henry; Sahlstrom, Ted; Walters, Robert; Lorentzen, Justin; hide

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international measurement round robin of monolithic, triple-junction, GaInP/GaAs/Ge space solar cells. Eight laboratories representing national labs, solar cell vendors and space solar cell consumers, measured cells using in-house reference cells and compared those results to measurements made where each lab used the same set of reference cells. The results show that most of the discrepancy between laboratories is likely due to the quality of the standard cells rather than the measurement system or solar simulator used.

  13. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  14. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P; Suhail, A; Fridman, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University

  15. Target-specific activation of mast cells by immunoglobulin E reactive with a renal cell carcinoma-associated antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, R. M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) that specifically binds to antigens present on carcinoma cells may represent a useful tool to combat carcinomas. Induction of an inflammatory response at the tumor site by tumor-specific IgE may result in reduced tumor growth and tumor regression. Local mast cells may be

  16. Cell-associated HIV DNA measured early during infection has prognostic value independent of serum HIV RNA measured concomitantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, Terese L; Oliveri, Roberto S; Benfield, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Using data from the Danish AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected homosexual men established in the 1980s, the prognostic value of early HIV DNA loads was evaluated. In addition to DNA measurements, concomitant serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts and CCR5 genotypes were determined. The patients were divided...... into 3 groups, according to whether their cell-associated HIV DNA load was or = 2,500 DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Clinical progression rates differed significantly between the groups (p value independent...... of serum HIV RNA (p value. Patients heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 allele had significantly lower HIV DNA loads than those homozygous for the normal allele (p

  17. Lipid rafts and B cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neetu; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2007-10-01

    B cells comprise an essential component of the humoral immune system. They are equipped with the unique ability to synthesize and secrete pathogen-neutralizing antibodies, and share with professional antigen presenting cells the ability to internalize foreign antigens, and process them for presentation to helper T cells. Recent evidence indicates that specialized cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane commonly referred to as lipid rafts, serve to compartmentalize key signaling molecules during the different stages of B cell activation including B cell antigen receptor (BCR)-initiated signal transduction, endocytosis of BCR-antigen complexes, loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC class II molecules, MHC-II associated antigen presentation to helper T cells, and receipt of helper signals via the CD40 receptor. Here we review the recent literature arguing for a role of lipid rafts in the spatial organization of B cell function.

  18. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong; Ngan, Alfonso H W; Tang, Bin; Wang, Anxun

    2012-01-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Reliable measurement of elastic modulus of cells by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhoulong

    2012-04-01

    The elastic modulus of an oral cancer cell line UM1 is investigated by nanoindentation in an atomic force microscope with a flat-ended tip. The commonly used Hertzian method gives apparent elastic modulus which increases with the loading rate, indicating strong effects of viscoelasticity. On the contrary, a rate-jump method developed for viscoelastic materials gives elastic modulus values which are independent of the rate-jump magnitude. The results show that the rate-jump method can be used as a standard protocol for measuring elastic stiffness of living cells, since the measured values are intrinsic properties of the cells. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. B Cells Promote Th1- Skewed NKT Cell Response by CD1d-TCR Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Park, Se-Ho

    2013-01-01

    CD1d expressing dendritic cells (DCs) are good glyco-lipid antigen presenting cells for NKT cells. However, resting B cells are very weak stimulators for NKT cells. Although ?-galactosylceramide (?-GalCer) loaded B cells can activate NKT cells, it is not well defined whether B cells interfere NKT cell stimulating activity of DCs. Unexpectedly, we found in this study that B cells can promote Th1-skewed NKT cell response, which means a increased level of IFN-? by NKT cells, concomitant with a d...

  1. Alterations in cellular metabolism modulate CD1d-mediated NKT-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tonya J; Carey, Gregory B; East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Bollino, Dominique R; Kimball, Amy S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a critical role in the host's innate immune response. CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipid antigens to NKT cells has been established; however, the mechanisms by which NKT cells recognize infected or cancerous cells remain unclear. 5(')-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of lipogenic pathways. We hypothesized that activation of AMPK during infection and malignancy could alter the repertoire of antigens presented by CD1d and serve as a danger signal to NKT cells. In this study, we examined the effect of alterations in metabolism on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells and found that an infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus rapidly increased CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) enhance T-cell effector functions during infection, therefore antigen presenting cells pretreated with pharmacological agents that inhibit glycolysis, induce HIF and activate AMPK were assessed for their ability to induce NKT-cell responses. Pretreatment with 2-deoxyglucose, cobalt chloride, AICAR and metformin significantly enhanced CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation. In addition, NKT cells preferentially respond to malignant B cells and B-cell lymphomas express HIF-1α. These data suggest that targeting cellular metabolism may serve as a novel means of inducing innate immune responses. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to Der p 1 allergen enhance the recruitment of Th2 cells: major involvement of the chemokines TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammad, Hamida; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Ratajczak, Céline; Nithiananthan, Asokananthan; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Stewart, Geoffrey A.; Jacquet, Alain; Tonnel, Andre-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen - presenting cells that can orientate the immune response towards a Th1 or a Th2 type. DC produce chemokines that are involved in the recruitment of either Th1 cells, such as IP10 (CXCL10), Th2 cells such as TARC (CCL17) and MDC (CCL22), or non-polarized T

  3. Chapter 1: Reliably Measuring the Performance of Emerging Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumbles, Garry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Reese, Matthew O [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Marshall, Ashley [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-08

    Determining the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells, especially those from new, emerging areas of technology, is important if advances in performance are to be made. However, although precise measurements are important, it is the accuracy of these types of measurements that can cause issues. Accurate measurements not only promote the development of new technology platforms, but they also enable comparisons with established technologies and allow assessments of advancements within the same field. This chapter provides insights into how measurements can be made with reasonable accuracy using both the components of the measuring system and a good protocol to acquire good data. The chapter discusses how to measure a calibrated lamp spectrum, determine a spectral mismatch factor, identify the correct reference cell and filter, define the illuminated active area, measure J-V curves to avoid any hysteresis effects, take note of sample degradation issues and avoid the temptation to artificially enhance efficiency data.

  4. [Prediction of the molecular response to pertubations from single cell measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, Françoise; Levine, Raphael D

    2014-12-01

    The response of protein signalization networks to perturbations is analysed from single cell measurements. This experimental approach allows characterizing the fluctuations in protein expression levels from cell to cell. The analysis is based on an information theoretic approach grounded in thermodynamics leading to a quantitative version of Le Chatelier principle which allows to predict the molecular response. Two systems are investigated: human macrophages subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, analogous to the immune response against Gram-negative bacteria and the response of the proteins involved in the mTOR signalizing network of GBM cancer cells to changes in partial oxygen pressure. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  5. Robust organelle size extractions from elastic scattering measurements of single cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannaday, Ashley E.; Draham, Robert; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate non-nuclear organelle size distributions in single cells by measuring angular scattering patterns and fitting them with Mie theory. Simulations have indicated that the large relative size distribution of organelles (mean:width≈2) leads to unstable Mie fits unless scattering is collected at polar angles less than 20 degrees. Our optical system has therefore been modified to collect angles down to 10 degrees. Initial validations will be performed on polystyrene bead populations whose size distributions resemble those of cell organelles. Unlike with the narrow bead distributions that are often used for calibration, we expect to see an order-of-magnitude improvement in the stability of the size estimates as the minimum angle decreases from 20 to 10 degrees. Scattering patterns will then be acquired and analyzed from single cells (EMT6 mouse cancer cells), both fixed and live, at multiple time points. Fixed cells, with no changes in organelle sizes over time, will be measured to determine the fluctuation level in estimated size distribution due to measurement imperfections alone. Subsequent measurements on live cells will determine whether there is a higher level of fluctuation that could be attributed to dynamic changes in organelle size. Studies on unperturbed cells are precursors to ones in which the effects of exogenous agents are monitored over time.

  6. Quantitative Methods for Measuring Repair Rates and Innate-Immune Cell Responses in Wounded Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Gothard, Elizabeth; Coles, Mark C; Ambler, Carrie A

    2018-01-01

    In skin wounds, innate-immune cells clear up tissue debris and microbial contamination, and also secrete cytokines and other growth factors that impact repair process such as re-epithelialization and wound closure. After injury, there is a rapid influx and efflux of immune cells at wound sites, yet the function of each innate cell population in skin repair is still under investigation. Flow cytometry is a valuable research tool for detecting and quantifying immune cells; however, in mouse back skin, the difficulty in extracting immune cells from small area of skin due to tissue complexity has made cytometric analysis an underutilized tool. In this paper, we provide detailed methods on the digestion of lesion-specific skin without disrupting antigen expression followed by multiplex cell staining that allows for identification of seven innate-immune populations, including rare subsets such as group-3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), by flow-cytometry analysis. Furthermore, when studying the functions of immune cells to tissue repair an important metric to monitor is size of the wound opening. Normal wounds close steadily albeit at non-linear rates, while slow or stalled wound closure can indicate an underlying problem with the repair process. Calliper measurements are difficult and time-consuming to obtain and can require repeated sedation of experimental animals. We provide advanced methods for measuring of wound openness; digital 3D image capture and semi-automated image processing that allows for unbiased, reliable measurements that can be taken repeatedly over time.

  7. Conventional CD4+ T cells present bacterial antigens to induce cytotoxic and memory CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Adalia, Aránzazu; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Osuna-Pérez, Jesús; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Zorita, Virgina; Martínez-Riaño, Ana; Boccasavia, Viola; Borroto, Aldo; Martínez Del Hoyo, Gloria; González-Granado, José María; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Veiga, Esteban

    2017-11-17

    Bacterial phagocytosis and antigen cross-presentation to activate CD8 + T cells are principal functions of professional antigen presenting cells. However, conventional CD4 + T cells also capture and kill bacteria from infected dendritic cells in a process termed transphagocytosis (also known as transinfection). Here, we show that transphagocytic T cells present bacterial antigens to naive CD8 + T cells, which proliferate and become cytotoxic in response. CD4 + T-cell-mediated antigen presentation also occurs in vivo in the course of infection, and induces the generation of central memory CD8 + T cells with low PD-1 expression. Moreover, transphagocytic CD4 + T cells induce protective anti-tumour immune responses by priming CD8 + T cells, highlighting the potential of CD4 + T cells as a tool for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Cell-free assay measuring repair DNA synthesis in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciarrocchi, G.; Linn, S.

    1978-01-01

    Osmotic disruption of confluent cultured human fibroblasts that have been irradiated or exposed to chemical carcinogens allows the specific measurement of repair DNA synthesis using dTTP as a precursor. Fibroblasts similarly prepared from various xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines show the deficiencies of uv-induced DNA synthesis predicted from in vivo studies, while giving normal responses to methylmethanesulfonate. A pyrimidine-dimer-specific enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, stimulated the rate of uv-induced repair synthesis with normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines. This system should prove useful for identifying agents that induce DNA repair, and cells that respond abnormally to such induction. It should also be applicable to an in vitro complementation assay with repair-defective cells and proteins obtained from repair-proficient cells. Finally, by using actively growing fibroblasts and thymidine in the system, DNA replication can be measured and studied in vitro

  9. Current density distribution mapping in PEM fuel cells as an instrument for operational measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, M.; Heuer, M.; Heideck, G.; Styczynski, Z. A. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Chair Electric Power Networks and Renewable Energy Sources, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes. (author)

  10. Calculation of the Flux in a Square Lattice Cell and a Comparison with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelqvist, G [State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1961-05-15

    A calculation has been made of the thermal neutron flux in a square lattice cell using methods devised by Galanin. The f and L lattice parameters have been expressed in measurable quantities and a comparison made between measured and calculated values.

  11. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  12. Field Measurements of PCB emissions from Building Surfaces Using a New Portable Emission Test Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Haven, Rune; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure PCB-emission rates from indoor surfaces on-site in contaminated buildings using a newly developed portable emission test cell. Emission rates were measured from six different surfaces; three untreated surfaces and three remediated surfaces in a contaminated...

  13. A few nascent methods for measuring mechanical properties of the biological cell.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, Gayle Echo; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corvalan, Carlos (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Corwin, Alex David; Campanella, Osvaldo H. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Nivens, David (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Werely, Steven (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Koch, Steven John

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes a survey of several new methods for obtaining mechanical and rheological properties of single biological cells, in particular: (1) The use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) to measure the natural vibrations of certain cells. (2) The development of a novel micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) for obtaining high-resolution force-displacement curves. (3) The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for cell imaging. (4) The adaptation of a novel squeezing-flow technique to micro-scale measurement. The LDV technique was used to investigate the recent finding reported by others that the membranes of certain biological cells vibrate naturally, and that the vibration can be detected clearly with recent instrumentation. The LDV has been reported to detect motions of certain biological cells indirectly through the motion of a probe. In this project, trials on Saccharomyces cerevisiae tested and rejected the hypothesis that the LDV could measure vibrations of the cell membranes directly. The MEMS investigated in the second technique is a polysilicon surface-micromachined force sensor that is able to measure forces to a few pN in both air and water. The simple device consists of compliant springs with force constants as low as 0.3 milliN/m and Moire patterns for nanometer-scale optical displacement measurement. Fields from an electromagnet created forces on magnetic micro beads glued to the force sensors. These forces were measured and agreed well with finite element prediction. It was demonstrated that the force sensor was fully functional when immersed in aqueous buffer. These results show the force sensors can be useful for calibrating magnetic forces on magnetic beads and also for direct measurement of biophysical forces on-chip. The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for profiling the geometry of red blood cells was the third technique investigated here. An important finding was that the method commonly used for attaching the cells to a

  14. Calorimetric Measurement for Internal Conversion Efficiency of Photovoltaic Cells/Modules Based on Electrical Substitution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Terubumi; Tatsuta, Muneaki; Abe, Yamato; Takesawa, Minato

    2018-02-01

    We have succeeded in the direct measurement for solar cell/module internal conversion efficiency based on a calorimetric method or electrical substitution method by which the absorbed radiant power is determined by replacing the heat absorbed in the cell/module with the electrical power. The technique is advantageous in that the reflectance and transmittance measurements, which are required in the conventional methods, are not necessary. Also, the internal quantum efficiency can be derived from conversion efficiencies by using the average photon energy. Agreements of the measured data with the values estimated from the nominal values support the validity of this technique.

  15. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fengxiang; Ai Yu; Wang Jiafu; Wang Lisheng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts-data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  16. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Fengxiang; Ai Yu; Wang Jiafu; Wang Lisheng, E-mail: phonixchen79@yahoo.com.cn [Department of physics science and technology, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan city, Hubei Province, 430070 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts-data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  17. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  18. Enteroantigen-presenting B cells efficiently stimulate CD4(+) T cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2011-01-01

    Presentation of enterobacterial antigens by antigen-presenting cells and activation of enteroantigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are considered crucial steps in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathology. The detrimental effects of such CD4(+) T cells have been thoroughly demonstrated in models...... of colitis. Also, we have previously established an in vitro assay where murine enteroantigen-specific colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells are activated by splenocytes pulsed with an enterobacterial extract....

  19. Correlation of Cell Surface Biomarker Expression Levels with Adhesion Contact Angle Measured by Lateral Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Jenna A; Mace, Charles R

    2018-06-05

    Immunophenotyping is typically achieved using flow cytometry, but any influence a biomarker may have on adhesion or surface recognition cannot be determined concurrently. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of lateral microscopy for correlating cell surface biomarker expression levels with quantitative descriptions of cell morphology. With our imaging system, we observed single cells from two T cell lines and two B cell lines adhere to antibody-coated substrates and quantified this adhesion using contact angle measurements. We found that SUP-T1 and CEM CD4+ cells, both of which express similar levels of CD4, experienced average changes in contact angle that were not statistically different from one another on surfaces coated in anti-CD4. However, MAVER-1 and BJAB K20 cells, both of which express different levels of CD20, underwent average changes in contact angle that were significantly different from one another on surfaces coated in anti-CD20. Our results indicate that changes in cell contact angles on antibody-coated substrates reflect the expression levels of corresponding antigens on the surfaces of cells as determined by flow cytometry. Our lateral microscopy approach offers a more reproducible and quantitative alternative to evaluate adhesion compared to commonly used wash assays and can be extended to many additional immunophenotyping applications to identify cells of interest within heterogeneous populations.

  20. Measuring cell viscoelastic properties using a force-spectrometer: influence of protein-cytoplasm interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Duperray, Alain; Leyrat, Anne; Verdier, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Cell adhesive and rheological properties play a very important role in cell transmigration through the endothelial barrier, in particular in the case of inflammation (leukocytes) or cancer metastasis (cancer cells). In order to characterize cell viscoelastic properties, we have designed a force spectrometer (AFM) which can stretch cells thereby allowing measurement of their rheological properties. This custom-made force spectrometer allows two different visualizations, one lateral and one from below. It allows investigation of the effects of rheology involved during cell stretching. To test the ability of our system to characterize such viscoelastic properties, ICAM-1 transfected CHO cells were analyzed. Two forms of ICAM-1 were tested; wild type ICAM-1, which can interact with the cytoskeleton, and a mutant form which lacks the cytoplasmic domain, and is unable to associate with the cytoskeleton. Stretching experiments carried out on these cells show the formation of long filaments. Using a previous model of filament elongation, we could determine the viscoelastic properties of a single cell. As expected, different viscoelastic components were found between the wild type and the mutant, which reveal that the presence of interactions between ICAM-1 and the cytoskeleton increases the stiffness of the cell.

  1. Optical Phase Measurements of Disorder Strength Link Microstructure to Cell Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Will J; Steelman, Zachary A; Loomis, Brianna; Wax, Adam

    2017-02-28

    There have been sustained efforts on the part of cell biologists to understand the mechanisms by which cells respond to mechanical stimuli. To this end, many rheological tools have been developed to characterize cellular stiffness. However, measurement of cellular viscoelastic properties has been limited in scope by the nature of most microrheological methods, which require direct mechanical contact, applied at the single-cell level. In this article, we describe, to our knowledge, a new analysis approach for quantitative phase imaging that relates refractive index variance to disorder strength, a parameter that is linked to cell stiffness. Significantly, both disorder strength and cell stiffness are measured with the same phase imaging system, presenting a unique alternative for label-free, noncontact, single-shot imaging of cellular rheologic properties. To demonstrate the potential applicability of the technique, we measure phase disorder strength and shear stiffness across five cellular populations with varying mechanical properties and demonstrate an inverse relationship between these two parameters. The existence of this relationship suggests that predictions of cell mechanical properties can be obtained from examining the disorder strength of cell structure using this, to our knowledge, novel, noncontact technique. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced thermal property measurement of a silver zinc battery cell using isothermal calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubelhor, Ryan, E-mail: ryan.ubelhor@navy.mil [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, 300 Highway 361, Crane, IN 47522 (United States); Ellison, Daniel [Science Applications International Corporation, 300 Highway 361, Crane, IN 47522 (United States); Pierce, Cecilia [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, 300 Highway 361, Crane, IN 47522 (United States)

    2015-04-20

    Highlights: • Design and construction of novel heat flow calorimeter for large battery cell. • Heat flow characterization of silver zinc battery under load. • Thermal efficiency determination of silver zinc battery under load. • Surface map of heat flow of silver zinc battery under load. - Abstract: The push for increased energy density of electrochemical cells highlights the need for novel electrochemical techniques as well as additional characterization methods for these cells in order to meet user needs and safety requirements. To achieve ever increasing energy densities and faster controlled release of that energy, all materials of construction must be constantly evaluated from electrode to casing and everything in-between. Increasing the energy density of the cell improves its utility, but it also increases the waste heat and maximum potential uncontrolled energy release. Design agents and system developers need new ways to monitor and classify the probability and severity of the catastrophic failures as well as the system characteristics during intended operation. To support optimization of these battery cells it is necessary to understand their thermal characteristics at rest as well as under prescribed charge and discharge cycles. One of the many calorimetric tools available to observe and record these characteristics is heat flow calorimetry. Typically, a heat flow calorimeter is operated isothermally and measures the sum heat released or consumed by a sample material inside of a calorimetric measuring cell. For this study an improved calorimetric measuring cell for a modified Hart 6209 precision temperature bath was designed and constructed to measure the heat flow of larger electrochemical cells (18 × 8 × 16 cm). This new calorimetric measuring cell is constructed to allow independent measurements of heat flow among each of the sample’s six sides in contrast to the typical one measurement of the average heat flow. Heat flows from 0.01 to 7

  3. Enhanced thermal property measurement of a silver zinc battery cell using isothermal calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubelhor, Ryan; Ellison, Daniel; Pierce, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Design and construction of novel heat flow calorimeter for large battery cell. • Heat flow characterization of silver zinc battery under load. • Thermal efficiency determination of silver zinc battery under load. • Surface map of heat flow of silver zinc battery under load. - Abstract: The push for increased energy density of electrochemical cells highlights the need for novel electrochemical techniques as well as additional characterization methods for these cells in order to meet user needs and safety requirements. To achieve ever increasing energy densities and faster controlled release of that energy, all materials of construction must be constantly evaluated from electrode to casing and everything in-between. Increasing the energy density of the cell improves its utility, but it also increases the waste heat and maximum potential uncontrolled energy release. Design agents and system developers need new ways to monitor and classify the probability and severity of the catastrophic failures as well as the system characteristics during intended operation. To support optimization of these battery cells it is necessary to understand their thermal characteristics at rest as well as under prescribed charge and discharge cycles. One of the many calorimetric tools available to observe and record these characteristics is heat flow calorimetry. Typically, a heat flow calorimeter is operated isothermally and measures the sum heat released or consumed by a sample material inside of a calorimetric measuring cell. For this study an improved calorimetric measuring cell for a modified Hart 6209 precision temperature bath was designed and constructed to measure the heat flow of larger electrochemical cells (18 × 8 × 16 cm). This new calorimetric measuring cell is constructed to allow independent measurements of heat flow among each of the sample’s six sides in contrast to the typical one measurement of the average heat flow. Heat flows from 0.01 to 7

  4. Heterogeneity in white blood cells has potential to confound DNA methylation measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn T Adalsteinsson

    Full Text Available Epigenetic studies are commonly conducted on DNA from tissue samples. However, tissues are ensembles of cells that may each have their own epigenetic profile, and therefore inter-individual cellular heterogeneity may compromise these studies. Here, we explore the potential for such confounding on DNA methylation measurement outcomes when using DNA from whole blood. DNA methylation was measured using pyrosequencing-based methodology in whole blood (n = 50-179 and in two white blood cell fractions (n = 20, isolated using density gradient centrifugation, in four CGIs (CpG Islands located in genes HHEX (10 CpG sites assayed, KCNJ11 (8 CpGs, KCNQ1 (4 CpGs and PM20D1 (7 CpGs. Cellular heterogeneity (variation in proportional white blood cell counts of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and basophils, counted by an automated cell counter explained up to 40% (p<0.0001 of the inter-individual variation in whole blood DNA methylation levels in the HHEX CGI, but not a significant proportion of the variation in the other three CGIs tested. DNA methylation levels in the two cell fractions, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, differed significantly in the HHEX CGI; specifically the average absolute difference ranged between 3.4-15.7 percentage points per CpG site. In the other three CGIs tested, methylation levels in the two fractions did not differ significantly, and/or the difference was more moderate. In the examined CGIs, methylation levels were highly correlated between cell fractions. In summary, our analysis detects region-specific differential DNA methylation between white blood cell subtypes, which can confound the outcome of whole blood DNA methylation measurements. Finally, by demonstrating the high correlation between methylation levels in cell fractions, our results suggest a possibility to use a proportional number of a single white blood cell type to correct for this confounding effect in analyses.

  5. Vapor cell geometry effect on Rydberg atom-based microwave electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linjie; Liu, Jiasheng; Jia, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Song, Zhenfei; Jia, Suotang

    2018-03-01

    The geometry effect of a vapor cell on the metrology of a microwave electric field is investigated. Based on the splitting of the electromagnetically induced transparency spectra of cesium Rydberg atoms in a vapor cell, high-resolution spatial distribution of the microwave electric field strength is achieved for both a cubic cell and a cylinder cell. The spatial distribution of the microwave field strength in two dimensions is measured with sub-wavelength resolution. The experimental results show that the shape of a vapor cell has a significant influence on the abnormal spatial distribution because of the Fabry–Pérot effect inside a vapor cell. A theoretical simulation is obtained for different vapor cell wall thicknesses and shows that a restricted wall thickness results in a measurement fluctuation smaller than 3% at the center of the vapor cell. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2017YFA03044200 and 2016YFF0200104), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91536110, 61505099, and 61378013), and the Fund for Shanxi “331 Project” Key Subjects Construction, China.

  6. A multi-slice sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Langxiang; Hu, Jinliang; Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The long capillary and shear-cell techniques are traditionally used for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Inspired by the idea of the shear-cell method, we have built a multi-slice sliding cell device for inter-diffusion measurements in liquid metals. The device is designed based on a linear sliding movement rather than a rotational shearing as used in the traditional shear-cell method. Compared with the normal shear-cell method, the present device is a more compact setup thus easier to handle. Also, it is expected to be easier to monitor with X-rays or neutrons if used in in situ experiments. A series of benchmark time-dependent diffusion experiments in Al-Cu melts carried out with the present technique reveal that accurate diffusion constants can be achieved only after a sufficient time. For short annealing times, the initial shearing process causing convective flow dominates the measurement and leads to an increase of the measured diffusion coefficient by a factor three. The diffusion data obtained for Al-Cu liquids are consistent with the most accurate data measured by the in situ X-ray radiography method under well controlled conditions of no temperature gradient or other perturbation. High accuracy and easy handling as well as superior adaptability make the present technique suitable for diffusion studies in liquid metals.

  7. Measurement of separase proteolytic activity in single living cells by a fluorogenic flow cytometry assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiltrud Haaß

    Full Text Available ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110 as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic

  8. A rapid and sensitive method for measuring N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mauri

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive method to quantitatively assess N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG activity in cultured cells is highly desirable for both basic research and clinical studies. NAG activity is deficient in cells from patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB due to mutations in NAGLU, the gene that encodes NAG. Currently available techniques for measuring NAG activity in patient-derived cell lines include chromogenic and fluorogenic assays and provide a biochemical method for the diagnosis of MPS IIIB. However, standard protocols require large amounts of cells, cell disruption by sonication or freeze-thawing, and normalization to the cellular protein content, resulting in an error-prone procedure that is material- and time-consuming and that produces highly variable results. Here we report a new procedure for measuring NAG activity in cultured cells. This procedure is based on the use of the fluorogenic NAG substrate, 4-Methylumbelliferyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MUG, in a one-step cell assay that does not require cell disruption or post-assay normalization and that employs a low number of cells in 96-well plate format. We show that the NAG one-step cell assay greatly discriminates between wild-type and MPS IIIB patient-derived fibroblasts, thus providing a rapid method for the detection of deficiencies in NAG activity. We also show that the assay is sensitive to changes in NAG activity due to increases in NAGLU expression achieved by either overexpressing the transcription factor EB (TFEB, a master regulator of lysosomal function, or by inducing TFEB activation chemically. Because of its small format, rapidity, sensitivity and reproducibility, the NAG one-step cell assay is suitable for multiple procedures, including the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries to identify modulators of NAG expression, folding and activity, and the investigation of candidate molecules and constructs for applications in

  9. Protein-induced changes during the maturation process of human dendritic cells: A 2-D DIGE approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Gb; Overbergh, L; Hansen, Kasper Lage

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are unique antigen presenting cells, which upon maturation change from a specialized antigen-capturing cell towards a professional antigen presenting cells. In this study, a 2-D DIGE analysis of immature and mature DCs was performed, to identify proteins changing in expression...... upon maturation. The protein expression profile of immature and mature DCs, derived from CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes was investigated using two pH ranges (pH 4-7 and 6-9) (n = 4). Ninety one differentially expressed spots (p...

  10. Peptide-Conjugated Nanoparticles Reduce Positive Co-stimulatory Expression and T Cell Activity to Induce Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Robert; Saito, Eiji; Miller, Stephen D; Shea, Lonnie D

    2017-07-05

    Targeted approaches to treat autoimmune diseases would improve upon current therapies that broadly suppress the immune system and lead to detrimental side effects. Antigen-specific tolerance was induced using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with disease-relevant antigen to treat a model of multiple sclerosis. Increasing the nanoparticle dose and amount of conjugated antigen both resulted in more durable immune tolerance. To identify active tolerance mechanisms, we investigated downstream cellular and molecular events following nanoparticle internalization by antigen-presenting cells. The initial cell response to nanoparticles indicated suppression of inflammatory signaling pathways. Direct and functional measurement of surface MHC-restricted antigen showed positive correlation with both increasing particle dose from 1 to 100 μg/mL and increasing peptide conjugation by 2-fold. Co-stimulatory analysis of cells expressing MHC-restricted antigen revealed most significant decreases in positive co-stimulatory molecules (CD86, CD80, and CD40) following high doses of nanoparticles with higher peptide conjugation, whereas expression of a negative co-stimulatory molecule (PD-L1) remained high. T cells isolated from mice immunized against myelin proteolipid protein (PLP 139-151 ) were co-cultured with antigen-presenting cells administered PLP 139-151 -conjugated nanoparticles, which resulted in reduced T cell proliferation, increased T cell apoptosis, and a stronger anti-inflammatory response. These findings indicate several potential mechanisms used by peptide-conjugated nanoparticles to induce antigen-specific tolerance. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Force and Compliance Measurements on Living Cells Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcikiewicz Ewa P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM in studies of cell adhesion and cell compliance. Our studies use the interaction between leukocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 as a model system. The forces required to unbind a single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bond were measured at different loading rates. This data was used to determine the dynamic strength of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 complex and characterize the activation potential that this complex overcomes during its breakage. Force measurements acquired at the multiple- bond level provided insight about the mechanism of cell adhesion. In addition, the AFM was used as a microindenter to determine the mechanical properties of cells. The applications of these methods are described using data from a previous study.

  12. Experimental measurements of the permeation of hydrogen isotopes in lithium filled niobium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.; Austin, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium filled niobium cells have been heated in vacua at temperatures in the range 300 to 900 0 C. By measuring the flow of deuterium into the cell it has been possible to make estimates of the rate of permeation of deuterium in the niobium wall. After initial fast diffusion into the capsule the rate of permeation becomes very much slower than that determined by diffusion in the bulk niobium indicating that a second, slower, rate process is involved. Measurements of the rate of deuterium permeation out of the cell have been made for a number of different cell geometries and a range of temperatures. The results indicate that the slow rate process, which is dominant at low concentrations, is the desorption step from the metal to the gas phase

  13. Transvers Impedance Measurements of the Modified DARHT-2 Accelerator Cell Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, Dick; Waldron, Will

    2005-01-01

    The DARHT-2 accelerator cells have been redesigned to make their high voltage performance more robust. At the outset of the DARHT-2 development program about 8 years ago, an extensive campaign was mounted to minimize the transverse impedance of the original cell design. Since the initial spec on the machine was a beam current of 4 kA, the control of beam-breakup (BBU) amplification with a 2 microsecond pulse length was considered to be one the most critical issues in the design. Even after advances in detector technology allowed the beam current requirement to be lowered to 2 kA, the goal for the standard cell impedance was kept at ∼300 ohms/meter to allow for the possibility of future beam current upgrades to 4 kA without any modifications in the cells. The results of this campaign to minimize the transverse impedance are described in detail in Reference 1. After several iterations in the design of ferrite dampers and the anode finger stock shape, the measured (peak) impedance of the original standard cell was determined to be about 280 ohms/meter. (As a reference point, the measured impedance of the DARHT-1 cell is about 880 ohms/meter). This impedance provided such a wide safety margin against BBU amplification at 2 kA that it was felt that the cell redesign could focus on voltage holding without any detailed considerations of impacts on the transverse impedance. Now that a baseline design for the DARHT-2 cell has been established and tested, however, it was felt that a measurement of its impedance would be prudent. The results of these impedance measurements are presented in this note. The objective was mainly to do a ''quick check'' to ensure that there were no surprises, and to provide an estimate of the BBU frequencies and growth rates to the experimental test program

  14. Measurement of neutron disadvantage factor for fuel and moderator in the square reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Spiric, V.

    1964-01-01

    Full text: Heterogeneous diffusion treatment for flux distribution was used to define the direction of measurements for obtaining mean neutron flux in the moderator of the reactor cell by single integration. Factor Q for the fuel was determined by using experimental flux distribution in the cell moderator and calculated values for the function X (x;y). Experimental and calculated results are shown as a diagram. All the calculations were done on the ZUSE-Z-23 computer

  15. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Busschots

    2015-01-01

    • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3 was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01 cell lines.

  16. Optical tweezers for measuring the interaction of the two single red blood cells in flow condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) is an intrinsic property of blood, which has direct effect on the blood viscosity and therefore affects overall the blood circulation throughout the body. It is attracting interest for the research in both fundamental science and clinical application. Despite of the intensive research, the aggregation mechanism is remaining not fully clear. Recent advances in methods allowed measuring the interaction between single RBCs in a well-defined configuration leading the better understanding of the mechanism of the process. However the most of the studies were made on the static cells. Thus, the measurements in flow mimicking conditions are missing. In this work, we aim to study the interaction of two RBCs in the flow conditions. We demonstrate the characterization of the cells interaction strength (or flow tolerance) by measuring the flow velocity to be applied to separate two aggregated cells trapped by double channel optical tweezers in a desired configuration. The age-separated cells were used for this study. The obtained values for the minimum flow velocities needed to separate the two cells were found to be 78.9 +/- 6.1 μm/s and 110 +/- 13 μm/s for old and young cells respectively. The data obtained is in agreement with the observations reported by other authors. The significance of our results is in ability for obtaining a comprehensible and absolute physical value characterizing the cells interaction in flow conditions (not like the Aggregation Index measured in whole blood suspensions by other techniques, which is some abstract parameter)

  17. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Anja; Everett, Helen; Hamza, Eman; Garbani, Mattia; Gerber, Vinzenz; Marti, Eliane; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including hor...

  18. Energy Yield Determination of Concentrator Solar Cells using Laboratory Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F.; Garcia, Ivan; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-14

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used to predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted. temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  19. Wall extensibility: its nature, measurement and relationship to plant cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cells is controlled principally by processes that loosen the wall and enable it to expand irreversibly. The central role of wall relaxation for cell expansion is reviewed. The most common methods for assessing the extension properties of plant cell walls ( wall extensibility') are described, categorized and assessed critically. What emerges are three fundamentally different approaches which test growing cells for their ability (a) to enlarge at different values of turgor, (b) to induce wall relaxation, and (c) to deform elastically or plastically in response to an applied tensile force. Analogous methods with isolated walls are similarly reviewed. The results of these different assays are related to the nature of plant cell growth and pertinent biophysical theory. I argue that the extensibilities' measured by these assays are fundamentally different from one another and that some are more pertinent to growth than others.

  20. Combined local current distribution measurements and high resolution neutron radiography of operating direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Wippermann, Klaus [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research, IEF-3: Fuel Cells; Sanders, Tilman [RWTH Aachen (DE). Inst. for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA); Arlt, Tobias [Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials

    2010-07-01

    Neutron radiography allows the investigation of the local fluid distribution in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) under operating conditions. Spatial resolutions in the order of some tens of micrometers at the full test cell area are achieved. This offers the possibility to study practice-oriented, large stack cells with an active area of several hundred cm{sup 2} as well as specially designed, small test cells with an area of some cm{sup 2}. Combined studies of high resolution neutron radiography and segmented cell measurements are especially valuable, because they enable a correlation of local fluid distribution and local performance [1, 2]. The knowledge of this interdependency is essential to optimise the water management and performance respecting a homogeneous fluid, current and temperature distribution and to achieve high performance and durability of DMFCs. (orig.)

  1. [3H]Serotonin release: an improved method to measure mast cell degranulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazingue, C.; Dessaint, J.-P.; Capron, A.

    1978-01-01

    A method based on the release of tritium-labelled serotonin by activated mast cells in rodents is described. Mast cells incorporate labelled serotonin selectively and released the label after activation by non-specific stimulators (compound 48/80, polymyxin B sulphate, ATP, bovine chymotrypsin and L-α-lysophosphatidylcholine) or anaphylactic antibody and the corresponding antigen. These two types of activation were investigated in comparison with the toluidine blue microscopic rat mast cell degranulation test, and a methodological study of the release of [ 3 H] serotonin is described. The measurement of labelled serotonin release provides a simple and quick assay of mast cell degranulation compared to the time required for the classical rat mast cell degranulation technique and achieves a greater sensitivity. (Auth.)

  2. A Multi-Compartment Hybrid Computational Model Predicts Key Roles for Dendritic Cells in Tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeone Marino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a world-wide health problem with approximately 2 billion people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative bacterium of TB. The pathologic hallmark of Mtb infection in humans and Non-Human Primates (NHPs is the formation of spherical structures, primarily in lungs, called granulomas. Infection occurs after inhalation of bacteria into lungs, where resident antigen-presenting cells (APCs, take up bacteria and initiate the immune response to Mtb infection. APCs traffic from the site of infection (lung to lung-draining lymph nodes (LNs where they prime T cells to recognize Mtb. These T cells, circulating back through blood, migrate back to lungs to perform their immune effector functions. We have previously developed a hybrid agent-based model (ABM, labeled GranSim describing in silico immune cell, bacterial (Mtb and molecular behaviors during tuberculosis infection and recently linked that model to operate across three physiological compartments: lung (infection site where granulomas form, lung draining lymph node (LN, site of generation of adaptive immunity and blood (a measurable compartment. Granuloma formation and function is captured by a spatio-temporal model (i.e., ABM, while LN and blood compartments represent temporal dynamics of the whole body in response to infection and are captured with ordinary differential equations (ODEs. In order to have a more mechanistic representation of APC trafficking from the lung to the lymph node, and to better capture antigen presentation in a draining LN, this current study incorporates the role of dendritic cells (DCs in a computational fashion into GranSim. Results: The model was calibrated using experimental data from the lungs and blood of NHPs. The addition of DCs allowed us to investigate in greater detail mechanisms of recruitment, trafficking and antigen presentation and their role in tuberculosis infection. Conclusion: The main conclusion of this study is

  3. Nanosensors for label-free measurement of sodium ion fluxes of neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebinoga, Michael, E-mail: michael.gebinoga@tu-ilmenau.de [ZIK MacroNano Microfluidics and Biosensors, Technical University Ilmenau, P.O. Box 100565, D-98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Silveira, Liele; Cimalla, Irina [ZIK MacroNano Microfluidics and Biosensors, Technical University Ilmenau, P.O. Box 100565, D-98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Dumitrescu, Andreea [University of Pennsylvania - School of Engineering and Applied Science, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6391 (United States); Kittler, Mario; Luebbers, Benedikt; Becker, Annette [ZIK MacroNano Microfluidics and Biosensors, Technical University Ilmenau, P.O. Box 100565, D-98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Lebedev, Vadim [Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Physics, Tullastr. 7, D-79108 Freiburg (Germany); Schober, Andreas [ZIK MacroNano Microfluidics and Biosensors, Technical University Ilmenau, P.O. Box 100565, D-98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2010-05-25

    Novel nanosensors based on aluminium gallium nitrides (AlGaN/GaN) high electron mobility transistors have been of high interest during the last years, especially for their electrical characteristics as open gate field effect transistors. These nanosensors provide a valuable tool for high content screening in drug discovery, cell monitoring and liquid analyses focusing on applications of electrochemical detection technology. Our own measurements with these sensors confirm their pH sensitivity and in addition the possibility of detection of other ions in aqueous media. These measurements deal with the reactions of NG 108-15 (mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid) neuronal cells in response to different acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Our experimental approach shows some advantages. The first advantage is the label-free measurement of ion fluxes, and another advantage is the possibility non-destructively to estimate cell signals.

  4. Nanosensors for label-free measurement of sodium ion fluxes of neuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebinoga, Michael; Silveira, Liele; Cimalla, Irina; Dumitrescu, Andreea; Kittler, Mario; Luebbers, Benedikt; Becker, Annette; Lebedev, Vadim; Schober, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Novel nanosensors based on aluminium gallium nitrides (AlGaN/GaN) high electron mobility transistors have been of high interest during the last years, especially for their electrical characteristics as open gate field effect transistors. These nanosensors provide a valuable tool for high content screening in drug discovery, cell monitoring and liquid analyses focusing on applications of electrochemical detection technology. Our own measurements with these sensors confirm their pH sensitivity and in addition the possibility of detection of other ions in aqueous media. These measurements deal with the reactions of NG 108-15 (mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid) neuronal cells in response to different acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Our experimental approach shows some advantages. The first advantage is the label-free measurement of ion fluxes, and another advantage is the possibility non-destructively to estimate cell signals.

  5. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Measuring the correlation between cell mechanics and myofibroblastic differentiation during maturation of 3D microtissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruogang; Wang, Weigang; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Tissue stiffness and cellular contractility are two of the most important biomechanical factors regulating pathological transitions of encapsulated cells, such as the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts - a key event contributing to tissue fibrosis. However, a quantitative correlation between tissue stiffness and cellular contraction and myofibroblast differentiation has not yet been established in 3D environments, mainly due to the lack of suitable 3D tissue culture models that allow both tissue remodeling and simultaneous measurement of the cell/tissue mechanics. To address this, we have developed a magnetic microtissue tester system that allows the remodeling of arrays of cell-laden 3D collagen microtissues and the measurement of cell and tissue mechanics using magnetically actuated elastomeric microcantilevers. By measuring the development of cell/tissue mechanical properties and the expression level of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, a marker for myofibroblast differentiation) during a 6 day culture period, we found microtissue stiffness increased by 45% and α-SMA expression increased by 38%, but tissue contraction forces only increased by 10%, indicating that tissue stiffness may be the predominant mechanical factor for regulation of myofibroblast differentiation. This study provides new quantitative insight into the regulatory effect of cell and tissue mechanics on cellular function. Supported in part by NIH grant HL090747

  7. Note: A quartz cell with Pt single crystal bead electrode for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhigang; Wang, Jihao; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we provide and demonstrate a design of a unique cell with Pt single crystal bead electrode for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ECSTM) measurements. The active metal Pt electrode can be protected from air contamination during the preparation process. The transparency of the cell allows the tip and bead to be aligned by direct observation. Based on this, a new and effective alignment method is introduced. The high-quality bead preparations through this new cell have been confirmed by the ECSTM images of Pt (111).

  8. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Y.; Durante, W.; Lancaster, D. G.; Klattenhoff, J.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues.

  9. Potassium ion influx measurements on cultured Chinese hamster cells exposed to 60-hertz electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, A.P.; Tobey, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Potassium ion influx was measured by monitoring 42 KCl uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown in suspension culture and exposed in the culture medium to 60-Hz electromagnetic fields up to 2.85 V/m. In the presence of the field CHO cells exhibited two components of uptake, the same as previously observed for those grown under normal conditions; both these components of influx were decreased when compared to sham-exposed cells. Although decreases were consistently observed in exposed cells when plotted as loge of uptake, the differences between the means of the calculated fluxes of exposed and sham-exposed cells were quite small (on the order of 4-7%). When standard deviations were calculated, there was no significant difference between these means; however, when time-paired uptake data were analyzed, the differences were found to be statistically significant. Cells exposed only to the magnetic field exhibited similar small decreases in influx rates when compared to sham-exposed cells, suggesting that the reduction in K+ uptake could be attributed to the magnetic field. Additionally, intracellular K+ levels were measured over a prolonged exposure period (96 h), and no apparent differences in intracellular K+ levels were observed between field-exposed and sham-exposed cultures. These results indicate that high-strength electric fields have a small effect on the rate of transport of potassium ions but no effect on long-term maintenance of intracellular K+

  10. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  11. Measuring and assessing the effective in-plane thermal conductivity of lithium iron phosphate pouch cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinski, S.J.; Wang, X.; Sangeorzan, B.P.; Guessous, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to experimentally determine the effective in-plane thermal conductivity of a lithium iron phosphate pouch cell. An experimental setup is designed to treat the battery cell as a straight rectangular fin in natural convection. Thermography and heat sensors were used to collect data that yields the temperature distribution and heat transfer rate of the fin, respectively. One-dimensional fin equations were combined with the experimental data to yield the in-plane thermal conductivity through an iterative process that best-fits the data to the model. The experiment was first calibrated using reference plates of different metals. The fin model predicts the thermal conductivity value well with a correction factor of approximately 7%–9%. Using this experimental method, the in-plane thermal conductivity of the pouch cells is measured at different state of charge (SOC) levels. The in-plane thermal conductivity decreases approximately 0.13 Wm"−"1 °C"−"1 per 10% increase in SOC for the LFP cells. This translates to a 4.2% overall decrease in the thermal conductivity as the cell becomes fully charged. - Highlights: • A method is proposed to measure the in-plane thermal conductivity of a pouch cell. • The thermal conductivity decreases slightly with increase in SOC for the LFP cells. • The fin model predicts the thermal conductivity well with a correction factor.

  12. A new cell for high temperature EXAFS measurements in molten rare earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Bessada, Catherine; Auger, Yannick; Melin, Philippe; Gailhanou, Marc; Thiaudiere, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    A new cell with simple design has been developed for high temperature X-rays absorption measurements in both solid and molten lanthanide fluorides. Two plates of pyrolitic boron nitride are fixed hermetically together around the samples in order to avoid any evaporation and atmosphere interaction. EXAFS spectra of molten mixtures of LiF-LaF 3 measured at the La L III absorption edge are reported up to 900 deg C, and show the ability of this cell to keep the salt and to perform long time acquisition improving the signal to noise ratio

  13. Measurement of neutrons in the RA reactor cell; Merenje neutrona u elementarnoj celiji reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Bosevski, T [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    A special experimental device was constructed for measuring the neutron flux distribution in the RA reactor cell. This device simulated the reactor cell in order to avoid disturbance in the reactor core. It was made of an aluminium cylindrical vessel having outer diameter same as the vertical experimental channel and contained three fuel slugs. Hole was made in through the center of the fuel slugs and a copper wire was placed in the hole for measuring the thermal neutron flux distribution. It was placed in the experimental channel VK-5 in the location of highest neutron flux. Handling of samples for irradiation was quite simple.

  14. Tuneable diode laser gas analyser for methane measurements on a large scale solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengden, Michael; Cunningham, Robert; Johnstone, Walter

    2011-10-01

    A new in-line, real time gas analyser is described that uses tuneable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) for the measurement of methane in solid oxide fuel cells. The sensor has been tested on an operating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in order to prove the fast response and accuracy of the technology as compared to a gas chromatograph. The advantages of using a TDLS system for process control in a large-scale, distributed power SOFC unit are described. In future work, the addition of new laser sources and wavelength modulation will allow the simultaneous measurement of methane, water vapour, carbon-dioxide and carbon-monoxide concentrations.

  15. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Accounting for randomness in measurement and sampling in studying cancer cell population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Siavash; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Lahouti, Farshad; Ullah, Mukhtar; Linnebacher, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Knowing the expected temporal evolution of the proportion of different cell types in sample tissues gives an indication about the progression of the disease and its possible response to drugs. Such systems have been modelled using Markov processes. We here consider an experimentally realistic scenario in which transition probabilities are estimated from noisy cell population size measurements. Using aggregated data of FACS measurements, we develop MMSE and ML estimators and formulate two problems to find the minimum number of required samples and measurements to guarantee the accuracy of predicted population sizes. Our numerical results show that the convergence mechanism of transition probabilities and steady states differ widely from the real values if one uses the standard deterministic approach for noisy measurements. This provides support for our argument that for the analysis of FACS data one should consider the observed state as a random variable. The second problem we address is about the consequences of estimating the probability of a cell being in a particular state from measurements of small population of cells. We show how the uncertainty arising from small sample sizes can be captured by a distribution for the state probability.

  17. Quantitative Methods for Measuring Repair Rates and Innate-Immune Cell Responses in Wounded Mouse Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In skin wounds, innate-immune cells clear up tissue debris and microbial contamination, and also secrete cytokines and other growth factors that impact repair process such as re-epithelialization and wound closure. After injury, there is a rapid influx and efflux of immune cells at wound sites, yet the function of each innate cell population in skin repair is still under investigation. Flow cytometry is a valuable research tool for detecting and quantifying immune cells; however, in mouse back skin, the difficulty in extracting immune cells from small area of skin due to tissue complexity has made cytometric analysis an underutilized tool. In this paper, we provide detailed methods on the digestion of lesion-specific skin without disrupting antigen expression followed by multiplex cell staining that allows for identification of seven innate-immune populations, including rare subsets such as group-3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s, by flow-cytometry analysis. Furthermore, when studying the functions of immune cells to tissue repair an important metric to monitor is size of the wound opening. Normal wounds close steadily albeit at non-linear rates, while slow or stalled wound closure can indicate an underlying problem with the repair process. Calliper measurements are difficult and time-consuming to obtain and can require repeated sedation of experimental animals. We provide advanced methods for measuring of wound openness; digital 3D image capture and semi-automated image processing that allows for unbiased, reliable measurements that can be taken repeatedly over time.

  18. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. GUM approach to uncertainty estimations for online 220Rn concentration measurements using Lucas scintillation cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyabama, N.

    2014-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that, when all of the known or suspected components of errors have been evaluated and corrected, there still remains an uncertainty, that is, a doubt about how well the result of the measurement represents the value of the quantity being measured. Evaluation of measurement data - Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) is a guidance document, the purpose of which is to promote full information on how uncertainty statements are arrived at and to provide a basis for the international comparison of measurement results. In this paper, uncertainty estimations following GUM guidelines have been made for the measured values of online thoron concentrations using Lucas scintillation cell to prove that the correction for disequilibrium between 220 Rn and 216 Po is significant in online 220 Rn measurements

  20. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Benjamin J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2015-01-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions

  1. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Benjamin J; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2015-06-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  2. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Benjamin J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, 920 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); El-Naggar, Mohamed Y., E-mail: mnaggar@usc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, 920 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Molecular and Computational Biology Section, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  3. Intravenous delivery of HIV-based lentiviral vectors preferentially transduces F4/80+ and Ly-6C+ cells in spleen, important target cells in autoimmune arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, B.T. van den; Vermeij, E.A.; Waterborg, C.E.J.; Arntz, O.J.; Kracht, M.; Bennink, M.B.; Berg, W.B. van den; Loo, F.A. van de

    2013-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APCs) play an important role in arthritis and APC specific gene therapeutic targeting will enable intracellular modulation of cell activity. Viral mediated overexpression is a potent approach to achieve adequate transgene expression levels and lentivirus (LV) is useful for

  4. Co-delivery of PLGA encapsulated invariant NKT cell agonist with antigenic protein induce strong T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolen, Y.; Kreutz, M.; Gileadi, U.; Tel, J.; Vasaturo, A.; Dinther, E.A.W. van; Hout-Kuijer, M.A. van; Cerundolo, V.; Figdor, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor immunity can be enhanced by the coordinated release and delivery of antigens and immune-stimulating agents to antigen-presenting cells via biodegradable vaccine carriers. So far, encapsulation of TLR ligands and tumor-associated antigens augmented cytotoxic T cell (CTLs) responses. Here,

  5. Dendritic cell-specific deletion of β-catenin results in fewer regulatory T-cells without exacerbating autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Alves (Celso Henrique); J.L. Ober-Blöbaum (Julia); I. Brouwers-Haspels (Inge); P. Asmawidjaja (Patrick); A.M.C. Mus (Adriana); W. Razawy (Wida); M. Molendijk (Marlieke); B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote

  6. AFM measurements of novel solar cells. Studying electronic properties of Si-based radial junctions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hývl, Matěj

    -, č. 1 (2014), s. 52-53 ISSN 1439-4243 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM measurements * conductive cantilever * electronic properties * nanowires * PF TUNA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.imaging-git.com/science/scanning-probe-microscopy/afm-measurements-novel-solar- cells

  7. Neutron flux distribution measurement in the elementary cell of the RB reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takac, S [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-04-15

    The distribution of thermal neutrons was measured in the elementary cell with dysprosium foils for different lattice pitches and the results obtained were given. From the distributions measured average fluxes were determined for every single zone. By using the published data concerning effective absorption cross sections thermal utilization factors were calculated and their changes given as functions of lattice pitches: l = 8.0 cm; 11.3 cm and 17.9 cm. (author)

  8. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan, E-mail: Ramanujanv@csmc.edu

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  9. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  10. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglzim, El-Hassane; Rouane, Amar; El-Moznine, Reddad

    2007-10-17

    In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentationdeveloped in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell orbattery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. Thisinstrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electroniccards. Software under Hpvee ® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout ofthe impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambienttemperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc..., were taken withseveral sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and theinfluence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a verynarrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation underPspice ® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility ofobtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results ona 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedancemeasurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper).The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5V)and with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A). The Nyquist diagram resulting from theexperimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internalimpedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the valuesobtained (both theoretical and practical) enables us to validate our electronic measurementinstrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  11. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddad El-Moznine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentationdeveloped in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell orbattery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. Thisinstrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electroniccards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout ofthe impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambienttemperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc..., were taken withseveral sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and theinfluence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a verynarrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation underPspice® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility ofobtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results ona 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedancemeasurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper.The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5Vand with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A. The Nyquist diagram resulting from theexperimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internalimpedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the valuesobtained (both theoretical and practical enables us to validate our electronic measurementinstrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  12. Pulsed taut-wire measurement of the magnetic alignment of the ITS induction cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, J.G.; Burns, M.J.; Honaberger, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical and magnetic alignment of the first eight induction-cell, solenoid magnets of the Integrated Test Stand (ITS) for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility were measured by observing the deflection of a fine, taut wire carrying a pulsed current. To achieve the required alignment (less than 0.25 mm offset and less than 5 mrad tilt), the magnet design uses quadrufilar windings and iron field-smoothing rings. After detailed measurements of each solenoid magnet, the cells are assembled and then mechanically aligned using a laser and an alignment target moved along the cell centerline. After the cells are in final position, the pulsed wire method is used to verify the magnetic alignment. The measurements show an average offset of the magnetic axes from the mechanical axis of 0. 15 mm, with a maximum offset of 0.3 mm. The average tilt of the magnetic axis was 0.7 mrad with a maximum tilt of 1.4 mrad. Tilts are corrected to less than 0.3 mrad, using dipole trim magnets assembled into each cell. Correction is limited noise

  13. Simultaneous measurement of passage through the restriction point and MCM loading in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håland, T. W.; Boye, E.; Stokke, T.; Grallert, B.; Syljuåsen, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    Passage through the Retinoblastoma protein (RB1)-dependent restriction point and the loading of minichromosome maintenance proteins (MCMs) are two crucial events in G1-phase that help maintain genome integrity. Deregulation of these processes can cause uncontrolled proliferation and cancer development. Both events have been extensively characterized individually, but their relative timing and inter-dependence remain less clear. Here, we describe a novel method to simultaneously measure MCM loading and passage through the restriction point. We exploit that the RB1 protein is anchored in G1-phase but is released when hyper-phosphorylated at the restriction point. After extracting cells with salt and detergent before fixation we can simultaneously measure, by flow cytometry, the loading of MCMs onto chromatin and RB1 binding to determine the order of the two events in individual cells. We have used this method to examine the relative timing of the two events in human cells. Whereas in BJ fibroblasts released from G0-phase MCM loading started mainly after the restriction point, in a significant fraction of exponentially growing BJ and U2OS osteosarcoma cells MCMs were loaded in G1-phase with RB1 anchored, demonstrating that MCM loading can also start before the restriction point. These results were supported by measurements in synchronized U2OS cells. PMID:26250117

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Single Cell Stiffness Measurements Using PZT-Integrated Buckling Nanoneedles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Tijjani, Auwal Shehu; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Auwal, Shehu Muhammad

    2016-12-23

    This paper proposes a new technique for real-time single cell stiffness measurement using lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-integrated buckling nanoneedles. The PZT and the buckling part of the nanoneedle have been modelled and validated using the ABAQUS software. The two parts are integrated together to function as a single unit. After calibration, the stiffness, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and sensitivity of the PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedle have been determined to be 0.7100 N·m -1 , 123.4700 GPa, 0.3000 and 0.0693 V·m·N -1 , respectively. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been modelled and validated based on compression tests. The average global stiffness and Young's modulus of the cells are determined to be 10.8867 ± 0.0094 N·m -1 and 110.7033 ± 0.0081 MPa, respectively. The nanoneedle and the cell have been assembled to measure the local stiffness of the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells The local stiffness, Young's modulus and PZT output voltage of the three different size Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined at different environmental conditions. We investigated that, at low temperature the stiffness value is low to adapt to the change in the environmental condition. As a result, Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes vulnerable to viral and bacterial attacks. Therefore, the proposed technique will serve as a quick and accurate process to diagnose diseases at early stage in a cell for effective treatment.

  15. Detection of honeycomb cell walls from measurement data based on Harris corner detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yan; Dong, Zhigang; Kang, Renke; Yang, Jie; Ayinde, Babajide O.

    2018-06-01

    A honeycomb core is a discontinuous material with a thin-wall structure—a characteristic that makes accurate surface measurement difficult. This paper presents a cell wall detection method based on the Harris corner detection algorithm using laser measurement data. The vertexes of honeycomb cores are recognized with two different methods: one method is the reduction of data density, and the other is the optimization of the threshold of the Harris corner detection algorithm. Each cell wall is then identified in accordance with the neighboring relationships of its vertexes. Experiments were carried out for different types and surface shapes of honeycomb cores, where the proposed method was proved effective in dealing with noise due to burrs and/or deformation of cell walls.

  16. FITTING A THREE DIMENSIONAL PEM FUEL CELL MODEL TO MEASUREMENTS BY TUNING THE POROSITY AND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads; Odgaard, Madeleine; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2004-01-01

    the distribution of current density and further how thisaffects the polarization curve.The porosity and conductivity of the catalyst layer are some ofthe most difficult parameters to measure, estimate and especiallycontrol. Yet the proposed model shows how these two parameterscan have significant influence...... on the performance of the fuel cell.The two parameters are shown to be key elements in adjusting thethree-dimensional model to fit measured polarization curves.Results from the proposed model are compared to single cellmeasurements on a test MEA from IRD Fuel Cells.......A three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a PEM fuel cell is presented. The model consists ofstraight channels, porous gas diffusion layers, porous catalystlayers and a membrane. In this computational domain, most ofthe transport phenomena which govern the performance of the...

  17. Instantaneous measurement of the internal temperature in lithium-ion rechargeable cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Rengaswamy; Carkhuff, Bliss G.; Butler, Michael H.; Baisden, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate, in three different rechargeable lithium-ion cells, the existence of an intrinsic relationship between a cell's internal temperature and a readily measurable electrical parameter, namely the phase shift between an applied sinusoidal current and the resulting voltage. The temperature range examined spanned from -20 to 66 deg. C. The optimum single frequency for the phase measurement is in the 40-100 Hz range, allowing for a measurement time of much less than a second; the phase shift in this range depends predominantly on temperature, and is almost completely independent of the state-of-charge. Literature reports suggest that the observed dependence of the phase shift on temperature arises from the ionic conduction of the so-called solid-electrolyte-interphase layer between the graphite anode and the electrolyte. A meter measuring the phase shift across this interphase is analogous to a thermometer reporting the temperature, thereby providing feedback for rapid corrections of any operating conditions that might lead to the catastrophic destruction of the cell. This level of monitoring and control is distinctly different from the present safety-enabling mechanisms: typically positive thermal coefficient ceramics/plastics, or 'shutdown' separators based on polyethylene that act to often permanently shut down current flow through the cell.

  18. Measurement of Minority-Carrier Lifetime in Silicon Solar Cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This manuscript describes the measurement of minority - carrier lifetime of silicon solar cells, at room temperature, by photoconductive decay method. The Holobeam, Model 655 Double-Pulsed Holographic system, is used as the light source. This consists of a Q-switched, pulsed ruby laser oscillator with two ruby laser ...

  19. Measuring Bioenergetics in T Cells Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Pearce, Erika L.

    2016-01-01

    This unit contains several protocols to determine the energy utilization of T cells in real-time using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer (http://www.seahorsebio.com). The advantages to using this machine over traditional metabolic assays include the simultaneous measurement of glycolysis and

  20. The study of sheath flow dark zone phenomenon in dynamic individual cells scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Xiaopin; Zhang, Weiguang

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic cells scattering is one of the most efficient approaches exploring in measurements of cells size, morphology and growth states. This technique can be widely applied in real-time detection for pharmaceutical industry, food industry, liquor industry and other biological fields. A novel method named dynamic individual cells scattering measurement is designed in this paper, which can make cells pass through quartz glass measurement zone one by one with sheath flow driving force. During the experiments, an obvious phenomenon has been found which is called sheath flow dark zone phenomenon (SFDZ). Under the influence of SFDZ, sheath flow forming detection becomes very difficult. In this paper, the causes giving rise to SFDZ have been analyzed. And an improved method is put forward, in which the orifice inside the measurement zone is set as an optical system. Then the illuminating system is redesigned. In this way, almost all the illuminating light can enter orifice so that the total reflection energy decreases substantially. A comparison experiments have been done, which proves the efficiency of this redesigned optical system and its sound effects on SFDZ avoiding.

  1. Molten salt e.m.f. cell measurements on U-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Kandan, R.; Nagarajan, K.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy of formation of intermetallic compounds, UGa 3 , UGa 2 and U 2 Ga 3 were determined by using high temperature molten salt galvanic cell measurements in the temperature range of 644-988 K, 751-947 K and 800-950 K, respectively. (author)

  2. Four-Parameter white blood cell differential counting based on light scattering measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; de Grooth, B.G.; Visscher, K.; Kouterik, F.A.; Greve, Jan

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of the depolarized orthogonal light scattering in flow cytometry enables one to discriminate human eosinephilic granulocytes from neutrophilic granulocytes. We use this method to perform a four-parameter differential white blood cell analysis. A simple flow cytometer was built equipped

  3. Apparatus for measuring resistance change only in a cell analyzer and method for calibrating it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to resistance only monitoring and calibration in an electrical cell analyzer. Sample and sheath fluid flows of different salinities are utilized, the sample flow being diameter modulated to produce a selected pattern which is compared to the resistance measured across the flows.

  4. Artifact Interpretation of Spectral Response Measurements on Two-Terminal Multijunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Si, F.T.; Isabella, O.; Zeman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Multijunction solar cells promise higher power-conversion efficiency than the single-junction. With respect to two-terminal devices, an accurate measurement of the spectral response requires a delicate adjustment of the light- and voltage-biasing; otherwise it can result in artifacts in the data and

  5. SQUID measurements of remanent magnetisation in refillable 3He spin-filter cells (SFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutanu, V.; Rupp, A.; Sander-Thömmes, T.

    2007-07-01

    A strong influence of external magnetic fields on the relaxation time constant T1 of glass cells serving as reservoirs for polarised 3He, observed for various alkali metal-coated cells made of different glass types, was initially associated with the presence of a large number of ferromagnetic clusters on the glass surface. Later experiments showed the presence of the so-called “ T1 hysteresis” phenomenon with a similar distinctiveness also in uncoated cells made of pure synthetic quartz glass. It suggests that the origin of such a relaxation is a macroscopic magnetisation in the bulk of the cell. We present the results of a multi-SQUID system investigation on magnetised and non-magnetised quartz glass cells, Cs coated as well as bare wall, to be used as neutron spin filters at HMI Berlin. The presence of a macroscopic remanent magnetic moment in the cells after their exposition to external magnetic fields has been experimentally shown. More than 80% of the remanent magnetic moment of the magnetised cells was found to be concentrated in the region of the glass valves. SQUID measurements reveal the existence of some remanent magnetisation in all valve parts and also in the vacuum grease, but most magnetic are the plastic parts and the O-ring. Different valve and sealing types have been compared in order to find the less magnetisable one.

  6. DNA fingerprinting of glioma cell lines and considerations on similarity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bady, Pierre; Diserens, Annie-Claire; Castella, Vincent; Kalt, Stefanie; Heinimann, Karl; Hamou, Marie-France; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E

    2012-06-01

    Glioma cell lines are an important tool for research in basic and translational neuro-oncology. Documentation of their genetic identity has become a requirement for scientific journals and grant applications to exclude cross-contamination and misidentification that lead to misinterpretation of results. Here, we report the standard 16 marker short tandem repeat (STR) DNA fingerprints for a panel of 39 widely used glioma cell lines as reference. Comparison of the fingerprints among themselves and with the large DSMZ database comprising 9 marker STRs for 2278 cell lines uncovered 3 misidentified cell lines and confirmed previously known cross-contaminations. Furthermore, 2 glioma cell lines exhibited identity scores of 0.8, which is proposed as the cutoff for detecting cross-contamination. Additional characteristics, comprising lack of a B-raf mutation in one line and a similarity score of 1 with the original tumor tissue in the other, excluded a cross-contamination. Subsequent simulation procedures suggested that, when using DNA fingerprints comprising only 9 STR markers, the commonly used similarity score of 0.8 is not sufficiently stringent to unambiguously differentiate the origin. DNA fingerprints are confounded by frequent genetic alterations in cancer cell lines, particularly loss of heterozygosity, that reduce the informativeness of STR markers and, thereby, the overall power for distinction. The similarity score depends on the number of markers measured; thus, more markers or additional cell line characteristics, such as information on specific mutations, may be necessary to clarify the origin.

  7. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Lo Monaco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain uncertain. Stem cells can contribute to cartilage repair via chondrogenic differentiation, via immunomodulation, or by the production of paracrine factors and extracellular vesicles. But before novel cell-based therapies for cartilage repair can be introduced into the clinic, rigorous testing in preclinical animal models is required. Preclinical models used in regenerative cartilage studies include murine, lapine, caprine, ovine, porcine, canine, and equine models, each associated with its specific advantages and limitations. This review presents a summary of recent in vitro data and from in vivo preclinical studies justifying the use of MSCs and iPSCs in cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing small and large animals will be discussed, while also describing suitable outcome measures for evaluating cartilage repair.

  8. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Melissa; Merckx, Greet; Ratajczak, Jessica; Gervois, Pascal; Hilkens, Petra; Clegg, Peter; Bronckaers, Annelies; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain uncertain. Stem cells can contribute to cartilage repair via chondrogenic differentiation, via immunomodulation, or by the production of paracrine factors and extracellular vesicles. But before novel cell-based therapies for cartilage repair can be introduced into the clinic, rigorous testing in preclinical animal models is required. Preclinical models used in regenerative cartilage studies include murine, lapine, caprine, ovine, porcine, canine, and equine models, each associated with its specific advantages and limitations. This review presents a summary of recent in vitro data and from in vivo preclinical studies justifying the use of MSCs and iPSCs in cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing small and large animals will be discussed, while also describing suitable outcome measures for evaluating cartilage repair.

  9. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanila Nawaz

    Full Text Available The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components.

  10. F NMR measurement of intracellular free calcium in human red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Schanne, F.A.X.

    1986-01-01

    Optical techniques for the measurement of intracellular Ca are not readily applicable to the human red cell because of the intense absorption of hemoglobin. The authors have therefore examined the use of 19 F NMR of 5,5'-difluoro-1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (5FBAPTA) introduced non-disruptively by intracellular hydrolysis of the membrane-permeant acetoxymethyl ester derivative. 19 F NMR spectra of 5FBAPTA-containing erythrocytes at 188 MHz displayed two well resolved resonances corresponding to the free and Ca-bound forms of the chelator, the resonance of the free form being ten-fold larger than that of the Ca-bound form. Addition of the ionophore A23187 resulted in the disappearance of the resonance of the free anion and a quantitative increase in the intensity of the resonance of the Ca-complex. From these data, and a K/sub D/ of 708 nM for the Ca-5FBAPTA complex, the authors estimate red cell free Ca to be 70 nM, which is in the range of values obtained for other cells, despite the fact that the human red cell, which lacks intracellular organelles for storing Ca, possesses only 1 μmol total Ca/1. cells in comparison to mmols of total Ca found in other cells. The authors ability to use 19 F NMR to measure free Ca in the red blood cell paves the way for future NMR studies of red cell free Ca concentrations in human essential hypertension as well as in other diseases states in which alterations in cellular Ca homeostasis may be involved

  11. Using cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging to measure real-time changes in cellular adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin D; Thomas, Shane R

    2015-02-19

    Cell-matrix adhesion plays a key role in controlling cell morphology and signaling. Stimuli that disrupt cell-matrix adhesion (e.g., myeloperoxidase and other matrix-modifying oxidants/enzymes released during inflammation) are implicated in triggering pathological changes in cellular function, phenotype and viability in a number of diseases. Here, we describe how cell-substrate impedance and live cell imaging approaches can be readily employed to accurately quantify real-time changes in cell adhesion and de-adhesion induced by matrix modification (using endothelial cells and myeloperoxidase as a pathophysiological matrix-modifying stimulus) with high temporal resolution and in a non-invasive manner. The xCELLigence cell-substrate impedance system continuously quantifies the area of cell-matrix adhesion by measuring the electrical impedance at the cell-substrate interface in cells grown on gold microelectrode arrays. Image analysis of time-lapse differential interference contrast movies quantifies changes in the projected area of individual cells over time, representing changes in the area of cell-matrix contact. Both techniques accurately quantify rapid changes to cellular adhesion and de-adhesion processes. Cell-substrate impedance on microelectrode biosensor arrays provides a platform for robust, high-throughput measurements. Live cell imaging analyses provide additional detail regarding the nature and dynamics of the morphological changes quantified by cell-substrate impedance measurements. These complementary approaches provide valuable new insights into how myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidative modification of subcellular extracellular matrix components triggers rapid changes in cell adhesion, morphology and signaling in endothelial cells. These approaches are also applicable for studying cellular adhesion dynamics in response to other matrix-modifying stimuli and in related adherent cells (e.g., epithelial cells).

  12. Direct and indirect measurement of somatic cell count as indicator of intramammary infection in dairy goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olofsson Ida

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mastitis is the most important and costly disease in dairy goat production. Subclinical mastitis is common in goats and is mainly caused by contagious bacteria. Several methods to diagnose subclinical mastitis are available. In this study indirect measurement of somatic cell count (SCC by California Mastitis Test (CMT and direct measurement of SCC using a portable deLaval cell counter (DCC are evaluated. Swedish goat farmers would primarily benefit from diagnostic methods that can be used at the farm. The purpose of the study was to evaluate SCC measured by CMT and DCC as possible markers for intramammary infection (IMI in goats without clinical symptoms of mastitis. Moreover to see how well indirect measurement of SCC (CMT corresponded to direct measurement of SCC (DCC. Method Udder half milk samples were collected once from dairy goats (n = 111, in five different farms in Northern and Central Sweden. Only clinically healthy animals were included in the study. All goats were in mid to late lactation at sampling. Milk samples were analyzed for SCC by CMT and DCC at the farm, and for bacterial growth at the laboratory. Results Intramammary infection, defined as growth of udder pathogens, was found in 39 (18% of the milk samples. No growth was found in 180 (81% samples while 3 (1% samples were contaminated. The most frequently isolated bacterial species was coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS (72% of all isolates, followed by Staphylococcus aureus (23% of all isolates. Somatic cell count measured by DCC was strongly (p = 0.000 associated with bacterial growth. There was also a very strong association between CMT and bacterial growth. CMT 1 was associated with freedom of IMI while CMT ≥2 was associated with IMI. Indirect measurement of SCC by CMT was well correlated with SCC measured by DCC. Conclusions According to the results, SCC measured with CMT or DCC can predict udder infection in goats, and CMT can be used as a

  13. In situ stress measurement with the new LVDT - Cell - method description and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.; Christiansson, R.; Martin, D.; Siren, T.; Kemppainen, K.

    2013-11-01

    Posiva Oy and SKB (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB) tested the suitability a new LVDT-cell (Linear Variable Differential Transducer cell) to measure the induced stresses in the vicinity of an excavated surface and further to use these results to interpret the in situ state of stress. It utilises the overcoring methodology, measuring the radial convergence of four diameters using eight LVDTs, and is similar in concept to the USBM-gauge. A 127 mm diameter pilot-hole is required and the overcore diameter is 200 mm. The minimum overcoring length is 350 mm, and hence a compact drill can be utilised. Extensive testing of the LVDT-cell shows it to be robust and suitable for use in an underground environment. Sensitivity tests also show that the cell can withstand a range of operating conditions and still provide acceptable results. The in situ stress at the measurement location can be solved by numerical inversion using the results of at least three overcoring measurements around the three-dimensional tunnel section. The large dimensions of the measurement tool and the ability to utilise multiple measurements at various locations in a tunnel section, provides flexibility in selecting an appropriate rock mass volume. Because the inversion technique relies on knowing the exact location of the measurements and the geometry profile of the tunnel, modern survey techniques such as Lidar or photogrammetric technology should be used. Checks using traditional surveying techniques should also be used to ensure adequate survey resolution, specially in case of sidecoring measurements. To evaluate the suitability of the LVDT-cell to provide the in situ state of stress, tests were carried out in the drill-and-blast TASS tunnel and TBM tunnel at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The state of stress established using the LVDT-cell was in agreement with the state of stress established previously using traditional overcoring and hydraulic fracturing methods. In this study, the

  14. In situ stress measurement with the new LVDT - Cell - method description and verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [KMS Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Christiansson, R. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Martin, D. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Siren, T.; Kemppainen, K.

    2013-11-15

    Posiva Oy and SKB (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB) tested the suitability a new LVDT-cell (Linear Variable Differential Transducer cell) to measure the induced stresses in the vicinity of an excavated surface and further to use these results to interpret the in situ state of stress. It utilises the overcoring methodology, measuring the radial convergence of four diameters using eight LVDTs, and is similar in concept to the USBM-gauge. A 127 mm diameter pilot-hole is required and the overcore diameter is 200 mm. The minimum overcoring length is 350 mm, and hence a compact drill can be utilised. Extensive testing of the LVDT-cell shows it to be robust and suitable for use in an underground environment. Sensitivity tests also show that the cell can withstand a range of operating conditions and still provide acceptable results. The in situ stress at the measurement location can be solved by numerical inversion using the results of at least three overcoring measurements around the three-dimensional tunnel section. The large dimensions of the measurement tool and the ability to utilise multiple measurements at various locations in a tunnel section, provides flexibility in selecting an appropriate rock mass volume. Because the inversion technique relies on knowing the exact location of the measurements and the geometry profile of the tunnel, modern survey techniques such as Lidar or photogrammetric technology should be used. Checks using traditional surveying techniques should also be used to ensure adequate survey resolution, specially in case of sidecoring measurements. To evaluate the suitability of the LVDT-cell to provide the in situ state of stress, tests were carried out in the drill-and-blast TASS tunnel and TBM tunnel at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The state of stress established using the LVDT-cell was in agreement with the state of stress established previously using traditional overcoring and hydraulic fracturing methods. In this study, the

  15. Effects of dendritic cell vaccine activated with protein components of toxoplasma gondii on tumor specific CD8+ T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amari A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Dendritic Cell (DC is an important antigen-presenting cell that present tumor antigen to CD8+ and CD4+ T- Lymphocytes and induce specific anti-tumor immunity. In order to induce effective anti-tumor response, an option is increasing the efficiency of antigen presentation of dendritic cells and T cell activation capacity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dendritic cell maturation with protein components of toxoplasma gondii on cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and their infiltration in to the tumor."n"nMethods: For DC generation, bone marrow cells were cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for five days. After that, LPS, protein components and whole extract of toxoplasma gondii were added to the culture media and incubated for another two days for DC maturation. To generate tumor, mices were injected subcutaneously with WEHI-164 cell line. For immunotherapy 106 DCs matured with different compounds were injected around the tumor site. Infiltration of CD8+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry and cytotoxic activity was measured by LDH detection kit."n"nResults: Immunotherapy with DCs treated with protein components of toxoplasma gondii led to a significant increase in the

  16. Measurement and adjustment of dumb-bells for 9-cell TESLA cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wencan; Quan Shengwen; Hao Jiankui; Jiang Tao; Zhang Baocheng; Zhao Kui

    2008-01-01

    Correct Dumb-bells are very important to make sure the right field flatness, frequency of TM010 mode and length of 9-cell TESLA cavity. The shape of the dumb-bells will be wrong due to deep drawing, machining and EB welding. Then, the dumb-bells should be adjusted after iris and stiffness welding according to the mechanical and microwave measurement. Peking University has set up facilities for measuring and correcting the dumb-bells. This paper discusses the method of measuring and correcting the dumb-bells. (authors)

  17. DC-STAMP, a novel multimembrane-spanning molecule preferentially expressed by dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartgers, F.C.; Vissers, J.L.M.; Looman, M.W.G.; Zoelen, C. van; Huffine, C.; Figdor, C.G.; Adema, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are unique in their ability to present antigen to naive T cells, and therefore play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. Characterization of DC-specific genes may help to unravel the mechanism underlying their potent antigen presenting capacity. Here we describe

  18. Computer based system for measuring the minority carrier lifetime in the solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales A, A.; Casados C, G.

    1994-01-01

    We show the development of a computer based system for measuring the minority carrier lifetime in the base of silicon solar cells. The system allows using two different techniques for such kind of measurements:the open circuit voltage decay (OCVD) and the surface voltage decay SVD. The equipment is based on internal cards for IBM-Pc or compatible computers that work as an oscilloscope and as a function generator, in addition to a synchronization and signal conditioning circuit. The system is fully controlled by a 'c' language program that optimizes the used of the instrument built in this way, and makes the analysis of the measurement data by curve fitting techniques. We show typical results obtained with silicon solar cells made in our laboratories. (Author)

  19. Polymeric pH nanosensor with extended measurement range bearing octaarginine as cell penetrating peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Peng; Sun, Honghao; Liu, Mingxing

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic peptide octaarginine which mimics human immunodeficiency virus-1, Tat protein is used as cell penetrating moiety for new pH nanosensors which demonstrate enhanced cellular uptake and expanded measurement range from pH 3.9 to pH 7.3 by simultaneously incorporating two complemental pH-s......H-sensitive fluorophores in a same nanoparticle. The authors believe that this triple fluorescent pH sensor provides a new tool to pH measurements that can have application in cellular uptake mechanism study and new nanomedicine design.......A synthetic peptide octaarginine which mimics human immunodeficiency virus-1, Tat protein is used as cell penetrating moiety for new pH nanosensors which demonstrate enhanced cellular uptake and expanded measurement range from pH 3.9 to pH 7.3 by simultaneously incorporating two complemental p...

  20. Measurement of PCB emissions from building surfaces using a novel portable emission test cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in building materials like caulks and paints from 1930 e1970s and in some cases that caused elevated PCB concentrations in the indoor air at levels considered harmful to occupant health. PCBs are semivolatile organic compounds and capable of spreading from...... and there is a need to prioritise remediation measures on different materials. An inexpensive and portable emission test cell was developed to resemble indoor conditions in relation to the area specific ventilation rate. Emissions were measured using the test cell in the laboratory on freshly made PCB paint. Further......, the chamber was used for determining emissions from PCB-containing building materials in the field as well as remediated walls. The measurements showed that sorption of PCBs to chamber walls was insignificant after 2-4 days of exposure to the source. Over a period of two weeks emission rates did not change...

  1. Accurate and reproducible measurements of RhoA activation in small samples of primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nini, Lylia; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-03-01

    Rho GTPase activation is essential in a wide variety of cellular processes. Measurement of Rho GTPase activation is difficult with limited material, such as tissues or primary cells that exhibit stringent culture requirements for growth and survival. We defined parameters to accurately and reproducibly measure RhoA activation (i.e., RhoA-GTP) in cultured primary keratinocytes in response to serum and growth factor stimulation using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based G-LISA assays. We also established conditions that minimize RhoA-GTP in unstimulated cells without affecting viability, allowing accurate measurements of RhoA activation on stimulation or induction of exogenous GTPase expression. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative measurements of intercellular adhesion between a macrophage and cancer cells using a cup-attached AFM chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyonchol; Yamagishi, Ayana; Imaizumi, Miku; Onomura, Yui; Nagasaki, Akira; Miyagi, Yohei; Okada, Tomoko; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2017-07-01

    Intercellular adhesion between a macrophage and cancer cells was quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cup-shaped metal hemispheres were fabricated using polystyrene particles as a template, and a cup was attached to the apex of the AFM cantilever. The cup-attached AFM chip (cup-chip) approached a murine macrophage cell (J774.2), the cell was captured on the inner concave of the cup, and picked up by withdrawing the cup-chip from the substrate. The cell-attached chip was advanced towards a murine breast cancer cell (FP10SC2), and intercellular adhesion between the two cells was quantitatively measured. To compare cell adhesion strength, the work required to separate two adhered cells (separation work) was used as a parameter. Separation work was almost 2-fold larger between a J774.2 cell and FP10SC2 cell than between J774.2 cell and three additional different cancer cells (4T1E, MAT-LyLu, and U-2OS), two FP10SC2 cells, or two J774.2 cells. FP10SC2 was established from 4T1E as a highly metastatic cell line, indicates separation work increased as the malignancy of cancer cells became higher. One possible explanation of the strong adhesion of macrophages to cancer cells observed in this study is that the measurement condition mimicked the microenvironment of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in vivo, and J774.2 cells strongly expressed CD204, which is a marker of TAMs. The results of the present study, which were obtained by measuring cell adhesion strength quantitatively, indicate that the fabricated cup-chip is a useful tool for measuring intercellular adhesion easily and quantitatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Natural Killer T Cells: An Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amrendra; Suryadevara, Naveenchandra; Hill, Timothy M.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Van Kaer, Luc; Joyce, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Type I natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the MHC class I-like protein CD1d. Agonistic activation of NKT cells leads to rapid pro-inflammatory and immune modulatory cytokine and chemokine responses. This property of NKT cells, in conjunction with their interactions with antigen-presenting cells, controls downstream innate and adaptive immune responses against cancers and infectious diseases, as well as in several inflammatory disorders. NKT cell properties are acquired during development in the thymus and by interactions with the host microbial consortium in the gut, the nature of which can be influenced by NKT cells. This latter property, together with the role of the host microbiota in cancer therapy, necessitates a new perspective. Hence, this review provides an initial approach to understanding NKT cells from an ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo) perspective. PMID:29312339

  4. Natural Killer T Cells: An Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amrendra; Suryadevara, Naveenchandra; Hill, Timothy M; Bezbradica, Jelena S; Van Kaer, Luc; Joyce, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Type I natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the MHC class I-like protein CD1d. Agonistic activation of NKT cells leads to rapid pro-inflammatory and immune modulatory cytokine and chemokine responses. This property of NKT cells, in conjunction with their interactions with antigen-presenting cells, controls downstream innate and adaptive immune responses against cancers and infectious diseases, as well as in several inflammatory disorders. NKT cell properties are acquired during development in the thymus and by interactions with the host microbial consortium in the gut, the nature of which can be influenced by NKT cells. This latter property, together with the role of the host microbiota in cancer therapy, necessitates a new perspective. Hence, this review provides an initial approach to understanding NKT cells from an ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo) perspective.

  5. Natural Killer T Cells: An Ecological Evolutionary Developmental Biology Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrendra Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type I natural killer T (NKT cells are innate-like T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the MHC class I-like protein CD1d. Agonistic activation of NKT cells leads to rapid pro-inflammatory and immune modulatory cytokine and chemokine responses. This property of NKT cells, in conjunction with their interactions with antigen-presenting cells, controls downstream innate and adaptive immune responses against cancers and infectious diseases, as well as in several inflammatory disorders. NKT cell properties are acquired during development in the thymus and by interactions with the host microbial consortium in the gut, the nature of which can be influenced by NKT cells. This latter property, together with the role of the host microbiota in cancer therapy, necessitates a new perspective. Hence, this review provides an initial approach to understanding NKT cells from an ecological evolutionary developmental biology (eco-evo-devo perspective.

  6. Mechanical properties of mammalian single smooth muscle cells. II. Evaluation of a modified technique for attachment of cells to the measurement apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Glerum (Jacobus); R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA method is described for attaching isolated single smooth muscle cells to an apparatus designed for measuring the longitudinal forces developed passively and actively by the cell upon straining, electrical or pharmacological stimulation. Primary attachment of the cell is based on its

  7. Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure Response of Protein-Stabilized Gold Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ARL-TR-7577 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure ...ARL-TR-7577 ● JAN 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure Response of...DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2014–September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of an Ethanol-Driven Pressure Cell to Measure Hydrostatic Pressure

  8. Neutron radiography characterization of an operating proton exchange membrane fuel cell with localized current distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardo, J.J.; Owejan, J.P.; Trabold, T.A.; Tighe, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron radiography has proven to be a powerful tool to study and understand the effects of liquid water in an operating fuel cell. In the present work, this experimental method is coupled with locally resolved current and ohmic resistance measurements, giving additional insight into water management and fuel cell performance under a variety of conditions. The effects of varying the inlet humidification level and the current density of the 50 cm 2 cell are studied by simultaneously monitoring electrochemical performance with a 10x10 matrix of current sensors, and liquid water volumes are measured using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) neutron imaging facility. A counter flow, straight channel proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is used to demonstrate localized performance loss corresponds to water-filled channels that impede gas transport to the catalyst layer, thereby creating an area that has low current density. Furthermore, certain operating conditions causing excess water accumulation in the channels can result in localized proton resistance increase, a result that can only be accurately observed with combined radiography and distributed electrochemical measurements.

  9. Anti-CD20 Cell Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis—A Fixed Dosing Schedule for Ocrelizumab is Overkill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannadha Avasarala

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-CD 20 therapies have found significant uses in multiple sclerosis (MS. Based singularly on the accumulated evidence with the use of rituximab (RTX; Rituxan, Genentech, and Biogen in neuroimmunological diseases, ocrelizumab (OCR; Ocrevus, Genentech was developed as a treatment option for MS and selectively targets CD20 B cells, a cell surface antigen found on pre-B cells, mature, and memory B cells, but not on lymphoid stem cells and plasma cells. On the basis of indirect evidence, elimination of the antigen-presenting capabilities and antigen nonspecific immune functions of B cells appear to be central to the therapeutic efficacy of anti-CD20 B-cell therapies. An important question is this—Why does the drug need to be dosed at fixed intervals and not based on a measurable endpoint, such as tracking peripheral CD20 cell counts? There is minimal scientific validity in infusing the drug every 6 months particularly if CD20 cell counts are negligible in the peripheral blood. In this analysis, a case is made for following CD19 cell populations as a surrogate for CD20 cells on a monthly basis to guide OCR redosing parameters and does not follow a scheduled dosing parameter.

  10. Detonation cell size measurements and predictions in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.

    1994-01-01

    The present research reports on the effect of initial mixture temperature on the experimentally measured detonation cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Experimental and theoretical research related to combustion phenomena in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures has been ongoing for many years. However, detonation cell size data currently exists or hydrogen-air-steam mixtures up to a temperature of only 400K. Sever accident scenarios have been identified for light water reactors (LWRs) where hydrogen-air mixture temperatures in excess of 400K could be generated within containment. The experiments in this report focus on extending the cell size data base for initial mixture temperatures in excess of 400K. The experiments were carried out in a 10-cm inner-diameter, 6.1-m long heated detonation tube with a maximum operating temperature of 700K and spatial temperature uniformity of ±14K. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air initial gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K--650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside-diameter test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent by hydrogen at 300K down to about 9 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments

  11. High-Throughput Flow Cytometric Method for the Simultaneous Measurement of CAR-T Cell Characterization and Cytotoxicity against Solid Tumor Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emily M; Klebanoff, Samuel D; Secrest, Stephanie; Romain, Gabrielle; Haile, Samuel T; Emtage, Peter C R; Gilbert, Amy E

    2018-04-01

    High-throughput flow cytometry is an attractive platform for the analysis of adoptive cellular therapies such as chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy (CAR-T) because it allows for the concurrent measurement of T cell-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (TDCC) and the functional characterization of engineered T cells with respect to percentage of CAR transduction, T cell phenotype, and measurement of T cell function such as activation in a single assay. The use of adherent tumor cell lines can be challenging in these flow-based assays. Here, we present the development of a high-throughput flow-based assay to measure TDCC for a CAR-T construct co-cultured with multiple adherent tumor cell lines. We describe optimal assay conditions (such as adherent cell dissociation techniques to minimize impact on cell viability) that result in robust cytotoxicity assays. In addition, we report on the concurrent use of T cell transduction and activation antibody panels (CD25) that provide further dissection of engineered T cell function. In conclusion, we present the development of a high-throughput flow cytometry method allowing for in vitro interrogation of solid tumor, targeting CAR-T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, CAR transduction, and engineered T cell characterization in a single assay.

  12. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    relapsed lymphoma following genetic modi - fi cation of tumor-antigen presenting cells and T-lymphocyte transfer. Blood 110:2838–2845 4. Heslop HE et...CD4þCD25þFOXP3þ regulatory T cells of both healthy subjects and type 1 diabetic patients. J Immunol 2006;177:8338–47. 32. HeslopHE, SlobodKS,PuleMA

  13. Thermal neutron measurements on electrolytic cells with deuterated palladium cathodes subjected to a pulsed current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, J.R.; Mayer, R.E.; Guido, G.; Florido, P.C.; Larreteguy, A.; Gillette, V.H.; Patino, N.E.; Converti, J.; Gomez, S.E.

    1990-01-01

    The present work describes the design of a high efficiency thermal neutron detection system and the measurements performed with it on electrolytic cells containing LiH dissolved in D 2 O with palladium cathodes. A procedure involving the use of a non-stationary (pulsed) current through the cell caused a correlated neutron production to be observed in a repeatable manner. These patterns are strongly dependent on the previous charging history of the cathodes. The technique employed seems to be very useful as a research tool for a systematic study of the different variables governing the phenomenon. (author)

  14. In-situ membrane hydration measurement of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Fly, Gerald W.; Clapham, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Achieving proper membrane hydration control is one of the most critical aspects of PEM fuel cell development. This article describes the development and application of a novel 50 cm2 fuel cell device to study the in-situ membrane hydration by measuring the through-thickness membrane swelling via an array of linear variable differential transducers. Using this setup either as an air/air (dummy) cell or as a hydrogen/air (operating) cell, we performed a series of hydration and dehydration experiments by cycling the RH of the inlet gas streams at 80 °C. From the linear relationship between the under-the-land swelling and the over-the-channel water content, the mechanical constraint within the fuel cell assembly can suppress the membrane water uptake by 11%-18%. The results from the air/air humidity cycling test show that the membrane can equilibrate within 120 s for all RH conditions and that membrane can reach full hydration at a RH higher than 140% in spite of the use of a liquid water impermeable Carbel MP30Z microporous layer. This result confirms that the U.S. DOE's humidity cycling mechanical durability protocol induces sufficient humidity swings to maximize hygrothermal mechanical stresses. This study shows that the novel experimental technique can provide a robust and accurate means to study the in-situ hydration of thin membranes subject to a wide range of fuel cell conditions.

  15. Simple Laboratory methods to measure cell proliferation using DNA synthesis property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan H N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a mini-review on the techniques to measure proliferation of cells by estimation of DNA synthesis. This is not an exhaustive review of literature, but a bird’s eye view of a few selected articles which may provide the technical details to the readers.The nucleus of a cell occupies about 10-30% of the cells space, depends on the type of genetic material (DNA -DeoxyriboNucleic Acid. DNA is a long, double-stranded, helical molecule which carries the genetic information. Duplication of the DNA takes place by the phenomena of replication. One copy of double-stranded DNA molecule forms two double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA replication is the fundamental process used in all living organisms as it is the basis for biological inheritance. This process is known also as Mitosis in somatic cells. In Mitosis, the duplication process results in two genetically identical "daughter" cells from a single "parent" cell. The resulting double-stranded DNA molecules are identical; proof reading and error-checking mechanisms exist to ensure near perfect pair. Mitosis is divided into six phases: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis.

  16. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbe, Yvette; Klier, Ulrike; Linnebacher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4 + , activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI + carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  17. Degradation of structurally characterized proteins injected into HeLa cells. Basic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.W.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-five proteins of known x-ray structure were labeled by chloramine-T radioiodination or by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using red cell-mediated microinjection. Degradation rates of the injected proteins were then determined over the next 50 h by measuring the release of soluble isotope to the culture medium. Control experiments demonstrated that the measured rates were not compromised by proteolysis within RBCs, the presence of unfused RBCs, or degradation of protein released from RBCs to the medium. Degradation of some injected proteins was faster during the first 12 h after fusion than at later times, apparently a response of HeLa cells to trypsinization. However, all proteins exhibited first-order degradation rates between 24 and 48 h post injection. Except for seven proteins, stabilities measured during this interval were unaffected by the labeling procedure. Reductive methylation was used to choose among the seven discordant values, and half-lives for the 35 proteins ranged from 16 h for lysozyme to 214 h for yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Since half-lives for six of the injected proteins closely match values obtained by in vivo measurements, we consider our estimates of the metabolic stabilities of the injected proteins to be generally accurate. Therefore, the half-lives obtained by microinjection should prove useful in the search for relationships between protein structure and intracellular stability

  18. Hyperspectral imaging for simultaneous measurements of two FRET biosensors in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amicia D; Bedard, Noah; Ustione, Alessandro; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Piston, David W

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are commonly used to study molecular processes in living cells. There are FP-FRET biosensors for many cellular molecules, but it remains difficult to perform simultaneous measurements of multiple biosensors. The overlapping emission spectra of the commonly used FPs, including CFP/YFP and GFP/RFP make dual FRET measurements challenging. In addition, a snapshot imaging modality is required for simultaneous imaging. The Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) is a snapshot hyperspectral imaging system that collects high resolution spectral data and can be used to overcome these challenges. We have previously demonstrated the IMS's capabilities for simultaneously imaging GFP and CFP/YFP-based biosensors in pancreatic β-cells. Here, we demonstrate a further capability of the IMS to image simultaneously two FRET biosensors with a single excitation band, one for cAMP and the other for Caspase-3. We use these measurements to measure simultaneously cAMP signaling and Caspase-3 activation in pancreatic β-cells during oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, which are essential components in the pathology of diabetes.

  19. The rise and fall of red cell mass measurement in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2005-05-01

    The total blood volume (BV) consists of the part occupied by red blood cells (RBC), which is referred to as red cell mass (RCM), and that occupied by plasma (ie, plasma volume). Quantitative laboratory measurements that are pertinent to RBC, including RBC count, hematocrit (Hct), and hemoglobin (Hgb) are expressed in reference to a given volume of whole blood and are therefore influenced by plasma volume. Consequently, a "direct" RCM measurement has been promoted as a more accurate indicator of the body's red cell content. In accordance with this view, an international group of investigators, then identified as the Polycythemia Vera Study Group (PVSG), recommended that RCM be measured and only if elevated should a patient be considered for participation in a series of clinical trials in PV that were conducted more than 30 years ago. By default, the 'study eligibility' criteria used in these studies became 'diagnostic' criteria without any systematic evaluation for diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore, over the years, it has become evident that RCM measurement is a cumbersome and costly test that is also suboptimal in its diagnostic accuracy. As a result, the specific procedure has been abandoned by the majority of hematologists in certain countries and instead physicians are increasingly using bone marrow histology, serum erythropoietin level, and other disease-characteristic biologic markers as diagnostic tools.

  20. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Fernandes, Fabiana; Sanroman, Laura; Hodenius, Michael; Lang, Claus; Himmelreich, Uwe; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Schueler, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3 + stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  1. BeO-OSL detectors for dose measurements in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeff, M.; Freudenberg, R.; Kotzerke, J.; Sommer, D.; Reichelt, U.; Henniger, J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The absorbed dose is an important parameter in experiments involving irradiation of cells in vitro with unsealed radionuclides. Typically, this is estimated with a model calculation, although the results thus obtained cannot be verified. Generally used real-time measurement methods are not applicable in this setting. A new detector material with in vitro suitability is the subject of this work. Methods: Optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters based on beryllium oxide (BeO) were used for dose measurement in cell cultures exposed to unsealed radionuclides. Their qualitative properties (e. g. energy-dependent count rate sensitivity, fading, contamination by radioactive liquids) were determined and compared to the results of a Monte Carlo simulation (using AMOS software). OSL dosimeters were tested in common cell culture setups with a known geometry. Results: Dose reproducibility of the OSL dosimeters was ± 1.5%. Fading at room temperature was 0.07% per day. Dose loss (optically-stimulated deletion) under ambient lighting conditions was 0.5% per minute. The Monte Carlo simulation for the relative sensitivity at different beta energies provided corresponding results to those obtained with the OSL dosimeters. Dose profile measurements using a 6 well plate and 14 ml PP tube showed that the geometry of the cell culture vessel has a marked influence on dose distribution with 188 Re. Conclusion: A new dosimeter system was calibrated with β-emitters of different energy. It turned out as suitable for measuring dose in liquids. The dose profile measurements obtained are suitably precise to be used as a check against theoretical dose calculations. (orig.)

  2. Understanding InP Nanowire Array Solar Cell Performance by Nanoprobe-Enabled Single Nanowire Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otnes, Gaute; Barrigón, Enrique; Sundvall, Christian; Svensson, K Erik; Heurlin, Magnus; Siefer, Gerald; Samuelson, Lars; Åberg, Ingvar; Borgström, Magnus T

    2018-05-09

    III-V solar cells in the nanowire geometry might hold significant synthesis-cost and device-design advantages as compared to thin films and have shown impressive performance improvements in recent years. To continue this development there is a need for characterization techniques giving quick and reliable feedback for growth development. Further, characterization techniques which can improve understanding of the link between nanowire growth conditions, subsequent processing, and solar cell performance are desired. Here, we present the use of a nanoprobe system inside a scanning electron microscope to efficiently contact single nanowires and characterize them in terms of key parameters for solar cell performance. Specifically, we study single as-grown InP nanowires and use electron beam induced current characterization to understand the charge carrier collection properties, and dark current-voltage characteristics to understand the diode recombination characteristics. By correlating the single nanowire measurements to performance of fully processed nanowire array solar cells, we identify how the performance limiting parameters are related to growth and/or processing conditions. We use this understanding to achieve a more than 7-fold improvement in efficiency of our InP nanowire solar cells, grown from a different seed particle pattern than previously reported from our group. The best cell shows a certified efficiency of 15.0%; the highest reported value for a bottom-up synthesized InP nanowire solar cell. We believe the presented approach have significant potential to speed-up the development of nanowire solar cells, as well as other nanowire-based electronic/optoelectronic devices.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin...

  4. A Decrease in the Density of HLA-DR-Positive Cells Occurs Faster in Corneas Stored in Organ Culture than under Hypothermic Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Al-Fakih, A.; Faltus, Václav; Jirsová, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2012), s. 39-46 ISSN 0030-3747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : antigen-presenting cells * langerhans cells * dendritic cells * allograft survival * transplantation * sensitization * rejection * storage * atpase * HLA-DR positivity * Organ culture * Hypothermic storage * Immunohistochemistry Impact factor: 1.562, year: 2012

  5. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cholera Toxin B Instructs Non-Mucosal Dendritic Cells to Promote IgA Production Via Retinoic Acid and TGF-β

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Gloudemans (Anouk); M. Plantinga (Maud); M. Guilliams (Martin); M.A. Willart (Monique); A. Ozir-Fazalalikhan (Arifa); A. van der Ham (Alwin); L. Boon (Louis); N.L. Harris (Nicola); H. Hammad (Hamida); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); M. Yazdanbakhsh (Maria); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); H.H. Smits (Hermelijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIt is currently unknown how mucosal adjuvants cause induction of secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), and how T cell-dependent (TD) or -independent (TI) pathways might be involved. Mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) are the primary antigen presenting cells driving TI IgA synthesis, by producing

  6. Flow cytometric measurement of the metabolism of benzo [a] pyrene by mouse liver cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, J.C.; Wade, C.G.; Dougherty, K.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene in individual cells was monitored by flow cytometry. The measurements are based on the alterations that occur in the fluorescence emission spectrum of benzo[a]pyrene when it is converted to various metabolities. Using present instrumentation the technique could easily detect 1 x 10/sup 6/ molecules per cells of benzo [a]pyrene and 1 x 10/sup 7/ molecules per cell of the diol epoxide. The analysis of C3H IOT 1/2 mouse fibroblasts growing in culture indicated that there was heterogeneity in the conversion of the parent compound into diol epoxide derivative suggesting that some variation in sensitivity to transformation by benzo[a]pyrene may be due to differences in cellular metabolism

  7. Measurements and Simulations on the Mechanisms of Efficiency Losses in HIT Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Pierro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the electrical and the optical behavior of HIT solar cell by means of measurements and optoelectrical simulations by TCAD simulations. We compare the HIT solar cell with a conventional crystalline silicon solar cell to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the HIT technology. Results highlight different mechanisms of electrical and optical efficiency losses caused by the presence of the amorphous silicon layer. The higher resistivity of the a-Si layers implies a smaller distance between the metal lines that causes a higher shadowing. The worst optical coupling between the amorphous silicon and the antireflective coating implies a slight increase of reflectivity around the 600 nm wavelength.

  8. Measurement of oxidative damage to DNA in nanomaterial exposed cells and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest

    2015-01-01

    -reactivity with other molecules in cells. This review provides an overview of efforts to reliably detect oxidatively damaged DNA and a critical assessment of the published studies on DNA damage levels. Animal studies with high baseline levels of oxidatively damaged DNA are more likely to show positive associations...... of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung tissue. Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black, TiO2 , carbon nanotubes and ZnO is associated with elevated levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in tissues. These observations are supported by cell culture studies showing concentration-dependent associations between ENM exposure...... and oxidatively damaged DNA measured by the comet assay. Cell culture studies show relatively high variation in the ability of ENMs to oxidatively damage DNA; hence, it is currently impossible to group ENMs according to their DNA damaging potential. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  9. Intracellular Drug Uptake-A Comparison of Single Cell Measurements Using ToF-SIMS Imaging and Quantification from Cell Populations with LC/MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carla F; Havelund, Rasmus; Passarelli, Melissa K; Marshall, Peter S; Francis, Ian; West, Andy; Alexander, Morgan R; Gilmore, Ian S; Dollery, Colin T

    2017-11-21

    ToF-SIMS is a label-free imaging method that has been shown to enable imaging of amiodarone in single rat macrophage (NR8383) cells. In this study, we show that the method extends to three other cell lines relevant to drug discovery: human embryonic kidney (HEK293), cervical cancer (HeLa), and liver cancer (HepG2). There is significant interest in the variation of drug uptake at the single cell level, and we use ToF-SIMS to show that there is great diversity between individual cells and when comparing each of the cell types. These single cell measurements are compared to quantitative measurements of cell-associated amiodarone for the population using LC/MS/MS and cell counting with flow cytometry. NR8383 and HepG2 cells uptake the greatest amount of amiodarone with an average of 2.38 and 2.60 pg per cell, respectively, and HeLa and Hek 293 have a significantly lower amount of amiodarone at 0.43 and 0.36 pg per cell, respectively. The amount of cell-associated drug for the ensemble population measurement (LC/MS/MS) is compared with the ToF-SIMS single cell data: a similar amount of drug was detected per cell for the NR8383, and HepG2 cells at a greater level than that for the HEK293 cells. However, the two techniques did not agree for the HeLa cells, and we postulate potential reasons for this.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Single Cell Stiffness Measurements Using PZT-Integrated Buckling Nanoneedles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alsadat Rad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new technique for real-time single cell stiffness measurement using lead zirconate titanate (PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedles. The PZT and the buckling part of the nanoneedle have been modelled and validated using the ABAQUS software. The two parts are integrated together to function as a single unit. After calibration, the stiffness, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and sensitivity of the PZT-integrated buckling nanoneedle have been determined to be 0.7100 N·m−1, 123.4700 GPa, 0.3000 and 0.0693 V·m·N−1, respectively. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells have been modelled and validated based on compression tests. The average global stiffness and Young’s modulus of the cells are determined to be 10.8867 ± 0.0094 N·m−1 and 110.7033 ± 0.0081 MPa, respectively. The nanoneedle and the cell have been assembled to measure the local stiffness of the single Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells The local stiffness, Young’s modulus and PZT output voltage of the three different size Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined at different environmental conditions. We investigated that, at low temperature the stiffness value is low to adapt to the change in the environmental condition. As a result, Saccharomyces cerevisiae becomes vulnerable to viral and bacterial attacks. Therefore, the proposed technique will serve as a quick and accurate process to diagnose diseases at early stage in a cell for effective treatment.

  11. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio [Organic OptoElectronics Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA—SS 14.5, km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.fraleoni@elettra.trieste.it, E-mail: afraleoni@units.it [Organic OptoElectronics Laboratory, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA—SS 14.5, km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Flextronics Laboratory, Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste. V. Valerio 10, 34100 Trieste (TS) (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  12. A home-made system for IPCE measurement of standard and dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Giuseppina; Cozzarini, Luca; Capria, Ennio; Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A home-made system for incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) characterization, based on a double-beam UV-Vis spectrophotometer, has been set up. In addition to its low cost (compared to the commercially available apparatuses), the double-beam configuration gives the advantage to measure, autonomously and with no need for supplementary equipment, the lamp power in real time, compensating possible variations of the spectral emission intensity and quality, thus reducing measurement times. To manage the optical and electronic components of the system, a custom software has been developed. Validations carried out on a common silicon-based photodiode and on a dye-sensitized solar cell confirm the possibility to adopt this system for determining the IPCE of solar cells, including dye-sensitized ones.

  13. Improved mass-measurement accuracy using a PNB Load Cell Scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, S.; Pontius, P.; Schoonover, R.

    1981-08-01

    The PNB Load Cell Scale is a Preloaded, Narrow-Band calibration mass comparator. It consists of (1) a frame and servo-mechanism that maintains a preload tension on the load cell until the load, an unknown mass, is sensed, and (2) a null-balance digital instrument that suppresses the cell response associated with the preload, thereby improving the precision and accuracy of the measurements. Ideally, the objects used to set the preload should be replica mass standards that closely approximate the density and mass of the unknowns. The advantages of the PNB scale are an expanded output signal over the range of interest which increases both the sensitivity and resolution, and minimizes the transient effects associated with loading of load cells. An area of immediate and practical application of this technique to nuclear material safeguards is the weighing of UF 6 cyliners where in-house mass standards are currently available and where the mass values are typically assigned on the basis of comparison weighings. Several prototypical versions of the PNB scale have been assembled at the US National Bureau of Standards. A description of the instrumentation, principles of measurements, and applications are presented in this paper

  14. Round robins of solar cells to evaluate measurement systems of different european research institutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manshanden, P.; Van der Brog, N.J.C.M. [ECN Solar, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Bliss, M.; Mihaylov, B.; Gottschlag, R. [CREST, Holywell Park MBG GJ/Gx, Loughborough Univeristy, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Izzi, M.; Tucci, M. [ENEA CASACCIA, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy); Roca, F.; Pellegrino, M.; Romano, A.; Graditi, G. [ENEA PORTICI, P. le E. Fermi Localita Granatello, 80055 Portici Napoli (Italy); Hohl-Ebinger, J.; Warta, W. [Fraunhofer ISE, Berliner Allee 30, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Debucquoy, M.; El Daif, O.; Gordon, I. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Champliaud, J.; Jouini, A. [INES, 50 avenue du lac Leman, BP 332, 73377, Le Bourget-du-Lac (France); Glatz-Reichenbach, J. [ISC, Rudolf Diesel Str. 15, D-78467 Konstanz (Germany); Bothe, K. [ISFH, Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Herguth, A. [University of Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Determination of the solar cell efficiency and internal quantum efficiency are standard characterization methods used by the majority of research institutes. Random errors can be assessed by institutes themselves by repeated measurements, but systematic deviations cannot be assessed without comparisons with other institutes. The comparisons were performed for illuminated IV, spectral response and reflection measurements. The results were split into systematic differences between the partners and random differences within an institute for a single measurement session. The total differences are: J{sub sc}: 0.27 A, V{sub oc}: 8.5 mV, FF: 2.4 %, {eta}: 0.6%, spectral response: 0.14 A/W and reflection: 0.08. For all measurement methods, the systematic differences exceeded the random differences. The major component for the systematic differences is likely the reference device, but also temperature control, contacting scheme and setup differences play a part.

  15. Dosimetry in single lung cells by means of microautoradiographic activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1976-01-01

    After inhalation of compounds containing promethium-147 in the lungs of mice most of the activity was deposited in the form of local concentrations (hotspots). By means of a special quantitative microautoradiographic method using stripping film ORWO K 105, measurements of the activity of single hotspots of about 10 -14 Ci were possible. A microphotometer with a variable measuring diaphragm was used for the determination of the density profile of the autoradiographic image in order to get hotspot depth within the biological specimen. To determine hotspot activity it was necessary to calibrate the film with a Pm-147 plane source. The systematic and random errors of the method are discussed in detail, giving a total error of +- 21% (SD) for one hotspot activity measurement. A few examples of biological results obtained by the method are given. Simple models were used to calculate doses absorbed in macrophage and alveolar cell nuclei from the measured activities. (author)

  16. Precise electrical transport measurements by using Bridgman type pressure cell at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Takayuki [Division of Civil and Enviromental Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Ohashi, Masashi [Faculty of Environmental Design, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    We report a technique for the precise measurement of the electrical resisivity under high pressure at low temperature by using Bridgman anvils made of tungsten carbide. Quasi-hydrostatic pressure is generated up to {approx}15 GPa in the relatively large working space which allows the use of large specimens and simple experimental procedures rather than using a standard diamond anvil cell. The application is demonstrated by the measurements of the electrical resistivity of lead in order to describe the effect of pressure on the superconducting transition.

  17. Can technetium-labelled millimicrospheres be used to measure Kupffer-cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, H.J.; Chamberlain, J.; Anderson, J.; Bowry, V.; Bell, P.R.F.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that sodium pertechnetate sup(99m)Tc millimicrospheres can be used to measure Kupffercell function. We studied animals and humans to show whether the clearance and catabolism of sup(99m)Tc-labelled millimicrospheres can be used as a measure of Kupffer-cell function. Comparison with albumin 125 I-microaggregates clearance of human serum albumin failed to demonstrate that they can be used for this purpose. We suggest that their blood clearance is mainly an expression of liver blood flow. (orig.)

  18. Precise electrical transport measurements by using Bridgman type pressure cell at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Takayuki; Ohashi, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    We report a technique for the precise measurement of the electrical resisivity under high pressure at low temperature by using Bridgman anvils made of tungsten carbide. Quasi-hydrostatic pressure is generated up to ∼15 GPa in the relatively large working space which allows the use of large specimens and simple experimental procedures rather than using a standard diamond anvil cell. The application is demonstrated by the measurements of the electrical resistivity of lead in order to describe the effect of pressure on the superconducting transition.

  19. Presentation of lipid antigens to T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-04-15

    T cells specific for lipid antigens participate in regulation of the immune response during infections, tumor immunosurveillance, allergy and autoimmune diseases. T cells recognize lipid antigens as complexes formed with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules, thus resembling recognition of MHC-peptide complexes. The biophysical properties of lipids impose unique mechanisms for their delivery, internalization into antigen-presenting cells, membrane trafficking, processing, and loading of CD1 molecules. Each of these steps is controlled at molecular and celular levels and determines lipid immunogenicity. Lipid antigens may derive from microbes and from the cellular metabolism, thus allowing the immune system to survey a large repertoire of immunogenic molecules. Recognition of lipid antigens facilitates the detection of infectious agents and the initiation of responses involved in immunoregulation and autoimmunity. This review focuses on the presentation mechanisms and specific recognition of self and bacterial lipid antigens and discusses the important open issues.

  20. Lightning Jump Algorithm and Relation to Thunderstorm Cell Tracking, GLM Proxy and Other Meteorological Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bateman, Monte

    2012-01-01

    The lightning jump algorithm has a robust history in correlating upward trends in lightning to severe and hazardous weather occurrence. The algorithm uses the correlation between the physical principles that govern an updraft's ability to produce microphysical and kinematic conditions conducive for electrification and its role in the development of severe weather conditions. Recent work has demonstrated that the lightning jump algorithm concept holds significant promise in the operational realm, aiding in the identification of thunderstorms that have potential to produce severe or hazardous weather. However, a large amount of work still needs to be completed in spite of these positive results. The total lightning jump algorithm is not a stand-alone concept that can be used independent of other meteorological measurements, parameters, and techniques. For example, the algorithm is highly dependent upon thunderstorm tracking to build lightning histories on convective cells. Current tracking methods show that thunderstorm cell tracking is most reliable and cell histories are most accurate when radar information is incorporated with lightning data. In the absence of radar data, the cell tracking is a bit less reliable but the value added by the lightning information is much greater. For optimal application, the algorithm should be integrated with other measurements that assess storm scale properties (e.g., satellite, radar). Therefore, the recent focus of this research effort has been assessing the lightning jump's relation to thunderstorm tracking, meteorological parameters, and its potential uses in operational meteorology. Furthermore, the algorithm must be tailored for the optically-based GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), as what has been observed using Very High Frequency Lightning Mapping Array (VHF LMA) measurements will not exactly translate to what will be observed by GLM due to resolution and other instrument differences. Herein, we present some of

  1. Measurements for assessing the exposure from 3G femto-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursianis, A.; Vanias, P.; Samaras, T.

    2012-01-01

    Femto-cells are low-power access points, which combine mobile and broadband technologies. The main operation of a femto-cell is to function as a miniature base station unit in an indoor environment and to connect to the operator's network through a broadband phone line or a coaxial cable line. This study provides the first experimental measurements and results in Greece for the assessment of exposure to a femto-cell access point (FAP) indoors. Using a mobile handset with the appropriate software, power level measurements of the transmitted (Tx) and the received by the mobile handset signal were performed in two different and typical (home and office) environments. Moreover, radiofrequency electric field strength and frequency selective measurements with a radiation meter (SRM-3000) were carried out in the proximity of the FAP installation point. The cumulative distribution functions of the Tx power at most cases (except one) show that in 90% of all points the power of the mobile phone was lower by at least 7 dB during FAP operation. At a distance of ∼1 m from the FAP (in its main beam), power flux density measurements show that there is very little difference between the two situations (FAP ON and OFF). As a conclusion, the use of femto-cells indoors improves reception quality, reduces the Tx power of the user's mobile terminal and results in an indiscernible increase of the electromagnetic field in front of the unit, at values that are extremely low compared with reference levels of exposure guidelines. (authors)

  2. Dynamic [Cl-]i measurement with chloride sensing quantum dots nanosensor in epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuchi; Mao Hua; Wong, Lid B

    2010-01-01

    We have synthesized a chloride sensing quantum dots (QD) nanosensor, Cl-QD, for the dynamic measurements of chloride ion concentration in the millimolar range, a sensitivity that is applicable to most physiological intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl - ] i ) measurements in epithelial cells. The Cl-QD is synthesized by conjugating an anion receptor, 1-(2-mercapto-ethyl)-3-phenyl-thiourea (MEPTU) to a water soluble CdSe/ZnS QD at an emission wavelength of 620 nm. Upon binding of chloride ions to the Cl-QD, a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism caused the fluorescence of the QD to quench. This resulted in an inversely proportional relationship between the chloride ion concentration and the fluorescence intensity of the Cl-QD. We have utilized this Cl-QD to measure [Cl - ] i in T84 and CF-PAC cultured cells, with either the C1C-2 or CFTR chloride channels being manipulated by pharmacological chloride channel activators and inhibitors. Activations of C1C-2 and CFTR chloride channels in T84 by the respective lubiprostone and genistein caused predictive increases in the fluorescence of the Cl-QD, i.e., a decrease of [Cl - ] i . Conversely, glibenclamide, a chloride channel inhibitor, applied to the CF-PAC cells caused a predictable decrease in the fluorescence of Cl-QD due to the increase of [Cl - ] i . These are the first data in using QD-based chloride ion sensors for dynamic measurements of intracellular chloride ion concentrations in epithelial cells.

  3. Measurement of the traction force of biological cells by digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Cross, Michael; Liu, Changgeng; Clark, David C.; Haynie, Donald T.; Kim, Myung K.

    2011-01-01

    The traction force produced by biological cells has been visualized as distortions in flexible substrata. We have utilized quantitative phase microscopy by digital holography (DH-QPM) to study the wrinkling of a silicone rubber film by motile fibroblasts. Surface deformation and the cellular traction force have been measured from phase profiles in a direct and straightforward manner. DH-QPM is shown to provide highly efficient and versatile means for quantitatively analyzing cellular motility. PMID:22254175

  4. A robust and scalable TCR-based reporter cell assay to measure HIV-1 Nef-mediated T cell immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anmole, Gursev; Kuang, Xiaomei T; Toyoda, Mako; Martin, Eric; Shahid, Aniqa; Le, Anh Q; Markle, Tristan; Baraki, Bemuluyigza; Jones, R Brad; Ostrowski, Mario A; Ueno, Takamasa; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brockman, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    HIV-1 evades cytotoxic T cell responses through Nef-mediated downregulation of HLA class I molecules from the infected cell surface. Methods to quantify the impact of Nef on T cell recognition typically employ patient-derived T cell clones; however, these assays are limited by the cost and effort required to isolate and maintain primary cell lines. The variable activity of different T cell clones and the limited number of cells generated by re-stimulation can also hinder assay reproducibility and scalability. Here, we describe a heterologous T cell receptor reporter assay and use it to study immune evasion by Nef. Induction of NFAT-driven luciferase following co-culture with peptide-pulsed or virus-infected target cells serves as a rapid, quantitative and antigen-specific measure of T cell recognition of its cognate peptide/HLA complex. We demonstrate that Nef-mediated downregulation of HLA on target cells correlates inversely with T cell receptor-dependent luminescent signal generated by effector cells. This method provides a robust, flexible and scalable platform that is suitable for studies to measure Nef function in the context of different viral peptide/HLA antigens, to assess the function of patient-derived Nef alleles, or to screen small molecule libraries to identify novel Nef inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interlaboratory comparison of red-cell ATP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and haemolysis measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, J R; Kagen, L R; van der Meer, P F; Simon, T; Cardigan, R; Greenwalt, T J; AuBuchon, J P; Brand, A; Lockwood, W; Zanella, A; Adamson, J; Snyder, E; Taylor, H L; Moroff, G; Hogman, C

    2005-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) storage systems are licensed based on their ability to prevent haemolysis and maintain RBC 24-h in vivo recovery. Preclinical testing includes measurement of RBC ATP as a surrogate for recovery, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) as a surrogate for oxygen affinity, and free haemoglobin, which is indicative of red cell lysis. The reproducibility of RBC ATP, DPG and haemolysis measurements between centres was investigated. Five, 4-day-old leucoreduced AS-1 RBC units were pooled, aliquotted and shipped on ice to 14 laboratories in the USA and European Union (EU). Each laboratory was to sample the bag twice on day 7 and measure RBC ATP, DPG, haemoglobin and haemolysis levels in triplicate on each sample. The variability of results was assessed by using coefficients of variation (CV) and analysis of variance. Measurements were highly reproducible at the individual sites. Between sites, the CV was 16% for ATP, 35% for DPG, 2% for total haemoglobin and 54% for haemolysis. For ATP and total haemoglobin, 94 and 80% of the variance in measurements was contributed by differences between sites, and more than 80% of the variance for DPG and haemolysis measurements came from markedly discordant results from three sites and one site, respectively. In descending order, mathematical errors, unvalidated analytical methods, a lack of shared standards and fluid handling errors contributed to the variability in measurements from different sites. While the methods used by laboratories engaged in RBC storage system clinical trials demonstrated good precision, differences in results between laboratories may hinder comparative analysis. Efforts to improve performance should focus on developing robust methods, especially for measuring RBC ATP.

  6. Dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Paul J; Lyerly, H Kim; Clay, Timothy M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2007-05-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to stimulate tumor antigen-specific T cell responses in preclinical studies. Consequently, there has been intense interest in developing dendritic cell based cancer vaccines. A variety of methods for generating dendritic cells, loading them with tumor antigens, and administering them to patients have been described. In recent years, a number of early phase clinical trials have been performed and have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of dendritic cell immunotherapies. A number of these trials have generated valuable preliminary data regarding the clinical and immunologic response to DC-based immunotherapy. The emphasis of dendritic cell immunotherapy research is increasingly shifting toward the development of strategies to increase the potency of dendritic cell vaccine preparations.

  7. Development Of PIXE Measurement Of Ca Changes Resulting From Viral Transduction In Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Chienthavorn, Orapin; Eronen, Hannele; Sajavaara, Timo; Laitinen, Mikko; Norarat, Rattanaporn; Gilbert, Leona K.

    2011-06-01

    Ca is a life-element of particular interest because it is both bound to proteins, and as Ca2+ which functions as a signal molecule in apoptosis. Here we report development of chemical-matrix blind assaying the Ca fluxes from transduced HepG2 cells using particle induced X-ray emission. The cells were transduced with recombinant baculoviruses hosting the DNA for non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of the human pavovirus B19. Different recombinant baculoviruses were used that carried different DNA payloads of this NS1. Two different approaches have been developed to assay Ca in cells. The first is where the cells were directly cultured using a self-supporting pioloform as a substrate. In the second approach the cells are permeabilized, and bound-Ca content in the debris, and unbound-Ca in the wash solutions were measured using an internal V reference standard. The results support a difference in the Ca contents depending on the payload of the infecting virus, however the PIXE signals were too close to the minimum detection limit to draw reliable conclusions.

  8. Measuring Bioenergetics in T Cells Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chang, Chih-Hao; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-04-01

    This unit contains several protocols to determine the energy utilization of T cells in real-time using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer (http://www.seahorsebio.com). The advantages to using this machine over traditional metabolic assays include the simultaneous measurement of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, in real-time, on relatively small numbers of cells, without any radioactivity. The Basic Protocol describes a standard mitochondrial stress test on the XF(e) 96, which yields information about oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, two energy-generating pathways. The alternate protocols provide examples of adaptations to the Basic Protocol, including adjustments for the use of the XF(e) 24. A protocol for real-time bioenergetic responses to T cell activation allows for the analysis of immediate metabolic changes after T cell receptor stimulation. Specific substrate utilization can be determined by the use of differential assay media, or the injection of drugs that specifically affect certain metabolic processes. Accurate cell numbers, purity, and viability are critical to obtain reliable results. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. On Leakage Current Measured at High Cell Voltages in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadivel, Nicole R.; Ha, Seungbum; He, Meinan; Dees, Dennis; Trask, Steve; Polzin, Bryant; Gallagher, Kevin G.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, parasitic side reactions in lithium-ion batteries were examined experimentally using a potentiostatic hold at high cell voltage. The experimental leakage current measured during the potentiostatic hold was compared to the Tafel expression and showed poor agreement with the expected transfer coefficient values, indicating that a more complicated expression could be needed to accurately capture the physics of this side reaction. Here we show that cross-talk between the electrodes is the primary contribution to the observed leakage current after the relaxation of concentration gradients has ceased. This cross-talk was confirmed with experiments using a lithium-ion conducting glass ceramic (LICGC) separator, which has high conductance only for lithium cations. The cells with LICGC separators showed significantly less leakage current during the potentiostatic hold test compared to cells with standard microporous separators where cross-talk is present. In addition, direct-current pulse power tests show an impedance rise for cells held at high potentials and for cells held at high temperatures, which could be attributed to film formation from the parasitic side reaction. Based on the experimental findings, a phenomenological mechanism is proposed for the parasitic side reaction which accounts for cross-talk and mass transport of the decomposition products across the separator.

  10. A nu-space for ICS: characterization and application to measure protein transport in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Chen, Lingfeng; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Wiseman, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new generalized theoretical framework for image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). Using this framework, we extend the ICS method in time-frequency ( ν , nu) space to map molecular flow of fluorescently tagged proteins in individual living cells. Even in the presence of a dominant immobile population of fluorescent molecules, nu-space ICS (nICS) provides an unbiased velocity measurement, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the flow, without requiring filtering. We also develop and characterize a tunable frequency-filter for STICS that allows quantification of the density, the diffusion coefficient and the velocity of biased diffusion. We show that the techniques are accurate over a wide range of parameter space in computer simulation. We then characterize the retrograde flow of adhesion proteins ( α 6- and αLβ 2-GFP integrins and mCherry-paxillin) in CHO.B2 cells plated on laminin and ICAM ligands respectively. STICS with a tunable frequency filter, in conjunction with nICS, measures two new transport parameters, the density and transport bias coefficient (a measure of the diffusive character of a flow/biased diffusion), showing that molecular flow in this cell system has a significant diffusive component. Our results suggest that the integrinligand interaction, along with the internal myosin-motor generated force, varies for different integrin-ligand pairs, consistent with previous results.

  11. Indirect viscosimetric method is less accurate than ektacytometry for the measurement of red blood cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Waltz, Xavier; Pichon, Aurélien; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Connes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the accuracy of viscosimetric method to estimate the red blood cell (RBC) deformability properties. Thirty-three subjects were enrolled in this study: 6 healthy subjects (AA), 11 patients with sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease (SC) and 16 patients with sickle cell anemia (SS). Two methods were used to assess RBC deformability: 1) indirect viscosimetric method and 2) ektacytometry. The indirect viscosimetric method was based on the Dintenfass equation where blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and hematocrit are measured and used to calculate an index of RBC rigidity (Tk index). The RBC deformability/rigidity of the three groups was compared using the two methods. Tk index was not different between SS and SC patients and the two groups had higher values than AA group. When ektacytometry was used, RBC deformability was lower in SS and SC groups compared to the AA group and SS and SC patients were different. Although the two measures of RBC deformability were correlated, the association was not very high. Bland and Altman analysis demonstrated a 3.25 bias suggesting a slight difference between the two methods. In addition, the limit of agreement represented 28% (>15%) of the mean values of RBC deformability, showing no interchangeability between the two methods. In conclusion, measuring RBC deformability by indirect viscosimetry is less accurate than by ektacytometry, which is considered the gold standard.

  12. Cellular dynamics of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells measured using MEMS force sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Hirayama Shoji, Kayoko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2018-04-01

    Adhesive cells perceive the mechanical properties of the substrates to which they adhere, adjusting their cellular mechanical forces according to their biological characteristics. This mechanical interaction subsequently affects the growth, locomotion, and differentiation of the cell. However, little is known about the detailed mechanism that underlies this interaction between adherent cells and substrates because dynamically measuring mechanical phenomena is difficult. Here, we utilize microelectromechamical systems force sensors that can measure cellular traction forces with high temporal resolution (~2.5 µs) over long periods (~3 h). We found that the cellular dynamics reflected physical phenomena with time scales from milliseconds to hours, which contradicts the idea that cellular motion is slow. A single focal adhesion (FA) generates an average force of 7 nN, which disappears in ms via the action of trypsin-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The force-changing rate obtained from our measurements suggests that the time required for an FA to decompose was nearly proportional to the force acting on the FA.

  13. Reverse-engineering of gene networks for regulating early blood development from single-cell measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiangyong; Hu, Xiaohua; Zou, Xiufen; Tian, Tianhai

    2017-12-28

    Recent advances in omics technologies have raised great opportunities to study large-scale regulatory networks inside the cell. In addition, single-cell experiments have measured the gene and protein activities in a large number of cells under the same experimental conditions. However, a significant challenge in computational biology and bioinformatics is how to derive quantitative information from the single-cell observations and how to develop sophisticated mathematical models to describe the dynamic properties of regulatory networks using the derived quantitative information. This work designs an integrated approach to reverse-engineer gene networks for regulating early blood development based on singel-cell experimental observations. The wanderlust algorithm is initially used to develop the pseudo-trajectory for the activities of a number of genes. Since the gene expression data in the developed pseudo-trajectory show large fluctuations, we then use Gaussian process regression methods to smooth the gene express data in order to obtain pseudo-trajectories with much less fluctuations. The proposed integrated framework consists of both bioinformatics algorithms to reconstruct the regulatory network and mathematical models using differential equations to describe the dynamics of gene expression. The developed approac