WorldWideScience

Sample records for antigen small molecule

  1. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. ► A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. ► Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. ► Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)’s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459–607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-Jκ binding to the Jκ site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560–574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with EBNA1 in vitro, and repressed EBNA1-dependent transcription in vivo. Collectively, this study describes two

  2. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kang, Myung-Soo, E-mail: mkang@skku.edu [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated

  3. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  4. Solution NMR characterization of apical membrane antigen 1 and small molecule interactions as a basis for designing new antimalarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Lim, San Sui; Devine, Shane M; Debono, Cael O; Lam, Raymond; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Jaipuria, Garima; Yagi, Hiromasa; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Scanlon, Martin J; MacRaild, Christopher A; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) plays an important role in the invasion by merozoites of human red blood cells during a malaria infection. A key region of PfAMA1 is a conserved hydrophobic cleft formed by 12 hydrophobic residues. As anti-apical membrane antigen 1 antibodies and other inhibitory molecules that target this hydrophobic cleft are able to block the invasion process, PfAMA1 is an attractive target for the development of strain-transcending antimalarial agents. As solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a valuable technique for the rapid characterization of protein-ligand interactions, we have determined the sequence-specific backbone assignments for PfAMA1 from two P. falciparum strains, FVO and 3D7. Both selective labelling and unlabelling strategies were used to complement triple-resonance experiments in order to facilitate the assignment process. We have then used these assignments for mapping the binding sites for small molecules, including benzimidazoles, pyrazoles and 2-aminothiazoles, which were selected on the basis of their affinities measured from surface plasmon resonance binding experiments. Among the compounds tested, benzimidazoles showed binding to a similar region on both FVO and 3D7 PfAMA1, suggesting that these compounds are promising scaffolds for the development of novel PfAMA1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26804042

  5. A remote arene-binding site on prostate specific membrane antigen revealed by antibody-recruiting small molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, A.X.; Murelli, R.P.; Bařinka, Cyril; Michel, J.; Cocleaza, A.; Jorgensen, W.L.; Lubkowski, J.; Spiegel, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 36 (2010), s. 12711-12716. ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Prostate -specific membrane antigen * antibody recruiting molecules * Structure-activity relationship Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  6. Clinical and experimental studies regarding the expression and diagnostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule that has a wide range of biological functions. According to previous reports, serum CEACAM1 is dysregulated in different malignant tumours and associated with tumour progression. However, the serum CEACAM1 expression in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) is unclear. The different expression ratio of CEACAM1-S and CEACAM1-L isoform has seldom been investigated in NSCLC. This research is intended to study the serum CEACAM1 and the ratio of CEACAM1-S/L isoforms in NSCLC. The expression of the serum CEACAM1 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The protein expression and the location of CEACAM1 in tumours were observed by immunohistochemical staining. The CEACAM1 mRNA levels in tumour and normal adjacent tissues were measured using quantitative real-time PCR, and the expression patterns and the rate of CEACAM1-S and CEACAM1-L were analysed by reverse transcription-PCR. Serum CEACAM1 levels were significantly higher in NSCLC patients compared with that from normal healthy controls (P <0.0001). 17 patients (81%) among 21 showed high expression of CEACAM1 by immunohistochemical staining. Although no significant differences were found between tumour and normal tissues on mRNA expression levels of CEACAM1 (P >0.05), the CEACAM1-S and the CEACAM1-S/L (S: L) ratios were significantly higher in tumour than normal tissues (P <0.05). Our data indicated that the serum levels of CEACAM1 could discriminate lung cancer patients from health donors and that CEACAM1 might be a useful marker in early diagnosis of NSCLC. Moreover, our results showed that the expression patterns of CEACAM1 isoforms could be changed during oncogenesis, even when total CEACAM1 in tumour tissues did not show significant changes. Our study suggested that the expression ratios of CEACAM1-S/CEACAM1-L might be a better diagnostic indicator in NSCLC than the quantitative

  7. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    OpenAIRE

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- bas...

  8. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  9. Small-molecule-dependent split aptamer ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani K; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2011-08-17

    Here we describe the first use of small-molecule binding to direct a chemical reaction between two nucleic acid strands. The reported reaction is a ligation between two fragments of a DNA split aptamer using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Utilizing the split aptamer for cocaine, we demonstrate small-molecule-dependent ligation that is dose-dependent over a wide range of cocaine concentrations and is compatible with complex biological fluids such as human blood serum. Moreover, studies of split aptamer ligation at varying salt concentrations and using structurally similar analogues of cocaine have revealed new insight into the assembly and small-molecule binding properties of the cocaine split aptamer. The ability to translate the presence of a small-molecule target into the output of DNA ligation is anticipated to enable the development of new, broadly applicable small-molecule detection assays. PMID:21761903

  10. Stability of small exotic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Three and four unit-charge particles with different masses may form bound states depending on the mass ratios. The aim of this work is to find out how many particles of unit charges can be put together to form bound states. We explore the possibility of the formation of stable N = 5,6...-particle systems of unit charges. We use a variational approach, in which the trial function is constructed out of generalised Gaussians whose parameters are determined by stochastic sampling. For few-body bound states this method has been shown to produce accurate results. First we made calculations for the five-body system (m+, m-, m+, m-, M+) with 0 ≤ σ ≤ ∞, where σ = m/M. We found that the binding energy of the system is larger than the nearest threshold for 0 ≤ σ ≤ 1.81, so the system in this region of mass ratio is bound. In the case of the system (m+, m-, m-, M+, M+) we cannot find a bound state for σ = 0. For 1 ≤ σ ≤ ∞, however, the system is bound. By decreasing σ from σ = 1, the binding energy is reduced, and around σ = 0.4 the system dissociates into (m-, m-, M+, M+) plus m+. Some six-body systems are under study, and cases have been found both for the existence and non-existence of bound states. From this study we can learn, e.g. that an H2 molecule cannot bind a positron and the positronium molecule can bind a proton, but it cannot bind an electron, unless we make the extra electron non-identical with the others. By comparing systems formed by identical and non-identical particles, we can point out the role of the Pauli principle in reducing the binding energy. (author)

  11. Auxin biology revealed by small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Robert, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates virtually every aspect of plant growth and development and unraveling its molecular and cellular modes of action is fundamental for plant biology research. Chemical genomics is the use of small molecules to modify protein functions. This approach currently rises as a powerful technology for basic research. Small compounds with auxin-like activities or affecting auxin-mediated biological processes have been widely used in auxin research. They can serve as a tool complementary to genetic and genomic methods, facilitating the identification of an array of components modulating auxin metabolism, transport and signaling. The employment of high-throughput screening technologies combined with informatics-based chemical design and organic chemical synthesis has since yielded many novel small molecules with more instantaneous, precise and specific functionalities. By applying those small molecules, novel molecular targets can be isolated to further understand and dissect auxin-related pathways and networks that otherwise are too complex to be elucidated only by gene-based methods. Here, we will review examples of recently characterized molecules used in auxin research, highlight the strategies of unraveling the mechanisms of these small molecules and discuss future perspectives of small molecule applications in auxin biology. PMID:24252105

  12. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Kole T Roybal; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen spec...

  13. Small Molecule Subgraph Detector (SMSD) toolkit

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman Syed; Bashton Matthew; Holliday Gemma L; Schrader Rainer; Thornton Janet M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Finding one small molecule (query) in a large target library is a challenging task in computational chemistry. Although several heuristic approaches are available using fragment-based chemical similarity searches, they fail to identify exact atom-bond equivalence between the query and target molecules and thus cannot be applied to complex chemical similarity searches, such as searching a complete or partial metabolic pathway. In this paper we present a new Maximum Common S...

  14. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  15. Allosteric small-molecule kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Nielsen, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors are invaluable targeted therapeutics for the treatment of various human diseases, especially cancers. While the majority of approved and developed preclinical small-molecule inhibitors are characterized as type I or type II inhibitors that target the ATP......-binding pocket of kinases, the remarkable sequential and structural similarity among ATP pockets renders the selective inhibition of kinases a daunting challenge. Therefore, targeting allosteric pockets of kinases outside the highly conversed ATP pocket has been proposed as a promising alternative to overcome...

  16. Uranium-mediated activation of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L

    2011-08-28

    Molecular complexes of uranium are capable of activating a range of industrially and economically important small molecules such as CO, CO(2), and N(2); new and often unexpected reactions provide insight into an element that needs to be well-understood if future clean-energy solutions are to involve nuclear power. PMID:21614341

  17. Small Molecule Subgraph Detector (SMSD toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding one small molecule (query in a large target library is a challenging task in computational chemistry. Although several heuristic approaches are available using fragment-based chemical similarity searches, they fail to identify exact atom-bond equivalence between the query and target molecules and thus cannot be applied to complex chemical similarity searches, such as searching a complete or partial metabolic pathway. In this paper we present a new Maximum Common Subgraph (MCS tool: SMSD (Small Molecule Subgraph Detector to overcome the issues with current heuristic approaches to small molecule similarity searches. The MCS search implemented in SMSD incorporates chemical knowledge (atom type match with bond sensitive and insensitive information while searching molecular similarity. We also propose a novel method by which solutions obtained by each MCS run can be ranked using chemical filters such as stereochemistry, bond energy, etc. Results In order to benchmark and test the tool, we performed a 50,000 pair-wise comparison between KEGG ligands and PDB HET Group atoms. In both cases the SMSD was shown to be more efficient than the widely used MCS module implemented in the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK in generating MCS solutions from our test cases. Conclusion Presently this tool can be applied to various areas of bioinformatics and chemo-informatics for finding exhaustive MCS matches. For example, it can be used to analyse metabolic networks by mapping the atoms between reactants and products involved in reactions. It can also be used to detect the MCS/substructure searches in small molecules reported by metabolome experiments, as well as in the screening of drug-like compounds with similar substructures. Thus, we present a robust tool that can be used for multiple applications, including the discovery of new drug molecules. This tool is freely available on http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/SMSD/

  18. Small Molecule Library Synthesis Using Segmented Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Christina M.; Djuric, Stevan W.; Cross, Jeffrey L.; Irini Akritopoulou-Zanze; Poole, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Flow chemistry has gained considerable recognition as a simple, efficient, and safe technology for the synthesis of many types of organic and inorganic molecules ranging in scope from large complex natural products to silicon nanoparticles. In this paper we describe a method that adapts flow chemistry to the synthesis of libraries of compounds using a fluorous immiscible solvent as a spacer between reactions. The methodology was validated in the synthesis of two small heterocycle containing l...

  19. Small molecule-guided thermoresponsive supramolecular assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2012-10-23

    Small organic molecules with strong intermolecular interactions have a wide range of desirable optical and electronic properties and rich phase behaviors. Incorporating them into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules opens new routes to generate functional responsive materials. Using oligothiophene- containing supramolecules, we present systematic studies of critical thermodynamic parameters and kinetic pathway that govern the coassemblies of BCP and strongly interacting small molecules. A number of potentially useful morphologies for optoelectronic materials, including a nanoscopic network of oligothiophene and nanoscopic crystalline lamellae, were obtained by varying the assembly pathway. Hierarchical coassemblies of oligothiophene and BCP, rather than macrophase separation, can be obtained. Crystallization of the oligothiophene not only induces chain stretching of the BCP block the oligothiophene is hydrogen bonded to but also changes the conformation of the other BCP coil block. This leads to an over 70% change in the BCP periodicity (e.g., from 31 to 53 nm) as the oligothiophene changes from a melt to a crystalline state, which provides access to a large BCP periodicity using fairly low molecular weight BCP. The present studies have demonstrated the experimental feasibility of generating thermoresponsive materials that convert heat into mechanical energy. Incorporating strongly interacting small molecules into BCP supramolecules effectively increases the BCP periodicity and may also open new opportunities to tailor their optical properties without the need for high molecular weight BCP. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Small polaron hopping transport along DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triberis, G P [University of Athens, Physics Department, Solid State Section, Panepistimiopolis, GR-15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Simserides, C [University of Athens, Physics Department, Solid State Section, Panepistimiopolis, GR-15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Special Laboratory for Non-Invasive Brain Imaging, Brenneckestrasse 6, D-39118 Magdeburg (Germany); Karavolas, V C [University of Athens, Physics Department, Solid State Section, Panepistimiopolis, GR-15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece)

    2005-05-04

    We present a small polaron hopping model for interpreting the strong temperature (T) dependence of the electrical conductivity, {sigma}, observed at high (h) temperatures along DNA molecules. The model takes into account the one-dimensional character of the system and the presence of disorder in the DNA double helix. Percolation-theoretical considerations lead to analytical expressions for the high temperature multiphonon-assisted small polaron hopping conductivity, the hopping distance and their temperature dependence. The experimental data for lambda phage DNA ({lambda}-DNA) and poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA follow nicely the theoretically predicted behaviour (ln{sigma}{sup h}{proportional_to}T{sup -2/3}). Moreover, our model leads to realistic values of the maximum hopping distances, supporting the idea of multiphonon-assisted hopping of small polarons between next nearest neighbours of the DNA molecular 'wire'. The low temperature case is also investigated.

  1. Small polaron hopping transport along DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triberis, G. P.; Simserides, C.; Karavolas, V. C.

    2005-05-01

    We present a small polaron hopping model for interpreting the strong temperature (T) dependence of the electrical conductivity, σ, observed at high (h) temperatures along DNA molecules. The model takes into account the one-dimensional character of the system and the presence of disorder in the DNA double helix. Percolation-theoretical considerations lead to analytical expressions for the high temperature multiphonon-assisted small polaron hopping conductivity, the hopping distance and their temperature dependence. The experimental data for lambda phage DNA (λ-DNA) and poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA follow nicely the theoretically predicted behaviour (lnσh~T-2/3). Moreover, our model leads to realistic values of the maximum hopping distances, supporting the idea of multiphonon-assisted hopping of small polarons between next nearest neighbours of the DNA molecular 'wire'. The low temperature case is also investigated.

  2. Designing a small molecule erythropoietin mimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a protein made by the kidneys in response to low red blood cell count that is secreted into the bloodstream and binds to a receptor on hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow inducing them to become new red blood cells. EPO made with recombinant DNA technology was brought to market in the 1980s to treat anemia caused by kidney disease and cancer chemotherapy. Because EPO infusion was able to replace blood transfusions in many cases, it rapidly became a multibillion dollar per year drug and as the first biologic created with recombinant technology it launched the biotech industry. For many years intense research was focused on creating a small molecule orally available EPO mimetic. The Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) group seemed to definitively establish that only large peptides with a minimum of 60 residues could replace EPO, as anything less was not a full agonist. An intense study of the published work led me to hypothesize that the size of the mimetic is not the real issue, but the symmetry making and breaking of the EPO receptor induced by the ligand is the key to activating the stem cells. This analysis meant that residues in the binding site of the receptor deemed absolutely essential for ligand binding and activation from mutagenesis experiments, were probably not really that important. My fundamental hypotheses were: (a) the symmetric state of the homodimeric receptor is the most stable state and thus must be the off-state, (b) a highly localized binding site exists at a pivot point where the two halves of the receptor meet, (c) small molecules can be created that have high potency for this site that will be competitive with EPO and thus can displace the protein-protein interaction, (d) small symmetric molecules will stabilize the symmetric off-state of the receptor, and (e) a key asymmetry in the small molecule will stabilize a mirror image asymmetry in the receptor resulting in the stabilization of the on-state and proliferation of

  3. - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of Small - Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.

    2011-06-01

    A series of small boron-containing molecules were synthesized in the gas phase using a tube furnace. High-resolution spectra of these species were recorded in either emission or absorption in the mid-infrared region using a Bruker IFS-125HR spectrometer. Our observations contain vibration-rotation bands of BO, the V1 and V3 bands of HBO, the V1 and V3 bands of HBS, the V1 band of FBO, and the V1 band of HBF2. The vibrational bands of HOBO, BF2OH and other boron-containing molecules may also be present. Ab initio calculations were performed at the MRCI level to assist in the vibrational assignments. Preliminary assignments of the spectra for these species will be reported.

  4. Small azomethine molecules and their use in photovoltaic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, T.J.; Petrus, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a small azomethine molecule having photovoltaic characteristics, a method of synthesizing said molecule, use of said molecule in a photovoltaic device, a solar cell comprising said molecule, and a film comprising said molecule. The present molecules may find

  5. Small-Molecule Target Engagement in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Marc; Janning, Petra; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-21

    Monitoring how, when, and where small molecules engage their targets inside living cells is a critical step in chemical biology and pharmacological research, because it enables compound efficacy and confirmation of mode of action to be assessed. In this mini-review we summarize the currently available methodologies to detect and prove direct target engagement in cells and offer a critical view of their key advantages and disadvantages. As the interest of the field shifts toward discovery and validation of high-quality agents, we expect that efforts to develop and refine these types of methodologies will also intensify in the near future. PMID:27049669

  6. No Major Role for Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Antigen Presentation by MHC Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-...

  7. Small Molecule Library Synthesis Using Segmented Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Thompson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Flow chemistry has gained considerable recognition as a simple, efficient, and safe technology for the synthesis of many types of organic and inorganic molecules ranging in scope from large complex natural products to silicon nanoparticles. In this paper we describe a method that adapts flow chemistry to the synthesis of libraries of compounds using a fluorous immiscible solvent as a spacer between reactions. The methodology was validated in the synthesis of two small heterocycle containing libraries. The reactions were performed on a 0.2 mmol scale, enabling tens of milligrams of material to be generated in a single 200 mL reaction plug. The methodology allowed library synthesis in half the time of conventional microwave synthesis while maintaining similar yields. The ability to perform multiple, potentially unrelated reactions in a single run is ideal for making small quantities of many different compounds quickly and efficiently.

  8. Rescattering photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We extracted DCSs of electron scattering from ions using electron spectroscopy. • Detail of the extraction procedure of DCS from the experiment is presented. • Experimentally extracted DCSs are compared with ab initio calculations. • Factorization model of rescattering is confirmed for molecules experimentally. - Abstract: We have measured angle-resolved rescattering photoelectron spectra of three small molecules (O2, CO2, and C2H4) using intense near-infrared laser pulses at several laser intensities. Based on the factorization formula for rescattering processes, we have extracted, from the electron spectra, the field-free differential cross sections of elastic electron scattering by the molecular ions. The detail of the extraction procedure is described. The experimentally extracted differential cross sections are compared with theoretical calculations of the field-free differential cross sections. Fairly good agreement between the experimentally extracted and theoretically calculated DCSs for wide range of the collision momentum indicates the validity of the present extraction procedure for the molecules

  9. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis. PMID:27296447

  10. Recent advances in developing small molecules targeting RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-01-20

    RNAs are underexploited targets for small molecule drugs or chemical probes of function. This may be due, in part, to a fundamental lack of understanding of the types of small molecules that bind RNA specifically and the types of RNA motifs that specifically bind small molecules. In this review, we describe recent advances in the development and design of small molecules that bind to RNA and modulate function that aim to fill this void. PMID:22185671

  11. Small Molecule Docking from Theoretical Structural Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Eva Maria; de Pouplana, Lluis Ribas; Orozco, Modesto

    Structural approaches to rational drug design rely on the basic assumption that pharmacological activity requires, as necessary but not sufficient condition, the binding of a drug to one or several cellular targets, proteins in most cases. The traditional paradigm assumes that drugs that interact only with a single cellular target are specific and accordingly have little secondary effects, while promiscuous molecules are more likely to generate undesirable side effects. However, current examples indicate that often efficient drugs are able to interact with several biological targets [1] and in fact some dirty drugs, such as chlorpromazine, dextromethorphan, and ibogaine exhibit desired pharmacological properties [2]. These considerations highlight the tremendous difficulty of designing small molecules that both have satisfactory ADME properties and the ability of interacting with a limited set of target proteins with a high affinity, avoiding at the same time undesirable interactions with other proteins. In this complex and challenging scenario, computer simulations emerge as the basic tool to guide medicinal chemists during the drug discovery process.

  12. Chemokines: Small Molecules Participate in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines are small protein molecules involved in cell signaling processes. They play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological processes. Chemokines are functionally classified into two categories; inflammatory/inducible and constitutive. Their biologic functional differences are the result of their receptors structural differences. Recently some studies were performed about the chemokines changes in diabetes. Inflammatory mechanisms have an important role in diabetes.Materials and Methods: In this review article we searched the keywords chemokines, diabetes, diabetes pathogenesis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes in Persian resources, PubMed and famous English-language websites through advanced search engines and found the newest studies about the role of chemokines in the pathogenesis of diabetes.Results: The results of the studies showed that diabetes and its disorders enhance the activation of immune cells and the expression of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, SDF-1, INF-γ, TGF-β, MCP-1, IP-10, TNF-α, and RANTES; most of them have impact on the pathogenesis of diabetes.Conclusion: Comparison and analysis of the results obtained from our research and the results of performed studies in the world and Iran shows that chemokines, like other protein molecules involved in the pathogenesis and etiology of diabetes, play a role in this process.

  13. Simulation Studies of Protein and Small Molecule Interactions and Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Zhang, J; Che, X; Gao, Y Q

    2016-01-01

    Computational studies of protein and small molecule (protein-ligand/enzyme-substrate) interactions become more and more important in biological science and drug discovery. Computer modeling can provide molecular details of the processes such as conformational change, binding, and transportation of small molecules/proteins, which are not easily to be captured in experiments. In this chapter, we discussed simulation studies of both protein and small molecules from three aspects: conformation sampling, transportations of small molecules in enzymes, and enzymatic reactions involving small molecules. Both methodology developments and examples of simulation studies in this field were presented. PMID:27497167

  14. Small Organic Molecules for Direct Aldol Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhuo; GONG Liu-Zhu; MI Ai-Qiao; JIANG Yao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Since the pioneering finding by List and Barbas Ⅲ and their coworkers that L-proline could work as a catalyst in the intermolecular direct aldol reaction, the concept of small organic molecules as catalysts has received great attention. However, new organic molecule which have better catalysis ability are reported scarcely.Our groups1 found L-Prolinamides 1 to be active catalysts for the direct aldol reaction of 4-nitrobenaldehyde with neat acetone at room temperature. The enantioselectivity increases as the amide N-H becomes more acidic and thus a better hydrogen bond donor. Introducing another proton donor, hydroxyl, in the catalyst lead to a further improvement in the catalytic enantioselectivity.The calculations reveal that the amide N-H and the terminal hydroxyl groups form hydrogen bonds with the benzaldehyde substrate. These hydrogen bonds reduce the activation energy and cause high enantioselectivity.Catalyst 2, prepared from L-proline and (1S, 2S)-diphenyl-2-aminoethanol, exhibits high enantioselectivities of up to 93% ee for aromatic aldehydes and up to >99% ee for aliphatic aldehydes. It is noteworthy that our results refuted the conventional wisdom that the carboxylic acid group of proline is a reqirement for high enatioselectivity and provide a powerful strategy in the molecular design of new organic catalyst because plentiful chiral resource containing multi-hydrogen bonding donor, for example, peptides.Very recently, we found that L-proline-based peptides 3-7 can catalyze the aldol reactions of hydroxyacetone with aldehydes 8 in aqueous media, to give 1,4-diols 9, the disfavored products with either aldolase or L-proline. Both peptides 5 and 6 give good results.The abilities of peptides 5 and 6 to catalyze the direct aldol reactions of hydroxyacetone with avariety of aldehydes were examined under optimal conditions. The results are shown in table. Highyields and entioselectivities of up to 96% ee were observed for aromatic aldehydes

  15. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia molecules and nominal antigen on antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, M L; Yip, C C; Shevach, E M; Delovitch, T L

    1986-01-01

    We have used radioiodinated photoreactive bovine insulin as antigen to examine the molecular nature of immunogenic complexes that form on antigen-presenting cells. The probe was allowed to bind to either insulin-presenting B-hybridoma cells, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated blasts, or bovine insulin-specific helper-T-hybridoma cells in the dark. Samples were then exposed to light to induce crosslinkage, solubilized, and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Two protein bands at about 36 kDa and 27 kD...

  16. Database of Small Molecule Thermochemistry for Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Goldsmith, C. Franklin

    2012-09-13

    High-accuracy ab initio thermochemistry is presented for 219 small molecules relevant in combustion chemistry, including many radical, biradical, and triplet species. These values are critical for accurate kinetic modeling. The RQCISD(T)/cc-PV∞QZ//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method was used to compute the electronic energies. A bond additivity correction for this method has been developed to remove systematic errors in the enthalpy calculations, using the Active Thermochemical Tables as reference values. On the basis of comparison with the benchmark data, the 3σ uncertainty in the standard-state heat of formation is 0.9 kcal/mol, or within chemical accuracy. An uncertainty analysis is presented for the entropy and heat capacity. In many cases, the present values are the most accurate and comprehensive numbers available. The present work is compared to several published databases. In some cases, there are large discrepancies and errors in published databases; the present work helps to resolve these problems. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. Small molecule annotation for the Protein Data Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Sanchayita; Young, Jasmine; Berrisford, John M.; Chen, Minyu; Conroy, Matthew J.; Dutta, Shuchismita; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Gao, Guanghua; Ghosh, Sutapa; Hudson, Brian P.; Igarashi, Reiko; Kengaku, Yumiko; Liang, Yuhe; Peisach, Ezra; Persikova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the single global repository for three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules and their complexes, and its more than 100 000 structures contain more than 20 000 distinct ligands or small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. Information about these small molecules and their interactions with proteins and nucleic acids is crucial for our understanding of biochemical processes and vital for structure-based drug design. Small molecules present...

  18. The radiocontrast molecule in anaphylaxis: a surprising antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser, Elliott C

    2004-01-01

    X-ray contrast media are individually injected into human blood vessels in greater quantities than any other pharmacological substance. Adverse reactions to these substances have heretofore been considered anaphylactoid in nature. Others and we have demonstrated that the mechanisms involved are multifactorial and may involve activation of mast cells and basophils, activation of the complement system, activation of the contact system, and the conversion of L-arginine into nitric oxide. Appropriate pretreatment with corticosteriods will diminish the incidence of reactions. Most recently we have demonstrated that the contrast media function as 'pseudoantigens' (PsA). They can combine with antibodies, but cannot themselves produce antibodies. This property appears to be dependent on aggregation in high concentrations and varies with the individual media. It furthermore appears to be non-specific in relation to antibodies, and suggests that binding occurs to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. We have now demonstrated that the least toxic of current media demonstrate the best antibody binding and in sufficient concentration can inhibit contrast induced mast cell activation and/or non-contrast antigen induced mast cell activation, apparently due to in vivo pseudoantigen excess. In lesser concentrations and/or lesser binding, the media can trigger mast cell activation. PMID:15025400

  19. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  20. Organic Optoelectronic Devices Employing Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetham, Tyler Blain

    Organic optoelectronic devices have remained a research topic of great interest over the past two decades, particularly in the development of efficient organic photovoltaics (OPV) and organic light emitting diodes (OLED). In order to improve the efficiency, stability, and materials variety for organic optoelectronic devices a number of emitting materials, absorbing materials, and charge transport materials were developed and employed in a device setting. Optical, electrical, and photophysical studies of the organic materials and their corresponding devices were thoroughly carried out. Two major approaches were taken to enhance the efficiency of small molecule based OPVs: developing material with higher open circuit voltages or improved device structures which increased short circuit current. To explore the factors affecting the open circuit voltage (VOC) in OPVs, molecular structures were modified to bring VOC closer to the effective bandgap, DeltaE DA, which allowed the achievement of 1V VOC for a heterojunction of a select Ir complex with estimated exciton energy of only 1.55eV. Furthermore, the development of anode interfacial layer for exciton blocking and molecular templating provide a general approach for enhancing the short circuit current. Ultimately, a 5.8% PCE was achieved in a single heterojunction of C60 and a ZnPc material prepared in a simple, one step, solvent free, synthesis. OLEDs employing newly developed deep blue emitters based on cyclometalated complexes were demonstrated. Ultimately, a peak EQE of 24.8% and nearly perfect blue emission of (0.148,0.079) was achieved from PtON7dtb, which approaches the maximum attainable performance from a blue OLED. Furthermore, utilizing the excimer formation properties of square-planar Pt complexes, highly efficient and stable white devices employing a single emissive material were demonstrated. A peak EQE of over 20% for pure white color (0.33,0.33) and 80 CRI was achieved with the tridentate Pt complex, Pt

  1. Design and cancer-targeting potential of antibody-based molecules directed against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Huhalov, A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis examines the use of protein engineering to create antibody-based molecules for cancer treatment. The targeting unit used for these molecules was the single chain Fv antibody fragment MFE-23, which is directed against the tumour-associated marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). It was hypothesised that implementation of molecular design features such as humanisation, high affinity, multivalency and mannose glycosylation to accelerate systemic clearance would result in the favourabl...

  2. Small Molecule Chemical Probes of MicroRNA Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Vummidi, Balayeshwanth R.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that control protein expression. Aberrant miRNA expression has been linked to various human diseases, and thus miRNAs have been explored as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Although it is challenging to target RNA with small molecules in general, there have been successful campaigns that have identified small molecule modulators of miRNA function by targeting various pathways. For example, small molecules that modulate transcription and target nuclease processing sites in miRNA precursors have been identified. Herein, we describe challenges in developing chemical probes that target miRNAs and highlight aspects of miRNA cellular biology elucidated by using small molecule chemical probes. We expect that this area will expand dramatically in the near future as strides are made to understand small molecule recognition of RNA from a fundamental perspective. PMID:25500006

  3. Small-molecule PSMA ligands. Current state, SAR and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machulkin, Alexey E; Ivanenkov, Yan A; Aladinskaya, Anastasia V; Veselov, Mark S; Aladinskiy, Vladimir A; Beloglazkina, Elena K; Koteliansky, Victor E; Shakhbazyan, Artem G; Sandulenko, Yuri B; Majouga, Alexander G

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the prevalent malignancy widespread among men in the Western World. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an established PC marker and has been considered as a promising biological target for anti-PC drug delivery and diagnostics. The protein was found to be overexpressed in PC cells, including metastatic, and the neovasculature of solid tumors. These properties make PSMA-based approach quite appropriate for effective PC imaging and specific drug therapy. Through the past decade, a variety of PSMA-targeted agents has been systematically evaluated. Small-molecule compounds have several advantages over other classes, such as improved pharmacokinetics and rapid blood clearance. These low-weight ligands have similar structure and can be divided into three basic categories in accordance with the type of their zinc-binding core-head. Several PSMA binders are currently undergoing clinical trials generally for PC imaging. The main goal of the present review is to describe the recent progress achieved within the title field and structure activity relationships (SAR) disclosed for different PSMA ligands. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies for each type of the compounds described have also been briefly summarized. PMID:26887438

  4. Fluorescence Emission from Small Molecules Containing Amino Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    After the treatment of oxygen gas, the small molecules containing amine group could emit fluorescence. Oxidation was believed to play an important role in the formation of fluorescence centers. Compared to previous results, both small molecules and macromolecules might have the same fluorescence centers.

  5. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein regulates endogenous and exogenous antigen presentation by group 1 CD1 molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kaser, Arthur; Hava, David L.; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Chen, Zhangguo; Zeissig, Sebastian; Brenner, Michael B.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Lipid antigens are presented to T cells by the non-polymorphic MHC class I-related CD1 molecules. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident chaperone that has been shown to lipidate the group 2 CD1 molecule CD1d and thus to regulate its function. We now report that MTP also regulates the function of group 1 CD1 molecules CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c. Pharmacological inhibition of MTP in monocyte-derived dendritic cells and lymphoblastoid B cell lines tra...

  6. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L;

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...... molecules are the questions discussed in this review. To us, the entire concept of processing has appeal not only because it explains some hitherto well-established, but poorly understood, phenomena such as the fact that T lymphocytes focus their attention entirely upon antigens on other cells. It has...

  7. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Culina

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands.

  8. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands. PMID:24516642

  9. Development of proneurogenic, neuroprotective small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    MacMillan, Karen S.; Naidoo, Jacinth; Liang, Jue; Melito, Lisa; Williams, Noelle S.; Morlock, Lorraine; Huntington, Paula J.; Estill, Sandi Jo; Longgood, Jamie; Becker, Ginger L.; McKnight, Steven L.; Pieper, Andrew A.; De Brabander, Jef K.; Ready, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Degeneration of the hippocampus is associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and occurs very early in the progression of the disease. Current options for treating the cognitive symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s are inadequate, giving urgency to the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Pharmacologic agents that safely enhance hippocampal neurogenesis may provide new therapeutic approaches. We discovered the first synthetic molecule, named P7C3, which protects newborn neurons from apopotic ce...

  10. TBD Resistence mechanisms and small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Corneila Zumbrunn

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial topoisomerases Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV are well validated targets in antibiotic research and discovery. Fluoroquinolones (eg. Ciprofloxacin) are potent inhibitors of these targets and are an important weapon in the battle against infections. Unfortunately their utility has lately been limited due to emerging resistance. Over the last years several companies have discovered molecules that inhibit topoisomerases by a novel mode of action and are therefore devoid of cross-resis...

  11. Small Talk: Children's Everyday `Molecule' Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Cheryl

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports on 6-11-year-old children's `sayings and doings' (Harré 2002) as they explore molecule artefacts in dialectical-interactive teaching interviews (Fleer, Cultural Studies of Science Education 3:781-786, 2008; Hedegaard et al. 2008). This sociocultural study was designed to explore children's everyday awareness of and meaning-making with cultural molecular artefacts. Our everyday world is populated with an ever increasing range of molecular or nanoworld words, symbols, images, and games. What do children today say about these artefacts that are used to represent molecular world entities? What are the material and social resources that can influence a child's everyday and developing scientific ideas about `molecules'? How do children interact with these cognitive tools when given expert assistance? What meaning-making is afforded when children are socially and materially assisted in using molecular tools in early chemical and nanoworld thinking? Tool-dependent discursive studies show that provision of cultural artefacts can assist and direct developmental thinking across many domains of science (Schoultz et al., Human Development 44:103-118, 2001; Siegal 2008). Young children's use of molecular artefacts as cognitive tools has not received much attention to date (Jakab 2009a, b). This study shows 6-11-year-old children expressing everyday ideas of molecular artefacts and raising their own questions about the artefacts. They are seen beginning to domesticate (Erneling 2010) the words, symbols, and images to their own purposes when given the opportunity to interact with such artefacts in supported activity. Discursive analysis supports the notion that using `molecules' as cultural tools can help young children to begin `putting on molecular spectacles' (Kind 2004). Playing with an interactive game (ICT) is shown to be particularly helpful in assisting children's early meaning-making with representations of molecules, atoms, and their chemical symbols.

  12. Small Molecule-Mediated Cleavage of RNA in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) control gene expression by triggering the degradation of a mRNA via recruitment of RNase H or the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), respectively.[1] These approaches are hampered, however, by the poor cellular permeability of oligonucleotides. A small molecule approach to cleave RNA targets could obviate uptake issues. Several compounds can induce RNA cleavage in vitro,[2] however, to the best of our knowledge no small molecul...

  13. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eRuscito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012 notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  14. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  15. Selection and Biosensor Application of Aptamers for Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Franziska; Mayer, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules play a major role in the human body and as drugs, toxins, and chemicals. Tools to detect and quantify them are therefore in high demand. This review will give an overview about aptamers interacting with small molecules and their selection. We discuss the current state of the field, including advantages as well as problems associated with their use and possible solutions to tackle these. We then discuss different kinds of small molecule aptamer-based sensors described in literature and their applications, ranging from detecting drinking water contaminations to RNA imaging. PMID:27379229

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of small-molecule endofullerenes

    CERN Document Server

    Rõõm, T; Ge, Min; Hüvonen, D; Nagel, U; Mamone, S; Levitt, M H; Carravetta, M; Chen, J Y -C; Lei, Xuegong; Turro, N J; Murata, Y; Komatsu, K

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen is one of the few molecules which has been incarcerated in the molecular cage of C$_{60}$ and forms endohedral supramolecular complex H$_2$@C$_{60}$. In this confinement hydrogen acquires new properties. Its translational motion becomes quantized and is correlated with its rotations. We applied infrared spectroscopy to study the dynamics of hydrogen isotopologs H$_2$, D$_2$ and HD incarcerated in C$_{60}$. The translational and rotational modes appear as side bands to the hydrogen vibrational mode in the mid infrared part of the absorption spectrum. Because of the large mass difference of hydrogen and C$_{60}$ and the high symmetry of C$_{60}$ the problem is identical to a problem of a vibrating rotor moving in a three-dimensional spherical potential. The translational motion within the C$_{60}$ cavity breaks the inversion symmetry and induces optical activity of H$_2$. We derive potential, rotational, vibrational and dipole moment parameters from the analysis of the infrared absorption spectra. Our ...

  17. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  18. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  19. CM2 antigen, a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on rat hepatocyte canalicular membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarized molecules predominately distributing at hepatocyte canalicular surface play a vital role in disclosing the process of bile formation and etiopathogenisis of cholestatic live diseases. Therefore, it is important to find novel polarized molecules on hepatocyte canalicular membrane. In the present study, canalicular membrane vesicles (CMVs isolated from rat hepatocyte by density gradient centrifugation were used as immunogens to produce hybridoma and 46 strains of monoclonal antibodies (mAb against CMVs were obtained. With a series of morphological assay methods, including immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscope, the antigens recognized by canalicular mAb1 (CM1 and canalicular mAb2 (CM2 were confirmed to predominately distribute at hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Transport activity assay revealed that CM2 could inhibit ATP-dependent E217βG uptake of rat hepatocyte CMVs. Meanwhile, Western blotting analysis showed that the molecular mass of CM2 antigen was approximately 110kDa, which was much less than Mr 180kDa of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 involved in glucuronide transport. These data indicated that CM2 antigen might be a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on the hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

  20. Modulation of p53's transcriptional function by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulenkov, Fedor

    2011-01-01

    p53 tumour suppressor is a transcriptional factor which induces apoptosis or growth arrest in response to stress thus eliminating damaged cells. p53 function is frequently abrogated in tumours either via inactivation mutations in the TP53 gene or by elevated activity of p53 negative regulators HDM2 and HDMX. Therefore application of small molecules that reactivate p53 function is a promising strategy for anti-cancer therapy. In addition, small molecules can serve as valuable research tool to ...

  1. Small molecule annotation for the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sanchayita; Young, Jasmine; Berrisford, John M; Chen, Minyu; Conroy, Matthew J; Dutta, Shuchismita; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Gao, Guanghua; Ghosh, Sutapa; Hudson, Brian P; Igarashi, Reiko; Kengaku, Yumiko; Liang, Yuhe; Peisach, Ezra; Persikova, Irina; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Narayanan, Buvaneswari Coimbatore; Sahni, Gaurav; Sato, Junko; Sekharan, Monica; Shao, Chenghua; Tan, Lihua; Zhuravleva, Marina A

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the single global repository for three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules and their complexes, and its more than 100,000 structures contain more than 20,000 distinct ligands or small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. Information about these small molecules and their interactions with proteins and nucleic acids is crucial for our understanding of biochemical processes and vital for structure-based drug design. Small molecules present in a deposited structure may be attached to a polymer or may occur as a separate, non-covalently linked ligand. During curation of a newly deposited structure by wwPDB annotation staff, each molecule is cross-referenced to the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary (CCD). If the molecule is new to the PDB, a dictionary description is created for it. The information about all small molecule components found in the PDB is distributed via the ftp archive as an external reference file. Small molecule annotation in the PDB also includes information about ligand-binding sites and about covalent and other linkages between ligands and macromolecules. During the remediation of the peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors present in the PDB archive in 2011, it became clear that additional annotation was required for consistent representation of these molecules, which are quite often composed of several sequential subcomponents including modified amino acids and other chemical groups. The connectivity information of the modified amino acids is necessary for correct representation of these biologically interesting molecules. The combined information is made available via a new resource called the Biologically Interesting molecules Reference Dictionary, which is complementary to the CCD and is now routinely used for annotation of peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors. PMID:25425036

  2. Hydrogen. A small molecule with large impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, H.; Ruthardt, K.; Mathiak, J.; Roosen, C. [Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    The first section of the presentation will provide general information about hydrogen including physical data, natural abundance, production and consumption figures. This will be followed by detailed information about current industrial production routes for hydrogen. Main on-purpose production for hydrogen is by classical steam reforming (SR) of natural gas. A brief overview of most important steps in stream reforming is given including reforming section, CO conversion and gas purification. Also the use of heavier than methane feedstocks and refinery off-gases is discussed. Alternative routes for hydrogen production or production of synthesis gas are autothermal reforming (ATR) or partial oxidation (POX). Pros and Cons for each specific technology are given and discussed. Gasification, especially gasification of renewable feedstocks, is a further possibility to produce hydrogen or synthesis gas. New developments and current commercial processes are presented. Hydrogen from electrolysis plants has only a small share on the hydrogen production slate, but in some cases this hydrogen is a suitable feedstock for niche applications with future potential. Finally, production of hydrogen by solar power as a new route is discussed. The final section focuses on the use of hydrogen. Classical applications are hydrogenation reactions in refineries, like HDS, HDN, hydrocracking and hydrofinishing. But, with an increased demand for liquid fuels for transportation or power supply, hydrogen becomes a key player in future as an energy source. Use of hydrogen in synthesis gas for the production of liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or coal liquefaction is discussed as well as use of pure hydrogen in fuel cells. Additional, new application for biomass-derived feedstocks are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 106 cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture

  4. Synchrotron radiation VUV double photoionization of some small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VUV double photoionizations of small molecules (NO, CO, CO2, CS2, OSC and NH3) were investigated with photoionization mass spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The double ionization energies of molecules were determined with photoionization efficiency spectroscopy. The total energies of these molecules and their parent dications (NO2+, CO2+, CO2+2, CS2+2, OSC2+ and NH2+3) were calculated using the Gaussian 03 program and Gaussian 2 calculations. Then, the adiabatic double ionization energies of the molecules were predicated by using high accuracy energy mode. The experimental double ionization energies of these small molecules were all in reasonable agreement with their respective calculated adiabatic double ionization energies. The mechanisms of double photoionization of these molecules were discussed based on a comparison of our experimental results with those predicted theoretically. The equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of molecules and their parent dications were calculated by using the MP2 (full) method. The differences in configurations between these molecules and their parent dications were also discussed on the basis of theoretical calculations. (atomic and molecular physics)

  5. Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  6. Thermal Degradation of Small Molecules: A Global Metabolomic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingliang; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Benton, H Paul; Johnson, Caroline H; Patti, Gary J; Hoang, Linh T; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Kurczy, Michael E; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-11-01

    Thermal processes are widely used in small molecule chemical analysis and metabolomics for derivatization, vaporization, chromatography, and ionization, especially in gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In this study the effect of heating was examined on a set of 64 small molecule standards and, separately, on human plasma metabolite extracts. The samples, either derivatized or underivatized, were heated at three different temperatures (60, 100, and 250 °C) at different exposure times (30 s, 60 s, and 300 s). All the samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and the data processed by XCMS Online ( xcmsonline.scripps.edu ). The results showed that heating at an elevated temperature of 100 °C had an appreciable effect on both the underivatized and derivatized molecules, and heating at 250 °C created substantial changes in the profile. For example, over 40% of the molecular peaks were altered in the plasma metabolite analysis after heating (250 °C, 300s) with a significant formation of degradation and transformation products. The analysis of 64 small molecule standards validated the temperature-induced changes observed on the plasma metabolites, where most of the small molecules degraded at elevated temperatures even after minimal exposure times (30 s). For example, tri- and diorganophosphates (e.g., adenosine triphosphate and adenosine diphosphate) were readily degraded into a mono-organophosphate (e.g., adenosine monophosphate) during heating. Nucleosides and nucleotides (e.g., inosine and inosine monophosphate) were also found to be transformed into purine derivatives (e.g., hypoxanthine). A newly formed transformation product, oleoyl ethyl amide, was identified in both the underivatized and derivatized forms of the plasma extracts and small molecule standard mixture, and was likely generated from oleic acid. Overall these analyses show that small molecules and metabolites undergo

  7. Identification of small molecule activators of BMP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Vrijens

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs are morphogens that play a major role in regulating development and homeostasis. Although BMPs are used for the treatment of bone and kidney disorders, their clinical use is limited due to the supra-physiological doses required for therapeutic efficacy causing severe side effects. Because recombinant BMPs are expensive to produce, small molecule activators of BMP signaling would be a cost-effective alternative with the added benefit of being potentially more easily deliverable. Here, we report our efforts to identify small molecule activators of BMP signaling. We have developed a cell-based assay to monitor BMP signaling by stably transfecting a BMP-responsive human cervical carcinoma cell line (C33A with a reporter construct in which the expression of luciferase is driven by a multimerized BMP-responsive element from the Id1 promoter. A BMP-responsive clone C33A-2D2 was used to screen a bioactive library containing ∼5,600 small molecules. We identified four small molecules of the family of flavonoids all of which induced luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner and ventralized zebrafish embryos. Two of the identified compounds induced Smad1, 5 phosphorylation (P-Smad, Id1 and Id2 expression in a dose-dependent manner demonstrating that our assays identified small molecule activators of BMP signaling.

  8. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  9. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  10. Automation of AMOEBA polarizable force field parameterization for small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Johnny C.; Chattree, Gaurav; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-01-01

    A protocol to generate parameters for the AMOEBA polarizable force field for small organic molecules has been established, and polarizable atomic typing utility, Poltype, which fully automates this process, has been implemented. For validation, we have compared with quantum mechanical calculations of molecular dipole moments, optimized geometry, electrostatic potential, and conformational energy for a variety of neutral and charged organic molecules, as well as dimer interaction energies of a...

  11. A Potent Activator of Melanogenesis Identified from Small Molecule Screening

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Brian R.; Gareiss, Peter C.; Jacobs, Stacey E.; Fricke, Alex F.; Scott, Glynis A.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the cellular level of melanin can be used to study melanogenesis, and have therapeutic potential for melanin-related diseases such as albinism. We describe the identification of a potent activator of melanogenesis from a targeted combinatorial library. Treating melanocytes with our most active molecule results in a 1.8-fold increase in melanin, and an increase in tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation of L-tyrosine, a key step in melanin biosynthesis.

  12. Application of a Small Molecule Radiopharmaceutical Concept to Improve Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-06-01

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:27275356

  13. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Litterman; Christopher Lipinski; Sean Ekins

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important r...

  14. Detecting and identifying small molecules in a nanopore flux capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Samuel; McClure, Ethan; Zhang, Guigen

    2016-02-01

    A new method of molecular detection in a metallic-semiconductor nanopore was developed and evaluated with experimental and computational methods. Measurements were made of the charging potential of the electrical double layer (EDL) capacitance as charge-carrying small molecules translocated the nanopore. Signals in the charging potential were found to be correlated to the physical properties of analyte molecules. From the measured signals, we were able to distinguish molecules with different valence charge or similar valence charge but different size. The relative magnitude of the signals from different analytes was consistent over a wide range of experimental conditions, suggesting that the detected signals are likely due to single molecules. Computational modeling of the nanopore system indicated that the double layer potential signal may be described in terms of disruption of the EDL structure due to the size and charge of the analyte molecule, in agreement with Huckel and Debye’s analysis of the electrical atmosphere of electrolyte solutions.

  15. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators. PMID:26836578

  16. Chemisorption and Reactions of Small Molecules on Small Gold Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Bond

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The activity of supported gold particles for a number of oxidations and hydrogenations starts to increase dramatically as the size falls below ~3 nm. This is accompanied by an increased propensity to chemisorption, especially of oxygen and hydrogen. The explanation for these phenomena has to be sought in kinetic analysis that connects catalytic activity with the strength and extent of chemisorption of the reactants, the latter depending on the electronic structure of the gold atoms constituting the active centre. Examination of the changes to the utilisation of electrons as particle size is decreased points to loss of metallic character at about 3 nm, as energy bands are replaced by levels, and a band gap appears. Detailed consideration of the Arrhenius parameters (E and ln A for CO oxidation points clearly to a step-change in activity at the point where metallic character is lost, as opposed to there being a monotonic dependence of rate on a physical property such as the fraction of atoms at corners or edges of particles. The deplorable scarcity of kinetic information on other reactions makes extension of this analysis difficult, but non-metallic behaviour is an unavoidable property of very small gold particles, and therefore cannot be ignored when seeking to explain their exceptional activity.

  17. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    OpenAIRE

    Hanau, D.; Fabre, M.; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S.; Cazenave, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show t...

  18. Systematic investigation of protein-small molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyan; Wang, Xin; Snyder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling is extensively wired between cellular components to sustain cell proliferation, differentiation, and adaptation. The interaction network is often manifested in how protein function is regulated through interacting with other cellular components including small molecule metabolites. While many biochemical interactions have been established as reactions between protein enzymes and their substrates and products, much less is known at the system level about how small metabolites regulate protein functions through allosteric binding. In the past decade, study of protein-small molecule interactions has been lagging behind other types of interactions. Recent technological advances have explored several high-throughput platforms to reveal many "unexpected" protein-small molecule interactions that could have profound impact on our understanding of cell signaling. These interactions will help bridge gaps in existing regulatory loops of cell signaling and serve as new targets for medical intervention. In this review, we summarize recent advances of systematic investigation of protein-metabolite/small molecule interactions, and discuss the impact of such studies and their potential impact on both biological researches and medicine. PMID:23225626

  19. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  20. Kinetics of T cell-activation molecules in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antas Paulo RZ

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic features acquired subsequent to antigen-specific stimulation in vitro were evaluated by means of the kinetic expressions of CD69 and CD25 activation molecules on T lymphocytes and assayed by flow cytometry in response to PPD, Ag85B, and ferritin in PPD-positive healthy control individuals. In response to PHA, CD69 staining on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells became initially marked after 4 h, peaked at 24 h, and quickly decreased after 120 h. For CD25, a latter expression was detected around 8 h, having increased after 96 h. As expected, the response rate to the mycobacterial antigens was much lower than that to the mitogen. Positive staining was high after 96 h for CD25 and after 24 h for CD69. CD69 expression was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05 on CD8+ as compared to CD4+ T cells. High levels were also found between 96-120 h. Regarding Ag85B, CD25+ cells were mostly CD4+ instead of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, in response to ferritin, a lower CD25 expression was noted. The present data will allow further characterization of the immune response to new mycobacterial-specific antigens and their evaluation for possible inclusion in developing new diagnostic techniques for tuberculosis as well in a new vaccine to prevent the disease.

  1. Engineered kinesin motor proteins amenable to small-molecule inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Martin F. Engelke; Winding, Michael; Yue, Yang; Shastry, Shankar; Teloni, Federico; Reddy, Sanjay(Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States); Blasius, T. Lynne; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Hancock, William O.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Verhey, Kristen J.

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes 45 kinesin motor proteins that drive cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Determining the cellular function of each kinesin would benefit from specific small-molecule inhibitors. However, screens have yielded only a few specific inhibitors. Here we present a novel chemical-genetic approach to engineer kinesin motors that can carry out the function of the wild-type motor yet can also be efficiently inhibited by small, cell-perme...

  2. Interfacial processes in small molecule organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the recent progress of small molecule organic solar cells mainly based on the previous worksof our group. We will mainly focus on the interfacial processes in the cells. The dissociation of excitons at electrode/organic andorganic/organic interfaces can be directly observed by transient photovoltage measurements. A simple model including dissociationof excitons at the interface and drift of free carriers in the built-in field is proposed to explain the observed signals of transientphotovoltage. Besides exciton-blocking and preventing damage due to cathode evaporation,blocking permeation of oxygen and/orwater molecules and modulating the built-in field are proposed as functions of the buffer layer between C60 and Al. By the use ofthe inverted structure,a shelf lifetime of over 1500 h is achieved for unencapsulated small-molecule organic solar cells.

  3. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  4. Small molecule MALDI MS imaging: Current technologies and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Paul J; Snel, Marten F

    2016-07-15

    Imaging of specific small molecules is particularly challenging using conventional optical microscopy techniques. This has led to the development of alternative imaging modalities, including mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods. This review aims to provide an overview of the technologies, methods and future directions of laser-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of small molecules. In particular it will focus on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) as the ion source, although other laser mass spectrometry methods will also be discussed to provide context, both historical and current. Small molecule MALDI MSI has been performed on a wide variety of instrument platforms: these are reviewed, as are the laser systems that are commonly used in this technique. Instrumentation and methodology cross over in the areas of achieving optimal spatial resolution, a key parameter in obtaining meaningful data. Also discussed is sample preparation, which is pivotal in maintaining sample integrity, providing a true reflection of the distribution of analytes, spatial resolution and sensitivity. Like all developing analytical techniques there are challenges to be overcome. Two of these are dealing with sample complexity and obtaining quantitative information from an imaging experiment. Both of these topics are addressed. Finally, novel experiments including non-MALDI laser ionization techniques are highlighted and a future perspective on the role of MALDI MSI in the small molecule arena is provided. PMID:26804564

  5. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer.

  6. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer

  7. Ultrafast charge redistribution in small iodine containing molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hollstein, Maximilian; Gerken, Nils; Klumpp, Stephan; Palutke, Steffen; Baev, Ivan; Brenner, Günter; Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Wurth, Wilfried; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The competition between intra molecular charge redistribution and fragmentation has been studied in small molecules containing iodine by using intense ultrashort pulses in the extreme ultraviolet regime (XUV). We show that after an element specific inner-shell photoionization of diiodomethane (CH$_2$I$_2$) and iodomethane (CH$_3$I), the induced positive charge is redistributed with a significantly different efficiency. Therefore, we analyze ion time-of-flight data obtained from XUV-pump XUV-probe experiments at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Theoretical considerations on the basis of ab initio electronic structure calculations including correlations relate this effect to a strongly molecule specific, purely electronic charge redistribution process that takes place directly after photoionization causing a distribution of the induced positive charge predominantly on the atoms which exhibit the lowest atomic ionization potential, i.e, in the molecules considered, the iodine atom(s). As a result of t...

  8. Regulation by gut commensal bacteria of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yasuaki; Murata, Yoji; Park, Jung-Ha; Kotani, Takenori; Imada, Shinya; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okazawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takeshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 1 and CEACAM20, immunoglobulin superfamily members, are predominantly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and co-localized at the apical surface of these cells. We here showed that the expression of mouse CEACAM1 and CEACAM20 at both mRNA and protein levels was markedly reduced in IECs of the small intestine by the treatment of mice with antibiotics against Gram-positive bacteria. The expression of both proteins was also decreased in IECs of the small intestine from germ-free mice, compared with that from control specific-pathogen-free mice. Exposure of intestinal organoids to IFN-γ markedly increased the expression of either CEACAM1 or CEACAM20, whereas the exposure to TNF-α increased the expression of the former protein, but not that of the latter. In contrast, the expression of CEACAM20, but not of CEACAM1, in intestinal organoids was markedly increased by exposure to butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by bacterial fermentation in the intestine. Collectively, our results suggest that Gram-positive bacteria promote the mRNA expression of CEACAM1 or CEACAM20 in the small intestine. Inflammatory cytokines or butyrate likely participates in such effects of commensal bacteria. PMID:25908210

  9. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  10. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  11. Inkjet printing of photopolymerizable small molecules for OLED applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Simon; Derue, Lionel; Geffroy, Bernard; Ishow, Eléna; Maindron, Tony

    2015-09-01

    The elaboration of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) via a solution deposition process turns out to be a cheaper alternative to the vacuum evaporation technique. However the most popular spin-coating wet deposition process mainly used in the semiconductor industry is not applicable for large mother glass substrates used in display applications. The inkjet technology addresses this drawback and appears to be a good solution to produce on a large scale wet deposited OLEDs1. This process has been commonly used for polymer deposition and only a few examples2-4 have demonstrated the possibility of depositing small molecules in functional devices. Deposition of small molecules from inkjet printing is supposed to be easier than polymers because monomers do not show polydispersity and consequently the viscosity of the solution containing the monomers, the ink, is easily controllable in production. This work aims at fabricating OLEDs composed of inkjet-printed hole-transporting molecules and a new class of fluorescent molecules that have been further UV-photopolymerized right after deposition.

  12. Design of Catalytically Amplified Sensors for Small Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Makhlynets

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Catalytically amplified sensors link an allosteric analyte binding site with a reactive site to catalytically convert substrate into colored or fluorescent product that can be easily measured. Such an arrangement greatly improves a sensor’s detection limit as illustrated by successful application of ELISA-based approaches. The ability to engineer synthetic catalytic sites into non-enzymatic proteins expands the repertoire of analytes as well as readout reactions. Here we review recent examples of small molecule sensors based on allosterically controlled enzymes and organometallic catalysts. The focus of this paper is on biocompatible, switchable enzymes regulated by small molecules to track analytes both in vivo and in the environment.

  13. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhir Boujday

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR, (phase-modulated InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS, and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS. Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes.

  14. Automation of AMOEBA polarizable force field parameterization for small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Johnny C; Chattree, Gaurav; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-02-26

    A protocol to generate parameters for the AMOEBA polarizable force field for small organic molecules has been established, and polarizable atomic typing utility, Poltype, which fully automates this process, has been implemented. For validation, we have compared with quantum mechanical calculations of molecular dipole moments, optimized geometry, electrostatic potential, and conformational energy for a variety of neutral and charged organic molecules, as well as dimer interaction energies of a set of amino acid side chain model compounds. Furthermore, parameters obtained in gas phase are substantiated in liquid-phase simulations. The hydration free energy (HFE) of neutral and charged molecules have been calculated and compared with experimental values. The RMS error for the HFE of neutral molecules is less than 1 kcal/mol. Meanwhile, the relative error in the predicted HFE of salts (cations and anions) is less than 3% with a correlation coefficient of 0.95. Overall, the performance of Poltype is satisfactory and provides a convenient utility for applications such as drug discovery. Further improvement can be achieved by the systematic study of various organic compounds, particularly ionic molecules, and refinement and expansion of the parameter database. PMID:22505837

  15. Surfen, a small molecule antagonist of heparan sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Schuksz, Manuela; Fuster, Mark M.; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Ditto, David P.; Lawrence, Roger; Glass, Charles A; Wang, Lianchun; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2008-01-01

    In a search for small molecule antagonists of heparan sulfate, we examined the activity of bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide, also known as surfen. Fluorescence-based titrations indicated that surfen bound to glycosaminoglycans, and the extent of binding increased according to charge density in the order heparin > dermatan sulfate > heparan sulfate > chondroitin sulfate. All charged groups in heparin (N-sulfates, O-sulfates, and carboxyl groups) contributed to binding, consistent with...

  16. Transcription Factor-Based Small-Molecule Screens and Selections

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Jeffrey Allen

    2011-01-01

    Directed evolution of E. coli for improved small-molecule production requires a combination of rational design and high-throughput screening technologies. Rational design-based directed evolution schemes use structural analyses and metabolic models to help identify targets for mutagenesis, thus improving the likelihood of identifying the desired phenotype. We used a strictly rational design-based approach to re-engineer cytochrome P450BM3 for epoxidation of amorphadiene, developing a novel ...

  17. Small Molecules Enhance CRISPR Genome Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chen; Liu, Yanxia; Ma, Tianhua; Liu, Kai; Xu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Honglei; La Russa, Marie; Xie, Min; Sheng, Ding; Qi, Lei S.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has emerged as an effective tool for sequence-specific gene knockout through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), but it remains inefficient for precise editing of genome sequences. Here we develop a reporter-based screening approach for high-throughput identification of chemical compounds that can modulate precise genome editing through homology-directed repair (HDR). Using our screening method, we have identified small molecules that can enhance CRISPR-mediate...

  18. Photoionization of atoms and small molecules using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of synchrotron radiation and time-of-flight electron spectroscopy has been used to study the photoionization dynamics of atoms (Li) and small molecules (SF6, SiF4, and SO2). Partial cross sections and angular distribution asymmetry parameters have been measured for Auger electrons and photoelectrons as functions of photon energy. Emphasis is on the basic understanding of electron correlation and resonant effects as manifested in the photoemission spectra for these systems. 254 refs., 46 figs., 10 tabs

  19. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Noah R.; Wang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates.

  20. Polymer and small molecule based hybrid light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Vi-En; Choulis, Stelios; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Mathai, Mathew; So, Franky

    2010-03-16

    An organic electroluminescent device, includes: a substrate; a hole-injecting electrode (anode) coated over the substrate; a hole injection layer coated over the anode; a hole transporting layer coated over the hole injection layer; a polymer based light emitting layer, coated over the hole transporting layer; a small molecule based light emitting layer, thermally evaporated over the polymer based light emitting layer; and an electron-injecting electrode (cathode) deposited over the electroluminescent polymer layer.

  1. Reprogramming with Small Molecules instead of Exogenous Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could be employed in the creation of patient-specific stem cells, which could subsequently be used in various basic and clinical applications. However, current iPSC methodologies present significant hidden risks with respect to genetic mutations and abnormal expression which are a barrier in realizing the full potential of iPSCs. A chemical approach is thought to be a promising strategy for safety and efficiency of iPSC generation. Many small molecules have been identified that can be used in place of exogenous transcription factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming efficiency and quality. Recent studies have shown that the use of small molecules results in the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These studies might lead to new areas of stem cell research and medical applications, not only human iPSC by chemicals alone, but also safe generation of somatic stem cells for cell based clinical trials and other researches. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent advances in small molecule approaches for the generation of iPSCs.

  2. Small molecule screening identifies targetable zebrafish pigmentation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colanesi, Sarah; Taylor, Kerrie L; Temperley, Nicholas D;

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules complement genetic mutants and can be used to probe pigment cell biology by inhibiting specific proteins or pathways. Here, we present the results of a screen of active compounds for those that affect the processes of melanocyte and iridophore development in zebrafish and investig......Small molecules complement genetic mutants and can be used to probe pigment cell biology by inhibiting specific proteins or pathways. Here, we present the results of a screen of active compounds for those that affect the processes of melanocyte and iridophore development in zebrafish and...... investigate the effects of a few of these compounds in further detail. We identified and confirmed 57 compounds that altered pigment cell patterning, number, survival, or differentiation. Additional tissue targets and toxicity of small molecules are also discussed. Given that the majority of cell types......, including pigment cells, are conserved between zebrafish and other vertebrates, we present these chemicals as molecular tools to study developmental processes of pigment cells in living animals and emphasize the value of zebrafish as an in vivo system for testing the on- and off-target activities of...

  3. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  4. A new class of pluripotent stem cell cytotoxic small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Richards

    Full Text Available A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo.

  5. Computer-aided molecular modeling study on antibody recognition of small molecules: an immunoassay for triazine herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Meng; Na, Yu; Li, Lingling; Liu, Bing; Sheng, Wei; Lu, Xiaonan; Kennedy, Ivan; Crossan, Angus; Wang, Shuo

    2012-10-24

    Most immunoassays for determination of small molecules are still designed on the basis of the "trial and error" method, due to the lack of understanding of antibody recognition. In the present study, we developed a heterologous indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of triazine herbicides, with limits of detection for 11 triazines ranging from 0.05 to 29.4 μg/L. Mechanisms of the antigen-antibody interaction were studied by computer-aided molecular modeling (CAMM)-based quantitative structure-activity relationship analyses. Co-effects of the analytes' substructural hydrophobic, electrostatic, and steric fields on antibody recognition were further revealed. Hydrophobicity of the antigens was demonstrated to have the most important impact. Even less exposed substituents provided hydrophobic force to the antigen-antibody interaction. Dislocated orientation of analyte functional groups could lead to steric hindrance and hydrophobic misleading of antibody recognition. This may happen even when the antigens contained the same substituent as the hapten. Frontier orbital energies also affect the reaction significantly. This study highlights of the power of CAMM-based analyses, providing insights into antibody recognition of small molecules. PMID:23043348

  6. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  7. An autonomous chemically fuelled small-molecule motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Miriam R.; Solà, Jordi; Carlone, Armando; Goldup, Stephen M.; Lebrasseur, Nathalie; Leigh, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines are among the most complex of all functional molecules and lie at the heart of nearly every biological process. A number of synthetic small-molecule machines have been developed, including molecular muscles, synthesizers, pumps, walkers, transporters and light-driven and electrically driven rotary motors. However, although biological molecular motors are powered by chemical gradients or the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), so far there are no synthetic small-molecule motors that can operate autonomously using chemical energy (that is, the components move with net directionality as long as a chemical fuel is present). Here we describe a system in which a small molecular ring (macrocycle) is continuously transported directionally around a cyclic molecular track when powered by irreversible reactions of a chemical fuel, 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride. Key to the design is that the rate of reaction of this fuel with reactive sites on the cyclic track is faster when the macrocycle is far from the reactive site than when it is near to it. We find that a bulky pyridine-based catalyst promotes carbonate-forming reactions that ratchet the displacement of the macrocycle away from the reactive sites on the track. Under reaction conditions where both attachment and cleavage of the 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl groups occur through different processes, and the cleavage reaction occurs at a rate independent of macrocycle location, net directional rotation of the molecular motor continues for as long as unreacted fuel remains. We anticipate that autonomous chemically fuelled molecular motors will find application as engines in molecular nanotechnology.

  8. Small Molecule Identification with MOLGEN and Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Meringer; Schymanski, Emma L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details the MOLGEN entries for the 2012 CASMI contest for small molecule identification to demonstrate structure elucidation using structure generation approaches. Different MOLGEN programs were used for different categories, including MOLGEN–MS/MS for Category 1, MOLGEN 3.5 and 5.0 for Category 2 and MOLGEN–MS for Categories 3 and 4. A greater focus is given to Categories 1 and 2, as most CASMI participants entered these categories. The settings used and the reasons behind them ar...

  9. Discovery of small molecule antagonists of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Harshad K; Thompson, Mervyn; Wyman, Paul; Jerman, Jeffrey C; Egerton, Julie; Brough, Stephen; Stevens, Alexander J; Randall, Andrew D; Smart, Darren; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Davis, John B

    2004-07-16

    Small molecule antagonists of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1, also known as VR1) are disclosed. Ureas such as 5 (SB-452533) were used to explore the structure activity relationship with several potent analogues identified. Pharmacological studies using electrophysiological and FLIPR Ca(2+) based assays showed compound 5 was an antagonist versus capsaicin, noxious heat and acid mediated activation of TRPV1. Study of a quaternary salt of 5 supports a mode of action in which compounds from this series cause inhibition via an extracellularly accessible binding site on the TRPV1 receptor. PMID:15203132

  10. Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.W.; Silbey, R.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have initiated a program to perform spectroscopic and dynamic studies of small molecules. Large amplitude motions in excited acetylene were discussed along with plans to record the dispersed fluorescence (DF) and the stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra. SEP spectra were reported for the formyl radical. A Fourier transform spectrometer was discussed with respect to its ability to probe the structure of radicals. This instrument is capable of performing studies using various techniques such as magnetic rotation spectroscopy and sub-Doppler sideband-OODR Zeman (SOODRZ) spectroscopy.

  11. Spectra and dynamics of small molecules Alexander von Humboldt lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    These seven lectures are intended to serve as an introduction for beginning graduate students to the spectra of small molecules. The author succeeds in illustrating the concepts by using language and metaphors that capture and elegantly convey simple insights into dynamics that lie beyond archival molecular constants. The lectures can simultaneously be viewed as a collection of interlocking special topics that have fascinated the author and his students over the years. Though neither a textbook nor a scholarly monograph, the book provides an illuminating perspective that will benefit students and researchers alike.

  12. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1and HLA-DR antigens in uveitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    目的:研究细胞间粘附分子-1(intellular adhesion molecule-1,ICAM-1)和人体组织相关抗原(human leudocyte antigen,HLA-DR)在萄萄膜炎免疫反应中的作用.方法:应用免疫组织化学染色检查20只正常眼和54例葡萄糖膜炎眼球摘除眼(其中外源性33例和内源性21例)的脉络膜和视网膜组织中ICAM-1和HLA-DR的表达.结果:正常眼的脉络膜和视网膜组织没有ICAM-1的阳性染色,没有或较少有HLA-DR的表达,葡萄膜炎眼中二者有增高表达(P<0.01),而外源性和内源性葡萄膜炎眼组间表达统计学上无显著差异(P>0.05).结论:ICAM-1、HLA-DR分子能够介导白细胞和炎症部位组织细胞的识别和粘附,二者的共同表达说明它们在葡萄糖膜炎脉络膜视网膜组织的免疫性损伤中具有重要意义.%Objective :To study the effects of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and human leukocyte antigen (HAL-DR) on the immunopathologic process of uveitis. Methods:Imn- munohistochemical techniques were applied to detect their expression in eyes of both the health (20 cases from eye bank) and patients with uveitis (54 cases with 54 eyes which included 33 ex- ogenous uveitis and 21 endogenous one). Results:Both the two ant igens were detectable in the choroidal and retinal tissues in eyes of uveitis while all the normal eyes showed negative expres- sion of ICAM-1 and negative or little expression of HLA-DR (P<0. 01). However,there was no statistically significant difference between exogenous and endogenous types (P>0. 05). Conclu- sion: Both ICAM-1 and HLA-DR may be responsible for cell recognition and binding in the in- flarnmatory tissues. The co-expression of ICAM-1 and HAL-DR showed that these two factors might play an important role in the immunologic damage of the choroid and retina in uveitis.

  13. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  14. An in vitro selection for small molecule induced switching RNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Laura; Ellington, Andrew D; Mansy, Sheref S

    2016-08-15

    The selection of RNA and DNA aptamers now has a long history. However, the ability to directly select for conformational changes upon ligand binding has remained elusive. These difficulties have stymied attempts at making small molecule responsive strand displacement circuitry as well as synthetic riboswitches. Herein we present a detailed strand displacement based selection protocol to directly select for RNA molecules with switching activity. The library was based on a previously selected thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch. The fully in vitro methodology gave sequences that showed strong strand displacement activity in the presence of thiamine pyrophosphate. Further, the selected sequences possessed riboswitch activity similar to that of natural riboswitches. The presented methodology should aid in the design of more complex, environmentally responsive strand displacement circuitry and in the selection of riboswitches responsive to toxic ligands. PMID:26899430

  15. Oral small molecule therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, Neal J

    2013-11-01

    For more than 20 years, "enzyme replacement therapy" (ERT) has been the prevalent treatment approach for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Unfortunately, ERT, as currently administered, is ineffective for primary neuronopathic LSDs. For LSDs whose major disease burden is non-neurological, ERT efficacy is limited by uneven tissue distribution and penetration, immunological intolerance, and disturbed intracellular homeostasis associated with persistent mutant enzymes that are not "replaced" by ERT. Many of these limitations might be circumvented by oral, low molecular weight pharmaceuticals that address relevant LSD pathophysiology and distribute widely in steady state concentrations in all cells and body tissues including the CNS. Two oral small molecule drugs (miglustat and cysteamine) are currently approved for clinical use and two (eliglustat and migalastat) are in advanced stage clinical trials. Several others are in early stages of clinical or pre-clinical investigation. This article reviews current knowledge of small molecule treatment for LSDs including approaches such as substrate synthesis inhibition, pharmacological chaperones, and proteostasis modification. PMID:24380126

  16. Roles of small molecules in somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-bin SU; Duan-qing PEI; Bao-ming QIN

    2013-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine 2012 was awarded to Sir John B GURDON and Shinya YAMANAKA for their discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent.This event reaffirms the importance of research on cell fate plasticity and the technology progress in the stem cell field and regenerative medicine.Indeed,reprogramming technology has developed at a dazzling speed within the past 6 years,yet we are still at the early stages of understanding the mechanisms of cell fate identity.This is particularly true in the case of human induced pluripotent stem ceils (iPSCs),which lack reliable standards in the evaluation of their fidelity and safety prior to their application.Along with the genetic approaches,small molecules nowadays become convenient tools for modulating endogenous protein functions and regulating key cellular processes,including the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition,metabolism,signal transduction and epigenetics.Moreover,small molecules may affect not only the efficiency of clone formation but also the quality of the resulting cells.With increasing availability of such chemicals,we can better understand the biology of stems cells and further improve the technology of generation of stem cells.

  17. Reprogramming the assembly of unmodified DNA with a small molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Nicole; Greschner, Andrea A.; Aldaye, Faisal; Serpell, Christopher J.; Toader, Violeta; Petitjean, Anne; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of DNA to store and encode information arises from base pairing of the four-letter nucleobase code to form a double helix. Expanding this DNA ‘alphabet’ by synthetic incorporation of new bases can introduce new functionalities and enable the formation of novel nucleic acid structures. However, reprogramming the self-assembly of existing nucleobases presents an alternative route to expand the structural space and functionality of nucleic acids. Here we report the discovery that a small molecule, cyanuric acid, with three thymine-like faces, reprogrammes the assembly of unmodified poly(adenine) (poly(A)) into stable, long and abundant fibres with a unique internal structure. Poly(A) DNA, RNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) all form these assemblies. Our studies are consistent with the association of adenine and cyanuric acid units into a hexameric rosette, which brings together poly(A) triplexes with a subsequent cooperative polymerization. Fundamentally, this study shows that small hydrogen-bonding molecules can be used to induce the assembly of nucleic acids in water, which leads to new structures from inexpensive and readily available materials.

  18. Discovery and development of small molecule SHIP phosphatase modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viernes, Dennis R; Choi, Lydia B; Kerr, William G; Chisholm, John D

    2014-07-01

    Inositol phospholipids play an important role in the transfer of signaling information across the cell membrane in eukaryotes. These signals are often governed by the phosphorylation patterns on the inositols, which are mediated by a number of inositol kinases and phosphatases. The src homology 2 (SH2) containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) plays a central role in these processes, influencing signals delivered through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. SHIP modulation by small molecules has been implicated as a treatment in a number of human disease states, including cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, alteration of SHIP phosphatase activity may provide a means to facilitate bone marrow transplantation and increase blood cell production. This review discusses the cellular signaling pathways and protein-protein interactions that provide the molecular basis for targeting the SHIP enzyme in these disease states. In addition, a comprehensive survey of small molecule modulators of SHIP1 and SHIP2 is provided, with a focus on the structure, potency, selectivity, and solubility properties of these compounds. PMID:24302498

  19. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Type III Secretion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Gu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant pathogens have presented increasing challenges to the discovery and development of new antibacterial agents. The type III secretion system (T3SS, existing in bacterial chromosomes or plasmids, is one of the most complicated protein secretion systems. T3SSs of animal and plant pathogens possess many highly conserved main structural components comprised of about 20 proteins. Many Gram-negative bacteria carry T3SS as a major virulence determinant, and using the T3SS, the bacteria secrete and inject effector proteins into target host cells, triggering disease symptoms. Therefore, T3SS has emerged as an attractive target for antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, many T3SS-targeting small-molecule inhibitors have been discovered; these inhibitors prevent the bacteria from injecting effector proteins and from causing pathophysiology in host cells. Targeting the virulence of Gram-negative pathogens, rather than their survival, is an innovative and promising approach that may greatly reduce selection pressures on pathogens to develop drug-resistant mutations. This article summarizes recent progress in the search for promising small-molecule T3SS inhibitors that target the secretion and translocation of bacterial effector proteins.

  20. First-in-class small molecule potentiators of cancer virotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Mark H; Krishnan, Ramya; Macklin, Andrew M; Selman, Mohammed; El Sayes, Nader; Son, Hwan Hee; Davis, Colin; Chen, Andrew; Keillor, Kerkeslin; Le, Penny J; Moi, Christina; Ou, Paula; Pardin, Christophe; Canez, Carlos R; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Bell, John C; Smith, Jeffrey C; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Boddy, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    The use of engineered viral strains such as gene therapy vectors and oncolytic viruses (OV) to selectively destroy cancer cells is poised to make a major impact in the clinic and revolutionize cancer therapy. In particular, several studies have shown that OV therapy is safe and well tolerated in humans and can infect a broad range of cancers. Yet in clinical studies OV therapy has highly variable response rates. The heterogeneous nature of tumors is widely accepted to be a major obstacle for OV therapeutics and highlights a need for strategies to improve viral replication efficacy. Here, we describe the development of a new class of small molecules for selectively enhancing OV replication in cancer tissue. Medicinal chemistry studies led to the identification of compounds that enhance multiple OVs and gene therapy vectors. Lead compounds increase OV growth up to 2000-fold in vitro and demonstrate remarkable selectivity for cancer cells over normal tissue ex vivo and in vivo. These small molecules also demonstrate enhanced stability with reduced electrophilicity and are highly tolerated in animals. This pharmacoviral approach expands the scope of OVs to include resistant tumors, further potentiating this transformative therapy. It is easily foreseeable that this approach can be applied to therapeutically enhance other attenuated viral vectors. PMID:27226390

  1. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  2. Small Molecules Facilitate Single Factor-Mediated Hepatic Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Tae Lim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that defined factors could lead to the direct conversion of fibroblasts into induced hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps. However, reported conversion efficiencies are very low, and the underlying mechanism of the direct hepatic reprogramming is largely unknown. Here, we report that direct conversion into iHeps is a stepwise transition involving the erasure of somatic memory, mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, and induction of hepatic cell fate in a sequential manner. Through screening for additional factors that could potentially enhance the conversion kinetics, we have found that c-Myc and Klf4 (CK dramatically accelerate conversion kinetics, resulting in remarkably improved iHep generation. Furthermore, we identified small molecules that could lead to the robust generation of iHeps without CK. Finally, we show that Hnf1α supported by small molecules is sufficient to efficiently induce direct hepatic reprogramming. This approach might help to fully elucidate the direct conversion process and also facilitate the translation of iHep into the clinic.

  3. Small and innovative molecules as new strategy to revert MDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eZinzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MDR is a complex phenomenon principally due to the overexpression of some transmembrane proteins belonging to the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC transporter family. Among these transporters, P-Glycoprotein (P-gp, is the mostly involved in MDR and its overexpression is the major cause of cancer therapy failure. The classical approach used to overcome MDR is the co-administration of a P-gp inhibitor and the classic antineoplastic drugs, although the results were often unsatisfactory.Different classes of P-gp ligands have been developed and, among them, Tariquidar has been extensively studied both in vitro and in vivo. Although Tariquidar has been considered for several years the lead compound for the development of P-gp inhibitors, recent studies demonstrated to be substrate and inhibitor, in dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Tariquidar SAR studies were difficult to carry out because of the complexity of the structure that do not allow to establish the role of each moiety for P-gp activity. For this purpose, SMALL molecules bearing different scaffolds such as tetralin, biphenyl, arylthiazole, furoxane, furazane have been developed. Many of these ligands have been tested both in in vitro assays and in in vivo PET studies. These preliminary evaluations lead to obtain a library of P-gp interacting agents useful to conjugate chemotherapeutic agents displaying reduced pharmacological activity and appropriate small molecules.These molecules could get over the limits due to the antineoplastic-P-gp inhibitor co-administration since pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles are related to a dual innovative drug.

  4. Hybrid functionals and their application to small molecules and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Hybrid functionals, containing a fraction of the exact exchange, allow for a rather accurate treatment of e.g. small molecules and band gaps in bulk materials. A plane-wave based algorithm was implemented in VASP (Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package) to accomplish the calculation of the exact exchange. Two functionals including exact exchange are presently available, i.e. the PBE0 (Perdew-BurKEX-Ernzerhof) and the HSE (Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof). A rigorous assessment of the implementation was performed by geometry optimization and calculation of the atomization energies of the G2-1 quantum chemical test set, containing 55 molecules. Excellent agreement compared to corresponding Gaussian 03 data and good agreement with experiment was achieved. The mean absolute error (theory related to experiment) for the atomization energies calculated with the PBE and the PBE0 is 8.6 and 3.7 kcal/mol, respectively. To investigate the properties of bulk materials, the lattice constants and bulk moduli of twenty solids comprising ionic, semiconducting and metallic materials, have been calculated using the PBE, PBE0 and HSE functional, respectively. Additionally, full potential linearized augmented plane wave calculations were carried out with the WIEN2k package using the PBE exchange correlation functional. Both ab initio methods give very similar values, well below the deviations from experiment. Referring to the projector augmented wave results (VASP) the mean deviation of the lattice constants from experiment is 0.041 A, 0.026 A and 0.031 A for the PBE, PBE0 and HSE functional, respectively. In general, hybrid functionals seem to improve the description of insulating periodic systems in a way similar to that of small molecules. (author)

  5. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Shi, Hanchang; Long, Feng

    2016-01-28

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  6. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen S Gene is an Effective Carrier Molecule for Developing GnRH DNA Immunocastration Vaccine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y G; Ye, W J; Liu, G Q; Jiang, X P; Ijaz, N; Zhao, J Y; Tesema, B

    2016-06-01

    Relatively molecular mass of GnRH antigens is small and hence needs to couple to a large carrier molecule to enhance its immunogenicity. This study investigated whether hepatitis B surface antigen S (HBsAg-S) gene can be used as an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine. Two copies of human GnRH gene were fused with HBsAg-S gene for constructing a recombinant plasmid pVAX-HBsAg-S-2GnRH that coded for 27 kDa target fusion protein. Ten male mice were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (50 μg/mice) prepared in saline solution was injected into male mice at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 7 of the experiment. Vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in terms of GnRH-specific IgG antibody response, plasma testosterone levels, testicular weight and extent of the testicular tissue damage. The specific anti-GnRH antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than in controls in only 4th week of immunization (p vaccinated animals showed lower testicular weight than those of the controls (p vaccinated animals was suppressed. In conclusion, in this study, the engineered plasmid to be used as a GnRH DNA vaccine induced antibody response and suppressed spermatogenesis in mice. This suggests that HBsAg-S gene can be an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine when relatively molecular mass of the aimed antigens is small. PMID:27157596

  7. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  8. Current status of the prebiotic synthesis of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stanley L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments designed to simulate conditions on the primitive earth and to demonstrate how the organic compounds that made up the first living organisms were synthesized are described. Simulated atmospheres with CH4, N2, NH3, and H2O were found to be most effective for synthesis of small prebiotic molecules, although atmospheres with H2, CO, N2, and H2O, and with H2, CO2, N2, and H2O also give good yields of organic compounds provided the H2/CO and H2/CO2 ratios are above 1 and 2, respectively. The spark discharge (which is a good source of HCN) and UV light are also important. Reasonable prebiotic syntheses were worked out for the amino acids that occur in proteins (with the exception of lysine, arginine, and histidine), and for purines, pyrimidines, sugars, and nicotinic acid. Many of the molecules that have been produced in these simulated primitive-earth experiments are found in carbonaceous chondrites.

  9. New theoretical approaches for studying electron collisions with small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1989-06-07

    There has been a recent resurgence of interest in the use of algebraic variational methods for studying a variety of collision problems. Much of this interest stems from the discovery that spurious singularities, which plagued the traditional methods, can be eliminated when the variational principle is formulated with outgoing-wave boundary conditions. Another reason for the recent activity is the obvious suitability of these methods to present-day supercomputers. My purpose here is to describe an implementation of the complex Kohn method, an algebraic variational technique, for studying electron collisions with small molecules, both liner and non-linear, unlike variational principles based on the integral form of the Schroedinger equation (Lippmann-Schwinger equation), the method only requires Hamiltonian matrix elements. I will also show how the formalism allows one to develop a variational principle for computing first-order properties, such as bound-free dipole transition amplitudes. I will show results for the electron-impact dissociation of hydrogen as a function of initial vibrational quantum number. I will also illustrate the method for polyatomic molecules with results for elastic scattering of electrons by formaldehyde. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  10. New theoretical approaches for studying electron collisions with small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a recent resurgence of interest in the use of algebraic variational methods for studying a variety of collision problems. Much of this interest stems from the discovery that spurious singularities, which plagued the traditional methods, can be eliminated when the variational principle is formulated with outgoing-wave boundary conditions. Another reason for the recent activity is the obvious suitability of these methods to present-day supercomputers. My purpose here is to describe an implementation of the complex Kohn method, an algebraic variational technique, for studying electron collisions with small molecules, both liner and non-linear, unlike variational principles based on the integral form of the Schroedinger equation (Lippmann-Schwinger equation), the method only requires Hamiltonian matrix elements. I will also show how the formalism allows one to develop a variational principle for computing first-order properties, such as bound-free dipole transition amplitudes. I will show results for the electron-impact dissociation of hydrogen as a function of initial vibrational quantum number. I will also illustrate the method for polyatomic molecules with results for elastic scattering of electrons by formaldehyde. 14 refs., 2 figs

  11. Cytoprotective small molecule modulators of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Soumyabrata; Dahl, Russell

    2016-06-01

    Cellular health depends on the normal function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to fold, assemble, and modify critical proteins to maintain viability. When the ER cannot process proteins effectively, a condition known as ER stress ensues. When this stress is excessive or prolonged, cell death via apoptotic pathways is triggered. Interestingly, most major diseases have been shown to be intimately linked to ER stress, including diabetes, stroke, neurodegeneration, and many cancers. Thus, controlling ER stress presents a significant strategy for drug development for these diseases. The goal of this review is to present various small molecules that alleviate ER stress with the intention that they may serve as useful starting points for therapeutic agent development. PMID:27091069

  12. A novel small molecule inhibitor of hepatitis C virus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J Baldick

    Full Text Available Small molecule inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV are being developed to complement or replace treatments with pegylated interferons and ribavirin, which have poor response rates and significant side effects. Resistance to these inhibitors emerges rapidly in the clinic, suggesting that successful therapy will involve combination therapy with multiple inhibitors of different targets. The entry process of HCV into hepatocytes represents another series of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, involving viral structural proteins that have not been extensively explored due to experimental limitations. To discover HCV entry inhibitors, we utilized HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp incorporating E1-E2 envelope proteins from a genotype 1b clinical isolate. Screening of a small molecule library identified a potent HCV-specific triazine inhibitor, EI-1. A series of HCVpp with E1-E2 sequences from various HCV isolates was used to show activity against all genotype 1a and 1b HCVpp tested, with median EC50 values of 0.134 and 0.027 µM, respectively. Time-of-addition experiments demonstrated a block in HCVpp entry, downstream of initial attachment to the cell surface, and prior to or concomitant with bafilomycin inhibition of endosomal acidification. EI-1 was equally active against cell-culture adapted HCV (HCVcc, blocking both cell-free entry and cell-to-cell transmission of virus. HCVcc with high-level resistance to EI-1 was selected by sequential passage in the presence of inhibitor, and resistance was shown to be conferred by changes to residue 719 in the carboxy-terminal transmembrane anchor region of E2, implicating this envelope protein in EI-1 susceptibility. Combinations of EI-1 with interferon, or inhibitors of NS3 or NS5A, resulted in additive to synergistic activity. These results suggest that inhibitors of HCV entry could be added to replication inhibitors and interferons already in development.

  13. Interferon-gamma-like molecule induces Ia antigens on cultured mast cell progenitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, G H; Clark-lewis, I.; McKimm-Breschkin, J L; Schrader, J W

    1982-01-01

    Persisting (P) cells (murine cells that resemble mast cells and grow continuously in vitro for prolonged periods in the presence of a specific growth factor) did not express detectable levels of Ia antigens (murine class II major histocompatibility antigens) when their growth was supported by partially purified P cell-stimulating factor. However, when these Ia-negative P cells were transferred to medium conditioned by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells, Ia antigens appeared within 24 hr. ...

  14. Multiscale sensing of antibody-antigen interactions by organic transistors and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalini, Stefano; Dumitru, Andra C; Leonardi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Herruzo, Elena T; Campana, Alessandra; de Oliveira, Rafael F; Cramer, Tobias; Garcia, Ricardo; Biscarini, Fabio

    2015-05-26

    Antibody-antigen (Ab-Ag) recognition is the primary event at the basis of many biosensing platforms. In label-free biosensors, these events occurring at solid-liquid interfaces are complex and often difficult to control technologically across the smallest length scales down to the molecular scale. Here a molecular-scale technique, such as single-molecule force spectroscopy, is performed across areas of a real electrode functionalized for the immunodetection of an inflammatory cytokine, viz. interleukin-4 (IL4). The statistical analysis of force-distance curves allows us to quantify the probability, the characteristic length scales, the adhesion energy, and the time scales of specific recognition. These results enable us to rationalize the response of an electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor (EGOFET) operated as an IL4 immunosensor. Two different strategies for the immobilization of IL4 antibodies on the Au gate electrode have been compared: antibodies are bound to (i) a smooth film of His-tagged protein G (PG)/Au; (ii) a 6-aminohexanethiol (HSC6NH2) self-assembled monolayer on Au through glutaraldehyde. The most sensitive EGOFET (concentration minimum detection level down to 5 nM of IL4) is obtained with the first functionalization strategy. This result is correlated to the highest probability (30%) of specific binding events detected by force spectroscopy on Ab/PG/Au electrodes, compared to 10% probability on electrodes with the second functionalization. Specifically, this demonstrates that Ab/PG/Au yields the largest areal density of oriented antibodies available for recognition. More in general, this work shows that specific recognition events in multiscale biosensors can be assessed, quantified, and optimized by means of a nanoscale technique. PMID:25868724

  15. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  16. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  17. Localization of the simian virus 40 small t antigen in the nucleus and cytoplasm of monkey and mouse cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellman, M; Bikel, I; Figge, J; Roberts, T; Schlossman, R; Livingston, D M

    1984-01-01

    Monkey and mouse cells producing simian virus 40 small t antigen in the absence of clearly detectable intact or truncated large T antigens were subjected to indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical cell compartment analyses. Results revealed specific immunofluorescence and small t polypeptide in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of these cells.

  18. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nestle, F.O.; Burg, G.; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dend...

  19. Small organic molecules modulating iodine uptake in thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thyroid gland accumulates large quantities of iodine. This uptake is needed for the production of iodinated hormones (T3 and T4). The first step in the iodine accumulation is a basolateral transport of iodide ions by the cloned 'Natrium Iodide Sym-porter' also called NIS. Using high-throughput screening techniques, we have identified a series of inhibitors of the iodide uptake in thyrocytes. These compounds are of medical significance in case of thyroid deregulation and can also offer solutions for radio-iodine detoxification in case of emergency situations (nuclear industry...). In addition, these small organic molecules can be important tools for the understanding of NIS structure and functions In parallel, we have identified and characterized a single compound capable to strongly enhance the amount of intra-cellular iodide in rat thyrocytes (FRTL5) as well as in HEK293 cells transfected with hNIS (Natrium/Iodide Sym-porter). Preliminary studies show that this effect is NIS dependant, and is induced by alternative and unknown mechanisms. Future work will consist in unraveling the mode of action of this molecule. These informations will help us not only to better understand the iodide pathways in the thyroid, but also to design more active analogues. We will use photo-labelling techniques to identify new proteins involved in the iodide transfer and retention. In addition, preliminary experiments are underway to validate our compound as an anti-cancer agent. Targeted NIS gene delivery into tumors plus radio-iodide injection leads to tumor size regression. Unfortunately, doses of radioactivity are to high for safe treatment. Our compound may lead to enhanced radio-iodide entrapment, thus necessitating lower doses of radioactivity for tumor regression. (author)

  20. Small organic molecules modulating iodine uptake in thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambroise, Y. [CEA Saclay, DSV/DBJC/SMMCB, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The thyroid gland accumulates large quantities of iodine. This uptake is needed for the production of iodinated hormones (T3 and T4). The first step in the iodine accumulation is a basolateral transport of iodide ions by the cloned 'Natrium Iodide Sym-porter' also called NIS. Using high-throughput screening techniques, we have identified a series of inhibitors of the iodide uptake in thyrocytes. These compounds are of medical significance in case of thyroid deregulation and can also offer solutions for radio-iodine detoxification in case of emergency situations (nuclear industry...). In addition, these small organic molecules can be important tools for the understanding of NIS structure and functions In parallel, we have identified and characterized a single compound capable to strongly enhance the amount of intra-cellular iodide in rat thyrocytes (FRTL5) as well as in HEK293 cells transfected with hNIS (Natrium/Iodide Sym-porter). Preliminary studies show that this effect is NIS dependant, and is induced by alternative and unknown mechanisms. Future work will consist in unraveling the mode of action of this molecule. These informations will help us not only to better understand the iodide pathways in the thyroid, but also to design more active analogues. We will use photo-labelling techniques to identify new proteins involved in the iodide transfer and retention. In addition, preliminary experiments are underway to validate our compound as an anti-cancer agent. Targeted NIS gene delivery into tumors plus radio-iodide injection leads to tumor size regression. Unfortunately, doses of radioactivity are to high for safe treatment. Our compound may lead to enhanced radio-iodide entrapment, thus necessitating lower doses of radioactivity for tumor regression. (author)

  1. High performance photovoltaic applications using solution-processed small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wan, Xiangjian; Long, Guankui

    2013-11-19

    Energy remains a critical issue for the survival and prosperity of humancivilization. Many experts believe that the eventual solution for sustainable energy is the use of direct solar energy as the main energy source. Among the options for renewable energy, photovoltaic technologies that harness solar energy offer a way to harness an unlimited resource and minimum environment impact in contrast with other alternatives such as water, nuclear, and wind energy. Currently, almost all commercial photovoltaic technologies use Si-based technology, which has a number of disadvantages including high cost, lack of flexibility, and the serious environmental impact of the Si industry. Other technologies, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, can overcome some of these issues. Today, polymer-based OPV (P-OPV) devices have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that exceed 9%. Compared with P-OPV, small molecules based OPV (SM-OPV) offers further advantages, including a defined structure for more reproducible performance, higher mobility and open circuit voltage, and easier synthetic control that leads to more diversified structures. Therefore, while largely undeveloped, SM-OPV is an important emerging technology with performance comparable to P-OPV. In this Account, we summarize our recent results on solution-processed SM-OPV. We believe that solution processing is essential for taking full advantage of OPV technologies. Our work started with the synthesis of oligothiophene derivatives with an acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure. Both the backbone conjugation length and electron withdrawing terminal groups play an important role in the light absorption, energy levels and performance of the devices. Among those molecules, devices using a 7-thiophene-unit backbone and a 3-ethylrhodanine (RD) terminal unit produced a 6.1% PCE. With the optimized conjugation length and terminal unit, we borrowed from the results with P-OPV devices to optimize the backbone. Thus we

  2. Novel patient cell-based HTS assay for identification of small molecules for a lysosomal storage disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Geng

    Full Text Available Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS, detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC acts as "plate fluorescence quencher" in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an

  3. Ion Momentum Imaging of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, low energy dissociative electron attachment (DEA) interactions have been of interest to varying biological and technological applications. To study the dynamics resulting from DEA, we used an ion-momentum imaging apparatus based on the Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) technique in which a molecular beam is crossed by a pulsed electron beam. The beam interaction takes place in a 4 π pulsed electrostatic spectrometer that collects the anion fragments resulting from DEA. The molecular beam is formed by a supersonic expansion which results in a well-localized and cold target. Using this apparatus we have investigated the DEA dynamics for several small molecules: CO2 at the 4 eV shape resonance and the 8 eV Feshbach resonance; N2O at the 2.3 eV shape resonance; HCCH at the 3 eV shape resonance; and CF4 near the 7 eV resonance. An overview of these experimental ion-momentum results will be compared to ab initio electronic structure and fixed-nuclei scattering calculations to gauge the resulting dynamics driven by DEA. In many cases, conical intersections play a pivotal role in driving the dynamics. Some of these systems exhibit non-axial recoil conditions indicative of a bending dynamics in the transitory negative ion state while others exhibit a direct axial recoil dissociation without any bending. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Contract NSF-PHYS1404366.

  4. Small Molecule Identification with MOLGEN and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Meringer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the MOLGEN entries for the 2012 CASMI contest for small molecule identification to demonstrate structure elucidation using structure generation approaches. Different MOLGEN programs were used for different categories, including MOLGEN–MS/MS for Category 1, MOLGEN 3.5 and 5.0 for Category 2 and MOLGEN–MS for Categories 3 and 4. A greater focus is given to Categories 1 and 2, as most CASMI participants entered these categories. The settings used and the reasons behind them are described in detail, while various evaluations are used to put these results into perspective. As one author was also an organiser of CASMI, these submissions were not part of the official CASMI competition, but this paper provides an insight into how unknown identification could be performed using structure generation approaches. The approaches are semi-automated (category dependent and benefit greatly from user experience. Thus, the results presented and discussed here may be better than those an inexperienced user could obtain with MOLGEN programs.

  5. Discovery of Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors of Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Kim; Londregan, Allyn T; Tesz, Gregory; Bahnck, Kevin B; Magee, Thomas V; Hepworth, David; Polivkova, Jana; Coffey, Steven B; Pabst, Brandon A; Gosset, James R; Nigam, Anu; Kou, Kou; Sun, Hao; Lee, Kyuha; Herr, Michael; Boehm, Markus; Carpino, Philip A; Goodwin, Bryan; Perreault, Christian; Li, Qifang; Jorgensen, Csilla C; Tkalcevic, George T; Subashi, Timothy A; Ahn, Kay

    2015-09-24

    Inhibition of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthetic enzymes has been suggested as a promising strategy to treat insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 3 (MGAT3) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the acylation of both monoacylglycerol (MAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) to generate DAG and TAG, respectively. Herein, we report the discovery and characterization of the first selective small molecule inhibitors of MGAT3. Isoindoline-5-sulfonamide (6f, PF-06471553) selectively inhibits MGAT3 with high in vitro potency and cell efficacy. Because the gene encoding MGAT3 (MOGAT3) is found only in higher mammals and humans, but not in rodents, a transgenic mouse model expressing the complete human MOGAT3 was used to characterize the effects of 6f in vivo. In the presence of a combination of diacylglycerol acyltransferases 1 and 2 (DGAT1 and DGAT2) inhibitors, an oral administration of 6f exhibited inhibition of the incorporation of deuterium-labeled glycerol into TAG in this mouse model. The availability of a potent and selective chemical tool and a humanized mouse model described in this report should facilitate further dissection of the physiological function of MGAT3 and its role in lipid homeostasis. PMID:26258602

  6. Inhibition of Nek2 by Small Molecules Affects Proteasome Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyao Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nek2 is a serine/threonine kinase localized to the centrosome. It promotes cell cycle progression from G2 to M by inducing centrosome separation. Recent studies have shown that high Nek2 expression is correlated with drug resistance in multiple myeloma patients. Materials and Methods. To investigate the role of Nek2 in bortezomib resistance, we ectopically overexpressed Nek2 in several cancer cell lines, including multiple myeloma lines. Small-molecule inhibitors of Nek2 were discovered using an in-house library of compounds. We tested the inhibitors on proteasome and cell cycle activity in several cell lines. Results. Proteasome activity was elevated in Nek2-overexpressing cell lines. The Nek2 inhibitors inhibited proteasome activity in these cancer cell lines. Treatment with these inhibitors resulted in inhibition of proteasome-mediated degradation of several cell cycle regulators in HeLa cells, leaving them arrested in G2/M. Combining these Nek2 inhibitors with bortezomib increased the efficacy of bortezomib in decreasing proteasome activity in vitro. Treatment with these novel Nek2 inhibitors successfully mitigated drug resistance in bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. Conclusion. Nek2 plays a central role in proteasome-mediated cell cycle regulation and in conferring resistance to bortezomib in cancer cells. Taken together, our results introduce Nek2 as a therapeutic target in bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal domain of pp60c-src molecules associated with polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Yonemoto, W; Jarvis-Morar, M; Brugge, J S; Bolen, J B; Israel, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the in vitro phosphorylation of cellular src protein (pp60c-src) molecules associated with the polyoma virus middle-sized tumor antigen in polyoma virus-transformed cells. These pp60c-src molecules possessed an enhanced tyrosyl kinase activity, migrated aberrantly on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels, and contained a novel site of tyrosine phosphorylation within the amino-terminal region of the molecule. The pp60c-src molecules not associated with the middle-sized tumor antigen we...

  8. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Targets the NEMO Adaptor Protein To Disrupt Inflammatory Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, David A.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Knight, Laura M.; Jackson, Brian R.; Richards, Kathryn; Prescott, Emma L.; Peach, A. Howard S.; Blair, G. Eric; MacDonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive nonmelanoma skin cancer arising from epidermal mechanoreceptor Merkel cells. In 2008, a novel human polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), was identified and is strongly implicated in MCC pathogenesis. Currently, little is known regarding the virus-host cell interactions which support virus replication and virus-induced mechanisms in cellular transformation and metastasis. Here we identify a new function of MCPyV small T antigen (ST)...

  9. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  10. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heredia A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alonso Heredia,1,3 Olga S Latinovic,2,3 Florent Barbault,4 Erik PH de Leeuw3,5 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 3Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMRCNRS7086, Paris, France; 5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV-1 infection into a managed condition with near-normal life expectancy. However, a significant number of patients remain with limited therapeutic options due to HIV-1 resistance, side effects, or drug costs. Further, it is likely that current drugs will not retain efficacy, due to risks of side effects and transmitted resistance.Results: We describe compound 5660386 (3-ethyl-2-[3-(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidene-1-propen-1-yl]-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 entry. Compound 5660386 inhibits HIV-1 entry in cell lines and primary cells, binds to HIV-1 envelope protein, and inhibits the interaction of GP120 to CD4. Further, compound 5660386 showed a unique and broad-range activity against primary HIV-1 isolates from different subtypes and geographical areas.Conclusion: Development of small-molecule entry inhibitors of HIV-1 such as 5660386 may lead to novel classes of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. These inhibitors may be particularly effective against viruses resistant to current antiretroviral drugs and could have potential applications in both treatment and prevention. Keywords: HIV-1, defensin, drug, entry, antiviral therapy, CD4

  11. Terminal protection of small molecule-linked ssDNA-SWNT nanoassembly for sensitive detection of small molecule and protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Dian-Ming Zhou; Zhan Wu; Li-Juan Tang; Jian-Hui Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between small molecules and proteins constitute a critical regulatory mechanism in many fundamental biological processes.A novel biosensing strategy has been developed for sensitive and selective detection of small molecule and protein interaction on the basis of terminal protection of small molecule-linked ssDNA-SWNT nanoassembly.The developed strategy is demonstrated using folate and its binding protein folate receptor (FR) as a model case.The results reveal the developed technique displays superb resistance to non-specific binding,very low detection limit as low as subnanomolar,and a wide dynamic range from 100 pmol/L to 500 nmol/L of FR.Thus,it may offer a simple,cost-effective,highly selective and sensitive platform for homogeneous fluorescence detection of small molecule-protein interaction and related biochemical studies.

  12. Synthesis of a small molecule walker and the application of mechanically interlocked ligands in asymmetric catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoekman, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports the synthesis of a novel synthetic small molecule walker, a chiral [2]rotaxane and a single-handed trefoil knot. The last two were employed as ligands for metal catalysed asymmetric reactions.Chapter 1 explains what small molecule walkers are and their resemblance to nature’s walking proteins. The motor protein myosin is discussed in more detail, followed by a section about small molecules that diffuse along a surface and recent advances in dynamic covalent walker systems....

  13. Identification of a sulfate-bearing molecule associated with HLA class II antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, A J; Cullen, S E; Schwartz, B D

    1984-01-01

    The human Ia antigens (DR, DS, and SB), determined by genes contained within the HLA complex on chromosome 6, are glycoprotein heterodimers consisting of a Mr approximately equal to 34,000 alpha chain and a Mr approximately equal to 28,000 beta chain. As a result of studies exploring the possibility that alpha or beta (or both) might be sulfated, a unique component of the oligomeric Ia antigen complex was discovered. When anti-Ia immunoprecipitates from Nonidet P-40 lysates of [35S]sulfate-la...

  14. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1 -specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the α1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the α1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the α2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules

  15. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  16. High performance small-molecule organic thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Chen

    The roadmap of developing microelectronics has a new branch: organic electronics. Organic electronics, which utilizes the electrical properties of organic materials in the active or passive layers, is an emerging technology that has received much attention. In conjunction with today's demands for new materials and devices, many technologies have emerged for developing organic electronics and consolidating applications and markets. An organic thin-film transistor is the essential device in this paradigm in addition to organic photodiodes and organic light emitting diodes. This thesis presents advances made in design and fabrication of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) using small-molecule organic semiconductors (pentacene, anthradithiophene, and their derivatives) as the active layer with record device performance. In this work OTFT test structures fabricated on oxidized silicon substrates were utilized to provide a convenient substrate, gate contact, and gate insulator for the processing and characterization of vapor-deposited organic materials and their transistors. By developing a gate dielectric treatment using silane coupling agents the performance and yield of pentacene OTFTs was improved and a field-effect mobility of larger than 2 cm2/V-s was achieved. Such device performance is comparable to a-Si:H TFTs and have the potential for electronic applications. In addition, the first direct photolithographic process for top contacts to pentacene OTFTs on oxidized silicon with an acceptable performance (a field-effect mobility of 0.3 cm2/V-s, an on/off current ratio of 10 7, and a subthreshold slope of 1 V/decade) was developed. The multiple layer photoresist process demonstrated the feasibility of creating source and drain metallic electrodes on vapor-deposited pentacene thin films with a resolution less than 10 mum. Subsequently, solution-processed OTFTs were then investigated and high performance transistors, with field-effect mobilities > 1 cm2/V-s and an

  17. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A

    2011-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is characterized by leukoerythroblastic anemia with circulating immature myeloid cells, including CD34+ cells, progressive splenomegaly and accumulation of connective tissue and neoangiogenesis in the bone marrow. Altered bone marrow stroma and cell adherence account for...... the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an...

  18. Structural requirements for the interaction between class II MHC molecules and peptide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E; Adorini, L; Grey, H M

    1990-01-01

    Previous work from our and other laboratories indicates that T cells recognize a complex between the MHC restriction element and peptide antigen fragments. This paper reviews the structural characteristics of the formation of such a complex. By analyzing in detail the interactions between purified...

  19. Adsorption of small gas molecules on B36 nanocluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Younes Valadbeigi; Hossein Farrokhpour; Mahmoud Tabrizchi

    2015-11-01

    Adsorption of CO, N2, H2O, O2, H2 and NO molecules on B36 cluster was studied using density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. Energies, enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of the adsorption processes were calculated. The thermodynamic data showed that the B36 cluster is a good adsorbent only for CO, O2 and NO molecules. The calculated energies of adsorption of N2, H2 O and H2 on the B36 cluster were positive values. CO molecule is adsorbed via the carbon atom more effectively, while the nitrogen atom of NO is adsorbed better than the oxygen atom. Also, when NO and O2 are adsorbed synchronously via both atoms, they dissociate. The edge boron atoms of the B36 cluster showed more reactivity than the inner atoms.

  20. Human lung tumor-associated antigen identified as an extracellular matrix adhesion molecule

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A single chain glycoprotein with an estimated molecular mass of 160 kD (gp160) was previously identified as a human lung tumor-associated antigen. This tumor marker is shown here to be associated noncovalently with a second 130-kD protein. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies of surface iodinated lung tumor cell lysates reveal that this heterodimeric complex is indistinguishable serologically and structurally from the integrin VLA-2, found originally on activated T lymphocytes and platelets...

  1. Hide and seek: Identification and confirmation of small molecule protein targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Andrei; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-08-15

    Target identification and confirmation for small molecules is often the rate limiting step in drug discovery. A robust method to identify proteins addressed by small molecules is affinity chromatography using chemical probes. These usually consist of the compound of interest equipped with a linker molecule and a proper tag. Recently, methods emerged that allow the identification of protein targets without prior functionalization of the small molecule of interest. The digest offers an update on the newest developments in the area of target identification with special focus on confirmation techniques. PMID:26115575

  2. Sjogren's Syndrome Antigen B Acts as an Endogenous Danger Molecule to Induce Interleukin-8 Gene Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Han Wu

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome antigen B is expressed in the nucleus and surface membrane of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is released after cell death. However, its biological role is not clear. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of Sjögren's syndrome antigen B on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.Human recombinant Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (rSSB purified from E. coli was incubated with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils as well as retinoid acid-induced granulocytic differentiated HL-60 cells, HL-60 (RA. Interleukin (IL-8 protein production and mRNA expressions were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-rSSB was assessed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and nuclear factor-kappaB activation were investigated.Human rSSB stimulated IL-8 production from normal human neutrophils and HL-60 (RA cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This IL-8-stimulated activity was blocked by chloroquine and NH4Cl, indicating that endosomal acidification is important for this effect. We found rSSB activated both MAPK pathway and nuclear factor-kappaB signaling to transcribe the IL-8 gene expression of cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α exerted an additive effect and rSSB-anti-SSB immune complex exhibited a synergistic effect on rSSB-induced IL-8 production.Sjögren's syndrome antigen B might act as an endogenous danger molecule to enhance IL-8 gene expression in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

  3. Ambient roll-to-roll fabrication of flexible solar cells based on small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yuze; Dam, Henrik Friis; Andersen, Thomas Rieks;

    2013-01-01

    All solution-processed roll-to-roll flexible solar cells based on a starshaped small molecule donor and PCBMacceptor were fabricated by slot-die coating, as the first successful example reported for small molecule roll-to-roll flexible solar cells....

  4. Group specific internal standard technology (GSIST) for simultaneous identification and quantification of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Jiri; Yang, Wen-Chu; Regnier, Fred E

    2014-01-14

    Reagents and methods are provided that permit simultaneous analysis of multiple diverse small molecule analytes present in a complex mixture. Samples are labeled with chemically identical but isotopically distince forms of the labeling reagent, and analyzed using mass spectrometry. A single reagent simultaneously derivatizes multiple small molecule analytes having different reactive functional groups.

  5. Reassembly and reconstitution of separate alpha and beta chains of human leukocyte antigen DR4 molecule isolated from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J H; Maeng, C Y; Park, J H; Hahm, K S; Han, B D; Kim, K L

    1997-04-30

    The class II major histocompatibility complex molecules play a major role in presentation of exogenous antigenic peptides to the CD4 positive helper T cell. These are heterodimeric cell surface glycoproteins consisting of alpha- and beta-chains. In the present study, we cloned and expressed the alpha- and beta-chain of HLA-DR4 lacking the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain separately in Escherichia coli using the pET-5a expression vector system. The expressed alpha- and beta-chains were purified in a denaturing condition by an ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and a gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, respectively. The recombinant proteins were refolded and reassembled by removing the denaturing agent and concomitant reoxidation of the disulfide bond. The refolded heterodimeric rDR4 molecule was resolved by 12.5% SDS-PAGE in a nonreducing condition and confirmed by Western blot using polyclonal antibody against DR-alpha and the monoclonal antibody (L243) for the conformationally correct DR molecule. The rDR4 molecules were reconstituted with a 50-fold molar excess biot-HA (307-319), and the bound peptides to the heterodimer complex were determined by a microplate assay coated with L243 antibody using Extravidin-HRP conjugate. PMID:9163739

  6. Imaging Self-assembly Dependent Spatial Distribution of Small Molecules in Cellular Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on t...

  7. Imaging Self-assembly Dependent Spatial Distribution of Small Molecules in Cellular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the location of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work not only demonstrates that self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells. PMID:24266765

  8. Imaging self-assembly dependent spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2013-12-10

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in a cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit a different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in a cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the locations of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work demonstrates self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in a cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells. PMID:24266765

  9. Changes in tumor-antigen expression profile as human small-cell lung cancers progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group has previously observed that in patients with small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs), the expression of a tumor antigen, glioma big potassium (gBK) ion channel, is higher at the time of death than when the cancer is first treated by surgical resection. This study aimed to determine whether this dichotomy was common in other potential lung tumor antigens by examining the same patient samples using our more extensive profile analysis of tumor-antigen precursor protein (TAPP). We then tested the hypothesis that therapeutic intervention may inadvertently cause this increased gBK production. SCLC samples (eight surgical resections and three autopsy samples) and three control lungs were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for 42 potential TAPPs that represent potential T-cell-mediated immunological targets. Twenty-two TAPP mRNAs displayed the same profile as gBK, i.e., more mRNAs were expressed at autopsy than in their surgical counterparts. B-cyclin and mouse double minute 2, human homolog of P53-binding protein were elevated in both autopsy and surgical specimens above the normal-lung controls. When HTB119 cells were incubated with doxorubicin, gBK was strongly induced, as confirmed by intracellular flow cytometry with a gBK-specific antibody. Our findings suggested that more immunological targets became available as the tumor responded to chemotherapy and proceeded toward its terminal stages

  10. Electrostatic potential of several small molecules from density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A number of density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to calculate the electrostatic potential for the series of molecules N2, F2, NH3, H2O, CHF3, CHCl3, C6H6, TiF4, CO(NH2)2 and C4H5N3O compared with QCISD (quadratic configuration interaction method including single and double substitutions) results. Comparisons were made between the DFT computed results and the QCISD ab initio ones and MP2 ab initio ones, compared with the root-mean-square deviation and electrostatic potential difference contours figures. It was found that the hybrid DFT method B3LYP, yields electrostatic potential in good agreement with the QCISD results. It is suggest this is a useful approach, especially for large molecules that are difficult to study by ab initio methods.

  11. Networking by small-molecule hormones in plant immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Van der Ent, Sjoerd; van Wees, Saskia C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Plants live in complex environments in which they intimately interact with a broad range of microbial pathogens with different lifestyles and infection strategies. The evolutionary arms race between plants and their attackers provided plants with a highly sophisticated defense system that, like the animal innate immune system, recognizes pathogen molecules and responds by activating specific defenses that are directed against the invader. Recent advances in plant immunity research have provid...

  12. Characterization of antigen processing and presentation by peptide-linked MHC class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    MHC-Klasse-I-Moleküle präsentieren gewöhnlich Peptide, die aus zytosolischen Antigenproteinen durch proteasomalen Verdau generiert und anschließend vom TAP-Peptidtransporter ins endoplasmatische Retikulum transportiert werden. Es können jedoch auch endozytierte Antigene für die MHC-Klasse-I-vermittelten Antigenpräsentation prozessiert werden, wobei dieser alternative Weg entweder in einer Proteasom/TAP-abhängigen oder unabhängigen Weise abläuft. Während diese so genannte „Kreuzpräsentation“ f...

  13. Gradient-Driven Molecule Construction: An Inverse Approach Applied to the Design of Small-Molecule Fixating Catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Weymuth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational design of molecules and materials usually requires extensive screening of molecular structures for the desired property. The inverse approach to deduce a structure for a predefined property would be highly desirable, but is, unfortunately, not well-defined. However, feasible strategies for such an inverse design process may be successfully developed for specific purposes. We discuss options for calculating 'jacket' potentials that fulfill a predefined target requirement - a concept that we recently introduced [T. Weymuth, M. Reiher, MRS Proceediungs, 2013, 1524, DOI:10.1557/opl.2012.1764]. We consider the case of small-molecule activating transition metal catalysts. As a target requirement we choose the vanishing geometry gradients on all atoms of a subsystem consisting of a metal center binding the small molecule to be activated. The jacket potential can be represented within a full quantum model or by a sequence of approximations of which a field of electrostatic point charges is the simplest. In a...

  14. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone λHB''-1 from a phage λgt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone λHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone λHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the λHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone λHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens

  15. Calreticulin promotes folding of functional human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Slobodan; Lauvau, Grégoire; Gubler, Brigitte; van Endert, Peter M

    2004-12-24

    The assembly of MHC class I molecules with beta(2)-microglobulin and peptides is assisted by the housekeeping chaperones calnexin, calreticulin, and Erp57 and the dedicated accessory protein, tapasin. Tapasin and calreticulin are essential for efficient MHC class I assembly, but their precise action during class I assembly remains to be elucidated. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that the lectin calreticulin interacts with monoglucosylated MHC class I heavy chains, whatever their state of assembly with light chains and peptide, and inhibits their aggregation above physiological temperature. We used a soluble single chain HLA-A2/beta(2)-microglobulin molecule, A2SC, to study the effect of calreticulin on the peptide binding capacity of HLA class I molecules. Calreticulin inhibited the formation of A2SC aggregates both when co-expressed in insect cells and during incubations at elevated temperature. Calreticulin dramatically enhanced acquisition of peptide binding capacity when added to denatured A2SC molecules during refolding at 4 degrees C. However, it had no effect on the rapid loss of A2SC peptide binding capacity at physiological temperature. We conclude that calreticulin promotes the folding of HLA class I molecules to a state in which, at low temperature, they spontaneously acquire peptide binding capacity. However, it does not induce or maintain a peptide-receptive state of the class I-binding site, which is likely to be promoted by one or several other components of the class I loading complexes. By being amenable to complementation with additional proteins, the described system should be useful for identification of these components. PMID:15494401

  16. Milk IgA responses are augmented by antigen delivery to the mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan; Bourges, Dorothee; Wijburg, Odilia; Strugnell, Richard A; Lew, Andrew M

    2006-07-01

    The mucosal addressin cellular adhesion molecule 1 (MAdCAM) is expressed on the venules of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT); it is also expressed on the venules of the lobules of the mammary gland. We have previously found that MAdCAM-targeting using a rat anti-MAdCAM monoclonal Ab as both antigen and targeting moiety resulted in an enhanced local IgA gut response. We therefore surmised that such targeting may also enhance IgA responses in the mammary gland. We show that our model antigen localizes to the lobules of the mammary glands as well as the GALT, but not to the draining lymph nodes and that targeting MAdCAM results in secretory IgA responses in the milk. We provide evidence that this milk IgA Ab is of a secretory nature and is consistent with derivation from gut plasmablasts that have migrated to the mammary gland. Targeting MAdCAM may be a way for a novel vaccine strategy that affords protection to the mammary gland and the suckling neonate. PMID:16723174

  17. Expression of costimulatory molecules in antigen-activated peritoneal macrophages treated with either ovalbumin or palmitoyl-ova conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Márcia Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the mechanisms by which adjuvants are believed to promote T-cell activation and prevent induction of oral tolerance is by up-regulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells. Mice treated orally with palmitoyl-ovalbumin conjugates become immunized, while those treated with native ovalbumin (Ova become tolerant. Cells from the peritoneal cavity of B6D2F1 mice were cultured in the presence of 0.01, or 0.1 mg/100ml of either Ova, or palmitoyl-Ova and tested for the presence of cell markers. PE-conjugated anti-mouse CD80, CD86, and CD11b antibodies as well as biotin-PE were used to stain the antigen-activated peritoneal cells. A significant increase in the expression of CD86 and CD80 was observed following in vitro stimulation with palmitoyl-Ova; additionally, both Ova and palmitoyl-Ova induced the basal expression of CD11b. These findings could be related with the strong T-cell proliferative response induced by palmitoyl-Ova.

  18. Dissociative chemisorption dynamics of small molecules on metal surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Bin; XIE DaiQian

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been achieved for both experimental and theoretical studies on the dissociative chemisorption of molecules on surfaces.Quantum state-resolved experimental data has provided unprecedented details for these fundamental steps in heterogeneous catalysis,while the quantitative dynamics is still not fully understood in theory.An in-depth understanding of experimental observations relies on accurate dynamical calculations,in which the potential energy surface and adequate quantum mechanical implementation are desired.This article summarizes the current methodologies on the construction of potential energy surfaces and the quantum mechanical treatments,some of which are promising for future applications.The challenges in this field are also addressed.

  19. Experimental Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) studies of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmer, J. L.; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Ohalloran, M. A.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. An overview of current studies of excited molecular states is given to illustrate the principles and prospects of REMPI.

  20. FRET based quantification and screening technology platform for the interactions of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 with intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The interaction between leukocyte function-associated antigen-1(LFA-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 plays a pivotal role in cellular adhesion including the extravasation and inflammatory response of leukocytes, and also in the formation of immunological synapse. However, irregular expressions of LFA-1 or ICAM-1 or both may lead to autoimmune diseases, metastasis cancer, etc. Thus, the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we developed one simple 'in solution' steady state fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET technique to obtain the dissociation constant (Kd of the interaction between LFA-1 and ICAM-1. Moreover, we developed the assay into a screening platform to identify peptides and small molecules that inhibit the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction. For the FRET pair, we used Alexa Fluor 488-LFA-1 conjugate as donor and Alexa Fluor 555-human recombinant ICAM-1 (D1-D2-Fc as acceptor. From our quantitative FRET analysis, the Kd between LFA-1 and D1-D2-Fc was determined to be 17.93±1.34 nM. Both the Kd determination and screening assay were performed in a 96-well plate platform, providing the opportunity to develop it into a high-throughput assay. This is the first reported work which applies FRET based technique to determine Kd as well as classifying inhibitors of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  1. Pulse labeling of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in vivo reveals distinct patterns of antigen recognition by human autoimmune antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, D E; Reeves, W H; Conner, G E; Blobel, G; Kunkel, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies directed against small nuclear ribonucleoprotein ( snRNP ) particles are found in the Sm and RNP autoimmune sera from numerous patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). These two reactivities differ in disease distribution as well as antigen specificity. Although sera from both of these autoimmune syndromes contain snRNP reactive antibodies, distinction in antigen binding specificity have been difficult to define because of the par...

  2. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule...... "adamantyl-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental...

  3. Small angle neutron scattering from DNA molecules during gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed small angle neutron scattering experiments on agarose-DNA gels undergoing electrophoresis. Two kinds of DNA (5 and 50 kilobase pairs) were used with applied fields up to 5 V/cm. The SANS patterns obtained do not show evidence of any anisotropic scattering. This result is discussed in the context of current theories of DNA fragments migrating through a polysaccharide network. (orig.)

  4. Developing an Efficient and General Strategy for Immobilization of Small Molecules onto Microarrays Using Isocyanate Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenggang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P.; Cui, Zhaomeng; Li, Quanfu; Dang, Yongjun; Mi, Lan; Zheng, Fengyun; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule microarray (SMM) is an effective platform for identifying lead compounds from large collections of small molecules in drug discovery, and efficient immobilization of molecular compounds is a pre-requisite for the success of such a platform. On an isocyanate functionalized surface, we studied the dependence of immobilization efficiency on chemical residues on molecular compounds, terminal residues on isocyanate functionalized surface, lengths of spacer molecules, and post-printing treatment conditions, and we identified a set of optimized conditions that enable us to immobilize small molecules with significantly improved efficiencies, particularly for those molecules with carboxylic acid residues that are known to have low isocyanate reactivity. We fabricated microarrays of 3375 bioactive compounds on isocyanate functionalized glass slides under these optimized conditions and confirmed that immobilization percentage is over 73%. PMID:26999137

  5. Ascorbic Acid and Gene Expression: Another Example of Regulation of Gene Expression by Small Molecules?

    OpenAIRE

    Belin, Sophie; Kaya, Ferdinand; Burtey, Stéphane; Fontes, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C, AA) has long been considered a food supplement necessary for life and for preventing scurvy. However, it has been reported that other small molecules such as retinoic acid (vitamin A) and different forms of calciferol (vitamin D) are directly involved in regulating the expression of numerous genes. These molecules bind to receptors that are differentially expressed in the embryo and are therefore crucial signalling molecules in vertebrate development. The question is...

  6. Combinatorics of feedback in cellular uptake and metabolism of small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the connection between structure and function for regulatory motifs associated with cellular uptake and usage of small molecules. Based on the boolean logic of the feedback we suggest four classes: the socialist, consumer, fashion, and collector motifs. We find that the socialist motif is good for homeostasis of a useful but potentially poisonous molecule, whereas the consumer motif is optimal for nutrition molecules. Accordingly, examples of these motifs are found in, respectively...

  7. Matrix Infrared Spectroscopic and Computational Investigations of Novel Small Uranium Containing Molecules - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Lester

    2014-10-17

    Direct reactions of f-element uranium, thorium and lanthanide metal atoms were investigated with small molecules. These metal atoms were generated by laser ablation and mixed with the reagent molecules then condensed with noble gases at 4K. The products were analyzed by absorption of infrared light to measure vibrational frequencies which were confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. We have learned more about the reactivity of uranium atoms with common molecules, which will aid in the develolpment of further applications of uranium.

  8. Recent advances in inorganic materials for LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C Y; Deng, C H

    2016-05-10

    In this review, various inorganic materials were summarized for the analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). Due to its tremendous advantages, such as simplicity, high speed, high throughput, small analyte volumes and tolerance towards salts, LDI-MS has been widely used in various analytes. During the ionization process, a suitable agent is required to assist the ionization, such as an appropriate matrix for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). However, it is normally difficult to analyze small molecules with the MALDI technique because conventional organic matrices may produce matrix-related peaks in the low molecular-weight region, which limits the detection of small molecules (m/z energy and improve the ionization efficiency of analytes. In addition, functionalized inorganic materials can act as both an adsorbent and an agent in the enrichment and ionization of small molecules. In this review, we mainly focus on present advances in inorganic materials for the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules in the last five years, which contains the synthetic protocols of novel inorganic materials and the detailed results achieved by inorganic materials. On the other hand, this review also summarizes the application of inorganic materials as adsorbents in the selective enrichment of small molecules, which provides a new field for the application of inorganic materials. PMID:27050451

  9. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaris, Alexander L.; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K.; Alamparambil, Zita R.; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (~90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)--a clinically approved NIR-I dye--in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ~4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  10. β-phenylethylamine, a small molecule with a large impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsfeld, Meredith; Spadafore, Matthew; Prüß, Birgit M

    2013-09-30

    During a screen of bacterial nutrients as inhibitors of Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm, the Prüß research team made an intriguing observation: among 95 carbon and 95 nitrogen sources tested, β-phenylethylamine (PEA) performed best at reducing bacterial cell counts and biofilm amounts, when supplemented to liquid beef broth medium. This review article summarizes what is known about PEA. After some starting information on the chemistry of the molecule, we focus on PEA as a neurotransmitter and then move on to its role in food processing. PEA is a trace amine whose molecular mechanism of action differs from biogenic amines, such as serotonin or dopamine. Especially low or high concentrations of PEA may be associated with specific psychological disorders. For those disorders that are characterized by low PEA levels (e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), PEA has been suggested as a 'safe' alternative to drugs, such as amphetamine or methylphenidate, which are accompanied by many undesirable side effects. On the food processing end, PEA can be detected in food either as a result of microbial metabolism or thermal processing. PEA's presence in food can be used as an indicator of bacterial contamination. PMID:24482732

  11. Novel apigenin based small molecule that targets snake venom metalloproteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalaiah Srinivasa

    Full Text Available The classical antivenom therapy has appreciably reduced snakebite mortality rate and thus is the only savior drug available. Unfortunately, it considerably fails to shield the viper bite complications like hemorrhage, local tissue degradation and necrosis responsible for severe morbidity. Moreover, the therapy is also tagged with limitations including anaphylaxis, serum sickness and poor availability. Over the last decade, snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs are reported to be the primary component responsible for hemorrhage and tissue degradation at bitten site. Thus, antivenom inability to offset viper venom-induced local toxicity has been a basis for an insistent search for SVMP inhibitors. Here we report the inhibitory effect of compound 5d, an apigenin based molecule against SVMPs both in silico and in vivo. Several apigenin analogues are synthesized using multicomponent Ugi reactions. Among them, compound 5d effectively abrogated Echis carinatus (EC venom-induced local hemorrhage, tissue necrosis and myotoxicity in a dose dependant fashion. The histopathological study further conferred effective inhibition of basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of EC venom inoculation. The compound also protected EC venom-induced fibrin and fibrinogen degradation. The molecular docking of compound 5d and bothropasin demonstrated the direct interaction of hydroxyl group of compound with Glu146 present in hydrophobic pocket of active site and does not chelate Zn2+. Hence, it is concluded that compound 5d could be a potent agent in viper bite management.

  12. Methods to enable the design of bioactive small molecules targeting RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D.; Yildirim, Ilyas; Childs-Disney, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is an immensely important target for small molecule therapeutics or chemical probes of function. However, methods that identify, annotate, and optimize RNA-small molecule interactions that could enable the design of compounds that modulate RNA function are in their infancies. This review describes recent approaches that have been developed to understand and optimize RNA motif-small molecule interactions, including Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (StARTS), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), chemical similarity searching, structure-based design and docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Case studies described include the design of small molecules targeting RNA expansions, the bacterial A-site, viral RNAs, and telomerase RNA. These approaches can be combined to afford a synergistic method to exploit the myriad of RNA targets in the transcriptome. PMID:24357181

  13. Stereochemistry definition of small organic molecules in solution: [H-H] NOE + molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheme of theoretical method of molecular configuration definition for small organic molecules in solution has been presented. The method bases on measurements of nuclear Overhauser effects for proton-proton interactions and molecular mechanics calculations

  14. Characteristics of product recalls of biopharmaceuticals and small-molecule drugs in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbers, Hans C; Tienda, Nina Fuentes de; Hoefnagel, Marcel C; Nibbeling, Ria; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2016-04-01

    Compared with chemically synthesized small-molecule drugs, the manufacturing process of biopharmaceuticals is more complex. Unexpected changes to product characteristics following manufacturing changes have given rise to calls for robust systems to monitor the postauthorization safety of biopharmaceuticals. We compared quality-related product recalls in the USA of biopharmaceuticals and of small molecules. Although the reasons for recalls for biopharmaceuticals differed from those for small molecules, adverse events were rarely reported. The relative contribution of recalls that could cause serious adverse health consequences was not greater for biopharmaceuticals than for small molecules. Therefore, these data do not give rise to concerns that biopharmaceuticals are more frequently associated with unexpected safety concerns. PMID:26552336

  15. Supercomputer algorithms for reactivity, dynamics and kinetics of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even for small systems, the accurate characterization of reactive processes is so demanding of computer resources as to suggest the use of supercomputers having vector and parallel facilities. The full advantages of vector and parallel architectures can sometimes be obtained by simply modifying existing programs, vectorizing the manipulation of vectors and matrices, and requiring the parallel execution of independent tasks. More often, however, a significant time saving can be obtained only when the computer code undergoes a deeper restructuring, requiring a change in the computational strategy or, more radically, the adoption of a different theoretical treatment. This book discusses supercomputer strategies based upon act and approximate methods aimed at calculating the electronic structure and the reactive properties of small systems. The book shows how, in recent years, intense design activity has led to the ability to calculate accurate electronic structures for reactive systems, exact and high-level approximations to three-dimensional reactive dynamics, and to efficient directive and declaratory software for the modelling of complex systems

  16. Light-up properties of complexes between thiazole orange-small molecule conjugates and aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Renjun; Rothman, Jeffrey; Xie, Yuli; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2009-01-01

    The full understanding of dynamics of cellular processes hinges on the development of efficient and non-invasive labels for intracellular RNA species. Light-up aptamers binding fluorogenic ligands show promise as specific labels for RNA species containing those aptamers. Herein, we took advantage of existing, non-light-up aptamers against small molecules and demonstrated a new class of light-up probes in vitro. We synthesized two conjugates of thiazole orange dye to small molecules (GMP and A...

  17. Is there a future for small molecule drugs in the treatment of rheumatic diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Stanczyk, Joanna; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review, we outline the landscape of recent developments regarding small molecule compounds for the treatment of inflammatory disorders by discussing drug candidates currently in the pipeline. We also stress the fact that novel techniques are available to evaluate the safety of new therapeutics at an early stage of development. RECENT FINDINGS: Regulation of signal transduction has evolved into an important field of drug research, and small molecule inhibitors of a n...

  18. New small-molecule drug design strategies for fighting resistant influenza A

    OpenAIRE

    Zuyuan Shen; Kaiyan Lou; Wei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is the major cause of seasonal or pandemic flu worldwide. Two main treatment strategies–vaccination and small molecule anti-influenza drugs are currently available. As an effective vaccine usually takes at least 6 months to develop, anti-influenza small molecule drugs are more effective for the first line of protection against the virus during an epidemic outbreak, especially in the early stage. Two major classes of anti-influenza drugs currently available are admantane-base...

  19. Engineered Protein Polymer-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Materials for Small Molecule Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Min; Frezzo, JA; SHARMA, E.; Chen, R.; Singh, N.; Yuvienco, C; Caglar, E; Xiao, S; Saxena, A.; Montclare, JK

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated protein polymer-gold nanoparticle (P-GNP) nanocomposites that exhibit enhanced binding and delivery properties of the small hydrophobic molecule drug, curcumin, to the model breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. These hybrid biomaterials are constructed via in situ GNP templated-synthesis with genetically engineered histidine tags. The P-GNP nanocomposites exhibit enhanced small molecule loading, sustained release and increased uptake by MCF-7 cells. When compared to the proteins...

  20. Resolving protein interactions and organization downstream the T cell antigen receptor using single-molecule localization microscopy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eilon

    2016-06-01

    Signal transduction is mediated by heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes. Such complexes play a critical role in diverse cell functions, with the important example of T cell activation. Biochemical studies of signalling complexes and their imaging by diffraction limited microscopy have resulted in an intricate network of interactions downstream the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). However, in spite of their crucial roles in T cell activation, much remains to be learned about these signalling complexes, including their heterogeneous contents and size distribution, their complex arrangements in the PM, and the molecular requirements for their formation. Here, we review how recent advancements in single molecule localization microscopy have helped to shed new light on the organization of signalling complexes in single molecule detail in intact T cells. From these studies emerges a picture where cells extensively employ hierarchical and dynamic patterns of nano-scale organization to control the local concentration of interacting molecular species. These patterns are suggested to play a critical role in cell decision making. The combination of SMLM with more traditional techniques is expected to continue and critically contribute to our understanding of multimolecular protein complexes and their significance to cell function.

  1. Small molecules as tracers in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ge

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed from in-air oxidation of volatile organic compounds, greatly affects human health and climate. Although substantial research has been devoted to SOA formation and evolution, the modeled and lab-generated SOA are still low in mass and degree of oxidation compared to ambient measurements. In order to compensate for these discrepancies, the aqueous processing pathway has been brought to attention. The atmospheric waters serve as aqueous reaction media for dissolved organics to undergo further oxidation, oligomerization, or other functionalization reactions, which decreases the vapor pressure while increasing the oxidation state of carbon atoms. Field evidence for aqueous processing requires the identification of tracer products such as organosulfates. We synthesized the standards for two organosulfates, glycolic acid sulfate and lactic acid sulfate, in order to measure their aerosol-state concentration from five distinct locations via filter samples. The water-extracted filter samples were analyzed by LC-MS. Lactic acid sulfate and glycolic acid sulfate were detected in urban locations in the United States, Mexico City, and Pakistan with varied concentrations, indicating their potential as tracers. We studied the aqueous processing reaction between glyoxal and nitrogen-containing species such as ammonium and amines exclusively by NMR spectrometry. The reaction products formic acid and several imidazoles along with the quantified kinetics were reported. The brown carbon generated from these reactions were quantified optically by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The organic-phase reaction between oxygen molecule and alkenes photosensitized by alpha-dicarbonyls were studied in the same manner. We observed the fast kinetics transferring alkenes to epoxides under simulated sunlight. Statistical estimations indicate a very effective conversion of aerosol-phase alkenes to epoxides, potentially forming organosulfates in a deliquescence event and

  2. Integration of {beta}-carotene molecules in small liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Popova, Antoaneta, E-mail: andreeva@phys.uni-sofia.b

    2010-11-01

    The most typical feature of carotenoids is the long polyene chain with conjugated double bonds suggesting that they can serve as conductors of electrons, acting as 'molecular wires', important elements in the molecular electronic devices. Carotenoids are essential components of photosynthetic systems, performing different functions as light harvesting, photoprotection and electron transfer. They act also as natural antioxidants. In addition they perform structural role stabilizing the three-dimensional organization of photosynthetic membranes. Carotenoids contribute to the stability of the lipid phase, preserving the membrane integrity under potentially harmful environmental conditions. Carotenoids can be easily integrated into model membranes, facilitating the investigation of their functional roles. In carotenoid-egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) liposomes ss-carotene is randomly distributed in the hydrocarbon interior of the bilayer, without any preferred, well defined orientation and retains a substantial degree of mobility. Here we investigate the degree of integration of ss-carotene in small unilamellar EPC liposomes and the changes in ss-carotene absorption and Raman spectra due to the lipid-pigment interaction. All observed changes in ss-carotene absorption and Raman spectra may be regarded as a result of the lipid-pigment interactions leading to the polyene geometry distortion and increasing of the environment heterogenety in the liposomes as compared to the solutions.

  3. Combinatorics of feedback in cellular uptake and metabolism of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-12-26

    We analyze the connection between structure and function for regulatory motifs associated with cellular uptake and usage of small molecules. Based on the boolean logic of the feedback we suggest four classes: the socialist, consumer, fashion, and collector motifs. We find that the socialist motif is good for homeostasis of a useful but potentially poisonous molecule, whereas the consumer motif is optimal for nutrition molecules. Accordingly, examples of these motifs are found in, respectively, the iron homeostasis system in various organisms and in the uptake of sugar molecules in bacteria. The remaining two motifs have no obvious analogs in small molecule regulation, but we illustrate their behavior using analogies to fashion and obesity. These extreme motifs could inspire construction of synthetic systems that exhibit bistable, history-dependent states, and homeostasis of flux (rather than concentration). PMID:18093927

  4. Small molecule screen for inhibitors of expression from canonical CREB response element-containing promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton, Bryan; Hsu, Katie; Dutta, Ritika; Tiu, Bruce C.; Cox, Nick; McLure, Kevin G.; Chae, Hee-Don; Smith, Mark; Eklund, Elizabeth A.; Solow-Cordero, David E.; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) is an important determinant in the growth of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) cells. CREB overexpression increases AML cell growth by driving the expression of key regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle. Conversely, CREB knockdown inhibits proliferation and survival of AML cells but not normal hematopoietic cells. Thus, CREB represents a promising drug target for the treatment of AML, which carries a poor prognosis. In this study, we performed a high-throughput small molecule screen to identify compounds that disrupt CREB function in AML cells. We screened ∼114,000 candidate compounds from Stanford University's small molecule library, and identified 5 molecules that inhibit CREB function at micromolar concentrations, but are non-toxic to normal hematopoietic cells. This study suggests that targeting CREB function using small molecules could provide alternative approaches to treat AML. PMID:26840025

  5. Comparative metabolomics and structural characterizations illuminate colibactin pathway-dependent small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaino, Maria I; Engel, Philipp; Trautman, Eric; Crawford, Jason M

    2014-07-01

    The gene cluster responsible for synthesis of the unknown molecule "colibactin" has been identified in mutualistic and pathogenic Escherichia coli. The pathway endows its producer with a long-term persistence phenotype in the human bowel, a probiotic activity used in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, and a carcinogenic activity under host inflammatory conditions. To date, functional small molecules from this pathway have not been reported. Here we implemented a comparative metabolomics and targeted structural network analyses approach to identify a catalog of small molecules dependent on the colibactin pathway from the meningitis isolate E. coli IHE3034 and the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917. The structures of 10 pathway-dependent small molecules are proposed based on structural characterizations and network relationships. The network will provide a roadmap for the structural and functional elucidation of a variety of other small molecules encoded by the pathway. From the characterized small molecule set, in vitro bacterial growth inhibitory and mammalian CNS receptor antagonist activities are presented. PMID:24932672

  6. Solution processable organic polymers and small molecules for bulk-heterojunction solar cells: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution processed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs) have gained wide interest in past few years and are established as one of the leading next generation photovoltaic technologies for low cost power production. Power conversion efficiencies up to 6% and 6.5% have been reported in the literature for single layer and tandem solar cells, respectively using conjugated polymers. A recent record efficiency about 8.13% with active area of 1.13 cm2 has been reported. However Solution processable small molecules have been widely applied for photovoltaic (PV) devices in recent years because they show strong absorption properties, and they can be easily purified and deposited onto flexible substrates at low cost. Introducing different donor and acceptor groups to construct donor--acceptor (D--A) structure small molecules has proved to be an efficient way to improve the properties of organic solar cells (OSCs). The power conversion efficiency about 4.4 % has been reported for OSCs based on the small molecules. This review deals with the recent progress of solution processable D--A structure small molecules and discusses the key factors affecting the properties of OSCs based on D--A structure small molecules: sunlight absorption, charge transport and the energy level of the molecules.

  7. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as versatile carrier for small and large molecules across cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful transport of molecules across the cell membrane is a key point in biology and medicine. In most cases, molecules alone cannot penetrate the cell membrane, therefore an efficient carrier is needed. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (diameter: 100–250 nm, depending on the functionalization) were loaded with fluorescent oligonucleotides, peptide, proteins, antibodies, polymers or porphyrins and characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Any excess of molecules was removed by ultracentrifugation, and the dissolved molecules at the same concentration were used as control. The uptake of such fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles into HeLa cells was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles were able to transport all molecules across the cell membrane, whereas the dissolved molecules alone were taken up only to a very small extent or even not at all.

  8. Inhibition of Antiapoptotic BCL-XL, BCL-2, and MCL-1 Proteins by Small Molecule Mimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Dalafave

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Informatics and computational design methods were used to create new molecules that could potentially bind antiapoptotic proteins, thus promoting death of cancer cells. Apoptosis is a cellular process that leads to the death of damaged cells. Its malfunction can cause cancer and poor response to conventional chemotherapy. After being activated by cellular stress signals, proapoptotic proteins bind antiapoptotic proteins, thus allowing apoptosis to go forward. An excess of antiapoptotic proteins can prevent apoptosis. Designed molecules that mimic the roles of proapoptotic proteins can promote the death of cancer cells. The goal of our study was to create new putative mimetics that could simultaneously bind several antiapoptotic proteins. Five new small molecules were designed that formed stable complexes with BCL-2, BCL-XL, and MCL-1 antiapoptotic proteins. These results are novel because, to our knowledge, there are not many, if any, small molecules known to bind all three proteins. Drug-likeness studies performed on the designed molecules, as well as previous experimental and preclinical studies on similar agents, strongly suggest that the designed molecules may indeed be promising drug candidates. All five molecules showed “drug-like” properties and had overall drug-likeness scores between 81% and 96%. A single drug based on these mimetics should cost less and cause fewer side effects than a combination of drugs each aimed at a single protein. Computer-based molecular design promises to accelerate drug research by predicting potential effectiveness of designed molecules prior to laborious experiments and costly preclinical trials.

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus surface antigen expression by small hairpin RNA in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Gang Yang; Zhi Chen; Qin Ni; Ning Xu; Jun-Bin Shao; Hang-Ping Yao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the anti-hepatitis B virus effect of RNA interference (RNAi) using small hairpin RNA (shRNA)expression vector.METHODS: Hepatitis B virus surface antigen green fluorescent protein (HBs-GFP) fusion vector and shRNA expression vectors were constructed and cotransfected transiently into HepG2 cells. mRNAs extracted from HepG2 cells were detected by real-time PCR. Fluorescence of HBs-GFP protein was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The effective shRNA expression vector was transfected into HepG2.2.15 cells. HBsAg and HBeAg in HepG2.2.15 cells were analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) method.RESULTS: FACS revealed that shRNA targeting at HBsAg reduced the GFP signal by 56% compared to the control.Real-time PCR showed that HBs-GFP mRNA extracted from HepG2 cells cotransfected with pAVU6+27 and HBs-GFP expression plasmids decreased by 90% compared to the empty vector control. The expressions of HBsAg and HBeAg were also inhibited by 43% and 64%, respectively.CONCLUSION: RNAi using shRNA expression vector can inhibit the expression of HBsAg, providing a fresh approach to screening the efficient small interfering RNAs (siRNAs).

  10. Characterization of the Antigen Processing Machinery and Endogenous Peptide Presentation of a Bat MHC Class I Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James W; Woon, Amanda P; Dudek, Nadine L; Croft, Nathan P; Ng, Justin H J; Baker, Michelle L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Bats are a major reservoir of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronaviruses, henipaviruses, and Ebola virus. Although highly pathogenic to their spillover hosts, bats harbor these viruses, and a large number of other viruses, with little or no clinical signs of disease. How bats asymptomatically coexist with these viruses is unknown. In particular, little is known about bat adaptive immunity, and the presence of functional MHC molecules is mostly inferred from recently described genomes. In this study, we used an affinity purification/mass spectrometry approach to demonstrate that a bat MHC class I molecule, Ptal-N*01:01, binds antigenic peptides and associates with peptide-loading complex components. We identified several bat MHC class I-binding partners, including calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase A3, tapasin, TAP1, and TAP2. Additionally, endogenous peptide ligands isolated from Ptal-N*01:01 displayed a relatively broad length distribution and an unusual preference for a C-terminal proline residue. Finally, we demonstrate that this preference for C-terminal proline residues was observed in Hendra virus-derived peptides presented by Ptal-N*01:01 on the surface of infected cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify endogenous and viral MHC class I ligands for any bat species and, as such, provides an important avenue for monitoring and development of vaccines against major bat-borne viruses both in the reservoir and spillover hosts. Additionally, it will provide a foundation to understand the role of adaptive immunity in bat antiviral responses. PMID:27183594

  11. The granulocyte receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 3 (CEACAM3) directly associates with Vav to promote phagocytosis of human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R

    2007-03-15

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negative form of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav, but not the dominant-negative versions SWAP70, Dock2, or ELMO1 interfered with CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Vav reduced uptake and abrogated the stimulation of Rac in response to bacterial CEACAM3 engagement. In Vav1/Vav2-deficient cells, CEACAM3-mediated internalization was only observed after re-expression of Vav. Vav colocalized with CEACAM3 upon bacterial infection, coimmunoprecipitated in a complex with CEACAM3, and the Vav Src homology 2 domain directly associated with phosphorylated Tyr(230) of CEACAM3. In primary human granulocytes, TAT-mediated transduction of dominant-negative Vav, but not SWAP70, severely impaired the uptake of CEACAM3-binding bacteria. These data support the view that, different from canonical ITAM signaling, the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence short-wires bacterial recognition and Rac stimulation via a direct association with Vav to promote rapid phagocytosis and elimination of CEACAM-binding human pathogens. PMID:17339478

  12. Comparative Metabolomics and Structural Characterizations Illuminate Colibactin Pathway-Dependent Small Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Vizcaino, Maria I.; Engel, Philipp; Trautman, Eric; Crawford, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    The gene cluster responsible for synthesis of the unknown molecule “colibactin” has been identified in mutualistic and pathogenic Escherichia coli. The pathway endows its producer with a long-term persistence phenotype in the human bowel, a probiotic activity used in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, and a carcinogenic activity under host inflammatory conditions. To date, functional small molecules from this pathway have not been reported. Here we implemented a comparative metabolomics and...

  13. A newly built setup for small bio-molecule fragmentation study in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new setup for studying ion induced small bio-molecule fragmentation processes has been built in Lanzhou, China. A preliminary collision experiment between a 30 keV He2+ ion beam and gas phase adenine molecules was performed. Partial TOF spectra associated to well-defined scattered projectile final charge states, He+ or He0 were recorded. Coincidence spectra between fragments were also obtained.

  14. Structural Effects of Small Molecules on Phospholipid Bilayers Investigated by Molecular Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, B W; Sum, A K; Vattulainen, I; Patra, M; Karttunen, M; Lee, Bryan W; Faller, Roland; Sum, Amadeu K; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Patra, Michael; Karttunen, Mikko

    2004-01-01

    We summarize and compare recent Molecular Dynamics simulations on the interactions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers in the liquid crystalline phase with a number of small molecules including trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, alcohols, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The sugar molecules tend to stabilize the structure of the bilayer as they bridge adjacent lipid headgroups. They do not strongly change the structure of the bilayer. Alcohols and DMSO destabilize the bilayer as they increase its area per molecule in the bilayer plane and decrease the order parameter. Alcohols have a stronger detrimental effect than DMSO. The observables which we compare are the area per molecule in the plane of the bilayer, the membrane thickness, and the NMR order parameter of DPPC hydrocarbon tails. The area per molecule and the order parameter are very well correlated whereas the bilayer thickness is not necessarily correlated with them.

  15. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  16. Small-angle neutron scattering study of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Ito, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Imai, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Takagi, T.

    1995-02-01

    The overall and internal structure of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particles was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering using the contrast variation method. The vaccine is a nearly spherical particle, and its contrast-matching point was determined to be at about 24% D 2O content, indicating that a large part of the vaccine particle is occupied by lipids and carbohydrates from the yeast. The Stuhrmann plot suggests that the surface antigens exist predominantly in the peripheral region of the particle, which is favorable to the induction of anti-virus antibodies.

  17. Small molecule screening with laser cytometry can be used to identify pro-survival molecules in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Sherman

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs provide an unlimited source of cells for use in regenerative medicine. The recent derivation of human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs provides a potential supply of pluripotent cells that avoid immune rejection and could provide patient-tailored therapy. In addition, the use of pluripotent cells for drug screening could enable routine toxicity testing and evaluation of underlying disease mechanisms. However, prior to establishment of patient specific cells for cell therapy it is important to understand the basic regulation of cell fate decisions in hESCs. One critical issue that hinders the use of these cells is the fact that hESCs survive poorly upon dissociation, which limits genetic manipulation because of poor cloning efficiency of individual hESCs, and hampers production of large-scale culture of hESCs. To address the problems associated with poor growth in culture and our lack of understanding of what regulates hESC signaling, we successfully developed a screening platform that allows for large scale screening for small molecules that regulate survival. In this work we developed the first large scale platform for hESC screening using laser scanning cytometry and were able to validate this platform by identifying the pro-survival molecule HA-1077. These small molecules provide targets for both improving our basic understanding of hESC survival as well as a tool to improve our ability to expand and genetically manipulate hESCs for use in regenerative applications.

  18. Rationally Designed Small Molecules Targeting the RNA That Causes Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Are Potently Bioactive

    OpenAIRE

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Hoskins, Jason; Rzuczek, Suzanne G.; Thornton, Charles A.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    RNA is an important drug target, but it is difficult to design or discover small molecules that modulate RNA function. In the present study, we report that rationally designed, modularly assembled small molecules that bind the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are potently bioactive in cell culture models. DM1 is caused when an expansion of r(CUG) repeats, or r(CUG)exp, is present in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) mRNA. r(CUG)e...

  19. Disrupted Adenovirus-Based Vaccines Against Small Addictive Molecules Circumvent Anti-Adenovirus Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya E; Hicks, Martin J.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Moreno, Amira Y.; Janda, Kim D.; Koob, George F; Worgall, Stefan; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Sondhi, Dolan; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vaccine vectors have been used for many applications due to the capacity of the Ad capsid proteins to evoke potent immune responses, but these vectors are often ineffective in the context of pre-existing anti-Ad immunity. Leveraging the knowledge that E1−E3− Ad gene transfer vectors are potent immunogens, we have developed a vaccine platform against small molecules by covalently coupling analogs of small molecules to the capsid proteins of disrupted Ad (dAd5). We hypothesized ...

  20. Dynamic Variation in Protein-Small Molecule Interaction Observed by Double-Nanohole Optical Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Balushi, Ahmed Al

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with small molecules is fundamental to their function in living organisms and it is widely studied in drug development. Here we compare optical trapping dynamics of streptavidin and biotinylated streptavidin using a double nanohole optical trap in a metal film. Consistent and clearly distinct behavior is seen between the protein with and without the small molecule binding. The real-time dynamics at the single protein level are accessible with this technique, which also has advantages of not requiring tethering to a surface or the need for exogeneous markers.

  1. Blu-ray based optomagnetic aptasensor for detection of small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Pinto, Alessandro;

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an aptamer-based optomagnetic biosensor for detection of a small molecule based on target binding-induced inhibition of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clustering. For the detection of a target small molecule, two mutually exclusive binding reactions (aptamer-target binding and...... aptamer-DNA linker hybridization) are designed. An aptamer specific to the target and a DNA linker complementary to a part of the aptamer sequence are immobilized onto separate MNPs. Hybridization of the DNA linker and the aptamer induces formation of MNP clusters. The target-to-aptamer binding on MNPs...

  2. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) and Fullerenes (C70), as electron donor and acceptor respectively, with cell area......Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced...... system. The work includes investigation of morphology and uniformity of the layers from atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical spectroscopy investigations....

  3. Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Neuropilin-1 Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A) Interaction†

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Ashley; Allerston, Charles K.; Jia, Haiyan; Herzog, Birger; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Winfield, Natalie; Ellard, Katie; Aqil, Rehan; Lynch, Rosemary; Chapman, Chris; Hartzoulakis, Basil; Nally, James; Stewart, Mark; Cheng, Lili; Menon, Malini

    2010-01-01

    We report the molecular design and synthesis of EG00229, 2, the first small molecule ligand for the VEGF-A receptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1) and the structural characterization of NRP1−ligand complexes by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Mutagenesis studies localized VEGF-A binding in the NRP1 b1 domain and a peptide fragment of VEGF-A was shown to bind at the same site by NMR, providing the basis for small molecule design. Compound 2 demonstrated inhibition of VEGF-A binding to NRP1 an...

  4. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Bruno; Liang, Shuaiyi; Park, Jongwoo; Schön, Arne; Courter, Joel R; LaLonde, Judith M; Wendler, Daniel J; Princiotto, Amy M; Seaman, Michael S; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Smith, Amos B

    2016-03-10

    The optimization, based on computational, thermodynamic, and crystallographic data, of a series of small-molecule ligands of the Phe43 cavity of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been achieved. Importantly, biological evaluation revealed that the small-molecule CD4 mimics (4-7) inhibit HIV-1 entry into target cells with both significantly higher potency and neutralization breadth than previous congeners, while maintaining high selectivity for the target virus. Their binding mode was characterized via thermodynamic and crystallographic studies. PMID:26985324

  5. A NOVEL SECOND-ORDER TRANSITION IN ORGANIC HYBRIDS CONSISTING OF POLYMERS AND SMALL MOLECULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-fei Wu

    2001-01-01

    A novel transition appeared above the glass transition temperature of chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) for binary blends of CPE and additives such as organic small molecules or oligomers. This transition was assigned to the dissociation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the polymer and additive within the additive rich phase. Of particular interest is that a novel pyramid crystal was observed in the annealed CPE/hindered phenol blends. Another intriguing observation is that these polymer/small molecule blends organized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding have several potential properties, such as shape-memorization, self-restoration, self-adhesiveness and super damping.``

  6. Following the nanostructural molecular orientation guidelines for sulfur versus thiophene units in small molecule photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-03-01

    In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not. The improved performance of the DR3TBDTT-based devices, particularly in the photocurrent and the fill factor, was attributed to the large population of donor compound crystallites with a favorable face-on orientation along the perpendicular direction. This orientation resulted in efficient charge transport and a reduction in charge recombination. These findings underscore the great potential of small-molecule solar cells and suggest that even higher efficiencies can be achieved through materials development and molecular orientation control.In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics, particularly those using small molecules, electron donor and/or electron acceptor materials form a distributed network in the photoactive layer where critical photo-physical processes occur. Extensive research has recently focused on the importance of sulfur atoms in the small molecules. Little is known about the three-dimensional orientation of these sulfur atom-containing molecules. Herein, we report on our research concerning the heterojunction textures of the crystalline molecular orientation of small compounds having sulfur-containing units in the side chains, specifically, compounds known as DR3TSBDT that contain the alkylthio group and DR3TBDTT that does not

  7. Construction of bifunctional molecules specific to antigen and antibody’s Fc-fragment by fusion of scFv-antibodies with staphylococcal protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolibo D. V.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop approach for detection of scFv and their complexes with antigens. Methods. The fusion proteins, which include sequences of scFv and staphylococcal protein A, were constructed and the obtained bifunctional molecules were immunochemically analysed. Results. It was shown, that scFv fused with protein A and their complexes with antigens are effectively recognized by labelled immunoglobulins with unrestricted antigenic specificity. Conclusions. The fusion of scFv with protein A fragment is a perspective approach to increase the efficiency of application in ELISA. The obtained scFv, fused with protein A, could be used for development of test-systems for the detection of diphtheria toxin.

  8. Enhanced T cell responses to antigenic peptides targeted to B cell surface Ig, Ia, or class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The helper T cell recognition of soluble globular protein antigens requires that the proteins be processed by an APC, releasing a peptide that is transported to and held on the APC surface where it is recognized by the specific T cell in conjunction with Ia. When cellular processing functions are blocked, APC lose their ability to present native antigens while retaining the capacity to activate T cells when provided with a cognate peptide fragment that contains the T cell antigenic determinan...

  9. Lung cancer-associated tumor antigens and the present status of immunotherapy against non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite recent advances in surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy, the prognosis of patients with lung cancer is still poor. Therefore, the development and application of new therapeutic strategies are essential for improving the prognosis of this disease. Significant progress in our understanding of tumor immunology and molecular biology has allowed us to identify the tumor-associated antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Immune responses and tumor-associated antigens against not only malignant melanoma but also lung cancer have been elucidated at the molecular level. In a theoretical sense, tumor eradication is considered possible through antigen-based immunotherapy against such diseases. However, many clinical trials of cancer vaccination with defined tumor antigens have resulted in objective clinical responses in only a small number of patients. Tumor escape mechanisms from host immune surveillance remain a major obstacle for cancer immunotherapy. A better understanding of the immune escape mechanisms employed by tumor cells is necessary before we can develop a more effective immunotherapeutic approach to lung cancer. We review recent studies regarding the identification of tumor antigens in lung cancer, tumor immune escape mechanisms, and clinical vaccine trials in lung cancer. (author)

  10. Antigenic evidence of bluetongue virus from small ruminant population of two different geographical regions of Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaswati Subhadarsini Pany

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to carry out antigenic detection of bluetongue virus (BTV among the small ruminant population of two different geographical regions of Odisha (coastal and central using recombinant VP7 (r-VP-7 based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (s-ELISA. Materials and Methods: Blood samples (n=274 were collected from two different geographical pockets of Odisha, which covered mostly the coastal and central regions. Of the total samples under study 185 were from goat and 89 were from sheep. The blood samples were tested for the presence of BTV antigen by r-VP7 based s-ELISA. Results: r-VP-7 s-ELISA detected BTV antigen in 52.43% and 44.94% of the goat and sheep population under study, respectively. This study highlights the antigenic persistence of BTV in the state for the 1st time. Conclusion: This high antigenic presence in both sheep and goat population suggests an alarming BTV infection in field conditions which warrants more systematic study directed toward isolation and characterization studies as well as the implementation of control strategy for BT in Odisha.

  11. Highly Crystalline Films of Organic Small Molecules with Alkyl Chains Fabricated by Weak Epitaxy Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yangjie; Chen, Weiping; Wang, Tong; Wang, Haibo; Wang, Yue; Yan, Donghang

    2016-05-12

    Because side-chain engineering of organic conjugated molecules has been widely utilized to tune organic solid-state optoelectronic properties, the achievement of their high-quality films is important for realizing high-performance devices. Here, highly crystalline films of an organic molecule with short alkyl chains, 5,8,15,18-tetrabutyl-5,8,15,18-tetrahydroindolo[3,2-a]indole[30,20:5,6]quinacridone (C4-IDQA), are fabricated by weak epitaxy growth, and highly oriented, large-area, and continuous films are obtained. Because of the soft matter properties, the C4-IDQA molecules can adjust themselves to realize commensurate epitaxy growth on the inducing layers and exhibited good lattice matching in the thin film phase. The crystalline phase is also observed in thicker C4-IDQA films. The growth behavior of C4-IDQA on the inducing layer is further investigated, including the strong dependence of film morphologies on substrate temperatures and deposition rates due to the poor diffusion ability of C4-IDQA molecules. Moreover, highly crystalline films and high electron field-effect mobility are also obtained for the small molecule N,N'-dioctyl-3,4:9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic diimide (C8-PTCDI), which demonstrate that the weak epitaxy growth method could be an effective way to fabricate highly crystalline films of organic small molecules with flexible side chains. PMID:27116036

  12. A density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule onto small copper clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiang-Jun Kuang; Xin-Qiang Wang; Gao-Bin Liu

    2011-09-01

    An all-electron scalar relativistic calculation on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule onto small copper clusters has been performed by using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) at PW91 level. Our results reveal that after adsorption of H2 molecule, the Cu-Cu interaction is strengthened and the H-H interaction is weakened, the reactivity enhancement of H2 molecule is obvious. The VIPs, HLGs and VEAs of CuH2 clusters show an obvious odd-even oscillation. It is suggested that the H2 molecule is more favourable to be adsorbed by the even-numbered small copper clusters. Meanwhile, the odd-even alteration of magnetic moments is also observed and may be served as the material with tunable code capacity of `0’ and `1' by adsorbing hydrogen molecule onto odd or even-numbered small copper clusters. Some discrepancies of dissociative adsorption between our work and previous works are found and may be understood in terms of the electron pairing effect and the scalar relativistic effect.

  13. Selective Chemical Labeling of Proteins with Small Fluorescent Molecules Based on Metal-Chelation Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuaki Soh

    2008-01-01

    Site-specific chemical labeling utilizing small fluorescent molecules is a powerful and attractive technique for in vivo and in vitro analysis of cellular proteins, which can circumvent some problems in genetic encoding labeling by large fluorescent proteins. In particular, affinity labeling based on metal-chelation, advantageous due to the high selectivity/simplicity and the small tag-size, is promising, as well as enzymatic covalent labeling, thereby a variety of novel methods have been stu...

  14. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice. PMID:27002145

  15. Identification and optimization of small-molecule agonists of the human relaxin hormone receptor RXFP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jingbo; Huang, Zaohua; Chen, Catherine Z; Agoulnik, Irina U; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Ferrer, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I; Marugan, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    The anti-fibrotic, vasodilatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutic properties of recombinant relaxin peptide hormone have been investigated in several diseases, and recent clinical trial data has shown benefit in treating acute heart failure. However, the remodelling capacity of these peptide hormones is difficult to study in chronic settings because of their short half-life and the need for intravenous administration. Here we present the first small-molecule series of human relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 agonists. These molecules display similar efficacy as the natural hormone in several functional assays. Mutagenesis studies indicate that the small molecules activate relaxin receptor through an allosteric site. These compounds have excellent physical and in vivo pharmacokinetic properties to support further investigation of relaxin biology and animal efficacy studies of the therapeutic benefits of relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 activation. PMID:23764525

  16. Diffusion dynamics of small molecules from mesoporous silicon films by real-time optical interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mares, Jeremy W.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2011-09-20

    Time-dependent laser reflectometry measurements are presented as a means to rigorously characterize analyte diffusion dynamics of small molecules from mesoporous silicon (PSi) films for drug delivery and membrane physics applications. Calculations based on inclusion of a spatially and temporally dependent solute concentration profile in a one-dimensional Fickian diffusion flow model are performed to determine the diffusion coefficients for the selected prototypical polar species, sucrose (340 Da), exiting from PSi films. The diffusion properties of the molecules depend on both PSi pore size and film thickness. For films with average pore diameters between 10-30 nm and film thicknesses between 300-900 nm, the sucrose diffusion coefficient can be tuned between approximately 100 and 550 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. Extensions of the real-time measurement and modeling approach for determining the diffusivity of small molecules that strongly interact with and corrode the internal surfaces of PSi films are also discussed.

  17. Small Molecule Drug Discovery at the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis S. Willard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic success of peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has inspired discovery efforts aimed at developing orally available small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. Although the GLP-1 receptor is a member of the structurally complex class B1 family of GPCRs, in recent years, a diverse array of orthosteric and allosteric nonpeptide ligands has been reported. These compounds include antagonists, agonists, and positive allosteric modulators with intrinsic efficacy. In this paper, a comprehensive review of currently disclosed small molecule GLP-1 receptor ligands is presented. In addition, examples of “ligand bias” and “probe dependency” for the GLP-1 receptor are discussed; these emerging concepts may influence further optimization of known molecules or persuade designs of expanded screening strategies to identify novel chemical starting points for GLP-1 receptor drug discovery.

  18. The Granulocyte Receptor Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 3 (CEACAM3) Directly Associates with Vav to Promote Phagocytosis of Human Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R.

    2007-01-01

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negativ...

  19. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  20. Two strategies for the development of mitochondrion-targeted small molecule radiation damage mitigators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Beck, Barbara; Wang, Wei; Doemling, Alexander; Epperly, Michael W.; Shields, Donna; Goff, Julie P.; Franicola, Darcy; Dixon, Tracy; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Wipf, Peter; Tyurina, Yulia; Kagan, Valerian E.; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation of acute ionizing radiation damage by mitochondrion-targeted small molecules. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the ability of nitroxide-linked alkene peptide isostere JP4-039, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-linked alkene peptide esostere M

  1. A Direct, Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) as a Quantitative Technique for Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Rippe, Karen Duda; Imarhia, Kelly; Swift, Aileen; Scholten, Melanie; Islam, Naina

    2012-01-01

    ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a widely used technique with applications in disease diagnosis, detection of contaminated foods, and screening for drugs of abuse or environmental contaminants. However, published protocols with a focus on quantitative detection of small molecules designed for teaching laboratories are limited. A…

  2. Conformational Heat Capacity of Interacting Systems of Polymers and Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyda, M.; Bartkowiak, M.; Wunderlich, B.

    1998-03-01

    The total heat capacity of systems of macromolecules interacting with small molecules is estimated as a sum of the vibrational, external and conformational contributions. The conformational contribution is calculated using a simple model in which monolayers or clusters of small molecules (such as polar or dispersive solvents) are assumed to interact with the flexible liner chains of the macromolecules. The conformational states of the chain are described by Ising variables. The interaction influences the conformational states energies, and the resulting one-dimensional model is solved exactly using the transfer matrix method. Depending on the model parameters, the presence of the small molecules can lead to a double-peaked structure of the heat capacity as a function of temperature. The interaction causes an increase of the heat capacity in the low temperature region. Formation of cluster of small molecules leads to a significant conformational heat capacity contribution for high temperatures. Specific results for polyethylene (PE), poly(oxyethylene) (POE), poly(oxymethylene) (POM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are presented as examples. The proposed approach can also be used to provide a more realistic description of heat capacities of protein-water, cellulose-water or starch-water systems.

  3. Recognizing and exploiting differences between RNAi and small-molecule inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, William A.; Taylor, Stephen S.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2007-01-01

    The biology of RNA interference has greatly facilitated analysis of loss-of-function phenotypes, but correlating these phenotypes with small-molecule inhibition profiles is not always straightforward. We examine the rationale of comparing RNA interference to pharmacological intervention in chemical biology.

  4. Transport of small molecules through fullerene-containing polyphenylene oxide membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polotskaya, G. A.; Gladchenko, S. V.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Brožová, Libuše; Bleha, Miroslav

    St. Petersburg : Institute of Macromolecular Compounds,Department of General and Technical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2002. s. P-169. [International Symposium: Molecular Order and Mobility in Polymer Systems /4./. 03.06.2002-07.06.2002, St. Petersburg] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : transport of small molecules * membranes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  5. Gramicidin-based fluorescence assay; for determining small molecules potential for modifying lipid bilayer properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Sanford, R Lea; Kapoor, Ruchi; Andersen, Olaf S

    2010-01-01

    Many drugs and other small molecules used to modulate biological function are amphiphiles that adsorb at the bilayer/solution interface and thereby alter lipid bilayer properties. This is important because membrane proteins are energetically coupled to their host bilayer by hydrophobic interactions.

  6. Screening for small molecules' bilayer-modifying potential using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Andersen, Olaf S

    2010-01-01

    Many drugs and other small molecules used to modulate biological function are amphiphiles that adsorb at the bilayer/solution interface and thereby alter lipid bilayer properties. This is important because membrane proteins are energetically coupled to their host bilayer by hydrophobic interactions.

  7. Discovery of a quorum sensing modulator pharmacophore by 3D small-molecule microarray screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsden, David M; Nicholson, Rebecca L; Skindersoe, Mette E;

    2010-01-01

    The screening of large arrays of drug-like small-molecules was traditionally a time consuming and resource intensive task. New methodology developed within our laboratories provides an attractive low cost, 3D microarray-assisted screening platform that could be used to rapidly assay thousands of...

  8. Small-molecule agonists for the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Kiel, Dan; Teng, Min;

    2007-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has important actions resulting in glucose lowering along with weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. As a peptide hormone, GLP-1 has to be administered by injection. Only a few small-molecule agonists to peptide hormone receptors have been...

  9. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example. PMID:27117425

  10. Identification of novel small molecule inhibitors of adenovirus gene transfer using a high throughput screening approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Margaret R; Parker, Alan L; Kalkman, Eric R; White, Katie; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Kelly, Sharon M; Baker, Andrew H

    2013-08-28

    Due to many favourable attributes adenoviruses (Ads) are the most extensively used vectors for clinical gene therapy applications. However, following intravascular administration, the safety and efficacy of Ad vectors are hampered by the strong hepatic tropism and induction of a potent immune response. Such effects are determined by a range of complex interactions including those with neutralising antibodies, blood cells and factors, as well as binding to native cellular receptors (coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR), integrins). Once in the bloodstream, coagulation factor X (FX) has a pivotal role in determining Ad liver transduction and viral immune recognition. Due to difficulties in generating a vector devoid of multiple receptor binding motifs, we hypothesised that a small molecule inhibitor would be of value. Here, a pharmacological approach was implemented to block adenovirus transduction pathways. We developed a high throughput screening (HTS) platform to identify small molecule inhibitors of FX-mediated Ad5 gene transfer. Using an in vitro fluorescence and cell-based HTS, we evaluated 10,240 small molecules. Following sequential rounds of screening, three compounds, T5424837, T5550585 and T5660138 were identified that ablated FX-mediated Ad5 transduction with low micromolar potency. The candidate molecules possessed common structural features and formed part of the one pharmacophore model. Focused, mini-libraries were generated with structurally related molecules and in vitro screening revealed novel hits with similar or improved efficacy. The compounds did not interfere with Ad5:FX engagement but acted at a subsequent step by blocking efficient intracellular transport of the virus. In vivo, T5660138 and its closely related analogue T5660136 significantly reduced Ad5 liver transgene expression at 48 h post-intravenous administration of a high viral dose (1×10¹¹ vp/mouse). Therefore, this study identifies novel and potent small molecule inhibitors of the

  11. Gold Nanoparticles Surface Plasmon Resonance Enhanced Signal for the Detection of Small Molecules on Split-Aptamer Microarrays (Small Molecules Detection from Split-Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feriel Melaine

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection of small molecules by biosensors remains a challenge for diagnostics in many areas like pharmacology, environment or homeland security. The main difficulty comes from both the low molecular weight and low concentrations of most targets, which generally requires an indirect detection with an amplification or a sandwich procedure. In this study, we combine both strategies as the amplification of Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi signal is obtained by the use of gold nanoparticles and the sequence engineering of split-aptamers, short oligonucleotides strands with strong affinity towards small targets, allows for a sandwich structure. Combining those two strategies, we obtained state-of-the-art results in the limit of detection (LOD = 50 nM with the model target adenosine. Furthermore, the SPRi detection led on aptamer microarrays paves the way for potential multi-target detections thanks to the multi-probe imaging approach.

  12. Evaluation of EML4-ALK Fusion Proteins in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Small Molecule Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The echinoderm microtubule–associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK fusion gene resulting from an inversion within chromosome 2p occurs in approximately 5% of non–small cell lung cancer and is mu-tually exclusive with Ras and EGFR mutations. In this study, we have used a potent and selective ALK small molecule inhibitor, NPV-TAE684, to assess the oncogenic role of EML4-ALK in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We show here that TAE684 inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor regression in two NSCLC models that harbor EML4-ALK fusions. TAE684 inhibits EML4-ALK activation and its downstream signaling including ERK, AKT, and STAT3. We used microarray analysis to carry out targeted pathway studies of gene expression changes in H2228 NSCLC xenograft model after TAE684 treatment and identified a gene signature of EML4-ALK inhibition. The gene signature represents 1210 known human genes, and the top biologic processes represented by these genes are cell cycle, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cell death. We also compared the effect of TAE684 with PF2341066, a c-Met and ALK small molecule inhibitor currently in clinical trial in cancers harboring ALK fusions, and demonstrated that TAE684 is a much more potent inhibitor of EML4-ALK. Our data demonstrate that EML4-ALK plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a subset of NSCLC and provides insight into the mech-anism of EML4-ALK inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor.

  13. Complex pole approach in thermodynamic description of fluid mixtures with small number of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslyamov, Timur, E-mail: t.aslyamov@gmail.com [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Dinariev, Oleg [Schlumberger Moscow Research Center (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-07

    The subject matter of classical thermodynamics is the asymptotic behavior of equilibrium systems in thermodynamic limit, for small molecular systems, when transition to thermodynamic limit is impossible, the extension of thermodynamics is required. This work studies novel approach for the evaluation of partition functions of small systems by complex pole analysis. Several cases for molecular systems in small cavities are studied numerically. In particular size-dependent additional pressure for small systems is evaluated analytically and numerically. Similar approach was developed earlier in nuclear physics for finite systems of nucleons. The obtained results correspond to published experimental data and molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Behavior of gas–liquid mixtures with small number of molecules in finite volume. • The analysis is performed in the frame of equilibrium statistical physics. • Partition function is evaluated by complex pole method. • Previous one-component method is extended for multicomponent molecular mixtures. • Size dependent additional pressure for small systems is computed.

  14. Dynamics of uptake and metabolism of small molecules in cellular response systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proper cellular function requires uptake of small molecules from the environment. In response to changes in extracellular conditions cells alter the import and utilization of small molecules. For a wide variety of small molecules the cellular response is regulated by a network motif that combines two feedback loops, one which regulates the transport and the other which regulates the subsequent metabolism. RESULTS: We analyze the dynamic behavior of two widespread but logically distinct two-loop motifs. These motifs differ in the logic of the feedback loop regulating the uptake of the small molecule. Our aim is to examine the qualitative features of the dynamics of these two classes of feedback motifs. We find that the negative feedback to transport is accompanied by overshoot in the intracellular amount of small molecules, whereas a positive feedback to transport removes overshoot by boosting the final steady state level. On the other hand, the negative feedback allows for a rapid initial response, whereas the positive feedback is slower. We also illustrate how the dynamical deficiencies of one feedback motif can be mitigated by an additional loop, while maintaining the original steady-state properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis emphasizes the core of the regulation found in many motifs at the interface between the metabolic network and the environment of the cell. By simplifying the regulation into uptake and the first metabolic step, we provide a basis for elaborate studies of more realistic network structures. Particularly, this theoretical analysis predicts that FeS cluster formation plays an important role in the dynamics of iron homeostasis.

  15. A chemical screen for biological small molecule-RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R

    2009-05-12

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3'-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5'-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule-RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule-RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule-RNA conjugates, including 3'-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5' terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (approximately < 200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  16. Multi-small molecule conjugations as new targeted delivery carriers for tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lingling Shan,1 Ming Liu,2 Chao Wu,1 Liang Zhao,1 Siwen Li,3 Lisheng Xu,1 Wengen Cao,1 Guizhen Gao,1 Yueqing Gu3 1Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Biology and Food Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Biology, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting ability, and harmful side effects, we developed a new tumor-targeted multi-small molecule drug delivery platform. Using paclitaxel (PTX as a model therapeutic, we prepared two prodrugs, ie, folic acid-fluorescein-5(6-isothiocyanate-arginine-paclitaxel (FA-FITC-Arg-PTX and folic acid-5-aminofluorescein-glutamic-paclitaxel (FA-5AF-Glu-PTX, composed of folic acid (FA, target, amino acids (Arg or Glu, linker, and fluorescent dye (fluorescein in vitro or near-infrared fluorescent dye in vivo in order to better understand the mechanism of PTX prodrug targeting. In vitro and acute toxicity studies demonstrated the low toxicity of the prodrug formulations compared with the free drug. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that folate receptor-mediated uptake of PTX-conjugated multi-small molecule carriers induced high antitumor activity. Notably, compared with free PTX and with PTX-loaded macromolecular carriers from our previous study, this multi-small molecule-conjugated strategy improved the water solubility, loading rate, targeting ability, antitumor activity, and toxicity profile of PTX. These results support the use of multi-small molecules as tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. Keywords: multi-small molecules, paclitaxel, prodrugs, targeting, tumor therapy

  17. A high throughput screening assay system for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of gsp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisan Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H. Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT or higher (R201C and R201H cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses.

  18. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference.

  19. Solution-processed small-molecule solar cells: breaking the 10% power conversion efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsheng Liu; Chun-Chao Chen; Ziruo Hong; Jing Gao; Yang Yang; Huanping Zhou; Letian Dou; Gang Li

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional conjugated small molecule (SMPV1) was designed and synthesized for high performance solution-processed organic solar cells. This study explores the photovoltaic properties of this molecule as a donor, with a fullerene derivative as an acceptor, using solution processing in single junction and double junction tandem solar cells. The single junction solar cells based on SMPV1 exhibited a certified power conversion efficiency of 8.02% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW cm−2). A...

  20. Molecular intrinsic characteristic contours of small organic molecules containing oxygen atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Lidong; ZHAO Dongxia; YANG Zhongzhi

    2003-01-01

    By utilizing the classical turning point of the electron movement, we have defined and computed the molecular intrinsic characteristic contour (MICC) via the combination of the ab initio quantum chemistry computational method with the ionization potential measured by photoelectron spectroscopy experiment. In this paper, we calculated the MICCs of several small organic molecules containing oxygen atom for the first time. The three-dimensional pictures have been drawn, by performing a large number of calculations. The analysis on some characterized cross-sections of the MICC can provide atomic spatial changing information in the process of forming a molecule.

  1. Calculation of the fourth-rank molecular hypermagnetizability of some small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2004-05-01

    A computational scheme has been developed within the framework of Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory to evaluate nonlinear interaction energy contributions for a molecule in the presence of an external spatially uniform, time-independent magnetic field. Terms connected with the fourth power of the perturbing field, representing the fourth-rank hypermagnetizabilities of five small molecules, have been evaluated at the coupled Hartree-Fock level of accuracy within the conventional common-origin approach. Gaugeless basis sets of increasing size and flexibility have been employed in a numerical test, adopting two different coordinate systems to estimate the degree of convergence of theoretical tensor components.

  2. Prediction of adsorption of small molecules in porous materials based on ab initio force field method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Computational prediction of adsorption of small molecules in porous materials has great impact on the basic and applied research in chemical engineering and material sciences. In this work,we report an approach based on grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo(GCMC) simulations and ab initio force fields. We calculated the adsorption curves of ammonia in ZSM-5 zeolite and hydrogen in MOF-5(a metal-organic-framework material). The predictions agree well with experimental data. Because the predictions are based on the first principle force fields,this approach can be used for the adsorption prediction of new molecules or materials without experimental data as guidance.

  3. Small-molecule kinase inhibitors: an analysis of FDA-approved drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule kinase inhibitors (SMKIs), 28 of which are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), have been actively pursued as promising targeted therapeutics. Here, we assess the key structural and physicochemical properties, target selectivity and mechanism of function, and...... therapeutic indications of these approved inhibitors. Our analysis showed that >30% of approved SMKIs have a molecule weight (MW) exceeding 500 and all have a total ring count of between three and five. The assumption that type II inhibitors tend to be more selective than type I inhibitors has been proved to...

  4. Ionically Cross-Linked Polymer Networks for the Multiple-Month Release of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Patrick G; Patil, Pritam S; Leipzig, Nic D; Lapitsky, Yakov

    2016-02-24

    Long-term (multiple-week or -month) release of small, water-soluble molecules from hydrogels remains a significant pharmaceutical challenge, which is typically overcome at the expense of more-complicated drug carrier designs. Such approaches are payload-specific and include covalent conjugation of drugs to base materials or incorporation of micro- and nanoparticles. As a simpler alternative, here we report a mild and simple method for achieving multiple-month release of small molecules from gel-like polymer networks. Densely cross-linked matrices were prepared through ionotropic gelation of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) with either pyrophosphate (PPi) or tripolyphosphate (TPP), all of which are commonly available commercial molecules. The loading of model small molecules (Fast Green FCF and Rhodamine B dyes) within these polymer networks increases with the payload/network binding strength and with the PAH and payload concentrations used during encapsulation. Once loaded into the PAH/PPi and PAH/TPP ionic networks, only a few percent of the payload is released over multiple months. This extended release is achieved regardless of the payload/network binding strength and likely reflects the small hydrodynamic mesh size within the gel-like matrices. Furthermore, the PAH/TPP networks show promising in vitro cytocompatibility with model cells (human dermal fibroblasts), though slight cytotoxic effects were exhibited by the PAH/PPi networks. Taken together, the above findings suggest that PAH/PPi and (especially) PAH/TPP networks might be attractive materials for the multiple-month delivery of drugs and other active molecules (e.g., fragrances or disinfectants). PMID:26811936

  5. Diversity of natural self-derived ligands presented by different HLA class I molecules in transporter antigen processing-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lorente

    Full Text Available The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP translocates the cytosol-derived proteolytic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen where they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules. Non-functional TAP complexes and viral or tumoral blocking of these transporters leads to reduced HLA class I surface expression and a drastic change in the available peptide repertoire. Using mass spectrometry to analyze complex human leukocyte antigen HLA-bound peptide pools isolated from large numbers of TAP-deficient cells, we identified 334 TAP-independent ligands naturally presented by four different HLA-A, -B, and -C class I molecules with very different TAP dependency from the same cell line. The repertoire of TAP-independent peptides examined favored increased peptide lengths and a lack of strict binding motifs for all four HLA class I molecules studied. The TAP-independent peptidome arose from 182 parental proteins, the majority of which yielded one HLA ligand. In contrast, TAP-independent antigen processing of very few cellular proteins generated multiple HLA ligands. Comparison between TAP-independent peptidome and proteome of several subcellular locations suggests that the secretory vesicle-like organelles could be a relevant source of parental proteins for TAP-independent HLA ligands. Finally, a predominant endoproteolytic peptidase specificity for Arg/Lys or Leu/Phe residues in the P(1 position of the scissile bond was found for the TAP-independent ligands. These data draw a new and intricate picture of TAP-independent pathways.

  6. Analysis of endogenous peptides bound by soluble MHC class I molecules: a novel approach for identifying tumor-specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Patoka, Renana; Ziv, Tamar; Kessler, Ofra; Tzehoval, Esther; Eisenbach, Lea; Zavazava, Nicholas; Admon, Arie

    2002-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at comprehensive cataloging of peptides presented within the context of different human leukocyte antigens (HLA) expressed by cells of various tissue origins, both in health and in disease. Of major interest are peptides presented on cancer cells, which include peptides derived from tumor antigens that are of interest for immunotherapy. Here, HLA-restricted tumor-specific antigens were identified by transfecting human breast, ovarian and prostate tumor cell lines with truncated genes of HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Soluble HLA secreted by these cell lines were purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed by nano-capillary electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Typically, a large peptide pool was recovered and sequenced including peptides derived from MAGE-B2 and mucin and other new tumor-derived antigens that may serve as potential candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:11782012

  7. Knowledge-based annotation of small molecule binding sites in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchenko Anna R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of protein-small molecule interactions is vital for understanding protein function and for practical applications in drug discovery. To benefit from the rapidly increasing structural data, it is essential to improve the tools that enable large scale binding site prediction with greater emphasis on their biological validity. Results We have developed a new method for the annotation of protein-small molecule binding sites, using inference by homology, which allows us to extend annotation onto protein sequences without experimental data available. To ensure biological relevance of binding sites, our method clusters similar binding sites found in homologous protein structures based on their sequence and structure conservation. Binding sites which appear evolutionarily conserved among non-redundant sets of homologous proteins are given higher priority. After binding sites are clustered, position specific score matrices (PSSMs are constructed from the corresponding binding site alignments. Together with other measures, the PSSMs are subsequently used to rank binding sites to assess how well they match the query and to better gauge their biological relevance. The method also facilitates a succinct and informative representation of observed and inferred binding sites from homologs with known three-dimensional structures, thereby providing the means to analyze conservation and diversity of binding modes. Furthermore, the chemical properties of small molecules bound to the inferred binding sites can be used as a starting point in small molecule virtual screening. The method was validated by comparison to other binding site prediction methods and to a collection of manually curated binding site annotations. We show that our method achieves a sensitivity of 72% at predicting biologically relevant binding sites and can accurately discriminate those sites that bind biological small molecules from non-biological ones. Conclusions

  8. Inhibition of helicase activity by a small molecule impairs Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) function in the cellular response to DNA damage or replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Monika; Sommers, Joshua A; Shoemaker, Robert H; Brosh, Robert M

    2011-01-25

    Modulation of DNA repair proteins by small molecules has attracted great interest. An in vitro helicase activity screen was used to identify molecules that modulate DNA unwinding by Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), mutated in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome. A small molecule from the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set designated NSC 19630 [1-(propoxymethyl)-maleimide] was identified that inhibited WRN helicase activity but did not affect other DNA helicases [Bloom syndrome (BLM), Fanconi anemia group J (FANCJ), RECQ1, RecQ, UvrD, or DnaB). Exposure of human cells to NSC 19630 dramatically impaired growth and proliferation, induced apoptosis in a WRN-dependent manner, and resulted in elevated γ-H2AX and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) foci. NSC 19630 exposure led to delayed S-phase progression, consistent with the accumulation of stalled replication forks, and to DNA damage in a WRN-dependent manner. Exposure to NSC 19630 sensitized cancer cells to the G-quadruplex-binding compound telomestatin or a poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Sublethal dosage of NSC 19630 and the chemotherapy drug topotecan acted synergistically to inhibit cell proliferation and induce DNA damage. The use of this WRN helicase inhibitor molecule may provide insight into the importance of WRN-mediated pathway(s) important for DNA repair and the replicational stress response. PMID:21220316

  9. Using the gini coefficient to measure the chemical diversity of small-molecule libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Filippov, Igor V

    2016-08-15

    Modern databases of small organic molecules contain tens of millions of structures. The size of theoretically available chemistry is even larger. However, despite the large amount of chemical information, the "big data" moment for chemistry has not yet provided the corresponding payoff of cheaper computer-predicted medicine or robust machine-learning models for the determination of efficacy and toxicity. Here, we present a study of the diversity of chemical datasets using a measure that is commonly used in socioeconomic studies. We demonstrate the use of this diversity measure on several datasets that were constructed to contain various congeneric subsets of molecules as well as randomly selected molecules. We also apply our method to a number of well-known databases that are frequently used for structure-activity relationship modeling. Our results show the poor diversity of the common sources of potential lead compounds compared to actual known drugs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27353971

  10. Fluctuation Induced Structure in Chemical Reaction with Small Number of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    We investigate the behaviors of chemical reactions of the Lotka-Volterra model with small number of molecules; hence the occurrence of random fluctuations modifies the deterministic behavior and the law of mass action is replaced by a stochastic model. We model it by using Abstract Rewriting System on Multisets, ARMS; ARMS is a stochastic method of simulating chemical reactions and it is based on the reaction rate equation. We confirmed that the magnitude of fluctuations on periodicity of oscillations becomes large, as the number of involved molecules is getting smaller; and these fluctuations induce another structure, which have not observed in the reactions with large number of molecules. We show that the underling mechanism through investigating the coarse grained phase space of ARMS.

  11. A geometry-based simulation of the hydration of ions and small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Plumridge, T H

    2001-01-01

    software has been tested with a set of twenty widely varying solutes and has produced results which generally agree with experimental data for structure makers and breakers, and also agrees well with traditional techniques such as molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques. The behaviour of solutes in water is of universal significance, but still not fully understood. This thesis provides details of a new computer simulation technique used to investigate the hydration of ions and small molecules. In contrast to conventional techniques such as molecular dynamics, this is a purely geometric method involving no forcefield or energy terms. Molecules of interest are modelled using crystallographic data to ensure that the structures are accurate. Water molecules are added randomly at any hydrogen bonding site in chains. At each addition the chain is rotated through all available space testing for the possibility of ring formation. The constraints used by the program to decide whether a ring should be conserved, ...

  12. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene polymorphism in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kowal, Aneta; Wiśniewski, Andrzej; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Jankowska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer represents the highest morbidity and mortality caused by neoplasms in the world; therefore researchers continue to search for new tools to diagnose and treat the disease. The aim of the study was to establish the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the promoter region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Methods We enrolled 143 patients with a mean age of 63 years, diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer...

  13. Molecular locks and keys: the role of small molecules in phytohormone research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eFonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant adaptation, growth and development rely on the integration of many environmental and endogenous signals that collectively determine the overall plant phenotypic plasticity. Plant signalling molecules, also known as phytohormones, are fundamental to this process. These molecules act at low concentrations and regulate multiple aspects of plant fitness and development via complex signalling networks. By its nature, phytohormone research lies at the interface between chemistry and biology. Classically, the scientific community has always used synthetic phytohormones and analogs to study hormone functions and responses. However, recent advances in synthetic and combinational chemistry, have allowed a new field, plant chemical biology, to emerge and this has provided a powerful tool with which to study phytohormone function.Plant chemical biology is helping to address some of the most enduring questions in phytohormone research such as: Are there still undiscovered plant hormones? How can we identify novel signalling molecules? How can plants activate specific hormone responses in a tissue-specific manner? How can we modulate hormone responses in one developmental context without inducing detrimental effects on other processes? The chemical genomics approaches rely on the identification of small molecules modulating different biological processes and have recently identified active forms of plant hormones and molecules regulating many aspects of hormone synthesis, transport and response. We envision that the field of chemical genomics will continue to provide novel molecules able to elucidate specific aspects of hormone-mediated responses. In addition, compounds blocking specific responses could uncover how complex biological responses are regulated. As we gain information about such compounds we can design small alterations to the chemical structure to further alter specificity, enhance affinity or modulate the activity of these compounds.

  14. Normal-mode-analysis-monitored energy minimization procedure for generating small-molecule bound conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available The energy minimization of a small molecule alone does not automatically stop at a local minimum of the potential energy surface of the molecule if the minimum is shallow, thus leading to folding of the molecule and consequently hampering the generation of the bound conformation of a guest in the absence of its host. This questions the practicality of virtual screening methods that use conformations at local minima of their potential energy surfaces (local minimum conformations as potential bound conformations. Here we report a normal-mode-analysis-monitored energy minimization (NEM procedure that generates local minimum conformations as potential bound conformations. Of 22 selected guest-host complex crystal structures with guest structures possessing up to four rotatable bonds, all complexes were reproduced, with guest mass-weighted root mean square deviations of <1.0 A, through docking with the NEM-generated guest local minimum conformations. An analysis of the potential energies of these local minimum conformations showed that 22 (100%, 18 (82%, 16 (73%, and 12 (55% of the 22 guest bound conformations in the crystal structures had conformational strain energies of less than or equal to 3.8, 2.0, 0.6, and 0.0 kcal/mol, respectively. These results suggest that (1 the NEM procedure can generate small-molecule bound conformations, and (2 guests adopt low-strain-energy conformations for complexation, thus supporting the virtual screening methods that use local minimum conformations.

  15. Small molecule proteostasis regulators that reprogram the ER to reduce extracellular protein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Lars; Cooley, Christina B; Chen, John J; Paxman, Ryan J; Gallagher, Ciara M; Madoux, Franck; Genereux, Joseph C; Dobbs, Wesley; Garza, Dan; Spicer, Timothy P; Scampavia, Louis; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Powers, Evan T; Walter, Peter; Hodder, Peter; Wiseman, R Luke; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-01-01

    Imbalances in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis are associated with etiologically-diverse degenerative diseases linked to excessive extracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment through genetic activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR)-associated transcription factor ATF6 attenuates secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. Here, we employed a screening approach that included complementary arm-specific UPR reporters and medium-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify non-toxic small molecules that phenocopy the ATF6-mediated reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment. The ER reprogramming afforded by our molecules requires activation of endogenous ATF6 and occurs independent of global ER stress. Furthermore, our molecules phenocopy the ability of genetic ATF6 activation to selectively reduce secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. These results show that small molecule-dependent ER reprogramming, achieved through preferential activation of the ATF6 transcriptional program, is a promising strategy to ameliorate imbalances in ER function associated with degenerative protein aggregation diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15550.001 PMID:27435961

  16. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a complex etiology and displays a wide range of cellular escape pathways that allow it to resist different treatment modalities. Crucial signaling molecules that function downstream of the survival pathways, particularly at points where several of these pathways crosstalk, provide valuable targets for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. Bcl-2 family member proteins are anti-apoptotic molecules that are known to be overexpressed in most cancers including PC. The anti-apoptotic machinery has been linked to the observed resistance developed to chemotherapy and radiation and therefore is important from the targeted drug development point of view. Over the past ten years, our group has extensively studied a series of small molecule inhibitors of Bcl-2 against PC and provide solid preclinical platform for testing such novel drugs in the clinic. This review examines the efficacy, potency, and function of several small molecule inhibitor drugs targeted to the Bcl-2 family of proteins and their preclinical progress against PC. This article further focuses on compounds that have been studied the most and also discusses the anti-cancer potential of newer class of Bcl-2 drugs

  17. Approaches to Validate and Manipulate RNA Targets with Small Molecules in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    RNA has become an increasingly important target for therapeutic interventions and for chemical probes that dissect and manipulate its cellular function. Emerging targets include human RNAs that have been shown to directly cause cancer, metabolic disorders, and genetic disease. In this review, we describe various routes to obtain bioactive compounds that target RNA, with a particular emphasis on the development of small molecules. We use these cases to describe approaches that are being developed for target validation, which include target-directed cleavage, classic pull-down experiments, and covalent cross-linking. Thus, tools are available to design small molecules to target RNA and to identify the cellular RNAs that are their targets. PMID:26514201

  18. Solution-processed small-molecule solar cells: breaking the 10% power conversion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Chen, Chun-Chao; Hong, Ziruo; Gao, Jing; Yang, Yang Michael; Zhou, Huanping; Dou, Letian; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional conjugated small molecule (SMPV1) was designed and synthesized for high performance solution-processed organic solar cells. This study explores the photovoltaic properties of this molecule as a donor, with a fullerene derivative as an acceptor, using solution processing in single junction and double junction tandem solar cells. The single junction solar cells based on SMPV1 exhibited a certified power conversion efficiency of 8.02% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW cm(-2)). A homo-tandem solar cell based on SMPV1 was constructed with a novel interlayer (or tunnel junction) consisting of bilayer conjugated polyelectrolyte, demonstrating an unprecedented PCE of 10.1%. These results strongly suggest solution-processed small molecular materials are excellent candidates for organic solar cells. PMID:24285006

  19. Discovery of gliotoxin as a new small molecule targeting thioredoxin redox system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thioredoxin redox system has been implicated as an intracellular anti-oxidant defense system leading to reduction of cellular oxidative stresses utilizing electrons from NADPH. From high content screening of small molecules targeting the system, gliotoxin, a fungal metabolite, was identified as an active compound. Gliotoxin potently accelerates NADPH oxidation and reduces H2O2. The compound reduces H2O2 to H2O by replacing the function of peroxiredoxin in vitro and decreases intracellular level of H2O2 in HeLa cells. The anti-oxidant activity of gliotoxin was further validated H2O2-mediated cellular phenotype of angiogenesis. The proliferation of endothelial cells was inhibited by the compound at nanomolar range. In addition, H2O2-induced tube formation and invasion of the cells were blocked by gliotoxin. Together, these results demonstrate that gliotoxin is a new small molecule targeting thioredoxin redox system

  20. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  1. Nanoimprinted distributed feedback dye laser sensor for real-time imaging of small molecule diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Dufva, Martin; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of different grating periods which result in distinct laser emission wavelengths. Imaging in two dimensions of space is enabled by focusing an image of the laser surface with a cylindrical lens onto the entrance slit of an imaging spectrometer. Imaging is demonstrated by monitoring of diffusing small......Label-free imaging is a promising tool for the study of biological processes such as cell adhesion and small molecule signaling processes. In order to image in two dimensions of space current solutions require motorized stages which results in low imaging frame rates. Here, a highly sensitive...... distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser sensor for real-time label-free imaging without any moving parts enabling a frame rate of 12 Hz is presented. The presence of molecules on the laser surface results in a wavelength shift which is used as sensor signal. The unique DFB laser structure comprises several areas...

  2. Using RosettaLigand for small molecule docking into comparative models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian W Kaufmann

    Full Text Available Computational small molecule docking into comparative models of proteins is widely used to query protein function and in the development of small molecule therapeutics. We benchmark RosettaLigand docking into comparative models for nine proteins built during CASP8 that contain ligands. We supplement the study with 21 additional protein/ligand complexes to cover a wider space of chemotypes. During a full docking run in 21 of the 30 cases, RosettaLigand successfully found a native-like binding mode among the top ten scoring binding modes. From the benchmark cases we find that careful template selection based on ligand occupancy provides the best chance of success while overall sequence identity between template and target do not appear to improve results. We also find that binding energy normalized by atom number is often less than -0.4 in native-like binding modes.

  3. Mechanism of p300 specific histone acetyltransferase inhibition by small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, M; Pradhan, Suman Kalyan; Thanuja, G R; Vedamurthy, B M; Agrawal, Shipra; Dasgupta, Dipak; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-22

    Dysfunction of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) leads to several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and asthma. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors and activators of HATs are being considered as new generation therapeutics. Here, we report the molecular mechanisms of p300 HAT inhibition by specific and nonspecific HAT inhibitors: garcinol, isogarcinol, and 1 (LTK14). The p300 specific HAT inhibitor 1 behaves as a noncompetitive inhibitor for both acetyl-CoA and histone, unlike nonspecific HAT inhibitors garcinol and isogarcinol. The isothermal calorimetric data suggest that there is a high affinity enthalpy driven single binding site for 1 on p300HAT domain in contrast to two binding sites for garcinol and isogarcinol. Furthermore, the precise nature of molecular interactions was determined by using fluorescence, docking, and mutational studies. On the basis of these observations, we have proposed the mechanisms of specific versus nonspecific HAT inhibition by these small molecule compounds, which may be useful to design therapeutically favorable HAT inhibitors. PMID:19086895

  4. Engineered Protein Polymer-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Materials for Small Molecule Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Min; Frezzo, JA; Sharma, E; Chen, R; Singh, N; Yuvienco, C; Caglar, E; Xiao, S; Saxena, A; Montclare, JK

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated protein polymer-gold nanoparticle (P-GNP) nanocomposites that exhibit enhanced binding and delivery properties of the small hydrophobic molecule drug, curcumin, to the model breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. These hybrid biomaterials are constructed via in situ GNP templated-synthesis with genetically engineered histidine tags. The P-GNP nanocomposites exhibit enhanced small molecule loading, sustained release and increased uptake by MCF-7 cells. When compared to the proteins polymers alone, the P-GNPs demonstrate a greater than 7-fold increase in curcumin binding, a nearly 50% slower release profile and more than 2-fold increase in cellular uptake of curcumin. These results suggest that P-GNP nanocomposites serve as promising candidates for drug delivery vehicles. PMID:27081576

  5. Considerable improvement in the stability of solution processed small molecule OLED by annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the annealing effect on solution processed small organic molecule organic films, which were annealed with various conditions. It was found that the densities of the spin-coated (SC) films increased and the surface roughness decreased as the annealing temperature rose. We fabricated corresponding organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) by spin coating on the same annealing conditions. The solution processed OLEDs show the considerable efficiency and stability, which were prior or equivalent to the vacuum-deposited (VD) counterparts. Our research shows that annealing process plays a key role in prolonging the lifetime of solution processed small molecule OLEDs, and the mechanism for the improvement of the device performance upon annealing was also discussed.

  6. Charge transfer through amino groups-small molecules interface improving the performance of electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havare, Ali Kemal; Can, Mustafa; Tozlu, Cem; Kus, Mahmut; Okur, Salih; Demic, Şerafettin; Demirak, Kadir; Kurt, Mustafa; Icli, Sıddık

    2016-05-01

    A carboxylic group functioned charge transporting was synthesized and self-assembled on an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. A typical electroluminescent device [modified ITO/TPD (50 nm)/Alq3 (60 nm)/LiF (2 nm)/(120 nm)] was fabricated to investigate the effect of the amino groups-small molecules interface on the characteristics of the device. The increase in the surface work function of ITO is expected to facilitate the hole injection from the ITO anode to the Hole Transport Layer (HTL) in electroluminescence. The modified electroluminescent device could endure a higher current and showed a much higher luminance than the nonmodified one. For the produced electroluminescent devices, the I-V characteristics, optical characterization and quantum yields were performed. The external quantum efficiency of the modified electroluminescent device is improved as the result of the presence of the amino groups-small molecules interface.

  7. A philicity based analysis of adsorption of small molecules in zeolites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angeles Cáun; Marcelo Galván; Pratim Kumar Chattaraj

    2005-09-01

    Adsorption of small molecules like CH4, CO and NH3 into the acid sites of zeolites is analysed as an interaction between an electrophile and a nucleophile. Global reactivity descriptors like softness and electrophilicity, and local reactivity descriptors like the Fukui function, local softness and local philicity are calculated within density functional as well as Hartree-Fock frameworks using both Mulliken and Hirshfeld population analysis schemes. The HSAB principle and the best electrophilenucleophile combination suggest that the reaction between the NH3 and Brönsted acid site of the zeolite is the strongest. Interaction between the zeolite and a small probe molecule takes place through the most electrophilic atom of one with the most nucleophilic atom of the other. This result is in conformity with those provided by the frontier orbital theory and the local HSAB principle.

  8. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of "preneoplastic antigen"-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. PMID:22310175

  9. Extended coupled cluster for Raman and infrared spectra of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sayali P.; Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Pal, Sourav [Physical Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory (CSIR), Pune 411008 (India); Vaval, Nayana, E-mail: np.vaval@ncl.res.in [Physical Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory (CSIR), Pune 411008 (India)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have used extended coupled cluster method to study IR and Raman spectroscopic properties for small molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach is semi-numerical. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Basis set dependence and electron correlation is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of partial triples makes the result closer to experimental and full CI values. -- Abstract: In this paper we study the harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared (IR) intensities, Raman intensities and depolarization ratio using extended coupled cluster method. Raman and IR intensities are mixed derivatives of energy with respect to the electric field and geometric perturbation whereas vibrational frequencies are derivatives of energy with respect to electric field. We use semi-numerical approach to obtain these derivatives. We have studied the effect of electron correlation and basis set for the above properties. We compare our results with non-variational coupled cluster and experimental values, wherever available. We have studied HF, BH, CH{sup +}, CO and H{sub 2}CO molecules in different basis sets. For HF molecule, benchmarking is done with full CI values and basis set convergence is studied for this molecule. Effect of triples is studied for all the molecules.

  10. Identification and optimization of small-molecule agonists of the human relaxin hormone receptor RXFP1

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jingbo; Huang, Zaohua; Chen, Catherine Z.; Agoulnik, Irina U; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Ferrer, Marc; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I.; Marugan, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    The anti-fibrotic, vasodilatory, and pro-angiogenic therapeutic properties of recombinant relaxin peptide hormone have been investigated in several diseases and recent clinical trial data has shown benefit in treating acute heart failure. However, the remodeling capacity of these peptide hormones is difficult to study in chronic settings due to their short half-life and the need for intravenous administration. Here we present the first small-molecule series of human relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1)...

  11. Identification of alsterpaullone as a novel small molecule inhibitor to target group 3 medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Claudia C.; Agnihotri, Sameer; Mack, Stephen C.; Golbourn, Brian J.; Diaz, Roberto J.; Olsen, Samantha; Bryant, Melissa; Bebenek, Matthew; Wang, Xin; Bertrand, Kelsey C.; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Clark, Ian; Dirks, Peter; Smith, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of medulloblastoma revealed four genetically and clinically distinct subgroups. Group 3 medulloblastomas are characterized by frequent amplifications of the oncogene MYC, a high incidence of metastasis, and poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. We investigated several potential small molecule inhibitors to target Group 3 medulloblastomas based on gene expression data using an in silico drug screen. The Connectivity Map (C-MAP) analysis identified piperlo...

  12. Small Molecule-Triggered Cas9 Protein with Improved Genome-Editing Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Kevin M.; Pattanayak, Vikram; Thompson, David B.; Zuris, John A.; Liu, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Directly modulating the activity of genome-editing proteins has the potential to increase their specificity by reducing activity following target locus modification. We developed Cas9 nucleases that are activated by the presence of a cell-permeable small molecule by inserting an evolved 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-HT)-responsive intein at specific positions in Cas9. In human cells, conditionally active Cas9s modify target genomic sites with up to 25-fold higher specificity than wild-type Cas9.

  13. Studies on organic solar cells based on small-molecules : tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene and fullerene C70

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo Lorente, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the research on organic solar cells based on small-molecules semiconductors. In particular, organic solar cells of this thesis have been used tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene as donor material and fullerene C70 as acceptor material. In the first part of this thesis, we focus on the influence of the density of states of the donor layer on the characteristic parameters of solar cells. Further, organic solar cells with p-i-n structure are presented, where the intrinsic lay...

  14. Isonitrile ligand effects on small-molecule-sequestering in bimetalladodecaborane clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bould, Jonathan; Londesborough, Michael Geoffrey Stephen; Kennedy, JD.; Macias, R.; Winter, REK.; Císařová, I.; Kubát, Pavel; Lang, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 747, december (2013), s. 76-84. ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/1577; GA ČR GAP208/10/1678; GA ČR GAP207/11/0705 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : Metallaboranes * Small molecule * Sequestration * DFT * Isonitrile * Carbon monoxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2013

  15. HIV Capsid is a Tractable Target for Small Molecule Therapeutic Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Wade S.; Pickford, Chris; Irving, Stephen L.; Brown, David G.; Anderson, Marie; Bazin, Richard; Cao, Joan; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Isaacson, Jason; Jackson, Lynn; Hunt, Rachael; Kjerrstrom, Anne; Nieman, James A.; Patick, Amy K.; Perros, Manos

    2010-01-01

    Despite a high current standard of care in antiretroviral therapy for HIV, multidrug-resistant strains continue to emerge, underscoring the need for additional novel mechanism inhibitors that will offer expanded therapeutic options in the clinic. We report a new class of small molecule antiretroviral compounds that directly target HIV-1 capsid (CA) via a novel mechanism of action. The compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and HIV-2, a...

  16. Benzofuranone derivatives as effective small molecules related to insulin amyloid fibrillation: a structure-function study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Navidpour, Latifeh;

    2011-01-01

    amyloid fibrils under slightly destabilizing conditions in vitro and may form amyloid structures when subcutaneously injected into patients with diabetes. There is a great deal of interest in developing novel small molecule inhibitors of amyloidogenic processes, as potential therapeutic compounds. In this...... study, the effects of five new synthetic benzofuranone derivatives were investigated on the insulin amyloid formation process. Protein fibrillation was analyzed by thioflavin-T fluorescence, Congo red binding, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy. Despite high structural similarity, one of the...

  17. The Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification (CASMI): Challenges and Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen Neumann; Schymanski, Emma L.

    2013-01-01

    The Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification, or CASMI, contest was founded in 2012 to provide scientists with a common open dataset to evaluate their identification methods. In this article, the challenges and solutions for the inaugural CASMI 2012 are presented. The contest was split into four categories corresponding with tasks to determine molecular formula and molecular structure, each from two measurement types, liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRM...

  18. Functional Characterization of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of the DKK1-LRP6 Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Iozzi; Rosaria Remelli; Barbara Lelli; Daniela Diamanti; Silvia Pileri; Luisa Bracci; Renza Roncarati; Andrea Caricasole; Simonetta Bernocco

    2012-01-01

    Background. DKK1 antagonizes canonical Wnt signalling through high-affinity binding to LRP5/6, an essential component of the Wnt receptor complex responsible for mediating downstream canonical Wnt signalling. DKK1 overexpression is known for its pathological implications in osteoporosis, cancer, and neurodegeneration, suggesting the interaction with LRP5/6 as a potential therapeutic target. Results. We show that the small-molecule NCI8642 can efficiently displace DKK1 from LRP6 and block DKK1...

  19. Small Molecules that Modulate Quorum Sensing and Control Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mattmann, Margrith E.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria use small molecule signals to access their local population densities in a process called quorum sensing (QS). Once a threshold signal concentration is reached, and therefore a certain number of bacteria have assembled, bacteria use QS to change gene expression levels and initiate behaviors that benefit the group. These group processes play central roles in both bacterial virulence and symbiosis, and can have significant impacts on human health, agriculture, and the environment. The ...

  20. A Useful Approach To Identify Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors Of Wnt-Dependent Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Ewan, Kenneth; Pająk, Bożena; Stubbs, Mark; Todd, Helen; Barbeau, Olivier; Quevedo, Camilo; Botfield, Hannah; Young, Rodrigo; Ruddle, Ruth; Samuel, Lee; Battersby, Alysia; Raynaud, Florence; Allen, Nicholas; Wilson, Stephen W; Latinkic, Branko

    2010-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in cancer due to mutations in the genes encoding APC, β-catenin and axin. To identify small molecule inhibitors of Wnt signaling as potential therapeutics, a diverse chemical library was screened using a TCF-reporter cell line in which the activity of the pathway was induced at the level of the Disheveled protein. A series of deconvolution studies was used to focus on 3 compound series that selectively killed cancer cell lines with constitut...

  1. A novel tankyrase small-molecule inhibitor suppresses APC mutation-driven colorectal tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, T.; Chan, E Y; Callow, M.; Waaler, J.; Boggs, J.; Blake, R.A.; Magnuson, S.; Sambrone, A.; Schutten, M; Firestein, R.; Machoň, O. (Ondřej); Kořínek, V. (Vladimír); Choo, E.; Diaz, D.; Merchant, M

    2013-01-01

    Most colorectal cancers (CRC) are initiated by mutations of APC, leading to increased β-catenin-mediated signaling. However, continued requirement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling for tumor progression in the context of acquired KRAS and other mutations is less well-established. To attenuate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tumors, we have developed potent and specific small-molecule tankyrase inhibitors, G007-LK and G244-LM, that reduce Wnt/β-catenin signaling by preventing poly(ADP-...

  2. Complexities of Particulate Matter Measurement in Parenteral Formulations of Small-Molecule Amphiphilic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, Magali B.; Waggener, Sara; Gole, Dilip; Jimidar, Ilias; Vermeersch, Hans; Ratanabanangkoon, Poe; Tinke, Arjen P.; Almarsson, Örn

    2011-01-01

    Reconstituted parenteral solutions of three surface-active anti-infective small-molecule drugs and solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a model surfactant) were studied to quantify the impact of sample preparation and handling on particle counts. Turbidimetry and light obscuration profiles were recorded as a function of agitation and shearing with and without the introduction of foam into the solutions. SDS solutions at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) show s...

  3. Physicochemical and Biopharmaceutical Characterisation of Small Drug Molecules by Capillary Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Örnskov, Eivor

    2004-01-01

    Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) was explored as a means for physicochemical and biopharmaceutical characterisation of small drug molecules. Special attention was paid to the characterisation of acid-base and lipophilic properties of drug compounds by analysing their migration behaviour in different CE systems. The thesis comprises an overview of the field together with separate studies on the different topics. The utility of CE for the determination of pKa of labile drug compounds was investig...

  4. Metal Nanowire Networks as Transparent Electrode for Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sachse, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the development of metal nanowire networks for the use as transparent electrodes in small-molecule organic solar cells. Broad adoption of organic solar cells requires inexpensive roll-to-roll processing on flexible, lightweight substrates. Under these conditions, traditional metal oxide electrodes suffer from significant drawbacks such as brittleness and cost. In contrast, metal nanowire networks provide properties more suitable for high-throughput processing and thus...

  5. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  6. Discovery of a small-molecule antiviral targeting the HIV-1 matrix protein

    OpenAIRE

    Zentner, Isaac; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Maciunas, Lina; Vinnik, Andrei; Fedichev, Peter; Mankowski, Marie K.; Ptak, Roger G.; Martín-García, Julio; Cocklin, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Due to the emergence of drug-resistant strains and the cumulative toxicities associated with current therapies, demand remains for new inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein is an essential viral component with established roles in the assembly of the virus. Using virtual and surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based screening, we describe the identification of the first small molecule to bind to the HIV-1 MA protein and to possess broad range anti-HIV properties.

  7. A journey in bioinspired supramolecular chemistry: from molecular tweezers to small molecules that target myotonic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes part of the author’s research in the area of supramolecular chemistry, beginning with his early life influences and early career efforts in molecular recognition, especially molecular tweezers. Although designed to complex DNA, these hosts proved more applicable to the field of host–guest chemistry. This early experience and interest in intercalation ultimately led to the current efforts to develop small molecule therapeutic agents for myotonic dystrophy using a rationa...

  8. Activation of CO2 and Related Small Molecules by Neopentyl-Derivatized Uranium Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Anna-Corina

    2015-01-01

    The world´s concern about the environment has continued to intensify as the effects of greenhouse gases or complicated work-up and disposal of radioactive substances become more obvious and profound. Unsurprisingly, the number of publications related to the solution of these issues has greatly increased in the last 15 years. Thus, a basic understanding of the specific properties and behavior of small molecules is crucial for the reduction of greenhouse gases, which may be realized through act...

  9. A complex task? Direct modulation of transcription factors with small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler, Angela N.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors with aberrant activity in disease are promising yet untested targets for therapeutic development, particularly in oncology. Directly inhibiting or activating the function of a transcription factor requires specific disruption or recruitment of protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. The discovery or design of small molecules that specifically modulate these interactions has thus far proven to be a significant challenge and the protein class is often perceived to be ...

  10. Chemical screening identifies filastatin, a small molecule inhibitor of Candida albicans adhesion, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fazly, Ahmed; Jain, Charu; Dehner, Amie C.; Issi, Luca; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Ali, Akbar; Cao, Hong; Fidel, Paul L.; P. Rao, Reeta; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans, begins with adhesion to host cells or implanted medical devices followed by biofilm formation. By high-throughput phenotypic screening of small molecules, we identified compounds that inhibit adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. Our lead candidate compound also inhibits binding of C. albicans to cultured human epithelial cells, the yeast-to-hyphal morphological transition, induction of the hyphal-specific HWP1 promoter, biofilm forma...

  11. Small molecule stimulation enhances bone regeneration but not titanium implant osseointegration

    OpenAIRE

    Gellynck, K.; Shah, R.; Parkar, M.; Young, A; Buxton, P.; Brett, P. (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The osteogenic and osseointegrative potential of a small molecule was examined to assess its usefulness in regenerative procedures. Purmorphamine was used to stimulate bone growth and repair in an in vitro cell based assay and an in vivo chick embryo CAM-assay with and without the presence of an implant. Purmorphamine adhered to precipitated hydroxyapatite coating, could activate the sonic hedgehog pathway and thereby stimulated osteodifferentiation. Porous calcium phosphate beads we...

  12. A Small Molecule, Odanacatib, Inhibits Inflammation and Bone Loss Caused by Endodontic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Wei; McConnell, Matthew; Zhu, Zheng; Li, Sheng; Reddy, Michael; Eleazer, Paul D; Wang, Min; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Periapical disease, an inflammatory disease mainly caused by dental caries, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of humans, affecting both children and adults. The infection travels through the root, leading to inflammation, bone destruction, and severe pain for the patient. Therefore, the development of a new class of anti-periapical disease therapies is necessary and critical for treatment and prevention. A small molecule, odanacatib (ODN), which is a cathepsin K (Ctsk) inhibito...

  13. Isothermal Chemical Denaturation to Determine Binding Affinity of Small Molecules to G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Patrick; Weihofen, Wilhelm; Siu, Fai; Xie, Amy; Katakia, Hetal; Wright, S. Kirk; Hunt, Ian; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The determination of accurate binding affinities is critical in drug discovery and development. Several techniques are available for characterizing the binding of small molecules to soluble proteins. The situation is different for integral membrane proteins. Isothermal chemical denaturation (ICD) has been shown to be a valuable biophysical method to determine in a direct and label-free fashion the binding of ligands to soluble proteins. In this communication, the application of isothermal che...

  14. Process Intensification Tools in the Small‐Scale Pharmaceutical Manufacturing of Small Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitic, Aleksandar; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical process industry is paying significant attention to the intensification of processes with the main aim of achieving increased productivity, improved economic status, and enhanced sustainability. The pharmaceutical industry is moving in the same direction and, therefore, dozens of......‐scale pharmaceutical manufacturing of so‐called small molecules. The focus is on microwave radiation, microreactors, ultrasounds, and meso‐scale tubular reactors....

  15. Metabolic Targeting of Malignant Tumors: Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Bioenergetic Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Mathupala, Saroj P.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism in tumors deviates significantly from that of normal tissues. Increasingly, the underlying aberrant metabolic pathways are being considered as novel targets for cancer therapy. Denoted “metabolic targeting”, small molecule drugs are under investigation for focused inhibition of key metabolic steps that are utilized by tumors, since such inhibitors should harbor minimal toxicity towards surrounding normal tissues.This review will examine the primary biochemical pathways that tumors ...

  16. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchet, L.M.; Smeitink, J; van Emst-de Vries, S E; Vogels, C.; Pellegrini, M; Jonckheere, A.I.; Rodenburg, R J; Buydens, L.M.; Beyrath, J.D.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to id...

  17. Interaction of Small Molecules with Transition Metal Ions in Zeolites: The Effect of the Local Environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nachtigall, Petr; Davidová, Markéta; Šilhan, Martin; Nachtigallová, Dana

    Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2002 - (Aiello, R.; Giordano, G.; Testa, F.), s. 101-108 - (Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis.. 142 A). [International FEZA Conference /2./. Taormina (IT), 01.09.2002-05.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : small molecules * metal ions * zeolites Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Bifunctional Pt-Si Alloys for Small Organic Molecule Electro-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna; Suntivich, Jin; Han, Binghong;

    bifunctional requirement, which demands both adsorption and water oxidation sites. In this contribution, we explore the possibility of using Pt-Si alloys to fulfill this bifunctional requirement. Silicon, a highly oxophillic element, is alloyed into Pt as a site for water oxidation, while Pt serves as a CO...... adsorption site. We will discuss the enhanced activity of Pt-Si alloys for small organic molecule oxidation, which can be attributed to the improved CO electro-oxidation kinetics on Pt-Si....

  19. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2013-01-01

    The unique expression pattern and immunogenic properties of cancer/testis antigens make them ideal targets for immunotherapy of cancer. The MAGE-A3 cancer/testis antigen is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and vaccination with MAGE-A3 in patients with MAGE-A3-positive...... NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC....

  20. High temperature electrical conductivity due to small polaron hopping motion in DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triberis, G P [University of Athens, Physics Department, Solid State Section, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Karavolas, V C [University of Athens, Physics Department, Solid State Section, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Simserides, C D [University of Athens, Physics Department, Solid State Section, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Special Lab for Non-Invasing Brain Imaging, Brenneckestr. 6, D-39118 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    We present a small polaron hopping model to interpret the high-temperature electrical conductivity measured along the DNA molecules. The model takes into account the one-dimensional character of the system and the presence of disorder in the DNA double helix. The experimental data for the lambda phage DNA ({lambda}-DNA) and the poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA follow nicely the theoretically predicted behavior leading to realistic values of the maximum hopping distances supporting the idea of multiphonon-assisted hopping of small polarons between next nearest neighbors of the DNA molecular 'wire'.

  1. High temperature electrical conductivity due to small polaron hopping motion in DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triberis, G. P.; Karavolas, V. C.; Simserides, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a small polaron hopping model to interpret the high-temperature electrical conductivity measured along the DNA molecules. The model takes into account the one-dimensional character of the system and the presence of disorder in the DNA double helix. The experimental data for the lambda phage DNA (λ-DNA) and the poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA follow nicely the theoretically predicted behavior leading to realistic values of the maximum hopping distances supporting the idea of multiphonon-assisted hopping of small polarons between next nearest neighbors of the DNA molecular "wire".

  2. Enhancement of Small Molecule Delivery by Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: A Parameter Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Yak-Nam; Farr, Navid; Zia, Jasmine; Chen, Hong; Ko, Bong Min; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Li, Tong; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug delivery is often ineffective within solid tumors, but increasing the drug dose would result in systemic toxicity. The use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has the potential to enhance penetration of small molecules. However, operation parameters need to be optimized before the use of chemotherapeutic drugs in vivo and translation to clinical trials. In this study, the effects of pulsed HIFU (pHIFU) parameters (spatial-average pulse-average intensity, duty factor and pulse repetition frequency) on the penetration as well as content of small molecules were evaluated in ex vivo porcine kidneys. Specific HIFU parameters resulted in more than 40 times greater Evans blue content and 3.5 times the penetration depth compared with untreated samples. When selected parameters were applied to porcine kidneys in vivo, a 2.3-fold increase in concentration was obtained after a 2-min exposure to pHIFU. Pulsed HIFU has been found to be an effective modality to enhance both the concentration and penetration depth of small molecules in tissue using the optimized HIFU parameters. Although, performed in normal tissue, this study has the promise of translation into tumor tissue. PMID:26803389

  3. Rapid Discovery of Functional Small Molecule Ligands against Proteomic Targets through Library-Against-Library Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Yi; Wang, Don-Hong; Wang, Xiaobing; Dixon, Seth M; Meng, Liping; Ahadi, Sara; Enter, Daniel H; Chen, Chao-Yu; Kato, Jason; Leon, Leonardo J; Ramirez, Laura M; Maeda, Yoshiko; Reis, Carolina F; Ribeiro, Brianna; Weems, Brittany; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Lam, Kit S

    2016-06-13

    Identifying "druggable" targets and their corresponding therapeutic agents are two fundamental challenges in drug discovery research. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library method has been developed to discover peptides or small molecules that bind to a specific target protein or elicit a specific cellular response. The phage display cDNA expression proteome library method has been employed to identify target proteins that interact with specific compounds. Here, we combined these two high-throughput approaches, efficiently interrogated approximately 10(13) possible molecular interactions, and identified 91 small molecule compound beads that interacted strongly with the phage library. Of 19 compounds resynthesized, 4 were cytotoxic against cancer cells; one of these compounds was found to interact with EIF5B and inhibit protein translation. As more binding pairs are confirmed and evaluated, the "library-against-library" screening approach and the resulting small molecule-protein domain interaction database may serve as a valuable tool for basic research and drug development. PMID:27053324

  4. Novel dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors: scaffolds and discovery strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Anran; Yu, Haiqing; Wang, Changyuan; Zhu, Xingqi; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Searching for safe and effective treatments for HIV infection is still a great challenge worldwide in spite of the 27 marketed anti-HIV drugs and the powerful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). As a promising prospect for generation of new HIV therapy drugs, multiple ligands (MDLs) were greatly focused on recently due to their lower toxicity, simplified dosing and patient adherence than single-target drugs. Till now, by disrupting two active sites or steps of HIV replications, a number of HIV dual inhibitors, such as CD4-gssucap120 inhibitors, CXCR4-gp20 inhibitors, RT-CXCR4 inhibitors, RT-protease inhibitors, RT-integrase inhibitors, and RTassociated functions inhibitors have been identified. Generally, these dual inhibitors were discovered mainly through screening approaches and design strategies. Of these compounds, the molecules bearing small skeletons exhibited strong anti-HIV activity and aroused great attention recently. Reviewing the progress of the dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors from the point of view of their scaffolds and discovery strategies will provide valuable information for producing more effective anti-HIV drugs. In this regard, novel dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors were illustrated, and their discovery paradigms as the major contents were also summarized in this manuscript. PMID:25269561

  5. Small molecule hydration energy and entropy from 3D-RISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J; Case, D A; Yamazaki, T; Gusarov, S; Kovalenko, A; Luchko, T

    2016-09-01

    Implicit solvent models offer an attractive way to estimate the effects of a solvent environment on the properties of small or large solutes without the complications of explicit simulations. One common test of accuracy is to compute the free energy of transfer from gas to liquid for a variety of small molecules, since many of these values have been measured. Studies of the temperature dependence of these values (i.e. solvation enthalpies and entropies) can provide additional insights into the performance of implicit solvent models. Here, we show how to compute temperature derivatives of hydration free energies for the 3D-RISM integral equation approach. We have computed hydration free energies of 1123 small drug-like molecules (both neutral and charged). Temperature derivatives were also used to calculate hydration energies and entropies of 74 of these molecules (both neutral and charged) for which experimental data is available. While direct results have rather poor agreement with experiment, we have found that several previously proposed linear hydration free energy correction schemes give good agreement with experiment. These corrections also provide good agreement for hydration energies and entropies though simple extensions are required in some cases. PMID:27367817

  6. Chitosan derivatives/reduced graphene oxide/alginate beads for small-molecule drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaihang; Ling, Yunzhi; Cao, Cong; Li, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-12-01

    This work reported chitosan derivatives (CSD)/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) blending with alginate to prepare hydrogel beads for small-molecule drug delivery for the first time. At the beginning, graphene oxide (GO) was successfully reduced using diverse CSD as reducing and stabilizing agents via facile heating. Then the obtained CSD/rGO was blended with alginate and crosslinked into hydrogel beads in CaCl2 solution. Finally, the beads were systematically evaluated as novel vehicles for pH-responsive small-molecule drug delivery. The optimal CSD/rGO/alginate beads showed a high drug-loading efficiency of 82.8% on small-molecule fluorescein sodium (FL), outstanding sustainable release of 71.6% upon 150h at a physiological pH and quick-release of 82.4% drug content at 20h in an acidic medium. Additionally, the cytotoxicity assay result suggested that the CSD/rGO/alginate beads showed negligible cytotoxicity to hepatic stellate cell lines, opening up possibilities for safe and efficient drug delivery. PMID:27612820

  7. The cellular membrane as a mediator for small molecule interaction with membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Christopher G; Arcario, Mark J; Mahinthichaichan, Paween; Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Navidpour, Latifeh; Wen, Po-Chao; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-10-01

    The cellular membrane constitutes the first element that encounters a wide variety of molecular species to which a cell might be exposed. Hosting a large number of structurally and functionally diverse proteins associated with this key metabolic compartment, the membrane not only directly controls the traffic of various molecules in and out of the cell, it also participates in such diverse and important processes as signal transduction and chemical processing of incoming molecular species. In this article, we present a number of cases where details of interaction of small molecular species such as drugs with the membrane, which are often experimentally inaccessible, have been studied using advanced molecular simulation techniques. We have selected systems in which partitioning of the small molecule with the membrane constitutes a key step for its final biological function, often binding to and interacting with a protein associated with the membrane. These examples demonstrate that membrane partitioning is not only important for the overall distribution of drugs and other small molecules into different compartments of the body, it may also play a key role in determining the efficiency and the mode of interaction of the drug with its target protein. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27163493

  8. Target identification for small bioactive molecules: finding the needle in the haystack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Slava; Pries, Verena; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert

    2013-03-01

    Identification and confirmation of bioactive small-molecule targets is a crucial, often decisive step both in academic and pharmaceutical research. Through the development and availability of several new experimental techniques, target identification is, in principle, feasible, and the number of successful examples steadily grows. However, a generic methodology that can successfully be applied in the majority of the cases has not yet been established. Herein we summarize current methods for target identification of small molecules, primarily for a chemistry audience but also the biological community, for example, the chemist or biologist attempting to identify the target of a given bioactive compound. We describe the most frequently employed experimental approaches for target identification and provide several representative examples illustrating the state-of-the-art. Among the techniques currently available, protein affinity isolation using suitable small-molecule probes (pulldown) and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated proteins appears to be most powerful and most frequently applied. To provide guidance for rapid entry into the field and based on our own experience we propose a typical workflow for target identification, which centers on the application of chemical proteomics as the key step to generate hypotheses for potential target proteins. PMID:23418026

  9. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, F O; Burg, G; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1997-02-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  10. Combination of small interfering RNAs mediates greater inhibition of human hepatitis B virus replication and antigen expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe; XU Ze-feng; YE Jing-jia; YAO Hang-ping; ZHENG Shu; DING Jia-yi

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the inhibitory effect mediated by combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting different sites of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcripts on the viral replication and antigen expression in vitro. Methods: (1) Seven siRNAs targeting surface (S), polymerase (P) or precore (PreC) region ofHBV genome were designed and chemically synthesized.(2) HBV-producing HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with or without siRNAs for 72 h. (3) HBsAg and HBeAg in the cell culture medium were detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. (4) Intracellular viral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR(Polymerase Chain Reaction). (5) HBV viral mRNA was reverse transcribed and quantified by real-time PCR. (6) The change of cell cycle and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Our data demonstrated that synthetic small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting S and PreC gene could efficiently and specifically inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression. The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg and the replication of HBV could be specifically inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by siRNAs.Furthermore, our results showed that the combination of siRNAs targeting various regions could inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression in a more efficient way than the use of single siRNA at the same final concentration. No apoptotic change was observed in the cell after siRNA treatment. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that siRNAs exerted robust and specific inhibition on HBV replication and antigen expression in a cell culture system and combination of siRNAs targeting different regions exhibited more potency.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of new electron-withdrawing moiety thieno[2,3-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione-based molecules for small molecule solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Lei; Pan, Hongbin; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod;

    2013-01-01

    –π–donor–π–acceptor type end-capped with thieno[2,3-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione (TPD) units for small molecule solar cells have been prepared through coupling of dithienosilole and TPD units bridged with thienylene and bithienylene. They are soluble in common organic solvents and show an interesting absorption. These small...

  12. Targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs with multimodal synthetic small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Duc Duy; Staedel, Cathy; Zehnacker, Laura; Benhida, Rachid; Darfeuille, Fabien; Duca, Maria

    2014-03-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered category of small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers and revealed to be oncogenic and to play a pivotal role in initiation and progression of these pathologies. It is now clear that the inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs, defined as blocking their biosynthesis or their function, could find an application in the therapy of different types of cancer in which these miRNAs are implicated. Here we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new small-molecule RNA ligands targeting the production of oncogenic microRNAs. In this work we focused our attention on miR-372 and miR-373 that are implicated in the tumorigenesis of different types of cancer such as gastric cancer. These two oncogenic miRNAs are overexpressed in gastric cancer cells starting from their precursors pre-miR-372 and pre-miR-373, two stem-loop structured RNAs that lead to mature miRNAs after cleavage by the enzyme Dicer. The small molecules described herein consist of the conjugation of two RNA binding motives, i.e., the aminoglycoside neomycin and different natural and artificial nucleobases, in order to obtain RNA ligands with increased affinity and selectivity compared to that of parent compounds. After the synthesis of this new series of RNA ligands, we demonstrated that they are able to inhibit the production of the oncogenic miRNA-372 and -373 by binding their pre-miRNAs and inhibiting the processing by Dicer. Moreover, we proved that some of these compounds bear anti-proliferative activity toward gastric cancer cells and that this activity is likely linked to a decrease in the production of targeted miRNAs. To date, only few examples of small molecules targeting oncogenic miRNAs have been reported, and such inhibitors could be extremely useful for the development of new anticancer therapeutic

  13. Recovery of small dye molecules from aqueous solutions using charged ultrafiltration membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiuwen; Zhao, Yiru [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Moutinho, Jennifer [Department of Chemical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Shao, Jiahui, E-mail: jhshao@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zydney, Andrew L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); He, Yiliang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • Dye retention was greatest with the most negatively charged dye molecule. • Higher rejection was observed in low ionic strength solutions. • The membrane with longer spacer arm length had higher rejection coefficient, consistent with its greater negative charge. • Results were consistent with model calculations based on partitioning of a charged sphere into a charged cylindrical pore. • UF membranes can effectively recover small dye molecules at low pressures under appropriate solution conditions. - Abstract: Recovery of reactive dyes from effluent streams is a growing environmental challenge. In this study, various charged regenerated cellulose (RC) ultrafiltration (UF) membranes were prepared and tested for removal of three model reactive dyes (reactive red ED-2B, reactive brilliant yellow K-6G, and reactive brilliant blue KN-R). Data were obtained with charged UF membranes having different spacer arm lengths between the base cellulose and the charge functionality. The effects of charge density of the dye molecules, ionic strength of the feed solution, spacer arm length of charged membranes and filtrate flux were studied. Results indicated that dye retention was greatest with the most negatively charged dye molecule. Higher rejection was also observed in low ionic strength solutions. Results were consistent with model calculations based on the partitioning of a charged sphere into a charged cylindrical pore. The membranes with longer spacer arm length had higher rejection coefficients, consistent with the greater negative charge on these membranes. This study confirms that charged UF membranes can effectively recover small reactive dye molecules at low pressures (below 100 kPa) under appropriate solution conditions due to the strong electrostatic repulsion from the membrane pores.

  14. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Christine M. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  15. Influence of Lithium Additives in Small Molecule Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuo-Yao; Bastatas, Lyndon D; Suhr, Kristin J; Moore, Matthew D; Holliday, Bradley J; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs) utilizing small molecule emitters such as iridium complexes have great potential as low-cost emissive devices. In these devices, ions rearrange during operation to facilitate carrier injection, bringing about efficient operation from simple, single layer devices. Recent work has shown that the luminance, efficiency, and responsiveness of iridium-based LEECs are greatly enhanced by the inclusion of small amounts of lithium salts (≤0.5%/wt) into the active layer. However, the origin of this enhancement has yet to be demonstrated experimentally. Furthermore, although iridium-based devices have been the longstanding leader among small molecule LEECs, fundamental understanding of the ionic distribution in these devices under operation is lacking. Herein, we use scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to measure the in situ potential profiles and electric field distributions of planar iridium-based LEECs and clarify the role of ionic lithium additives. In pristine devices, it is found that ions do not pack densely at the cathode, and ionic redistribution is slow. Inclusion of small amounts of Li[PF6] greatly increases ionic space charge near the cathode that doubles the peak electric fields and enhances electronic injection relative to pristine devices. This study confirms and clarifies a number of longstanding hypotheses regarding iridium LEECs and recent postulates concerning optimization of their operation. PMID:27299981

  16. Strategies for Discovery of Small Molecule Radiation Protectors and Radiation Mitigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S Greenberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial targeted radiation damage protectors (delivered prior to irradiation and mitigators (delivered after irradiation, but before the appearance of symptoms associated with radiation syndrome have been a recent focus in drug discovery for 1 normal tissue radiation protection during fractionated radiotherapy, and 2 radiation terrorism counter measures. Several categories of such molecules have been discovered: nitroxide-linked hybrid molecules, including GS-nitroxide, GS-nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitors, and pharmaceutical agents including inhibitors of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathway and the anti-seizure medicine, carbamazepine. Evaluation of potential new irradiation dose modifying molecules to protect normal tissue includes: clonagenic radiation survival curves; assays for apoptosis and DNA repair, and irradiation-induced depletion of antioxidant stores. Studies of organ specific radioprotection and in total body irradiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome in the mouse model for protection/mitigation facilitate rational means by which to move candidate small molecule drugs along the drug discovery pipeline into clinical development.

  17. Small molecules ATP-competitive inhibitors of FLT3: a chemical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenone, S; Brullo, C; Botta, M

    2008-01-01

    FLT3 is a tyrosine kinase (TK), member of the class III TK receptor family, normally expressed in hematopoietic, immune and neural systems, also playing an important role in the pathogenesis of acute leukemias, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where it is present in constitutively activated mutated forms, correlated with poor prognosis, in a notable percentage of patients. For these reasons FLT3 soon appeared as a promising target for the therapeutic intervention for this severe and aggressive malignancy; the recent determination of the crystal structure of the autoinhibited form of FLT3 gave new trend for the design and the synthesis of potent inhibitors. Small molecules tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent one of the largest drug family currently targeted by pharmaceutical companies for the treatment of cancer. Exciting examples of such molecules have reached advanced clinical trials and have been recently approved by FDA for the treatment of different solid or haematological tumors. Usually TK inhibitors share common features, namely two hydrophobic/aromatic regions bearing one or more hydrogen bonding substituents. These two regions can be connected by different spacers and almost all the molecules contain a component resembling the ATP purine structure. This review will deal with FLT3 synthetic inhibitors, reporting not only the most important molecules that are in clinical trials, but also the new compounds that have appeared in literature in the last few years. Our attention will be focused on chemical structures, mechanisms of action and structure-activity relationships. PMID:19075657

  18. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C;

    1995-01-01

    Absorption and elution experiments showed that it was impossible to separate antibodies against blood group factor M' from antibodies against bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA) A16 in an antiserum showing haemolytic activity against M' as well as lymphocytotoxic activity against BoLA-A16....... To elucidate the structural relationship between BoLA-A16 and blood group antigen M', immunoprecipitation experiments on red and white cell lysates isolated from M'-A16 positive and negative cattle were carried out. These results showed that M(r) 44,000 and M(r) 12000 polypeptides can be precipitated from both...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  19. Structure of the myotonic dystrophy type 2 RNA and designed small molecules that reduce toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Lohman, Jeremy R; Guan, Lirui; Tran, Tuan; Sarkar, Partha; Schatz, George C; Disney, Matthew D

    2014-02-21

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is an incurable neuromuscular disorder caused by a r(CCUG) expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that folds into an extended hairpin with periodically repeating 2×2 nucleotide internal loops (5'CCUG/3'GUCC). We designed multivalent compounds that improve DM2-associated defects using information about RNA-small molecule interactions. We also report the first crystal structure of r(CCUG) repeats refined to 2.35 Å. Structural analysis of the three 5'CCUG/3'GUCC repeat internal loops (L) reveals that the CU pairs in L1 are each stabilized by one hydrogen bond and a water-mediated hydrogen bond, while CU pairs in L2 and L3 are stabilized by two hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the CU pairs are dynamic and stabilized by Na(+) and water molecules. MD simulations of the binding of the small molecule to r(CCUG) repeats reveal that the lowest free energy binding mode occurs via the major groove, in which one C residue is unstacked and the cross-strand nucleotides are displaced. Moreover, we modeled the binding of our dimeric compound to two 5'CCUG/3'GUCC motifs, which shows that the scaffold on which the RNA-binding modules are displayed provides an optimal distance to span two adjacent loops. PMID:24341895

  20. A study of small molecule ingress into planar and cylindrical materials using ion beam analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, R W

    2001-01-01

    mechanisms that take place, and where relevant diffusion coefficients have been obtained using either a semi-infinite medium Fickian planar diffusion model or a cylindrical Fickian diffusion model. Ion beam analysis techniques have been developed to allow profiling of small molecules diffused into materials at depths ranging from 10 sup - sup 7 to 10 sup - sup 1 m. A model DPS/PS/DPS triple-layer film and D( sup 3 He,p) sup 4 He nuclear reaction analysis was used to test the applicability of a novel data processing program - the IBA DataFurnace - to nuclear reaction data. The same reaction and program were used to depth profile the diffusion of heavy water into cellophane. A scanning sup 3 He micro-beam technique was developed to profile the diffusion of small molecules into both planar and cylindrical materials. The materials were exposed to liquids containing deuterium labelled molecules. A cross-section was exposed by cutting the material perpendicular to the surface and this was bombarded by a scanning su...

  1. Shaping Small Bioactive Molecules to Untangle Their Biological Function: A Focus on Fluorescent Plant Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lace, Beatrice; Prandi, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Modern biology overlaps with chemistry in explaining the structure and function of all cellular processes at the molecular level. Plant hormone research is perfectly located at the interface between these two disciplines, taking advantage of synthetic and computational chemistry as a tool to decipher the complex biological mechanisms regulating the action of plant hormones. These small signaling molecules regulate a wide range of developmental processes, adapting plant growth to ever changing environmental conditions. The synthesis of small bioactive molecules mimicking the activity of endogenous hormones allows us to unveil many molecular features of their functioning, giving rise to a new field, plant chemical biology. In this framework, fluorescence labeling of plant hormones is emerging as a successful strategy to track the fate of these challenging molecules inside living organisms. Thanks to the increasing availability of new fluorescent probes as well as advanced and innovative imaging technologies, we are now in a position to investigate many of the dynamic mechanisms through which plant hormones exert their action. Such a deep and detailed comprehension is mandatory for the development of new green technologies for practical applications. In this review, we summarize the results obtained so far concerning the fluorescent labeling of plant hormones, highlighting the basic steps leading to the design and synthesis of these compelling molecular tools and their applications. PMID:27378726

  2. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. Conclusion/Significance This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible. PMID:22355395

  3. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Çakir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an allosteric Zn(+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  4. Faradaic Impedance Spectroscopy for Detection of Small Molecules Binding using the Avidin-Biotin Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in the Faradaic impedance of gold/biomolecules system due to specific binding of small molecule to a significantly larger binding protein molecule were investigated. The biotin (244.31 Da) - avidin (66000 Da) couple was used as a model for small ligand - binding protein biorecognition. The study was carried out under open circuit potential in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]−3/−4 redox couple. An equivalent electrical circuit was proposed and used for the interpretation of the recorded impedance spectra. Adsorption of thiolated avidin increased the electron transfer resistance, Rct, by a factor of about 7.5 while subsequent addition of biotin within the concentration range of 4.1-40.9 nM reduced the value of Rct by amount proportional to the biotin concentration. The addition of biotin did not affect, however, the equivalent double layer capacitance or other equivalent circuit parameters. A simple model based on effective surface coverage by the avidin molecules and the effect of the added biotin on electron transfer through the coated surface is proposed. A model for the minimum detection limit based on the random distribution of the binding protein and its dimensions is proposed

  5. Interaction of small molecules with fungal laccase: A Surface Plasmon Resonance based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwase, Swati V; Patil, Sushama A; Srinivas, Sistla; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2016-01-01

    Laccases have a great potential for use in industrial and biotechnological applications. It has affinity towards phenolics and finds major applications in the field of bioremediation. Here, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) as a biosensor with immobilized laccase on chip surface has been studied. Laccase was immobilized by thiol coupling method and compounds containing increasing number of hydroxyl groups were analyzed for their binding affinity at various concentrations in millimolar range. The small molecules like phloroglucinol (1.532×10(-8) M), crocin (3.204×10(-3) M), ascorbic acid (8.331×10(-8) M), kojic acid (6.411×10(-7) M) and saffron (3.466×10(-7) M) were studied and respective KD values are obtained. The results were also confirmed by inhibition assay and IC50 values were calculated. All these molecules showed different affinity towards laccase in terms of KD values. This method may be useful for preliminary screening and characterization of small molecules as laccase substrates, inhibitors or modulators of activity. This method will be useful for rapid screening of phenolics in waste water because of high sensitivity. PMID:26672456

  6. A quorum sensing small volatile molecule promotes antibiotic tolerance in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yok-Ai Que

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be refractory to antibiotics due to a sub-population of dormant cells, called persisters that are highly tolerant to antibiotic exposure. The low frequency and transience of the antibiotic tolerant "persister" trait has complicated elucidation of the mechanism that controls antibiotic tolerance. In this study, we show that 2' Amino-acetophenone (2-AA, a poorly studied but diagnostically important small, volatile molecule produced by the recalcitrant gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, promotes antibiotic tolerance in response to quorum-sensing (QS signaling. Our results show that 2-AA mediated persister cell accumulation occurs via alteration of the expression of genes involved in the translational capacity of the cell, including almost all ribosomal protein genes and other translation-related factors. That 2-AA promotes persisters formation also in other emerging multi-drug resistant pathogens, including the non 2-AA producer Acinetobacter baumannii implies that 2-AA may play an important role in the ability of gram-negative bacteria to tolerate antibiotic treatments in polymicrobial infections. Given that the synthesis, excretion and uptake of QS small molecules is a common hallmark of prokaryotes, together with the fact that the translational machinery is highly conserved, we posit that modulation of the translational capacity of the cell via QS molecules, may be a general, widely distributed mechanism that promotes antibiotic tolerance among prokaryotes.

  7. Radiolocalization of human small cell lung cancer and antigen-positive normal tissues using monoclonal antibody LS2D617

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The murine monoclonal antibody LS2D617, which reacts with an antigen associated with human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), was tested in preclinical models to assess its potential for specific targeting of tumors in human SCLC cancer patients. LS2D617 detects a cell antigen on the surface of cultured SCLC and neuroblastoma cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding of LS2D617 to NCIH69 SCLC cells indicates an affinity constant of about 1 x 10(8) M-1 and an epitope expression level of approximately 2 x 10(6) antigenic sites/cell. Molecular weight analysis of the target antigen and antibody competition experiments showed that LS2D617 should be classified as a SCLC Cluster 1 antibody. LS2D617 was labeled with 111In and tested for biodistribution (4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postinjection) in nude mice bearing the human SCLC NCIH69 tumor. Tumor values peaked at about 35% injected dose/g (Day 3) compared with about 8% injected dose/g for an irrelevant IgG1 antibody while normal tissue accumulation for both antibodies was about 2-8% injected dose/g. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that LS2D617 reacts with the central nervous system, peripheral nerves, endocrine tissues, and heart tissue of rabbits as it does in human tissues. The ability of LS2D617 to accumulate in vivo in normal tissues that express the specific target antigen was tested in rabbits. Rabbits given i.v. injections of 111In-LS2D617 or control labeled antibody were sacrificed at 48 h and tissues were examined by gamma well counting, autoradiography, and immunohistochemical staining for murine immunoglobulin. Specific uptake was seen in all sites defined as antigen positive by immunohistology (i.e., heart, liver bile duct, peripheral nerves, pituitary, adrenal), except the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) which was inaccessible to antibody because of the blood brain barrier

  8. Computational study of small molecule binding for both tethered and free conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ytreberg, F Marty

    2009-01-01

    Using a calix[4]arene-benzene complex as a test system we compare the potential of mean force for when the calix[4]arene is tethered versus free. When the complex is in vacuum our results show that the difference between tethered and free is primarily due to the entropic contribution to the potential of mean force resulting in a binding free energy difference of 6.5 kJ/mol. By contrast, when the complex is in water our results suggest that the difference between tethered and free is due to the enthalpic contribution resulting in a binding free energy difference of 1.6 kJ/mol. This study elucidates the roles of entropy and enthalpy for this small molecule system and emphasizes the point that tethering the receptor has the potential to dramatically impact the binding properties. These findings should be taken into consideration when using calixarene molecules in nanosensor design.

  9. LT-STM studies on substrate-dependent self-assembly of small organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy is widely used to image and manipulate individual atoms and molecules on surfaces, as well as to investigate surface molecular processes such as diffusion, desorption, and configuration switching, at the atomic scale. The aim of this contribution is to highlight our recent progress in understanding the interface between small organic molecules and different substrates, focusing on two model systems: copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) on HOPG, Ag(1 1 1), Bi/Ag(1 1 1), and copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc) on perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-3,4,9,10-dianhydride (PTCDA) and C60 pre-covered surfaces. The influence of the underlying substrates on the molecular packing is discussed.

  10. Extended-x-ray-absorption-fine-structure study of small Fe molecules isolated in solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used rare gas matrix isolation techniques in combination with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to study the variation in interatomic distances for small Fe molecules in solid neon. A considerable contraction in the interatomic distances was observed for the metal molecules. An Fe-Fe distance of 2.03 +- l0.03 A for the lowest concentration of metal was observed. This is in good agreement with early EXAFS measurements in Fe2-Ar. We also carried out a careful study of the x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and observed the appearance of considerable structure for a 1.5-at. % Fe sample. The XANES spectra were analyzed in terms of 1s-to-(3d,4s) and 1s-to-4p transitions

  11. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  12. The benefits from giving makers of conventional 'small molecule' drugs longer exclusivity over clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Malkin, Jesse D; Romley, John; Philipson, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies and generic drug manufacturers have long been at odds over "data exclusivity" regulations. These rules require a waiting period of at least five years before generic drug companies can access valuable clinical trial data necessary to bring less expensive forms of innovative drugs to market. Pharmaceutical companies want the data exclusivity period lengthened to protect their investment. Generic manufacturers want the period shortened so that they can bring less expensive versions of drugs to patients sooner. We examine the long-term effect of extending the data exclusivity period for conventional "small-molecule" drugs to twelve years--the same exclusivity period already extended to large-molecule biologic drugs under the Affordable Care Act. We conclude that Americans would benefit from a longer period of data exclusivity. PMID:21209443

  13. Elevated 68Ga Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Activity in Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Deepa; Loh, Han; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Stevanovic, Amanda

    2016-05-01

    A 71-year-old man with a background of treated stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer was referred for Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT for staging of prostate cancer. In addition to the PSMA uptake in the known prostate malignancy, the study also demonstrated increased PSMA uptake in an enlarging left lower lobe lung mass with diffusely increased PSMA uptake in an enlarged thyroid gland and bilateral enlarged supraclavicular lymph nodes. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid gland and a left supraclavicular lymph node demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma from a primary lung cancer. PMID:26828144

  14. Supported gold catalysis: from small molecule activation to green chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; He, Lin; Liu, Yong-Mei; Cao, Yong

    2014-03-18

    With diminishing natural resources, there is an ever-increasing demand for cost-effective and sustainable production of fine and commodity chemicals. For this purpose, there is a need for new catalytic methods that can permit efficient and targeted conversion of fossil and biorenewable feedstocks with lower energy requirements and environmental impact. A significant number of industrial catalytic processes are performed by platinum-group-metal (PGM)-based heterogeneous catalysts capable of activating a range of important small molecules, such as CO, O2, H2, and N2. In contrast, there is a general feeling that gold (Au) cannot act as an efficient catalyst because of its inability to activate most molecules, which is essential to any catalytic processes. As a consequence, researchers have long neglected the potential for use of gold as a catalyst. In recent years, however, chemists have put forth tremendous effort and progress in the use of supported gold catalysts to facilitate a variety of useful synthetic transformations. The seminal discovery by Haruta in 1987 that suitably prepared Au-based catalysts were surprisingly active for CO oxidation even at 200 K initiated rapid development of the field. Since then, researchers have widely employed Au-based catalysts in many types of mild chemical processes, with special focus on selective reactions involving small molecules (for example, CO, H2O, O2, or H2) as a reactant. That gold in the form of tiny nanoparticles (NPs, generally less than 5 nm in diameter) can subtly activate the reactant molecules under mild conditions has been evoked to explain the superior effectiveness of gold compared with conventional PGMs. In this context, Au-based catalysts are gaining great significance in developing new green processes with improved selectivity and energy minimization. In this Account, we describe our efforts toward the development of a range of green and selective processes largely through the appropriate choice of Au

  15. On the benefits of localized modes in anharmonic vibrational calculations for small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Paweł T; Jacob, Christoph R

    2016-04-28

    Anharmonic vibrational calculations can already be computationally demanding for relatively small molecules. The main bottlenecks lie in the construction of the potential energy surface and in the size of the excitation space in the vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations. To address these challenges, we use localized-mode coordinates to construct potential energy surfaces and perform vibrational self-consistent field and L-VCI calculations [P. T. Panek and C. R. Jacob, ChemPhysChem 15, 3365 (2014)] for all vibrational modes of two prototypical test cases, the ethene and furan molecules. We find that the mutual coupling between modes is reduced when switching from normal-mode coordinates to localized-mode coordinates. When using such localized-mode coordinates, we observe a faster convergence of the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface. This makes it possible to neglect higher-order contributions in the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface or to approximate higher-order contributions in hybrid potential energy surfaces, which reduced the computational effort for the construction of the anharmonic potential energy surface significantly. Moreover, we find that when using localized-mode coordinates, the convergence with respect to the VCI excitation space proceeds more smoothly and that the error at low orders is reduced significantly. This makes it possible to devise low-cost models for obtaining a first approximation of anharmonic corrections. This demonstrates that the use of localized-mode coordinates can be beneficial already in anharmonic vibrational calculations of small molecules and provides a possible avenue for enabling such accurate calculations also for larger molecules. PMID:27131535

  16. On the benefits of localized modes in anharmonic vibrational calculations for small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Paweł T.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2016-04-01

    Anharmonic vibrational calculations can already be computationally demanding for relatively small molecules. The main bottlenecks lie in the construction of the potential energy surface and in the size of the excitation space in the vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations. To address these challenges, we use localized-mode coordinates to construct potential energy surfaces and perform vibrational self-consistent field and L-VCI calculations [P. T. Panek and C. R. Jacob, ChemPhysChem 15, 3365 (2014)] for all vibrational modes of two prototypical test cases, the ethene and furan molecules. We find that the mutual coupling between modes is reduced when switching from normal-mode coordinates to localized-mode coordinates. When using such localized-mode coordinates, we observe a faster convergence of the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface. This makes it possible to neglect higher-order contributions in the n-mode expansion of the potential energy surface or to approximate higher-order contributions in hybrid potential energy surfaces, which reduced the computational effort for the construction of the anharmonic potential energy surface significantly. Moreover, we find that when using localized-mode coordinates, the convergence with respect to the VCI excitation space proceeds more smoothly and that the error at low orders is reduced significantly. This makes it possible to devise low-cost models for obtaining a first approximation of anharmonic corrections. This demonstrates that the use of localized-mode coordinates can be beneficial already in anharmonic vibrational calculations of small molecules and provides a possible avenue for enabling such accurate calculations also for larger molecules.

  17. Small-molecule quinolinol inhibitor identified provides protection against BoNT/A in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Singh

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylaminomethyl-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096 to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC(50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A.

  18. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  19. Small-molecule modulators of Hedgehog signaling: identification and characterization of Smoothened agonists and antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulok Janine

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is vital to animal development as it mediates the differentiation of multiple cell types during embryogenesis. In adults, Hh signaling can be activated to facilitate tissue maintenance and repair. Moreover, stimulation of the Hh pathway has shown therapeutic efficacy in models of neuropathy. The underlying mechanisms of Hh signal transduction remain obscure, however: little is known about the communication between the pathway suppressor Patched (Ptc, a multipass transmembrane protein that directly binds Hh, and the pathway activator Smoothened (Smo, a protein that is related to G-protein-coupled receptors and is capable of constitutive activation in the absence of Ptc. Results We have identified and characterized a synthetic non-peptidyl small molecule, Hh-Ag, that acts as an agonist of the Hh pathway. This Hh agonist promotes cell-type-specific proliferation and concentration-dependent differentiation in vitro, while in utero it rescues aspects of the Hh-signaling defect in Sonic hedgehog-null, but not Smo-null, mouse embryos. Biochemical studies with Hh-Ag, the Hh-signaling antagonist cyclopamine, and a novel Hh-signaling inhibitor Cur61414, reveal that the action of all these compounds is independent of Hh-protein ligand and of the Hh receptor Ptc, as each binds directly to Smo. Conclusions Smo can have its activity modulated directly by synthetic small molecules. These studies raise the possibility that Hh signaling may be regulated by endogenous small molecules in vivo and provide potent compounds with which to test the therapeutic value of activating the Hh-signaling pathway in the treatment of traumatic and chronic degenerative conditions.

  20. General Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Homogeneous Immunoassay for Small Molecules Based on Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuezhi; Wen, Kai; Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Xiya; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    Here, we describe a general bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) homogeneous immunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) as the acceptor and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) as the donor (QD-BRET) for the determination of small molecules. The ratio of the donor-acceptor that could produce energy transfer varied in the presence of different concentrations of free enrofloxacin (ENR), an important small molecule in food safety. The calculated Förster distance (R0) was 7.86 nm. Under optimized conditions, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for ENR was less than 1 ng/mL and the linear range covered 4 orders of magnitude (0.023 to 25.60 ng/mL). The cross-reactivities (CRs) of seven representative fluoroquinolones (FQs) were similar to the data obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The average intra- and interassay recoveries from spiked milk of were 79.8-118.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 10%, meeting the requirement of residue detection, which was a satisfactory result. Furthermore, we compared the influence of different luciferase substrates on the performance of the assay. Considering sensitivity and stability, coelenterazine-h was the most appropriate substrate. The results from this study will enable better-informed decisions on the choice of Rluc substrate for QD-BRET systems. For the future, the QD-BRET immunosensor could easily be extended to other small molecules and thus represents a versatile strategy in food safety, the environment, clinical diagnosis, and other fields. PMID:26948147

  1. Selectivity by small-molecule inhibitors of protein interactions can be driven by protein surface fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Johnson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these "distinct" pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  2. Identification of a Small Molecule That Modulates Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-von Willebrand Factor Interaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Katleen; Trekels, Mieke; Jose, Rani Alphonsa; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Venken, Tom; Egle, Brecht; De Borggraeve, Wim M.; Deckmyn, Hans; De Maeyer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-glycoprotein (GP) Ibα interaction is of major importance during thrombosis mainly at sites of high shear stress. Inhibitors of this interaction prevent platelet-dependent thrombus formation in vivo, without major bleeding complications. However, the size and/or protein nature of the inhibitors currently in development limit oral bioavailability and clinical development. We therefore aimed to search for a small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitor interfering with the VWF-GPIbα binding. After determination of putative small molecule binding pockets on the surface of VWF-A1 and GPIbα using site-finding algorithms and molecular dynamics, high throughput molecular docking was performed on both binding partners. A selection of compounds showing good in silico docking scores into the predicted pockets was retained for testing their in vitro effect on VWF-GPIbα complex formation, by which we identified a compound that surprisingly stimulated the VWF-GPIbα binding in a ristocetin cofactor ELISA and increased platelet adhesion in whole blood to collagen under arterial shear rate but in contrast inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. The selected compound adhering to the predicted binding partner GPIbα could be confirmed by saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy. We thus clearly identified a small molecule that modulates VWF-GPIbα binding and that will now serve as a starting point for further studies and chemical modifications to fully characterize the interaction and to manipulate specific activity of the compound. PMID:22232560

  3. Intracellularly Biodegradable Polyelectrolyte/Silica Composite Microcapsules as Carriers for Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Goriacheva, Olga A; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2016-04-20

    Microcapsules that can be efficiently loaded with small molecules and effectively released at the target area through the degradation of the capsule shells hold great potential for treating diseases. Traditional biodegradable polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules can be degraded by cells and eliminated from the body but fail to encapsulate drugs with small molecular weight. Here, we report a poly-l-arginine hydrochloride (PARG)/dextran sulfate sodium salt (DEXS)/silica (SiO2) composite capsule that can be destructed in cells and of which the in situ formed inorganic SiO2 enables loading of small model molecules, Rhodamine B (Rh-B). The composite capsules were fabricated based on the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Capsules composed of nondegradable PEs and SiO2, polyllamine hydrochloride (PAH)/poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)/silica (the control sample), were prepared and briefly compared with the degradable composite capsules. An intracellular degradation study of both types of composite capsules revealed that PARG/DEXS/silica capsules were degraded into fragments and lead to the release of model molecules in a relatively short time (2 h), while the structure of PAH/PSS/silica capsules remained intact even after 3 days incubation with B50 cells. Such results indicated that the polymer components played a significant role in the degradability of the SiO2. Specifically, PAH/PSS scaffolds blocked the degradation of SiO2. For PARG/DEXS/silica capsules, we proposed the effects of both hydrolytic degradation of amorphous silica and enzymatic degradation of PARG/DEXS polymers as a cell degradation mechanism. All the results demonstrated a new type of functional composite microcapsule with low permeability, good biocompatibility, and biodegradability for potential medical applications. PMID:27008032

  4. Structure of the Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 RNA and Designed Small Molecules That Reduce Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Guan, Lirui; Tran, Van Tuan; Sarkar, Partha; Schatz, George C.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is an untreatable neuromuscular disorder caused by a r(CCUG) expansion (r(CCUG)exp) that folds into an extended hairpin with periodically repeating 2×2 nucleotide internal loops (5’CCUG/3’GUCC). We designed multivalent compounds that improve DM2-associated defects using information about RNA-small molecule interactions. We also report the first crystal structure of r(CCUG)exp refined to 2.35 Å. Structural analysis of the three 5’CCUG/3’GUCC repeat internal loop...

  5. A journey in bioinspired supramolecular chemistry: from molecular tweezers to small molecules that target myotonic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes part of the author’s research in the area of supramolecular chemistry, beginning with his early life influences and early career efforts in molecular recognition, especially molecular tweezers. Although designed to complex DNA, these hosts proved more applicable to the field of host–guest chemistry. This early experience and interest in intercalation ultimately led to the current efforts to develop small molecule therapeutic agents for myotonic dystrophy using a rational design approach that heavily relies on principles of supramolecular chemistry. How this work was influenced by that of others in the field and the evolution of each area of research is highlighted with selected examples. PMID:26877815

  6. STITCH 2: an interaction network database for small molecules and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Szklarczyk, Damian; Franceschini, Andrea;

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years, the publicly available knowledge on interactions between small molecules and proteins has been steadily increasing. To create a network of interactions, STITCH aims to integrate the data dispersed over the literature and various databases of biological pathways, drug......-target relationships and binding affinities. In STITCH 2, the number of relevant interactions is increased by incorporation of BindingDB, PharmGKB and the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. The resulting network can be explored interactively or used as the basis for large-scale analyses. To facilitate links to other...

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection by Virus Capsid Destabilization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Jiong; Zhou, Jing; Shah, Vaibhav B.; Aiken, Christopher; Whitby, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is dependent on the proper disassembly of the viral capsid, or “uncoating,” in target cells. The HIV-1 capsid consists of a conical multimeric complex of the viral capsid protein (CA) arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Mutations in CA that destabilize the viral capsid result in impaired infection owing to defects in reverse transcription in target cells. We describe here the mechanism of action of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, PF-3450074...

  8. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

    KAUST Repository

    Pérez, Louis A.

    2013-09-04

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Silicon nitride nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is limited to analyses of higher molecular weight compounds due to high background noise generated by the matrix in the lower mass region. Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry is an alternative solution to this problem. Nanoparticles, structured silicon surfaces and carbon allotropes are commonly used as SALDI surfaces. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate the application of silicon nitride nanoparticles as a suitable medium for laser desorption/ionization of small drug molecules.

  10. Nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for in vitro detection of small molecule metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites secreted by pathological processes can act as molecular biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. In vitro detection of the metabolites such as glucose and reactive oxygen species is of great significance for precise screening, monitoring and prognosis of metabolic disorders and relevant diseases such as cancer, and has been under intense research and development in clinical chemistry and molecular diagnostics. In this review, we summarize recent developments in nanomaterial based electrochemical (bio)sensors for in vitro detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species and the progress in utilizing lightweight and flexible electrodes and micro/nanoscale electrodes for flexible and miniaturized sensors. PMID:26845060

  11. Dual Function Additives: A Small Molecule Crosslinker for Enhanced Efficiency and Stability in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rumer, Joseph W.

    2015-02-01

    A bis-azide-based small molecule crosslinker is synthesized and evaluated as both a stabilizing and efficiency-boosting additive in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells. Activated by a noninvasive and scalable solution processing technique, polymer:fullerene blends exhibit improved thermal stability with suppressed polymer skin formation at the cathode and frustrated fullerene aggregation on ageing, with initial efficiency increased from 6% to 7%. © 2015 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Spectral and electrochemical detection of protonated triplex formation by a small-molecule anticancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lingyan; Li, Xi; Peng, Yinghua; Geng, Jie; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2009-10-01

    Triplex helical formation has been the focus of considerable interest because of possible applications in developing new molecular biology tools as well as therapeutic agents and the possible relevance of H-DNA structures in biology system. We report here that a small-molecule anticancer agent, coralyne, has binding preference to the less stable protonated triplex d(C +-T) 6:d(A-G) 6·d(C-T) 6 over duplex d(A-G) 6·d(C-T) 6 and shows different spectral and electrochemical characteristics when binding to triplex and duplex DNA, indicating that electrochemical technique can detect the less stable protonated triplex formation.

  13. Morphology versus Vertical Phase Segregation in Solvent Annealed Small Molecule Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep study of solvent annealed small molecules bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on DPP(TBFu2 : PC60BM blend is carried out. To reveal the reason of the solvent annealing advantage over the thermal one, capacitance-voltage measurements were applied. It was found that controlling the vertical phase segregation in the solar cells a high fullerene population in the vicinity of the cathode could be achieved. This results in increase of the shunt resistance of the cell, thus improving the light harvesting efficiency.

  14. Correlated, Static and Dynamic Polarizabilities of Small Molecules. Comparison of Four "Black Box" Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Erik K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular static and dynamic polarizabilities for thirteen small molecules have been calculated using four "black box" ab initio methods, the random phase approximation, RPA, the second-order polarization propagator approximation, SOPPA, the second-order polarization propagator approximation with...... were employed, Sadlej's medium size polarized basis set and Dunning's correlation consistent basis set of triple- quality augmented by two diffuse functions of each angular momentum (daug-cc-pVTZ). The results are compared to other theoretical results as well as to experimental values for the static...

  15. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Çakir; Onur Dağliyan; Ezgi Dağyildiz; İbrahim Bariş; Ibrahim Halil Kavakli; Seda Kizilel; Metin Türkay

    2012-01-01

    Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme Bilal C¸ akir1, Onur Dag˘ liyan1, Ezgi Dag˘ yildiz1, I˙brahim Baris¸1, Ibrahim Halil Kavakli1,2*, Seda Kizilel1*, Metin Tu¨ rkay3* 1 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 3 Department of Industrial Engineering, Koc¸ University...

  16. Efficient small molecule bulk heterojunction solar cells with high fill factors via pyrene-directed molecular self-assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Olivia P.

    2011-10-21

    Efficient organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials are constructed by attaching completely planar, symmetric end-groups to donor-acceptor electroactive small molecules. Appending C2-pyrene as the small molecule end-group to a diketopyrrolopyrrole core leads to materials with a tight, aligned crystal packing and favorable morphology dictated by π-π interactions, resulting in high power conversion efficiencies and high fill factors. The use of end-groups to direct molecular self-assembly is an effective strategy for designing high-performance small molecule OPV devices. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Small stress molecules inhibit aggregation and neurotoxicity of prion peptide 106-126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In prion diseases, the posttranslational modification of host-encoded prion protein PrPc yields a high β-sheet content modified protein PrPsc, which further polymerizes into amyloid fibrils. PrP106-126 initiates the conformational changes leading to the conversion of PrPc to PrPsc. Molecules that can defunctionalize such peptides can serve as a potential tool in combating prion diseases. In microorganisms during stressed conditions, small stress molecules (SSMs) are formed to prevent protein denaturation and maintain protein stability and function. The effect of such SSMs on PrP106-126 amyloid formation is explored in the present study using turbidity, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cellular toxicity assay. Turbidity and AFM studies clearly depict that the SSMs-ectoine and mannosylglyceramide (MGA) inhibit the PrP106-126 aggregation. Our study also connotes that ectoine and MGA offer strong resistance to prion peptide-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells, concluding that such molecules can be potential inhibitors of prion aggregation and toxicity

  18. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Stoszko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4+ T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal.

  19. Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on gold: a DFT localized basis set study including van der Waals effects

    OpenAIRE

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Morari, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    We compare the density functional theory (DFT) results on the adsorption of small aromatic molecules (benzene, pyridine and thiophene) on gold surfaces obtained by using three types of van der Waals exchange-correlation functionals and localized basis set calculations. We show that the value of the molecule surface binding energy depends on the interplay between the BSSE effect and the tendency of the exchange-correlation functionals to overestimate both the molecule-surface as well as the go...

  20. Live-cell microscopy reveals small molecule inhibitor effects on MAPK pathway dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Anderson

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway are prevalent in human tumors, making this pathway a target of drug development efforts. Recently, ATP-competitive Raf inhibitors were shown to cause MAPK pathway activation via Raf kinase priming in wild-type BRaf cells and tumors, highlighting the need for a thorough understanding of signaling in the context of small molecule kinase inhibitors. Here, we present critical improvements in cell-line engineering and image analysis coupled with automated image acquisition that allow for the simultaneous identification of cellular localization of multiple MAPK pathway components (KRas, CRaf, Mek1 and Erk2. We use these assays in a systematic study of the effect of small molecule inhibitors across the MAPK cascade either as single agents or in combination. Both Raf inhibitor priming as well as the release from negative feedback induced by Mek and Erk inhibitors cause translocation of CRaf to the plasma membrane via mechanisms that are additive in pathway activation. Analysis of Erk activation and sub-cellular localization upon inhibitor treatments reveals differential inhibition and activation with the Raf inhibitors AZD628 and GDC0879 respectively. Since both single agent and combination studies of Raf and Mek inhibitors are currently in the clinic, our assays provide valuable insight into their effects on MAPK signaling in live cells.

  1. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  2. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Gregory W.; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2016-05-01

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO2-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data.

  3. SM-TF: A structural database of small molecule-transcription factor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Ma, Zhiwei; Sun, Hongmin; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-06-30

    Transcription factors (TFs) are the proteins involved in the transcription process, ensuring the correct expression of specific genes. Numerous diseases arise from the dysfunction of specific TFs. In fact, over 30 TFs have been identified as therapeutic targets of about 9% of the approved drugs. In this study, we created a structural database of small molecule-transcription factor (SM-TF) complexes, available online at http://zoulab.dalton.missouri.edu/SM-TF. The 3D structures of the co-bound small molecule and the corresponding binding sites on TFs are provided in the database, serving as a valuable resource to assist structure-based drug design related to TFs. Currently, the SM-TF database contains 934 entries covering 176 TFs from a variety of species. The database is further classified into several subsets by species and organisms. The entries in the SM-TF database are linked to the UniProt database and other sequence-based TF databases. Furthermore, the druggable TFs from human and the corresponding approved drugs are linked to the DrugBank. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27010673

  4. Discovery of Small-Molecule Modulators of the Human Y4 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, David; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The human neuropeptide Y4 receptor (Y4R) and its native ligand, pancreatic polypeptide, are critically involved in the regulation of human metabolism by signaling satiety and regulating food intake, as well as increasing energy expenditure. Thus, this receptor represents a putative target for treatment of obesity. With respect to new approaches to treat complex metabolic disorders, especially in multi-receptor systems, small molecule allosteric modulators have been in the focus of research in the last years. However, no positive allosteric modulators or agonists of the Y4R have been described so far. In this study, small molecule compounds derived from the Niclosamide scaffold were identified by high-throughput screening to increase Y4R activity. Compounds were characterized for their potency and their effects at the human Y4R and as well as their selectivity towards Y1R, Y2R and Y5R. These compounds provide a structure-activity relationship profile around this common scaffold and lay the groundwork for hit-to-lead optimization and characterization of positive allosteric modulators of the Y4R. PMID:27294784

  5. Artificial Avidin-Based Receptors for a Panel of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Tullila, Antti; Agrawal, Nitin; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Kähkönen, Niklas; Koskinen, Masi; Nevanen, Tarja K; Johnson, Mark S; Airenne, Tomi T; Kulomaa, Markku S; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2016-01-15

    Proteins with high specificity, affinity, and stability are needed for biomolecular recognition in a plethora of applications. Antibodies are powerful affinity tools, but they may also suffer from limitations such as low stability and high production costs. Avidin and streptavidin provide a promising scaffold for protein engineering, and due to their ultratight binding to D-biotin they are widely used in various biotechnological and biomedical applications. In this study, we demonstrate that the avidin scaffold is suitable for use as a novel receptor for several biologically active small molecules: Artificial, chicken avidin-based proteins, antidins, were generated using a directed evolution method for progesterone, hydrocortisone, testosterone, cholic acid, ketoprofen, and folic acid, all with micromolar to nanomolar affinity and significantly reduced biotin-binding affinity. We also describe the crystal structure of an antidin, sbAvd-2(I117Y), a steroid-binding avidin, which proves that the avidin scaffold can tolerate significant modifications without losing its characteristic tetrameric beta-barrel structure, helping us to further design avidin-based small molecule receptors. PMID:26550684

  6. General approach for engineering small-molecule-binding DNA split aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Alexandra D; Spiropulos, Nicholas G; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2013-10-15

    Here we report a general method for engineering three-way junction DNA aptamers into split aptamers. Split aptamers show significant potential for use as recognition elements in biosensing applications, but reliable methods for generating these sequences are currently lacking. We hypothesize that the three-way junction is a "privileged architecture" for the elaboration of aptamers into split aptamers, as it provides two potential splitting sites that are distal from the target binding pocket. We propose a general method for split aptamer engineering that involves removing one loop region, then systematically modifying the number of base pairs in the remaining stem regions in order to achieve selective assembly only in the presence of the target small molecule. We screen putative split aptamer sequence pairs using split aptamer proximity ligation (StAPL) technology developed by our laboratory, but we validate that the results obtained using StAPL translate directly to systems in which the aptamer fragments are assembling noncovalently. We introduce four new split aptamer sequences, which triples the number of small-molecule-binding DNA split aptamers reported to date, and the methods described herein provide a reliable route for the engineering of additional split aptamers, dramatically advancing the potential substrate scope of DNA assembly based biosensors. PMID:24033257

  7. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Gregory W; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO2-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data. PMID:27155622

  8. Predicting Molecular Targets for Small-Molecule Drugs with a Ligand-Based Interaction Fingerprint Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ran; Wang, Yanli

    2016-06-20

    The computational prediction of molecular targets for small-molecule drugs remains a great challenge. Herein we describe a ligand-based interaction fingerprint (LIFt) approach for target prediction. Together with physics-based docking and sampling methods, we assessed the performance systematically by modeling the polypharmacology of 12 kinase inhibitors in three stages. First, we examined the capacity of this approach to differentiate true targets from false targets with the promiscuous binder staurosporine, based on native complex structures. Second, we performed large-scale profiling of kinase selectivity on the clinical drug sunitinib by means of computational simulation. Third, we extended the study beyond kinases by modeling the cross-inhibition of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) for 10 well-established kinase inhibitors. On this basis, we made prospective predictions by exploring new kinase targets for the anticancer drug candidate TN-16, originally known as a colchicine site binder and microtubule disruptor. As a result, p38α was highlighted from a panel of 187 different kinases. Encouragingly, our prediction was validated by an in vitro kinase assay, which showed TN-16 as a low-micromolar p38α inhibitor. Collectively, our results suggest the promise of the LIFt approach in predicting potential targets for small-molecule drugs. PMID:26222196

  9. Improved small-molecule macroarray platform for the rapid synthesis and discovery of antibacterial chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Joseph R; Bowman, Matthew D; Weisblum, Bernard; Blackwell, Helen E

    2011-03-14

    Bacterial resistance to current antibiotics is a major global health threat. Consequently, there is an urgent need for the identification of new antibacterial agents. We are applying the small-molecule macroarray platform to rapidly synthesize and screen compounds for activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Herein, we report the synthesis of a 1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-one (chalcone) macroarray using a Rink-amide linker-derivatized cellulose support. The Rink linker allowed for the incorporation of a broader array of library building blocks relative to our previous syntheses because milder reaction conditions could be utilized; significantly higher compound loadings were also achieved (~80% vs ~15%). Analysis of the 174-member chalcone macroarray in off-support antibacterial screening assays revealed three chalcones with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against MRSA comparable to currently used antibacterial drugs and low hemolytic activities. These results serve to further showcase and extend the utility of the small molecule macroarray for antibacterial discovery. PMID:21210707

  10. Temperature and composition-dependent density of states in organic small-molecule/polymer blend transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Simon; Mottram, Alexander D.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2016-07-01

    The density of trap states (DOS) in organic p-type transistors based on the small-molecule 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl) anthradithiophene (diF-TES ADT), the polymer poly(triarylamine) and blends thereof are investigated. The DOS in these devices are measured as a function of semiconductor composition and operating temperature. We show that increasing operating temperature causes a broadening of the DOS below 250 K. Characteristic trap depths of ˜15 meV are measured at 100 K, increasing to between 20 and 50 meV at room-temperature, dependent on the semiconductor composition. Semiconductor films with high concentrations of diF-TES ADT exhibit both a greater density of trap states as well as broader DOS distributions when measured at room-temperature. These results shed light on the underlying charge transport mechanisms in organic blend semiconductors and the apparent freezing-out of hole conduction through the polymer and mixed polymer/small molecule phases at temperatures below 225 K.

  11. Investigations on geometrical features in induced ordering of collagen by small molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Madhan; Aruna Dhathathreyan; V Subramanian; T Ramasami

    2003-10-01

    Binding energies of the interaction of collagen like triple helical peptides with a series of polyphenols, viz. gallic acid, catechin, epigallocatechingallate and pentagalloylglucose have been computed using molecular modelling approaches. A correlation of calculated binding energies with the interfacial molecular volumes involved in the interaction is observed. Calculated interface surface areas for the binding of polyphenols with collagen-like triple helical peptides vary in the range of 60-210 Å2 and hydrogen bond lengths vary in the range of 2.7-3.4 Å. Interfacial molecular volumes can be calculated from the solvent inaccessible surface areas and hydrogen bond lengths involved in the binding of polyphenols to collagen. Molecular aggregation of collagen in the presence of some polyphenols and chromium (III) salts has been probed experimentally in monolayer systems. The monolayer arrangement of collagen seems to be influenced by the presence of small molecules like formaldehyde, gluteraldehyde, tannic acid and chromium (III) salts. A fractal structure is observed on account of two-dimensional aggregation of collagen induced by tanning species. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to probe the topographic images of two-dimensional aggregation of collagen induced by chromium (III) salts. A case is made that long-range ordering of collagen by molecular species involved in its stabilisation is influenced by molecular geometries involved in its interaction with small molecules.

  12. iPSCs and small molecules: a reciprocal effort towards better approaches for drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru ZHANG; Li-hong ZHANG; Xin XIE

    2013-01-01

    The revolutionary induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology provides a new path for cell replacement therapies and drug screening.Patient-specific iPSCs and subsequent differentiated cells manifesting disease phenotypes will finally position human disease pathology at the core of drug discovery.Cells used to test the toxic effects of drugs can also be generated from normal iPSCs and provide a much more accurate and cost-effective system than many animal models.Here,we highlight the recent progress in iPSC-based cell therapy,disease modeling and drug evaluations.In addition,we discuss the use of small molecule drugs to improve the generation of iPSCs and understand the reprogramming mechanism.It is foreseeable that the interplay between iPSC technology and small molecule compounds will push forward the applications of iPSC-based therapy and screening systems in the real world and eventually revolutionize the methods used to treat diseases.

  13. A small molecule that induces reactive oxygen species via cellular glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Muroi, Makoto; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Induction of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by small-molecule compounds has been considered a potentially effective therapeutic strategy against cancer cells, which are often subjected to chronic oxidative stress. However, to elucidate the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds is generally a time-consuming process. We have recently identified NPD926, a small molecule that induces rapid cell death in cancer cells. Using a combination of two comprehensive and complementary approaches, proteomic profiling and affinity purification, together with the subsequent biochemical assays, we have elucidated the mechanism of action underlying NPD926-induced cell death: conjugation with glutathione mediated by GST, depletion of cellular glutathione and subsequent ROS generation. NPD926 preferentially induced effects in KRAS-transformed fibroblast cells, compared with their untransformed counterparts. Furthermore, NPD926 sensitized cells to inhibitors of system x(c)⁻, a cystine-glutamate antiporter considered to be a potential therapeutic target in cancers including cancer stem cells. These data show the effectiveness of a newly identified ROS inducer, which targets glutathione metabolism, in cancer treatment. PMID:25011393

  14. Synthesis of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based small molecule donors containing thiophene or furan for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yujeong [Department of Chemistry, Kyonggi University, San 94-6, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi 443-760 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Eun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Ara; Kim, Jungwoon; Eom, Yoonho; Ahn, Jongho [Department of Chemistry, Kyonggi University, San 94-6, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi 443-760 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sang-Jin [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), 100 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Eunhee, E-mail: ehlim@kyonggi.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Kyonggi University, San 94-6, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi 443-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Two π-conjugated small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP), DPP4T and DPP2F2T, were synthesized using the Suzuki coupling reaction. DPP4T and DPP2F2T contained furan and thiophene, respectively, next to a DPP core. Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) were fabricated using two DPP-based oligothiophenes as donors. DPP4T showed higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) (1.44%) than DPP2F2T (0.85%). The short-circuit current (J{sub SC}) of DPP4T (4.38 mA cm{sup −2}) was nearly twice that of DPP2F2T (2.49 mA cm{sup −2}). The improved photovoltaic properties of DPP4T could be explained by the optical properties and the film morphology. - Highlights: • Two small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole were synthesized for OPVs. • To determine the effects of furan and thiophene on the performance. • DPP4T yielded a better PCE (1.44%) than DPP2F2T (0.85%). • DPP4T have the broad absorption and the low-lying HOMO energy level than DPP2F2T.

  15. Discovery and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of the BET family bromodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chun-Wa; Coste, Herve; White, Julia H; Mirguet, Olivier; Wilde, Jonathan; Gosmini, Romain L; Delves, Chris; Magny, Sylvie M; Woodward, Robert; Hughes, Stephen A; Boursier, Eric V; Flynn, Helen; Bouillot, Anne M; Bamborough, Paul; Brusq, Jean-Marie G; Gellibert, Francoise J; Jones, Emma J; Riou, Alizon M; Homes, Paul; Martin, Sandrine L; Uings, Iain J; Toum, Jerome; Clement, Catherine A; Boullay, Anne-Benedicte; Grimley, Rachel L; Blandel, Florence M; Prinjha, Rab K; Lee, Kevin; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Nicodeme, Edwige

    2011-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation have a profound role in normal development and disease processes. An integral part of this mechanism occurs through lysine acetylation of histone tails which are recognized by bromodomains. While the biological and structural characterization of many bromodomain containing proteins has advanced considerably, the therapeutic tractability of this protein family is only now becoming understood. This paper describes the discovery and molecular characterization of potent (nM) small molecule inhibitors that disrupt the function of the BET family of bromodomains (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4). By using a combination of phenotypic screening, chemoproteomics, and biophysical studies, we have discovered that the protein-protein interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones can be antagonized by selective small molecules that bind at the acetylated lysine recognition pocket. X-ray crystal structures of compounds bound into bromodomains of Brd2 and Brd4 elucidate the molecular interactions of binding and explain the precisely defined stereochemistry required for activity. PMID:21568322

  16. Synthesis of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based small molecule donors containing thiophene or furan for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two π-conjugated small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP), DPP4T and DPP2F2T, were synthesized using the Suzuki coupling reaction. DPP4T and DPP2F2T contained furan and thiophene, respectively, next to a DPP core. Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) were fabricated using two DPP-based oligothiophenes as donors. DPP4T showed higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) (1.44%) than DPP2F2T (0.85%). The short-circuit current (JSC) of DPP4T (4.38 mA cm−2) was nearly twice that of DPP2F2T (2.49 mA cm−2). The improved photovoltaic properties of DPP4T could be explained by the optical properties and the film morphology. - Highlights: • Two small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole were synthesized for OPVs. • To determine the effects of furan and thiophene on the performance. • DPP4T yielded a better PCE (1.44%) than DPP2F2T (0.85%). • DPP4T have the broad absorption and the low-lying HOMO energy level than DPP2F2T

  17. Designing small molecule polyaromatic p- and n-type semiconductor materials for organic electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Collis, Gavin E.

    2015-12-22

    By combining computational aided design with synthetic chemistry, we are able to identify core 2D polyaromatic small molecule templates with the necessary optoelectronic properties for p- and n-type materials. By judicious selection of the functional groups, we can tune the physical properties of the material making them amenable to solution and vacuum deposition. In addition to solubility, we observe that the functional group can influence the thin film molecular packing. By developing structure-property relationships (SPRs) for these families of compounds we observe that some compounds are better suited for use in organic solar cells, while others, varying only slightly in structure, are favoured in organic field effect transistor devices. We also find that the processing conditions can have a dramatic impact on molecular packing (i.e. 1D vs 2D polymorphism) and charge mobility; this has implications for material and device long term stability. We have developed small molecule p- and n-type materials for organic solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 2%. Subtle variations in the functional groups of these materials produces p- and ntype materials with mobilities higher than 0.3 cm2/Vs. We are also interested in using our SPR approach to develop materials for sensor and bioelectronic applications.

  18. A Method of Permeabilization of Drosophila Embryos for Assays of Small Molecule Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila embryo has long been a powerful laboratory model for elucidating molecular and genetic mechanisms that control development. The ease of genetic manipulations with this model has supplanted pharmacological approaches that are commonplace in other animal models and cell-based assays. Here we describe recent advances in a protocol that enables application of small molecules to the developing fruit fly embryo. The method details steps to overcome the impermeability of the eggshell while maintaining embryo viability. Eggshell permeabilization across a broad range of developmental stages is achieved by application of a previously described d-limonene embryo permeabilization solvent (EPS1) and by aging embryos at reduced temperature (18 °C) prior to treatments. In addition, use of a far-red dye (CY5) as a permeabilization indicator is described, which is compatible with downstream applications involving standard red and green fluorescent dyes in live and fixed preparations. This protocol is applicable to studies using bioactive compounds to probe developmental mechanisms as well as for studies aimed at evaluating teratogenic or pharmacologic activity of uncharacterized small molecules. PMID:25046169

  19. Discovery and mechanistic study of a small molecule inhibitor for motor protein KIFC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaquan; Mikule, Keith; Wang, Wenxian; Su, Nancy; Petteruti, Philip; Gharahdaghi, Farzin; Code, Erin; Zhu, Xiahui; Jacques, Kelly; Lai, Zhongwu; Yang, Bin; Lamb, Michelle L; Chuaqui, Claudio; Keen, Nicholas; Chen, Huawei

    2013-10-18

    Centrosome amplification is observed in many human cancers and has been proposed to be a driver of both genetic instability and tumorigenesis. Cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to bundle multiple centrosomes into two spindle poles to avoid multipolar mitosis that can lead to chromosomal segregation defects and eventually cell death. KIFC1, a kinesin-14 family protein, plays an essential role in centrosomal bundling in cancer cells, but its function is not required for normal diploid cell division, suggesting that KIFC1 is an attractive therapeutic target for human cancers. To this end, we have identified the first reported small molecule inhibitor AZ82 for KIFC1. AZ82 bound specifically to the KIFC1/microtubule (MT) binary complex and inhibited the MT-stimulated KIFC1 enzymatic activity in an ATP-competitive and MT-noncompetitive manner with a Ki of 0.043 μM. AZ82 effectively engaged with the minus end-directed KIFC1 motor inside cells to reverse the monopolar spindle phenotype induced by the inhibition of the plus end-directed kinesin Eg5. Treatment with AZ82 caused centrosome declustering in BT-549 breast cancer cells with amplified centrosomes. Consistent with genetic studies, our data confirmed that KIFC1 inhibition by a small molecule holds promise for targeting cancer cells with amplified centrosomes and provided evidence that functional suppression of KIFC1 by inhibiting its enzymatic activity could be an effective means for developing cancer therapeutics. PMID:23895133

  20. Designing small molecule polyaromatic p- and n-type semiconductor materials for organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Gavin E.

    2015-12-01

    By combining computational aided design with synthetic chemistry, we are able to identify core 2D polyaromatic small molecule templates with the necessary optoelectronic properties for p- and n-type materials. By judicious selection of the functional groups, we can tune the physical properties of the material making them amenable to solution and vacuum deposition. In addition to solubility, we observe that the functional group can influence the thin film molecular packing. By developing structure-property relationships (SPRs) for these families of compounds we observe that some compounds are better suited for use in organic solar cells, while others, varying only slightly in structure, are favoured in organic field effect transistor devices. We also find that the processing conditions can have a dramatic impact on molecular packing (i.e. 1D vs 2D polymorphism) and charge mobility; this has implications for material and device long term stability. We have developed small molecule p- and n-type materials for organic solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 2%. Subtle variations in the functional groups of these materials produces p- and ntype materials with mobilities higher than 0.3 cm2/Vs. We are also interested in using our SPR approach to develop materials for sensor and bioelectronic applications.

  1. Small molecule photoelectron spectroscopy: Recoil effects, stoichiometric surprises, and double-core-hole ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The effects of recoil momentum on a photoelectron spectrum are illustrated. ► Rotational motion within a molecule leads to Doppler broadening in the XPS spectrum. ► Intensities in an XPS spectrum may not quantitatively reflect molecule composition. ► Measurement of double-core-hole-ionization energies may lead to new insights. -- Abstract: Three features of small-molecule photoelectron spectroscopy are considered (1) the atom from which a photoelectron is emitted must have a recoil momentum equal to that of the emitted electron. This is shared among the various modes of motion of the ion, leading to rotational and vibrational excitation. Furthermore, any initial velocity of the atom (due to either translational, rotational, or vibrational motion) will lead to Doppler broadening. These effects are observable and can, in general, be accounted for by simple models. In some cases, however, the simple models fail and a deeper insight is necessary. (2) Inner-shell photoionization is essentially an atomic process, and it is expected that the intensity for emission of a photoelectron from the core of an atom in a molecule will be independent of its chemical environment. Recent measurements on the carbon 1s photoelectron spectra of three chloroethanes show that this is not the case. At energies not far above the ionization threshold there are strong oscillations of the intensity ratio (CCl/CH) with increasing photon energy. These are similar to those seen in EXAFS and can be accounted for by considering backscattering of the photoelectrons from the chlorine atoms. Moreover, even at high energies the cross section for ionization has been found to depend on the chemical environment of the atom. These results have important consequences for the use of inner-shell electron spectroscopy for quantitative analysis. (3) Single-core-hole ionization energies have long been used as a tool for investigating chemical phenomena. Double-core-hole ionization energies

  2. Synthesis and Photovoltaic Properties of Non-fullerene Solution Processable Small Molecule Acceptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; LIU Zhao-yang; ZHANG Xiao-yu; YAO Shi-yu; WEN Shan-peng; TIAN Wen-jing

    2013-01-01

    Two non-fullerene small molecules,BT-C6 and BT-C12,based on the vinylene-linked benzothiadiazolethiophene(BT) moiety flanked with 2-(3,5,5-trimethylcyclohex-2-en-l-ylidene)malononitrile have been synthesized and characterized by solution/thin film UV-Vis absorption,photoluminescence(PL),and cyclic voltammetry(CV) measurements.The two molecules show intense absorption bands in a wide range from 300 nm to 700 nm and low optical bandgaps for BT-C6(1.60 eV) and for BT-C12(1.67 eV).The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital(LUMO) levels of both the molecules are relatively higher than that of [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester(PCBM),promising high open circuit voltage(Voc) for photovoltaic application.Bulk heterojunction(BHJ) solar cells with poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT) as the electron donor and the two molecules as the acceptors were fabricated.Under 100 mW/cm2 AM 1.5 G illumination,the devices based on P3HT∶BT-C6(1∶1,mass ratio) show a power conversion efficiency(PCE) of 0.67%,a short-circuit current(Jsc) of 1.63 mA/cm2,an open circuit voltage(Voc) of 0.74 V,and a fill factor(FF) of 0.56.

  3. Small Molecule-BIO Accelerates and Enhances Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Vitro Chondrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyaline cartilage defects exhibit a major challenge in the field of orthopedic surgery owing to its limited repair capacity. On the other hand, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are regarded as potent cells with a property of cartilage regeneration. We aimed to optimize marrow-derived MSC chondrogenic culture using a small bioactive molecule referred to as BIO. Methods: MSCs from the marrow of NMRI mice were extracted, culture-expanded, and characterized. Micro-mass culture was then established for chondrogenic differentiation (control group. The cultures of MSC in chondrogenic medium supplemented with 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 1 µM BIO were taken as the experimental groups. Cartilage differentiation was examined by both histological sections and real-time PCR for Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen II at different time points. Moreover, the involvement of the Wnt pathway was investigated. Results: Based on histological sections, there was seemingly more intense metachromatic matrix produced in the cultures with 0.01 µM BIO. In this experimental group, cartilage-specific genes tended to be upregulated at day 14 compared to day 21 of the control group, indicating the accelerating effect of BIO on cartilage differentiation. Overall, there was statistically a significant increase (P=0.01 in the expression level of cartilage-specific genes in cultures with 0.01 µM BIO (enhancing effects. These upregulations appeared to be mediated through the Wnt pathway evident from the significant upregulation of T-cell factor and beta-catenin molecules (P=0.01. Conclusion: Taken together, BIO at 0.01 µM could accelerate and enhance in vitro chondrogenesis of mouse marrow-derived MSCs. Please cite this article as: Baghaban Eslaminejad MR, Fallah N. Small Molecule-BIO Accelerates and Enhances Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Vitro Chondrogenesis. Iran J Med Sci. 2014;39(2:107-116.

  4. In vitro and in vivo activity of a novel antifungal small molecule against Candida infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sze Wah Wong

    Full Text Available Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 0.2-1.6 µg/ml. In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use.

  5. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. PMID:26896846

  6. Panel docking of small-molecule libraries - Prospects to improve efficiency of lead compound discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnpitak, Pakornwit; Mujumdar, Prashant; Taylor, Paul; Cross, Megan; Coster, Mark J; Gorse, Alain-Dominique; Krasavin, Mikhail; Hofmann, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Computational docking as a means to prioritise small molecules in drug discovery projects remains a highly popular in silico screening approach. Contemporary docking approaches without experimental parametrisation can reliably differentiate active and inactive chemotypes in a protein binding site, but the absence of a correlation between the score of a predicted binding pose and the biological activity of the molecule presents a clear limitation. Several novel or improved computational approaches have been developed in the recent past to aid in screening and profiling of small-molecule ligands for drug discovery, but also more broadly in developing conceptual relationships between different protein targets by chemical probing. Among those new methodologies is a strategy known as inverse virtual screening, which involves the docking of a compound into different protein structures. In the present article, we review the different computational screening methodologies that employ docking of atomic models, and, by means of a case study, present an approach that expands the inverse virtual screening concept. By computationally screening a reasonably sized library of 1235 compounds against a panel of 48 mostly human kinases, we have been able to identify five groups of putative lead compounds with substantial diversity when compared to each other. One representative of each of the five groups was synthesised, and tested in kinase inhibition assays, yielding two compounds with micro-molar inhibition in five human kinases. This highly economic and cost-effective methodology holds great promise for drug discovery projects, especially in cases where a group of target proteins share high structural similarity in their binding sites. PMID:26025037

  7. Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-06-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and already this has been used widely to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling the self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employ an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control the self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrate its in vivo applicability by imaging caspase-3/7 activity in human tumour xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The fluorescent nanoparticles assembled in situ were imaged successfully in both apoptotic cells and tumour tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo. PMID:24848238

  8. A Small Molecule that Targets r(CGG)exp and Improves Defects in Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Disney, Matthew D.; Liu, Biao; Yang, Wang-Yong; Sellier, Chantal; Tran, Van Tuan; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Childs-Disney, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    The development of small molecule chemical probes or therapeutics that target RNA remains a significant challenge despite the great interest in such compounds. The most significant barrier to compound development is a lack of knowledge of the chemical and RNA motif spaces that interact specifically. Herein, we describe a bioactive small molecule probe that targets expanded r(CGG) repeats, or r(CGG)exp , that causes Fragile X-associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS). The compound was identifi...

  9. Discovery of Small-Molecule Enhancers of Reactive Oxygen Species That are Nontoxic or Cause Genotype-Selective Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Drew J.; Boskovic, Zarko; Theriault, Jimmy R.; Wang, Alex J.; Stern, Andrew M.; Wagner, Bridget K.; Shamji, Alykhan Farid; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels has been observed in many cancer cells relative to nontransformed cells, and recent reports have suggested that small-molecule enhancers of ROS may selectively kill cancer cells in various in vitro and in vivo models. We used a high-throughput screening approach to identify several hundred small-molecule enhancers of ROS in a human osteosarcoma cell line. A minority of these compounds diminished the viability of cancer cell lines, indicating t...

  10. Solution-processed new porphyrin-based small molecules as electron donors for highly efficient organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Xiao, Liangang; Zhu, Xunjin; Peng, Xiaobing; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2015-10-01

    A series of unsymmetrical π-conjugated small molecules have been constructed from meso-alkyl substituted porphyrins as the central unit and 3-ethylrhodanine as the terminal group. Using PC71BM as an acceptor, and these small molecules as electron donors in solution-processed bulk-heterojunction solar cells, a high power conversion efficiency of 6.49% has been achieved. PMID:26248887

  11. Small round blue cell tumours: diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of the expression of B7-H3 surface molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorio, A.; Corrias, M V; R. Castriconi; Dondero, A; Mosconi, M.; Gambini, C; Moretta, A; Moretta, L; Bottino, C

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess whether the expression of B7-H3 surface molecule could improve differential diagnosis of small cell round tumours. Methods and results: One hundred and one well-characterized paraffin-embedded small round cell tumours, stored in the pathology archive of the Gaslini Institute, were immunohistochemically analysed with the 5B14 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the surface molecule B7-H3. All lymphoblastic lymphomas and the blastematous component of Wilms’ tumours were comple...

  12. Expression and significance of C-fos and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the small intestinal tissue of human fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-hong LIU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the expression rule of proliferating cell nuclear antigen(PCNA,C-fos proteins and apoptosis genes in the small intestinal tissue of human fetus.Methods At the second-to fourth-month of gestation,the expressions of cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed in 16 specimens of human fetal small intestinal tissue by using the immunohistochemical methods and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling(TUNEL.Results At the second to fourth month of gestation,all the PCNA and C-fos proteins were positively expressed in the small intestinal tissues and cells of human fetus.With the increase in gestational period,the positive cell number and average intensity(AI of PCNA protein increased gradually(P < 0.01.The positive cell number of C-fos protein increased first,and then decreased,while the AI of C-fos protein stably increased in the small intestinal tissues and cells of human fetus(P < 0.01.At the second to fourth month of gestation,TUNEL positive cells were seen to distribute in each layer of the small intestinal tissues of human fetus.With the increase of age,all the positive cell number and AI of TUNEL positive cells showed a tendency of decrease following increase in the small intestine of human fetus(P < 0.01.Conclusions PCNA,C-fos and apoptosis gene participate in adjusting the growth and development of the cells and tissues in the small intestine of human fetus.In the third month of gestation,especially,proliferation and apoptosis are significantly increased in the small intestinal tissue of human fetus,which may be the key period of intestinal tissue development.

  13. Morphological study on small molecule acceptor-based organic solar cells with efficiencies beyond 7% (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Yan, He

    2015-10-01

    Despite the essential role of fullerenes in achieving best-performance organic solar cells (OSCs), fullerene acceptors have several drawbacks including poor light absorption, high-cost production and purification. For this reason, small molecule acceptor (SMA)-based OSCs have attracted much attention due to the easy tunability of electronic and optical properties of SMA materials. In this study, polymers with temperature dependent aggregation behaviors are combined with various small molecule acceptor materials, which lead to impressive power conversion efficiencies of up to 7.3%. The morphological and aggregation properties of the polymer:small molecule blends are studied in details. It is found that the temperature-dependent aggregation behavior of polymers allows for the processing of the polymer solutions at moderately elevated temperature, and more importantly, controlled aggregation and strong crystallization of the polymer during the film cooling and drying process. This results in a well-controlled and near-ideal polymer:small molecule morphology that is controlled by polymer aggregation during warm casting and thus insensitive to the choice of small molecules. As a result, several cases of highly efficient (PCE between 6-7.3%) SMA OSCs are achieved. The second part of this presentation will describe the morphology of a new small molecule acceptor with a unique 3D structure. The relationship between molecular structure and morphology is revealed.

  14. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models of small molecules and therapeutic antibodies: a mini-review on fundamental concepts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Gregory Z; Theil, Frank-Peter; Wong, Harvey

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of small and large molecule therapeutics differ significantly from one another and can be explored within the framework of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. This paper briefly reviews fundamental approaches to PBPK modeling, in which drug kinetics within tissues and organs are explicitly represented using physiologically meaningful parameters. The differences in PBPK models applied to small/large molecule drugs are highlighted, thus elucidating differences in absorption, distribution and elimination properties between these two classes of drugs in a systematic manner. The absorption of small and large molecules differs with respect to their common extravascular routes of delivery (oral versus subcutaneous). The role of the lymphatic system in drug distribution, and the involvement of tissues as sites of elimination (through catabolism and target mediated drug disposition) are unique features of antibody distribution and elimination that differ from small molecules, which are commonly distributed into the tissues but are eliminated primarily by liver metabolism. Fundamental differences exist in the ability to predict human pharmacokinetics based upon preclinical data due to differing mechanisms governing small and large molecule disposition. These differences have influence on the evolving utilization of PBPK modeling in the discovery and development of small and large molecule therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26461173

  15. Elevated serum levels of fetal antigen 1,a member of the epidermal growth factor superfamily, in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harken Jensen, C; Drivsholm, L; Laursen, I; Teisner, B

    1999-01-01

    Serum levels of fetal antigen 1 (FA1) were quantified pretherapeutically in 16 patients with pneumonia, 30 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 10 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and compared to the normal reference interval (n = 177). Serum FA1 levels were significantly...

  16. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [3H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3. Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10-7. There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D3, vitamin D2, or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  17. Colloidal Graphite-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization MS and MSn of Small Molecules. 2. Direct Profiling and MS Imaging of Small Metabolites from Fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Zhang; Sangwon Cha; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-09-01

    Due to a high background in the low-mass region, conventional MALDI is not as useful for detecting small molecules (molecular masses <500 Da) as it is for large ones. Also, spatial inhomogeneity that is inherent to crystalline matrixes can degrade resolution in imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). In this study, colloidal graphite was investigated as an alternative matrix for laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in IMS. We demonstrate its advantages over conventional MALDI in the detection of small molecules such as organic acids, flavonoids, and oligosaccharides. GALDI provides good sensitivity for such small molecules. The detection limit of fatty acids and flavonoids in the negative-ion mode are in the low-femtomole range. Molecules were detected directly and identified by comparing the MS and MS/MS spectra with those of standards. Various fruits were chosen to evaluate the practical utility of GALDI since many types of small molecules are present in them. Distribution of these small molecules in the fruit was investigated by using IMS and IMS/MS.

  18. Cycloxygenase-2(cox-2) - a potential target for screening of small molecules as radiation countermeasure agents: an in silico study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COX-2 is well established for its role in inflammation and cancer, and has also been reported to play a significant role in radiation induced inflammation and by standard effect. It's already reported to have a role in protection against radiation induced damage suggesting it to be an important target for identifying novel radiation countermeasure agents. Present study aims at identifying novel small molecules from pharmacopoeia using COX-2 as target in-silico. Systematic search of the reported molecules exhibiting radiation protection revealed lat around 29 % (40 in 138) of them have a role in inflammation and a small percentage of these molecules (20 %; 8 in 40) are reported to as non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). Docking studies performed further clarified that all these 8 radioprotective molecules shows high binding affinity and inhibit COX-2. Further Johns Hopkins clinical compound library (JHCCL), a collection of small molecule clinical compounds, were screened virtually for COX-2 inhibition by docking approach. Docking of around 1400 small molecules against COX-2 lead to identification of a number of previously unreported molecules which are likely to act as radioprotectors. (author)

  19. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  20. Small Molecule Targeting of a MicroRNA Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-02-19

    Development of precision therapeutics is of immense interest, particularly as applied to the treatment of cancer. By analyzing the preferred cellular RNA targets of small molecules, we discovered that 5″-azido neomycin B binds the Drosha processing site in the microRNA (miR)-525 precursor. MiR-525 confers invasive properties to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Although HCC is one of the most common cancers, treatment options are limited, making the disease often fatal. Herein, we find that addition of 5″-azido neomycin B and its FDA-approved precursor, neomycin B, to an HCC cell line selectively inhibits production of the mature miRNA, boosts a downstream protein, and inhibits invasion. Interestingly, neomycin B is a second-line agent for hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and bacterial infections due to cirrhosis. Our results provocatively suggest that neomycin B, or second-generation derivatives, may be dual functioning molecules to treat both HE and HCC. Collectively, these studies show that rational design approaches can be tailored to disease-associated RNAs to afford potential lead therapeutics. PMID:26551630

  1. Structural and spectroscopic properties of small Pun (n =2-5) molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Ting-Ting; Gao Tao; Zhang Yun-Guang; Lei Qiang-Hua; Luo De-Li

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium structures and the electronic,spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of small Pun (n =2-5) molecules are systematically investigated using the methods of general gradient approximation (GGA) of density functional theory (DFT).The results show that the bond length of the lowest-energy structure of Pu2 is 2.578 (A).The ground state structure of Pu3 is a triangle with D3h symmetry,whereas for Pu4,the ground state structure is a square (D4h) and the spin polarization of 16 for molecule Pus with square geometry (D4h) is the most stable structure.For the ground state structures,the vibrational spectra as well as thermodynamic parameters are worked out.In addition,the values for the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) along with the energy gap of all the Pu2-5 structures are presented.The relevant structural and chemical stabilities are predicted.

  2. Assembly of an antiparallel homo-adenine DNA duplex by small-molecule binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persil, Ozgül; Santai, Catherine T; Jain, Swapan S; Hud, Nicholas V

    2004-07-21

    Molecules that reversibly bind DNA and trigger the formation of non-Watson-Crick secondary structures would be useful in the design of dynamic DNA nanostructures and as potential leads for new therapeutic agents. We demonstrate that coralyne, a small crescent-shaped molecule, promotes the formation of a duplex secondary structure from homo-adenine oligonucleotides. AFM studies reveal that the staggered alignment of homo-adenine oligonucleotides upon coralyne binding produces polymers of micrometers in length, but only 2 nm in height. A DNA duplex was also studied that contained eight A.A mismatches between two flanking 7-bp Watson-Crick helices. CD spectra confirm that the multiple A.A mismatches of this duplex bind coralyne in manner similar to that of homo-adenine oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the melting temperature of this hybrid duplex increases by 13 degrees C upon coralyne binding. These observations illustrate that the helical structure of the homo-adenine-coralyne duplex is compatible with the B-form DNA helix. PMID:15250704

  3. Optically switchable transistors by simple incorporation of photochromic systems into small-molecule semiconducting matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemayel, Mirella El; Börjesson, Karl; Herder, Martin; Duong, Duc T.; Hutchison, James A.; Ruzié, Christian; Schweicher, Guillaume; Salleo, Alberto; Geerts, Yves; Hecht, Stefan; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    The fabrication of multifunctional high-performance organic thin-film transistors as key elements in future logic circuits is a major research challenge. Here we demonstrate that a photoresponsive bi-functional field-effect transistor with carrier mobilities exceeding 0.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 can be developed by incorporating photochromic molecules into an organic semiconductor matrix via a single-step solution processing deposition of a two components blend. Tuning the interactions between the photochromic diarylethene system and the organic semiconductor is achieved via ad-hoc side functionalization of the diarylethene. Thereby, a large-scale phase-segregation can be avoided and superior miscibility is provided, while retaining optimal π-π stacking to warrant efficient charge transport and to attenuate the effect of photoinduced switching on the extent of current modulation. This leads to enhanced electrical performance of transistors incorporating small conjugated molecules as compared with polymeric semiconductors. These findings are of interest for the development of high-performing optically gated electronic devices.

  4. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity. PMID:25668511

  5. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity.

  6. Performance of W4 theory for spectroscopic constants and electrical properties of small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Karton, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Accurate spectroscopic constants and electrical properties of small molecules are determined by means of W4 and post-W4 theories. For a set of 28 first- and second-row diatomic molecules for which very accurate experimental spectroscopic constants are available, W4 theory affords near-spectroscopic or better predictions. Specifically, the root-mean-square deviations (RMSD) from experiment are 0.04 pm for the equilibrium bond distances (r_e), 1.03 cm^{-1} for the harmonic frequencies (\\omega_e), 0.20 cm^{-1} for the first anharmonicity constants (\\omega_e x_e), 0.10 cm^{-1} for the second anharmonicity constants (\\omega_e y_e), and 0.001 cm^{-1} for the vibration-rotation coupling constants (\\alpha_e). Higher-order connected triples, \\hat{T}_3-(T), improve agreement with experiment for the hydride systems, but their inclusion (in the absence of \\hat{T}_4) tends to worsen agreement with experiment for the nonhydride systems. Connected quadruple excitations, \\hat{T}_4, have significant and systematic effects on ...

  7. Understanding the morphology of solution processed fullerene-free small molecule bulk heterojunction blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namepetra, Andrew; Kitching, Elizabeth; Eftaiha, Ala'a F; Hill, Ian G; Welch, Gregory C

    2016-05-14

    Bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) molecular blends prepared from small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and perylene-diimide (PDI) chromophores have been studied using optical absorption, cyclic voltammetry, photoluminescence quenching, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and current-voltage measurements. The results provided useful insights into the use of DPP and PDI based molecules as donor-acceptor composites for organic photovoltaic (OPV) applications. Beside optoelectronic compatibility, the choice of active layer processing conditions is of key importance to improve the performance of BHJ solar cells. In this context, post-production treatments, viz. thermal and solvent vapour annealing, and the use of 1,8-diiodooctane as a solvent additive were employed to optimize the morphology of blend films. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy indicated that the aforementioned processing strategies led to non-optimal composite morphologies with significantly large crystallites in comparison to exciton diffusion lengths. Although the open circuit voltage of the OPV devices was satisfactory (0.78 V), it was anticipated that the bulky domains hamper charge dissociation and transport, which resulted in low photovoltaic performance. PMID:27087259

  8. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E; Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M; Ogilvie, Donald J; Ward, Simon E; Atack, John R; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W; Oliver, Antony W

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a 'humanized' form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  9. On the benefits of localized modes in anharmonic vibrational calculations for small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Panek, Pawel T

    2016-01-01

    Anharmonic vibrational calculations can already be computationally demanding for relatively small molecules. The main bottlenecks lie in the construction of the potential energy surface and in the size of the excitation space in the vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations. To address these challanges, we use localized-mode coordinates to construct potential energy surfaces and perform vibrational self-consistent field (L-VSCF) and L-VCI calculations [P. T. Panek, Ch. R. Jacob, ChemPhysChem 15, 3365 (2014)] for all vibrational modes of two prototypical test cases, the ethene and furan molecules. We find that the mutual coupling between modes is reduced when switching from normal-mode coordinates to localized-mode coordinates. When using such localized-mode coordinates, we observe a faster convergence of the $n$-mode expansion of the potential energy surface. This makes it possible to neglect higher-order contributions in the $n$-mode expansion of the potential energy surface or to approximate ...

  10. Tuning dissociation using isoelectronically doped graphene and hexagonal boron nitride: Water and other small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Alfè, Dario; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-04-01

    Novel uses for 2-dimensional materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are being frequently discovered especially for membrane and catalysis applications. Still however, a great deal remains to be understood about the interaction of environmentally and industrially relevant molecules such as water with these materials. Taking inspiration from advances in hybridising graphene and h-BN, we explore using density functional theory, the dissociation of water, hydrogen, methane, and methanol on graphene, h-BN, and their isoelectronic doped counterparts: BN doped graphene and C doped h-BN. We find that doped surfaces are considerably more reactive than their pristine counterparts and by comparing the reactivity of several small molecules, we develop a general framework for dissociative adsorption. From this a particularly attractive consequence of isoelectronic doping emerges: substrates can be doped to enhance their reactivity specifically towards either polar or non-polar adsorbates. As such, these substrates are potentially viable candidates for selective catalysts and membranes, with the implication that a range of tuneable materials can be designed.

  11. Kinase-Independent Small-Molecule Inhibition of JAK-STAT Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chou, Danny Hung-Chieh; Vetere, Amedeo; Choudhary, Amit;

    2015-01-01

    -cell apoptosis, inhibits interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activation of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling to promote β-cell survival. However, unlike common JAK-STAT pathway inhibitors, BRD0476 inhibits JAK-STAT signaling without suppressing the kinase activity of...... any JAK. Rather, we identified the deubiquitinase ubiquitin-specific peptidase 9X (USP9X) as an intracellular target, using a quantitative proteomic analysis in rat β cells. RNAi-mediated and CRISPR/Cas9 knockdown mimicked the effects of BRD0476, and reverse chemical genetics using a known inhibitor...... of USP9X blocked JAK-STAT signaling without suppressing JAK activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of a putative ubiquitination site on JAK2 mitigated BRD0476 activity, suggesting a competition between phosphorylation and ubiquitination to explain small-molecule MoA. These results demonstrate that...

  12. Gold nanoparticles for the colorimetric and fluorescent detection of ions and small organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingbin; Wang, Zhuo; Jiang, Xingyu

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have drawn considerable research attention in the fields of catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, diagnostics, therapy and biosensors due to their unique optical and electronic properties. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the development of AuNP-based colorimetric and fluorescent assays for ions including cations (such as Hg2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, As3+, Ca2+, Al3+, etc) and anions (such as NO2-, CN-, PF6-, F-, I-, oxoanions), and small organic molecules (such as cysteine, homocysteine, trinitrotoluene, melamine and cocaine, ATP, glucose, dopamine and so forth). Many of these species adversely affect human health and the environment. Moreover, we paid particular attention to AuNP-based colorimetric and fluorescent assays in practical applications.

  13. Small Molecules Antagonise the MIA-Fibronectin Interaction in Malignant Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, King Tuo; Zhong, Xue Yin; Seibel, Nadia; Pütz, Stefanie; Autzen, Jasmin; Gasper, Raphael; Hofmann, Eckhard; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA), an extracellular protein highly expressed by malignant melanoma cells, plays an important functional role in melanoma development, progression, and metastasis. After its secretion, MIA directly interacts with extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN). By this mechanism, MIA actively facilitates focal cell detachment from surrounding structures and strongly promotes tumour cell invasion and migration. Hence, the molecular understanding of MIA's function provides a promising target for the development of new strategies in malignant melanoma therapy. Here, we describe for the first time the discovery of small molecules that are able to disrupt the MIA-FN complex by selectively binding to a new druggable pocket, which we could identify on MIA by structural analysis and fragment-based screening. Our findings may inspire novel drug discovery efforts aiming at a therapeutically effective treatment of melanoma by targeting MIA. PMID:27151361

  14. Efficient polymer solar cells employing a non-conjugated small-molecule electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xinhua; Peng, Ruixiang; Ai, Ling; Zhang, Xingye; Ge, Ziyi

    2015-08-01

    Polymer solar cells have drawn a great deal of attention due to the attractiveness of their use in renewable energy sources that are potentially lightweight and low in cost. Recently, numerous significant research efforts have resulted in polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies in excess of 9% (ref. 1). Nevertheless, further improvements in performance are sought for commercial applications. Here, we report polymer solar cells with a power conversion efficiency of 10.02% that employ a non-conjugated small-molecule electrolyte as an interlayer. The material offers good contact for photogenerated charge carrier collection and allows optimum photon harvesting in the device. Furthermore, the enhanced performance is attributed to improved electron mobility, enhanced active-layer absorption and properly active-layer microstructures with optimal horizontal phase separation and vertical phase gradation. Our discovery opens a new avenue for single-junction devices by fully exploiting the potential of various material systems with efficiency over 10%.

  15. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  16. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Gene Silencing using Small Interferin RNA: DNA Hybrid Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, L

    2006-02-08

    The recent discovery that short hybrid RNA:DNA molecules (siHybrids) induce long-term silencing of gene expression in mammalian cells conflicts with the currently hypothesized mechanisms explaining the action of small, interfering RNA (siRNA). As a first step to elucidating the mechanism for this effect, we set out to quantify the delivery of siHybrids and determine their cellular localization in mammalian cells. We then tracked the segregation of the siHybrids into daughter cells after cell division. Markers for siHybrid delivery were shown to enter cells with and without the use of a transfection agent. Furthermore, delivery without transfection agent only occurred after a delay of 2-4 hours, suggesting a degradation process occurring in the cell culture media. Therefore, we studied the effects of nucleases and backbone modifications on the stability of siHybrids under cell culture conditions.

  17. Discovery of RG7112: A Small-Molecule MDM2 Inhibitor in Clinical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Binh; Wovkulich, Peter; Pizzolato, Giacomo; Lovey, Allen; Ding, Qingjie; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jin-Jun; Zhao, Chunlin; Glenn, Kelli; Wen, Yang; Tovar, Christian; Packman, Kathryn; Vassilev, Lyubomir; Graves, Bradford

    2013-05-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a potent transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of cellular responses to stress. It is controlled by its negative regulator MDM2, which binds directly to p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity. MDM2 also targets p53 for degradation by the proteasome. Many tumors produce high levels of MDM2, thereby impairing p53 function. Restoration of p53 activity by inhibiting the p53-MDM2 interaction may represent a novel approach to cancer treatment. RG7112 (2g) is the first clinical small-molecule MDM2 inhibitor designed to occupy the p53-binding pocket of MDM2. In cancer cells expressing wild-type p53, RG7112 stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and inhibition or regression of human tumor xenografts. PMID:24900694

  18. Solution-Procesed Small-Molecule OLED Luminaire for Interior Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Ian [Dupont Displays, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    Prototype lighting panels and luminaires were fabricated using DuPont Displays solution-processed small-molecule OLED technology. These lighting panels were based on a spatially-patterned, 3-color design, similar in concept to an OLED display panel, with materials chosen to maximize device efficacy. The majority of the processing steps take place in air (rather than high vacuum). Optimization of device architecture, processing and construction was undertaken, with a final prototype design of 50 cm{sup 2} being fabricated and tested. Performance of these panels reached 35 lm/W at illuminant-A. A unique feature of this technology is the ability to color tune the emission, and color temperatures ranging from 2700 to > 6,500K were attained in the final build. Significant attention was paid to low-cost fabrication techniques.

  19. Polymers with Cavities Tuned for Fast Selective Transport of Small Molecules and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ho Bum; Jung, Chul Ho; Lee, Young Moo; Hill, Anita J.; Pas, Steven J.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Van Wagner, Elizabeth; Freeman, Benny D.; Cookson, David J. (ASRP); (Hanyang); (CSIRO); (Texas)

    2008-04-02

    Within a polymer film, free-volume elements such as pores and channels typically have a wide range of sizes and topologies. This broad range of free-volume element sizes compromises a polymer's ability to perform molecular separations. We demonstrated free-volume structures in dense vitreous polymers that enable outstanding molecular and ionic transport and separation performance that surpasses the limits of conventional polymers. The unusual microstructure in these materials can be systematically tailored by thermally driven segment rearrangement. Free-volume topologies can be tailored by controlling the degree of rearrangement, flexibility of the original chain, and judicious inclusion of small templating molecules. This rational tailoring of free-volume element architecture provides a route for preparing high-performance polymers for molecular-scale separations.

  20. Discovery and computer aided potency optimization of a novel class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinader, Victoria; Ahmet, Djevdet S; Ahmed, Mohaned S; Patterson, Laurence H; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the chemokine signalling axes involved in cancer, chemokine CXCL12 acting on chemokine receptor CXCR4 is particularly significant since it orchestrates migration of cancer cells in a tissue-specific metastatic process. High CXCR4 tumour expression is associated with poor prognosis of lung, brain, CNS, blood and breast cancers. We have identified a new class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists based on the use of computational modelling studies in concert with experimental determination of in vitro activity against CXCL12-induced intracellular calcium mobilisation, proliferation and chemotaxis. Molecular modelling proved to be a useful tool in rationalising our observed potencies, as well as informing the direction of the synthetic efforts aimed at producing more potent compounds. PMID:24205302

  1. Dual Functional Small Molecule Probes as Fluorophore and Ligand for Misfolding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Ran, Chongzhao

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding of a protein is a destructive process for variety of diseases that include neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, mad cow disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontal temporal dementia (FTD), and other non-CNS diseases such as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and lysosomal storage diseases. Formation of various misfunctional large assembles of the misfolded protein is the primary consequence. To detect the formation of the aggregated species is very important for not only basic mechanism research but also very crucial for diagnosis of the diseases. In this review, we updated references related to the new development of the dual functional fluorescent small molecule probes for detecting the aggregated proteins in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24363605

  2. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  3. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Warwick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT. The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  4. Line printing solution-processable small molecules with uniform surface profile via ink-jet printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Tan, Wanyi; Zhu, Xuhui; Wang, Jian; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Line printing offers a feasible approach to remove the pixel well structure which is widely used to confine the ink-jet printed solution. In the study, a uniform line is printed by an ink-jet printer. To achieve a uniform surface profile of the printed line, 10vol% low-volatile solvent DMA (3,4-Dimethylanisole) is mixed with high-volatile solvent Pxy (p-xylene) as the solvent. After a solution-processable small molecule is dissolved, the surface tension of DMA solution becomes lower than that of Pxy solution, which creates an inward Marangoni flow during the solvent evaporation. The inward Marangoni flow balances out the outward capillary flow, thereby forming a flat film surface. The line width of the printed line depends on the contact angle of the solution on the hole injection layer. PMID:26669496

  5. Small Molecule Detection in Saliva Facilitates Portable Tests of Marijuana Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Choi, Joohong; Shultz, Tyler O; Wang, Shan X

    2016-08-01

    As medical and recreational use of cannabis, or marijuana, becomes more prevalent, law enforcement needs a tool to evaluate whether drivers are operating vehicles under the influence of cannabis, specifically the psychoactive substance, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). However, the cutoff concentration of THC that causes impairment is still controversial, and current on-site screening tools are not sensitive enough to detect trace amounts of THC in oral fluids. Here we present a novel sensing platform that employs giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors integrated with a portable reader system and smartphone to detect THC in saliva using competitive assays. With a simple saliva collection scheme, we have optimized the assay to measure THC in the range from 0 to 50 ng/mL, covering most cutoff values proposed in previous studies. This work facilitates on-site screening for THC and shows potential for testing of other small molecule drugs and analytes in point-of-care (POC) settings. PMID:27434697

  6. Benzofuran Small Molecules as Potential Inhibitors of Human Protein Kinases. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecień, Halina; Goszczyńska, Agata; Rokosz, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are known to regulate the majority of human cellular processes such as communication, division, metabolism, survival and apoptosis therefore they can be promising targets in cancer diseases, viral infection and in other disorders. Small molecules acting as selective human protein kinase inhibitors are very attractive pharmacological targets. This review presents a number of examples of biologically active natural and synthetic benzo[b]furans and their derivatives, such as benzo[b]furan-2- and 3-ones, benzo[b]furan-2- and 3-carboxylic acids, as well as benzo[c]furans as potential inhibitors of various human protein kinases. The pathways of function and implication of the inhibitors in cancer and other diseases are discussed. PMID:26648467

  7. Development of peptide and small-molecule HIV-1 fusion inhibitors that target gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-11-01

    It has been 25 years since the development of the first efficient HIV-1/AIDS treatment. Scientists now know more about the HIV-1 infection life cycle, and more than 30 antiretroviral drugs have been developed, including HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Fundamental work was begun in the early 1990s and led to the development of a novel class of anti-HIV-1 drugs, culminating in a peptide known as T20, which is currently the only HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. However, more work needs to be done to perfect the development of peptide and small-molecule HIV fusion inhibitors, particularly those that target gp41. Herein we present a brief overview of the development of this class of anti-HIV-1 drug by focusing on the achievements, challenges, and lessons learned. We cite hallmark studies of the past and comment on future drug development. PMID:20845360

  8. Identification of small molecules acting against H1N1 influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agamennone, Mariangela; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Superti, Fabiana

    2016-01-15

    Influenza virus represents a serious threat to public health. The lack of effective drugs against flu prompted researchers to identify more promising viral target. In this respect hemagglutinin (HA) can represent an interesting option because of its pivotal role in the infection process. With this aim we collected a small library of commercially available compounds starting from a large database and performing a diversity-based selection to reduce the number of screened compounds avoiding structural redundancy of the library. Selected compounds were tested for their hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) ability against two different A/H1N1 viral strains (one of which is oseltamivir sensitive), and 17 of them showed the ability to interact with HA. Five drug-like molecules, in particular, were able to impair hemagglutination of both A/H1N1 viral strains under study and to inhibit cytopathic effect and hemolysis at sub-micromolar level. PMID:26655243

  9. Shutting down the pore: The search for small molecule inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šileikytė, Justina; Forte, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is now recognized as playing a key role in a wide variety of human diseases whose common pathology may be based in mitochondrial dysfunction. Recently, PTP assays have been adapted to high-throughput screening approaches to identify small molecules specifically inhibiting the PTP. Following extensive secondary chemistry, the most potent inhibitors of the PTP described to date have been developed. This review will provide an overview of each of these screening efforts, use of resulting compounds in animal models of PTP-based diseases, and problems that will require further study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26924772

  10. High-throughput screening of small molecule ligands targeted to live bacteria surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Heon; Park, Sunny; Hyun, Hoon; Bordo, Mark W; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Nasr, Khaled A; Frangioni, John V; Choi, Hak Soo

    2013-04-01

    The discovery of small molecule ligands targeted to the surface of live pathogenic bacteria would enable an entirely new class of antibiotics. We report the development and validation of a microarray-based high-throughput screening platform for bacteria that exploits 300 μm diameter chemical spots in a 1 in. × 3 in. nanolayered glass slide format. Using 24 model compounds and 4 different bacterial strains, we optimized the screening technology, including fluorophore-based optical deconvolution for automated scoring of affinity and cyan-magenta-yellow-key (CMYK) color-coding for scoring of both affinity and specificity. The latter provides a lossless, one-dimensional view of multidimensional data. By linking in silico analysis with cell binding affinity and specificity, we could also begin to identify the physicochemical factors that affect ligand performance. The technology we describe could form the foundation for developing new classes of antibiotics. PMID:23461528

  11. Small-molecule antagonists of germination of the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook-Smith, Duncan; Toh, Shigeo; Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; McCourt, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Striga spp. (witchweed) is an obligate parasitic plant that attaches to host roots to deplete them of nutrients. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the most destructive Striga species, Striga hermonthica, parasitizes major food crops affecting two-thirds of the arable land and over 100 million people. One potential weakness in the Striga infection process is the way it senses the presence of a host crop. Striga only germinates in the presence of the plant hormone strigolactone, which exudes from a host root. Hence small molecules that perturb strigolactone signaling may be useful tools for disrupting the Striga lifecycle. Here we developed a chemical screen to suppress strigolactone signaling in the model plant Arabidopsis. One compound, soporidine, specifically inhibited a S. hermonthica strigolactone receptor and inhibited the parasite's germination. This indicates that strigolactone-based screens using Arabidopsis are useful in identifying lead compounds to combat Striga infestations. PMID:27428512

  12. Antioxidant small molecules confer variable protection against oxidative damage in yeast mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amari, Foued; Fettouche, Abdelmadjid; Samra, Mario Abou;

    2008-01-01

    responsive proteins oye2 and oye3. Yeast strains deficient in superoxide dismutase (Delta sod1), catalase A (Delta cta1), and double-deficient in Old Yellow enzyme 2 and glutathione reductase 1 (Delta oye2 glr1) were supplemented with ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, caffeic acid, or quercetin, subjected to pro......To assess the capacity of small molecules to function as antioxidants in pathologic conditions, a set of yeast assays utilizing strains deficient in the antioxidant machinery was applied with measurements of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH/GSSG), and induction of the stress...... endogenous levels of ROS in some yeast mutants. Quercetin supplementation increased significantly GSH and GSSG levels but could not maintain GSH levels in H(2)O(2)-exposed cells. Induction of the stress response machinery was manifested by the strong up-regulation of a chromosomally encoded OYE2-GFP fusion...

  13. Benchmarking Density Functionals on Structural Parameters of Small-/Medium-Sized Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémond, Éric; Savarese, Marika; Su, Neil Qiang; Pérez-Jiménez, Ángel José; Xu, Xin; Sancho-García, Juan Carlos; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    In this Letter we report the error analysis of 59 exchange-correlation functionals in evaluating the structural parameters of small- and medium-sized organic molecules. From this analysis, recently developed double hybrids, such as xDH-PBE0, emerge as the most reliable methods, while global hybrids confirm their robustness in reproducing molecular structures. Notably the M06-L density functional is the only semilocal method reaching an accuracy comparable to hybrids'. A comparison with errors obtained on energetic databases (including thermochemistry, reaction barriers, and interaction energies) indicate that most of the functionals have a coherent behavior, showing low (or high) deviations on both energy and structure data sets. Only a few of them are more prone toward one of these two properties. PMID:26730741

  14. Discovery and computer aided potency optimization of a novel class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Vinader

    Full Text Available Amongst the chemokine signalling axes involved in cancer, chemokine CXCL12 acting on chemokine receptor CXCR4 is particularly significant since it orchestrates migration of cancer cells in a tissue-specific metastatic process. High CXCR4 tumour expression is associated with poor prognosis of lung, brain, CNS, blood and breast cancers. We have identified a new class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists based on the use of computational modelling studies in concert with experimental determination of in vitro activity against CXCL12-induced intracellular calcium mobilisation, proliferation and chemotaxis. Molecular modelling proved to be a useful tool in rationalising our observed potencies, as well as informing the direction of the synthetic efforts aimed at producing more potent compounds.

  15. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Gokhale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  16. Small-molecule-driven hepatocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Richard; Greenhough, Sebastian; Naumovska, Elena; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2015-05-12

    The differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to hepatocytes is well established, yet current methods suffer from several drawbacks. These include a lack of definition and reproducibility, which in part stems from continued reliance on recombinant growth factors. This has remained a stumbling block for the translation of the technology into industry and the clinic for reasons associated with cost and quality. We have devised a growth-factor-free protocol that relies on small molecules to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells toward a hepatic phenotype. The procedure can efficiently direct both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells. The final population of cells demonstrates marker expression at the transcriptional and protein levels, as well as key hepatic functions such as serum protein production, glycogen storage, and cytochrome P450 activity. PMID:25937370

  17. pKa prediction of monoprotic small molecules the SMARTS way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adam C; Yu, Jing-Yu; Crippen, Gordon M

    2008-10-01

    Realizing favorable absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and toxicity profiles is a necessity due to the high attrition rate of lead compounds in drug development today. The ability to accurately predict bioavailability can help save time and money during the screening and optimization processes. As several robust programs already exist for predicting logP, we have turned our attention to the fast and robust prediction of pK(a) for small molecules. Using curated data from the Beilstein Database and Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, we have created a decision tree based on a novel set of SMARTS strings that can accurately predict the pK(a) for monoprotic compounds with R(2) of 0.94 and root mean squared error of 0.68. Leave-some-out (10%) cross-validation achieved Q(2) of 0.91 and root mean squared error of 0.80. PMID:18826209

  18. Reactivating mutant p53 using small molecules as zinc metallochaperones: awakening a sleeping giant in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanden, Adam R.; Yu, Xin; Loh, Stewart N.; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor protein p53 (TP53) is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancer. The majority of mutations are missense, and generate a defective protein that is druggable. Yet, for decades, the small-molecule restoration of wild-type (WT) p53 function in mutant p53 tumors (so-called p53 mutant ‘reactivation’) has been elusive to researchers. The p53 protein requires the binding of a single zinc ion for proper folding, and impairing zinc binding is a major mechanism for loss of function in missense mutant p53. Here, we describe recent work defining a new class of drugs termed zinc metallochaperones that restore WT p53 structure and function by restoring Zn2+ to Zn2+-deficient mutant p53. PMID:26205328

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors of sodium iodide sym-porter function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Na+/l- sym-porter (NIS) mediates iodide uptake into thyroid follicular cells. Although NIS has been cloned and thoroughly studied at the molecular level, the biochemical processes involved in post-translational regulation of NIS are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize inhibitors of NIS function. These small organic molecules represent a starting point in the identification of pharmacological tools for the characterization of NIS trafficking and activation mechanisms. screening of a collection of 17020 drug-like compounds revealed new chemical inhibitors with potencies down to 40 nM. Fluorescence measurement of membrane potential indicates that these inhibitors do not act by disrupting the sodium gradient. They allow immediate and total iodide discharge from preloaded cells in accord with a specific modification of NIS activity, probably through distinct mechanisms. (authors)

  20. Iminoboronate-Based Peptide Cyclization That Responds to pH, Oxidation, and Small Molecule Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-02-24

    As a rich source of therapeutic agents, peptide natural products usually adopt a cyclic or multicyclic scaffold that minimizes structural flexibility to favor target binding. Inspired by nature, chemists have been interested in developing synthetic cyclic and multicyclic peptides that serve as biological probes and potential therapeutics. Herein we describe a novel strategy for peptide cyclization in which intramolecular iminoboronate formation allows spontaneous cyclization under physiologic conditions to yield monocyclic and bicyclic peptides. Importantly the iminoboronate-based cyclization can be rapidly reversed in response to multiple stimuli, including pH, oxidation, and small molecules. This highly versatile strategy for peptide cyclization should find applications in many areas of chemical biology. PMID:26859098

  1. Experimental Evaluation of Proposed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Water Channel Aquaporin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Jin, Byung-Ju; Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    The aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channel is a potentially important drug target, as AQP1 inhibition is predicted to have therapeutic action in edema, tumor growth, glaucoma, and other conditions. Here, we measured the AQP1 inhibition efficacy of 12 putative small-molecule AQP1 inhibitors reported in six recent studies, and one AQP1 activator. Osmotic water permeability was measured by stopped-flow light scattering in human and rat erythrocytes that natively express AQP1, in hemoglobin-free membrane vesicles from rat and human erythrocytes, and in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from AQP1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. As a positive control, 0.3 mM HgCl2 inhibited AQP1 water permeability by >95%. We found that none of the tested compounds at 50 µM significantly inhibited or increased AQP1 water permeability in these assays. Identification of AQP1 inhibitors remains an important priority. PMID:26993802

  2. Dockres: a computer program that analyzes the output of virtual screening of small molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Ming-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes a computer program named Dockres that is designed to analyze and summarize results of virtual screening of small molecules. The program is supplemented with utilities that support the screening process. Foremost among these utilities are scripts that run the virtual screening of a chemical library on a large number of processors in parallel. Methods Dockres and some of its supporting utilities are written Fortran-77; other utilities are written as C-shell scripts. They support the parallel execution of the screening. The current implementation of the program handles virtual screening with Autodock-3 and Autodock-4, but can be extended to work with the output of other programs. Results Analysis of virtual screening by Dockres led to both active and selective lead compounds. Conclusions Analysis of virtual screening was facilitated and enhanced by Dockres in both the authors' laboratories as well as laboratories elsewhere.

  3. Comparison of Experimental and Calculated Ion Mobilities of Small Molecules in Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is a well-known technique for analyzing gases. Examples are military applications, but also safety related applications, for example, for protection of employees in industries working with hazardous gases. In the last 15 years, this technique has been further developed as a tool for structural analysis, for example, in pharmaceutical applications. In particular, the collision cross section, which is related to the mobility, is of interest here. With help of theoretic principles, it is possible to develop molecular models that can be verified by the comparison of their calculated cross sections with experimental data. In this paper, it is analyzed how well the ion trajectory method is suitable to reproduce the measured ion mobility of small organic molecules such as the water clusters forming the positively charged reactant ions, simple aromatic substances, and n-alkanes. PMID:27298751

  4. Comparison of Experimental and Calculated Ion Mobilities of Small Molecules in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Gunzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion mobility spectrometry is a well-known technique for analyzing gases. Examples are military applications, but also safety related applications, for example, for protection of employees in industries working with hazardous gases. In the last 15 years, this technique has been further developed as a tool for structural analysis, for example, in pharmaceutical applications. In particular, the collision cross section, which is related to the mobility, is of interest here. With help of theoretic principles, it is possible to develop molecular models that can be verified by the comparison of their calculated cross sections with experimental data. In this paper, it is analyzed how well the ion trajectory method is suitable to reproduce the measured ion mobility of small organic molecules such as the water clusters forming the positively charged reactant ions, simple aromatic substances, and n-alkanes.

  5. Effective Absorption Enhancement in Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Employing Trapezoid Gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Chun-Ping, Xiang; Yu, Jin; Bin-Zong, Xu; Wei-Min, Wang; Xin, Wei; Guo-Feng, Song; Yun, Xu

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the optical absorption has been enhanced in the small molecule organic solar cells by employing trapezoid grating structure. The enhanced absorption is mainly attributed to both waveguide modes and surface plasmon modes, which has been simulated by using finite-difference time-domain method. The simulated results show that the surface plasmon along the semitransparent metallic Ag anode is excited by introducing the periodical trapezoid gratings, which induce high intensity field increment in the donor layer. Meanwhile, the waveguide modes result a high intensity field in acceptor layer. The increment of field improves the absorption of organic solar cells, significantly, which has been demonstrated by simulating the electrical properties. The simulated results exhibiting 31 % increment of the short-circuit current has been achieved in the optimized device, which is supported by the experimental measurement. The power conversion efficiency of the grating sample obtained in experiment exhibits an...

  6. Fully Integrated Approach to Compute Vibrationally Resolved Optical Spectra: From Small Molecules to Macrosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Bloino, Julien; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2009-03-10

    A general and effective time-independent approach to compute vibrationally resolved electronic spectra from first principles has been integrated into the Gaussian computational chemistry package. This computational tool offers a simple and easy-to-use way to compute theoretical spectra starting from geometry optimization and frequency calculations for each electronic state. It is shown that in such a way it is straightforward to combine calculation of Franck-Condon integrals with any electronic computational model. The given examples illustrate the calculation of absorption and emission spectra, all in the UV-vis region, of various systems from small molecules to large ones, in gas as well as in condensed phases. The computational models applied range from fully quantum mechanical descriptions to discrete/continuum quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical/polarizable continuum models. PMID:26610221

  7. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    Full Text Available New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R, which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  8. Rationally designed small molecules targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 are potently bioactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Hoskins, Jason; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-05-18

    RNA is an important drug target, but it is difficult to design or discover small molecules that modulate RNA function. In the present study, we report that rationally designed, modularly assembled small molecules that bind the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are potently bioactive in cell culture models. DM1 is caused when an expansion of r(CUG) repeats, or r(CUG)(exp), is present in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) mRNA. r(CUG)(exp) folds into a hairpin with regularly repeating 5'CUG/3'GUC motifs and sequesters muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). A variety of defects are associated with DM1, including (i) formation of nuclear foci, (ii) decreased translation of DMPK mRNA due to its nuclear retention, and (iii) pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1, which controls the alternative splicing of various pre-mRNAs. Previously, modularly assembled ligands targeting r(CUG)(exp) were designed using information in an RNA motif-ligand database. These studies showed that a bis-benzimidazole (H) binds the 5'CUG/3'GUC motif in r(CUG)(exp.) Therefore, we designed multivalent ligands to bind simultaneously multiple copies of this motif in r(CUG)(exp). Herein, we report that the designed compounds improve DM1-associated defects including improvement of translational and pre-mRNA splicing defects and the disruption of nuclear foci. These studies may establish a foundation to exploit other RNA targets in genomic sequence. PMID:22332923

  9. Small-molecule inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection by virus capsid destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiong; Zhou, Jing; Shah, Vaibhav B; Aiken, Christopher; Whitby, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is dependent on the proper disassembly of the viral capsid, or "uncoating," in target cells. The HIV-1 capsid consists of a conical multimeric complex of the viral capsid protein (CA) arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Mutations in CA that destabilize the viral capsid result in impaired infection owing to defects in reverse transcription in target cells. We describe here the mechanism of action of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, PF-3450074 (PF74), which targets CA. PF74 acts at an early stage of HIV-1 infection and inhibits reverse transcription in target cells. We show that PF74 binds specifically to HIV-1 particles, and substitutions in CA that confer resistance to the compound prevent binding. A single point mutation in CA that stabilizes the HIV-1 core also conferred strong resistance to the virus without inhibiting compound binding. Treatment of HIV-1 particles or purified cores with PF74 destabilized the viral capsid in vitro. Furthermore, the compound induced the rapid dissolution of the HIV-1 capsid in target cells. PF74 antiviral activity was promoted by binding of the host protein cyclophilin A to the HIV-1 capsid, and PF74 and cyclosporine exhibited mutual antagonism. Our data suggest that PF74 triggers premature HIV-1 uncoating in target cells, thereby mimicking the activity of the retrovirus restriction factor TRIM5α. This study highlights uncoating as a step in the HIV-1 life cycle that is susceptible to small molecule intervention. PMID:20962083

  10. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection by Virus Capsid Destabilization▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiong; Zhou, Jing; Shah, Vaibhav B.; Aiken, Christopher; Whitby, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is dependent on the proper disassembly of the viral capsid, or “uncoating,” in target cells. The HIV-1 capsid consists of a conical multimeric complex of the viral capsid protein (CA) arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Mutations in CA that destabilize the viral capsid result in impaired infection owing to defects in reverse transcription in target cells. We describe here the mechanism of action of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, PF-3450074 (PF74), which targets CA. PF74 acts at an early stage of HIV-1 infection and inhibits reverse transcription in target cells. We show that PF74 binds specifically to HIV-1 particles, and substitutions in CA that confer resistance to the compound prevent binding. A single point mutation in CA that stabilizes the HIV-1 core also conferred strong resistance to the virus without inhibiting compound binding. Treatment of HIV-1 particles or purified cores with PF74 destabilized the viral capsid in vitro. Furthermore, the compound induced the rapid dissolution of the HIV-1 capsid in target cells. PF74 antiviral activity was promoted by binding of the host protein cyclophilin A to the HIV-1 capsid, and PF74 and cyclosporine exhibited mutual antagonism. Our data suggest that PF74 triggers premature HIV-1 uncoating in target cells, thereby mimicking the activity of the retrovirus restriction factor TRIM5α. This study highlights uncoating as a step in the HIV-1 life cycle that is susceptible to small molecule intervention. PMID:20962083

  11. Identification and characterization of a small-molecule inhibitor of Wnt signaling in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Liu, Boping; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Jing Tai, Shi; Cheong, Seong-Moon; He, Xi; Caricasole, Andrea; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2013-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than 1 year. Although canonical Wnt pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-catenin, or Axin proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest that elevated Wnt signaling in GBM is initiated by several alternative mechanisms that are involved in different steps of the disease. Therefore, inhibition of Wnt signaling may represent a therapeutically relevant approach for GBM treatment. After the selection of a GBM cell model responsive to Wnt inhibition, we set out to develop a screening approach for the identification of compounds capable of modulating canonical Wnt signaling and associated proliferative responses in GBM cells. Here, we show that the small molecule SEN461 inhibits the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in GBM cells, with relevant effects at both molecular and phenotypic levels in vitro and in vivo. These include SEN461-induced Axin stabilization, increased β-catenin phosphorylation/degradation, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of human GBM cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells in vitro. Moreover, in vivo administration of SEN461 antagonized Wnt signaling in Xenopus embryos and reduced tumor growth in a GBM xenograft model. These data represent the first demonstration that small-molecule-mediated inhibition of Wnt signaling may be a potential approach for GBM therapeutics. PMID:23619303

  12. Wafer-scale arrays of nonvolatile polymer memories with microprinted semiconducting small molecule/polymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Insung; Hwang, Sun Kak; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Kang, Seok Ju; Park, Cheolmin

    2013-11-13

    Nonvolatile ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors (Fe-FETs) memories with solution-processed ferroelectric polymers are of great interest because of their potential for use in low-cost flexible devices. In particular, the development of a process for patterning high-performance semiconducting channel layers with mechanical flexibility is essential not only for proper cell-to-cell isolation but also for arrays of flexible nonvolatile memories. We demonstrate a robust route for printing large-scale micropatterns of solution-processed semiconducting small molecules/insulating polymer blends for high performance arrays of nonvolatile ferroelectric polymer memory. The nonvolatile memory devices are based on top-gate/bottom-contact Fe-FET with ferroelectric polymer insulator and micropatterned semiconducting blend channels. Printed micropatterns of a thin blended semiconducting film were achieved by our selective contact evaporation printing, with which semiconducting small molecules in contact with a micropatterned elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) mold were preferentially evaporated and absorbed into the PDMS mold while insulating polymer remained intact. Well-defined micrometer-scale patterns with various shapes and dimensions were readily developed over a very large area on a 4 in. wafer, allowing for fabrication of large-scale printed arrays of Fe-FETs with highly uniform device performance. We statistically analyzed the memory properties of Fe-FETs, including ON/OFF ratio, operation voltage, retention, and endurance, as a function of the micropattern dimensions of the semiconducting films. Furthermore, roll-up memory arrays were produced by successfully detaching large-area Fe-FETs printed on a flexible substrate with a transient adhesive layer from a hard substrate and subsequently transferring them to a nonplanar surface. PMID:24070419

  13. Deposition of low sheet resistance indium tin oxide directly onto functional small molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Franklin, Joseph B.

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. We outline a methodology for depositing tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) directly onto semiconducting organic small molecule films for use as a transparent conducting oxide top-electrode. ITO films were grown using pulsed laser deposition onto copper(II)phthalocyanine (CuPc):buckminsterfullerene (C60) coated substrates. The ITO was deposited at a substrate temperature of 150 °C over a wide range of background oxygen pressures (Pd) (0.67-10 Pa). Deposition at 0.67 ≤ Pd ≤ 4.7 Pa led to delamination of the organic films owing to damage induced by the high energy ablated particles, at intermediate 4.7 ≤ Pd < 6.7 Pa pressures macroscopic cracking is observed in the ITO. Increasing Pd further, ≥ 6.7 Pa, supports the deposition of continuous, polycrystalline and highly transparent ITO films without damage to the CuPc:C60. The free carrier concentration of ITO is strongly influenced by Pd; hence growth at > 6.7 Pa induces a significant decrease in conductivity; with a minimum sheet resistance (Rs) of 145 /□ achieved for 300 nm thick ITO films. To reduce the Rs a multi-pressure deposition was implemented, resulting in the formation of polycrystalline, highly transparent ITO with an Rs of - 20/□ whilst maintaining the inherent functionality and integrity of the small molecule substrate.

  14. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 replicate signaling pathways triggered by calorie restriction in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavu Siva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calorie restriction (CR produces a number of health benefits and ameliorates diseases of aging such as type 2 diabetes. The components of the pathways downstream of CR may provide intervention points for developing therapeutics for treating diseases of aging. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated as one of the key downstream regulators of CR in yeast, rodents, and humans. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 have been identified that exhibit efficacy in animal models of diseases typically associated with aging including type 2 diabetes. To identify molecular processes induced in the liver of mice treated with two structurally distinct SIRT1 activators, SIRT501 (formulated resveratrol and SRT1720, for three days, we utilized a systems biology approach and applied Causal Network Modeling (CNM on gene expression data to elucidate downstream effects of SIRT1 activation. Results Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 activators recapitulate many of the molecular events downstream of CR in vivo, such as enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis, improving metabolic signaling pathways, and blunting pro-inflammatory pathways in mice fed a high fat, high calorie diet. Conclusion CNM of gene expression data from mice treated with SRT501 or SRT1720 in combination with supporting in vitro and in vivo data demonstrates that SRT501 and SRT1720 produce a signaling profile that mirrors CR, improves glucose and insulin homeostasis, and acts via SIRT1 activation in vivo. Taken together these results are encouraging regarding the use of small molecule activators of SIRT1 for therapeutic intervention into type 2 diabetes, a strategy which is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials.

  15. Stable Small Composite Microbubbles Decorated with Magnetite Nanoparticles - A Synergistic Effect between Surfactant Molecules and Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Pourroy, Geneviève; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2016-05-01

    Three approaches to preparing iron oxide nanoparticle-decorated microbubbles (NP-decoMBs) have been investigated. The size and stability characteristics of these microbubbles (MBs) were investigated by optical microscopy, laser light scattering and an acoustical method, and compared with those of non-decorated MBs. First, magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) grafted with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) were synthesized and used to prepare MBs by brief sonication under an atmosphere of air saturated with perfluorohexane. These MBs had a rather large mean radius (r ~ 12 µm), and a moderate volume of encapsulated gas. Remarkably, a second approach that consisted of dispersing unbound DMPC molecules in the aqueous phase along with DMPC-grafted Fe3O4NPs prior to sonication was found to drastically change the situation, allowing the obtaining of monomodal populations of much smaller (r ~ 0.6 µm) NP-decoMBs. The latter were echogenic and stable for at least 10 days at room temperature, without significant variation of their size characteristics. In a third approach, NP-decoMBs were directly prepared from dispersions of naked Fe3O4NPs in the presence of DMPC. The resulting NP-decoMBs suspensions consisted of broadly distributed bubble populations mostly containing two populations (with r ~ 5 and ~ 15 µm). Control microbubbles made of DMPC only were small (r ~ 1.3 µm), although not as small as those formed from DMPC-grafted Fe3O4NPs in the presence of free DMPC, and were less stable, with a room temperature half-life of only ~1 day. These observations imply that there is a synergy between the Fe3O4NPs and the DMPC molecules in the air/water interfacial film stabilization process. PMID:27087000

  16. Identification and characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of WNT signaling in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Boping, Liu; Mee, Ng Fui; Wen, Then Siew; Jing, Tai Shi; Cheong, Seong-Moon; He, Xi; Caricasole, Andrea; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than one year. Although canonical WNT pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-CATENIN or AXIN proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest that elevated WNT signaling in GBM is initiated by several alternative mechanisms that are involved in different steps of the disease. Therefore, inhibition of WNT signaling may represent a therapeutically relevant approach for GBM treatment. After the selection of a GBM cell model responsive to WNT inhibition, we set out to develop a screening approach for the identification of compounds capable of modulating canonical WNT signaling and associated proliferative responses in GBM cells. Here we show that the small molecule SEN461 inhibits the canonical WNT signaling pathway in GBM cells, with relevant effects at both molecular and phenotypic levels in vitro and in vivo. These include SEN461-induced AXIN stabilization, increased β-CATENIN phosphorylation/degradation, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth of human GBM cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells in vitro. Moreover, in vivo administration of SEN461 antagonized WNT signaling in Xenopus embryos and reduced tumor growth in a GBM xenograft model. These data represent the first demonstration that small molecule-mediated inhibition of WNT signaling may be a potential approach for GBM therapeutics. PMID:23619303

  17. A small molecule, odanacatib, inhibits inflammation and bone loss caused by endodontic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Wei; McConnell, Matthew; Zhu, Zheng; Li, Sheng; Reddy, Michael; Eleazer, Paul D; Wang, Min; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Periapical disease, an inflammatory disease mainly caused by dental caries, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of humans, affecting both children and adults. The infection travels through the root, leading to inflammation, bone destruction, and severe pain for the patient. Therefore, the development of a new class of anti-periapical disease therapies is necessary and critical for treatment and prevention. A small molecule, odanacatib (ODN), which is a cathepsin K (Ctsk) inhibitor, was investigated to determine its ability to treat this disease in a mouse model of periapical disease. While Ctsk was originally found in osteoclasts as an osteoclast-specific lysosomal protease, we were surprised to find that ODN can suppress the bacterium-induced immune response as well as bone destruction in the lesion area. X rays and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) showed that ODN treatment had significant bone protection effects at different time points. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining show that ODN treatment dramatically decreased F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells in the lesion areas 42 days after infection. Consistent with these findings, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed low levels of proinflammatory mRNAs (for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 23α) and corresponding cytokine expression in the ODN-treated disease group. The levels of mRNA for Toll-like receptors 4, 5, and 9 also largely decreased in the ODN-treated disease group. Our results demonstrated that ODN can inhibit endodontic disease development, bone erosion, and immune response. These results indicate that application of this small molecule offers a new opportunity to design effective therapies that could prevent periapical inflammation and revolutionize current treatment options. PMID:25583522

  18. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease. PMID:26842854

  19. Therapeutic efficacy of the small molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Travis K; Jordan, Robert; Lo, Michael K; Ray, Adrian S; Mackman, Richard L; Soloveva, Veronica; Siegel, Dustin; Perron, Michel; Bannister, Roy; Hui, Hon C; Larson, Nate; Strickley, Robert; Wells, Jay; Stuthman, Kelly S; Van Tongeren, Sean A; Garza, Nicole L; Donnelly, Ginger; Shurtleff, Amy C; Retterer, Cary J; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kenny, Tara; Eaton, Brett P; Grimes, Elizabeth; Welch, Lisa S; Gomba, Laura; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L; Nichols, Donald K; Nuss, Jonathan E; Nagle, Elyse R; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Palacios, Gustavo; Doerffler, Edward; Neville, Sean; Carra, Ernest; Clarke, Michael O; Zhang, Lijun; Lew, Willard; Ross, Bruce; Wang, Queenie; Chun, Kwon; Wolfe, Lydia; Babusis, Darius; Park, Yeojin; Stray, Kirsten M; Trancheva, Iva; Feng, Joy Y; Barauskas, Ona; Xu, Yili; Wong, Pamela; Braun, Molly R; Flint, Mike; McMullan, Laura K; Chen, Shan-Shan; Fearns, Rachel; Swaminathan, Swami; Mayers, Douglas L; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Lee, William A; Nichol, Stuart T; Cihlar, Tomas; Bavari, Sina

    2016-03-17

    The most recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, which was unprecedented in the number of cases and fatalities, geographic distribution, and number of nations affected, highlights the need for safe, effective, and readily available antiviral agents for treatment and prevention of acute Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) or sequelae. No antiviral therapeutics have yet received regulatory approval or demonstrated clinical efficacy. Here we report the discovery of a novel small molecule GS-5734, a monophosphoramidate prodrug of an adenosine analogue, with antiviral activity against EBOV. GS-5734 exhibits antiviral activity against multiple variants of EBOV and other filoviruses in cell-based assays. The pharmacologically active nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) is efficiently formed in multiple human cell types incubated with GS-5734 in vitro, and the NTP acts as an alternative substrate and RNA-chain terminator in primer-extension assays using a surrogate respiratory syncytial virus RNA polymerase. Intravenous administration of GS-5734 to nonhuman primates resulted in persistent NTP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (half-life, 14 h) and distribution to sanctuary sites for viral replication including testes, eyes, and brain. In a rhesus monkey model of EVD, once-daily intravenous administration of 10 mg kg(-1) GS-5734 for 12 days resulted in profound suppression of EBOV replication and protected 100% of EBOV-infected animals against lethal disease, ameliorating clinical disease signs and pathophysiological markers, even when treatments were initiated three days after virus exposure when systemic viral RNA was detected in two out of six treated animals. These results show the first substantive post-exposure protection by a small-molecule antiviral compound against EBOV in nonhuman primates. The broad-spectrum antiviral activity of GS-5734 in vitro against other pathogenic RNA viruses, including filoviruses, arenaviruses, and coronaviruses, suggests the

  20. Induction and Reversal of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Pre-mRNA Splicing Defects by Small Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Van Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z.; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J.; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P.; Schatz, George C.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)exp). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. The thiophene-containing small ...

  1. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC. In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell

  2. Mechanical Properties of Solution-Processed Small-Molecule Semiconductor Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Daniel; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; Proctor, Christopher M; McDowell, Caitlin; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Lipomi, Darren J

    2016-05-11

    Advantages of semiconducting small molecules-as opposed to semiconducting polymers-include synthetic simplicity, monodispersity, low cost, and ease of purification. One purported disadvantage of small-molecule films is reduced mechanical robustness. This paper measures the tensile modulus and crack-onset strain for pure films of the high-performance solution-processable small-molecule donors 7,7'-[4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl]bis[6-fluoro-4-(5'-hexyl-[2,2'-bithiophen]-5-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole] (DTS(FBTTh2)2), 2,5-di(2-ethylhexyl)-3,6-bis(5″-n-hexyl-[2,2',5',2″]terthiophen-5-yl)-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (SMDPPEH), and 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), the acceptor 5,5'-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyldi-2,1-ethenediyl)bis[2-hexyl-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione] (HPI-BT), blends of DTS(FBTTh2)2 and SMDPPEH with [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) and with HPI-BT, and bulk heterojunction films processed with the additives 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) and polystyrene (PS). The most deformable films of solution-processed organic semiconductors are found to exhibit tensile moduli and crack-onset strains comparable to those measured for conjugated polymers. For example, the tensile modulus of as-cast DTS(FBTTh2)2 is 0.68 GPa (i.e., comparable to poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), the common polymer), while it exhibits no cracks when stretched on an elastomeric substrate to strains of 14%. While this high degree of stretchability is lost upon the addition of PC71BM (4.2 GPa, 1.42%), it can be partially recovered using processing additives. Tensile modulus and crack-onset strain are highly correlated, which is typical of van der Waals solids. Increased surface roughness was correlated to increased modulus and brittleness within films of similar composition. Decreased stiffness for soluble molecular semiconductors can be rationalized by the presence of alkyl side chains, which decrease the

  3. Small molecule aptamer assays based on fluorescence anisotropy signal-enhancer oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Sandrine; Bouilloud, Prisca; De Oliveira Coelho, Gisella; Henry, Mickael; Peyrin, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Herein, we design novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) aptamer sensing platforms dedicated to small molecule detection. The assay strategy relied on enhanced fluctuations of segmental motion dynamics of the aptamer tracer mediated by an unlabelled, partially complementary oligonucleotide. The signal-enhancer oligonucleotide (SEO) essentially served as a free probe fraction revealer. By targeting specific regions of the signalling functional nucleic acid, the SEO binding to the unbound aptamer triggered perturbations of both the internal DNA flexibility and the localized dye environment upon the free probe to duplex structure transition. This potentiating effect determined increased FA variations between the duplex and target bound states of the aptameric probe. FA assay responses were obtained with both pre-structured (adenosine) and unstructured (tyrosinamide) aptamers and with dyes of different photochemical properties (fluorescein and texas red). The multiplexed analysis ability was further demonstrated through the simultaneous multicolour detection of the two small targets. The FA method appears to be especially simple, sensitive and widely applicable. PMID:27085946

  4. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Spindler

    Full Text Available Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT, the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and protein kinase C (PKC. If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  5. Small Molecule Activation by Intermolecular Zr(IV)-Phosphine Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metters, Owen J; Forrest, Sebastian J K; Sparkes, Hazel A; Manners, Ian; Wass, Duncan F

    2016-02-17

    We report intermolecular transition metal frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) based on zirconocene aryloxide and phosphine moieties that exhibit a broad range of small molecule activation chemistry that has previously been the preserve of only intramolecular pairs. Reactions with D2, CO2, THF, and PhCCH are reported. By contrast with previous intramolecular examples, these systems allow facile access to a variety of steric and electronic characteristics at the Lewis acidic and Lewis basic components, with the three-step syntheses of 10 new intermolecular transition metal FLPs being reported. Systematic variation to the phosphine Lewis base is used to unravel steric considerations, with the surprising conclusion that phosphines with relatively small Tolman steric parameters not only give highly reactive FLPs but are often seen to have the highest selectivity for the desired product. DOSY NMR spectroscopic studies on these systems reveal for the first time the nature of the Lewis acid/Lewis base interactions in transition metal FLPs of this type. PMID:26788963

  6. Aptamer/quantum dot-based simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haixia [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang Bingying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400040 (China); Xiang Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Zhang Yuyong; Chai Yaqin [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-03-04

    A novel strategy for 'signal on' and sensitive one-spot simultaneous detection of multiple small molecular analytes based on electrochemically encoded barcode quantum dot (QD) tags is described. The target analytes, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cocaine, respectively, are sandwiched between the corresponding set of surface-immobilized primary binding aptamers and the secondary binding aptamer/QD bioconjugates. The captured QDs yield distinct electrochemical signatures after acid dissolution, whose position and size reflect the identity and level, respectively, of the corresponding target analytes. Due to the inherent amplification feature of the QD labels and the 'signal on' detection scheme, as well as the sensitive monitoring of the metal ions released upon acid dissolution of the QD labels, low detection limits of 30 nM and 50 nM were obtained for ATP and cocaine, respectively, in our assays. Our multi-analyte sensing system also shows high specificity to target analytes and promising applicability to complex sample matrix, which makes the proposed assay protocol an attractive route for screening of small molecules in clinical diagnosis.

  7. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Peyressatre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported.

  8. Recent Developments in β-Cell Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced by Small and Large Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suresh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs, hold promise as novel therapeutic tools for diabetes treatment because of their self-renewal capacity and ability to differentiate into beta (β-cells. Small and large molecules play important roles in each stage of β-cell differentiation from both hESCs and hiPSCs. The small and large molecules that are described in this review have significantly advanced efforts to cure diabetic disease. Lately, effective protocols have been implemented to induce hESCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs to differentiate into functional β-cells. Several small molecules, proteins, and growth factors promote pancreatic differentiation from hESCs and hMSCs. These small molecules (e.g., cyclopamine, wortmannin, retinoic acid, and sodium butyrate and large molecules (e.g. activin A, betacellulin, bone morphogentic protein (BMP4, epidermal growth factor (EGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, noggin, transforming growth factor (TGF-α, and WNT3A are thought to contribute from the initial stages of definitive endoderm formation to the final stages of maturation of functional endocrine cells. We discuss the importance of such small and large molecules in uniquely optimized protocols of β-cell differentiation from stem cells. A global understanding of various small and large molecules and their functions will help to establish an efficient protocol for β-cell differentiation.

  9. Identification of ATP synthase beta subunit (ATPB) on the cell surface as a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) associated antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibody-based immuneotherapy has achieved some success for cancer. But the main problem is that only a few tumor-associated antigens or therapeutic targets have been known to us so far. It is essential to identify more immunogenic antigens (especially cellular membrane markers) for tumor diagnosis and therapy. The membrane proteins of lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 were used to immunize the BALB/c mice. A monoclonal antibody 4E7 (McAb4E7) was produced with hybridoma technique. MTT cell proliferation assay was carried out to evaluate the inhibitory effect of McAb4E7 on A549 cells. Flow cytometric assay, immunohistochemistry, western blot and proteomic technologies based on 2-DE and mass spectrometry were employed to detect and identify the corresponding antigen of McAb4E7. The monoclonal antibody 4E7 (McAb4E7) specific against A549 cells was produced, which exhibited inhibitory effect on the proliferation of A549 cells. By the proteomic technologies, we identified that ATP synthase beta subunit (ATPB) was the corresponding antigen of McAb4E7. Then, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the localization of the targeting antigen of McAb4E7 was on the A549 cells surface. Furthermore, immunohistochemstry showed that the antigen of McAb4E7 mainly aberrantly expressed in tumor cellular membrane in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but not in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The rate of ectopic expressed ATPB in the cellular membrane in lung adenocarcinoma, squamous carcinoma and their adjacent nontumourous lung tissues was 71.88%, 66.67% and 25.81% respectively. In the present study, we identified that the ectopic ATPB in tumor cellular membrane was the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) associated antigen. ATPB may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for the immunotherapy of NSCLC

  10. A Comprehensive Insight into the Chemical Space and ADME Features of Small Molecule NS5A Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Veselov, Mark S; Shakhbazyan, Artem G; Aladinskiy, Vladimir A; Aladinskaya, Anastasia V; Yartseva, Sofya M; Majouga, Alexander G; Vantskul, Anton S; Leonov, Sergey V; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2016-01-01

    Non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein plays a crucial role in the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and during the past decade has attracted increasing attention as a promising biological target for the treatment of viral infections and related disorders. Small-molecule NS5A inhibitors have shown significant antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo. Several lead molecules are reasonably regarded as novel highly potent drug candidates with favorable ADME features and tolerable side effects. The first-in-class daclatasvir has recently been launched into the market and 14 novel molecules are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. From this perspective, we provide an overview of the available chemical space of small-molecule NS5A inhibitors and their PK properties, mainly focusing on the diversity in structure and scaffold representation. PMID:26585933

  11. OCS in small para-hydrogen clusters: energetics and structure with N=1-8 complexed hydrogen molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Paesani, F; Whaley, K B

    2003-01-01

    We determine the structure and energetics of complexes of the linear OCS molecule with small numbers of para-hydrogen molecules, N=1-8, using zero temperature quantum Monte Carlo methods. Ground state calculations are carried out with importance-sampled rigid body diffusion Monte Carlo (IS-RBDMC) and excited state calculations with the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution (POITSE) methodology. The ground states are found to be highly structured, with a gradual build up of two axial rings as N increases to 8. Analysis of the azimuthal density correlations around the OCS molecule shows that these rings are quite delocalized for small N values, but become strongly localized for N \\geq 5 . Excited state calculations are made for a range of total cluster angular momentum values and the rotational energy levels fitted to obtain effective rotational and distortion constants of the complexed OCS molecule as a function of cluster size N. Detailed analysis of these spectroscopic constants indicates tha...

  12. In silico mechanistic profiling to probe small molecule binding to sulfotransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Y Martiny

    Full Text Available Drug metabolizing enzymes play a key role in the metabolism, elimination and detoxification of xenobiotics, drugs and endogenous molecules. While their principal role is to detoxify organisms by modifying compounds, such as pollutants or drugs, for a rapid excretion, in some cases they render their substrates more toxic thereby inducing severe side effects and adverse drug reactions, or their inhibition can lead to drug-drug interactions. We focus on sulfotransferases (SULTs, a family of phase II metabolizing enzymes, acting on a large number of drugs and hormones and showing important structural flexibility. Here we report a novel in silico structure-based approach to probe ligand binding to SULTs. We explored the flexibility of SULTs by molecular dynamics (MD simulations in order to identify the most suitable multiple receptor conformations for ligand binding prediction. Then, we employed structure-based docking-scoring approach to predict ligand binding and finally we combined the predicted interaction energies by using a QSAR methodology. The results showed that our protocol successfully prioritizes potent binders for the studied here SULT1 isoforms, and give new insights on specific molecular mechanisms for diverse ligands' binding related to their binding sites plasticity. Our best QSAR models, introducing predicted protein-ligand interaction energy by using docking, showed accuracy of 67.28%, 78.00% and 75.46%, for the isoforms SULT1A1, SULT1A3 and SULT1E1, respectively. To the best of our knowledge our protocol is the first in silico structure-based approach consisting of a protein-ligand interaction analysis at atomic level that considers both ligand and enzyme flexibility, along with a QSAR approach, to identify small molecules that can interact with II phase dug metabolizing enzymes.

  13. A small synthetic molecule functions as a chloride-bicarbonate dual-transporter and induces chloride secretion in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-Yun; Li, Shing-To; Shen, Fang-Fang; Ko, Wing-Hung; Yao, Xiao-Qiang; Yang, Dan

    2016-05-31

    A C2 symmetric small molecule composed of l-phenylalanine and isophthalamide was found to function as a Cl(-)/HCO3(-) dual transporter and self-assemble into chloride channels. In Ussing-chamber based short-circuit current measurements, this molecule elicited chloride-dependent short-circuit current (Isc) increase in both Calu-3 cell and CFBE41o-cell (with F508del mutant CFTR) monolayers. PMID:27188496

  14. Small molecule inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase suppresses t cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telang Sucheta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell activation is associated with a rapid increase in intracellular fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP, an allosteric activator of the glycolytic enzyme, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. The steady state concentration of F2,6BP in T cells is dependent on the expression of the bifunctional 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatases (PFKFB1-4 and the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, TIGAR. Of the PFKFB family of enzymes, PFKFB3 has the highest kinase:bisphosphatase ratio and has been demonstrated to be required for T cell proliferation. A small molecule antagonist of PFKFB3, 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3PO, recently has been shown to reduce F2,6BP synthesis, glucose uptake and proliferation in transformed cells. We hypothesized that the induction of PFKFB3 expression may be required for the stimulation of glycolysis in T cells and that exposure to the PFKFB3 antagonist, 3PO, would suppress T cell activation. Methods We examined PFKFB1-4 and TIGAR expression and F2,6BP concentration in purified CD3+ T cells stimulated with microbead-conjugated agonist antibodies specific for CD3 and the co-stimulatory receptor, CD28. We then determined the effect of 3PO on anti-CD3/anti-CD28-induced T cell activation, F2,6BP synthesis, 2-[1-14C]-deoxy-d-glucose uptake, lactate secretion, TNF-α secretion and proliferation. Finally, we examined the effect of 3PO administration on the development of delayed type hypersensitivity to methylated BSA and on imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice. Results We found that purified human CD3+ T cells express PFKFB2, PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and TIGAR, and that anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated microbeads stimulated a >20-fold increase in F2,6BP with a coincident increase in protein expression of the PFKFB3 family member and a decrease in TIGAR protein expression. We then found that exposure to the PFKFB3 small molecule antagonist, 3PO (1–10 μM, markedly attenuated the stimulation of F2,6BP

  15. Multi-Functional Diarylurea Small Molecule Inhibitors of TRPV1 with Therapeutic Potential for Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiwei; Pearce, Larry V; Zhang, Yu; Xing, Changrui; Herold, Brienna K A; Ma, Shifan; Hu, Ziheng; Turcios, Noe A; Yang, Peng; Tong, Qin; McCall, Anna K; Blumberg, Peter M; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), a heat-sensitive calcium channel protein, contributes to inflammation as well as to acute and persistent pain. Since TRPV1 occupies a central position in pathways of neuronal inflammatory signaling, it represents a highly attractive potential therapeutic target for neuroinflammation. In the present work, we have in silico identified a series of diarylurea analogues for hTRPV1, of which 11 compounds showed activity in the nanomolar to micromolar range as validated by in vitro biological assays. Then, we utilized molecular docking to explore the detailed interactions between TRPV1 and the compounds to understand the contributions of the different substituent groups. Tyr511, Leu518, Leu547, Thr550, Asn551, Arg557, and Leu670 were important for the recognition of the small molecules by TRPV1. A hydrophobic group in R2 or a polar/hydrophilic group in R1 contributed significantly to the activities of the antagonists at TRPV1. In addition, the subtle different binding pose of meta-chloro in place of para-fluoro in the R2 group converted antagonism into partial agonism, as was predicted by our short-term molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and validated by bioassay. Importantly, compound 15, one of our best TRPV1 inhibitors, also showed potential binding affinity (1.39 μM) at cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), which is another attractive target for immuno-inflammation diseases. Furthermore, compound 1 and its diarylurea analogues were predicted to target the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), although bioassay validation of CXCR2 with these compounds still needs to be performed. This prediction from the modeling is of interest, since CXCR2 is also a potential therapeutic target for chronic inflammatory diseases. Our findings provide novel strategies to develop a small molecule inhibitor to simultaneously target two or more inflammation-related proteins for the treatment of a wide range of inflammatory disorders including

  16. Small molecule inhibitors of PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions as novel analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Ashpole, Nicole M; Hudmon, Andy; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Thakur, Ganesh A; Lai, Yvonne Y; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant increases in NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling contributes to central nervous system sensitization and chronic pain by activating neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and generating nitric oxide (NO). Because the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDA (PSD95) tethers nNOS to NMDARs, the PSD95-nNOS complex represents a therapeutic target. Small molecule inhibitors IC87201 (EC5O: 23.94 μM) and ZL006 (EC50: 12.88 μM) directly inhibited binding of purified PSD95 and nNOS proteins in AlphaScreen without altering binding of PSD95 to ErbB4. Both PSD95-nNOS inhibitors suppressed glutamate-induced cell death with efficacy comparable to MK-801. IC87201 and ZL006 preferentially suppressed phase 2A pain behavior in the formalin test and suppressed allodynia induced by intraplantar complete Freund's adjuvant administration. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed mechanical and cold allodynia induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (ED50s: 2.47 and 0.93 mg/kg i.p. for IC87201 and ZL006, respectively). Efficacy of PSD95-nNOS disruptors was similar to MK-801. Motor ataxic effects were induced by MK-801 but not by ZL006 or IC87201. Finally, MK-801 produced hyperalgesia in the tail-flick test whereas IC87201 and ZL006 did not alter basal nociceptive thresholds. Our studies establish the utility of using AlphaScreen and purified protein pairs to establish and quantify disruption of protein-protein interactions. Our results demonstrate previously unrecognized antinociceptive efficacy of ZL006 and establish, using two small molecules, a broad application for PSD95-nNOS inhibitors in treating neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Collectively, our results demonstrate that disrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions is effective in attenuating pathological pain without producing unwanted side effects (i.e. motor ataxia) associated with NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26071110

  17. Two Strategies for the Development of Mitochondrion-Targeted Small Molecule Radiation Damage Mitigators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation of acute ionizing radiation damage by mitochondrion-targeted small molecules. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the ability of nitroxide-linked alkene peptide isostere JP4-039, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor-linked alkene peptide esostere MCF201-89, and the p53/mdm2/mdm4 protein complex inhibitor BEB55 to mitigate radiation effects by clonogenic survival curves with the murine hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 and the human bone marrow stromal (KM101) and pulmonary epithelial (IB3) cell lines. The p53-dependent mechanism of action was tested with p53+/+ and p53-/- murine bone marrow stromal cell lines. C57BL/6 NHsd female mice were injected i.p. with JP4-039, MCF201-89, or BEB55 individually or in combination, after receiving 9.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). Results: Each drug, JP4-039, MCF201-89, or BEB55, individually or as a mixture of all three compounds increased the survival of 32D cl 3 (p = 0.0021, p = 0.0011, p = 0.0038, and p = 0.0073, respectively) and IB3 cells (p = 0.0193, p = 0.0452, p = 0.0017, and p = 0.0019, respectively) significantly relative to that of control irradiated cells. KM101 cells were protected by individual drugs (p = 0.0007, p = 0.0235, p = 0.0044, respectively). JP4-039 and MCF201-89 increased irradiation survival of both p53+/+ (p = 0.0396 and p = 0.0071, respectively) and p53-/- cells (p = 0.0007 and p = 0.0188, respectively), while BEB55 was ineffective with p53-/- cells. Drugs administered individually or as a mixtures of all three after TBI significantly increased mouse survival (p = 0.0234, 0.0009, 0.0052, and 0.0167, respectively). Conclusion: Mitochondrial targeting of small molecule radiation mitigators decreases irradiation-induced cell death in vitro and prolongs survival of lethally irradiated mice.

  18. Cobalt coated substrate for matrix-free analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small molecule analysis is one of the most challenging issues in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. We have developed a cobalt coated substrate as a target for matrix-free analysis of small molecules in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Cobalt coating of 60-70 nm thickness has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. This target facilitates hundreds of samples to be spotted and analyzed without mixing any matrices, in a very short time. This can save a lot of time and money and can be a very practical approach for the analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  19. An enzymatic deconjugation method for the analysis of small molecule active drugs on antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Gu, Christine; Gruenhagen, Jason; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik P; Medley, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex therapeutic agents that use the specific targeting properties of antibodies and the highly potent cytotoxicity of small molecule drugs to selectively eliminate tumor cells while limiting the toxicity to normal healthy tissues. Two critical quality attributes of ADCs are the purity and stability of the active small molecule drug linked to the ADC, but these are difficult to assess once the drug is conjugated to the antibody. In this study, we report a enzyme deconjugation approach to cleave small molecule drugs from ADCs, which allows the drugs to be subsequently characterized by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The model ADC we used in this study utilizes a valine-citrulline linker that is designed to be sensitive to endoproteases after internalization by tumor cells. We screened several proteases to determine the most effective enzyme. Among the 3 cysteine proteases evaluated, papain had the best efficiency in cleaving the small molecule drug from the model ADC. The deconjugation conditions were further optimized to achieve complete cleavage of the small molecule drug. This papain deconjugation approach demonstrated excellent specificity and precision. The purity and stability of the active drug on an ADC drug product was evaluated and the major degradation products of the active drug were identified. The papain deconjugation method was also applied to several other ADCs, with the results suggesting it could be applied generally to ADCs containing a valine-citrulline linker. Our results indicate that the papain deconjugation method is a powerful tool for characterizing the active small molecule drug conjugated to an ADC, and may be useful in ensuring the product quality, efficacy and the safety of ADCs. PMID:26891281

  20. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardama GA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Georgina A Cardama,1 Nazareno Gonzalez,1 Matias Ciarlantini,2 Lucia Gandolfi Donadío,2 María Julieta Comin,2 Daniel F Alonso,1 Pablo Lorenzano Menna,1,* Daniel E Gomez1,*1Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, National University of Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Laboratory of Organic Synthesis, Center of Research and Development in Chemistry, National Institute of Industrial Technology, San Martín, Argentina, *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models.Keywords: GTPases. invasion, Dock180, small molecule