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Sample records for antigen recognition profiles

  1. Antigen presentation profiling reveals recognition of lymphoma immunoglobulin neoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Michael S; Olsson, Niclas; Wagar, Lisa E; Haabeth, Ole A W; Chen, Binbin; Swaminathan, Kavya; Rawson, Keith; Liu, Chih Long; Steiner, David; Lund, Peder; Rao, Samhita; Zhang, Lichao; Marceau, Caleb; Stehr, Henning; Newman, Aaron M; Czerwinski, Debra K; Carlton, Victoria E H; Moorhead, Martin; Faham, Malek; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Carette, Jan; Green, Michael R; Davis, Mark M; Levy, Ronald; Elias, Joshua E; Alizadeh, Ash A

    2017-03-30

    Cancer somatic mutations can generate neoantigens that distinguish malignant from normal cells. However, the personalized identification and validation of neoantigens remains a major challenge. Here we discover neoantigens in human mantle-cell lymphomas by using an integrated genomic and proteomic strategy that interrogates tumour antigen peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules. We applied this approach to systematically characterize MHC ligands from 17 patients. Remarkably, all discovered neoantigenic peptides were exclusively derived from the lymphoma immunoglobulin heavy- or light-chain variable regions. Although we identified MHC presentation of private polymorphic germline alleles, no mutated peptides were recovered from non-immunoglobulin somatically mutated genes. Somatic mutations within the immunoglobulin variable region were almost exclusively presented by MHC class II. We isolated circulating CD4 + T cells specific for immunoglobulin-derived neoantigens and found these cells could mediate killing of autologous lymphoma cells. These results demonstrate that an integrative approach combining MHC isolation, peptide identification, and exome sequencing is an effective platform to uncover tumour neoantigens. Application of this strategy to human lymphoma implicates immunoglobulin neoantigens as targets for lymphoma immunotherapy.

  2. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... recognition utilizing DNA barcode labeled MHC multimers to screen peripheral blood lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy donor samples. Signif-icantly more TAA specific T cell responses were detected in breast cancer patients than healthy donors for both HLA-A*0201 (P

  3. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  4. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans

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    Cunha-Neto E.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  5. Random-Profiles-Based 3D Face Recognition System

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    Joongrock Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a noble nonintrusive three-dimensional (3D face modeling system for random-profile-based 3D face recognition is presented. Although recent two-dimensional (2D face recognition systems can achieve a reliable recognition rate under certain conditions, their performance is limited by internal and external changes, such as illumination and pose variation. To address these issues, 3D face recognition, which uses 3D face data, has recently received much attention. However, the performance of 3D face recognition highly depends on the precision of acquired 3D face data, while also requiring more computational power and storage capacity than 2D face recognition systems. In this paper, we present a developed nonintrusive 3D face modeling system composed of a stereo vision system and an invisible near-infrared line laser, which can be directly applied to profile-based 3D face recognition. We further propose a novel random-profile-based 3D face recognition method that is memory-efficient and pose-invariant. The experimental results demonstrate that the reconstructed 3D face data consists of more than 50 k 3D point clouds and a reliable recognition rate against pose variation.

  6. Function and Dynamics of Tetraspanins during Antigen Recognition and Immunological Synapse Formation

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    Vera eRocha-Perugini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs are specialized membrane platforms driven by protein-protein interactions that integrate membrane receptors and adhesion molecules. Tetraspanins participate in antigen recognition and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs through the organization of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their downstream induced-signaling, as well as the regulation of MHC-II-peptide trafficking. T lymphocyte activation is triggered upon specific recognition of antigens present on the APC surface during immunological synapse (IS formation. This dynamic process is characterized by a defined spatial organization involving the compartmentalization of receptors and adhesion molecules in specialized membrane domains that are connected to the underlying cytoskeleton and signaling molecules. Tetraspanins contribute to the spatial organization and maturation of the IS by controlling receptor clustering and local accumulation of adhesion receptors and integrins, their downstream signaling and linkage to the actin cytoskeleton. This review offers a perspective on the important role of TEMs in the regulation of antigen recognition and presentation, and in the dynamics of IS architectural organization.

  7. Fungal pattern-recognition receptors and tetraspanins: partners on antigen-presenting cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figdor, C.G.; Spriel, A.B. van

    2010-01-01

    Fungal pattern-recognition receptors (F-PRRs), including C-type lectins, Toll-like receptors, scavenger receptors and Fc/complement receptors, are crucial for inducing anti-fungal immune responses by antigen-presenting cells. The recent identification of specific F-PRR interactions with tetraspanins

  8. H-2 restriction: Independent recognition of H-2 and foreign antigen by a single receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliciano, Robert F.; Zacharchuk, Charles M.; Shin, Hyun S.

    1980-01-01

    We describe two situations in which the recognition of hapten can compensate for the lack of recognition of appropriate H-2 gene products in hapten-specific, H-2 restricted, T lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis. First, we show that although recognition of appropriate H-2 gene products is essential for the lysis of target cells bearing a low hapten density, significant hapten-specific lysis of H-2 inappropriate target cells is observed at high levels of target cell derivatization. Secondly, we show that hapten-conjugated anti-H-2 antibody inhibits cytolysis poorly even though its binding to target cell H-2 antigens is equivalent to that of underivatized antibody. These results suggest that hapten and H-2 are recognized independently and are therefore inconsistent with the altered-self model. Although our data do not exclude the dual-recognition model, we prefer to interpret them within the framework of a single-receptor model in which hapten and H-2 are recognized independently by receptors of identical idiotype on the T cell. We postulate that the affinity of these receptors for the relevant H-2 gene product is low enough so that the T cell is not activated by encounters with normal-self cells expressing that H-2 gene product. However, when self cells express in addition a foreign antigen that can also be recognized by the same receptor, then the force of T cell-target cell interaction may be increased sufficiently to activate T cell effector function. PMID:6966404

  9. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells: New Insights into Antigen Recognition and Activation

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    Xingxing Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells, a novel subpopulation of innate-like T cells that express an invariant T cell receptor (TCRα chain and a diverse TCRβ chain, can recognize a distinct set of small molecules, vitamin B metabolites, derived from some bacteria, fungi but not viruses, in the context of an evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex-related molecule 1 (MR1. This implies that MAIT cells may play unique and important roles in host immunity. Although viral antigens are not recognized by this limited TCR repertoire, MAIT cells are known to be activated in a TCR-independent mechanism during some viral infections, such as hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. In this article, we will review recent works in MAIT cell antigen recognition, activation and the role MAIT cells may play in the process of bacterial and viral infections and pathogenesis of non-infectious diseases.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide O-antigen delays plant innate immune recognition of Xylella fastidiosa.

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    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Muszyński, Artur; Figueroa-Balderas, Rosa; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Azadi, Parastoo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Castro, Claudia; Cantu, Dario; Roper, M Caroline

    2018-01-26

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are among the known pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). LPSs are potent elicitors of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI), and bacteria have evolved intricate mechanisms to dampen PTI. Here we demonstrate that Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), a hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic bacterium, possesses a long chain O-antigen that enables it to delay initial plant recognition, thereby allowing it to effectively skirt initial elicitation of innate immunity and establish itself in the host. Lack of the O-antigen modifies plant perception of Xf and enables elicitation of hallmarks of PTI, such as ROS production specifically in the plant xylem tissue compartment, a tissue not traditionally considered a spatial location of PTI. To explore translational applications of our findings, we demonstrate that pre-treatment of plants with Xf LPS primes grapevine defenses to confer tolerance to Xf challenge.

  11. Toxocara canis glycans influence antigen recognition by mouse IgG1 and IgM antibodies.

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    Długosz, Ewa; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The impact of sugar moieties of Toxocara canis glycoprotein antigens on their recognition by infected mouse antibodies was investigated in this study. Native TES and recombinant Toxocara mucins generated in Pichia pastoris yeast as well as their deglycosylated forms were used in ELISA. TES and recombinant mucins were equally recognized by T. canis infected mouse IgG1 antibodies. IgM immunoglobulins predominantly recognized TES antigens. Among mucins recognition of Tc-MUC-4 was the most significant. Deglycosylation of antigens resulted in significant loss of IgM and IgG1 reactivity to TES, mucins, Tc-MUC-3 and Tc-MUC-4. The presence of sugar moieties had no influence on IgE binding to native or recombinant T. canis antigens. Our results suggest that glycans are involved in epitope formation what should be taken into consideration in production of recombinant helminth antigens for diagnostic purposes.

  12. Human antibody recognition of antigenic site IV on Pneumovirus fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Jarrod J; Binshtein, Elad; Human, Stacey; Fong, Rachel H; Alvarado, Gabriela; Doranz, Benjamin J; Moore, Martin L; Ohi, Melanie D; Crowe, James E

    2018-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major human pathogen that infects the majority of children by two years of age. The RSV fusion (F) protein is a primary target of human antibodies, and it has several antigenic regions capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies. Antigenic site IV is preserved in both the pre-fusion and post-fusion conformations of RSV F. Antibodies to antigenic site IV have been described that bind and neutralize both RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). To explore the diversity of binding modes at antigenic site IV, we generated a panel of four new human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and competition-binding suggested the mAbs bind at antigenic site IV. Mutagenesis experiments revealed that binding and neutralization of two mAbs (3M3 and 6F18) depended on arginine (R) residue R429. We discovered two R429-independent mAbs (17E10 and 2N6) at this site that neutralized an RSV R429A mutant strain, and one of these mAbs (17E10) neutralized both RSV and hMPV. To determine the mechanism of cross-reactivity, we performed competition-binding, recombinant protein mutagenesis, peptide binding, and electron microscopy experiments. It was determined that the human cross-reactive mAb 17E10 binds to RSV F with a binding pose similar to 101F, which may be indicative of cross-reactivity with hMPV F. The data presented provide new concepts in RSV immune recognition and vaccine design, as we describe the novel idea that binding pose may influence mAb cross-reactivity between RSV and hMPV. Characterization of the site IV epitope bound by human antibodies may inform the design of a pan-Pneumovirus vaccine.

  13. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  14. Protein array profiling of tic patient sera reveals a broad range and enhanced immune response against Group A Streptococcus antigens.

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    Mauro Bombaci

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS is widely recognized as a major cause of common pharyngitis as well as of severe invasive diseases and non-suppurative sequelae associated with the existence of GAS antigens eliciting host autoantibodies. It has been proposed that a subset of paediatric disorders characterized by tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms would exacerbate in association with relapses of GAS-associated pharyngitis. This hypothesis is however still controversial. In the attempt to shed light on the contribution of GAS infections to the onset of neuropsychiatric or behavioral disorders affecting as many as 3% of children and adolescents, we tested the antibody response of tic patient sera to a representative panel of GAS antigens. In particular, 102 recombinant proteins were spotted on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides and probed against 61 sera collected from young patients with typical tic neuropsychiatric symptoms but with no overt GAS infection. Sera from 35 children with neither tic disorder nor overt GAS infection were also analyzed. The protein recognition patterns of these two sera groups were compared with those obtained using 239 sera from children with GAS-associated pharyngitis. This comparative analysis identified 25 antigens recognized by sera of the three patient groups and 21 antigens recognized by tic and pharyngitis sera, but poorly or not recognized by sera from children without tic. Interestingly, these antigens appeared to be, in quantitative terms, more immunogenic in tic than in pharyngitis patients. Additionally, a third group of antigens appeared to be preferentially and specifically recognized by tic sera. These findings provide the first evidence that tic patient sera exhibit immunological profiles typical of individuals who elicited a broad, specific and strong immune response against GAS. This may be relevant in the context of one of the hypothesis proposing that GAS

  15. Heat shock protein-90 inhibitors enhance antigen expression on melanomas and increase T cell recognition of tumor cells.

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    Timothy J Haggerty

    Full Text Available In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90 share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer.

  16. Leishmania-specific surface antigens show sub-genus sequence variation and immune recognition.

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    Daniel P Depledge

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A family of hydrophilic acylated surface (HASP proteins, containing extensive and variant amino acid repeats, is expressed at the plasma membrane in infective extracellular (metacyclic and intracellular (amastigote stages of Old World Leishmania species. While HASPs are antigenic in the host and can induce protective immune responses, the biological functions of these Leishmania-specific proteins remain unresolved. Previous genome analysis has suggested that parasites of the sub-genus Leishmania (Viannia have lost HASP genes from their genomes.We have used molecular and cellular methods to analyse HASP expression in New World Leishmania mexicana complex species and show that, unlike in L. major, these proteins are expressed predominantly following differentiation into amastigotes within macrophages. Further genome analysis has revealed that the L. (Viannia species, L. (V. braziliensis, does express HASP-like proteins of low amino acid similarity but with similar biochemical characteristics, from genes present on a region of chromosome 23 that is syntenic with the HASP/SHERP locus in Old World Leishmania species and the L. (L. mexicana complex. A related gene is also present in Leptomonas seymouri and this may represent the ancestral copy of these Leishmania-genus specific sequences. The L. braziliensis HASP-like proteins (named the orthologous (o HASPs are predominantly expressed on the plasma membrane in amastigotes and are recognised by immune sera taken from 4 out of 6 leishmaniasis patients tested in an endemic region of Brazil. Analysis of the repetitive domains of the oHASPs has shown considerable genetic variation in parasite isolates taken from the same patients, suggesting that antigenic change may play a role in immune recognition of this protein family.These findings confirm that antigenic hydrophilic acylated proteins are expressed from genes in the same chromosomal region in species across the genus Leishmania. These proteins are

  17. Association of Pneumococcal Protein Antigen Serology With Age and Antigenic Profile of Colonizing Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Grant, Lindsay R; Georgieva, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Reid, Raymond; Bentley, Stephen D; Goldblatt, David; Santosham, Mathuran; Weatherholtz, Robert; Burbidge, Paula; Goklish, Novalene; Thompson, Claudette M; Hanage, William P; O'Brien, Kate L; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Several Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins play a role in pathogenesis and are being investigated as vaccine targets. It is largely unknown whether naturally acquired antibodies reduce the risk of colonization with strains expressing a particular antigenic variant. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers to 28 pneumococcal protein antigens were measured among 242 individuals aged - 30 days after serum collection, and the antigen variant in each pneumococcal isolate was determined using genomic data. We assessed the association between preexisting variant-specific antibody titers and subsequent carriage of pneumococcus expressing a particular antigen variant. Antibody titers often increased across pediatric groups before decreasing among adults. Individuals with low titers against group 3 pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) variants were more likely to be colonized with pneumococci expressing those variants. For other antigens, variant-specific IgG titers do not predict colonization. We observed an inverse association between variant-specific antibody concentration and homologous pneumococcal colonization for only 1 protein. Further assessment of antibody repertoires may elucidate the nature of antipneumococcal antibody-mediated mucosal immunity while informing vaccine development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Atomic resolution structural characterization of recognition of histo-blood group antigens by Norwalk virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-Mun; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor)

    2008-07-28

    Members of Norovirus, a genus in the family Caliciviridae, are causative agents of epidemic diarrhea in humans. Susceptibility to several noroviruses is linked to human histo-blood type, and its determinant histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are regarded as receptors for these viruses. Specificity for these carbohydrates is strain-dependent. Norwalk virus (NV) is the prototype genogroup I norovirus that specifically recognizes A- and H-type HBGA, in contrast to genogroup II noroviruses that exhibit a more diverse HBGA binding pattern. To understand the structural basis for how HBGAs interact with the NV capsid protein, and how the specificity is achieved, we carried out x-ray crystallographic analysis of the capsid protein domain by itself and in complex with A- and H-type HBGA at a resolution of {approx}1.4 {angstrom}. Despite differences in their carbohydrate sequence and linkage, both HBGAs bind to the same surface-exposed site in the capsid protein and project outward from the capsid surface, substantiating their possible role in initiating cell attachment. Precisely juxtaposed polar side chains that engage the sugar hydroxyls in a cooperative hydrogen bonding and a His/Trp pair involved in a cation-p interaction contribute to selective and specific recognition of A- and H-type HBGAs. This unique binding epitope, confirmed by mutational analysis, is highly conserved, but only in the genogroup I noroviruses, suggesting that a mechanism by which noroviruses infect broader human populations is by evolving different sites with altered HBGA specificities.

  19. Epidemiologic and HLA Antigen Profile in Patients with Aplastic Anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, M.; Shamsi, T. S.; Ansari, S. H.; Farzana, T.; Nazi, A.; Nadeem, M.; Queresi, R. N.; Sheikh, K.; Kazmi, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze patients suffering from aplastic anemia (AA, peripheral pancytopenia and hypocellular bone marrow in the absence of dysplasia, infiltration and fibrosis) for documenting patient's baseline characteristics and association with various human leucocyte antigens. Study Design: An observational, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The National Institute of Blood Disease (NIBD), Karachi, from March 2003 to August 2008. Methodology: All consecutive patients with confirmed diagnosis of AA were evaluated. Data included the baseline characteristics, complete blood counts (CBC), bone marrow biopsy findings, severity of disease, exposure to drugs or chemicals, viral serology and their HLA expression. The data was analyzed on SPSS programme and frequencies were documented. Results: Among 318 patients, there were 236 (74.21%) males and 82 (25.78%) females. Median age was 16 and 70% belonged to urban population. Drug exposure could be established in 23 (7.23%) of cases, while 4 (1.25%) were HBV surface antigen positive and 7 (2.2%) were HCV antibodies positive. In all, 73 (22.9%) had very severe AA, 195 (61.32%) had severe AA while 50 (15.7%) cases had non-severe AA. HLA B5 (52) showed high expression in 83 patients (26%) in comparison to 5.9% reported in healthy population. Conclusion: AA was found to affect young adult males living in urban areas. HLA B5 (52) showed higher expression in patients with aplastic anemia. (author)

  20. Naive T lymphocytes traffic to inflamed central nervous system, but require antigen recognition for activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakowski, M L; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Organ-specific autoimmune diseases may be induced by infiltration of the target tissue by CD4(+) T cells with specificity for self antigen(s). As disease progresses, T cells of other specificities appear in the tissue. Traffic of naive, antigen-inexperienced T cells to target tissues has not been...

  1. Bone marrow-derived thymic antigen-presenting cells determine self-recognition of Ia-restricted T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, D.L.; Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors previously have demonstrated that in radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, T-cell self-Ia restriction specificity appeared to correlate with the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting (or dendritic) cell in the thymus during T-cell development. However, these correlations were necessarily indirect because of the difficulty in assaying thymic function directly by adult thymus transplant, which has in the past been uniformly unsuccessful. They now report success in obtaining functional T cells from nude mice grafted with adult thymuses reduced in size by treatment of the thymus donor with anti-thymocyte globulin and cortisone. When (B10 Scn X B10.D2)F1 nude mice (I-Ab,d) are given parental B10.D2 (I-Ad) thymus grafts subcutaneously, their T cells are restricted to antigen recognition in association with I-Ad gene products but not I-Ab gene products. Furthermore, thymuses from (B10 X B10.D2)F1 (I-Ab,d)----B10 (I-Ab) chimeras transplanted 6 months or longer after radiation (a time at which antigen-presenting cell function is of donor bone marrow phenotype) into (B10 X B10.D2)F1 nude mice generate T cells restricted to antigen recognition in association with both I-Ad and I-Ab gene products. Thymuses from totally allogeneic bone marrow chimeras appear to generate T cells of bone marrow donor and thymic host restriction specificity. Thus, when thymus donors are radiation-induced bone marrow chimeras, the T-cell I-region restriction of the nude mice recipients is determined at least in part by the phenotype of the bone marrow-derived thymic antigen presenting cells or dendritic cells in the chimeric thymus

  2. Analysis of human leukocyte antigen genotypes in pemphigus with antidesmoglein antibody profile shift

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    Seiko Mitsui

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In particular pemphigus cases, the phenotypic transition between pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is observed with the change of antibody profile between anti-desmoglein (Dsg 3 antibodies and anti-Dsg1 antibodies. In this study, we examined human leukocyte antigen (HLA genotypes of four pemphigus patients who presented with the phenotypic transition and/or antibody profile shift. Two out of four patients possessed a DRB1*0405-DQB1*0401, and two out of four patients possessed a DRB1*1405-DQB1*0503. These alleles might be associated with the development of phenotypic transition and antibody profile shift.

  3. Profile of sequential determinants in tissue polypeptide antigen BrCN:B fragment.

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    Chersi, A; Camera, M; Trinca, M L; Castelli, M

    1989-02-15

    A synthetic approach has been applied to determine the profile of sequential determinants of one immunodominant region of Tissue Polypeptide Antigen (TPA). Five overlapping peptides, covering 30 of the 32 amino acid residues of this fragment, were chemically synthesized, and their antibody-binding activities for rabbit anti-TPA antibodies determined by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbant assays. Anti-TPA reacted with two overlapping fragments at the COOH-terminal end of the fragment, but not with peptides that include Arg 15 considered as essential for the antigenicity of the whole fragment. This might suggest that this critical residue is involved in the formation of a complex conformational determinant.

  4. RNA Sequencing of Murine Norovirus-Infected Cells Reveals Transcriptional Alteration of Genes Important to Viral Recognition and Antigen Presentation

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    Daniel Enosi Tuipulotu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses inherently exploit normal cellular functions to promote replication and survival. One mechanism involves transcriptional control of the host, and knowledge of the genes modified and their molecular function can aid in understanding viral-host interactions. Norovirus pathogenesis, despite the recent advances in cell cultivation, remains largely uncharacterized. Several studies have utilized the related murine norovirus (MNV to identify innate response, antigen presentation, and cellular recognition components that are activated during infection. In this study, we have used next-generation sequencing to probe the transcriptomic changes of MNV-infected mouse macrophages. Our in-depth analysis has revealed that MNV is a potent stimulator of the innate response including genes involved in interferon and cytokine production pathways. We observed that genes involved in viral recognition, namely IFIH1, DDX58, and DHX58 were significantly upregulated with infection, whereas we observed significant downregulation of cytokine receptors (Il17rc, Il1rl1, Cxcr3, and Cxcr5 and TLR7. Furthermore, we identified that pathways involved in protein degradation (including genes Psmb3, Psmb4, Psmb5, Psmb9, and Psme2, antigen presentation, and lymphocyte activation are downregulated by MNV infection. Thus, our findings illustrate that MNV induces perturbations in the innate immune transcriptome, particularly in MHC maturation and viral recognition that can contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  5. Antigenic profiling of Yersinia pestis infection in the Wyoming coyote (Canis latrans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernati, G.; Edwards, W.H.; Rocke, T.E.; Little, S.F.; Andrews, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Although Yersinia pestis is classified as a "high-virulence" pathogen, some host species are variably susceptible to disease. Coyotes (Canis latrans) exhibit mild, if any, symptoms during infection, but antibody production occurs postinfection. This immune response has been reported to be against the F1 capsule, although little subsequent characterization has been conducted. To further define the nature of coyote humoral immunity to plague, qualitative serology was conducted to assess the antiplague antibody repertoire. Humoral responses to six plasmid-encoded Y. pestis virulence factors were first examined. Of 20 individual immune coyotes, 90% were reactive to at least one other antigen in the panel other than F1. The frequency of reactivity to low calcium response plasmid (pLcr)-encoded Yersinia protein kinase A (YpkA) and Yersinia outer protein D (YopD) was significantly greater than that previously observed in a murine model for plague. Additionally, both V antigen and plasminogen activator were reactive with over half of the serum samples tested. Reactivity to F1 was markedly less frequent in coyotes (35%). Twenty previously tested antibody-negative samples were also examined. While the majority were negative across the panel, 15% were positive for 1-3 non-F1 antigens. In vivo-induced antigen technology employed to identify novel chromosomal genes of Y. pestis that are up-regulated during infection resulted in the identification of five proteins, including a flagellar component (FliP) that was uniquely reactive with the coyote serum compared with immune serum from two other host species. Collectively, these data suggest that humoral immunity to pLcr-encoded antigens and the pesticin plasmid (pPst)-encoded Pla antigen may be relevant to plague resistance in coyotes. The serologic profile of Y. pestis chromosomal antigens up-regulated in vivo specific to C. latrans may provide insight into the differences in the pathogen-host responses during Y. pestis infection.

  6. Protein and Antigenic Profile among Mycoplasma bovis Field Strains Isolated in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maid Rifatbegović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma bovis is a serious, worldwide-spread but often overlooked pathogen causing respiratory disease, mastitis, and arthritis in cattle. In this study we characterize the protein and antigenic profiles of M. bovis field strains isolated in Bosnia and Herzegovina by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, and analyze possible variations among these strains. Greater differences occurred when comparing field strains with the reference strain PG45. One field strain isolated from lung samples of a heifer was markedly different from strains isolated from nasal swabs taken from cattle raised in another geographic region. A possible correlation may exist between protein and antigen profiles of M. bovis field strains, geographic regions and anatomical sites of isolation.

  7. Differential recognition and hydrolysis of host carbohydrate antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae family 98 glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Melanie A; Whitworth, Garrett E; El Warry, Nahida; Randriantsoa, Mialy; Samain, Eric; Burke, Robert D; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2009-09-18

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-beta-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-beta-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  8. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  9. Recognition of Leishmania antigens by T lymphocytes from nonexposed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hansen, M B; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    than 1:10,000 and varied considerably between individuals. Depletion of CD45R0-positive (memory) cells from the PBMC abolished proliferative responses induced by Leishmania antigen and by tetanus toxoid. In cell populations depleted of CD45RA-positive (naive) cells, only a small reduction in response...

  10. Structural characteristics of an antigen required for its interaction with Ia and recognition by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1987-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the residues within an immunogenic peptide that endow it with the capacity to interact with Ia and to be recognized by T cells is presented. Ia interacts with only a few of the peptide residues and overall exhibits a very broad specificity. Some residues appear to interact...... both with Ia and with T cells, leading to a model in which a peptide antigen is 'sandwiched' between Ia and the T-cell receptor....

  11. Rationalization and Design of the Complementarity Determining Region Sequences in an Antibody-Antigen Recognition Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jun-Bo; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Chang, Hung-Ju; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Huang, Kai-Fa; Ma, Alex Che; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical determinants in biological systems. Engineered proteins binding to specific areas on protein surfaces could lead to therapeutics or diagnostics for treating diseases in humans. But designing epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains a difficult challenge. Here we show that, with the antibody-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) interaction as a model system, the experimentally observed amino acid preferences in the antibody-antigen interface can be rationalized with 3-dimensional distributions of interacting atoms derived from the database of protein structures. Machine learning models established on the rationalization can be generalized to design amino acid preferences in antibody-antigen interfaces, for which the experimental validations are tractable with current high throughput synthetic antibody display technologies. Leave-one-out cross validation on the benchmark system yielded the accuracy, precision, recall (sensitivity) and specificity of the overall binary predictions to be 0.69, 0.45, 0.63, and 0.71 respectively, and the overall Matthews correlation coefficient of the 20 amino acid types in the 24 interface CDR positions was 0.312. The structure-based computational antibody design methodology was further tested with other antibodies binding to VEGF. The results indicate that the methodology could provide alternatives to the current antibody technologies based on animal immune systems in engineering therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies against predetermined antigen epitopes. PMID:22457753

  12. Carcinoembryonic antigen family receptor recognition by gonococcal Opa proteins requires distinct combinations of hypervariable Opa protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Martine P; Kao, David; Hogan, Daniel M; Grant, Christopher C R; Belland, Robert J

    2002-04-01

    Neisserial Opa proteins function as a family of adhesins that bind heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) or carcinoembryonic antigen family (CEACAM) receptors on human host cells. In order to define the CEACAM binding domain on Opa proteins, we tested the binding properties of a series of gonococcal (strain MS11) recombinants producing mutant and chimeric Opa proteins with alterations in one or more of the four surface-exposed loops. Mutagenesis demonstrated that the semivariable domain, present in the first loop, was completely dispensable for CEACAM binding. In contrast, the two hypervariable (HV) regions present in the second and third loops were essential for binding; deletion of either domain resulted in loss of receptor recognition. Deletion of the fourth loop resulted in a severe decrease in Opa expression at the cell surface and could therefore not be tested for CEACAM binding. Chimeric Opa variants, containing combinations of HV regions derived from different CEACAM binding Opa proteins, lost most of their receptor binding activity. Some chimeric variants gained HSPG binding activity. Together, our results indicate that full recognition of CEACAM receptors by Opa proteins requires a highly coordinate interplay between both HV regions. Furthermore, shuffling of HV regions may result in novel HSPG receptor binding activity.

  13. Oncolytic viruses sensitize human tumor cells for NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen recognition by CD4+ effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Tiphaine; Violland, Mathilde; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Dutoit, Soizic; Vignard, Virginie; Münz, Christian; Gannage, Monique; Dréno, Brigitte; Vaivode, Kristine; Pjanova, Dace; Labarrière, Nathalie; Wang, Yaohe; Chiocca, E Antonio; Boeuf, Fabrice Le; Bell, John C; Erbs, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2018-01-01

    Oncolytic immunotherapy using oncolytic viruses (OV) has been shown to stimulate the antitumor immune response by inducing the release of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and danger signals from the dying infected tumor cells. In this study, we sought to determine if the lysis of tumor cells induced by different OV: measles virus, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, herpes simplex type I virus, adenovirus or enterovirus, has consequences on the capacity of tumor cells to present TAA, such as NY-ESO-1. We show that the co-culture of NY-ESO-1 neg /HLA-DP4 pos melanoma cells with NY-ESO-1 pos /HLA-DP4 neg melanoma cells infected and killed by different OV induces an intercellular transfer of NY-ESO-1 that allows the recognition of NY-ESO-1 neg /HLA-DP4 pos tumor cells by an HLA-DP4/NY-ESO-1 (157-170) -specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cell clone, NY67. We then confirmed this result in a second model with an HLA-DP4+ melanoma cell line that expresses a low amount of NY-ESO-1. Recognition of this cell line by the NY67 clone is largely increased in the presence of OV productive infection. Altogether, our results show for the first time another mechanism of stimulation of the anti-tumor immune response by OV, via the loading of tumor cells with TAA that sensitizes them for direct recognition by specific effector CD4+ T cells, supporting the use of OV for cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Application of nonnegative matrix factorization to improve profile-profile alignment features for fold recognition and remote homolog detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo-Young

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF is a feature extraction method that has the property of intuitive part-based representation of the original features. This unique ability makes NMF a potentially promising method for biological sequence analysis. Here, we apply NMF to fold recognition and remote homolog detection problems. Recent studies have shown that combining support vector machines (SVM with profile-profile alignments improves performance of fold recognition and remote homolog detection remarkably. However, it is not clear which parts of sequences are essential for the performance improvement. Results The performance of fold recognition and remote homolog detection using NMF features is compared to that of the unmodified profile-profile alignment (PPA features by estimating Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC scores. The overall performance is noticeably improved. For fold recognition at the fold level, SVM with NMF features recognize 30% of homolog proteins at > 0.99 ROC scores, while original PPA feature, HHsearch, and PSI-BLAST recognize almost none. For detecting remote homologs that are related at the superfamily level, NMF features also achieve higher performance than the original PPA features. At > 0.90 ROC50 scores, 25% of proteins with NMF features correctly detects remotely related proteins, whereas using original PPA features only 1% of proteins detect remote homologs. In addition, we investigate the effect of number of positive training examples and the number of basis vectors on performance improvement. We also analyze the ability of NMF to extract essential features by comparing NMF basis vectors with functionally important sites and structurally conserved regions of proteins. The results show that NMF basis vectors have significant overlap with functional sites from PROSITE and with structurally conserved regions from the multiple structural alignments generated by MUSTANG. The correlation between

  15. Structural basis of antigen recognition: crystal structure of duck egg lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, David Brent; Schofield, Peter; Jackson, Jenny; Zeraati, Mahdi; Maltby, David; Christie, Mary; Burnett, Deborah; Brink, Robert; Goodnow, Christopher; Christ, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Duck egg lysozyme (DEL) is a widely used model antigen owing to its capacity to bind with differential affinity to anti-chicken egg lysozyme antibodies. However, no structures of DEL have so far been reported, and the situation had been complicated by the presence of multiple isoforms and conflicting reports of primary sequence. Here, the structures of two DEL isoforms from the eggs of the commonly used Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos) are reported. Using structural analyses in combination with mass spectrometry, non-ambiguous DEL primary sequences are reported. Furthermore, the structures and sequences determined here enable rationalization of the binding affinity of DEL for well documented landmark anti-lysozyme antibodies. PMID:29095163

  16. Dynamic Gesture Recognition with a Terahertz Radar Based on Range Profile Sequences and Doppler Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Cao, Zongjie; Pi, Yiming

    2017-12-21

    The frequency of terahertz radar ranges from 0.1 THz to 10 THz, which is higher than that of microwaves. Multi-modal signals, including high-resolution range profile (HRRP) and Doppler signatures, can be acquired by the terahertz radar system. These two kinds of information are commonly used in automatic target recognition; however, dynamic gesture recognition is rarely discussed in the terahertz regime. In this paper, a dynamic gesture recognition system using a terahertz radar is proposed, based on multi-modal signals. The HRRP sequences and Doppler signatures were first achieved from the radar echoes. Considering the electromagnetic scattering characteristics, a feature extraction model is designed using location parameter estimation of scattering centers. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) extended to multi-modal signals is used to accomplish the classifications. Ten types of gesture signals, collected from a terahertz radar, are applied to validate the analysis and the recognition system. The results of the experiment indicate that the recognition rate reaches more than 91%. This research verifies the potential applications of dynamic gesture recognition using a terahertz radar.

  17. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriti Tyagi

    Full Text Available The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites.Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively.Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1 showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3 showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1 utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite.Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host.

  18. Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I shall examine the cognitive, heuristic and theoretical functions of the concept of recognition. To evaluate both the explanatory power and the limitations of a sociological concept, the theory construction must be analysed and its actual productivity for sociological theory must...... be evaluated. In the first section, I will introduce the concept of recognition as a travelling concept playing a role both on the intellectual stage and in real life. In the second section, I will concentrate on the presentation of Honneth’s theory of recognition, emphasizing the construction of the concept...... and its explanatory power. Finally, I will discuss Honneth’s concept in relation to the critique that has been raised, addressing the debate between Honneth and Fraser. In a short conclusion, I will return to the question of the explanatory power of the concept of recognition....

  19. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition.

  20. Recognition of HLA class II molecules by antipeptide antibodies elicited by synthetic peptides selected from regions of HLA-DP antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Houghten, R A; Morganti, M C; Muratti, E

    1987-01-01

    Repeated immunizations of rabbits with chemically synthesized peptides from selected regions of HLA-DP histocompatibility antigens resulted in the production of specific antibodies that were then isolated from the immune sera by chromatography on Sepharose-peptide immunoadsorbents. The purified antibodies, when tested with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specifically bound to the inciting fragments; moreover, two of them recognized glycoproteins extracted by nonionic detergents from human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, as revealed by binding assays. The results suggest that amino acid stretches 51-61 of the alpha chain and 80-90 of the beta chain of HLA-DP histocompatibility antigens are likely exposed on the surface of the protein molecule. The specific recognition of DP regions is strongly suggested by the difference in the binding of those antibodies to soluble membrane proteins, as compared to the binding of monomorphic anti-Class II monoclonal antibodies to the same antigens.

  1. γ-Radiation promotes immunological recognition of cancer cells through increased expression of cancer-testis antigens in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: γ-radiation is an effective treatment for cancer. There is evidence that radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. It was described that irradiation induces de novo protein synthesis and enhances antigen presentation, we therefore investigated whether γ-radiation results in increased expression of cancer-testis (CT antigens and MHC-I, thus allowing efficient immunological control. This is relevant because the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I on tumor cells is often heterogeneous. We found that the changes induced by γ-radiation promote the immunological recognition of the tumor, which is illustrated by the increased infiltration by lymphocytes after radiotherapy. METHODS/FINDINGS: We compared the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I in various cancer cell lines and fresh biopsies before and after in vitro irradiation (20 Gy. Furthermore, we compared paired biopsies that were taken before and after radiotherapy from sarcoma patients. To investigate whether the changed expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I is specific for γ-radiation or is part of a generalized stress response, we analyzed the effect of hypoxia, hyperthermia and genotoxic stress on the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I. In vitro irradiation of cancer cell lines and of fresh tumor biopsies induced a higher or de novo expression of different CT-antigens and a higher expression of MHC-I in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Importantly, we show that irradiation of cancer cells enhances their recognition by tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. The analysis of paired biopsies taken from a cohort of sarcoma patients before and after radiotherapy confirmed our findings and, in addition showed that irradiation resulted in higher infiltration by lymphocytes. Other forms of stress did not have an impact on the expression of CT-antigens or MHC-I. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that γ-radiation promotes the immunological recognition of the tumor. We therefore propose that

  2. Cd1b-Mediated T Cell Recognition of a Glycolipid Antigen Generated from Mycobacterial Lipid and Host Carbohydrate during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D. Branch; Guy, Mark R.; Grant, Ethan; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Brenner, Michael B.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    T cells recognize microbial glycolipids presented by CD1 proteins, but there is no information regarding the generation of natural glycolipid antigens within infected tissues. Therefore, we determined the molecular basis of CD1b-restricted T cell recognition of mycobacterial glycosylated mycolates, including those produced during tissue infection in vivo. Transfection of the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β chains from a glucose monomycolate (GMM)-specific T cell line reconstituted GMM recognition in TCR-deficient T lymphoblastoma cells. This TCR-mediated response was highly specific for natural mycobacterial glucose-6-O-(2R, 3R) monomycolate, including the precise structure of the glucose moiety, the stereochemistry of the mycolate lipid, and the linkage between the carbohydrate and the lipid. Mycobacterial production of antigenic GMM absolutely required a nonmycobacterial source of glucose that could be supplied by adding glucose to media at concentrations found in mammalian tissues or by infecting tissue in vivo. These results indicate that mycobacteria synthesized antigenic GMM by coupling mycobacterial mycolates to host-derived glucose. Specific T cell recognition of an epitope formed by interaction of host and pathogen biosynthetic pathways provides a mechanism for immune response to those pathogenic mycobacteria that have productively infected tissues, as distinguished from ubiquitous, but innocuous, environmental mycobacteria. PMID:11015438

  3. Demographic Recommendation by means of Group Profile Elicitation Using Speaker Age and Gender Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepstone, Sven Ewan; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we show a new method of using automatic age and gender recognition to recommend a sequence of multimedia items to a home TV audience comprising multiple viewers. Instead of relying on explicitly provided demographic data for each user, we define an audio-based demographic group...... profile that captures the age and gender for all members of the audience. A 7-class age and gender classifier employing a fusion of acoustic and prosodic features determines the probability of each speaker belonging to each class. The information for all speakers is then combined to form the group profile......, which itself is the input to a recommender system. The recommender system finds the content items whose demographics best match the group profile. We tested the effectiveness of the system for several typical home audience configurations. In a survey, users were given a configuration and asked to rate...

  4. The HIV-1 Integrase α4-Helix Involved in LTR-DNA Recognition Is also a Highly Antigenic Peptide Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, Sandy; Parissi, Vincent; Maroun, Richard G.; Eid, Pierre; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbas) constitute remarkable tools to analyze the relationship between the structure and the function of a protein. By immunizing a mouse with a 29mer peptide (K159) formed by residues 147 to 175 of the HIV-1 integrase (IN), we obtained a monoclonal antibody (MAba4) recognizing an epitope lying in the N-terminal portion of K159 (residues 147–166 of IN). The boundaries of the epitope were determined in ELISA assays using peptide truncation and amino acid substitutions. The epitope in K159 or as a free peptide (pep-a4) was mostly a random coil in solution, while in the CCD (catalytic core domain) crystal, the homologous segment displayed an amphipathic helix structure (α4-helix) at the protein surface. Despite this conformational difference, a strong antigenic crossreactivity was observed between pep-a4 and the protein segment, as well as K156, a stabilized analogue of pep-a4 constrained into helix by seven helicogenic mutations, most of them involving hydrophobic residues. We concluded that the epitope is freely accessible to the antibody inside the protein and that its recognition by the antibody is not influenced by the conformation of its backbone and the chemistry of amino acids submitted to helicogenic mutations. In contrast, the AA →Glu mutations of the hydrophilic residues Gln148, Lys156 and Lys159, known for their interactions with LTRs (long terminal repeats) and inhibitors (5 CITEP, for instance), significantly impaired the binding of K156 to the antibody. Moreover, we found that in competition ELISAs, the processed and unprocessed LTR oligonucleotides interfered with the binding of MAba4 to IN and K156, confirming that the IN α4-helix uses common residues to interact with the DNA target and the MAba4 antibody. This also explains why, in our standard in vitro concerted integration assays, MAba4 strongly impaired the IN enzymatic activity. PMID:21209864

  5. Modulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen-C by Human Cytomegalovirus Stimulates KIR2DS1 Recognition by Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Kattria; Chang, Chiwen; Ivarsson, Martin A; Moffett, Ashley; Wills, Mark R; Trowsdale, John

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules has been characterized in detail. By contrast, activating members of the KIR family, although closely related to inhibitory KIRs, appear to interact weakly, if at all, with HLA class I. KIR2DS1 is the best studied activating KIR and it interacts with C2 group HLA-C (C2-HLA-C) in some assays, but not as strongly as KIR2DL1. We used a mouse 2B4 cell reporter system, which carries NFAT-green fluorescent protein with KIR2DS1 and a modified DAP12 adaptor protein. KIR2DS1 reporter cells were not activated upon coculture with 721.221 cells transfected with different HLA-C molecules, or with interferon-γ stimulated primary dermal fibroblasts. However, KIR2DS1 reporter cells and KIR2DS1 + primary natural killer (NK) cells were activated by C2-HLA-C homozygous human fetal foreskin fibroblasts (HFFFs) but only after infection with specific clones of a clinical strain of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Active viral gene expression was required for activation of both cell types. Primary NKG2A - KIR2DS1 + NK cell subsets degranulated after coculture with HCMV-infected HFFFs. The W6/32 antibody to HLA class I blocked the KIR2DS1 reporter cell interaction with its ligand on HCMV-infected HFFFs but did not block interaction with KIR2DL1. This implies a differential recognition of HLA-C by KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS1. The data suggest that modulation of HLA-C by HCMV is required for a potent KIR2DS1-mediated NK cell activation.

  6. A pattern recognition methodology for evaluation of load profiles and typical days of large electricity customers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsekouras, G.J.; Kotoulas, P.B.; Tsirekis, C.D.; Dialynas, E.N.; Hatziargyriou, N.D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pattern recognition methodology for the classification of the daily chronological load curves of each large electricity customer, in order to estimate his typical days and his respective representative daily load profiles. It is based on pattern recognition methods, such as k-means, self-organized maps (SOM), fuzzy k-means and hierarchical clustering, which are theoretically described and properly adapted. The parameters of each clustering method are properly selected by an optimization process, which is separately applied for each one of six adequacy measures. The results can be used for the short-term and mid-term load forecasting of each consumer, for the choice of the proper tariffs and the feasibility studies of demand side management programs. This methodology is analytically applied for one medium voltage industrial customer and synoptically for a set of medium voltage customers of the Greek power system. The results of the clustering methods are presented and discussed. (author)

  7. Recognition of nonpeptide antigens by human V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells requires contact with cells of human origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A E; Lissina, A; Hutchinson, S L; Hewitt, R E; Temple, B; James, D; Boulter, J M; Price, D A; Sewell, A K

    2004-06-01

    SUMMARY It is becoming apparent that gamma delta T cells form an important part of the adaptive immune response. However, the ligands recognized by gamma delta T cell receptors (TCRs) and the exact biological function of the cells that express this receptor remain unclear. Numerous studies have shown that the dominant human peripheral blood subset of gamma delta T cells, which express a V gamma 9V delta 2 TCR, can activate in response to low molecular weight nonpeptidic molecules. Some of these components have been purified from bacteria or parasites. We examined the activation of polyclonal gamma delta T cell lines, clones with V gamma 9V delta 2 and V gamma 9V delta 1 TCRs, and gamma delta T cells directly ex vivo in response to multiple phosphate, alkylamine and aminobisphosphonate (nBP) antigens and purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (PPD). V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells were able to respond to multiple small organic molecules of highly variable structure whereas cells expressing a similar V gamma 9 chain paired with a V delta 1 chain failed to recognize these antigens. Thus, the TCR delta chain appears to make an important contribution to the recognition of these antigens. The kinetics of responses to alkylphosphate and alkylamine antigens differ from those of responses to the nBP pamidronate. These different classes of antigen are believed to have differed mechanisms of action. Such differences explain why nBPs can be pulsed onto antigen presenting cells (APCs) and still retain their ability to activate gamma delta T cells while alkylphosphate and alkylamine antigens cannot. We also demonstrate that a substantial proportion of the cells that produce IFN gamma directly ex vivo in response to PPD are gamma delta T cells and that gamma delta T cell activation requires contact with cells of human origin.

  8. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Molecular characterization of antigen-peptide pulsed dendritic cells: immature dendritic cells develop a distinct molecular profile when pulsed with antigen peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy X Yang

    Full Text Available As dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC, immature DC (iDC, and mature DC (mDC from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20, a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC. When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA, pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN, anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA, DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1, and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61 in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host.

  10. The Molecular Determinants of Antibody Recognition and Antigenic Drift in the H3 Hemagglutinin of Swine Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Santos, Jefferson; Lewis, Nicola S.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Stratton, Jered; Skepner, Eugene; Rajao, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important respiratory pathogen that affects both humans and swine. Vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) is the primary method used to control disease. However, due to antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be periodically updated. Six of the 7 positions previously identified in human seasonal H3 (positions 145, 155, 156, 158, 159, 189, and 193) were also indicated in swine H3 antigenic evolution. To experimentally test the effect on virus antigenicity of these 7 positions, substitutions were introduced into the HA of an isogenic swine lineage virus. We tested the antigenic effect of these introduced substitutions by using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) data with monovalent swine antisera and antigenic cartography to evaluate the antigenic phenotype of the mutant viruses. Combinations of substitutions within the antigenic motif caused significant changes in antigenicity. One virus mutant that varied at only two positions relative to the wild type had a >4-fold reduction in HI titers compared to homologous antisera. Potential changes in pathogenesis and transmission of the double mutant were evaluated in pigs. Although the double mutant had virus shedding titers and transmissibility comparable to those of the wild type, it caused a significantly lower percentage of lung lesions. Elucidating the antigenic effects of specific amino acid substitutions at these sites in swine H3 IAV has important implications for understanding IAV evolution within pigs as well as for improved vaccine development and control strategies in swine. IMPORTANCE A key component of influenza virus evolution is antigenic drift mediated by the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, resulting in escape from prior immunity generated by natural infection or vaccination. Understanding which amino acid positions of the HA contribute to the ability

  11. Antigenic profile, isolation and characterization of whole body extract of Paramphistomum gracile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuracpreeda, P; Chawengkirttikul, R; Sobhon, P

    2016-07-01

    An antigenic component of adult Paramphistomum gracile was characterized by means of indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (indirect ELISA), sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from cattle naturally infected with P. gracile, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Fasciola gigantica, Moniezia benedeni, strongylids, Trichuris sp. and Strongyloides sp. The whole body (WB) extracts of P. gracile were fractionated by gel filtration chromatography in a Sephadex G-200 column. It was found that the WB extract fractions, F1-F3 were highly antigenic, F5 was moderately antigenic and F4 was poorly antigenic. For SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting, the antigenic molecules of WB extract and all five fractions were mostly at molecular weights (MW) ranging from 12 to 150 kDa. One antigenic protein of 16 kDa detected in WB extract and F1-F3 was found to give a consistent reaction with sera from infected cattle. The antigenicity of the purified 16 kDa protein was confirmed by immunoblotting and indirect ELISA using a pool of sera and individual serum samples from infected cattle (at 1 : 78 125 dilution) and hyperimmunized rabbit (at 1 : 390 625 dilution). This finding suggests that the 16 kDa protein may be a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of cattle paramphistomosis caused by P. gracile. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Detection and Antigenic Profiling of Undeclared Peanut in Imported Garlic Using an xMAP Multiplex Immunoassay for Food Allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ronnie O; Peters, Tim; Panda, Rakhi; Wehling, Paul; Garber, Eric A E

    2017-07-01

    A shipment of imported garlic powder was suspected of containing peanut. Samples (subs) collected from the shipment displayed considerable variability in peanut antigenicity when analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This raised questions regarding whether peanut was actually present, the amount present, and the basis for the variability in antigenic content. Analyses that used an xMAP multiplex assay for the detection of peanut and additional food allergens generated responses that were characteristic of peanut. Specifically, the relative intensities of two different peanut-specific antibodies coupled to beads (peanut-37 and -38) and the antigen profiles were identical to garlic controls spiked with peanut. In addition, the xMAP data did not indicate the presence of other allergens. Quantitative analyses indicated an approximately fivefold variation in peanut concentration among different subs. In contrast, within a sub, the apparent peanut concentration appeared constant. Particle size analyses of the garlic powder subs indicated a single distribution profile, with a peak at 380 μm. ELISA analysis of sieve-fractionated garlic powder from one of the subs indicated that slightly less than half of the detectable peanut was smaller than 212 μm, with the remainder almost evenly split between 212 and 300 μm and >300 μm. Modeling to predict possible oral exposure levels of peanut other than those directly measured requires additional research on the physicochemical properties of peanut and garlic, along with information on the production of the garlic powder.

  13. Surface Antigen Profiling of Helicobacter pylori-Infected and -Uninfected Gastric Cancer Cells Using Antibody Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukri, Asif; Hanafiah, Alfizah; Kosai, Nik Ritza; Mohamed Taher, Mustafa; Mohamed Rose, Isa

    2016-10-01

    Comprehensive immunophenotyping cluster of differentiation (CD) antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma, specifically between Helicobacter pylori-infected and -uninfected gastric cancer patients by using DotScan(™) antibody microarray has not been conducted. Current immunophenotyping techniques include flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry are limited to the use of few antibodies for parallel examination. We used DotScan(™) antibody microarray consisting 144 CD antibodies to determine the distribution of CD antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma cells and to elucidate the effect of H. pylori infection toward CD antigen expression in gastric cancer. Mixed leukocytes population derived from gastric adenocarcinoma patients were immunophenotyped using DotScan(™) antibody microarray. AGS cells were infected with H. pylori strains and cells were captured on DotScan(™) slides. Cluster of differentiation antigens involved in perpetuating the tolerance of immune cells to tumor cells was upregulated in gastric adenocarcinoma cells compared to normal cells. CD279 which is essential in T cells apoptosis was found to be upregulated in normal cells. Remarkably, H. pylori-infected gastric cancer patients exhibited upregulated expression of CD27 that important in maintenance of T cells. Infection of cagA+ H. pylori with AGS cells increased CD antigens expression which involved in cancer stem cell while cagA- H. pylori polarized AGS cells to express immune-regulatory CD antigens. Increased CD antigens expression in AGS cells infected with cagA+ H. pylori were also detected in H. pylori-infected gastric cancer patients. This study suggests the tolerance of immune system toward tumor cells in gastric cancer and distinct mechanisms of immune responses exploited by different H. pylori strains. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Non-Cooperative Target Recognition by Means of Singular Value Decomposition Applied to Radar High Resolution Range Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  15. Th1/Th17 cell recognition of desmoglein 3 and bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 in lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Solimani, Farzan; Pollmann, Robert; Stein, Ronja; Schmidt, Ansgar; Stulberg, Inna; Kühn, Katja; Eming, Rüdiger; Eubel, Verena; Kind, Peter; Arweiler, Nicole; Sitaru, Cassian; Hertl, Michael

    2018-04-04

    We identified Th1/Th17 cell responses against desmoglein 3 and bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 in lichen planus. In contrast, patients with pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid showed significantly higher Th2 cell responses against these autoantigens. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Recruitment of Cbl-b to B cell antigen receptor couples antigen recognition to Toll-like receptor 9 activation in late endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Veselits

    Full Text Available Casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b (Cbl-b is a ubiquitin ligase (E3 that modulates signaling by tagging molecules for degradation. It is a complex protein with multiple domains and binding partners that are not involved in ubiquitinating substrates. Herein, we demonstrate that Cbl-b, but not c-Cbl, is recruited to the clustered B cell antigen receptor (BCR and that Cbl-b is required for entry of endocytosed BCRs into late endosomes. The E3 activity of Cbl-b is not necessary for BCR endocytic trafficking. Rather, the ubiquitin associated (UBA domain is required. Furthermore, the Cbl-b UBA domain is sufficient to confer the receptor trafficking functions of Cbl-b on c-Cbl. Cbl-b is also required for entry of the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 into late endosomes and for the in vitro activation of TLR9 by BCR-captured ligands. These data indicate that Cbl-b acts as a scaffolding molecule to coordinate the delivery of the BCR and TLR9 into subcellular compartments required for productively delivering BCR-captured ligands to TLR9.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance is an analytically sensitive method for antigen profiling of extracellular vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gool, Elmar L.; Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Sturk, Auguste; Van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.; Coumans, Frank A.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification, enumeration, and characterization of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are hampered by the small size of EVs, a low refractive index, and low numbers of antigens on their surface. METHODS: We investigated the potential of a 48- multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging

  18. Surface Plasmon Resonance is an Analytically Sensitive Method for Antigen Profiling of Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gool, Elmar L.; Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richard B. M.; Sturk, Auguste; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Coumans, Frank A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Identification, enumeration, and characterization of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are hampered by the small size of EVs, a low refractive index, and low numbers of antigens on their surface. We investigated the potential of a 48-multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system to perform EV

  19. FULL-LENGTH PEPTIDE ASSAY OF ANTIGENIC PROFILE OF ENVELOPE PROTEINS FROM SIBERIAN ISOLATES OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Grazhdantseva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic profiles of envelope glycoproteins of hepatitis C virus presented by three genotypes 1b, 2a/2c and 3a, which are most widespread in the territory of Russia and, in particular, in Novosibirsk, were studied using a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides. It was shown that highly immunogenic peptide epitopes of Е1 and Е2 proteins common for all HCV genotypes, are located in amino acid positions 250-260, 315-325 (Е1 protein, 390-400 (hypervariable region 1, 430-440, and 680-690 (Е2 protein. The greatest inter-genotypic differences were recorded in positions 280-290, 410-430 and 520-540. A novel antigenic determinant was detected in the region of aa 280-290 of the Е1 protein which was typical only for HCV 2a/2c genotype. A broad variation in the boundaries for the most epitopes suggests a high variability of the Е1 and Е2 viral proteins; however, a similar repertoire of antibodies induced by different HCV genotypes indicates to an opportunity of designing a new generation of cross-reactive HCV vaccines based on mapping of the E1 and E2 antigenic regions.

  20. Impact Of Mutation-derived Antigens In Immune Recognition Of Hematological Malignancies, Specifically Myeloid Dysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Sunil Kumar; Dorfmüller, S.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Mutation-derived neoepitopes have been suggested as a major component for immune recognition of solid tumors with a high mutational load, e.g. Melanoma and Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms characterized by increasing...

  1. Impact Of Mutation-derived Antigens In Immune Recognition Of Hematological Malignancies, Specifically Myeloid Dysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Sunil Kumar; Dorfmüller, S.; Bjerregaard, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Mutation-derived neoepitopes have been suggested as a major component for immune recognition of solid tumors with a high mutational load, e.g. Melanoma and Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms characterized by increasing...... to the generation of tumor-specific neoepitopes....

  2. [Recognition of excretory/secretory antigens of Anisakis type I and evolution of IgE in experimentally infected rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Mateos, Magdalena; Valero-López, Adela; de la Rubia-Nieto, Teresa; Romero-López, María Del Carmen; Díaz-Sáez, Victoriano

    2014-10-01

    Anisakis spp., during parasitism, release excretory-secretory antigens that, in contact with the human immune system, can trigger a hypersensitivity response mediated by IgE, causing various allergic symptoms. To evaluate the IgE response in Wistar rats after infection with L3 larvae of the parasite Anisakis spp. Some determining factors involved in the technique have been improved in this work, such as: the concentration of polyacrylamide used in the preparation of the gels, the antigen concentration used, and the temperature required for denaturation of proteins. Immune responses (Ag-Ab) observed by the immunoblotting technique showed a greater intensity with serum obtained after reinfection, which have recognized proteins that may correspond to the major antigen Ani s 1 and other polypeptides of interest in the diagnosis of human anisakiasis. This paper concludes that immunoblotting is a useful technique to detect IgE antibodies against Anisakis proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. T cell recognition of rat myelin basic protein as a TCR antagonist inhibits reciprocal activation of antigen-presenting cells and engenders resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M R; Mannie, M D

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether T cell recognition of myelin basic protein (MBP) as a partially antagonistic self antigen regulates the reciprocal activation of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This study focused on the rat 3H3 T cell clone that recognized guinea pig (GP) MBP as a full agonist and self rat (R) MBP as a partial agonist. In cultures of 3H3 T cells and splenic APC, the agonist GPMBP elicited several responses by splenic APC, including production of nitric oxide, down-regulation of I-A, induction of B7.1 and B7.2, and prolongation of APC survival. RMBP stimulated a partial increase in production of nitric oxide, partially promoted survival of splenic APC, but did not alter expression of I-A, B7.1, or B7.2 on splenic APC. In the presence ofGPMBP, RMBP antagonized agonist-stimulated induction of B7 molecules, reversed the loss of I-A, and promoted the generation of I-A(+), costimulus-deficient APC. Furthermore, 3H3 T cells cultured with RMBP and irradiated splenocytes reduced the severity of EAE upon adoptive transfer into naive rat recipients subsequently challenged with an encephalitogenic dose of GPMBP/CFA. Overall, this study indicates that T cell receptor antagonism blocks T cell activation, inhibits feedback activation of splenic APC, and promotes T cell-dependent regulatory activities in EAE.

  4. Modulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen-C by Human Cytomegalovirus Stimulates KIR2DS1 Recognition by Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    van der Ploeg, Kattria; Chang, Chiwen; Ivarsson, Martin A.; Moffett, Ashley; Wills, Mark R.; Trowsdale, John

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules has been characterized in detail. By contrast, activating members of the KIR family, although closely related to inhibitory KIRs, appear to interact weakly, if at all, with HLA class I. KIR2DS1 is the best studied activating KIR and it interacts with C2 group HLA-C (C2-HLA-C) in some assays, but not as strongly as KIR2DL1. We used a mouse 2B4 cell reporter system, which carr...

  5. BRAFV600E Co-opts a Conserved MHC Class I Internalization Pathway to Diminish Antigen Presentation and CD8+ T-cell Recognition of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sherille D; Chen, Zeming; Melendez, Brenda; Talukder, Amjad; Khalili, Jahan S; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Liu, Shujuan; Whittington, Mayra; Deng, Wanleng; Li, Fenge; Bernatchez, Chantale; Radvanyi, Laszlo G; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick; Lizée, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    Oncogene activation in tumor cells induces broad and complex cellular changes that contribute significantly to disease initiation and progression. In melanoma, oncogenic BRAF(V600E) has been shown to drive the transcription of a specific gene signature that can promote multiple mechanisms of immune suppression within the tumor microenvironment. We show here that BRAF(V600E) also induces rapid internalization of MHC class I (MHC-I) from the melanoma cell surface and its intracellular sequestration within endolysosomal compartments. Importantly, MAPK inhibitor treatment quickly restored MHC-I surface expression in tumor cells, thereby enhancing melanoma antigen-specific T-cell recognition and effector function. MAPK pathway-driven relocalization of HLA-A*0201 required a highly conserved cytoplasmic serine phosphorylation site previously implicated in rapid MHC-I internalization and recycling by activated immune cells. Collectively, these data suggest that oncogenic activation of BRAF allows tumor cells to co-opt an evolutionarily conserved MHC-I trafficking pathway as a strategy to facilitate immune evasion. This link between MAPK pathway activation and the MHC-I cytoplasmic tail has direct implications for immunologic recognition of tumor cells and provides further evidence to support testing therapeutic strategies combining MAPK pathway inhibition with immunotherapies in the clinical setting. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Epitope mapping of histo blood group antigens bound to norovirus VLPs using STD NMR experiments reveals fine details of molecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Brigitte; Leuthold, Mila; Parra, Francisco; Dalton, Kevin P; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; Peters, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Attachment of human noroviruses to histo blood group antigens (HBGAs) is thought to be critical for the infection process. Therefore, we have determined binding epitopes of synthetic type 1 to 6 blood group A- and B-tetrasaccharides binding to GII.4 human Norovirus virus like particles (VLPs) using STD NMR experiments. So far, little information is available from crystal structure analysis studies on the interactions of the reducing-end sugars with the protruding domain (P-domain) of the viral coat protein VP1. Here, we show that the reducing-end sugars make notable contacts with the protein surface. The type of glycosidic linkage, and the identity of the sugar at the reducing end modulate HBGA recognition. Most strikingly, type 2 structures yield only very poor saturation transfer indicating impeded binding. This observation is in accordance with previous mass spectrometry based affinity measurements, and can be understood based on recent crystal structure data of a complex of highly homologous GII.4 P-dimers with H-type 2 trisaccharide where the N-acetyl group of the reducing N-acetyl glucosamine residue points towards a loop comprising amino acids Q390 to H395. We suggest that in our case, binding of type 2 A- and B-tetrasaccharides leads to steric conflicts with this loop. In order to identify factors determining L-Fuc recognition, we also synthesized GII.4 VLPs with point mutations D391A and H395A. Prior studies had suggested that these residues, located in a second shell around the L-Fuc binding site, assist L-Fuc binding. STD NMR experiments with L-Fuc and B-trisaccharide in the presence of wild type and mutant VLPs yield virtually identical binding epitopes suggesting that these two mutations do not significantly alter HBGA recognition. Our study emphasizes that recognition of α-(1→2)-linked L-Fuc residues is a conserved feature of GII.4 noroviruses. However, structural variation of the HBGA core structures clearly modulates molecular recognition

  7. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF FIVE RAT STRAINS REVEAL TRANSCRIPTIONAL MODES IN THE ANTIGEN PROCESSING PATHWAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative gene expression profiling of rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases can help decode the transcriptional program that governs cellular behavior. We hypothesized that co-transcribed, intra-pathway, functionally coherent genes can be r...

  8. Glycan analysis of Fonsecaea monophora from clinical and environmental origins reveals different structural profile and human antigenic response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Reis Burjack

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dematiaceous fungi constitute a large and heterogeneous group, characterized by having a dark pigment, the dihydroxynaftalen melanin - DHN, inside their cell walls. In nature they are found mainly as soil microbiota or decomposing organic matter, and are spread in tropical and subtropical regions. The fungus Fonsecaea monophora causes chromoblastomycosis in humans, and possesses essential mechanisms that may enhance pathogenicity, proliferation and dissemination inside the host. Glycoconjugates confer important properties to these pathogenic microorganisms. In this work, structural characterization of glycan structures present in two different strains of F. monophora MMHC82 and FE5p4, from clinical and environmental origins, respectively, was performed. Each one were grown on Minimal Medium (MM and Czapeck-Dox (CD medium, and the water soluble cell wall glycoconjugates and exopolysaccharides (EPS were evaluated by NMR, methylation and principal component analysis (PCA. By combining the methylation and 2D NMR analyses, it was possible to visualize the glycosidic profiles of the complex carbohydrate mixtures. Significant differences were observed in β-D-Galf-(1→5 and (1→6 linkages, α- and β-D-Glcp-(1→3, (1→4 and (1→6 units, as well as in α-D-Manp. PCA from 1H-NMR data showed that MMHC82 from CD medium showed a higher variation in the cell wall carbohydrates, mainly related to O-2 substituted β-D-Galf (δ 106.0/5.23 and δ 105.3/5.23 units. In order to investigate the antigenic response of the glycoconjugates, these were screened against serum from chromoblastomycosis patients. The antigen which contained the cell wall of MMHC82 grown in MM had β-D-Manp units that promoted higher antigenic response. The distribution of these fungal species in nature and the knowledge of how cell wall polysaccharides and glycoconjugates structure vary, may contribute to the better understanding and the elucidation of the pathology caused by this

  9. Multiplex flow cytometry barcoding and antibody arrays identify surface antigen profiles of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sukhdeo

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a deadly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Current treatment challenges include management of disease burden as well as improvements in detection and targeting of tumor cells. To identify disease state-specific surface antigen signatures, we combined fluorescent cell barcoding with high-throughput flow cytometric profiling of primary and metastatic colon cancer lines (SW480, SW620, and HCT116. Our multiplexed technique offers improvements over conventional methods by permitting the simultaneous and rapid screening of cancer cells with reduced effort and cost. The method uses a protein-level analysis with commercially available antibodies on live cells with intact epitopes to detect potential tumor-specific targets that can be further investigated for their clinical utility. Multiplexed antibody arrays can easily be applied to other tumor types or pathologies for discovery-based approaches to target identification.

  10. Whole genome protein microarrays for serum profiling of immunodominant antigens of Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Elizabeth Kempsell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A commercial Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax whole genome protein microarray has been used to identify immunogenic Anthrax proteins using sera from groups of donors with (a confirmed B. anthracis naturally acquired cutaneous infection, (b confirmed B. anthracis intravenous drug use-acquired infection (c occupational exposure in a wool-sorters factory (d humans and rabbits vaccinated with the UK Anthrax protein vaccine and compared to naïve unexposed controls. Anti-IAP responses were observed for both IgG and IgA in the challenged groups; however the anti-IAP IgG response was more evident in the vaccinated group and the anti-IAP IgA response more evident in the B. anthracis-infected groups. Infected individuals appeared somewhat suppressed for their general IgG response, compared with other challenged groups.Immunogenic protein antigens were identified in all groups, some of which were shared between groups whilst others were specific for individual groups. The toxin proteins were immunodominant in all vaccinated, infected or other challenged groups. However a number of other chromosomally-located and plasmid encoded open reading frames were also recognised by infected or exposed groups in comparison to controls. Some of these antigens e.g. BA4182 are not recognised by vaccinated individuals, suggesting that there are proteins more specifically expressed by live Anthrax spores in vivo and are not currently found in the UK licensed Anthrax Vaccine (AVP. These may perhaps be preferentially expressed during infection and represent expression of alternative pathways in the B. anthracis ‘infectome’. These may make highly attractive candidates for diagnostic and vaccine biomarker development as they may be more specifically associated with the infectious phase of the pathogen. A number of B. anthracis small hypothetical protein targets have been synthesised, tested in mouse immunogenicity studies and validated in parallel using human sera from the

  11. Whole genome protein microarrays for serum profiling of immunodominant antigens of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Kidd, Stephen P.; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Elmore, Michael J.; Charlton, Sue; Yeates, Annemarie; Cuthbertson, Hannah; Hallis, Bassam; Altmann, Daniel M.; Rogers, Mitch; Wattiau, Pierre; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Brooks, Tim; Vipond, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A commercial Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) whole genome protein microarray has been used to identify immunogenic Anthrax proteins (IAP) using sera from groups of donors with (a) confirmed B. anthracis naturally acquired cutaneous infection, (b) confirmed B. anthracis intravenous drug use-acquired infection, (c) occupational exposure in a wool-sorters factory, (d) humans and rabbits vaccinated with the UK Anthrax protein vaccine and compared to naïve unexposed controls. Anti-IAP responses were observed for both IgG and IgA in the challenged groups; however the anti-IAP IgG response was more evident in the vaccinated group and the anti-IAP IgA response more evident in the B. anthracis-infected groups. Infected individuals appeared somewhat suppressed for their general IgG response, compared with other challenged groups. Immunogenic protein antigens were identified in all groups, some of which were shared between groups whilst others were specific for individual groups. The toxin proteins were immunodominant in all vaccinated, infected or other challenged groups. However, a number of other chromosomally-located and plasmid encoded open reading frame proteins were also recognized by infected or exposed groups in comparison to controls. Some of these antigens e.g., BA4182 are not recognized by vaccinated individuals, suggesting that there are proteins more specifically expressed by live Anthrax spores in vivo that are not currently found in the UK licensed Anthrax Vaccine (AVP). These may perhaps be preferentially expressed during infection and represent expression of alternative pathways in the B. anthracis “infectome.” These may make highly attractive candidates for diagnostic and vaccine biomarker development as they may be more specifically associated with the infectious phase of the pathogen. A number of B. anthracis small hypothetical protein targets have been synthesized, tested in mouse immunogenicity studies and validated in parallel using human sera from

  12. Identification of genetic polymorphisms that predict responder/non-responder profiles to the RhD antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joanne C G; Armstrong, Nicola J; Yuan, Fang Fang; Flower, Robert L; Dyer, Wayne B

    2015-12-01

    Regular plasma donors who produce high titre anti-D immunoglobulin (Ig) are overseen by the Australian Red Cross Blood Service RhD Program. New donors to the program are immunised with small amounts of RhD-positive RBCs, whilst donors who have developed anti-D due to previous RhD-incompatible blood transfusion or pregnancy are boosted with RhD-positive RBCs to maintain a high level of serum anti-D Ig. A significant proportion of primarily immunised individuals do not respond to RhD immunisation and are therefore unnecessarily exposed to the risks involved in RBC sensitisation. We genotyped 184 anti-D donors for ∼9000 immunological and inflammatory genetic polymorphisms on an Affymetrix GeneChip, and validated the results with a High-Resolution Melt analysis assay. We built and validated a predictive logistic regression model using High Responder and Non-Responder anti-D donors that incorporated highly-associated polymorphisms and gender. High Responder and Non-Responder profiles in anti-D donors were significantly associated with a shortlist of 13 genetic polymorphisms and sex of the donor. The derivation of a logistic regression model showed an accuracy rate of 92.6% that was subsequently validated as 60.0% with an independent set of donor samples. This study has developed a logistic regression model and a genotyping assay that can predict the responder profiles of anti-D donors and could potentially be applied to new donors and transfusion-dependent patients in a clinical setting. Additionally, target polymorphisms identified in immunological genes could help to elucidate the immunomodulatory pathways regulating the immune response to the RhD antigen, and to other RBC antigens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M [NIH; (Notre)

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I and Class II Polymorphisms and Serum Cytokine Profiles in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Bahls

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Only a small proportion of women who are exposed to infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV progress to persistent infection and develop cervical cancer (CC. The immune response and genetic background of the host may affect the risk of progression from a HR-HPV infection to lesions and cancer. However, to our knowledge, no studies has been conducted to evaluate the relationship between variability of human leukocyte antigens (HLA genes and serum cytokine expression in this pathology. In the current study, we examined the associations of HLA alleles and haplotypes including Class I (HLA-A, -B and -C and II (HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 with serum levels of cytokines interleukin (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-17 as well as risks of HPV infections, lesions and CC among admixed Brazilian women. HLA polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk or protection from HPV, lesions and CC. Additionally, we demonstrated a potential association of a HLA class I haplotype (HLA-B*14-C*08 with higher IL-10 cytokine serum levels in cervical disease, suggesting an association between HLA class I and specific cytokines in cervical carcinogenesis. However, larger studies with detailed HPV types coupled with genetic data are needed to further evaluate the effects of HLA and CC by HPV genotype.

  15. A gp41 MPER-specific llama VHH requires a hydrophobic CDR3 for neutralization but not for antigen recognition.

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    David Lutje Hulsik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal external region (MPER of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 is targeted by the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. To date, no immunization regimen in animals or humans has produced HIV-1 neutralizing MPER-specific antibodies. We immunized llamas with gp41-MPER proteoliposomes and selected a MPER-specific single chain antibody (VHH, 2H10, whose epitope overlaps with that of mAb 2F5. Bi-2H10, a bivalent form of 2H10, which displayed an approximately 20-fold increased affinity compared to the monovalent 2H10, neutralized various sensitive and resistant HIV-1 strains, as well as SHIV strains in TZM-bl cells. X-ray and NMR analyses combined with mutagenesis and modeling revealed that 2H10 recognizes its gp41 epitope in a helical conformation. Notably, tryptophan 100 at the tip of the long CDR3 is not required for gp41 interaction but essential for neutralization. Thus bi-2H10 is an anti-MPER antibody generated by immunization that requires hydrophobic CDR3 determinants in addition to epitope recognition for neutralization similar to the mode of neutralization employed by mAbs 2F5 and 4E10.

  16. A New Profile Shape Matching Stereovision Algorithm for Real-time Human Pose and Hand Gesture Recognition

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    Dong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new profile shape matching stereovision algorithm that is designed to extract 3D information in real time. This algorithm obtains 3D information by matching profile intensity shapes of each corresponding row of the stereo image pair. It detects the corresponding matching patterns of the intensity profile rather than the intensity values of individual pixels or pixels in a small neighbourhood. This approach reduces the effect of the intensity and colour variations caused by lighting differences. As with all real-time vision algorithms, there is always a trade-off between accuracy and processing speed. This algorithm achieves a balance between the two to produce accurate results for real-time applications. To demonstrate its performance, the proposed algorithm is tested for human pose and hand gesture recognition to control a smart phone and an entertainment system.

  17. Human neutrophil antigen profiles in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Siti M; NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z A; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd N; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Edinur, Hisham A

    2015-10-01

    Human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are polymorphic and immunogenic proteins involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-related alloimmune neutropenia. The characterisation of HNA at a population level is important for predicting the risk of alloimmunisation associated with blood transfusion and gestation and for anthropological studies. Blood samples from 192 healthy, unrelated Malays were collected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (HNA-1, -3, -4) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (HNA-5). The group comprised 30 Banjar, 37 Bugis, 51 Champa, 39 Jawa and 35 Kelantan Malays. The most common HNA alleles in the Malays studied were HNA-1a (0.641-0.765), -3a (0.676-0.867), -4a (0.943-1.000) and -5a (0.529-0.910). According to principal coordinate plots constructed using HNA allele frequencies, the Malay sub-ethnic groups are closely related and grouped together with other Asian populations. The risks of TRALI or neonatal neutropenia were not increased for subjects with HNA-1, -3 and -4 loci even for donor and recipient or pairs from different Malay sub-ethnic groups. Nonetheless, our estimates showed significantly higher risks of HNA alloimmunisation during pregnancy and transfusion between Malays and other genetically differentiated populations such as Africans and Europeans. This study reports HNA allele and genotype frequencies for the five Malay sub-ethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia for the first time. These Malay sub-ethnic groups show closer genetic relationships with other Asian populations than with Europeans and Africans. The distributions of HNA alleles in other lineages of people living in Malaysia (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli) would be an interesting subject for future study.

  18. The principal genetic determinants for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in China involve the HLA class I antigen recognition groove.

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    Minzhong Tang

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is an epithelial malignancy facilitated by Epstein-Barr Virus infection. Here we resolve the major genetic influences for NPC incidence using a genome-wide association study (GWAS, independent cohort replication, and high-resolution molecular HLA class I gene typing including 4,055 study participants from the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Guangdong province of southern China. We detect and replicate strong association signals involving SNPs, HLA alleles, and amino acid (aa variants across the major histocompatibility complex-HLA-A, HLA -B, and HLA -C class I genes (P(HLA-A-aa-site-62 = 7.4 × 10(-29; P (HLA-B-aa-site-116 = 6.5 × 10(-19; P (HLA-C-aa-site-156 = 6.8 × 10(-8 respectively. Over 250 NPC-HLA associated variants within HLA were analyzed in concert to resolve separate and largely independent HLA-A, -B, and -C gene influences. Multivariate logistical regression analysis collapsed significant associations in adjacent genes spanning 500 kb (OR2H1, GABBR1, HLA-F, and HCG9 as proxies for peptide binding motifs carried by HLA- A*11:01. A similar analysis resolved an independent association signal driven by HLA-B*13:01, B*38:02, and B*55:02 alleles together. NPC resistance alleles carrying the strongly associated amino acid variants implicate specific class I peptide recognition motifs in HLA-A and -B peptide binding groove as conferring strong genetic influence on the development of NPC in China.

  19. Whole blood transcriptional profiling reveals significant down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    be down-regulation of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and II genes, which are used by tumor cells to escape antitumor T-cell-mediated immune responses. We have performed whole blood transcriptional profiling of genes encoding human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, β2-microglobulin...... and members of the antigen processing machinery of HLA class I molecules (LMP2, LMP7, TAP1, TAP2 and tapasin). The findings of significant down-regulation of several of these genes may possibly be of major importance for defective tumor immune surveillance. Since up-regulation of HLA genes is recorded during...

  20. Pattern recognition of acorns from different Quercus species based on oil content and fatty acid profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu, José M.F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was (i to characterize different species of Quercus genus and (ii to discriminate among them on the basis of the content and fatty acid composition of the oil in their fruits and/or their morphological aspects via pattern recognition techniques (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Cluster Analysis, CA, and Discriminant Analysis, DA. Quercus rotundifolia Lam., Quercus suber L. and Quercus pyrenaica Willd., grown in the same stand in the centre of Portugal, were investigated. When oil content and respective fatty acid composition were used to characterize samples, well-separated groups corresponding to each of the species were observed by PCA and confirmed by CA and DA. The ‘‘width’’ and ‘‘length’’ of acorns exhibited a low discriminant power. Acorns from Q. rotundifolia showed the highest average oil content followed by Q. suber and Q. pyrenaica acorns (9.1, 5.2 and 3.8%, respectively. Fatty acid profiles of Q. rotundifolia and Q. suber oils are similar to olive oil while the oil from Q. pyrenaica acorns is more unsaturated.El objetivo de este estudio fué (i la caracterización de diferentes especies del género Quercus y (ii la clasificación de las mismas en base al contenido y composición de ácidos grasos del aceite de sus frutos y/o en sus caracteres morfológicos, via técnicas de patrón de reconocimiento (Análisis de Componentes Principales, ACP, Análisis de Cluster, AC, y Análisis Discriminante, AD. Se han estudiado Quercus rotundifolia Lam., Quercus suber L. y Quercus pyrenaica Willd., pertenecientes a la misma zona del centro de Portugal. Al emplear el contenido de aceite y sus respectivas composiciones de ácidos grasos para caracterizar a las muestras, el ACP reveló grupos bien separados correspondientes a cada especie, los cuales, a su vez, se confirmarón con el AC y el AD. El ‘‘ancho’’ y ‘‘longitud’’ de las bellotas

  1. Streptococcus iniae SF1: complete genome sequence, proteomic profile, and immunoprotective antigens.

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    Bao-cun Zhang

    Full Text Available Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium that is reckoned one of the most severe aquaculture pathogens. It has a broad host range among farmed marine and freshwater fish and can also cause zoonotic infection in humans. Here we report for the first time the complete genome sequence as well as the host factor-induced proteomic profile of a pathogenic S. iniae strain, SF1, a serotype I isolate from diseased fish. SF1 possesses a single chromosome of 2,149,844 base pairs, which contains 2,125 predicted protein coding sequences (CDS, 12 rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Among the protein-encoding CDS are genes involved in resource acquisition and utilization, signal sensing and transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, and defense against host immune response. Potential virulence genes include those encoding adhesins, autolysins, toxins, exoenzymes, and proteases. In addition, two putative prophages and a CRISPR-Cas system were found in the genome, the latter containing a CRISPR locus and four cas genes. Proteomic analysis detected 21 secreted proteins whose expressions were induced by host serum. Five of the serum-responsive proteins were subjected to immunoprotective analysis, which revealed that two of the proteins were highly protective against lethal S. iniae challenge when used as purified recombinant subunit vaccines. Taken together, these results provide an important molecular basis for future study of S. iniae in various aspects, in particular those related to pathogenesis and disease control.

  2. Streptococcus iniae SF1: Complete Genome Sequence, Proteomic Profile, and Immunoprotective Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-cun; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Li

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium that is reckoned one of the most severe aquaculture pathogens. It has a broad host range among farmed marine and freshwater fish and can also cause zoonotic infection in humans. Here we report for the first time the complete genome sequence as well as the host factor-induced proteomic profile of a pathogenic S. iniae strain, SF1, a serotype I isolate from diseased fish. SF1 possesses a single chromosome of 2,149,844 base pairs, which contains 2,125 predicted protein coding sequences (CDS), 12 rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Among the protein-encoding CDS are genes involved in resource acquisition and utilization, signal sensing and transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, and defense against host immune response. Potential virulence genes include those encoding adhesins, autolysins, toxins, exoenzymes, and proteases. In addition, two putative prophages and a CRISPR-Cas system were found in the genome, the latter containing a CRISPR locus and four cas genes. Proteomic analysis detected 21 secreted proteins whose expressions were induced by host serum. Five of the serum-responsive proteins were subjected to immunoprotective analysis, which revealed that two of the proteins were highly protective against lethal S. iniae challenge when used as purified recombinant subunit vaccines. Taken together, these results provide an important molecular basis for future study of S. iniae in various aspects, in particular those related to pathogenesis and disease control. PMID:24621602

  3. Phenotypic and functional profiling of CD4 T cell compartment in distinct populations of healthy adults with different antigenic exposure.

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    Sophie Roetynck

    Full Text Available Multiparameter flow cytometry has revealed extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of CD4 T cell responses in mice and humans, emphasizing the importance of assessing multiple aspects of the immune response in correlation with infection or vaccination outcome. The aim of this study was to establish and validate reliable and feasible flow cytometry assays, which will allow us to characterize CD4 T cell population in humans in field studies more fully.We developed polychromatic flow cytometry antibody panels for immunophenotyping the major CD4 T cell subsets as well as broadly characterizing the functional profiles of the CD4 T cells in peripheral blood. We then validated these assays by conducting a pilot study comparing CD4 T cell responses in distinct populations of healthy adults living in either rural or urban Kenya. This study revealed that the expression profile of CD4 T cell activation and memory markers differed significantly between African and European donors but was similar amongst African individuals from either rural or urban areas. Adults from rural Kenya had, however, higher frequencies and greater polyfunctionality among cytokine producing CD4 T cells compared to both urban populations, particularly for "Th1" type of response. Finally, endemic exposure to malaria in rural Kenya may have influenced the expansion of few discrete CD4 T cell populations with specific functional signatures.These findings suggest that environmentally driven T cell activation does not drive the dysfunction of CD4 T cells but is rather associated with greater magnitude and quality of CD4 T cell response, indicating that the level or type of microbial exposure and antigenic experience may influence and shape the functionality of CD4 T cell compartment. Our data confirm that it is possible and mandatory to assess multiple functional attributes of CD4 T cell response in the context of infection.

  4. Cytokine and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinhua; Meng, Xueqin; Xu, Yuning; Xie, Haiyang; Yin, Shengyong; Li, Hongchun; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-10-12

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after liver and kidney transplantation has high mortality and causes diagnostic challenges. This study aims to describe the cytokine and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile in the GVHD after liver and kidney transplantation. A high-throughput detection kit was applied and altogether 18 different cytokines were tested simultaneously. GVHD patients included 23 post-liver transplantation patients; 22 post-renal transplantation patients; The control patients include 22 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients without transplantation and 20 healthy controls. Their HLA characters were compared. The full spectrum of cytokines was present. The inflammatory markers were activated significantly in liver transplantation. The level of inflammatory markers in liver transplantation was higher than that in renal transplantation, HCC or healthy controls. GVHD was associated with the HLA characters; HLA characters are involved in liver GVHD occurrence and act as risk factors. Our findings confirmed that the inflammatory cytokines play a pathogenic role in GVHD and can be used as early diagnostic markers. The HLA mismatch acts as a risk factor in liver transplantation to predict GVHD occurrence.

  5. The Ocular Conjunctiva as a Mucosal Immunization Route: A Profile of the Immune Response to the Model Antigen Tetanus Toxoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belij, Sandra; Marinkovic, Emilija; Stojicevic, Ivana; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Stein, Elisabeth; Bintner, Nora; Stojanovic, Marijana

    2013-01-01

    Background In a quest for a needle-free vaccine administration strategy, we evaluated the ocular conjunctiva as an alternative mucosal immunization route by profiling and comparing the local and systemic immune responses to the subcutaneous or conjunctival administration of tetanus toxoid (TTd), a model antigen. Materials and methods BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized either subcutaneously with TTd alone or via the conjunctiva with TTd alone, TTd mixed with 2% glycerol or TTd with merthiolate-inactivated whole-cell B. pertussis (wBP) as adjuvants. Mice were immunized on days 0, 7 and 14 via both routes, and an evaluation of the local and systemic immune responses was performed two weeks after the last immunization. Four weeks after the last immunization, the mice were challenged with a lethal dose (2 × LD50) of tetanus toxin. Results The conjunctival application of TTd in BALB/c mice induced TTd-specific secretory IgA production and skewed the TTd-specific immune response toward a Th1/Th17 profile, as determined by the stimulation of IFNγ and IL-17A secretion and/or the concurrent pronounced reduction of IL-4 secretion, irrespective of the adjuvant. In conjunctivaly immunized C57BL/6 mice, only TTd administered with wBP promoted the establishment of a mixed Th1/Th17 TTd-specific immune response, whereas TTd alone or TTd in conjunction with glycerol initiated a dominant Th1 response against TTd. Immunization via the conjunctiva with TTd plus wBP adjuvant resulted in a 33% survival rate of challenged mice compared to a 0% survival rate in non-immunized animals (p<0.05). Conclusion Conjunctival immunization with TTd alone or with various adjuvants induced TTd-specific local and systemic immune responses, predominantly of the Th1 type. The strongest immune responses developed in mice that received TTd together with wBP, which implies that this alternative route might tailor the immune response to fight intracellular bacteria or viruses more effectively. PMID

  6. The ocular conjunctiva as a mucosal immunization route: a profile of the immune response to the model antigen tetanus toxoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talin Barisani-Asenbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a quest for a needle-free vaccine administration strategy, we evaluated the ocular conjunctiva as an alternative mucosal immunization route by profiling and comparing the local and systemic immune responses to the subcutaneous or conjunctival administration of tetanus toxoid (TTd, a model antigen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized either subcutaneously with TTd alone or via the conjunctiva with TTd alone, TTd mixed with 2% glycerol or TTd with merthiolate-inactivated whole-cell B. pertussis (wBP as adjuvants. Mice were immunized on days 0, 7 and 14 via both routes, and an evaluation of the local and systemic immune responses was performed two weeks after the last immunization. Four weeks after the last immunization, the mice were challenged with a lethal dose (2 × LD50 of tetanus toxin. RESULTS: The conjunctival application of TTd in BALB/c mice induced TTd-specific secretory IgA production and skewed the TTd-specific immune response toward a Th1/Th17 profile, as determined by the stimulation of IFNγ and IL-17A secretion and/or the concurrent pronounced reduction of IL-4 secretion, irrespective of the adjuvant. In conjunctivaly immunized C57BL/6 mice, only TTd administered with wBP promoted the establishment of a mixed Th1/Th17 TTd-specific immune response, whereas TTd alone or TTd in conjunction with glycerol initiated a dominant Th1 response against TTd. Immunization via the conjunctiva with TTd plus wBP adjuvant resulted in a 33% survival rate of challenged mice compared to a 0% survival rate in non-immunized animals (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Conjunctival immunization with TTd alone or with various adjuvants induced TTd-specific local and systemic immune responses, predominantly of the Th1 type. The strongest immune responses developed in mice that received TTd together with wBP, which implies that this alternative route might tailor the immune response to fight intracellular bacteria or viruses more

  7. ORION: a web server for protein fold recognition and structure prediction using evolutionary hybrid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouzam, Yassine; Postic, Guillaume; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2016-06-20

    Protein structure prediction based on comparative modeling is the most efficient way to produce structural models when it can be performed. ORION is a dedicated webserver based on a new strategy that performs this task. The identification by ORION of suitable templates is performed using an original profile-profile approach that combines sequence and structure evolution information. Structure evolution information is encoded into profiles using structural features, such as solvent accessibility and local conformation -with Protein Blocks-, which give an accurate description of the local protein structure. ORION has recently been improved, increasing by 5% the quality of its results. The ORION web server accepts a single protein sequence as input and searches homologous protein structures within minutes. Various databases such as PDB, SCOP and HOMSTRAD can be mined to find an appropriate structural template. For the modeling step, a protein 3D structure can be directly obtained from the selected template by MODELLER and displayed with global and local quality model estimation measures. The sequence and the predicted structure of 4 examples from the CAMEO server and a recent CASP11 target from the 'Hard' category (T0818-D1) are shown as pertinent examples. Our web server is accessible at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/ORION/.

  8. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  9. An Efficient Kernel Optimization Method for Radar High-Resolution Range Profile Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A kernel optimization method based on fusion kernel for high-resolution range profile (HRRP is proposed in this paper. Based on the fusion of -norm and -norm Gaussian kernels, our method combines the different characteristics of them so that not only is the kernel function optimized but also the speckle fluctuations of HRRP are restrained. Then the proposed method is employed to optimize the kernel of kernel principle component analysis (KPCA and the classification performance of extracted features is evaluated via support vector machines (SVMs classifier. Finally, experimental results on the benchmark and radar-measured data sets are compared and analyzed to demonstrate the efficiency of our method.

  10. Genetic diversity, anti-microbial resistance, plasmid profile and frequency of the Vi antigen in Salmonella Dublin strains isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, F P; Frazão, M R; Rodrigues, D P; Costa, R G; Casas, M R T; Fernandes, S A; Falcão, J P; Campioni, F

    2018-02-01

    Salmonella Dublin is strongly adapted to cattle causing enteritis and/or systemic disease with high rates of mortality. However, it can be sporadically isolated from humans, usually causing serious disease, especially in patients with underlying chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to molecularly type S. Dublin strains isolated from humans and animals in Brazil to verify the diversity of these strains as well as to ascertain possible differences between strains isolated from humans and animals. Moreover, the presence of the capsular antigen Vi and the plasmid profile was characterized in addition to the anti-microbial resistance against 15 drugs. For this reason, 113 S. Dublin strains isolated between 1983 and 2016 from humans (83) and animals (30) in Brazil were typed by PFGE and MLVA. The presence of the capsular antigen Vi was verified by PCR, and the phenotypic expression of the capsular antigen was determined serologically. Also, a plasmid analysis for each strain was carried out. The strains studied were divided into 35 different PFGE types and 89 MLVA-types with a similarity of ≥80% and ≥17.5%, respectively. The plasmid sizes found ranged from 2 to >150 kb and none of the strains studied presented the capsular antigen Vi. Resistance or intermediate resistance was found in 23 strains (20.3%) that were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, imipenem, nalidixic acid, piperacillin, streptomycin and/or tetracycline. The majority of the S. Dublin strains studied and isolated over a 33-year period may descend from a common subtype that has been contaminating humans and animals in Brazil and able to cause invasive disease even in the absence of the capsular antigen. The higher diversity of resistance phenotypes in human isolates, as compared with animal strains, may be a reflection of the different anti-microbial treatments used to control S. Dublin infections in humans in Brazil. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Anthelmintic Therapy Modifies the Systemic and Mycobacterial Antigen-Stimulated Cytokine Profile in Helminth-Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2017-04-01

    Helminth infections are known to modulate cytokine responses in latent tuberculosis (LTB). However, very few studies have examined whether this modulation is reversible upon anthelmintic therapy. We measured the systemic and mycobacterial (TB) antigen-stimulated levels of type 1, type 2, type 17, and regulatory cytokines in individuals with LTB and with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection before and after anthelmintic therapy. Our data reveal that individuals with LTB and coexistent S. stercoralis infection have significantly lower levels of systemic and TB antigen-stimulated type 1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]) and type 17 (IL-17A and/or IL-17F) cytokines and significantly higher levels of systemic but not TB antigen-stimulated type 2 (IL-4 and IL-5) and regulatory (transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) cytokines. Anthelmintic therapy resulted in significantly increased systemic levels of type 1 and/or type 17 cytokines and in significantly decreased systemic levels of type 2 and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines. In addition, anthelmintic therapy resulted in significantly increased TB antigen-stimulated levels of type 1 cytokines only. Our data therefore confirm that the modulation of systemic and TB antigen-stimulated cytokine responses in S. stercoralis -LTB coinfection is reversible (for the most part) by anthelmintic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Recognition of melanoma-derived antigens by CTL: possible mechanisms involved in down-regulating anti-tumor T-cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivoltini, L; Loftus, D J; Squarcina, P

    1998-01-01

    Several T cell-recognized epitopes presented by melanoma cells have been identified recently. Despite the large array of epitopes potentially available for clinical use, it is still unclear which of these antigens could be effective in mediating anti-tumor responses when used as a vaccine...... (detected as increased antigen-specific CTL activity in peripheral blood) was obtained by vaccinating HLA-A2.1+ melanoma patients with the immunodominant epitope (residues 27-35) of the differentiation antigen MART-1, but this immunization was not accompanied by a significant clinical response. To implement...... immunotherapeuties capable of significantly impacting disease outcome, it is necessary to identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the failure of some antigens to mediate significant anti-tumor responses in vivo. In the case of the MART-1(27-35) epitope, we hypothesize that one of these mechanisms may...

  13. Recognition of oxidized albumin and thyroid antigens by psoriasis autoantibodies. A possible role of reactive-oxygen-species induced epitopes in chronic plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani A. Al-Shobaili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the role of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS induced epitopes on human-serum-albumin (HSA and thyroid antigens in psoriasis autoimmunity. Methods: This study was performed in the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia between May 2014 and February 2015. The study was designed to explore the role of ROS-induced epitopes in psoriasis autoimmunity. Singlet-oxygen (or ROS-induced epitopes on protein (ROS-epitopes-albumin was characterized by in-vitro and in-vivo. Thyroid antigens were prepared from rabbit thyroid, and thyroglobulin was isolated from thyroid extract. Immunocross-reactions of protein-A purified anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-immunoglobulin G (IgGs with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin, and their oxidized forms were determined. Binding characteristics of autoantibodies in chronic plaque psoriasis patients (n=26 against ROS-epitopes-HSA and also with native and oxidized thyroid antigens were screened, and the results were compared with age-matched controls (n=22. Results: The anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-IgGs showed cross-reactions with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin and with their oxidized forms. High degree of specific binding by psoriasis IgGs to ROS-epitopes-HSA, ROS-thyroid antigen and ROS-thyroglobulin was observed. Immunoglobulin G from normal-human-controls showed negligible binding with all tested antigens. Moreover, sera from psoriasis patients had higher levels of carbonyl contents compared with control sera. Conclusion: Structural alterations in albumin, thyroid antigens by ROS, generate unique neo-epitopes that might be one of the factors for the induction of autoantibodies in psoriasis.

  14. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...

  15. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  16. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  17. A T Helper Cell 2 (Th2) Immune Response against Non-self Antigens Modifies the Cytokine Profile of Autoimmune T Cells and Protects against Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marika; Bloom, Barry R.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), and the most commonly used experimental model for multiple sclerosis. It is mediated by autoreactive T cell clones exhibiting a T helper cell (Th) 1 cytokine profile. Nonencephalitogenic T lymphocytes specific for self or exogenous antigens have been found to suppress encephalitogenic T cell responses and to protect against autoimmune disease. The mechanisms by which exogenous antigens modulate autoimmunity are not fully understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a Th2-type immune response against an exogenous, nonself antigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), by releasing IL-4 in the microenvironment, could shift the cytokine profile of encephalitogenic T cells from an inflammatory Th1 to a protective Th2 type. SJL/J mice were preimmunized with the KLH in incomplete Freund's adjuvant to induce a population of Th2 memory cells that would be expected to release Th2 cytokines when activated by the specific antigen at the time of EAE induction. Four weeks later, mice received an encephalitogenic challenge containing guinea pig myelin in complete Freund's adjuvant with or without KLH. All KLH primed animals not receiving the exogenous antigen at the time of EAE induction developed a severe clinical disease indistinguishable from control mice not KLH primed. In contrast, animals preimmunized and challenged with the encephalitogenic inoculum containing KLH showed either no, or markedly reduced, clinical signs. Enzyme-linked immunospot analysis demonstrated that KLH-specific T cells in the primed mice were producing IL-4 characteristic of Th2 cells. In the KLH-primed and restimulated mice, the cytokine profile of the autoreactive, myelin basic protein–specific T cells was shifted from an inflammatory Th1 towards a protective Th2 type. We infer that the presence of IL-4 secreted by KLH-specific memory Th2 cells in the lymphoid system microenvironment

  18. A T helper cell 2 (Th2) immune response against non-self antigens modifies the cytokine profile of autoimmune T cells and protects against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, M; Bloom, B R

    1997-03-03

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), and the most commonly used experimental model for multiple sclerosis. It is mediated by autoreactive T cell clones exhibiting a T helper cell (Th) 1 cytokine profile. Nonencephalitogenic T lymphocytes specific for self or exogenous antigens have been found to suppress encephalitogenic T cell responses and to protect against autoimmune disease. The mechanisms by which exogenous antigens modulate autoimmunity are not fully understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a Th2-type immune response against an exogenous, nonself antigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), by releasing IL-4 in the microenvironment, could shift the cytokine profile of encephalitogenic T cells from an inflammatory Th1 to a protective Th2 type. SJL/J mice were preimmunized with the KLH in incomplete Freund's adjuvant to induce a population of Th2 memory cells that would be expected to release Th2 cytokines when activated by the specific antigen at the time of EAE induction. Four weeks later, mice received an encephalitogenic challenge containing guinea pig myelin in complete Freund's adjuvant with or without KLH. All KLH primed animals not receiving the exogenous antigen at the time of EAE induction developed a severe clinical disease indistinguishable from control mice not KLH primed. In contrast, animals preimmunized and challenged with the encephalitogenic inoculum containing KLH showed either no, or markedly reduced, clinical signs. Enzyme-linked immunospot analysis demonstrated that KLH-specific T cells in the primed mice were producing IL-4 characteristic of Th2 cells. In the KLH-primed and restimulated mice, the cytokine profile of the autoreactive, myelin basic protein-specific T cells was shifted from an inflammatory Th1 towards a protective Th2 type. We infer that the presence of IL-4 secreted by KLH-specific memory Th2 cells in the lymphoid system microenvironment in

  19. T-antigen binding lectin with antibacterial activity from marine invertebrate, sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra): Possible involvement in differential recognition of bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gowda, N.M.; Goswami, U.; Khan, M.I.

    * Corresponding author. Fax: +91 20 2590 2648. 1 Abbreviations: HSL, Holothuria scabra lectin; MeaGal, methyl-a-D-galactopyrano- side; T-antigen (Gal b1-3 GalNAc a-1-O-L-Ser), Thomsen–Friedenreich antigen. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 99 (2008) 141..., nodule formation and phagocyto- sis (Cooper et al., 1992). The microbial load in natural marine hab- itat can number up to 10 6 bacteria and 10 9 virus mL C01 of seawater (Ammerman et al., 1984). It is therefore imperative that animals develop a robust...

  20. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M

    2001-01-01

    to identify TAA, mice were immunized with mixtures of peptides representing putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from one of the gene products. Indeed, such immunized mice were partially protected against subsequent tumor challenge. Despite being immunized with bona fide self antigens, no clinical signs...... imprints, which may be used to identify patient-specific arrays of TAA. This may enable a multi-epitope based immunotherapy with improved prospects of clinical tumor rejection....

  1. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søren; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, Morten

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors we...... imprints, which may be used to identify patient-specific arrays of TAA. This may enable a multi-epitope based immunotherapy with improved prospects of clinical tumor rejection....

  2. Specific T-cell recognition of the merozoite proteins rhoptry-associated protein 1 and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living i...

  3. Recognition of melanoma-derived antigens by CTL: possible mechanisms involved in down-regulating anti-tumor T-cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivoltini, L; Loftus, D J; Squarcina, P

    1998-01-01

    Several T cell-recognized epitopes presented by melanoma cells have been identified recently. Despite the large array of epitopes potentially available for clinical use, it is still unclear which of these antigens could be effective in mediating anti-tumor responses when used as a vaccine...

  4. Antigenic profile of heat-killed versus thimerosal-treated Leishmania major using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania is a parasitic protozoan of trypanosomatidae family which causes a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from self-healing cutaneous lesions to deadly visceral forms. In endemic areas, field trials of different preparations of Leishmania total antigen were tested as leishmaniasis vaccine. Two preparations of killed Leishmania major were produced In Iran, which were heat-killed vaccine called autoclaved L. major (ALM and thimerosal-treated freeze-thawed vaccine called killed L. major (KLM. In this study, the protein content of both ALM and KLM were compared with that of freshly harvested intact L. major promastigotes using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Materials and Methods: L. major (MRHO/IR/75/ER from pre-infected Balb/c mice was isolated with modified Novy-MacNeal-Nicolle (NNN medium and then subcultured in liquid RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with fetal calf serum (FCS 20% for mass production. Two preparations of KLM and ALM were produced by Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Iran, under WHO/TDR supervision. Electrophoresis was performed by SDS-PAGE method and the gel was stained by Coomassie brilliant blue dye. The resultant unit bands were compared using standard molecular proteins. Results: Electrophoresis of the two preparations produced many bands from 10 kDa to 100 kDa. KLM bands were much like those of freshly harvested intact L. major. Conclusion: It is concluded that although there are similar bands in the three forms of Leishmania antigens, there are some variations which might be considered for identification and purification of protective immunogens in a total crude antigen, and detection of their stability is essential for the production and marketing of a putative vaccine.

  5. Recognition of anti-mycolic acid antibody at self-assembled mycolic acid antigens on a gold electrode: a potential impedimetric immunosensing platform for active tuberculosis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathebula, NS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical impedimetric recognition by anti-mycolic acid antibodies, present in tuberculosis (TB)-positive human serum co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of mycolic acids (MA) integrated into a self-assembled monolayer of N-(2...

  6. Single-cell multiplexed cytokine profiling of CD19 CAR-T cells reveals a diverse landscape of polyfunctional antigen-specific response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiong; Bettini, Emily; Paczkowski, Patrick; Ng, Colin; Kaiser, Alaina; McConnell, Timothy; Kodrasi, Olja; Quigley, Máire F; Heath, James; Fan, Rong; Mackay, Sean; Dudley, Mark E; Kassim, Sadik H; Zhou, Jing

    2017-11-21

    It remains challenging to characterize the functional attributes of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cell product targeting CD19 related to potency and immunotoxicity ex vivo, despite promising in vivo efficacy in patients with B cell malignancies. We employed a single-cell, 16-plex cytokine microfluidics device and new analysis techniques to evaluate the functional profile of CD19 CAR-T cells upon antigen-specific stimulation. CAR-T cells were manufactured from human PBMCs transfected with the lentivirus encoding the CD19-BB-z transgene and expanded with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 coated beads. The enriched CAR-T cells were stimulated with anti-CAR or control IgG beads, stained with anti-CD4 RPE and anti-CD8 Alexa Fluor 647 antibodies, and incubated for 16 h in a single-cell barcode chip (SCBC). Each SCBC contains ~12,000 microchambers, covered with a glass slide that was pre-patterned with a complete copy of a 16-plex antibody array. Protein secretions from single CAR-T cells were captured and subsequently analyzed using proprietary software and new visualization methods. We demonstrate a new method for single-cell profiling of CD19 CAR-T pre-infusion products prepared from 4 healthy donors. CAR-T single cells exhibited a marked heterogeneity of cytokine secretions and polyfunctional (2+ cytokine) subsets specific to anti-CAR bead stimulation. The breadth of responses includes anti-tumor effector (Granzyme B, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF-α), stimulatory (GM-CSF, IL-2, IL-8), regulatory (IL-4, IL-13, IL-22), and inflammatory (IL-6, IL-17A) functions. Furthermore, we developed two new bioinformatics tools for more effective polyfunctional subset visualization and comparison between donors. Single-cell, multiplexed, proteomic profiling of CD19 CAR-T product reveals a diverse landscape of immune effector response of CD19 CAR-T cells to antigen-specific challenge, providing a new platform for capturing CAR-T product data for correlative analysis. Additionally, such high

  7. MHC class II DRB diversity predicts antigen recognition and is associated with disease severity in California sea lions naturally infected with Leptospira interrogans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Gulland, Frances; Bowen, Lizabeth

    2018-01-01

    We examined the associations between California sea lion MHC class II DRB (Zaca-DRB) configuration and diversity, and leptospirosis. As Zaca-DRB gene sequences are involved with antigen presentation of bacteria and other extracellular pathogens, we predicted that they would play a role in determining responses to these pathogenic spirochaetes. Specifically, we investigated whether Zaca-DRB diversity (number of genes) and configuration (presence of specific genes) explained differences in disease severity, and whether higher levels of Zaca-DRB diversity predicted the number of specific Leptospira interrogans serovars that a sea lion's serum would react against. We found that serum from diseased sea lions with more Zaca-DRB loci reacted against a wider array of serovars. Specific Zaca-DRB loci were linked to reactions with particular serovars. Interestingly, sea lions with clinical manifestation of leptospirosis that had higher numbers of Zaca-DRB loci were less likely to recover from disease than those with lower diversity, and those that harboured Zaca-DRB.C or –G were 4.5 to 5.3 times more likely to die from leptospirosis, regardless of the infective serovars. We propose that for leptospirosis, a disadvantage of having a wider range of antigen presentation might be increased disease severity due to immunopathology. Ours is the first study to examine the importance of Zaca-DRB diversity for antigen detection and disease severity following natural exposure to infective leptospires.

  8. MHC class II DRB diversity predicts antigen recognition and is associated with disease severity in California sea lions naturally infected with Leptospira interrogans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Gulland, Frances M D; Bowen, Lizabeth

    2018-01-01

    We examined the associations between California sea lion MHC class II DRB (Zaca-DRB) configuration and diversity, and leptospirosis. As Zaca-DRB gene sequences are involved with antigen presentation of bacteria and other extracellular pathogens, we predicted that they would play a role in determining responses to these pathogenic spirochaetes. Specifically, we investigated whether Zaca-DRB diversity (number of genes) and configuration (presence of specific genes) explained differences in disease severity, and whether higher levels of Zaca-DRB diversity predicted the number of specific Leptospira interrogans serovars that a sea lion's serum would react against. We found that serum from diseased sea lions with more Zaca-DRB loci reacted against a wider array of serovars. Specific Zaca-DRB loci were linked to reactions with particular serovars. Interestingly, sea lions with clinical manifestation of leptospirosis that had higher numbers of Zaca-DRB loci were less likely to recover from disease than those with lower diversity, and those that harboured Zaca-DRB.C or -G were 4.5 to 5.3 times more likely to die from leptospirosis, regardless of the infective serovars. We propose that for leptospirosis, a disadvantage of having a wider range of antigen presentation might be increased disease severity due to immunopathology. Ours is the first study to examine the importance of Zaca-DRB diversity for antigen detection and disease severity following natural exposure to infective leptospires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet antigen 2 antibody profiles in people with adult-onset diabetes mellitus: a comparison between mixed ethnic populations in Singapore and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Y H; Koh, W C A; Ng, M L; Tam, Z Y; Lim, S C; Boehm, B O

    2017-08-01

    To gain insight into the presence of islet cell autoimmunity in an ethnic Asian compared with a white European population. For this cross-sectional study we recruited people with adult-onset diabetes (age of diagnosis 20-60 years), at tertiary referral centres in Germany (n=1020) and Singapore (n=1088). Glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet antigen 2 antibodies were measured according to Islet Autoantibody Standardization Program protocols. The prevalence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positivity was 13.9% (95% CI 12.1-16.0; PGlutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positivity was 11.4% (95% CI 7.7-16.6) in Indian, 6.0% (95% CI 3.6-9.9) in Malay and 5.8% (95% CI 4.3-7.7; Pglutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody-positive had a lower BMI than those who were autoantibody-negative, but this trend was absent in the Asian cohort. A marked prevalence of islet cell autoimmunity was observed in people with adult-onset diabetes. While glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies were more frequent in the European cohort, islet antigen 2 antibody positivity was highest in the three ethnic groups in Singapore, suggesting ethnic-specific differences in antibody profiles. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  10. Rotavirus antigen, cytokine, and neutralising antibody profiles in sera of children with and without HIV infection in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Jennifer J; Cunliffe, Nigel; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Moon, Sung-Sil; Wang, Yuhuan; Parashar, Umesh; Jiang, Baoming

    2017-03-01

    Rotavirus and HIV infection are major causes of death among children in sub-Saharan Africa. A previous study reported no association between concomitant HIV infection and rotavirus disease severity among hospitalised children in Malawi. This study examined rotavirus antigenaemia and broader immune responses among HIV-infected and uninfected children. Stored (-80°C), paired sera from acute and convalescent phases of Malawian children less than 5 years old, hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis in the primary study, collected from July 1997 to June 1999, were utilised. Among children older than 15 months, HIV infection was defined as the presence of HIV antibody in the blood, when confirmed by at least 2 established methods. For those younger than 15 months, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of proviral DNA was used for verification. All were followed for up to 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Rotavirus antigen levels in sera were measured with Premier™ Rotaclone® rotavirus enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit. Acute-phase sera were examined for 17 cytokines, using Luminex fluorescent bead human cytokine immunoassay kit. Rotavirus-specific IgA and neutralising activity were determined by EIA and microneutralisation (MN) assay, respectively. Human strains and bovine-human reassortants were propagated in MA104 cells with serum-free Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM). Differences in results, from specimens with and without HIV infection, were analysed for statistical significance using the chi-square test. We detected rotavirus antigen in 30% of the HIV-infected and 21% HIV-uninfected, in the acute-phase sera. HIV-infected children developed slightly prolonged rotavirus antigenaemia compared to HIV-uninfected children. Rotavirus-specific IgA seroconversion rates and neutralising titres were similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children, thus, HIV infection had no major effect on immune responses to rotavirus infection.

  11. Specific T-cell recognition of the merozoite proteins rhoptry-associated protein 1 and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living...... by individuals living in an area with a high transmission rate of malaria. Most of the donor plasma samples tested contained immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies recognizing the merozoite proteins, while only a minority showed high IgG reactivity to the synthetic peptides....

  12. The origin of the chemical profiles of fungal symbionts and their significance for nestmate recognition in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Poulsen, Michael; Hefetz, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    exist in the fungus-growing ants where the symbiotic fungus garden may be an independent source of recognition compounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we quantified the chemical profiles of the fungal symbionts of 18 sympatric colonies of Acromyrmex echinatior and Acromyrmex octospinosus...... and evaluated the quantitative variation of the 47 compounds in a multivariate analysis. Colony-specific chemical profiles of fungal symbionts were highly distinct and significantly different between the two ant species. We also estimated the relative genetic distances between the fungal symbionts using...... in chemical profiles could be explained by genetic differences between the fungal symbionts. However, there was no significant effect of ant species in partial analyses because genetic differences between symbionts tend to coincide with being reared by different ant species. However, compound groups differed...

  13. Human antibody recognition of xenogeneic antigens (NeuGc and Gal) on porcine heart valves: could genetically modified pig heart valves reduce structural valve deterioration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whayoung; Long, Cassandra; Ramsoondar, Jagdeece; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C; Manji, Rizwan A; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-09-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves (GBHVs) derived from wild-type (WT, genetically unmodified) pigs are widely used clinically for heart valve replacement. There is evidence that their failure is related to an immune response. The use of valves from genetically engineered pigs that do not express specific pig antigens may prolong GBHV survival. Our aims were to determine (i) expression of Gal and NeuGc on heart (aortic and pulmonary) valves and pericardium of WT, α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) and GTKO/N-glycolylneuraminic acid gene-knockout (GTKO/NeuGcKO) pigs in comparison with three different commercially available GBHVs and (ii) to determine human antibody binding to these tissues. Wild-type, GTKO/CD46, and GTKO/CD46/NeuGcKO pig valves and pericardium were tested (i) fresh and (ii) after fixation with glutaraldehyde (0.02%, 0.2%, 2%). Sections of GBHVs, fresh and fixed valves, and pericardium were stained for Gal and NeuGc expression, and for human IgM and IgG antibody binding. Gal and NeuGc expression was high on all GBHVs and WT pig valves/pericardium, but was absent after antigen-specific-knockout. There was no difference in antigen expression or antibody binding among WT aortic, pulmonary valves, and pericardium as well as GBHVs. Glutaraldehyde fixation did not alter expression of Gal or NeuGc. After incubation with human serum, human IgM and IgG bound to all GBHVs and WT pig valves/pericardium. Valves from GTKO/CD46 pigs and, particularly, GTKO/CD46/NeuGcKO pigs (with/without glutaraldehyde fixation) showed less IgM and IgG binding. Compared to WT pigs, GTKO/CD46/NeuGcKO pigs would be preferable sources of GBHVs, because the absence of Gal/NeuGc expression reduces human antibody binding. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Profiling of glycan receptors for minute virus of mice in permissive cell lines towards understanding the mechanism of cell recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Halder

    Full Text Available The recognition of sialic acids by two strains of minute virus of mice (MVM, MVMp (prototype and MVMi (immunosuppressive, is an essential requirement for successful infection. To understand the potential for recognition of different modifications of sialic acid by MVM, three types of capsids, virus-like particles, wild type empty (no DNA capsids, and DNA packaged virions, were screened on a sialylated glycan microarray (SGM. Both viruses demonstrated a preference for binding to 9-O-methylated sialic acid derivatives, while MVMp showed additional binding to 9-O-acetylated and 9-O-lactoylated sialic acid derivatives, indicating recognition differences. The glycans recognized contained a type-2 Galβ1-4GlcNAc motif (Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc or 3'SIA-LN and were biantennary complex-type N-glycans with the exception of one. To correlate the recognition of the 3'SIA-LN glycan motif as well as the biantennary structures to their natural expression in cell lines permissive for MVMp, MVMi, or both strains, the N- and O-glycans, and polar glycolipids present in three cell lines used for in vitro studies, A9 fibroblasts, EL4 T lymphocytes, and the SV40 transformed NB324K cells, were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The cells showed an abundance of the sialylated glycan motifs recognized by the viruses in the SGM and previous glycan microarrays supporting their role in cellular recognition by MVM. Significantly, the NB324K showed fucosylation at the non-reducing end of their biantennary glycans, suggesting that recognition of these cells is possibly mediated by the Lewis X motif as in 3'SIA-Le(X identified in a previous glycan microarray screen.

  15. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

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    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation.Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene.B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats.B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets

  16. Specific immunologic recognition of the tumor-specific E2A-PBX1 fusion-point antigen in t(1;19)-positive pre-B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendes, P; Hoogeveen, A; van Dijk, M; van Denderen, J; van Ewijk, W

    1995-08-01

    The t(1;19) translocation is the most commonly observed chromosomal translocation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Its presence among pre-B cell ALL cases, has been associated with a poor prognosis. Two genes, E2A and PBX1, are involved in this t(1;19) translocation. As a consequence, parts of the E2A and PBX1 genes are fused, resulting in a chimeric E2A-PBX1 gene, encoding chimeric E2A-PBX1 proteins. As such, the amino acid sequence at the fusion site represents a unique tumor-specific determinant. We report on the generation of a polyclonal antiserum, termed BP 1/19, raised against the tumor-specific E2A-PBX1 junction of E2A-PBX1 proteins. The specificity of antiserum BP 1/19 for the E2A-PBX1 fusion-point is demonstrated at the peptide and at the protein level. Furthermore, specific binding of antiserum BP 1/19 to t(1;19) positive cells was shown using immunofluorescence techniques. The study shows that: (1) the tumor-specific fusion-point epitope on E2A-PBX1 proteins is presented in an antigenic fashion, and (2) this particular fusion-point epitope can be used in immunological marker analysis using fluorescence microscopy.

  17. A plasma survey using 38 PfEMP1 domains reveals frequent recognition of the Plasmodium falciparum antigen VAR2CSA among young Tanzanian children.

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    Andrew V Oleinikov

    Full Text Available PfEMP1 proteins comprise a family of variant antigens that appear on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and bind to multiple host receptors. Using a mammalian expression system and BioPlex technology, we developed an array of 24 protein constructs representing 38 PfEMP1 domains for high throughput analyses of receptor binding as well as total and functional antibody responses. We analyzed the reactivity of 561 plasma samples from 378 young Tanzanian children followed up to maximum 192 weeks of life in a longitudinal birth cohort. Surprisingly, reactivity to the DBL5 domain of VAR2CSA, a pregnancy malaria vaccine candidate, was most common, and the prevalence of reactivity was stable throughout early childhood. Reactivity to all other PfEMP1 constructs increased with age. Antibodies to the DBL2βC2(PF11_0521 domain, measured as plasma reactivity or plasma inhibition of ICAM1 binding, predicted reduced risk of hospitalization for severe or moderately severe malaria. These data suggest a role for VAR2CSA in childhood malaria and implicate DBL2βC2(PF11_0521 in protective immunity.

  18. Short-Lived Antigen Recognition but Not Viral Infection at a Defined Checkpoint Programs Effector CD4 T Cells To Become Protective Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Bianca L; Devarajan, Priyadharshini; McKinstry, K Kai; Strutt, Tara M; Vong, Allen M; Jones, Michael C; Kuang, Yi; Mott, Daniel; Swain, Susan L

    2016-11-15

    Although memory CD4 T cells are critical for effective immunity to pathogens, the mechanisms underlying their generation are still poorly defined. We find that following murine influenza infection, most effector CD4 T cells undergo apoptosis unless they encounter cognate Ag at a defined stage near the peak of effector generation. Ag recognition at this memory checkpoint blocks default apoptosis and programs their transition to long-lived memory. Strikingly, we find that viral infection is not required, because memory formation can be restored by the addition of short-lived, Ag-pulsed APC at this checkpoint. The resulting memory CD4 T cells express an enhanced memory phenotype, have increased cytokine production, and provide protection against lethal influenza infection. Finally, we find that memory CD4 T cell formation following cold-adapted influenza vaccination is boosted when Ag is administered during this checkpoint. These findings imply that persistence of viral Ag presentation into the effector phase is the key factor that determines the efficiency of memory generation. We also suggest that administering Ag at this checkpoint may improve vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Protein and antigen profiles of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo Perfil proteico e antigênico da Leptospira interrogans sorovariedade Hardjo

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    Bárbara Nobre Lafetá

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The protein profile of the outer membrane of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo subtype hardjoprajitno associated with the bovine natural immune response was investigated. The outer membrane proteins were extracted utilizing Triton X114 and precipitated with acetone. The protein sample was then resolved by SDS-PAGE and reacted in western blot against sera from a hyperimmune rabbit and from naturally infected bovines. In silver stained gels, 14 protein bands were observed, among which four proteins, with 22, 29, 47 and 63kDa, appeared as major constituents. Western blot tests with hyperimmune rabbit antiserum detected bands corresponding to proteins with 35; 27; 24; 21; 17 and 14kDa, while 32kDa and 45kDa proteins were the most immunoreactive with sera from naturally infected bovines.Estudou-se o perfil proteico da membrana externa da Leptospira interrogans sorovariedade Hardjo, amostra hardjoprajitno, associado à resposta imune natural de bovinos infectados. Foram utilizados Triton X114 para a extração das proteínas de membrana externa e acetona para precipitá-las. As proteínas extraídas foram analisadas por SDS-PAGE e western blot contra soro de coelhos hiperimunes e de bovinos naturalmente infectados. Em géis corados com nitrato de prata, 14 bandas proteicas foram identificadas, e quatro dessas bandas, com 22, 29, 47 e 63kDa, foram as mais proeminentes. Os western blots com soro hiperimune de coelho detectaram bandas correspondentes a proteínas com pesos moleculares de 35, 27, 24, 21, 17 e 14kDa, e bandas de 32 e 45kDa destacaram-se nos testes com soros de bovinos naturalmente infectados.

  20. Recognition of distinct HLA-DQA1 promoter elements by a single nuclear factor containing Jun and Fos or antigenically related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve Ombra, M; Autiero, M; DeLerma Barbaro, A; Barretta, R; Del Pozzo, G; Guardiola, J

    1993-01-01

    The activity of MHC class II promoters depends upon conserved regulatory signals one of which, the extended X-box, contains in its X2 subregion a sequence related to the cAMP response element, CRE and to the TPA response element, TRE. Accordingly, X2 is recognized by the AP-1 factor and by other c-Jun or c-Fos containing heterodimers. We report that the X-box dependent promoter activity of the HLA-DQA1 gene is down-modulated by an array of DNA elements each of which represented twice either in an invertedly or directly repeated orientation. In this frame, we describe a nuclear binding factor, namely DBF, promiscuously interacting with two of these additional signals, delta and sigma, and with a portion of the X-box, namely the X-core, devoid of X2. The presence of a single factor recognizing divergent DNA sequences was indicated by the finding that these activities were co-eluted from a heparin-Sepharose column and from DNA affinity columns carrying different DNA binding sites as ligands. Competition experiments made with oligonucleotides representing wild type and mutant DNA elements showed that each DNA element specifically inhibited the binding of the others, supporting the contention that DBF is involved in recognition of different targets. Furthermore, we found that DBF also exhibits CRE/TRE binding activity and that this activity can be competed out by addition of an excess of sigma, delta and X-core oligonucleotides. Anti-Jun peptide and anti-Fos peptide antibodies blocked not only the binding activity of DBF, but also its X-core and sigma binding; this blockade was removed by the addition of the Jun or Fos peptides against which the antibodies had been raised. In vitro synthesized Jun/Fos was able to bind to all these boxes, albeit with seemingly different affinities. The cooperativity of DBF interactions may explain the modulation of the X-box dependent promoter activity mediated by the accessory DNA elements described here. Images PMID:8493100

  1. Immunogenic profiling in mice of a HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate (MVA-B expressing four HIV-1 antigens and potentiation by specific gene deletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan García-Arriaza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The immune parameters of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates that might be relevant in protection against HIV-1 infection are still undefined. The highly attenuated poxvirus strain MVA is one of the most promising vectors to be use as HIV-1 vaccine. We have previously described a recombinant MVA expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (referred as MVA-B, that induced HIV-1-specific immune responses in different animal models and gene signatures in human dendritic cells (DCs with immunoregulatory function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an effort to characterize in more detail the immunogenic profile of MVA-B and to improve its immunogenicity we have generated a new vector lacking two genes (A41L and B16R, known to counteract host immune responses by blocking the action of CC-chemokines and of interleukin 1beta, respectively (referred as MVA-B DeltaA41L/DeltaB16R. A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol was used to compare the adaptive and memory HIV-1 specific immune responses induced in mice by the parental MVA-B and by the double deletion mutant MVA-B DeltaA41L/DeltaB16R. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that both vectors triggered HIV-1-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, with the CD8(+ T-cell compartment responsible for >91.9% of the total HIV-1 responses in both immunization groups. However, MVA-B DeltaA41L/DeltaB16R enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cell immune responses. HIV-1-specific CD4(+ T-cell responses were polyfunctional and preferentially Env-specific in both immunization groups. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses, MVA-B DeltaA41L/DeltaB16R induced more GPN-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses, with an enhanced polyfunctional pattern. Both vectors were capable of producing similar levels of antibodies against Env. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings revealed that MVA-B and MVA-B DeltaA41L/DeltaB16R

  2. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  3. Glycomic Analysis of Life Stages of the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni Reveals Developmental Expression Profiles of Functional and Antigenic Glycan Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Cornelis H; van Diepen, Angela; Nguyen, D Linh; Wuhrer, Manfred; Hoffmann, Karl F; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-07-01

    Glycans present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the major human parasite Schistosoma mansoni induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the host. To be able to study the molecular characteristics of schistosome infections it is therefore required to determine the expression profiles of glycans and antigenic glycan-motifs during a range of critical stages of the complex schistosome lifecycle. We performed a longitudinal profiling study covering schistosome glycosylation throughout worm- and egg-development using a mass spectrometry-based glycomics approach. Our study revealed that during worm development N-glycans with Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LeX) and core-xylose motifs were rapidly lost after cercariae to schistosomula transformation, whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs gradually became abundant and predominated in adult worms. LeX-motifs were present on glycolipids up to 2 weeks of schistosomula development, whereas glycolipids with mono- and multifucosylated LDN-motifs remained present up to the adult worm stage. In contrast, expression of complex O-glycans diminished to undetectable levels within days after transformation. During egg development, a rich diversity of N-glycans with fucosylated motifs was expressed, but with α3-core fucose and a high degree of multifucosylated antennae only in mature eggs and miracidia. N-glycan antennae were exclusively LDN-based in miracidia. O-glycans in the mature eggs were also diverse and contained LeX- and multifucosylated LDN, but none of these were associated with miracidia in which we detected only the Galβ1-3(Galβ1-6)GalNAc core glycan. Immature eggs also exhibited short O-glycan core structures only, suggesting that complex fucosylated O-glycans of schistosome eggs are derived primarily from glycoproteins produced by the subshell envelope in the developed egg. Lipid glycans with multifucosylated GlcNAc repeats were present throughout egg development, but with the longer highly fucosylated

  4. Probiotic Bacteria Alter Pattern-Recognition Receptor Expression and Cytokine Profile in a Human Macrophage Model Challenged with Candida albicans and Lipopolysaccharide

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    Victor H. Matsubara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer benefits to the host health. The infection rate of potentially pathogenic organisms such as Candida albicans, the most common agent associated with mucosal candidiasis, can be reduced by probiotics. However, the mechanisms by which the probiotics interfere with the immune system are largely unknown. We evaluated the effect of probiotic bacteria on C. albicans challenged human macrophages. Macrophages were pretreated with lactobacilli alone (Lactobacillus rhamnosus LR32, Lactobacillus casei L324m, or Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM or associated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, followed by the challenge with C. albicans or LPS in a co-culture assay. The expression of pattern-recognition receptors genes (CLE7A, TLR2, and TLR4 was determined by RT-qPCR, and dectin-1 reduced levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. The cytokine profile was determined by ELISA using the macrophage cell supernatant. Overall probiotic lactobacilli down-regulated the transcription of CLEC7A (p < 0.05, resulting in the decreased expression of dectin-1 on probiotic pretreated macrophages. The tested Lactobacillus species down-regulated TLR4, and increased TLR2 mRNA levels in macrophages challenged with C. albicans. The cytokines profile of macrophages challenged with C. albicans or LPS were altered by the probiotics, which generally led to increased levels of IL-10 and IL-1β, and reduction of IL-12 production by macrophages (p < 0.05. Our data suggest that probiotic lactobacilli impair the recognition of PAMPs by macrophages, and alter the production of pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus modulating inflammation.

  5. ERP profiles for face and word recognition are based on their status in semantic memory not their stimulus category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Aiqing; Griffin, Michael; Keinath, Alexander; Walsh, Matthew; Dittmann, Andrea; Reder, Lynne

    2014-04-04

    Previous research has suggested that faces and words are processed and remembered differently as reflected by different ERP patterns for the two types of stimuli. Specifically, face stimuli produced greater late positive deflections for old items in anterior compared to posterior regions, while word stimuli produced greater late positive deflections in posterior compared to anterior regions. Given that words have existing representations in subjects׳ long-term memories (LTM) and that face stimuli used in prior experiments were of unknown individuals, we conducted an ERP study that crossed face and letter stimuli with the presence or absence of a prior (stable or existing) memory representation. During encoding, subjects judged whether stimuli were known (famous face or real word) or not known (unknown person or pseudo-word). A surprise recognition memory test required subjects to distinguish between stimuli that appeared during the encoding phase and stimuli that did not. ERP results were consistent with previous research when comparing unknown faces and words; however, the late ERP pattern for famous faces was more similar to that for words than for unknown faces. This suggests that the critical ERP difference is mediated by whether there is a prior representation in LTM, and not whether the stimulus involves letters or faces. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Profiles is a synthetic overview of more than 100 national energy markets in the world, providing insightful facts and key energy statistics. A Profile is structured around 6 main items and completed by key statistics: Ministries, public agencies, energy policy are concerned; main companies in the oil, gas, electricity and coal sectors, status, shareholders; reserve, production, imports and exports, electricity and refining capacities; deregulation of prices, subsidies, taxes; consumption trends by sector, energy market shares; main energy projects, production and consumption prospects. Statistical Profiles are present in about 3 pages the main data and indicators on oil, gas, coal and electricity. (A.L.B.)

  7. Macrophage pattern recognition receptors in immunity, homeostasis and self tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Plüddemann, Annette; Gordon, Siamon

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages, a major component of innate immune defence, express a large repertoire of different classes of pattern recognition receptors and other surface antigens which determine the immunologic and homeostatic potential of these versatile cells. In the light of present knowledge ofmacrophage surface antigens, we discuss self versus nonself recognition, microbicidal effector functions and self tolerance in the innate immune system.

  8. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  9. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  10. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...

  11. New BAGE (B melanoma antigen) genes mapping to the juxtacentromeric regions of human chromosomes 13 and 21 have a cancer/testis expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruault, Myriam; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Boyle, Shelagh; Roizès, Gérard; De Sario, Albertina

    2002-12-01

    A first BAGE (B melanoma antigen) gene, BAGE1, was identified because it encodes a human tumour antigen recognised by a cytolytic T lymphocyte. Here, we characterised five new BAGE genes mapping to the juxtacentromeric regions of human chromosomes 13 and 21 and nine BAGE gene fragments mapping to the juxtacentromeric regions of chromosomes 9, 13, 18, and 21. Genes and gene fragments share extensive regions of 90-99% nucleotide identity. We analysed the expression of BAGE genes on 215 tumours of various histological types and on nine normal tissues. Similar to BAGE1, the new BAGE genes are expressed in melanomas, bladder and lung carcinomas and in a few tumours of other histological types. All the normal tissues were negative, with the exception of testis. Our results show that human juxtacentromeric regions harbour genes, which are transcribed and translated, in addition to gene fragments that are generally not expressed. We suggest that the pattern of expression restricted to cancer/testis is a feature of the few genes mapping to juxtacentromeric regions.

  12. Application of fluorescent monocytes for probing immune complexes on antigen microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Szittner

    Full Text Available Microarrayed antigens are used for identifying serum antibodies with given specificities and for generating binding profiles. Antibodies bind to these arrayed antigens forming immune complexes and are conventionally identified by secondary labelled antibodies.In the body immune complexes are identified by bone marrow derived phagocytic cells, such as monocytes. In our work we were looking into the possibility of replacing secondary antibodies with monocytoid cells for the generation of antibody profiles. Using the human monocytoid cell line U937, which expresses cell surface receptors for immune complex components, we show that cell adhesion is completely dependent on the interaction of IgG heavy chains and Fcγ receptors, and this recognition is susceptible to differences between heavy chain structures and their glycosylation. We also report data on a possible application of this system in autoimmune diagnostics.Compared to secondary antibodies, fluorescent monocytesas biosensors are superior in reflecting biological functions of microarray-bound antibodies and represent an easy and robust alternative for profiling interactions between serum proteins and antigens.

  13. Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Morariu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of speech recognition by pattern recognition techniques. Learning consists in determining the unique characteristics of a word (cepstral coefficients by eliminating those characteristics that are different from one word to another. For learning and recognition, the system will build a dictionary of words by determining the characteristics of each word to be used in the recognition. Determining the characteristics of an audio signal consists in the following steps: noise removal, sampling it, applying Hamming window, switching to frequency domain through Fourier transform, calculating the magnitude spectrum, filtering data, determining cepstral coefficients.

  14. Glycomic Analysis of Life Stages of the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni Reveals Developmental Expression Profiles of Functional and Antigenic Glycan Motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.H.; van Diepen, A.; Nguyen, D.L.; Wuhrer, M.; Hoffmann, K.F.; Deelder, A.M.; Hokke, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Glycans present on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the major human parasite Schistosoma mansoni induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the host. To be able to study the molecular characteristics of schistosome infections it is therefore required to determine the expression profiles

  15. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  16. Antigenic profile of African horse sickness virus serotype 4 VP5 and identification of a neutralizing epitope shared with bluetongue virus and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J.L.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Venteo, A.

    1999-01-01

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) causes a fatal disease in horses. The virus capsid is composed of a double protein layer, the outermost of which is formed by two proteins: VP2 and VP5. VP2 is known to determine the serotype of the virus and to contain the neutralizing epitopes. The biological...... in a plaque reduction assay were generated. To dissect the antigenic structure of AHSV VP5, the protein was cloned in Escherichia coil using the pET3 system. The immunoreactivity of both MAbs, and horse and rabbit polyclonal antisera, with 17 overlapping fragments from VP5 was analyzed. The most....... Neutralizing epitopes were defined at positions 85-92 (PDPLSPGE) for MAb 10AE12 and at 179-185 (EEDLRTR) for MAb 10AC6. Epitope 10AE12 is highly conserved between the different orbiviruses. MAb 10AE12 was able to recognize bluetongue virus VP5 and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus VP5 by several techniques...

  17. ANTIGENIC PROMOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Yu; Cinader, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with p-azobenzene arsonic acid derivatives of human serum albumin (HA-As) or of dissociated keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The IgM response to the hapten was evaluated in terms of the number of hapten-specific plaque-forming cells in the lymph node draining the injection site. In some experiments, antibody was measured by agglutination of tanned and sensitized erythrocytes. The hapten response of animals immunized with HA-As was increased (promoting effect) when the animals were injected with one of several structurally unrelated macromolecules: keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), horse spleen ferritin (HSF), lysozyme (Lys), alum-precipitated human gamma globulin (alum-precipitated HGG). Different macromolecules differed in the magnitude of the promoting effect they induced, e.g., promotion by the associated form of KLH was greater than that by the dissociated form; alum-precipitated HGG was a better promoter than was soluble HGG. The relative magnitude of promotion by different macromolecules (associated vs. dissociated KLH, alum-precipitated vs. soluble HGG) correlated with the relative magnitude of the carrier effect, as judged by the hapten response induced by p-azobenzene arsonic acid conjugated to various proteins. Promotion was detected by agglutination assay of circulating antibody, by plaque assay of cells from the popliteal lymph node draining the site of preinjection, but not by plaque assay of cells from the contralateral lymph node. Promotion was dependent on the dose of the promoting macromolecule and on the dose of the hapten-protein conjugate. It was not observed in animals tolerant to the promoting macromolecule. Inhibition (i.e. antigenic competition), rather than promotion, was observed upon a secondary response to the preinjected macromolecule or when the hapten-protein conjugate was incorporated in Freund's adjuvant. PMID:15776570

  18. Global Profiling and Novel Structure Discovery Using Multiple Neutral Loss/Precursor Ion Scanning Combined with Substructure Recognition and Statistical Analysis (MNPSS): Characterization of Terpene-Conjugated Curcuminoids in Curcuma longa as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Lin, Xiong-hao; Ji, Shuai; Zhang, Zheng-xiang; Bo, Tao; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2016-01-05

    To fully understand the chemical diversity of an herbal medicine is challenging. In this work, we describe a new approach to globally profile and discover novel compounds from an herbal extract using multiple neutral loss/precursor ion scanning combined with substructure recognition and statistical analysis. Turmeric (the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L.) was used as an example. This approach consists of three steps: (i) multiple neutral loss/precursor ion scanning to obtain substructure information; (ii) targeted identification of new compounds by extracted ion current and substructure recognition; and (iii) untargeted identification using total ion current and multivariate statistical analysis to discover novel structures. Using this approach, 846 terpecurcumins (terpene-conjugated curcuminoids) were discovered from turmeric, including a number of potentially novel compounds. Furthermore, two unprecedented compounds (terpecurcumins X and Y) were purified, and their structures were identified by NMR spectroscopy. This study extended the application of mass spectrometry to global profiling of natural products in herbal medicines and could help chemists to rapidly discover novel compounds from a complex matrix.

  19. Recognition of viral and self-antigens by TH1 and TH1/TH17 central memory cells in patients with multiple sclerosis reveals distinct roles in immune surveillance and relapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroni, Moira; Maltese, Virginia; De Simone, Marco; Ranzani, Valeria; Larghi, Paola; Fenoglio, Chiara; Pietroboni, Anna M; De Riz, Milena A; Crosti, Maria C; Maglie, Stefano; Moro, Monica; Caprioli, Flavio; Rossi, Riccardo; Rossetti, Grazisa; Galimberti, Daniela; Pagani, Massimiliano; Scarpini, Elio; Abrignani, Sergio; Geginat, Jens

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is caused by autoreactive T cells and associated with viral infections. However, the phenotype of pathogenic T cells in peripheral blood remains to be defined, and how viruses promote MS is debated. We aimed to identify and characterize potentially pathogenic autoreactive T cells, as well as protective antiviral T cells, in patients with MS. We analyzed CD4 + helper T-cell subsets from peripheral blood or cerebrospinal fluid for cytokine production, gene expression, plasticity, homing potentials, and their reactivity to self-antigens and viral antigens in healthy subjects and patients with MS. Moreover, we monitored their frequencies in untreated and fingolimod- or natalizumab-treated patients with MS. T H 1/T H 17 central memory (T H 1/T H 17 CM ) cells were selectively increased in peripheral blood of patients with relapsing-remitting MS with a high disease score. T H 1/T H 17 CM cells were closely related to conventional T H 17 cells but had more pathogenic features. In particular, they could shuttle between lymph nodes and the CNS and produced encephalitogenic cytokines. The cerebrospinal fluid of patients with active MS was enriched for CXCL10 and contained mainly CXCR3-expressing T H 1 and T H 1/T H 17 subsets. However, while T H 1 cells responded consistently to viruses, T H 1/T H 17 CM cells reacted strongly with John Cunningham virus in healthy subjects but responded instead to myelin-derived self-antigens in patients with MS. Fingolimod and natalizumab therapies efficiently targeted autoreactive T H 1/T H 17 CM cells but also blocked virus-specific T H 1 cells. We propose that autoreactive T H 1/T H 17 CM cells expand in patients with MS and promote relapses after bystander recruitment to the CNS, whereas T H 1 cells perform immune surveillance. Thus the selective targeting of T H 1/T H 17 cells could inhibit relapses without causing John

  20. A perspective on two chemometrics tools: PCA and MCR, and introduction of a new one: Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), as applied to XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles of organic and inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shiladitya; Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Lee, Zheng Rong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff; Tolley, H. Dennis; Gallagher, Neal B.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) are much used analytical techniques that provide information about the outermost atomic and molecular layers of materials. In this work, we discuss the application of multivariate spectral techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR), to the analysis of XPS and ToF-SIMS depth profiles. Multivariate analyses often provide insight into data sets that is not easily obtained in a univariate fashion. Pattern recognition entropy (PRE), which has its roots in Shannon's information theory, is also introduced. This approach is not the same as the mutual information/entropy approaches sometimes used in data processing. A discussion of the theory of each technique is presented. PCA, MCR, and PRE are applied to four different data sets obtained from: a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized C3F6 on Si, a ToF-SIMS depth profile through ca. 100 nm of plasma polymerized PNIPAM (poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)) on Si, an XPS depth profile through a film of SiO2 on Si, and an XPS depth profile through a film of Ta2O5 on Ta. PCA, MCR, and PRE reveal the presence of interfaces in the films, and often indicate that the first few scans in the depth profiles are different from those that follow. PRE and backward difference PRE provide this information in a straightforward fashion. Rises in the PRE signals at interfaces suggest greater complexity to the corresponding spectra. Results from PCA, especially for the higher principal components, were sometimes difficult to understand. MCR analyses were generally more interpretable.

  1. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation.

  2. Healthy human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelkamal Chaudhary

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (T(H1-T(H17 and destructive allergic (T(H2 immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown.To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with T(H2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-gamma, IL-4 or IL-17 to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-gamma more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 T(H1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein, Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase, Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and Asp f22 (enolase. Strong IFN-gamma responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals.Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases.

  3. Healthy human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Staab, Janet F; Marr, Kieren A

    2010-02-17

    Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (T(H)1-T(H)17) and destructive allergic (T(H)2) immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins) participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown. To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with T(H)2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-gamma, IL-4 or IL-17) to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-gamma more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 T(H)1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein), Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase), Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase) and Asp f22 (enolase). Strong IFN-gamma responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals. Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases.

  4. Speaker Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti; Jørgensen, Kasper Winther

    2005-01-01

    Speaker recognition is basically divided into speaker identification and speaker verification. Verification is the task of automatically determining if a person really is the person he or she claims to be. This technology can be used as a biometric feature for verifying the identity of a person...

  5. The Antigenic Structure of Zika Virus and Its Relation to Other Flaviviruses: Implications for Infection and Immunoprophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiasny, Karin

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Zika virus was discovered ∼70 years ago in Uganda and maintained a low profile as a human disease agent in Africa and Asia. Only recently has it caused explosive outbreaks in previously unaffected regions, first in Oceania and then in the Americas since 2015. Of special concern is the newly identified link between congenital malformations (especially microcephaly) and Zika virus infections during pregnancy. At present, it is unclear whether Zika virus changed its pathogenicity or whether the huge number of infections allowed the recognition of a previously cryptic pathogenic property. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent data on the molecular antigenic structure of Zika virus in the context of antibody-mediated neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection, a phenomenon that has been implicated in the development of severe disease caused by the related dengue viruses. Emphasis is given to epitopes of antibodies that potently neutralize Zika virus and also to epitopes that provide antigenic links to other important human-pathogenic flaviviruses such as dengue, yellow fever, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The antigenic cross talk between Zika and dengue viruses appears to be of special importance, since they cocirculate in many regions of endemicity and sequential infections are likely to occur frequently. New insights into the molecular antigenic structure of Zika virus and flaviviruses in general have provided the foundation for great progress made in developing Zika virus vaccines and antibodies for passive immunization. PMID:28179396

  6. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  7. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, Burton

    1973-01-01

    An antigenic analysis of the alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from dental plaque was performed by use of antisera against a strain of Streptococcus sanguis (M-5) which was isolated from dental plaque. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony tests of Rantz and Randall extracts of 45 strains gave positive reactions with the M-5 antisera. These strains represented 60% of the strains tested. The number of antigens which could be identified in these extracts varied from one to five and were designated a to e. The a antigen was found in 36 of the strains tested, including reference strains of S. sanguis and the group H streptococci. The strains reacting with the M-5 antisera were divided into two majors types: type I consisted of 23 strains in which the a antigen was found alone or with one or more of the c, d, and e antigens; type II consisted of 13 strains in which both the a and b antigens were found with or without one or more of the c, d, and e antigens. The remaining strains contained, either singly or in combination, the b, c, d, and e antigens but not the a antigen. Biochemical tests of representatives of each serotype and reference strains indicated that strains reacting with M-5 antisera were S. sanguis. These findings suggest that S. sanguis strains share common physiological and serological properties. Images PMID:4633291

  8. Identification of protective antigens for vaccination against systemic salmonellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eBumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50-200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing.

  9. The molecular relationship between antigenic domains and epitopes on hCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Peter; Lapthorn, Adrian J

    2016-08-01

    Antigenic domains are defined to contain a limited number of neighboring epitopes recognized by antibodies (Abs) but their molecular relationship remains rather elusive. We thoroughly analyzed the antigenic surface of the important pregnancy and tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a cystine knot (ck) growth factor, and set antigenic domains and epitopes in molecular relationships to each other. Antigenic domains on hCG, its free hCGα and hCGβ subunits are dependent on appropriate inherent molecular features such as molecular accessibility and protrusion indices that determine bulging structures accessible to Abs. The banana-shaped intact hCG comprises ∼7500Å(2) of antigenic surface with minimally five antigenic domains that encompass a continuum of overlapping non-linear composite epitopes, not taking into account the C-terminal peptide extension of hCGβ (hCGβCTP). Epitopes within an antigenic domain are defined by specific Abs, that bury nearly 1000Å(2) of surface accessible area on the antigen and recognize a few up to 15 amino acid (aa) residues, whereby between 2 and 5 of these provide the essential binding energy. Variability in Ab binding modes to the contact aa residues are responsible for the variation in affinity and intra- and inter-species specificity, e.g. cross-reactions with luteinizing hormone (LH). Each genetically distinct fragment antigen binding (Fab) defines its own epitope. Consequently, recognition of the same epitope by different Abs is only possible in cases of genetically identical sequences of its binding sites. Due to combinatorial V(D)J gene segment variability of heavy and light chains, Abs defining numerous epitopes within an antigenic domain can be generated by different individuals and species. Far more than hundred Abs against the immuno-dominant antigenic domains of either subunit at both ends of the hCG-molecule, the tips of peptide loops one and three (Ł1+3) protruding from the central ck, encompassing h

  10. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  11. Saposins utilize two strategies for lipid transfer and CD1 antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon, Luis; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Grenha, Rosa; Sun, Ying; Barral, Duarte C.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Bhowruth, Veemal; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Kasmar, Anne; Peng, Wei; Moody, D. Branch; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Transferring lipid antigens from membranes into CD1 antigen-presenting proteins represents a major molecular hurdle necessary for T-cell recognition. Saposins facilitate this process, but the mechanisms used are not well understood. We found that saposin B forms soluble saposin protein-lipid

  12. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  13. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  14. Indirect recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Christian; Rachman, Noer Fauzi

    2018-01-01

    Government institutions and local people in Indonesia have entrenched, resurrected, and reinvented space through their different territorial and property claims. From colonial times, onward, government institutions have dissolved local political orders and territorialized and reordered spatial...... categories are struggled over, and groups of actors seek to legitimate their presence, their activities, and their resource use by occupation, mapping, and construction of "public" infrastructure. In the case of conservation in the Mount Halimun-Salak National Park, we find that rather than one overarching...... important legal and political work. After the authoritarian New Order regime, in particular, claims to citizenship worked as indirect property claims, and indirect recognition of such claims are important because they serve as pragmatic proxies for formal property rights. Two case studies examine how people...

  15. Immunogenicity of Novel DosR Regulon-Encoded Candidate Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Three High-Burden Populations in Africa▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Gillian F.; Thiel, Bonnie A.; Ota, Martin O.; Parida, Shreemanta K.; Adegbola, Richard; Boom, W. Henry; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Friggen, Annemiek H.; Hill, Philip C.; Klein, Michel R.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Mayanja, Harriet; Schoolnik, Gary; Stanley, Kim; Weldingh, Karin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about DosR regulon-encoded proteins has led us to produce novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for immunogenicity testing in human populations in three countries in Africa to which tuberculosis (TB) is endemic. A total of 131 tuberculin skin test-positive and/or ESAT-6/CFP10-positive, human immunodeficiency virus-negative adult household contacts of active pulmonary TB cases from South Africa (n = 56), The Gambia (n = 26), and Uganda (n = 49) were tested for gamma interferon responses to 7 classical and 51 DosR regulon-encoded M. tuberculosis recombinant protein antigens. ESAT-6/CFP10 fusion protein evoked responses in >75% of study participants in all three countries. Of the DosR regulon-encoded antigens tested, Rv1733c was the most commonly recognized by participants from both South Africa and Uganda and the third most commonly recognized antigen in The Gambia. The four most frequently recognized DosR regulon-encoded antigens in Uganda (Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c) included the three most immunogenic antigens in South Africa. In contrast, Rv3131 induced the highest percentage of responders in Gambian contacts (38%), compared to only 3.4% of Ugandan contacts and no South African contacts. Appreciable percentages of TB contacts with a high likelihood of latent M. tuberculosis infection responded to several novel DosR regulon-encoded M. tuberculosis proteins. In addition to significant similarities in antigen recognition profiles between the three African population groups, there were also disparities, which may stem from genetic differences between both pathogen and host populations. Our findings have implications for the selection of potential TB vaccine candidates and for determining biosignatures of latent M. tuberculosis infection, active TB disease, and protective immunity. PMID:19553548

  16. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Vink (Cornelis); L. Rudenko (Larisa); H.S. Seifert (H. Steven)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a

  17. Viral immune evasion : Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weijer, Michael L.; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Wiertz, EJHJ

    2015-01-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I

  18. Antigen binding characteristics of immunoglobulin free light chains: crosslinking by antigen is essential to induce allergic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Thio

    Full Text Available Beside the production of complete immunoglobulins IgG, IgE, IgA, IgM and IgD, consisting of tetrameric heterodimers of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, B cells also secrete immunoglobulin free light chains (Ig-fLC. Previous studies showed that Ig-fLCs are able to induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions. It is apparent that recognition and binding of antigen are crucial steps in the onset of these inflammatory responses. In this study, the binding characteristics of Ig-fLC to antigen were further investigated using various biochemical approaches. In addition, we investigated whether antigen-mediated crosslinking of Ig-fLC is required to initiate allergic skin inflammation in vivo. Our study shows that binding of Ig-fLCs to antigen can be measured with different experimental setups. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed real-time antigen binding characteristics. Specific antigen binding by Ig-fLCs was further detected using immunoblotting and ELISA. Using the ELISA-based assay, a binding affinity of 76.9±3.8 nM was determined for TNP-specific Ig-fLC. Antigen-induced ear swelling in mice passively sensitized with trinitrophenol-specific Ig-fLC was inhibited when multivalent antigen was combined with excess of monovalent antigen during challenge. We conclude that Ig-fLCs are able to interact with antigen, a prerequisite for antigen-specific cellular activation. In analogy to antigen-specific Fc receptor-induced mast cell activation, crosslinking of Ig-fLCs is necessary to initiate a local allergic response.

  19. The antigen processing machinery of class I human leukocyte antigens: linked patterns of gene expression in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorda, Ezio; Sibilio, Leonardo; Martayan, Aline; Moretti, Sara; Venturo, Irene; Mottolese, Marcella; Ferrara, Giovan Battista; Cappellacci, Sandra; Eibenschutz, Laura; Catricalà, Caterina; Grammatico, Paola; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2003-07-15

    The ultimate outcome of an immune response (escape or surveillance) depends on a delicate balance of opposing signals delivered by activating and inhibitory immune receptors expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In this light, loss and down-regulation of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class I molecules, while important for keeping tumors below the T-cell detection levels, may incite recognition of missing self. Conversely, the maintenance of normal levels of expression (or even up-regulation) may be favorable to tumors, at least in certain cases. In this study, we took advantage of a previously characterized panel of 15 early passage tumor cell lines (mainly from melanoma and lung carcinoma lesions) enriched with class I-low phenotypes. These cells were systematically characterized by Northern and/or Western blotting (e.g., mini-transcriptome/mini-proteome analysis) for the expression of HLA-A, -B, -C, beta(2)-microglobulin, and the members of the "antigen processing machinery" of class I molecules (LMP2, LMP7, TAP1, TAP2, tapasin, calreticulin, calnexin, and ERp57). In addition, we established four pairs of cultures, each comprising melanoma cells and normal melanocytes from the same patient. We found that approximately 97% of the 185 tested gene products are expressed (although often weakly), and in many cases coordinately regulated in 18 of 19 tumor cell lines. Linked expression patterns could be hierarchically arranged by statistical methods and graphically described as a class I HLA "coordinome." Deviations (both down- and up-regulation) from the coordinome expression pattern inherited from the normal, paired melanocyte counterpart, were allowed but limited in magnitude, as if melanoma cells were trying to keep a "low profile" HLA phenotype. We conclude that irreversible HLA loss is a rare event, and class I expression in tumor cells almost invariably results from reversible gene regulatory (rather than gene disruption) events.

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  1. Individual Recognition in Ant Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Heinze, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Personal relationships are the cornerstone of vertebrate societies, but insect societies are either too large for individual recognition, or their members were assumed to lack the necessary cognitive abilities 1 and 2 . This paradigm has been challenged by the recent discovery that paper wasps...... recognize each other's unique facial color patterns [3] . Individual recognition is advantageous when dominance hierarchies control the partitioning of work and reproduction 2 and 4 . Here, we show that unrelated founding queens of the ant Pachycondyla villosa use chemical cues to recognize each other...... perception, was prevented and in tests with anaesthetized queens. The cuticular chemical profiles of queens were neither associated with dominance nor fertility and, therefore, do not represent status badges 5 and 6 , and nestmate queens did not share a common odor. Personal recognition facilitates...

  2. Vaccination and the TAP-independent antigen processing pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Johnstone, Carolina; Mir, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    The cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocyte-mediated cellular response is important for the elimination of virus-infected cells and requires the prior recognition of short viral peptide antigens previously translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or infected cells with TAP molecules blocked by specific viral proteins, such as the cowpoxvirus, a component of the first source of early empirical vaccination against smallpox, are still able to present several HLA class I ligands generated by the TAP-independent antigen processing pathways to specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Currently, bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases have renewed interest in poxviruses. Recent works that have identified HLA class I ligands and epitopes in virus-infected TAP-deficient cells have implications for the study of both the effectiveness of early empirical vaccination and the analysis of HLA class I antigen processing in TAP-deficient subjects.

  3. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T cell – tumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T cell – tumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  4. Non-stoichiometric O-acetylation of Shigella flexneri 2a O-specific polysaccharide: synthesis and antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Charles; Chassagne, Pierre; Theillet, François-Xavier; Guerreiro, Catherine; Thouron, Françoise; Nato, Farida; Delepierre, Muriel; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Phalipon, Armelle; Mulard, Laurence A

    2014-06-28

    Synthetic functional mimics of the O-antigen from Shigella flexneri 2a are seen as promising vaccine components against endemic shigellosis. Herein, the influence of the polysaccharide non-stoichiometric di-O-acetylation on antigenicity is addressed for the first time. Three decasaccharides, representing relevant internal mono- and di-O-acetylation profiles of the O-antigen, were synthesized from a pivotal protected decasaccharide designed to tailor late stage site-selective O-acetylation. The latter was obtained via a convergent route involving the imidate glycosylation chemistry. Binding studies to five protective mIgGs showed that none of the acetates adds significantly to broad antibody recognition. Yet, one of the five antibodies had a unique pattern of binding. With IC50 in the micromolar to submicromolar range mIgG F22-4 exemplifies a remarkable tight binding antibody against diversely O-acetylated and non-O-acetylated fragments of a neutral polysaccharide of medical importance.

  5. Recognition of microbial viability via TLR8 drives TFH cell differentiation and vaccine responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugolini, Matteo; Gerhard, Jenny; Burkert, Sanne

    2018-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are generally highly efficacious and often superior to inactivated vaccines, yet the underlying mechanisms of this remain largely unclear. Here we identify recognition of microbial viability as a potent stimulus for follicular helper T cell (TFH cell) differentiation...... and vaccine responses. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) distinguished viable bacteria from dead bacteria through Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8)-dependent detection of bacterial RNA. In contrast to dead bacteria and other TLR ligands, live bacteria, bacterial RNA and synthetic TLR8 agonists induced a specific...... cytokine profile in human and porcine APCs, thereby promoting TFH cell differentiation. In domestic pigs, immunization with a live bacterial vaccine induced robust TFH cell and antibody responses, but immunization with its heat-killed counterpart did not. Finally, a hypermorphic TLR8 polymorphism...

  6. Protein and antigenic heterogeneity among isolates of Bacillus piliformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, L K; Besch-Williford, C; Waggie, K S

    1990-01-01

    Protein and antigenic heterogeneity among isolates of Bacillus piliformis, the etiologic agent of Tyzzer's disease, were investigated. The seven isolates utilized in this study were originally isolated from naturally infected animals of different animal species and diverse geographical locations. Isolates were propagated in mammalian cell lines, and bacterial extracts were prepared. Protein and antigenic profiles were compared among isolates, using Coomassie blue-stained polyacrylamide gels a...

  7. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  8. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  10. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  11. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  12. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  13. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  14. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  15. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  16. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  17. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  18. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  19. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  20. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research efforts towards developing algorithms for a robust face recognition system to overcome many of the limitations found in existing two-dimensional facial recognition systems...

  1. Graphical symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    K.C. , Santosh; Wendling , Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The chapter focuses on one of the key issues in document image processing i.e., graphical symbol recognition. Graphical symbol recognition is a sub-field of a larger research domain: pattern recognition. The chapter covers several approaches (i.e., statistical, structural and syntactic) and specially designed symbol recognition techniques inspired by real-world industrial problems. It, in general, contains research problems, state-of-the-art methods that convey basic s...

  2. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  3. Optical pattern recognition via adaptive spatial homodyne detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Magnus T L; Knittel, Joachim; Morizur, Jean-Francois; Bachor, Hans-A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2010-12-01

    We present an experimental demonstration of an optical pattern recognition scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. Our scheme is adaptive, all-optical, utilizes a single-element photo-detector, and provides a single parameter readout to quantify the efficacy of pattern recognition, thereby allowing very fast pattern recognition speeds. The spatial homodyne detector was applied to the identification of one- and two-dimensional phase profiles.

  4. Human platelet antigens - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2014-02-01

    To date, 33 human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) have been identified on six functionally important platelet glycoprotein (GP) complexes and have been implicated in alloimmune platelet disorders including foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and multitransfusion platelet refractoriness (MPR). The greatest number of recognized HPA (20 of 33) resides on the GPIIb/IIIa complex, which serves as the receptor for ligands important in mediating haemostasis and inflammation. These include HPA-1a, the most commonly implicated HPA in FNAIT and PTP in Caucasian populations. Other platelet GP complexes, GPIb/V/IX, GPIa/IIa and CD109, express the remaining 13 HPAs. Of the recognized HPAs, 12 occur as six serologically and genetically defined biallelic 'systems' where the -a form designates the higher frequency allele and the -b form, the lower. Twenty-one other HPAs are low-frequency or rare antigens for which postulated higher frequency -a alleles have not yet been identified as antibody specificities. In addition to the HPA markers, platelets also express ABO and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens; antibodies directed at the former are occasionally important in FNAIT, and to the latter, in MPR. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms...... or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate and importantly different conceptions of both toleration and recognition...

  6. Endothelial cells present antigens in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellides George

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune recognition of vascular endothelial cells (EC has been implicated in allograft rejection, protection against pathogens, and lymphocyte recruitment. However, EC pervade nearly all tissues and predominate in none, complicating any direct test of immune recognition. Here, we examined antigen presentation by EC in vivo by testing immune responses against E. coli β-galactosidase (β-gal in two lines of transgenic mice that express β-gal exclusively in their EC. TIE2-lacZ mice express β-gal in all EC and VWF-lacZ mice express β-gal in heart and brain microvascular EC. Results Transgenic and congenic wild type FVB mice immunized with β-gal expression vector DNA or β-gal protein generated high titer, high affinity antisera containing comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, suggesting equivalent activation of T helper cell subsets. The immunized transgenic mice remained healthy, their EC continued to express β-gal, and their blood vessels showed no histological abnormalities. In response to β-gal in vitro, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from immunized transgenic and FVB mice proliferated, expressed CD25, and secreted IFN-γ. Infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding β-gal raised equivalent responses in transgenic and FVB mice. Hearts transplanted from transgenic mice into FVB mice continued to beat and the graft EC continued to express β-gal. These results suggested immunological ignorance of the transgene encoded EC protein. However, skin transplanted from TIE2-lacZ onto FVB mice lost β-gal+ EC and the hosts developed β-gal-specific antisera, demonstrating activation of host immune effector mechanisms. In contrast, skin grafted from TIE2-lacZ onto VWF-lacZ mice retained β-gal+ EC and no antisera developed, suggesting a tolerant host immune system. Conclusion Resting, β-gal+ EC in transgenic mice tolerize specific lymphocytes that would otherwise respond against β-gal expressed by EC within

  7. Virtual models of the HLA class I antigen processing pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Brusic, Vladimir

    2004-12-01

    Antigen recognition by cytotoxic CD8 T cells is dependent upon a number of critical steps in MHC class I antigen processing including proteosomal cleavage, TAP transport into the endoplasmic reticulum, and MHC class I binding. Based on extensive experimental data relating to each of these steps there is now the capacity to model individual antigen processing steps with a high degree of accuracy. This paper demonstrates the potential to bring together models of individual antigen processing steps, for example proteosome cleavage, TAP transport, and MHC binding, to build highly informative models of functional pathways. In particular, we demonstrate how an artificial neural network model of TAP transport was used to mine a HLA-binding database so as to identify HLA-binding peptides transported by TAP. This integrated model of antigen processing provided the unique insight that HLA class I alleles apparently constitute two separate classes: those that are TAP-efficient for peptide loading (HLA-B27, -A3, and -A24) and those that are TAP-inefficient (HLA-A2, -B7, and -B8). Hence, using this integrated model we were able to generate novel hypotheses regarding antigen processing, and these hypotheses are now capable of being tested experimentally. This model confirms the feasibility of constructing a virtual immune system, whereby each additional step in antigen processing is incorporated into a single modular model. Accurate models of antigen processing have implications for the study of basic immunology as well as for the design of peptide-based vaccines and other immunotherapies.

  8. A systems approach to designing next generation vaccines: combining α-galactose modified antigens with nanoparticle platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanse, Yashdeep; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda R.; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Broderick, Scott; Kong, Chang Sun; Rajan, Krishna; Flick, Ramon; Mandell, Robert B.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Wannemuehler, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Innovative vaccine platforms are needed to develop effective countermeasures against emerging and re-emerging diseases. These platforms should direct antigen internalization by antigen presenting cells and promote immunogenic responses. This work describes an innovative systems approach combining two novel platforms, αGalactose (αGal)-modification of antigens and amphiphilic polyanhydride nanoparticles as vaccine delivery vehicles, to rationally design vaccine formulations. Regimens comprising soluble αGal-modified antigen and nanoparticle-encapsulated unmodified antigen induced a high titer, high avidity antibody response with broader epitope recognition of antigenic peptides than other regimen. Proliferation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells was also enhanced compared to a traditional adjuvant. Combining the technology platforms and augmenting immune response studies with peptide arrays and informatics analysis provides a new paradigm for rational, systems-based design of next generation vaccine platforms against emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  9. Western blot analysis of antigens specifically recognized by natural immune responses of patients with Japanese encephalitis infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarapotikul, J; Pothipunya, S; Wanotayan, R; Hongyantarachai, A; Tharavanij, S

    1993-06-01

    Specific recognition of antigenic proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) by JE patients was investigated by using non-reducing and reducing Western immunoblot analysis. Under non-reducing conditions, the profile of JEV proteins recognized comprised E (52 kDa), NS1 (45 and 41 kDa), NS3 (66.2 kDa) and NS5 (103 and 97.4 kDa). When recognition patterns of sera from JE and dengue patients were compared, only slight differences between JE and dengue sera were found (under non-reducing conditions), involving only the 66.2 kDa protein: to this protein, JE sera exhibited greater reactivity, but not in greater frequency, than did dengue sera. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from JE patients showed more differences from JE sera: CSF antibody lacked recognition of the 41 kDa protein and had lower frequencies, as well as less reactivities to several other proteins. These results suggested that restricted populations of lymphocytes were localized in the central nervous system of JE patients. The effect of reducing agent (2 beta-mercaptoethanol) on the recognition patterns of those groups of sera was also analysed: the reducing agent affected all the proteins mentioned above, however, the effects were not uniform. It is proposed that JE and dengue sera may recognize different epitopes on some or all of these proteins. Such differences cannot be detected by Western immunoblot analysis, but it would be feasible to test this hypothesis using epitope mapping with synthetic peptides in a multi-pin ELISA. Analysis in this fine detail is essential for designing improved JE vaccines.

  10. Development of an indirect ELISA to detect Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis specific antibodies in sheep employing T1 strain culture supernatant as antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam F. Rebouças

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiologic agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA, a chronic disease that affects goats and sheep, characterized by granuloma formation in subcutaneous and internal lymph nodes. CLA causes significant economic losses to commercial goat herds. In this study, we aimed to test secreted antigens secreted from T1 strain bacteria grown in brain heart infusion (BHI broth in an indirect ELISA system to determine the presence of specific immunoglobulins against C. pseudotuberculosis. We analyzed the BHI antigen electrophoretic profile and the recognition pattern by infected sheep sera samples. The ELISA results were compared with multiplex PCR assay and IFN-gamma production. The ELISA was able to discriminate between negative and positive animals, with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 99%, using microbiological isolation as gold standard. When this assay was compared with multiplex PCR and specific IFN-gamma quantification, six discrepant results were found among thirty-two samples. We concluded that the ELISA using antigens secreted from C. pseudotuberculosis T1 strain growth in BHI broth culture can be used for the serodiagnosis of CLA in sheep.

  11. Antigen microarrays: descriptive chemistry or functional immunomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Erdei, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Advances in protein microarray technology allow the generation of high content, reliable information about complex, multilevel protein interaction networks. Yet antigen arrays are used mostly only as devices for parallel immune assays describing multitudes of individual binding events. We propose here that the huge amount of immunological information hidden in the plasma of an individual could be better revealed by combining the characterization of antibody binding to target epitopes with improved estimation of effector functions triggered by these binding events. Furthermore, we could generate functional immune profiles characterizing general immune responsiveness of the individual by designing arrays incorporating epitope collections from diverse subsets of antibody targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antigenic and genomic homogeneity of successive Mycoplasma hominis isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, LT; Thorsen, P; Møller, B

    1998-01-01

    Sixty Mycoplasma hominis isolates were obtained from the cervices of pregnant women and from the ears or pharynges of their newborn babies. The isolates were examined by SDS-PAGE and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Antigenic and genomic profiles were obtained for 16 series with two or more...

  13. Antigen processing influences HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunodominance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Wee, Edmund; Burgevin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    -associated antigen proteins p17 and p24 correlated with epitope abundance, which was strongly influenced by proteasomal digestion profiles, affinity for the transporter protein TAP, and trimming mediated by the endoplasmatic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAAP, and was moderately influenced by HLA affinity. Structural...

  14. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  16. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  17. Antigen-specific CD4 T cells are induced after intravesical BCG-instillation therapy in patients with bladder cancer and show similar cytokine profiles as in active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Elsäßer

    Full Text Available Specific T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis is associated with a decrease in multifunctionality. However, it is unknown whether cytokine profiles differ in patients with primary infection and those with prior contact. We therefore used intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated live Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG in patients with urothelial carcinoma as a model to characterise the induction of systemic immunity towards purified protein derivate (PPD and to study whether cytokine profiles differ depending on pre-existing immunity. Eighteen patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were recruited during the BCG-induction course. Fifty-four healthy individuals served as controls. Interferon (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-2 producing PPD-specific CD4 T cells were analysed longitudinally before each instillation using a rapid flow-cytometric whole blood immunoassay. Baseline levels of IFN-γ producing PPD-specific T cells were comparable to controls. T cells showed a 5-fold increase to 0.23% by week 2/3, and further increased 8-fold by week 4/5 (to 0.42%, p=0.0007. Systemic immunity was induced in all patients, although the increase was less pronounced in patients with pre-existing immunity. As in active TB, cytokine profiling during therapy revealed a lower percentage of multifunctional IFN-γ/IL-2 double-positive T cells compared to controls (60.2% vs. 71.9%, p=0.0003. Of note, when comparing patients with and without pre-existing immunity, cytokine profiles in patients with primary immunity were shifted towards IL-2 single producing T cells (p=0.02, whereas those in patients with pre-existing immunity were shifted towards IFN-γ single-positivity (p=0.01. In conclusion, systemic T cell responses were induced after BCG-therapy, and their kinetics and cytokine profile depended on pre-existing immunity. Decreased functionality is a typical feature of specific immunity in both patients with active tuberculosis and BCG

  18. Recognition of microbial glycolipids by Natural Killer T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Michael Zajonc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the Major Histocompatibility (MHC family (MHC I and II, lipids, glycolipids and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are Type I Natural killer T (iNKT cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi the causative agents of Lyme disease and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR, leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18 and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  19. Pattern recognition & machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Anzai, Y

    1992-01-01

    This is the first text to provide a unified and self-contained introduction to visual pattern recognition and machine learning. It is useful as a general introduction to artifical intelligence and knowledge engineering, and no previous knowledge of pattern recognition or machine learning is necessary. Basic for various pattern recognition and machine learning methods. Translated from Japanese, the book also features chapter exercises, keywords, and summaries.

  20. Bacterial Surface Glycans: Microarray and QCM Strategies for Glycophenotyping and Exploration of Recognition by Host Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalograiaki, Ioanna; Campanero-Rhodes, María A; Proverbio, Davide; Euba, Begoña; Garmendia, Junkal; Aastrup, Teodor; Solís, Dolores

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial surfaces are decorated with a diversity of carbohydrate structures that play important roles in the bacteria-host relationships. They may offer protection against host defense mechanisms, elicit strong antigenic responses, or serve as ligands for host receptors, including lectins of the innate immune system. Binding by these lectins may trigger defense responses or, alternatively, promote attachment, thereby enhancing infection. The outcome will depend on the particular bacterial surface landscape, which may substantially differ among species and strains. In this chapter, we describe two novel methods for exploring interactions directly on the bacterial surface, based on the generation of bacterial microarrays and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor chips. Bacterial microarrays enable profiling of accessible carbohydrate structures and screening of their recognition by host receptors, also providing information on binding avidity, while the QCM approach allows determination of binding affinity and kinetics. In both cases, the chief element is the use of entire bacterial cells, so that recognition of the bacterial glycan epitopes is explored in their natural environment. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigations of FIBCD1: Immunohistochemical localization and immunomodulatory role upon helminth antigen stimulation in colon epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Huth, Sebastian; Skallerup, Sofie; Buragaite, Benita

    as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immune response. Aim: In the present study, we investigate the localization of FIBCD1 in 49 different healthy human tissues by immunohistochemistry. Further, we investigate the in vitro effects of excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from pig whipworm (Trichuris...... system. FIBCD1 binds to ES antigens. Stimula-tion with ES antigens does not appear to be influenced by FIBCD1 transfection in vitro. FIBCD1 may play a role in whipworm infections in vivo....

  2. Antigen processing and immune regulation in the response to tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Emma; James, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The MHC class I and II antigen processing and presentation pathways display peptides to circulating CD8 + cytotoxic and CD4 + helper T cells respectively to enable pathogens and transformed cells to be identified. Once detected, T cells become activated and either directly kill the infected / transformed cells (CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes) or orchestrate the activation of the adaptive immune response (CD4 + T cells). The immune surveillance of transformed/tumour cells drives alteration of the antigen processing and presentation pathways to evade detection and hence the immune response. Evasion of the immune response is a significant event tumour development and considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. To avoid immune recognition, tumours employ a multitude of strategies with most resulting in a down-regulation of the MHC class I expression at the cell surface, significantly impairing the ability of CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes to recognize the tumour. Alteration of the expression of key players in antigen processing not only affects MHC class I expression but also significantly alters the repertoire of peptides being presented. These modified peptide repertoires may serve to further reduce the presentation of tumour-specific/associated antigenic epitopes to aid immune evasion and tumour progression. Here we review the modifications to the antigen processing and presentation pathway in tumours and how it affects the anti-tumour immune response, considering the role of tumour-infiltrating cell populations and highlighting possible future therapeutic targets. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Statistical Pattern Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Statistical pattern recognition relates to the use of statistical techniques for analysing data measurements in order to extract information and make justified decisions.  It is a very active area of study and research, which has seen many advances in recent years. Applications such as data mining, web searching, multimedia data retrieval, face recognition, and cursive handwriting recognition, all require robust and efficient pattern recognition techniques. This third edition provides an introduction to statistical pattern theory and techniques, with material drawn from a wide range of fields,

  5. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  6. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron AM; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, JS Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12217.001 PMID:27113719

  7. Pattern recognition principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, J. T.; Gonzalez, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The present work gives an account of basic principles and available techniques for the analysis and design of pattern processing and recognition systems. Areas covered include decision functions, pattern classification by distance functions, pattern classification by likelihood functions, the perceptron and the potential function approaches to trainable pattern classifiers, statistical approach to trainable classifiers, pattern preprocessing and feature selection, and syntactic pattern recognition.

  8. Paradigms in object recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutihac, R.; Mutihac, R.C.

    1999-09-01

    A broad range of approaches has been proposed and applied for the complex and rather difficult task of object recognition that involves the determination of object characteristics and object classification into one of many a priori object types. Our paper revises briefly the three main different paradigms in pattern recognition, namely Bayesian statistics, neural networks, and expert systems. (author)

  9. Rational design of protamine nanocapsules as antigen delivery carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Presas, Elena; Dalmau-Mena, Inmaculada; Martínez-Pulgarín, Susana; Alonso, Covadonga; Escribano, José M; Alonso, María J; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2017-01-10

    Current challenges in global immunization indicate the demand for new delivery strategies, which could be applied to the development of new vaccines against emerging diseases, as well as to improve safety and efficacy of currently existing vaccine formulations. Here, we report a novel antigen nanocarrier consisting of an oily core and a protamine shell, further stabilized with pegylated surfactants. These nanocarriers, named protamine nanocapsules, were rationally designed to promote the intracellular delivery of antigens to immunocompetent cells and to trigger an efficient and long-lasting immune response. Protamine nanocapsules have nanometric size, positive zeta potential and high association capacity for H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin, a protein that was used here as a model antigen. The new formulation shows an attractive stability profile both, as an aqueous suspension or a freeze-dried powder formulation. In vitro studies showed that protamine nanocapsules were efficiently internalized by macrophages without eliciting significant toxicity. In vivo studies indicate that antigen-loaded nanocapsules trigger immune responses comparable to those achieved with alum, even when using significantly lower antigen doses, thus indicating their adjuvant properties. These promising in vivo data, alongside with their versatility for the loading of different antigens and oily immunomodulators and their excellent stability profile, make these nanocapsules a promising platform for the delivery of antigens. Protamine sulphate (PubChem SID: 7849283), Sodium Cholate (PubChem CID: 23668194), Miglyol (PubChem CID: 53471835), α tocopherol (PubChem CID: 14985), Tween® 20(PubChem CID: 443314), Tween® 80(PubChem CID: 5281955), TPGS (PubChem CID: 71406). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Challenging ocular image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauca, V. Paúl; Forkin, Michael; Xu, Xiao; Plemmons, Robert; Ross, Arun A.

    2011-06-01

    Ocular recognition is a new area of biometric investigation targeted at overcoming the limitations of iris recognition performance in the presence of non-ideal data. There are several advantages for increasing the area beyond the iris, yet there are also key issues that must be addressed such as size of the ocular region, factors affecting performance, and appropriate corpora to study these factors in isolation. In this paper, we explore and identify some of these issues with the goal of better defining parameters for ocular recognition. An empirical study is performed where iris recognition methods are contrasted with texture and point operators on existing iris and face datasets. The experimental results show a dramatic recognition performance gain when additional features are considered in the presence of poor quality iris data, offering strong evidence for extending interest beyond the iris. The experiments also highlight the need for the direct collection of additional ocular imagery.

  11. Recognition and Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Reagan

    2016-01-01

    The complexities of the meanings of “to recognize” and “recognition” are important in their roles in the realm of justice. I include in the concept of justice, the judiciary, both civil and criminal; distributive justice; and, social and political justice. For each one of these, there are multiple meanings of recognition that are important to understanding their foundation and their scope. There are meanings of recognition that are relevant to other aspects of social justice as the recognition of marginal, oppressed, devalued, groups as deserving of being treated as equals. The structure of my paper is to go through the various meanings and categories of meanings of “to recognize” and “recognition.” I give an account of each of the types of justice and show how various kinds of recognition are relevant to each kind of justice.

  12. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value...

  13. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure

  14. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled...... with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential...

  15. Antigen-driven focal inflammatory death of malaria liver stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganchimeg eBayarsaikhan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple immunizations using live irradiated sporozoites, the infectious plasmodial stage delivered into the host skin during a mosquito bite, can elicit sterile immunity to malaria. CD8+ T cells seem to play an essential role in this protective immunity, since their depletion consistently abolishes sterilizing protection in several experimental models. So far, only a few parasite antigens are known to induce CD8+ T cell-dependent protection, but none of them can reach the levels of protection afforded by live attenuated parasites. Systematic attempts to identify novel antigens associated with this efficient cellular protection were so far unsuccessful. In addition, the precise mechanisms involved in the recognition and elimination of parasitized hepatocytes in vivo by CD8+ T cells still remain obscure. Recently, it has been shown that specific effector CD8+ T cells, after recognition of parasitized hepatocytes, recruit specific and non-specific activated CD8+ T cells to the site of infection, resulting in the formation of cellular clusters around and in the further elimination of intracellular parasites. The significance of this finding is discussed in the perspective of a general mechanism of antigen-dependent focalized inflammation and its consequences for the elimination of malaria liver stages.

  16. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  17. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  18. Epstein Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 interference with MHC class I antigen presentation reveals a close correlation between mRNA translation initiation and antigen presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Apcher

    Full Text Available Viruses are known to employ different strategies to manipulate the major histocompatibility (MHC class I antigen presentation pathway to avoid recognition of the infected host cell by the immune system. However, viral control of antigen presentation via the processes that supply and select antigenic peptide precursors is yet relatively unknown. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-encoded EBNA1 is expressed in all EBV-infected cells, but the immune system fails to detect and destroy EBV-carrying host cells. This immune evasion has been attributed to the capacity of a Gly-Ala repeat (GAr within EBNA1 to inhibit MHC class I restricted antigen presentation. Here we demonstrate that suppression of mRNA translation initiation by the GAr in cis is sufficient and necessary to prevent presentation of antigenic peptides from mRNAs to which it is fused. Furthermore, we demonstrate a direct correlation between the rate of translation initiation and MHC class I antigen presentation from a certain mRNA. These results support the idea that mRNAs, and not the encoded full length proteins, are used for MHC class I restricted immune surveillance. This offers an additional view on the role of virus-mediated control of mRNA translation initiation and of the mechanisms that control MHC class I restricted antigen presentation in general.

  19. Identification and characterization of Neospora caninum tachyzoite antigens useful for diagnosis of neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkas, I; Jenkins, M C; Dubey, J P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify antigens of the protozoan Neospora caninum that could be useful for the diagnosis of neosporosis in domestic animals. As revealed by immunoblotting, immune sera from a wide range of animal species exhibited a similar recognition pattern of four major and several minor N. caninum antigens. In contrast to preinoculation sera, all tested immune sera recognized nonreduced immunodominant 17-, 29-, 30-, and 27-kDa antigens. A 46-kDa protein which showed faint recognition by preimmune sera also exhibited a strong response by immune sera. Immunolocalization of the four immunodominant N. caninum antigens was investigated by immunogold electron microscopy using monospecific polyclonal antisera. The 17-kDa antigen appears to be associated with the body part of the rhoptries, while the 29- and 30-kDa antigens were associated with the dense granules, network, and limiting membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole. Studies were also conducted to compare antibody responses to N. caninum and the related protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Although N. caninum and T. gondii (RH strain) tachyzoites shared a few cross-reacting antigens, the immunodominant antigens of both parasites were not recognized by heterologous sera. Also, immunogold staining with rabbit anti-Neospora hyperimmune serum exhibited almost no labeling of external membranes of Neospora tachyzoites compared with the very marked labeling seen when Toxoplasma tachyzoites (RH strain) were incubated with rabbit anti-Toxoplasma hyperimmune serum. These unique antigenic differences should be useful in developing a diagnostic assay for N. caninum. Images PMID:7496948

  20. Genetic engineering of chimeric antigen receptors using lamprey derived variable lymphocyte receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are used to redirect effector cell specificity to selected cell surface antigens. Using CARs, antitumor activity can be initiated in patients with no prior tumor specific immunity. Although CARs have shown promising clinical results, the technology remains limited by the availability of specific cognate cell target antigens. To increase the repertoire of targetable tumor cell antigens we utilized the immune system of the sea lamprey to generate directed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs. VLRs serve as membrane bound and soluble immune effectors analogous but not homologous to immunoglobulins. They have a fundamentally different structure than immunoglobulin (Ig-based antibodies while still demonstrating high degrees of specificity and affinity. To test the functionality of VLRs as the antigen recognition domain of CARs, two VLR-CARs were created. One contained a VLR specific for a murine B cell leukemia and the other contained a VLR specific for the human T cell surface antigen, CD5. The CAR design consisted of the VLR sequence, myc-epitope tag, CD28 transmembrane domain, and intracellular CD3ζ signaling domain. We demonstrate proof of concept, including gene transfer, biosynthesis, cell surface localization, and effector cell activation for multiple VLR-CAR designs. Therefore, VLRs provide an alternative means of CAR-based cancer recognition.

  1. The effects of Ostertagia occidentalis somatic antigens on ovine TLR2 and TLR4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan BORJI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recognition of helminth-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, including toll like recep­tors (TLRs is the first step towards initiating anti–helminth immune re­sponses.Methods: Using somatic antigens of Ostertagia occidentalis, an important abomasal parasite of ruminants, the expression of ovine TLR2 and TLR4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was analyzed by real-time quatitative reverse-transcrip­tion polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis were prepared to stimulate ovine PBMCs in a time and dose dependent manner.Results: A high expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in PBMCs cultured with somatic antigens of the parasites specially when PBMCs were cultured with 100 µg/ml of somatic antigens and incubated for 2h. Up-regulation of TLR2 expres­sion was more pronounced and evident in our study.Conclsusion: Somatic antigens of O. occidentalis have immunostimulatory and domi­nant role on peripheral immune cells. This study provide for the first time evidence of induction of TLRs in ovine PBMCs by somatic antigen of O. occidentalis

  2. Work and Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willig, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    individual and collective identity formation and has led to an increase in social pathological illnesses such as stress and depression. By juxtaposing these analyses with Honneth’s theory on recognition, we conclude that the contemporary logic of work is unable to provide adequate forms of recognition......The article deals with the relationship between work and recognition, taking Axel Honneth’s social-philosophical theory of the struggle for recognition as its point of departure. In order to give sociological substance to Honneth’s theory, we turn to three contemporary social theorists - Jean......-Pierre Le Goff, Christophe Dejours and Emmanuel Renault. In spite of many differences, their work is united by a critical description of the logic of work and its consequences for individual individuation. These theorists agree that the growth of autonomy, flexibility and mobility has destabilised...

  3. Forensic speaker recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwly, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of forensic speaker recognition is to establish links between individuals and criminal activities, through audio speech recordings. This field is multidisciplinary, combining predominantly phonetics, linguistics, speech signal processing, and forensic statistics. On these bases, expert-based

  4. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni candidate antigens for diagnosis of schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardenia Braz Figueiredo Carvalho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a more sensitive diagnostic test for schistosomiasis is needed to overcome the limitations of the use of stool examination in low endemic areas. Using parasite antigens in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a promising strategy, however a more rational selection of parasite antigens is necessary. In this study we performed in silico analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome, using SchistoDB database and bioinformatic tools for screening immunogenic antigens. Based on evidence of expression in all parasite life stage within the definitive host, extracellular or plasmatic membrane localization, low similarity to human and other helminthic proteins and presence of predicted B cell epitopes, six candidates were selected: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored 200 kDa protein, two putative cytochrome oxidase subunits, two expressed proteins and one hypothetical protein. The recognition in unidimensional and bidimensional Western blot of protein with similar molecular weight and isoelectric point to the selected antigens by sera from S. mansoni infected mice indicate a good correlation between these two approaches in selecting immunogenic proteins.

  5. The Recognition Of Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsass, Peter; Jensen, Bodil; Mørup, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87......Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87...

  6. Wood Species Recognition System

    OpenAIRE

    Bremananth R; Nithya B; Saipriya R

    2009-01-01

    The proposed system identifies the species of the wood using the textural features present in its barks. Each species of a wood has its own unique patterns in its bark, which enabled the proposed system to identify it accurately. Automatic wood recognition system has not yet been well established mainly due to lack of research in this area and the difficulty in obtaining the wood database. In our work, a wood recognition system has been designed based on pre-processing te...

  7. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  8. A high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptor redirects lymphocytes to target human melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William R; Zhao, Yangbing; Frankel, Timothy L; Hinrichs, Christian S; Zheng, Zhili; Xu, Hui; Feldman, Steven A; Ferrone, Soldano; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2010-04-15

    Immunotherapy, particularly the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), is a very promising therapy for metastatic melanoma. Some patients unable to receive TIL have been successfully treated with autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen-restricted, melanoma antigen-reactive T-cell receptors; however, substantial numbers of patients remain ineligible due to the lack of expression of the restricting HLA class I allele. We sought to overcome this limitation by designing a non-MHC-restricted, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), which is highly expressed on more than 90% of human melanomas but has a restricted distribution in normal tissues. HMW-MAA-specific CARs containing an antigen recognition domain based on variations of the HMW-MAA-specific monoclonal antibody 225.28S and a T-cell activation domain based on combinations of CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3zeta activation motifs were constructed within a retroviral vector to allow stable gene transfer into cells and their progeny. Following optimization of the HMW-MAA-specific CAR for expression and function in human PBL, these gene-modified T cells secreted cytokines, were cytolytic, and proliferated in response to HMW-MAA-expressing cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor functioned in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, was non-MHC restricted, and reacted against explanted human melanomas. To evaluate this HMW-MAA-specific CAR in patients with metastatic melanoma, we developed a clinical-grade retroviral packaging line. This may represent a novel means to treat the majority of patients with advanced melanoma, most notably those unable to receive current ACT therapies. (c)2010 AACR.

  9. Why recognition is rational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clintin P. Davis-Stober

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Recognition Heuristic (Gigerenzer and Goldstein, 1996; Goldstein and Gigerenzer, 2002 makes the counter-intuitive prediction that a decision maker utilizing less information may do as well as, or outperform, an idealized decision maker utilizing more information. We lay a theoretical foundation for the use of single-variable heuristics such as the Recognition Heuristic as an optimal decision strategy within a linear modeling framework. We identify conditions under which over-weighting a single predictor is a mini-max strategy among a class of a priori chosen weights based on decision heuristics with respect to a measure of statistical lack of fit we call ``risk''. These strategies, in turn, outperform standard multiple regression as long as the amount of data available is limited. We also show that, under related conditions, weighting only one variable and ignoring all others produces the same risk as ignoring the single variable and weighting all others. This approach has the advantage of generalizing beyond the original environment of the Recognition Heuristic to situations with more than two choice options, binary or continuous representations of recognition, and to other single variable heuristics. We analyze the structure of data used in some prior recognition tasks and find that it matches the sufficient conditions for optimality in our results. Rather than being a poor or adequate substitute for a compensatory model, the Recognition Heuristic closely approximates an optimal strategy when a decision maker has finite data about the world.

  10. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  11. Antigenic relationships among four herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, W T; Plummer, G

    1973-06-01

    Common viral antigens were detected, by fluorescent-antibody studies, in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1, squirrel monkey herpesvirus 1, bovine rhinotracheitis, and equine abortion viruses. The two primate viruses showed slight cross-neutralization.

  12. HLA-B27 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human leukocyte antigen B27; Ankylosing spondylitis-HLA; Psoriatic arthritis-HLA; Reactive arthritis-HLA ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ) Rheumatoid factor X-rays HLA testing is also used to match donated tissue ...

  13. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on CD4 cell count, HIV RNA, and p24 antigen in patients with HIV and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian; Furtado, A.; Camara, C.

    2013-01-01

    To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment.......To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment....

  14. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  15. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  16. Pattern recognition in the satellite temperature retrieval problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, O. E.; Goldberg, M. D.; Dazlich, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Pattern recognition procedures have been developed in order to improve the first-guess fields for satellite temperature retrievals. The first procedure is used to select one or more historical radiosonde temperature profiles as analog estimates of ambient thermal structure. The second procedure is used to organize a priori data into shape-coherent pattern libraries using structural information inherent in the data itself. On the basis of independent tests of about 800 temperature retrievals, it was found that: (1) the pattern recognition techniques reduced first-guess profile errors by nearly 50 percent in comparison with traditional partitioning schemes; and (2) with regression and physical-iterative retrieval algorithms, however, the effect of pattern recognition on temperature retrieval error was insignificant. Analysis of individual retrieval errors showed that poor retrievals may outweigh the potential benefits of both pattern recognition techniques.

  17. Methyldopa blocks MHC class II binding to disease-specific antigens in autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, David A; Alkanani, Aimon; McDaniel, Kristen A; Case, Stephanie; Baschal, Erin E; Pyle, Laura; Ellis, Samuel; Pöllinger, Bernadette; Seidl, Katherine J; Shah, Viral N; Garg, Satish K; Atkinson, Mark A; Gottlieb, Peter A; Michels, Aaron W

    2018-02-13

    Major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules are strongly associated with many autoimmune disorders. In type 1 diabetes, the DQ8 molecule is common, confers significant disease risk and is involved in disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized blocking DQ8 antigen presentation would provide therapeutic benefit by preventing recognition of self-peptides by pathogenic T cells. We used the crystal structure of DQ8 to select drug-like small molecules predicted to bind structural pockets in the MHC antigen-binding cleft. A limited number of the predicted compounds inhibited DQ8 antigen presentation in vitro with one compound preventing insulin autoantibody production and delaying diabetes onset in an animal model of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes. An existing drug of similar structure, methyldopa, specifically blocked DQ8 in recent-onset patients with type 1 diabetes along with reducing inflammatory T cell responses toward insulin, highlighting the relevance of blocking disease-specific MHC class II antigen presentation to treat autoimmunity.

  18. HIV immune evasion disruption of antigen presentation by the HIV Nef protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderlich, Elizabeth R; Leonard, Jolie A; Collins, Kathleen L

    2011-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Nef protein is necessary for high viral loads and for timely progression to AIDS. Nef plays a number of roles, but its effect on antigen presentation and immune evasion are among the best characterized. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize and lyse virally infected cells by detecting viral antigens in complex with host major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on the infected cell surface. The HIV Nef protein disrupts antigen presentation at the cell surface by interfering with the normal trafficking pathway of MHC-I and thus reduces CTL recognition and lysis of infected cells. The molecular mechanism by which Nef causes MHC-I downmodulation is becoming more clear, but some questions remain. A better understanding of how Nef disrupts antigen presentation may lead to the development of drugs that enhance the ability of the anti-HIV CTLs to control HIV disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Page Recognition: Quantum Leap In Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry

    1989-07-01

    No milestone has proven as elusive as the always-approaching "year of the LAN," but the "year of the scanner" might claim the silver medal. Desktop scanners have been around almost as long as personal computers. And everyone thinks they are used for obvious desktop-publishing and business tasks like scanning business documents, magazine articles and other pages, and translating those words into files your computer understands. But, until now, the reality fell far short of the promise. Because it's true that scanners deliver an accurate image of the page to your computer, but the software to recognize this text has been woefully disappointing. Old optical-character recognition (OCR) software recognized such a limited range of pages as to be virtually useless to real users. (For example, one OCR vendor specified 12-point Courier font from an IBM Selectric typewriter: the same font in 10-point, or from a Diablo printer, was unrecognizable!) Computer dealers have told me the chasm between OCR expectations and reality is so broad and deep that nine out of ten prospects leave their stores in disgust when they learn the limitations. And this is a very important, very unfortunate gap. Because the promise of recognition -- what people want it to do -- carries with it tremendous improvements in our productivity and ability to get tons of written documents into our computers where we can do real work with it. The good news is that a revolutionary new development effort has led to the new technology of "page recognition," which actually does deliver the promise we've always wanted from OCR. I'm sure every reader appreciates the breakthrough represented by the laser printer and page-makeup software, a combination so powerful it created new reasons for buying a computer. A similar breakthrough is happening right now in page recognition: the Macintosh (and, I must admit, other personal computers) equipped with a moderately priced scanner and OmniPage software (from Caere

  20. Local Feature Learning for Face Recognition under Varying Poses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Xiaodong; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a local feature learning method for face recognition to deal with varying poses. As opposed to the commonly used approaches of recovering frontal face images from profile views, the proposed method extracts the subject related part from a local feature by removing the pose...... related part in it on the basis of a pose feature. The method has a closed-form solution, hence being time efficient. For performance evaluation, cross pose face recognition experiments are conducted on two public face recognition databases FERET and FEI. The proposed method shows a significant...... recognition improvement under varying poses over general local feature approaches and outperforms or is comparable with related state-of-the-art pose invariant face recognition approaches. Copyright ©2015 by IEEE....

  1. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto N. Peón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage and canids (in its adult stage that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models.

  2. Mature IgM-expressing plasma cells sense antigen and develop competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Pascal; Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; Barthly, Lucas; Jagot, Ferdinand; This, Sébastien; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Colisson, Renaud; Hobeika, Elias; Fest, Thierry; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Sicard, Antoine; Mondière, Paul; Genestier, Laurent; Nutt, Stephen L.; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogma holds that plasma cells, as opposed to B cells, cannot bind antigen because they have switched from expression of membrane-bound immunoglobulins (Ig) that constitute the B-cell receptor (BCR) to production of the secreted form of immunoglobulins. Here we compare the phenotypical and functional attributes of plasma cells generated by the T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent forms of the hapten NP. We show that the nature of the secreted Ig isotype, rather than the chemical structure of the immunizing antigen, defines two functionally distinct populations of plasma cells. Fully mature IgM-expressing plasma cells resident in the bone marrow retain expression of a functional BCR, whereas their IgG+ counterparts do not. Antigen boost modifies the gene expression profile of IgM+ plasma cells and initiates a cytokine production program, characterized by upregulation of CCL5 and IL-10. Our results demonstrate that IgM-expressing plasma cells can sense antigen and acquire competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge. PMID:27924814

  3. Human sensitization to Ganoderma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Bell, B; Srinivasan, J; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1979-07-01

    Continuous air sampling with a Hirst volumetric spore trap over 3 yr has identified basidiospores of Ganoderma applanatum, a bracket fungus, as the most numerous fungal spores in two southern Ontario locations. The particle size is small and the calculated total spore mass approximates that of the spores of Cladosporium and Alternaria. Extracts of Ganoderma applanatum bracket fungus and spores in w/v, 1:10 concentration were prepared after collection of samples of the fungus from local woods. Skin prick tests with the extracts were performed in 294 consecutive children and adults attending two chest/allergy clinics. Of these patients, 182 (61.9%) reacted to 1 or more of the common inhalant allergen extracts and 24 (8.2%) reacted to Ganoderma antigen. There was no consistent relationship between reactivity to Ganoderma antigen and any of the common inhaled allergens. IgE-dependent sensitization to Ganoderma was confirmed by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Rabbit antisera to Ganoderma antigen preparations did not appear to cross-react with preparations of the various clinically important allergens. The findings indicate that Ganoderma antigen is commonly encountered, can induce human sensitization, and has unique antigenicity among common allergens of clinical importance.

  4. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEAKER RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen ERTAŞ

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The explosive growth of information technology in the last decade has made a considerable impact on the design and construction of systems for human-machine communication, which is becoming increasingly important in many aspects of life. Amongst other speech processing tasks, a great deal of attention has been devoted to developing procedures that identify people from their voices, and the design and construction of speaker recognition systems has been a fascinating enterprise pursued over many decades. This paper introduces speaker recognition in general and discusses its relevant parameters in relation to system performance.

  5. Touchless palmprint recognition systems

    CERN Document Server

    Genovese, Angelo; Scotti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    This book examines the context, motivation and current status of biometric systems based on the palmprint, with a specific focus on touchless and less-constrained systems. It covers new technologies in this rapidly evolving field and is one of the first comprehensive books on palmprint recognition systems.It discusses the research literature and the most relevant industrial applications of palmprint biometrics, including the low-cost solutions based on webcams. The steps of biometric recognition are described in detail, including acquisition setups, algorithms, and evaluation procedures. Const

  6. Spectrum of antibody profiles in tuberculous elephants, cervids, and cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Gortázar, Christian; Miller, Michele A; Waters, W Ray

    2018-02-01

    Using multi-antigen print immunoassay and DPP ® VetTB Assay approved in the United States for testing captive cervids and elephants, we analyzed antibody recognition of MPB83 and CFP10/ESAT-6 antigens in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), fallow deer (Dama dama), elk (Cervus elaphus), and cattle (Bos taurus) infected with Mycobacterium bovis. Serum IgG reactivity to MPB83 was found in the vast majority of tuberculous cattle and cervid species among which white-tailed deer and elk also showed significant CFP10/ESAT-6 recognition rates with added serodiagnostic value. In contrast, the infected elephants developed antibody responses mainly to CFP10/ESAT-6 with MPB83 reactivity being relatively low. The findings demonstrate distinct patterns of predominant antigen recognition by different animal hosts in tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pattern recognition receptors in HIV transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teunis B. Geijtenbeek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs, Langerhans cells (LCs and macrophages are innate immune cells that reside in genital and intestinal mucosal tissues susceptible to HIV-1 infection. These innate cells play distinct roles in initiation of HIV-1 infection and induction of anti-viral immunity. DCs are potent migratory cells that capture HIV-1 and transfer virus to CD4+ T cells in the lymph nodes, whereas LCs have a protective anti-viral function, and macrophages function as viral reservoirs since they produce viruses over prolonged times. These differences are due to the different immune functions of these cells partly dependent on the expression of specific pattern recognition receptors. Expression of Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and cell-specific machinery for antigen uptake and processing strongly influence the outcome of virus interactions.

  8. Galeotti on recognition as inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2008-01-01

    Anna Elisabetta Galeotti's theory of 'toleration as recognition' has been criticised by Peter Jones for being conceptually incoherent, since liberal toleration presupposes a negative attitude to differences, whereas multicultural recognition requires positive affirmation hereof. The paper spells...... out Galeotti's justification for recognition as a requirement of liberal justice in detail and asks in what sense the policies supported by Galeotti are policies of recognition. It is argued that Jones misrepresents Galeotti's theory, insofar as this sense of recognition actually is compatible...... in respects that need to be filled out in order to secure compatibility with liberalism, and that this may prove problematic. Keywords: liberalism; multiculturalism; recognition; toleration...

  9. The antigenic identity of human class I MHC phosphopeptides is critically dependent upon phosphorylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Fiyaz; Stones, Daniel H; Zarling, Angela L; Willcox, Carrie R; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Cummings, Kara L; Hunt, Donald F; Cobbold, Mark; Engelhard, Victor H; Willcox, Benjamin E

    2017-08-15

    Dysregulated post-translational modification provides a source of altered self-antigens that can stimulate immune responses in autoimmunity, inflammation, and cancer. In recent years, phosphorylated peptides have emerged as a group of tumour-associated antigens presented by MHC molecules and recognised by T cells, and represent promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. However, the impact of phosphorylation on the antigenic identity of phosphopeptide epitopes is unclear. Here we examined this by determining structures of MHC-bound phosphopeptides bearing canonical position 4-phosphorylations in the presence and absence of their phosphate moiety, and examining phosphopeptide recognition by the T cell receptor (TCR). Strikingly, two peptides exhibited major conformational changes upon phosphorylation, involving a similar molecular mechanism, which focussed changes on the central peptide region most critical for T cell recognition. In contrast, a third epitope displayed little conformational alteration upon phosphorylation. In addition, binding studies demonstrated TCR interaction with an MHC-bound phosphopeptide was both epitope-specific and absolutely dependent upon phosphorylation status. These results highlight the critical influence of phosphorylation on the antigenic identity of naturally processed class I MHC epitopes. In doing so they provide a molecular framework for understanding phosphopeptide-specific immune responses, and have implications for the development of phosphopeptide antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy approaches.

  10. Differential antibody response of Gambian donors to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Riley, E M; Allen, S J

    1991-01-01

    A seroepidemiological and clinical study was performed in an area of West Africa (The Gambia) where Plasmodium falciparum is endemic with seasonal transmission. Plasma samples were tested by intermediate gel immunoelectrophoresis for antibodies against 7 soluble P. falciparum antigens. There were...... who had had a documented attack of clinical malaria or parasitaemia. There was no difference in antibody profiles to soluble antigens between children with sickle cell trait and children with normal haemoglobin....

  11. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayla K Shorter

    Full Text Available T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL, have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4 are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  12. Recognition of fractal graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perepelitsa, VA; Sergienko, [No Value; Kochkarov, AM

    1999-01-01

    Definitions of prefractal and fractal graphs are introduced, and they are used to formulate mathematical models in different fields of knowledge. The topicality of fractal-graph recognition from the point of view, of fundamental improvement in the efficiency of the solution of algorithmic problems

  13. Optical Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  14. Tolerance and recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Marius Hansteen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though “toleration” and “recognition” designate opposing attitudes (to tolerate something, implies a negative stance towards it, whereas recognition seems to imply a positive one, the concepts do not constitute mutually exclusive alternatives. However, “toleration” is often associated with liberal universalism, focusing on individual rights, whereas “recognition” often connotes communitarian perspectives, focusing on relations and identity. This paper argues that toleration may be founded on recognition, and that recognition may imply toleration. In outlining a differentiated understanding of the relationship between toleration and recognition, it seems apt to avoid an all-to-general dichotomy between universalism and particularism or, in other words, to reach beyond the debate between liberalism and communitarianism in political philosophy.The paper takes as its starting point the view that the discussion on toleration and diversity in intercultural communication is one of the contexts where it seems important to get beyond the liberal/communitarian dichotomy. Some basic features of Rainer Forst’s theory of toleration and Axel Honneth’s theory of the struggle for recognition are presented, in order to develop a more substantial understanding of the relationship between the concepts of toleration and recognition. One lesson from Forst is that toleration is a normatively dependent concept, i.e., that it is impossible to deduce principles for toleration and its limits from a theory of toleration as such. A central lesson from Honneth is that recognition – understood as a basic human need – is always conflictual and therefore dynamic.Accordingly, a main point in the paper is that the theory of struggles for and about recognition (where struggles for designates struggles within an established order of recognition, and struggles about designates struggles that challenge established orders of recognition may clarify what

  15. Importance of ECM recognition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Importance of ECM recognition. Leishmaniasis transmitted by parasite injection into blood during blood meal of insect vector. Parasites home in macrophages of liver and spleen - adhere, penetrate, transform and replicate. Macrophage lysis - attack of neighbouring ...

  16. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  17. Contribution to automatic handwritten characters recognition. Application to optical moving characters recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokana, Denis

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a research work on computer aided vision relating to the design of a vision system which can recognize isolated handwritten characters written on a mobile support. We use a technique which consists in analyzing information contained in the contours of the polygon circumscribed to the character's shape. These contours are segmented and labelled to give a new set of features constituted by: - right and left 'profiles', - topological and algebraic unvarying properties. A new method of character's recognition induced from this representation based on a multilevel hierarchical technique is then described. In the primary level, we use a fuzzy classification with dynamic programming technique using 'profiles'. The other levels adjust the recognition by using topological and algebraic unvarying properties. Several results are presented and an accuracy of 99 pc was reached for handwritten numeral characters, thereby attesting the robustness of our algorithm. (author) [fr

  18. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Tumor antigens are the primary target of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We set out to define and compare the expression pattern of tumor antigen genes in esophagus carcinoma biopsies and in an allogeneic tumor lysate-based cancer vaccine, MelCancerVac. Cells used for vaccine production were treated...... with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) to determine whether this treatment could improve the profile of tumor antigen genes expressed in these cells. In addition, the presence of MAGE-A tumor antigen protein was evaluated in the purified tumor cell lysate used...

  20. Nanomechanical recognition of prognostic biomarker suPAR with DVD-ROM optical technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Michael; Bosco, Filippo; Brøgger, Anna Line

    2013-01-01

    of soluble uPAR (suPAR) to infectious diseases, such as HIV, and certain types of cancer. Using hundreds of cantilevers and a DVD-based platform, cantilever deflection response from antibody–antigen recognition is investigated as a function of suPAR concentration. The goal is to provide a cheap and portable...

  1. School IPM Recognition and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools and school districts can get support and recognition for implementation of school IPM. EPA is developing a program to provide recognition for school districts that are working towards or have achieved a level of success with school IPM programs.

  2. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  3. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  4. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial Intelligence 17(1): 41–62. Hu M K 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. on Information Theory, IT-8,. 179–187. Huang F T, Zhou Z, Zhang H-J and Chen T 2000 Pose invariant face recognition, Proc. Fourth IEEE. International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, ...

  5. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  6. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  7. Nestmate recognition in ants is possible without tactile interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstaetter, Andreas Simon; Endler, Annett; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Ants of the genus Camponotus are able to discriminate recognition cues of colony members (nestmates) from recognition cues of workers of a different colony (non-nestmates) from a distance of 1 cm. Free moving, individual Camponotus floridanus workers encountered differently treated dummies on a T-bar and their behavior was recorded. Aggressive behavior was scored as mandibular threat towards dummies. Dummies were treated with hexane extracts of postpharyngeal glands (PPGs) from nestmates or non-nestmates which contain long-chain hydrocarbons in ratios comparable to what is found on the cuticle. The cuticular hydrocarbon profile bears cues which are essential for nestmate recognition. Although workers were prevented from antennating the dummies, they showed significantly less aggressive behavior towards dummies treated with nestmate PPG extracts than towards dummies treated with non-nestmate PPG extracts. In an additional experiment, we show that cis-9-tricosene, an alkene naturally not found in C. floridanus’ cuticular profile, is behaviorally active and can interfere with nestmate recognition when presented together with a nestmate PPG extract. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the complex multi-component recognition cues can be perceived and discriminated by ants at close range. We conclude that contact chemosensilla are not crucial for nestmate recognition since tactile interaction is not necessary.

  8. Understanding individual differences in word recognition skills of ESL children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, E; Yaghoub-Zadeh, Z; Schuster, B

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on the extent to which the development of ESL (English as a Second Language) word recognition skills mimics similar trajectories in same-aged EL1 (English as a First Language) children, and the extent to which phonological processing skills and rapid naming can be used to predict word recognition performance in ESL children. Two cohorts of Grade 1 ESL and EL1 primary-level children were followed for two consecutive years. Results indicated that vocabulary knowledge, a measure of language proficiency, and nonverbal intelligence were not significant predictors of word recognition in either group. Yet, by considering individual differences in phonological awareness and rapid naming, it was possible to predict substantial amounts of variance on word recognition performance six months and one year later in both language groups. Commonality analyses indicated that phonological awareness and rapid naming contributed unique variance to word recognition performance. Moreover, the profiles of not at-risk children in the EL1 and ESL groups were similar on all but the oral language measure, where EL1 children had the advantage. In addition, EL1 and ESL profiles of children who had word-recognition difficulty were similar, with low performance on rapid naming and phonological awareness. Results indicate that these measures are reliable indicators of potential reading disability among ESL children.

  9. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  10. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  11. Immune responses to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigen ESAT-6 signal subclinical infection among contacts of tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doherty, T Mark; Demissie, Abebech; Olobo, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is considered essential for tuberculosis control but is hampered by the lack of specific reagents. We report that strong recognition of tuberculosis complex-specific antigen ESAT-6 by healthy household contacts of tuberculosis patients...

  12. Varicellovirus UL49.5 proteins differentially affect the function of the transporter associated with antigen processing, TAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppers-Lalic, D.; Verweij, M.C.; Lipinska, A.D.; Wang, Y.; Quinten, E.; Reits, E.A.; Koch, J.; Loch, S.; Rezende, M.M.; Daus, F.J.; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, K.; Osterrieder, N.; Mettenleiter, T.C.; Heemskerk, M.H.M.; Tampe, R.; Neefjes, J.J.; Chowdhury, S.I.; Ressing, M.E.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Wiertz, E.J.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes play an important role in the protection against viral infections, which they detect through the recognition of virus-derived peptides, presented in the context of MHC class I molecules at the surface of the infected cell. The transporter associated with antigen processing

  13. Varicellovirus UL 49.5 proteins differentially affect the function of the transporter associated with antigen processing, TAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppers-Lalic, Danijela; Verweij, Marieke C.; Lipińska, Andrea D.; Wang, Ying; Quinten, Edwin; Reits, Eric A.; Koch, Joachim; Loch, Sandra; Rezende, Marisa Marcondes; Daus, Franz; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Tampé, Robert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Chowdhury, Shafiqul I.; Ressing, Maaike E.; Rijsewijk, Frans A. M.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes play an important role in the protection against viral infections, which they detect through the recognition of virus-derived peptides, presented in the context of MHC class I molecules at the surface of the infected cell. The transporter associated with antigen processing

  14. Pattern recognition in calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Negra, M.

    1980-07-01

    It is probable that LEP detectors will often include 4π calorimeters. Since this is a novel technique, not much expertise exists yet in the field of pattern recognition for large calorimeter systems. A fast method to simulate calorimeter signals, based on an analytical parametrization of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, developped by the UAl software group on calorimetry, is presented. Some reconstruction problems are discussed, in particular the question of disentangling individual showers within an energetic jet

  15. Harmonization versus Mutual Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp

    with the opportunity to start export sales. In contrast, harmonization, in particular the prospect that one’s own national (but not the foreign) standard becomes the only globally accepted standard, opens the foreign market without balancing entry at home. We study these scenarios in a reduced form lobby game with two......, harmonized standards may fail to harvest the full pro-competitive effects from trade liberalization compared to mutual recognition; moreover, the issue is most pronounced in markets featuring price competition....

  16. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambone, Elisabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected vehicle response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach was used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the thruster performance characteristics, a database of information relating the thruster ring commands and the desired vehicle response was used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands was analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods was used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands was established, it was used in place of traditional control methods and gains set. This pattern recognition approach was compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  17. Audio-visual gender recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Xun; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-11-01

    Combining different modalities for pattern recognition task is a very promising field. Basically, human always fuse information from different modalities to recognize object and perform inference, etc. Audio-Visual gender recognition is one of the most common task in human social communication. Human can identify the gender by facial appearance, by speech and also by body gait. Indeed, human gender recognition is a multi-modal data acquisition and processing procedure. However, computational multimodal gender recognition has not been extensively investigated in the literature. In this paper, speech and facial image are fused to perform a mutli-modal gender recognition for exploring the improvement of combining different modalities.

  18. Social context predicts recognition systems in ant queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Stéphanie Agnès Jeanine; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    for dominance are costly; but it would not evolve in absence of hierarchies. We previously showed that Pachycondyla co-founding queens, which form dominance hierarchies, have accurate individual recognition based on chemical cues. Here, we used the ant Lasius niger to test the null hypothesis that individual...... recognition does not occur when co-founding queens do not establish dominance hierarchies. Indeed, L. niger queens show a similar level of aggression towards both co-foundresses and intruders, indicating that they are unable of individual recognition, contrary to Pachycondyla. Additionally, the variation...... in chemical profiles of Lasius and Pachycondyla queens is comparable, thus informational constraints are unlikely to apply. We conclude that selection pressure from the social context is of crucial significance for the sophistication of recognition systems....

  19. Screening Donors for Rare Antigen Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F

    2009-01-01

    SCREENING BLOOD DONORS FOR RARE ANTIGEN CONSTELLATIONS HAS BEEN IMPLEMENTED USING SIMPLE PCR METHODS: PCR with enzyme digestion has been used to type donor cohorts for Dombrock antigens, and PCR with sequence-specific priming to identify donors negative for antigens of high frequency. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods as well as their current state is discussed.

  20. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Erik D; Simmons, Ryan S; Palmer, Amy L; Hildebrand, William H; Rockey, Daniel D; Dolan, Brian P

    2016-02-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8(+) T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8(+) killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Adoptive T Cell Therapies: A Comparison of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel T.; Kranz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-killing properties of T cells provide tremendous opportunities to treat cancer. Adoptive T cell therapies have begun to harness this potential by endowing a functionally diverse repertoire of T cells with genetically modified, tumor-specific recognition receptors. Normally, this antigen recognition function is mediated by an αβ T cell receptor (TCR), but the dominant therapeutic forms currently in development are synthetic constructs called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). While CAR-based adoptive cell therapies are already showing great promise, their basic mechanistic properties have been studied in less detail compared with those of αβ TCRs. In this review, we compare and contrast various features of TCRs versus CARs, with a goal of highlighting issues that need to be addressed to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of both. PMID:26705086

  2. [Mixed episode: complex recognition and complicated treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargoloff, Pedro Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Mixed Episode is a complex syndrome with difficult in its recognition, the most prolonged duration of bipolar episodes, more frequent psychotic profile than Pure Manic Episode, with high suicidality and poor response to drugs. There are evidences of less efficacy with Lithium and Carbamazepine in Manic Episode than mixed states. Valproate improve both, manic and depressive symptoms, and it is proposed to be first choice. Olanzapine has been widely evaluated, showing robust response in acute Mania as well in depressive symptoms during Mixed episode. In the field of clinical practice, there are many patients receiving more than one drug, usually Valproate plus a second generation antipsychotic.

  3. Features fusion based approach for handwritten Gujarati character recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Sharma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Handwritten character recognition is a challenging area of research. Lots of research activities in the area of character recognition are already done for Indian languages such as Hindi, Bangla, Kannada, Tamil and Telugu. Literature review on handwritten character recognition indicates that in comparison with other Indian scripts research activities on Gujarati handwritten character recognition are very less.  This paper aims to bring Gujarati character recognition in attention. Recognition of isolated Gujarati handwritten characters is proposed using three different kinds of features and their fusion. Chain code based, zone based and projection profiles based features are utilized as individual features. One of the significant contribution of proposed work is towards the generation of large and representative dataset of 88,000 handwritten Gujarati characters. Experiments are carried out on this developed dataset. Artificial Neural Network (ANN, Support Vector Machine (SVM and Naive Bayes (NB classifier based methods are implemented for handwritten Gujarati character recognition. Experimental results show substantial enhancement over state-of-the-art and authenticate our proposals.

  4. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P immersion, notably 50‰ salinity significantly enhanced antigen uptake and the expression of selected genes associated with antigen presentation, providing evidence for an enhanced immune activation of the fish's immune response by the hyperosmotic immersion treatment prior to vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MHC I presentation of Toxoplasma gondii immunodominant antigen does not require Sec22b and is regulated by antigen orientation at the vacuole membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaillon, Célia; Guerrero, Nestor A; Cebrian, Ignacio; Blanié, Sophie; Lopez, Jodie; Bassot, Emilie; Vasseur, Virginie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    The intracellular Toxoplasma gondii parasite replicates within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV). T. gondii secretes proteins that remain soluble in the PV space, are inserted into PV membranes or are exported beyond the PV boundary. In addition to supporting T. gondii growth, these proteins can be processed and presented by MHC I for CD8 + T-cell recognition. Yet it is unclear whether membrane binding influences the processing pathways employed and if topology of membrane antigens impacts their MHC I presentation. Here we report that the MHC I pathways of soluble and membrane-bound antigens differ in their requirement for host ER recruitment. In contrast to the soluble SAG1-OVA model antigen, we find that presentation of the membrane-bound GRA6 is independent from the SNARE Sec22b, a key molecule for transfer of host endoplasmic reticulum components onto the PV. Using parasites modified to secrete a transmembrane antigen with opposite orientations, we further show that MHC I presentation is highly favored when the C-terminal epitope is exposed to the host cell cytosol, which corresponds to GRA6 natural orientation. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of antigens released by intracellular pathogens critically guide their processing pathway and are valuable parameters to consider for vaccination strategies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Determinants that govern the recognition and uptake of Escherichia coli O157 : H7 by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jason W; Spacht, Drew; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2016-10-01

    Predation by phagocytic predators is a major source of bacterial mortality. The first steps in protozoan predation are recognition and consumption of their bacterial prey. However, the precise mechanisms governing prey recognition and phagocytosis by protists, and the identities of the molecular and cellular factors involved in these processes are, as yet, ill-characterized. Here, we show that that the ability of the phagocytic bacterivorous amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii, to recognize and internalize Escherichia coli, a bacterial prey, varies with LPS structure and composition. The presence of an O-antigen carbohydrate is not required for uptake of E. coli by A. castellanii. However, O1-antigen types, not O157 O-antigen types, inhibit recognition and uptake of bacteria by amoeba. This finding implies that O-antigen may function as an antipredator defence molecule. Recognition and uptake of E. coli by A. castellanii is mediated by the interaction of mannose-binding protein located on amoebae's surface with LPS carbohydrate. Phagocytic mammalian cells also use mannose-binding lectins to recognize and/or mediate phagocytosis of E. coli. Nonetheless, A. castellanii's mannose binding protein apparently displays no sequence similarity with any known metazoan mannose binding protein. Hence, the similarity in bacterial recognition mechanisms of amoebae and mammalian phagocytes may be a result of convergent evolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Specific Lipids Modulate the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölz, Christian; Parcej, David; Ejsing, Christer S.; Robenek, Horst; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Tampé, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a key role in adaptive immunity by translocating proteasomal degradation products from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum lumen for subsequent loading onto major histocompatibility (MHC) class I molecules. For functional and structural analysis of this ATP-binding cassette complex, we established the overexpression of TAP in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Screening of optimal solubilization and purification conditions allowed the isolation of the heterodimeric transport complex, yielding 30 mg of TAP/liter of culture. Detailed analysis of TAP function in the membrane, solubilized, purified, and reconstituted states revealed a direct influence of the native lipid environment on activity. TAP-associated phospholipids, essential for function, were profiled by liquid chromatography Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The antigen translocation activity is stimulated by phosphatidylinositol and -ethanolamine, whereas cholesterol has a negative effect on TAP activity. PMID:21357424

  8. Identification of an Antigen from Normal Human Tissue That Crossreacts with the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, S. Von; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1972-01-01

    A glycoprotein present in normal human tissue is characterized that is neither organ- nor tumor-specific (nonspecific crossreacting antigen) and that crossreacts (by the Ouchterlony double-diffusion technique) with the carcinoembryonic antigen. This immunological relationship indicates common determinants on the molecules of both antigens. We demonstrate that the nonspecific crossreacting antigen is not a fragment of the carcinoembryonic antigen molecule. Images PMID:4115954

  9. INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IDENTIFY M. TUBERCULOSIS ANTIGENS AND EPITOPES USING GENOME-WIDE ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke eGeluk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the fact that only a small part of the Mtb expressome has been explored for identification of antigens capable of activating human T-cell responses, which is critically required for the design of better TB vaccination strategies, more emphasis should be placed on innovative ways to discover new Mtb antigens and explore their function at the several stages of infection. Better protective antigens for TB vaccines are urgently needed, also in view of the disappointing results of the MVA85 vaccine which failed to induce additional protection in BCG vaccinated infants [54]. Moreover, immune responses to relevant antigens may be useful to identify TB-specific biomarker signatures. Here we describe the potency of novel tools and strategies to reveal such Mtb antigens. Using proteins specific for different Mtb infection phases, many new antigens of the latency-associated Mtb DosR regulon as well as Rpf proteins, associated with resuscitating TB, were discovered that were recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, by employing MHC binding algorithms and bioinformatics combined with high throughput human T-cell screens and tetramers, HLA-class Ia restricted poly-functional CD8+ T-cells were identified in TB patients. Comparable methods, led to the identification of HLA-E-restricted Mtb epitopes recognized by CD8+ T-cells. A genome-wide unbiased antigen discovery approach was applied to analyse the in vivo Mtb gene expression profiles in the lungs of mice, resulting in the identification of IVE-TB antigens, which are expressed during infection in the lung, the main target organ of Mtb. IVE-TB antigens induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently Mtb infected individuals, and represent an interesting new group of TB antigens for vaccination. In summary, new tools have helped expand our view on the Mtb antigenome involved in human cellular immunity and provided new candidates for TB vaccination.

  10. Acquired Immune Resistance Follows Complete Tumor Regression without Loss of Target Antigens or IFN gamma Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Harbst, Katja; van Buuren, Marit

    2017-01-01

    disease recurrence following an initial, unequivocal radiologic complete regression after T-cell-based immunotherapy. Functional cytotoxic T-cell responses, including responses to one mutant neoantigen, were amplified effectively with therapy and generated durable immunologic memory. However, these immune...... responses, including apparently effective surveillance of the tumor mutanome, did not prevent recurrence. Alterations of the MHC class I antigen-processing and presentation machinery (APM) in resistant cancer cells, but not antigen loss or impaired IFN gamma signaling, led to impaired recognition by tumor......-specific CD8(+) T cells. Our results suggest that future immunotherapy combinations should take into account targeting cancer cells with intact and impaired MHC class I-related APM. Loss of target antigens or impaired IFN gamma signaling does not appear to be mandatory for tumor relapse after a complete...

  11. Re-thinking employee recognition: understanding employee experiences of recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread acceptance of the importance of employee recognition for both individuals and organisations and evidence of its increasing use in organisations, employee recognition has received relatively little focused attention from academic researchers. Particularly lacking is research exploring the lived experience of employee recognition and the interpretations and meanings which individuals give to these experiences. Drawing on qualitative interviews conducted as part of my PhD rese...

  12. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid Autoantibodies Display both “Original Antigenic Sin” and Epitope Spreading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. McLachlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for original antigenic sin in spontaneous thyroid autoimmunity is revealed by autoantibody interactions with immunodominant regions on thyroid autoantigens, thyroglobulin (Tg, thyroid peroxidase (TPO, and the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR A-subunit. In contrast, antibodies induced by immunization of rabbits or mice recognize diverse epitopes. Recognition of immunodominant regions persists despite fluctuations in autoantibody levels following treatment or over time. The enhancement of spontaneously arising pathogenic TSHR antibodies in transgenic human thyrotropin receptor/NOD.H2h4 mice by injecting a non-pathogenic form of TSHR A-subunit protein also provides evidence for original antigenic sin. From other studies, antigen presentation by B cells, not dendritic cells, is likely responsible for original antigenic sin. Recognition of restricted epitopes on the large glycosylated thyroid autoantigens (60-kDa A-subunit, 100-kDa TPO, and 600-kDa Tg facilitates exploring the amino acid locations in the immunodominant regions. Epitope spreading has also been revealed by autoantibodies in thyroid autoimmunity. In humans, and in mice that spontaneously develop autoimmunity to all three thyroid autoantigens, autoantibodies develop first to Tg and later to TPO and the TSHR A-subunit. The pattern of intermolecular epitope spreading is related in part to the thyroidal content of Tg, TPO and TSHR A-subunit and to the molecular sizes of these proteins. Importantly, the epitope spreading pattern provides a rationale for future antigen-specific manipulation to block the development of all thyroid autoantibodies by inducing tolerance to Tg, first in the autoantigen cascade. Because of its abundance, Tg may be the autoantigen of choice to explore antigen-specific treatment, preventing the development of pathogenic TSHR antibodies.

  14. Human activity recognition and prediction

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a unique view of human activity recognition, especially fine-grained human activity structure learning, human-interaction recognition, RGB-D data based action recognition, temporal decomposition, and causality learning in unconstrained human activity videos. The techniques discussed give readers tools that provide a significant improvement over existing methodologies of video content understanding by taking advantage of activity recognition. It links multiple popular research fields in computer vision, machine learning, human-centered computing, human-computer interaction, image classification, and pattern recognition. In addition, the book includes several key chapters covering multiple emerging topics in the field. Contributed by top experts and practitioners, the chapters present key topics from different angles and blend both methodology and application, composing a solid overview of the human activity recognition techniques. .

  15. ALGORITHM OF OBJECT RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Alexey Alexeevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The second important problem to be resolved to the algorithm and its software, that comprises an automatic design of a complex closed circuit television system, represents object recognition, by virtue of which an image is transmitted by the video camera. Since imaging of almost any object is dependent on many factors, including its orientation in respect of the camera, lighting conditions, parameters of the registering system, static and dynamic parameters of the object itself, it is quite difficult to formalize the image and represent it in the form of a certain mathematical model. Therefore, methods of computer-aided visualization depend substantially on the problems to be solved. They can be rarely generalized. The majority of these methods are non-linear; therefore, there is a need to increase the computing power and complexity of algorithms to be able to process the image. This paper covers the research of visual object recognition and implementation of the algorithm in the view of the software application that operates in the real-time mode

  16. Xerostomia: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    Awareness and recognition of xerostomia are essential in order to help patients minimize dryness symptoms, to institute preventive measures and to limit oral complications. The dental professional has the opportunity to ask every patient if they are experiencing dry mouth. In particular, complaints of dryness while eating, or difficulty swallowing dry foods, or the necessity of using liquids to ease swallowing are important clues that salivary function may be impaired. As part of a routine oral examination, one should examine the oral cavity carefully for signs of salivary gland dysfunction. Findings such as an increase in caries activity, mucosal alterations, infection or salivary gland enlargement may indicate salivary dysfunction. Evaluation should be conducted proactively at each patient visit. Early recognition will minimize damage and dysfunction and allow appropriate management to begin. Although the salivary dysfunction may be irreversible, preventive measures and conservative treatments can avoid or limit mucosal breakdown, infections and permanent damage to teeth. Adequate symptomatic relief is possible with local palliative and systemic measures in many patients. Appropriate management of symptoms and increasing saliva output may help patients feel more comfortable and improve their quality of life.

  17. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  18. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Markov Models for Handwriting Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Plotz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Since their first inception, automatic reading systems have evolved substantially, yet the recognition of handwriting remains an open research problem due to its substantial variation in appearance. With the introduction of Markovian models to the field, a promising modeling and recognition paradigm was established for automatic handwriting recognition. However, no standard procedures for building Markov model-based recognizers have yet been established. This text provides a comprehensive overview of the application of Markov models in the field of handwriting recognition, covering both hidden

  20. Speech Recognition on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    The enthusiasm of deploying automatic speech recognition (ASR) on mobile devices is driven both by remarkable advances in ASR technology and by the demand for efficient user interfaces on such devices as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). This chapter presents an overview of ASR...... in the mobile context covering motivations, challenges, fundamental techniques and applications. Three ASR architectures are introduced: embedded speech recognition, distributed speech recognition and network speech recognition. Their pros and cons and implementation issues are discussed. Applications within...... command and control, text entry and search are presented with an emphasis on mobile text entry....

  1. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Asyraf Zulkifley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1 the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2 frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3 the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4 various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Odor Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anholt, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... We characterized the transduction pathway for the recognition of pheromones in the vomeronasal organ and also characterized subpopulations of olfactory neurons expressing different axonal G proteins...

  3. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  4. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody–Protein Antigen Complexes Using Small-Angle Scattering and Molecular Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Monica Castellanos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of monoclonal antibody interactions with protein antigens in solution can lead to important insights guiding physical characterization and molecular engineering of therapeutic targets. We used small-angle scattering (SAS combined with size-exclusion multi-angle light scattering high-performance liquid chromatography to obtain monodisperse samples with defined stoichiometry to study an anti-streptavidin monoclonal antibody interacting with tetrameric streptavidin. Ensembles of structures with both monodentate and bidentate antibody–antigen complexes were generated using molecular docking protocols and molecular simulations. By comparing theoretical SAS profiles to the experimental data it was determined that the primary component(s were compact monodentate and/or bidentate complexes. SAS profiles of extended monodentate complexes were not consistent with the experimental data. These results highlight the capability for determining the shape of monoclonal antibody–antigen complexes in solution using SAS data and physics-based molecular modeling.

  5. Cytomegalovirus selectively blocks antigen processing and presentation of its immediate-early gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, M J; Riddell, S R; Plachter, B; Greenberg, P D

    1996-10-24

    Recognition of virus-infected cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires that the viral proteins be processed into peptides, the derived peptides transported into the endoplasmic reticulum and inserted into the binding groove of a major histocompatibility complex class I molecule, and the antigenic complex exported to the cell surface. However, viral pathogens can disrupt this process and interfere with immune recognition. These mechanisms may be vital to large viruses such as human cytomegalovirus (CMV), which causes persistent infection despite producing over 200 potentially antigenic proteins during the sequential immediate-early, early and late phases of viral gene expression. Products of CMV early-phase gene expression can globally block class I presentation and prevent recognition of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, but an essential viral transcription factor, the 72K principal immediate-early protein, is abundantly expressed before this blockade. However, only a few host CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for immediate-early protein are present in seropositive individuals, and these lyse CMV-infected cells poorly. Here we demonstrate selective abrogation of immediate-early peptide presentation by a CMV matrix protein with associated kinase activity and suggest that modification of a viral protein can result in limiting access to the processing machinery and evasion of cytotoxic-T-cell recognition.

  6. Antigenicity of Dermatophilus congolensis hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalka, B; Pospísil, L

    1993-05-01

    The separated cell-free form of hemolytic exosubstance was obtained from five strains of Dermatophilus congolensis. Three strains produced exosubstance with high activity, two strains produced exosubstance with lower intensity of activity. The separated forms exhibited the same hemolytic interactions as the native forms produced by growing strains, namely the antagonism with staphylococcal beta hemolysin and the synergism with staphylococcal delta hemolysin, streptococcal CAMP factor and rhodococcal equi factor. Rabbit sera obtained after intravenous or intraperitoneal application of the separated forms contained precipitation and neutralization antibodies. Cross tests of precipitation and neutralization proved antigen identity of hemolysins of different D. congolensis, strains which makes the serodiagnostics of this species possible.

  7. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  8. Chronic bystander infections and immunity to unrelated antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infections with persistent pathogens such as helminths, mycobacteria, Plasmodium and hepatitis viruses affect more than a third of the human population and are associated with increased susceptibility to other pathogens as well as reduced vaccine efficacy. Although these observations suggest an impact of chronic infections in modulating immunity to unrelated antigens, little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Here, we summarize evidence of the most prevalent infections affecting immunity to unrelated pathogens and vaccines, and discuss potential mechanisms of how different bystander chronic infections might impact immune responses. We suggest that bystander chronic infections affect different stages of host responses and may impact transmission of other pathogens, recognition and innate immune responses, priming and differentiation of adaptive effector responses, as well as the development and maintenance of immunological memory. Further understanding of the immunological effects of co-infection should provide opportunities to enhance vaccine efficacy and control infectious diseases. PMID:23084915

  9. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  10. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  11. Iris Recognition Using Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq Masood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biometric systems are getting more attention in the present era. Iris recognition is one of the most secure and authentic among the other biometrics and this field demands more authentic, reliable and fast algorithms to implement these biometric systems in real time. In this paper, an efficient localization technique is presented to identify pupil and iris boundaries using histogram of the iris image. Two small portions of iris have been used for polar transformation to reduce computational time and to increase the efficiency of the system. Wavelet transform is used for feature vector generation. Rotation of iris is compensated without shifts in the iris code. System is tested on Multimedia University Iris Database and results show that proposed system has encouraging performance.

  12. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Activation of nickel-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasorri, Francesca; Sebastiani, Silvia; Mariani, Valentina; De Pità, Ornella; Puddu, Pietro; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Cavani, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis ensues from exaggerated T cell responses to haptens. Dendritic cells are required for the initiation of hapten sensitization, but they may not be necessary for disease expression. Here we investigated the antigen-presenting cell requirement of nickel-specific CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from the blood of six allergic individuals. A significant proportion (42 out of 121; 35%) of the T cell clones proliferated in vitro to nickel also in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells, suggesting a direct T-T hapten presentation. Antigen-presenting-cell-independent T cells showed a predominant T helper 1 phenotype. Nickel recognition by these T cells was major histocompatibility complex class II restricted, not influenced by CD28 triggering, independent from their state of activation, and did not require processing. The capacity of this T cell subset to be directly stimulated by nickel was not due to unique antigen-presenting properties, as both antigen-presenting-cell-dependent and antigen-presenting-cell-independent clones displayed comparable levels of HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86, and were equally capable of presenting nickel to antigen-presenting-cell-independent clones. In contrast, neither T cell types activated antigen-presenting-cell-dependent T lymphocytes. T-T presentation induced T cell receptor downregulation, CD25, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR upregulation, and interferon-gamma release, although to a lesser extent compared to those induced by dendritic cell-T presentation. Following T-T presentation, the clones did not undergo unresponsiveness and maintained the capacity to respond to dendritic cells pulsed with antigen. In aggregate, our data suggest that antigen-presenting-cell-independent T cell activation can effectively amplify hapten- specific immune responses.

  14. Isolation of Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyer, G V

    1980-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens were isolated from intact worms in the cold by using Nonidet P-40. Proof of the tegumental nature of the antigens was shown by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical technique at the light microscope level. The potential of F. hepatica tegument antigens for the immunodiagnosis of rabbit and human fascioliasis was shown by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, although cross-reactivity was evident in one of six serum samples from patients infected with Schi...

  15. Carbohydrates as T-cell antigens with implications in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lina; Middleton, Dustin R; Wantuch, Paeton L; Ozdilek, Ahmet; Avci, Fikri Y

    2016-10-01

    Glycosylation is arguably the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins in microbial and mammalian cells. During the past few years, there has been intensive research demonstrating that carbohydrates, either in pure forms or in conjunction with proteins or lipids, evoke and modulate adaptive immune responses. We now know that carbohydrates can be directly recognized by T cells or participate in T-cell stimulation as components of T-cell epitopes. T-cell recognition of carbohydrate antigens takes place via their presentation by major histocompatibility complex pathways on antigen-presenting cells. In this review, we summarize studies on carbohydrates as T-cell antigens modulating adaptive immune responses. Through discussion of glycan-containing antigens, such as glycoproteins, glycolipids, zwitterionic polysaccharides and carbohydrate-based glycoconjugate vaccines, we will illustrate the key molecular and cellular interactions between carbohydrate antigens and T cells and the implications of these interactions in health and disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Investigation of the antigenic evolution of field isolates using the reverse genetics system of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairaj, Vijay; Sellers, Holly S; Linnemann, Erich G; Icard, Alan H; Mundt, Egbert

    2011-10-01

    The antigenic profiles of over 300 infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates were analyzed using a panel of monoclonal antibodies in a reverse genetics system. In addition, the sequences of a large portion of the neutralizing-antibody-inducing VP2 of IBDV were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide and amino acid sequences in combination with the antigenic profiles obtained using the monoclonal antibody panel, revealed a lack of correlation between antigenicity and isolate's placement within the phylogenetic tree. In-depth analysis of amino acid exchanges revealed that changes within a certain region of the VP2 molecule resulted in differences in the antigenicity of the virus. This comprehensive analysis of VP2 sequences indicated a high selective pressure in the field that was likely due to vaccination programs, which increase the rate of evolution of the virus.

  17. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  18. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  19. Iris Recognition - Beyond One Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matey, James R.; Kennell, Lauren R.

    Iris recognition Iris recognition is, arguably, the most robust form of biometric Biometrics identification. It has been deployed in large-scale systems that have been very effective. The systems deployed to date make use of iris Remote Biometric cameras that require significant user cooperation; that in turn imposes significant constraints on the deployment scenarios that are practical.

  20. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; van den Biggelaar, Olivier

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss

  1. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Beside a few papers which focus on the forensic aspects of automatic face recognition, there is not much published about it in contrast to the literature on developing new techniques and methodologies for biometric face recognition. In this report, we review forensic facial identification which is

  2. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face

  3. Computer image processing and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  4. Characterization of the Apa antigen from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a conserved Mycobacterium antigen that elicits a strong humoral response in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioffré, A; Echeverría-Valencia, G; Arese, A; Morsella, C; Garbaccio, S; Delgado, F; Zumárraga, M; Paolicchi, F; Cataldi, A; Romano, M I

    2009-12-15

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is widespread in almost all countries and remains difficult to eradicate. Nowadays, diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MPTB) infection is one of the main concerns. In this work, we evaluated the expression, biochemical properties and antigenicity of the Apa antigen, encoded by the gene annotated as MAP1569, in the MPTB genome. We confirmed its expression in MPTB and its glycosylation by the ConA binding assay. Although the MPTB-Apa is not an immunodominant antigen, MPTB-infected cattle showed a strong humoral response to recombinant Apa by Western blot and ELISA. Milk was also a suitable sample to be tested by ELISA. We comparatively analysed the humoral cross-reactivity to the Apa from MPTB (MPTB-Apa) and the orthologue from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT-Apa, identical to that from Mycobacterium bovis) in both infected and control cows. Response of M. bovis- and MPTB-infected animals against MT-Apa was similar (P=0.6985) but the response of the M. bovis-infected ones to MPTB-Apa was differential, being significantly diminished (PApa stimulation in the IFNgamma release assay, we found no significant differences when compared infected herds with non-infected ones (P=0.34). This antigen, in contrast to bovine Purified Protein Derivative (PPDb), was strongly represented in avian PPD (PPDa), as shown by the recognition of BALB/c mice hyperimmune sera against MPTB-Apa by Dot-blot immunoassay. We therefore demonstrated the antigenicity of Apa in MPTB-infected animals and a differential response to the recombinant antigen when compared to M. bovis-infected animals. These traits herein described, added to the usefulness of milk samples to detect IgG anti-Apa, could be important for routine screening in dairy cattle, considering a multiantigenic approach to overcome the lack of immunodominance.

  5. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bouchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN, were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA or pertussis toxin (PT deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells.

  6. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Known As Coronary Risk Panel Formal Name Lipid Profile This article was last reviewed on June 29, ... phospholipid molecules. The particles measured with a lipid profile are classified by their density into high-density ...

  7. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  8. Synthetic multivalent V3 glycopeptides display enhanced recognition by glycan-dependent HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui; Orwenyo, Jared; Guenaga, Javier; Giddens, John; Toonstra, Christian; Wyatt, Richard T; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2017-05-14

    We describe here the synthesis of novel multivalent HIV V3 domain glycopeptides and their binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 10-1074. Our binding data reveal a distinct mode of antigen recognition by the two antibodies and further suggest that multivalent glycopeptides could mimic the neutralizing epitopes more efficiently than the monomeric glycopeptide.

  9. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition.To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter-based imaging.These results support the

  10. Recognition memory impairments caused by false recognition of novel objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Lok-Kin; Ryan, Jennifer D; Cowell, Rosemary A; Barense, Morgan D

    2013-11-01

    A fundamental assumption underlying most current theories of amnesia is that memory impairments arise because previously studied information either is lost rapidly or is made inaccessible (i.e., the old information appears to be new). Recent studies in rodents have challenged this view, suggesting instead that under conditions of high interference, recognition memory impairments following medial temporal lobe damage arise because novel information appears as though it has been previously seen. Here, we developed a new object recognition memory paradigm that distinguished whether object recognition memory impairments were driven by previously viewed objects being treated as if they were novel or by novel objects falsely recognized as though they were previously seen. In this indirect, eyetracking-based passive viewing task, older adults at risk for mild cognitive impairment showed false recognition to high-interference novel items (with a significant degree of feature overlap with previously studied items) but normal novelty responses to low-interference novel items (with a lower degree of feature overlap). The indirect nature of the task minimized the effects of response bias and other memory-based decision processes, suggesting that these factors cannot solely account for false recognition. These findings support the counterintuitive notion that recognition memory impairments in this memory-impaired population are not characterized by forgetting but rather are driven by the failure to differentiate perceptually similar objects, leading to the false recognition of novel objects as having been seen before. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Antigenic modules in the N-terminal S1 region of the transmissible gastroenteritis virus spike protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Juan; Ordoño, Desiderio; Santiago, César; Enjuanes, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The N-terminal S1 region of the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) spike (S) glycoprotein contains four antigenic sites (C, B, D and A, from the N- to the C-terminal end) and is engaged in host-cell receptor recognition. The most N-terminal portion of the S1 region, which comprises antigenic sites C and B, is needed for the enteric tropism of TGEV, whereas the major antigenic site A at the C-terminal moiety is required for both respiratory and enteric cell tropism, and is engaged in recognition of the aminopeptidase N (APN) receptor. This study determined the kinetics for binding of a soluble S1 protein to the APN protein. Moreover, the S1 region of the TGEV S protein was dissected, with the aim of identifying discrete modules displaying unique antigenic sites and receptor-binding functions. Following protease treatments and mammalian cell expression methods, four modules or domains (D1–D4) were defined at the S1 region. Papain treatment identified an N-terminal domain (D1) resistant to proteolysis, whereas receptor binding defined a soluble and functional APN receptor-binding domain (D3). This domain was recognized by neutralizing antibodies belonging to the antigenic site A and therefore could be used as an immunogen for the prevention of viral infection. The organization of the four modules in the S1 region of the TGEV S glycoprotein is discussed. PMID:21228126

  12. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  13. Antigenic cartography of H1N1 influenza viruses using sequence-based antigenic distance calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S; McCall, Patrick R; Stern, Harry A; Yang, Hongmei; Topham, David J

    2018-02-12

    The ease at which influenza virus sequence data can be used to estimate antigenic relationships between strains and the existence of databases containing sequence data for hundreds of thousands influenza strains make sequence-based antigenic distance estimates an attractive approach to researchers. Antigenic mismatch between circulating strains and vaccine strains results in significantly decreased vaccine effectiveness. Furthermore, antigenic relatedness between the vaccine strain and the strains an individual was originally primed with can affect the cross-reactivity of the antibody response. Thus, understanding the antigenic relationships between influenza viruses that have circulated is important to both vaccinologists and immunologists. Here we develop a method of mapping antigenic relationships between influenza virus stains using a sequence-based antigenic distance approach (SBM). We used a modified version of the p-all-epitope sequence-based antigenic distance calculation, which determines the antigenic relatedness between strains using influenza hemagglutinin (HA) genetic coding sequence data and provide experimental validation of the p-all-epitope calculation. We calculated the antigenic distance between 4838 H1N1 viruses isolated from infected humans between 1918 and 2016. We demonstrate, for the first time, that sequence-based antigenic distances of H1N1 Influenza viruses can be accurately represented in 2-dimenstional antigenic cartography using classic multidimensional scaling. Additionally, the model correctly predicted decreases in cross-reactive antibody levels with 87% accuracy and was highly reproducible with even when small numbers of sequences were used. This work provides a highly accurate and precise bioinformatics tool that can be used to assess immune risk as well as design optimized vaccination strategies. SBM accurately estimated the antigenic relationship between strains using HA sequence data. Antigenic maps of H1N1 virus strains reveal

  14. Purification of nonlipopolysaccharide antigen from Brucella abortus during preparation of antigen used for indirect hemolysis test.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, E M; Houle, J J

    1986-01-01

    The indirect hemolysis test (IHLT) for the diagnosis of brucellosis uses a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen obtained by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction of Brucella abortus. We showed that a non-LPS antigen can be obtained as a by-product of the IHLT antigen preparation. The antigen was purified to homogeneity by a combination of gel-filtration chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. The substance contained 8% protein and about 65% carbohydrate. The molecular weight of the primary unit w...

  15. Combination of cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen can improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease.......The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease....

  16. CD4+ T-cell Responses Among Adults and Young Children In Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae Vaccine Candidate Protein Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sharad K.; Roumanes, David; Almudevar, Anthony; Mosmann, Tim R.; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    We characterized cytokine profiles of CD4+ T-helper (h) cells in adults and young children to ascertain if responses occur to next-generation candidate vaccine antigens PspA, PcpA, PhtD, PhtE, Ply, LytB of Streptococcus pneumonia (Spn) and Protein D and OMP26 of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Adults had vaccine antigen-specific Th1 - and Th2 cells responsive to all antigens evaluated whereas young children had significant numbers of vaccine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells producing...

  17. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  18. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  19. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  20. Expression of cysteine proteinase type I and II of Leishmania infantum and their recognition by sera during canine and human visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Sima; Nakhaee, Alireza; Taheri, Tahere; Ghashghaii, Andishe; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Jimenez, Maribel; Mohebali, Mehdi; Masina, Slavica; Fasel, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the mature domains of type I (CPB) and type II (CPA) cysteine proteinases (CPs) of Leishmania infantum were expressed and their immunogenic properties defined using sera from active and recovered cases of human visceral leishmaniasis and sera from infected dogs. Immunoblotting and ELISA analysis indicated that a freeze/thaw extract of parasite antigens showed similar and intensive recognition in both active cases of human and dog sera but lower recognition in recovered human individuals. The total IgG of actively infected human sera was higher than in recovered cases when rCPs were used as antigen. In contrast to dog sera, both active and recovered human cases have higher recognition toward rCPB than rCPA. Furthermore, the asymptomatic dogs in contrast to the symptomatic cases exhibited specific lymphocyte proliferation to both crude antigens and rCPs.

  1. Diagnostic Values of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cancer Antigen 15-3 and Cancer Antigen 125 Levels in Nipple Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Gai, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongmei; Liang, Weili; Gao, Haidong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Ma, Rong

    2015-12-31

    An expedient and cost-effective diagnostic tool is needed to complement galactography and exfoliative cytology for detection of benign or malignant breast diseases with nipple discharge. The aim of this prospective study is to explore the utility of carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 and cancer antigen 125 levels in nipple discharge for the diagnosis of various breast diseases. We evaluated the pre-operative tumor marker levels in 153 nipple discharge samples collected from one or both breasts of 142 women undergoing surgery. Patients with nipple discharge underwent auxiliary examination (ultrasonography, exfoliative cytology, ductoscopy and galactography). Statistically higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 were found in patients in the malignant group as compared to those in the benign group. No statistically significant difference in the level of cancer antigen 125 (P = 0.895). Sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 for diagnosing breast cancer were 74.42% and 58.14%, and specificities were 87.27% and 80.00% where as the cutoff values with max-sum of sensitivity and specificity were 224.3 ng/ml and 1368.2 U/ml, respectively. The following sensitivities for telling malignant from benign could be determined: exfoliative cytology 46.67%, ultrasonography 76.74%, galactography 75.00%, and ductoscopy 0%. Exfoliative cytology was found to be a valuable alternative method for differentiating benign from malignancy. Thus, tumor marker analysis of nipple discharge fluid for carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 would enhance the accurate assessment and treatment planning for patients with nipple discharge.

  2. Autonomy, recognition and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Vitório Cenci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses Honneth’s concept of autonomy from two dimensions of his work, distinct, though inseparable. The first one is suggested through the subject’s positive practical self-relation linked to the patterns of reciprocal recognition of love, right and social esteem; the second is formulated as non-centered autonomy opposed to the present-day criticism of the modern autonomous subject encompassing three levels, namely: the capacity of linguistic articulation, the narrative coherence of life and the complementation of being guided by principles with some criteria of moral sensitivity to the context. We defend the position that, by metaphysically anchoring the concept of autonomy onto the intersubjective assumptions of his/her theory of the subject, and exploring it linked to the subject’s positive practical self-relation and to a non-centered meaning, Honneth has managed to renew it, which allows drawing important consequences of such effort to the field of education.

  3. Pattern recognition in spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  4. Pattern recognition in spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebran, M; Paletou, F

    2017-01-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature T eff , surface gravity log g , metallicity [ Fe/H ], and equatorial projected rotational velocity v e sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones. (paper)

  5. Modulation of associated ovarian carcinoma antigens by 5 cytokines used as single agents or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert-Marcille, B M; Thédrez, P; Saï-Maurel, C; François, C; Auget, J L; Benard, J; Jacques, Y; Imai, S; Chatal, J F

    1994-05-01

    Optimization of intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer depends on increasing the antigenic expression of tumor cells. For this purpose, we studied the effect of 5 cytokines (IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta), used as single agents or in combination, on 4 ovarian cancer cell lines which present different antigenic profiles with the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested (OC125, OVTL-3, MOv 18 and MOv 19). Analyses were performed by flow cytometry and the Scatchard technique in order to study antigenic modulation. The effect on proliferation was determined by cell counting. Expression of O3 antigen, recognized by the OVTL3 MAb, was increased up to 2.5 times after IFNs and TNF-alpha (used as single agent) on the 2 lines presenting low basal expression (SHIN-3 and IGROVI). The expression of CA125 antigen and the antigens recognized by MOv 18 and MOv 19 MAbs was not increased by any of the cytokines tested. The combination IFN-gamma+TNF-alpha was synergistic on cytotoxicity and enhanced O3 expression, providing 10 times as many sites per cell on the SHIN-3 line. For 3 other associations (IFN-alpha+IFN-gamma, IFN-beta+IFN-gamma and IFN-alpha+TNF-alpha), there was an additive effect on O3 expression and on cell cytotoxicity.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  7. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antigen level New England Journal of Medicine 2004;350(22):2239-2246. [PubMed Abstract] Barry ... antigen testing for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. New England Journal of Medicine 2001;344(18):1373-1377. [PubMed Abstract] Pinsky ...

  8. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    1. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a single test,. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antigens and antibodies, not ... considered above threshold of detection for antigen proteins suggested a lack of sensitivity by this assay ..... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (sinusoidal.

  9. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination

  10. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  11. Variable Lymphocyte Receptor Recognition of the Immunodominant Glycoprotein of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Herrin, Brantley R.; Han, Byung Woo; Turnbough, Jr., Charles L.; Cooper, Max D.; Wilson, Ian A. (SNU); (Scripps); (Emory); (UAB); (Emory Vaccine)

    2012-07-25

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are the adaptive immune receptors of jawless fish, which evolved adaptive immunity independent of other vertebrates. In lieu of the immunoglobulin fold-based T and B cell receptors, lymphocyte-like cells of jawless fish express VLRs (VLRA, VLRB, or VLRC) composed of leucine-rich repeats and are similar to toll-like receptors (TLRs) in structure, but antibodies (VLRB) and T cell receptors (VLRA and VLRC) in function. Here, we present the structural and biochemical characterization of VLR4, a VLRB, in complex with BclA, the immunodominant glycoprotein of Bacillus anthracis spores. Using a combination of crystallography, mutagenesis, and binding studies, we delineate the mode of antigen recognition and binding between VLR4 and BclA, examine commonalities in VLRB recognition of antigens, and demonstrate the potential of VLR4 as a diagnostic tool for the identification of B. anthracis spores.

  12. Recognition Using Classification and Segmentation Scoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimball, Owen; Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, Robin

    1992-01-01

    .... We describe an approach to connected word recognition that allows the use of segmental information through an explicit decomposition of the recognition criterion into classification and segmentation scoring...

  13. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants -- both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  14. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1998-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants: both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  15. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  16. Blending of heritable recognition cues among ant nestmates creates distinct colony gestalt odours but prevents within-colony nepotism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zweden, Jelle Stijn; Brask, Josefine B.; Christensen, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    members to create a Gestalt odour. Although earlier studies have established that hydrocarbon profiles are influenced by heritable factors, transfer among nestmates and additional environmental factors, no studies have quantified these relative contributions for separate compounds. Here, we use the ant...... discrimination or as nestmate recognition cues. These results indicate that heritable compounds are suitable for establishing a genetic Gestalt for efficient nestmate recognition, but that recognition cues within colonies are insufficiently distinct to allow nepotistic kin discrimination....

  17. Facial recognition in education system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  18. Iris recognition via plenoptic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J.; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Bolme, David S.

    2017-11-07

    Iris recognition can be accomplished for a wide variety of eye images by using plenoptic imaging. Using plenoptic technology, it is possible to correct focus after image acquisition. One example technology reconstructs images having different focus depths and stitches them together, resulting in a fully focused image, even in an off-angle gaze scenario. Another example technology determines three-dimensional data for an eye and incorporates it into an eye model used for iris recognition processing. Another example technology detects contact lenses. Application of the technologies can result in improved iris recognition under a wide variety of scenarios.

  19. Evaluating music emotion recognition:Lessons from music genre recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER syste...

  20. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  1. What are the Mechanisms Behind a Parasite-Induced Decline in Nestmate Recognition in Ants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beros, Sara; Foitzik, Susanne; Menzel, Florian

    2017-09-01

    Social insects have developed sophisticated recognition skills to defend their nests against intruders. They do this by aggressively discriminating against non-nestmates with deviant cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) signatures. Studying nestmate recognition can be challenging as individual insects do not only vary in their discriminatory abilities, but also in their motivation to behave aggressively. To disentangle the influence of signaling and behavioral motivation on nestmate recognition, we investigated the ant Temnothorax nylanderi, where the presence of tapeworm-infected nestmates leads to reduced nestmate recognition among uninfected workers. The parasite-induced decline in nestmate recognition could be caused by higher intra-colonial cue diversity as tapeworm-infected workers are known to exhibit a modified hydrocarbon signature. This in turn may broaden the neuronal template of their nestmates, leading to a higher tolerance towards alien conspecifics. To test this hypothesis, we exchanged infected ants between colonies and analyzed their impact on CHC profiles of uninfected workers. We demonstrate that despite frequent grooming, which should promote the transfer of recognition cues, CHC profiles of uninfected workers neither changed in the presence of tapeworm-infected ants, nor did it increase cue diversity among uninfected nestmates within or between colonies. However, CHC profiles were systematically affected by the removal of nestmates and addition of non-nestmates, independently from the ants' infection status. For example, when non-nestmates were present workers expressed more dimethyl alkanes and higher overall CHC quantities, possibly to achieve a better distinction from non-nestmates. Workers showed clear task-specific profiles with tapeworm-infected workers resembling more closely young nurses than older foragers. Our results show that the parasite-induced decline in nestmate recognition is not due to increased recognition cue diversity or altered CHC

  2. Cooperation between Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion Proteins Spreads Protection from CD8+ T Cell Recognition across All Three Phases of the Lytic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Laura L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Abbott, Rachel J. M.; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Tierney, Rosemary J.; Hislop, Andrew D.; Rowe, Martin

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle expressed antigens display a hierarchy of immunodominance, in which responses to epitopes of immediate-early (IE) and some early (E) antigens are more frequently observed than responses to epitopes of late (L) expressed antigens. It has been proposed that this hierarchy, which correlates with the phase-specific efficiency of antigen presentation, may be due to the influence of viral immune-evasion genes. At least three EBV-encoded genes, BNLF2a, BGLF5 and BILF1, have the potential to inhibit processing and presentation of CD8+ T cell epitopes. Here we examined the relative contribution of these genes to modulation of CD8+ T cell recognition of EBV lytic antigens expressed at different phases of the replication cycle in EBV-transformed B-cells (LCLs) which spontaneously reactivate lytic cycle. Selective shRNA-mediated knockdown of BNLF2a expression led to more efficient recognition of immediate-early (IE)- and early (E)-derived epitopes by CD8+ T cells, while knock down of BILF1 increased recognition of epitopes from E and late (L)-expressed antigens. Contrary to what might have been predicted from previous ectopic expression studies in EBV-negative model cell lines, the shRNA-mediated inhibition of BGLF5 expression in LCLs showed only modest, if any, increase in recognition of epitopes expressed in any phase of lytic cycle. These data indicate that whilst BNLF2a interferes with antigen presentation with diminishing efficiency as lytic cycle progresses (IE>E>>L), interference by BILF1 increases with progression through lytic cycle (IEevasion functions are actually relevant in the context of lytic virus replication, and secondly identify lytic-cycle phase-specific effects that provide mechanistic insight into the immunodominance pattern seen for CD8+ T cell responses to EBV lytic antigens. PMID:25144360

  3. Recognition and Relevance of Anti-DFS70 Autoantibodies in Routine Antinuclear Autoantibodies Testing at a Community Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Carter

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA displaying a dense fine speckled pattern (DFS, ICAP AC-2 on HEp-2 cells are frequently observed in clinical laboratory referrals, often associated with anti-DFS70 specificity. Anti-DFS70 positive patients rarely develop systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease (SARD, especially in the absence of clinical evidence or additional anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA antibodies, prompting suggestions that an isolated DFS70-specific ENA may be an exclusionary finding for SARD. In this study, the frequency and diagnostic significance of anti-DFS70 autoantibodies was investigated in a community hospital cohort of patients undergoing routine ANA testing. ANA screening was performed by HEp-20-10-based indirect immunofluorescence, followed by ENA profiling using a multiparametric line immunoassay (LIA. Of 6,511 patient samples tested for ANA in 2016, the DFS pattern was identified in 1,758 (27.0%, 720 (41.0% of which were anti-DFS70 positive by LIA. Of these, 526 (73.1% revealed isolated anti-DFS70 reactivity, while 194 (26.9% showed additional ENA specificities. Among 1,038 anti-DFS70 negative or borderline samples, 778 (75.0% were ENA profile negative, while the remaining 260 (25.0% showed a varied presence of other ENA specificities. Chart reviews of patients with an isolated anti-DFS70 ANA affirmed that ANA-related SARD is rare in the absence of clinical evidence or other ENA specificities, there being no case thus far identified. Rheumatoid arthritis patients occasionally had an isolated anti-DFS70 ANA and were positive for rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In conclusion, the recognition of a DFS ANA pattern using a mitotic-rich HEp-2 substrate, followed by confirmation of anti-DFS70 specificity should be a routine ANA testing service. Use of an expanded ENA profile and clinical correlation is necessary to affirm the “isolation” of anti-DFS70 as the cause of an ANA. Recognition of

  4. SAIC - PROFILES

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    insecurity and violence, particularly in low-income urban neighbourhoods. The main perpetrators of this violence are poor men, yet they are also its victims. Violence against women, particularly domestic and family violence, is also alarmingly widespread. Recognition is growing among prac- titioners and academics for the ...

  5. Indoor navigation by image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Io Teng; Leong, Chi Chong; Hong, Ka Wo; Pun, Chi-Man

    2017-07-01

    With the progress of smartphones hardware, it is simple on smartphone using image recognition technique such as face detection. In addition, indoor navigation system development is much slower than outdoor navigation system. Hence, this research proves a usage of image recognition technique for navigation in indoor environment. In this paper, we introduced an indoor navigation application that uses the indoor environment features to locate user's location and a route calculating algorithm to generate an appropriate path for user. The application is implemented on Android smartphone rather than iPhone. Yet, the application design can also be applied on iOS because the design is implemented without using special features only for Android. We found that digital navigation system provides better and clearer location information than paper map. Also, the indoor environment is ideal for Image recognition processing. Hence, the results motivate us to design an indoor navigation system using image recognition.

  6. Pattern recognition and string matching

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiuzhen

    2002-01-01

    The research and development of pattern recognition have proven to be of importance in science, technology, and human activity. Many useful concepts and tools from different disciplines have been employed in pattern recognition. Among them is string matching, which receives much theoretical and practical attention. String matching is also an important topic in combinatorial optimization. This book is devoted to recent advances in pattern recognition and string matching. It consists of twenty eight chapters written by different authors, addressing a broad range of topics such as those from classifica­ tion, matching, mining, feature selection, and applications. Each chapter is self-contained, and presents either novel methodological approaches or applications of existing theories and techniques. The aim, intent, and motivation for publishing this book is to pro­ vide a reference tool for the increasing number of readers who depend upon pattern recognition or string matching in some way. This includes student...

  7. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  8. License plate recognition (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    License Plate Recognition (LPR) technology has been used for off-line automobile enforcement purposes. The technology has seen mixed success with correct reading rate as high as 60 to 80% depending on the specific application and environment. This li...

  9. Effective indexing for face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochenkov, I.; Sochenkova, A.; Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Melnikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Face recognition is one of the most important tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. Face recognition is useful for security systems to provide safety. In some situations it is necessary to identify the person among many others. In this case this work presents new approach in data indexing, which provides fast retrieval in big image collections. Data indexing in this research consists of five steps. First, we detect the area containing face, second we align face, and then we detect areas containing eyes and eyebrows, nose, mouth. After that we find key points of each area using different descriptors and finally index these descriptors with help of quantization procedure. The experimental analysis of this method is performed. This paper shows that performing method has results at the level of state-of-the-art face recognition methods, but it is also gives results fast that is important for the systems that provide safety.

  10. Handwritten Sindhi Character Recognition Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Ahmed Awan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available OCR (OpticalCharacter Recognition is a technology in which text image is used to understand and write text by machines. The work on languages containing isolated characters such as German, English, French and others is at its peak. The OCR and ICR (Intelligent Character Recognition research in Sindhi script is currently at in starting stages and not sufficient work have been cited in this area even though Sindhi language is rich in culture and history. This paper presents one of the initial steps in recognizing Sindhi handwritten characters. The isolated characters of Sindhi script written by thesubjects have been recognized. The various subjects were asked to write Sindhi characters in unconstrained form and then the written samples were collected and scanned through a flatbed scanner. The scanned documents were preprocessedwith the help of binary conversion, removing noise by pepper noise and the lines were segmented with the help of horizontal profile technique. The segmented lines were used to extract characters from scanned pages.This character segmentation was done by vertical projection. The extracted characters have been used to extract features so that the characters can be classified easily. Zoning was used for the feature extraction technique. For the classification, neural network has been used. The recognized characters converted into editable text with an average accuracy of 85%.

  11. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Several mechanisms exist to avoid or suppress inflammatory T-cell immune responses that could prove harmful to the host due to targeting self-antigens or commensal microbes. We hypothesized that these mechanisms could become evident when comparing the immunogenicity of a peptide from a pathogen...... as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and potentially...... the polarization) of T-cell responses to a given epitope is influenced and to some extent predictable based on its similarity to self-antigens and commensal antigens....

  12. Language Recognition via Sparse Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    exploiting variation of the nonzero locations and magnitude, we can build a discrimi- native pipeline for language recognition. Figure 1 describes a...classify each language as a target within six predefined language clusters. The language clusters are Ara- bic, Chinese, English , French, Slavic, and... Language Recognition via Sparse Coding† Youngjune L. Gwon1, William M. Campbell1, Douglas Sturim1, H. T. Kung2 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory 2Harvard

  13. An automatic image recognition approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Barbu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the graphical analysis domain. We propose an automatic image recognition technique. This approach consists of two main pattern recognition steps. First, it performs an image feature extraction operation on an input image set, using statistical dispersion features. Then, an unsupervised classification process is performed on the previously obtained graphical feature vectors. An automatic region-growing based clustering procedure is proposed and utilized in the classification stage.

  14. Backpropagation neural networks: pattern recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Studenikin, Oleg

    2005-01-01

    In this Master’s degree work artificial neural networks and back propagation learning algorithm for human faces and pattern recognition are analyzed. In the second part of work artificial neural networks and their architecture and structures models are analyzed. In the third part of article the backpropagation procedure and procedures theoretical learning principle are analyzed. In the fourth part different kinds of ANN methods and patterns extracting methods in recognition, learning and ...

  15. Activity Recognition in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0044 Activity Recognition in Social Media Subhasis Chaudhuri INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY Final Report 05/09/2016...DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 Aug 2013 to 30 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Activity Recognition in Social Media 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER...15. SUBJECT TERMS Social Media , AOARD, social interactions 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 15 19a

  16. Avaliação hematológica e histopatológica de camundongos BALB/c e C57BL/6 expostos aos antígenos recombinantes Cytoplasmic Repetitive Antigen e Flagellar Repetitive Antigen de Trypanosoma cruzi Hematological and histopathological evaluation of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice exposed to Cytoplasmic Repetitive Antigen and Flagellar Repetitive Antigen recombinant antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Rêgo Alves Pereira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Os antígenos recombinantes Cytoplasmic Repetitive Antigen e Flagellar Repetitive Antigen de Trypanosoma cruzi foram inoculados em camundongos BALB/c e C57BL/6 e o seu efeito avaliado a nível hematológico e histopatológico. Os resultados mostraram que o padrão histológico normal dos órgãos e o perfil hematológico dos camundongos não foram modificados sugerindo que esses antígenos não parecem causar dano ao animal.The Cytoplasmic Repetitive Antigen and Flagellar Repetitive Antigen recombinant antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi were inoculated into BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and its effects evaluated at hematological and histopathological levels. The results showed that the histological pattern of the organs and the hematological profile of mice were not modified suggesting that these antigens are not harmful for the animal.

  17. Study of the antigenic cross reactivity between carcinoembryonic antigen and "nonspecific cross reacting antigens" (NCA and NCA 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, T.; Staebler, D.; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1975-01-01

    The immunochemical relationship between CEA, NCA and NCA 2 was studied in guinea-pigs. Strong cross reactions were found between these antigens, either in delayed or anaphylactic reactions. Some specific determinants for each antigen could still be demonstrated. Delayed hypersensitivity is likely to be due to the protein moiety of the molecules while anaphylactic reactivity could probably be related to their glucidic parts. Consequently, CEA and NCA have common antigenic determinants on their glucidic and peptidic moieties, perhaps more on the latter ones. PMID:50854

  18. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  19. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent) varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  20. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Campeanu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  1. Recognition of lyso-phospholipids by human natural killer T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Fox

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a subset of T lymphocytes with potent immunoregulatory properties. Recognition of self-antigens presented by CD1d molecules is an important route of NKT cell activation; however, the molecular identity of specific autoantigens that stimulate human NKT cells remains unclear. Here, we have analyzed human NKT cell recognition of CD1d cellular ligands. The most clearly antigenic species was lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC. Diacylated phosphatidylcholine and lyso-phosphoglycerols differing in the chemistry of the head group stimulated only weak responses from human NKT cells. However, lyso-sphingomyelin, which shares the phosphocholine head group of LPC, also activated NKT cells. Antigen-presenting cells pulsed with LPC were capable of stimulating increased cytokine responses by NKT cell clones and by freshly isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results demonstrate that human NKT cells recognize cholinated lyso-phospholipids as antigens presented by CD1d. Since these lyso-phospholipids serve as lipid messengers in normal physiological processes and are present at elevated levels during inflammatory responses, these findings point to a novel link between NKT cells and cellular signaling pathways that are associated with human disease pathophysiology.

  2. Flowcytometric Immunophenotypic Profile of Acute Leukemia: Mansoura Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Dalia A.; Abd El-Aziz, Sherin M.

    2011-01-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) displays characteristic patterns of antigen expression, which facilitate their identification and proper classification. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of commonly used immune-markers for immunophenotyping of AL and to define the best immune-markers to be used for proper diagnosis and classification of AL. Besides, to recognize the frequency of different AL subtypes and the antigen expression profile in our Egyptian patients. We retrospe...

  3. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. A melanoma immune response signature including Human Leukocyte Antigen-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremante, Elisa; Ginebri, Agnese; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Benassi, Barbara; Frascione, Pasquale; Grammatico, Paola; Cappellacci, Sandra; Catricalà, Caterina; Arcelli, Diego; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Di Filippo, Franco; Mottolese, Marcella; Visca, Paolo; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Paired cultures of early-passage melanoma cells and melanocytes were established from metastatic lesions and the uninvolved skin of five patients. In this stringent autologous setting, cDNA profiling was used to analyze a subset of 1477 genes selected by the Gene Ontology term 'immune response'. Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E) was ranked 19th among melanoma-overexpressed genes and was embedded in a transformation signature including its preferred peptide ligand donors HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-G. Mostly undetectable in normal skin and 39 nevi (including rare and atypical lesions), HLA-E was detected by immunohistochemistry in 17/30 (57%) and 32/48 (67%) primary and metastatic lesions, respectively. Accordingly, surface HLA-E was higher on melanoma cells than on melanocytes and protected the former (6/6 cell lines) from lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, functionally counteracting co-expressed triggering ligands. Although lacking HLA-E, melanocytes (4/4 cultures) were nevertheless (and surprisingly) fully protected from NK cell lysis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  6. Indirect haemagglutination reaction with Sarcocystis dispersa antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Cerná, Z

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the preparation of antigen from Sarcocystis dispersa cystozoites and the procedure of the indirect haemagglutination test (IHA). The antibodies against this antigen were detected in experimentally infected mice from day 20 p.i. (1: 640). In the following weeks the antibody titres reached the value of 1: 40,960. The sera of pigs, sheep and horses spontaneously infected with other Sarcocystis species reacted with this antigen in low titres only. The bovine sera gave negative reactions even in cases when Sarcocystis cysts were present in the muscles of the examined animals. A possible application of IHA for the research and diagnostic purposes is discussed.

  7. Naive T lymphocytes traffic to inflamed central nervous system, but require antigen recognition for activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakowski, M L; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    )-specific CD4(+) T cells were equivalent in number to disease-inducing myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T cells at disease onset. Furthermore, OVA-specific T cells retained a naive phenotype and did not transcribe Th1 cytokines, in contrast to MBP-specific T cells. These findings demonstrate that the T cell...

  8. Recognition of Salmonella by Dectin-1 induces presentation of peptide antigen to type B T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nicola; Compton, Evan; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P

    2014-04-01

    Type B T cells recognize peptide-MHC class II (pMHCII) isoforms that are structurally distinct from those recognized by conventional type A T cells. These alternative type B conformers result from peptide loading in the absence of HLA-DM. Type A conformers are more stable than type B pMHCII conformers but bind the same peptide in the same register. Here, we show that interaction of Salmonella Typhimurium with bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from C3H/HeNCr1 mice results in enhanced presentation of peptide Ag to type B T cells. The effect could be mimicked by purified PAMPs, the most potent of which were curdlan and zymosan, β-(1,3)-glucan-containing polymers that are recognized by Dectin-1. Blocking of Dectin-1 with Ab and laminarin inhibited the induction of the type B T-cell response by BMDCs, confirming its role as a PRR for S. Typhimurium. Splenic DCs (sDCs) expressed Dectin-1 but were refractive to the induction of type B responses by S. Typhimurium and curdlan. Type B T cells have been shown to escape thymic tolerance and to transfer pathology in an autoimmune disease model. The induction of type B responses by gram-negative bacteria provides a mechanism by which autoreactive T cells may be produced during infection. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. [T cell-mediated immune responses and the recognition of tuberculosis antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Kunio; Koide, Yukio

    2010-06-01

    T cell-mediated immune responses profoundly contribute to the protection against the re-activation of latently infected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Th1 cells produce IFN-gamma to activate infected macrophages and promote the formation of granulomas around infected macrophages. CD8+, gamma delta and CD1-restricted T cells also produce IFN-gamma and participate the protective responses against bacterial growth. Th17 cells produce IL-17 to promote the mobilization of immunocompetent cells and contribute to the granuloma formation. On the contrary, Th2 cells and Tregs interfere these protective immune responses.

  10. Antigen recognition and immunomodulation by gamma delta T cells in bovine tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, S G; Hewinson, R G; Vordermeier, H M

    2001-05-01

    This report describes the in vitro proliferative responses of peripheral blood gammadelta T cells to defined mycobacterial protein Ags and the immunomodulatory effect of gammadelta T cells in cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis. gammadelta T cell responses were specific to M. bovis infection because they were detected in cattle either experimentally or naturally infected with M. bovis, but were not present in uninfected controls. Proliferating gammadelta T cell cultures produced enhanced levels of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta, but not IL-2 in response to the more immunodominant mycobacterial AGS: Depletion of gammadelta T cells from PBMC resulted in an increased Ag-specific proliferation in half the animals tested, indicating a suppressive effect of gammadelta T cells upon other (alphabeta) T cell responses. Because gammadelta T cells constitute a major T cell population in the peripheral blood of cattle, the activities of gammadelta T cells described in this report could make a significant contribution to the immune response in bovine tuberculosis.

  11. Conformational Heterogeneity in Antibody-Protein Antigen Recognition IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH AFFINITY PROTEIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Addis, P. W.; Hall, c. J.; Bruton, S.; Veverka, Václav; Wilkinson, I. C.; Muskett, F. W.; Renshaw, P. S.; Prosser, C. E.; Carrington, B.; Lawson, A. D. G.; Griffin, R.; Taylor, R. J.; Waters, L. C.; Henry, A. J.; Carr, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 10 (2014), s. 7200-7210 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * antibody * protein-protein interaction * protein conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  12. T-cell dysregulation caused by chronic antigenic stress: the role of CMV in immunosenescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, Graham; Gouttefangeas, Cécile

    2006-04-01

    Dysfunctional T-cell immunity contributes to susceptibility to infectious disease in the elderly. A characteristic feature of this "immunosenescence" is the predominance of clonal expansions of CD8 cells and decreased diversity of the T-cell antigen receptor repertoire. Lifelong chronic antigenic stress commonly caused by infection with persistent activating herpes viruses causes the accumulation of anergic, apoptosis-resistant CD8 T cells. These dysfunctional cells are indirectly immunosuppressive by tasking up the "immunological space" as well as directly suppressive via blockade of antigen presenting cells or cytokine secretion. They are associated with an emerging "immunological risk profile" predicting mortality in longitudinal studies of very old people. It is therefore hypothesized that for that majority of elderly people infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV), which seems to act as the dominant chronic stressor, anti-viral strategies would be of benefit in abrogating some of the detrimental clinical manifestations of immunosenescence.

  13. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  14. Identification of Theileria lestoquardi Antigens Recognized by CD8+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shan; Ngugi, Daniel; Lizundia, Regina; Hostettler, Isabel; Woods, Kerry; Ballingall, Keith; MacHugh, Niall D; Morrison, W Ivan; Weir, Willie; Shiels, Brian; Werling, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    As part of an international effort to develop vaccines for Theileria lestoquardi, we undertook a limited screen to test T. lestoquardi orthologues of antigens recognised by CD8+ T lymphocyte responses against T. annulata and T. parva in cattle. Five MHC defined sheep were immunized by live T. lestoquardi infection and their CD8+ T lymphocyte responses determined. Thirteen T. lestoquardi orthologues of T. parva and T. annulata genes, previously shown to be targets of CD8+ T lymphocyte responses of immune cattle, were expressed in autologous fibroblasts and screened for T cell recognition using an IFNγ assay. Genes encoding T. lestoquardi antigens Tl8 (putative cysteine proteinase, 349 aa) or Tl9 (hypothetical secreted protein, 293 aa) were recognise by T cells from one animal that displayed a unique MHC class I genotype. Antigenic 9-mer peptide epitopes of Tl8 and Tl9 were identified through peptide scans using CD8+ T cells from the responding animal. These experiments identify the first T. lestoquardi antigens recognised by CD8+ T cell responses linked to specific MHC class I alleles.

  15. Identification of Theileria lestoquardi Antigens Recognized by CD8+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Goh

    Full Text Available As part of an international effort to develop vaccines for Theileria lestoquardi, we undertook a limited screen to test T. lestoquardi orthologues of antigens recognised by CD8+ T lymphocyte responses against T. annulata and T. parva in cattle. Five MHC defined sheep were immunized by live T. lestoquardi infection and their CD8+ T lymphocyte responses determined. Thirteen T. lestoquardi orthologues of T. parva and T. annulata genes, previously shown to be targets of CD8+ T lymphocyte responses of immune cattle, were expressed in autologous fibroblasts and screened for T cell recognition using an IFNγ assay. Genes encoding T. lestoquardi antigens Tl8 (putative cysteine proteinase, 349 aa or Tl9 (hypothetical secreted protein, 293 aa were recognise by T cells from one animal that displayed a unique MHC class I genotype. Antigenic 9-mer peptide epitopes of Tl8 and Tl9 were identified through peptide scans using CD8+ T cells from the responding animal. These experiments identify the first T. lestoquardi antigens recognised by CD8+ T cell responses linked to specific MHC class I alleles.

  16. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G.G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-07-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase. 32 references.

  17. Mini-review: Can non-human leucocyte antigen genes determine susceptibility to severe dengue syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Dorothy; Ghosh, Aparna; Jit, Mark; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2017-09-01

    Dengue viral infections are endemic or epidemic in virtually all tropical countries. Among individuals infected with the dengue virus, severe dengue syndromes (i.e., dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndromes) tend to affect only some and this may be due to a combination of host genetic susceptibility and viral factors. In this review article we analyse and discuss the present knowledge of non-human leucocyte antigen host genetic susceptibility to severe dengue syndromes. The relevance of genetic polymorphisms in the pathways of antigen recognition, uptake, processing and presentation, activation of interferon α responses, mast cell and complement activation and T cell activation and dengue disease severity has been reviewed and analysed. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cartellieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are powerful components of adaptive immunity, which essentially contribute to the elimination of tumors. Due to their cytotoxic capacity, T cells emerged as attractive candidates for specific immunotherapy of cancer. A promising approach is the genetic modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. First generation CARs consist of a binding moiety specifically recognizing a tumor cell surface antigen and a lymphocyte activating signaling chain. The CAR-mediated recognition induces cytokine production and tumor-directed cytotoxicity of T cells. Second and third generation CARs include signal sequences from various costimulatory molecules resulting in enhanced T-cell persistence and sustained antitumor reaction. Clinical trials revealed that the adoptive transfer of T cells engineered with first generation CARs represents a feasible concept for the induction of clinical responses in some tumor patients. However, further improvement is required, which may be achieved by second or third generation CAR-engrafted T cells.

  19. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones.

  20. Fast Radioactive Nuclide Recognition Method Study Based on Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on pattern recognition method, applied the nuclear radiation digital measurement and analysis system platform, through synthetically making use of the radioactive nuclide’s ray information, selected radiation characteristic information of the radioactive nuclide, established the characteristic arrays database of radioactive nuclides, the recognition method is designed and applied to the identification of radionuclide radiation while using middle or low-resolution detector in this paper. Verified by experiments, when the count value of the traditional low-resolution spectrometer system is not reach single full energy peak’s statistical lower limit value, the three kinds of mixed radioactive nuclides’ true discrimination rate reached more than 90 % in the digital measurement and analysis system using fast radionuclide recognition method. The results show that this method is obviously superior to the traditional methods, and effectively improve the rapid identification ability to radioactive nuclide.

  1. Tissue polypeptide antigen activity in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, F; Söletormos, Georg; Dombernowsky, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue polypeptide antigen (TPpA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was measured in 59 consecutive breast cancer patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Subsequently, we determined that 13 patients had parenchymal brain metastases, 10 had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis...

  2. HLA antigens in three populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiha, S S; Wentzel, J; Shah, K C; Roberts, D F

    1989-01-01

    In blood samples from a Hindu population of Uttar Pradesh (North India) and from two Muslim groups, one from Andhra Pradesh (South India) and the other from Gujurat (West India), frequencies of 38 HLA-A, -B and -C antigens were investigated. Eight antigens - A23, A25, A29, A32, Bw45, B21, Bw22 and Bw53 - were absent in the Hindu population, four different antigens - A29, Bw52, B14 and Bw42 - were absent in Hyderabad Muslims, two antigens - A31 and Bw45 - were lacking in Surat Muslims. The three populations showed considerable genetic heterogeneity. The genetic difference between the two Muslim groups was small, but the Hindu population showed pronounced differences from each of the Muslim groups.

  3. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... determined by a colorimetric method. (2) The phenol content for Pullorum Tube Antigen shall be 0.55 ±0.05 percent as determined by direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution. (d) Sensitivity...

  4. How T lymphocytes see antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2009-03-01

    Complex organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that enables us to do battle with diverse pathogens. This flexible system can also go awry, and many diseases are the direct consequence of the adaptive immune system failing to discriminate between markers of self and non-self. The orchestrators of adaptive immunity are a class of cells called T lymphocytes (T cells). T cells recognize minute numbers of molecular signatures of pathogens, and T cell recognition of these molecular markers of non-self is both specific and degenerate. The specific (yet, cross-reactive), diverse, and self-tolerant T cell repertoire is designed in the thymus. I will describe how an approach that brings together theoretical and computational studies (rooted in statistical physics) with experiments (carried out by key collaborators) has allowed us to shed light on the mechanistic principles underlying how T cells respond to pathogens in a digital fashion (``on'' or ``off''), and how this molecular machinery coupled with frustration (a la spin glasses) plays a key role in designing the special properties of the T cell repertoire during development in the thymus.

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissel, M.; Hoefer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the usefulness of determining the serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a specific tumor marker in thyroid cancer, CEA serum levels were measured (enzymeimmunoassay, Abbott-Kit) repeatedly at the routine followup checks performed at various intervals after total thyroidectomy, in 65 patients with papillary, 82 with follicular, 25 with mixed type (papillary/follicular), 8 with anaplastic, and in 18 patients with medullary thyroid cancer. The postoperative observation period of these patients ranged from 2 to 36 months. Calcitonin serum levels were additionally determined in patients with medullary carcinoma (radioimmunoassay kit of Immuno-Nuclear Corp.). In the family of one patient with medullary carcinoma we also had an opportunity to investigate, within the framework of family screening (pentagastrin tests, etc.), the value of preoperative CEA determination. In the patients with ''non-medullary'' histological types of thyroid cancer, the maximum CEA serum concentration was 9.8 ng/ml. 6% of the patients with papillary, 9% of the patients with follicular, and 8% of those with mixed type thyroid cancer had serum levels above the upper limit of our normal range (5 ng/ml). All patients with anaplastic carcinoma had values below 3 ng/ml. The values quoted represent maximal values and were confirmed at various follow-up checks. However, 1 year after thyroidectomy, a female patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma developed an adenocarcinoma of the rectum: The CEA levels measured in this patient were: 4.2 ng/ml 3 weeks after thyroidectomy, 8.4 ng/ml 6 months later, and 37 ng/ml 1 week before operation on the rectum. In none of the other patients with elevated CEA levels were metastases of thyroid cancer, or any other malignancy, detected. (orig.) [de

  6. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B. I.

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  7. The Regions on the Light Chain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Recognized by T Cells from Toxin-Treated Cervical Dystonia Patients. The Complete Human T-Cell Recognition Map of the Toxin Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Minako; Deitiker, Philip; Jankovic, Joseph; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2018-01-01

    We have recently mapped the in vitro proliferative responses of T cells from botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A)-treated cervical dystonia (CD) patients with overlapping peptides encompassing BoNT/A heavy chain (residues 449-1296). In the present study, we determined the recognition profiles, by peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from the same set of patients, of BoNT/A light (L) chain (residues 1-453) by using 32 synthetic overlapping peptides that encompassed the entire L chain. Profiles of the T-cell responses (expressed in stimulation index, SI; Z score based on transformed SI) to the peptides varied among the patients. Samples from 14 patients treated solely with BoNT/A recognized 3-13 (average 7.2) peptides/sample at Z > 3.0 level. Two peptide regions representing residues 113-131 and 225-243 were recognized by around 40% of these patients. Regarding treatment parameters, treatment history with current BOTOX ® only group produced significantly lower average T-cell responses to the 32 L-chain peptides compared to treatments with mix of type A including original and current BOTOX ® . Influence of other treatment parameters on T-cell recognition of the L-chain peptides was also observed. Results of the submolecular T-cell recognition of the L chain are compared to those of the H chain and the T-cell recognition profile of the entire BoNT/A molecule is discussed. Abbreviations used: BoNT/A, botulinum neurotoxin type A; BoNT/A i , inactivated BoNT/A; BoNT/B, botulinum neurotoxin type B; CD, cervical dystonia; L chain, the light chain (residues 1-448) of BoNT/A; LNC, lymph node cells; H chain, the heavy chain (residues 449-1296) of BoNT/A; H C , C-terminal domain (residues 855-1296) of H chain; H N , N-terminal domain (residues 449-859) of H chain; MPA, mouse protection assay; SI, stimulation index (SI = cpm of 3 H-thymidine incorporated by antigen-stimulated T cells/cpm incorporated by unstimulated cells); TeNT, tetanus neurotoxin; TeNT i , inactivated TeNT.

  8. Allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article literature review of the causes of allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens are presented. It is shown that the ability to produce antierythrocyte antibodies is affected by many factors, principal of whom it is difficult to identify. For the allosensibilisation development requires genetically determined differences in erythrocyte antigens phenotypes of donor and recipient, mother and fetus, which can lead to immune response and antibodies production. The biochemical nature of erythrocyte antigens, antigen dose (the amount of transfused doses, the number of antigens determinants on donor and fetus erythrocytes, the number of pregnancies are important. Individual patient characteristics: age, gender, diseases, the use of immunosuppressive therapy and the presence of inflammatory processes, are also relevant. Note that antibody to one erythrocyte antigens have clinical value, and to the other – have no. The actual data about frequency of clinically significant antibodies contribute to the development of post-transfusion hemolytic complications prophylaxis as well as the improvement of laboratory diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the newborn in the presence of maternal antierythrocyte antibodies.

  9. [Antigenic relations of several strains of Naegleria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaur, E; Alonso, P

    1987-02-01

    In previous papers different aspects of one strain of Naegleria lovaniensis (Aq/9/1/45D) and two strains of N. gruberi (1518/le and 1518/lf) have been studied. From the results obtained it can be concluded that each strain behaves differently; no more similarities have been found between both N. gruberi strains, than between each of these and N. lovaniensis. Such an event has prompted us to characterize their antigenic relationships by means of an immunoprecipitation assay (double diffusion in plate). Each antiserum was tested against the different antigenic extracts. For N. lovaniensis, besides the whole extract, two fractions (particulate and soluble) and their respective antisera were assayed separately. No reaction occurred between any of the anti-N. lovaniensis sera and either of the two N. gruberi extracts. The antiserum to N. gruberi 1518/lf reacted only with its homologue and with N. lovaniensis antigens. Both N. lovaniensis fractions share some antigenic components being more complex the antigenic structure of the soluble fraction. Therefore no more similarities occur between both N. gruberi strains than between each one and N. lovaniensis, rather N. gruberi 1518/le exhibits more antigenic relationships with N. lovaniensis than with 1518/lf strains. In view of such results the species N. gruberi should be taxonomically reconsidered, criterium shared by other authors.

  10. Face Recognition using Approximate Arithmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Karol

    Face recognition is image processing technique which aims to identify human faces and found its use in various different fields for example in security. Throughout the years this field evolved and there are many approaches and many different algorithms which aim to make the face recognition as effective...... as possible. The use of different approaches such as neural networks and machine learning can lead to fast and efficient solutions however, these solutions are expensive in terms of hardware resources and power consumption. A possible solution to this problem can be use of approximate arithmetic. In many image...... processing applications the results do not need to be completely precise and use of the approximate arithmetic can lead to reduction in terms of delay, space and power consumption. In this paper we examine possible use of approximate arithmetic in face recognition using Eigenfaces algorithm....

  11. Mandarin recognition over the telephone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yuhung

    1996-06-01

    Mandarin Chinese is the official language in China and Taiwan, it is the native language of a quarter of the world population. As the services enabled by speech recognition technology (e.g. telephone voice dialing, information query) become more popular in English, we would like to extend this capability to other languages. Mandarin is one of the major languages under research in our laboratory. This paper describes how we extend our work in English speech recognition into Mandarin. We will described the corpus: Voice Across Taiwan, the training of a complete set of Mandarin syllable models, preliminary performance results and error analysis. A fast prototyping system was built, where a user can write any context free grammar with no restriction of vocabulary, then the grammar can be compiled into recognition models. It enables user to quickly test the performance of a new vocabulary.

  12. Antigenic Determinants of the Bilobal Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfolk, Judith A; Glesner, Jill; Wright, Paul W; Kepley, Christopher L; Li, Mi; Himly, Martin; Muehling, Lyndsey M; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chapman, Martin D; Pomés, Anna

    2016-01-29

    Bla g 2 is a major indoor cockroach allergen associated with the development of asthma. Antigenic determinants on Bla g 2 were analyzed by mutagenesis based on the structure of the allergen alone and in complex with monoclonal antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding. The structural analysis revealed mechanisms of allergen-antibody recognition through cation-π interactions. Single and multiple Bla g 2 mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. The triple mutant K132A/K251A/F162Y showed an ∼100-fold reduced capacity to bind IgE, while preserving the native molecular fold, as proven by x-ray crystallography. This mutant was still able to induce mast cell release. T-cell responses were assessed by analyzing Th1/Th2 cytokine production and the CD4(+) T-cell phenotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. Although T-cell activating capacity was similar for the KKF mutant and Bla g 2 based on CD25 expression, the KKF mutant was a weaker inducer of the Th2 cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, this mutant induced IL-10 from a non-T-cell source at higher levels that those induced by Bla g 2. Our findings demonstrate that a rational design of site-directed mutagenesis was effective in producing a mutant with only 3 amino acid substitutions that maintained the same fold as wild type Bla g 2. These residues, which were involved in IgE antibody binding, endowed Bla g 2 with a T-cell modulatory capacity. The antigenic analysis of Bla g 2 will be useful for the subsequent development of recombinant allergen vaccines. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Antigenic Determinants of the Bilobal Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfolk, Judith A.; Glesner, Jill; Wright, Paul W.; Kepley, Christopher L.; Li, Mi; Himly, Martin; Muehling, Lyndsey M.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chapman, Martin D.; Pomés, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Bla g 2 is a major indoor cockroach allergen associated with the development of asthma. Antigenic determinants on Bla g 2 were analyzed by mutagenesis based on the structure of the allergen alone and in complex with monoclonal antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding. The structural analysis revealed mechanisms of allergen-antibody recognition through cation-π interactions. Single and multiple Bla g 2 mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. The triple mutant K132A/K251A/F162Y showed an ∼100-fold reduced capacity to bind IgE, while preserving the native molecular fold, as proven by x-ray crystallography. This mutant was still able to induce mast cell release. T-cell responses were assessed by analyzing Th1/Th2 cytokine production and the CD4+ T-cell phenotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. Although T-cell activating capacity was similar for the KKF mutant and Bla g 2 based on CD25 expression, the KKF mutant was a weaker inducer of the Th2 cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, this mutant induced IL-10 from a non-T-cell source at higher levels that those induced by Bla g 2. Our findings demonstrate that a rational design of site-directed mutagenesis was effective in producing a mutant with only 3 amino acid substitutions that maintained the same fold as wild type Bla g 2. These residues, which were involved in IgE antibody binding, endowed Bla g 2 with a T-cell modulatory capacity. The antigenic analysis of Bla g 2 will be useful for the subsequent development of recombinant allergen vaccines. PMID:26644466

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi: Maintenance in Culture Modify Gene and Antigenic Expression of Metacyclic Trypomastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor T Contreras

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined whether the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi by long-time in axenic culture produces changes in gene expression and antigenic profiles. The studies were made with a Dm30L-clone from a low-virulent strain and a non-cloned virulent EP-strain of T. cruzi. Both parasites were maintained, for at least seven years, by successive alternate passage triatomine/mouse (triatomine condition, or by serial passage in axenic medium (culture condition. The comparison of the [35S]methionine metabolic labeling products of virulent and non-virulent parasites by 2D-SDS-PAGE, clearly indicates that the expression of metacyclic trypomastigotes (but not of epimastigotes proteins have been altered by laboratory maintenance conditions. Western blot analysis of EP and Dm30L-epimastigotes using a serum anti-epimastigotes revealed that although most of antigens are conserved, four antigens are characteristics of triatomine condition parasites and three other are characteristics of culture condition parasites. Anti-metacyclics serum revealed significative differences in EP- and Dm30L-metacyclic trypomastigotes from triatomine condition. However, avirulent metacyclic forms were antigenically very similar. These results suggest that besides a possible selection of avirulent subpopulation from T. cruzi strains genetically heterogeneous when maintained by long time in axenic culture, changes in virulence might be due to post-translational modifications of the antigens induced by the absence of the natural alternability (vertebrate-invertebrate in the life-cycle of T. cruzi

  15. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Simultaneous tracking and activity recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina Elena; Fleet, David J.; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Many tracking problems involve several distinct objects interacting with each other. We develop a framework that takes into account interactions between objects allowing the recognition of complex activities. In contrast to classic approaches that consider distinct phases of tracking and activity...... recognition, our framework performs these two tasks simultaneously. In particular, we adopt a Bayesian standpoint where the system maintains a joint distribution of the positions, the interactions and the possible activities. This turns out to be advantegeous, as information about the ongoing activities can...

  17. Discriminative learning for speech recognition

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiadong

    2008-01-01

    In this book, we introduce the background and mainstream methods of probabilistic modeling and discriminative parameter optimization for speech recognition. The specific models treated in depth include the widely used exponential-family distributions and the hidden Markov model. A detailed study is presented on unifying the common objective functions for discriminative learning in speech recognition, namely maximum mutual information (MMI), minimum classification error, and minimum phone/word error. The unification is presented, with rigorous mathematical analysis, in a common rational-functio

  18. Iris Recognition for Human Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alandkar, Lajari; Gengaje, Sachin

    2010-11-01

    Iris recognition system is the biometric identification system. Iris has an intricate structure, uniqueness, stability, and natural protection. Due to these features of the iris it can be used for biometric identification. This system gives better performance than other biometric identification systems. A novel eyelash removal method for preprocessing of human iris images in a human iris recognition system is presented.. Discrete cosine transform (DCT) method is used for feature extraction. For matching of two-iris code Hamming distance calculation is used. EER value must be less for the optimum performance of the system.

  19. Human ear recognition by computer

    CERN Document Server

    Bhanu, Bir; Chen, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Biometrics deals with recognition of individuals based on their physiological or behavioral characteristics. The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. Unlike the fingerprint and iris, it can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject, although sometimes it may be hidden with hair, scarf and jewellery. Also, unlike a face, the ear is a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. ""Human Ear Recognition by Computer"" is the first book o

  20. Unequal recognition, misrecognition and injustice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2012-01-01

    Euro-multiculturalism is (1) concerned with religiously defined immigrant minorities; (2) sees policies of recognition as a means to secure multicultural equality between groups; (3) endorses the moderate secularism of European states; and (4) adopts a contextualist approach to answering the norm......Euro-multiculturalism is (1) concerned with religiously defined immigrant minorities; (2) sees policies of recognition as a means to secure multicultural equality between groups; (3) endorses the moderate secularism of European states; and (4) adopts a contextualist approach to answering...

  1. Familiar Person Recognition: Is Autonoetic Consciousness More Likely to Accompany Face Recognition Than Voice Recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsics, Catherine; Brédart, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Autonoetic consciousness is a fundamental property of human memory, enabling us to experience mental time travel, to recollect past events with a feeling of self-involvement, and to project ourselves in the future. Autonoetic consciousness is a characteristic of episodic memory. By contrast, awareness of the past associated with a mere feeling of familiarity or knowing relies on noetic consciousness, depending on semantic memory integrity. Present research was aimed at evaluating whether conscious recollection of episodic memories is more likely to occur following the recognition of a familiar face than following the recognition of a familiar voice. Recall of semantic information (biographical information) was also assessed. Previous studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used faces and voices of famous people as stimuli. In this study, the participants were presented with personally familiar people's voices and faces, thus avoiding the presence of identity cues in the spoken extracts and allowing a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces). In the present study, the rate of retrieved episodic memories, associated with autonoetic awareness, was significantly higher from familiar faces than familiar voices even though the level of overall recognition was similar for both these stimuli domains. The same pattern was observed regarding semantic information retrieval. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed.

  2. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  3. Evolution of MHC-based technologies used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-05-01

    T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Novel insights into this mechanism are crucial to understanding disease development and establishing new treatment strategies. MHC multimers have been used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells since the first report by Altman et al. showed that tetramerization of pMHC class I molecules provided sufficient stability to T cell receptor (TCR)-pMHC interactions, allowing detection of MHC multimer-binding T cells using flow cytometry. Since this breakthrough the scientific community has aimed for expanding the capacity of MHC multimer-based detection technologies to facilitate large-scale epitope discovery and immune monitoring in limited biological material. Screening of T cell specificity using large libraries of pMHC molecules is suitable for analyses of T cell recognition potentially at genome-wide levels rather than analyses restricted to a selection of model antigens. Such strategies provide novel insights into the immune specificities involved in disease development and response to immunotherapy, and extend fundamental knowledge related to T cell recognition patterns and cross-recognition by TCRs. MHC multimer-based technologies have now evolved from detection of 1-2 different T cell specificities per cell sample, to include more than 1000 evaluable pMHC molecules using novel technologies. Here, we provide an overview of MHC multimer-based detection technologies developed over two decades, focusing primarily on MHC class I interactions.

  4. VaxiJen: a server for prediction of protective antigens, tumour antigens and subunit vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flower Darren R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine development in the post-genomic era often begins with the in silico screening of genome information, with the most probable protective antigens being predicted rather than requiring causative microorganisms to be grown. Despite the obvious advantages of this approach – such as speed and cost efficiency – its success remains dependent on the accuracy of antigen prediction. Most approaches use sequence alignment to identify antigens. This is problematic for several reasons. Some proteins lack obvious sequence similarity, although they may share similar structures and biological properties. The antigenicity of a sequence may be encoded in a subtle and recondite manner not amendable to direct identification by sequence alignment. The discovery of truly novel antigens will be frustrated by their lack of similarity to antigens of known provenance. To overcome the limitations of alignment-dependent methods, we propose a new alignment-free approach for antigen prediction, which is based on auto cross covariance (ACC transformation of protein sequences into uniform vectors of principal amino acid properties. Results Bacterial, viral and tumour protein datasets were used to derive models for prediction of whole protein antigenicity. Every set consisted of 100 known antigens and 100 non-antigens. The derived models were tested by internal leave-one-out cross-validation and external validation using test sets. An additional five training sets for each class of antigens were used to test the stability of the discrimination between antigens and non-antigens. The models performed well in both validations showing prediction accuracy of 70% to 89%. The models were implemented in a server, which we call VaxiJen. Conclusion VaxiJen is the first server for alignment-independent prediction of protective antigens. It was developed to allow antigen classification solely based on the physicochemical properties of proteins without

  5. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  6. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  7. Disruption of the circadian patterns of serum cortisol in breast and ovarian cancer patients: relationships with tumour marker antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Touitou, Y.; Bogdan, A.; L?vi, F.; Benavides, M.; Auz?by, A.

    1996-01-01

    Few data are available on the circadian rhythmicity in cancer patients. Since monitoring the disease usually implies the follow-up of blood concentrations of a number of biological variables, it would be of value to examine the profile of the circadian variations of serum cortisol and tumour marker antigens. This we did in 33 cancer patients (13 breast cancer patients and 20 ovarian cancer patients). The profiles of serum cortisol were documented, since this hormone is considered as a strong ...

  8. Structural features of glycan recognition among viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Atmar, Robert L; Estes, Mary K; Venkataram Prasad, B V

    2017-06-01

    Recognition and binding to host glycans present on cellular surfaces is an initial and critical step in viral entry. Diverse families of host glycans such as histo-blood group antigens, sialoglycans and glycosaminoglycans are recognized by viruses. Glycan binding determines virus-host specificity, tissue tropism, pathogenesis and potential for interspecies transmission. Viruses including noroviruses, rotaviruses, enteroviruses, influenza, and papillomaviruses have evolved novel strategies to bind specific glycans often in a strain-specific manner. Structural studies have been instrumental in elucidating the molecular determinants of these virus-glycan interactions, aiding in developing vaccines and antivirals targeting this key interaction. Our review focuses on these key structural aspects of virus-glycan interactions, particularly highlighting the different strain-specific strategies employed by viruses to bind host glycans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Kelly R; Green, Jordan J

    2018-03-07

    Exciting developments in cancer nanomedicine include the engineering of nanocarriers to deliver drugs locally to tumors, increasing efficacy and reducing off-target toxicity associated with chemotherapies. Despite nanocarrier advances, metastatic cancer remains challenging to treat due to barriers that prevent nanoparticles from gaining access to remote, dispersed, and poorly vascularized metastatic tumors. Instead of relying on nanoparticles to directly destroy every tumor cell, immunotherapeutic approaches target immune cells to train them to recognize and destroy tumor cells, which, due to the amplification and specificity of an adaptive immune response, may be a more effective approach to treating metastatic cancer. One novel technology for cancer immunotherapy is the artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC), a micro- or nanoparticle-based system that mimics an antigen presenting cell by presenting important signal proteins to T cells to activate them against cancer. Signal 1 molecules target the T cell receptor and facilitate antigen recognition by T cells, signal 2 molecules provide costimulation essential for T cell activation, and signal 3 consists of secreted cues that further stimulate T cells. Classic microscale aAPCs present signal 1 and 2 molecules on their surface, and biodegradable polymeric aAPCs offer the additional capability of releasing signal 3 cytokines and costimulatory molecules that modulate the T cell response. Although particles of approximately 5-10 μm in diameter may be considered the optimal size of an aAPC for ex vivo cellular expansion, nanoscale aAPCs have demonstrated superior in vivo pharmacokinetic properties and are more suitable for systemic injection. As sufficient surface contact between T cells and aAPCs is essential for activation, nano-aAPCs with microscale contact surface areas have been created through engineering approaches such as shape manipulation and nanoparticle clustering. These design strategies have

  10. Emotion recognition pattern in adolescent boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspan, Nikoletta; Bozsik, Csilla; Gadoros, Julia; Nagy, Peter; Inantsy-Pap, Judit; Vida, Peter; Halasz, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Social and emotional deficits were recently considered as inherent features of individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but only sporadic literature data exist on emotion recognition in adolescents with ADHD. The aim of the present study was to establish emotion recognition profile in adolescent boys with ADHD in comparison with control adolescents. Forty-four adolescent boys (13-16 years) participated in the study after informed consent; 22 boys had a clinical diagnosis of ADHD, while data were also assessed from 22 adolescent control boys matched for age and Raven IQ. Parent- and self-reported behavioral characteristics were assessed by the means of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. The recognition of six basic emotions was evaluated by the "Facial Expressions of Emotion-Stimuli and Tests." Compared to controls, adolescents with ADHD were more sensitive in the recognition of disgust and, worse in the recognition of fear and showed a tendency for impaired recognition of sadness. Hyperactivity measures showed an inverse correlation with fear recognition. Our data suggest that adolescent boys with ADHD have alterations in the recognition of specific emotions.

  11. Pattern recognition in speech and language processing

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Minimum Classification Error (MSE) Approach in Pattern Recognition, Wu ChouMinimum Bayes-Risk Methods in Automatic Speech Recognition, Vaibhava Goel and William ByrneA Decision Theoretic Formulation for Adaptive and Robust Automatic Speech Recognition, Qiang HuoSpeech Pattern Recognition Using Neural Networks, Shigeru KatagiriLarge Vocabulary Speech Recognition Based on Statistical Methods, Jean-Luc GauvainToward Spontaneous Speech Recognition and Understanding, Sadaoki FuruiSpeaker Authentication, Qi Li and Biing-Hwang JuangHMMs for Language Processing Problems, Ri

  12. Functional role of BK virus tumor antigens in transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakshatri, H; Pater, M M; Pater, A

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the role of the human papovavirus BK virus (BKV) tumor (T) antigen(s) in the maintenance of transformation and have identified the domain of T antigen essential for transformation. BKV-transformed BHK 21 and NIH 3T3 cells expressing antisense T-antigen RNA lose their ability to grow in soft agar, indicating the need for the continued expression of T antigen for the maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Experiments using translation termination linker insertion and deletio...

  13. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  14. Action Recognition using Motion Primitives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeslund, Thomas B.; Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft

    The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent...

  15. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next ...

  16. Mobile Visual Recognition on Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwen Gui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the recognition of large-scale outdoor scenes on smartphones by fusing outputs of inertial sensors and computer vision techniques. The main contributions can be summarized as follows. Firstly, we propose an ORD (overlap region divide method to plot image position area, which is fast enough to find the nearest visiting area and can also reduce the search range compared with the traditional approaches. Secondly, the vocabulary tree-based approach is improved by introducing GAGCC (gravity-aligned geometric consistency constraint. Our method involves no operation in the high-dimensional feature space and does not assume a global transform between a pair of images. Thus, it substantially reduces the computational complexity and memory usage, which makes the city scale image recognition feasible on the smartphone. Experiments on a collected database including 0.16 million images show that the proposed method demonstrates excellent recognition performance, while maintaining the average recognition time about 1 s.

  17. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction in face ...

  18. Target recognition by wavelet transform

    CERN Document Server

    Li Zheng Dong; He Wu Liang; Pei Chun Lan; Peng Wen; SongChen; Zheng Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Wavelet transform has an important character of multi-resolution power, which presents pyramid structure, and this character coincides the way by which people distinguish object from coarse to fineness and from large to tiny. In addition to it, wavelet transform benefits to reducing image noise, simplifying calculation, and embodying target image characteristic point. A method of target recognition by wavelet transform is provided

  19. Face recognition, a landmarks tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Face recognition is a technology that appeals to the imagination of many people. This is particularly reflected in the popularity of science-fiction films and forensic detective series such as CSI, CSI New York, CSI Miami, Bones and NCIS. Although these series tend to be set in the present, their

  20. Phosphate Recognition in Structural Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Anna K.H.; Fischer, Felix R.; Diederich, François

    2007-01-01

    Drug-discovery research in the past decade has seen an increased selection of targets with phosphate recognition sites, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, in the past decade. This review attempts, with the help of database-mining tools, to give an overview of the most important principles in

  1. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  2. Selective Search for Object Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlings, J.R.; van de Sande, K.E.A.; Gevers, T.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    This paper addresses the problem of generating possible object locations for use in object recognition. We introduce selective search which combines the strength of both an exhaustive search and segmentation. Like segmentation, we use the image structure to guide our sampling process. Like

  3. Object Recognition by Contour Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir Peter Boots; Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill

    2002-01-01

    This article deals with automatic object recognition. The goal is that in a certain grey-level image, possibly containing many objects, a certain object can be recognized and localized, based upon its shape. The assumption is that this shape has no special characteristics on which a dedicated

  4. Speech recognition implementation in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous speech recognition (SR) is an emerging technology that allows direct digital transcription of dictated radiology reports. The SR systems are being widely deployed in the radiology community. This is a review of technical and practical issues that should be considered when implementing an SR system. (orig.)

  5. Non-Intrusive Appliance Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, G; Hoogsteen, Gerwin; Krist, J.O.; Bakker, Vincent; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    Energy conservation becomes more important nowadays. The use of smart meters and, in the near future, smart appliances, are the key to achieve reduction in energy consumption. This research proposes a non-intrusive appliance monitor and recognition system for implementation on an embedded system.

  6. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    automatic recognition of speech (ASR). Instead, likely for historical reasons, envelopes of power spectrum were adopted as main carrier of linguistic information in ASR. However, the relationships between phonetic values of sounds and their short-term spectral envelopes are not straightforward. Consequently, this asks for ...

  7. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  8. Motion Primitives for Action Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent t...

  9. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction ...

  10. Ear recognition: a complete system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ayman; Harrison, Mary Ann F.

    2013-05-01

    Ear Recognition has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current ear recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity, their success is still limited. This paper presents an efficient complete ear-based biometric system that can process five frames/sec; Hence it can be used for surveillance applications. The ear detection is achieved using Haar features arranged in a cascaded Adaboost classifier. The feature extraction is based on dividing the ear image into several blocks from which Local Binary Pattern feature distributions are extracted. These feature distributions are then fused at the feature level to represent the original ear texture in the classification stage. The contribution of this paper is three fold: (i) Applying a new technique for ear feature extraction, and studying various optimization parameters for that technique; (ii) Presenting a practical ear recognition system and a detailed analysis about error propagation in that system; (iii) Studying the occlusion effect of several ear parts. Detailed experiments show that the proposed ear recognition system achieved better performance (94:34%) compared to other shape-based systems as Scale-invariant feature transform (67:92%). The proposed approach can also handle efficiently hair occlusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can achieve about (78%) rank-1 identification, even in presence of 60% occlusion.

  11. Towards automatic forensic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology and experimental results for evidence evaluation in the context of forensic face recognition. In forensic applications, the matching score (hereafter referred to as similarity score) from a biometric system must be represented as a Likelihood Ratio (LR). In our

  12. Rapid screening and identification of dominant B cell epitopes of HBV surface antigen by quantum dot-based fluorescence polarization assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhongji; Song, Ruihua; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yang; Tian, Yanhui; Li, Ding; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    A method for quickly screening and identifying dominant B cell epitopes was developed using hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen as a target. Eleven amino acid fragments from HBV surface antigen were synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl solid-phase peptide synthesis strategy, and then CdTe quantum dots were used to label the N-terminals of all peptides. After optimizing the factors for fluorescence polarization (FP) immunoassay, the antigenicities of synthetic peptides were determined by analyzing the recognition and combination of peptides and standard antibody samples. The results of FP assays confirmed that 10 of 11 synthetic peptides have distinct antigenicities. In order to screen dominant antigenic peptides, the FP assays were carried out to investigate the antibodies against the 10 synthetic peptides of HBV surface antigen respectively in 159 samples of anti-HBV surface antigen-positive antiserum. The results showed that 3 of the 10 antigenic peptides may be immunodominant because the antibodies against them existed more widely among the samples and their antibody titers were higher than those of other peptides. Using three dominant antigenic peptides, 293 serum samples were detected for HBV infection by FP assays; the results showed that the antibody-positive ratio was 51.9% and the sensitivity and specificity were 84.3% and 98.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a quantum dot-based FP assay is a very simple, rapid, and convenient method for determining immunodominant antigenic peptides and has great potential in applications such as epitope mapping, vaccine designing, or clinical disease diagnosis in the future.

  13. Structural characterisation of human galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain in complex with glycerol, lactose, 3′-sulfo-lactose, and 2′-fucosyllactose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Leffler, Hakon; Nilsson, Ulf J.; Blanchard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-4 is a tandem-repeat galectin with two distinct carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD). Galectin-4 is expressed mainly in the alimentary tract and is proposed to function as a lipid raft and adherens junction stabilizer by its glycan cross-linking capacity. Galectin-4 plays divergent roles in cancer and inflammatory conditions, either promoting or inhibiting each disease progression, depending on the specific pathological condition. The study of galectin-4’s ligand-binding profile may help decipher its roles under specific conditions. Here we present the X-ray structures of human galectin-4 N-terminal CRD (galectin-4N) bound to different saccharide ligands. Galectin-4’s overall fold and its core interactions to lactose are similar to other galectin CRDs. Galectin-4N recognises the sulfate cap of 3′-sulfated glycans by a weak interaction through Arg45 and two water-mediated hydrogen bonds via Trp84 and Asn49. When galectin-4N interacts with the H-antigen mimic, 2′-fucosyllactose, an interaction is formed between the ring oxygen of fucose and Arg45. The extended binding site of galectin-4N may not be well suited to the A/B-antigen determinants, α-GalNAc/α-Gal, specifically due to clashes with residue Phe47. Overall, galectin-4N favours sulfated glycans whilst galectin-4C prefers blood group determinants. However, the two CRDs of galectin-4 can, to a less extent, recognise each other’s ligands. PMID:26828567

  14. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  15. Serum reactome induced by Bordetella pertussis infection and Pertussis vaccines: qualitative differences in serum antibody recognition patterns revealed by peptide microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Davide; Ferrara, Giovanni; Advani, Reza; Hallander, Hans O; Maeurer, Markus J

    2015-07-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough) remains a public health problem despite extensive vaccination strategies. Better understanding of the host-pathogen interaction and the detailed B. pertussis (Bp) target recognition pattern will help in guided vaccine design. We characterized the specific epitope antigen recognition profiles of serum antibodies ('the reactome') induced by whooping cough and B. pertussis (Bp) vaccines from a case-control study conducted in 1996 in infants enrolled in a Bp vaccine trial in Sweden (Gustafsson, NEJM, 1996, 334, 349-355). Sera from children with whooping cough, vaccinated with Diphtheria Tetanus Pertussis (DTP) whole-cell (wc), acellular 5 (DPTa5), or with the 2 component (a2) vaccines and from infants receiving only DT (n=10 for each group) were tested with high-content peptide microarrays containing 17 Bp proteins displayed as linear (n=3175) peptide stretches. Slides were incubated with serum and peptide-IgG complexes detected with Cy5-labeled goat anti-human IgG and analyzed using a GenePix 4000B microarray scanner, followed by statistical analysis, using PAM (Prediction Analysis for Microarrays) and the identification of uniquely recognized peptide epitopes. 367/3,085 (11.9%) peptides were recognized in 10/10 sera from children with whooping cough, 239 (7.7%) in DTPwc, 259 (8.4%) in DTPa5, 105 (3.4%) DTPa2, 179 (5.8%) in the DT groups. Recognition of strongly recognized peptides was similar between whooping cough and DPTwc, but statistically different between whooping cough vs. DTPa5 (p<0.05), DTPa2 and DT (p<0.001 vs. both) vaccines. 6/3,085 and 2/3,085 peptides were exclusively recognized in (10/10) sera from children with whooping cough and DTPa2 vaccination, respectively. DTPwc resembles more closely the whooping cough reactome as compared to acellular vaccines. We could identify a unique recognition signature common for each vaccination group (10/10 children). Peptide microarray technology allows detection of subtle differences in

  16. Scanner image quality profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chengwu

    2009-01-01

    When using a document scanner, scan image quality is often unknown to the end user of the scanned image. Document scanners may employ different imaging technologies that can result in different image characteristics. Variability of scanner parts and the manufacturing process may also create variability of the scanned image quality from machine to machine. Image quality of the same scanner may also change as it ages and becomes contaminated. If the scanned image is used for human viewing, the resulting image quality variability may not be mission critical other than being a visual annoyance because the human visual system has superb adaptation and segmentation capability. However, if the scanned image is used for machine recognition or for printing, the image quality variability may become important and even mission critical. Here we propose a framework to profile the scanner image quality and tag the scanned image with the IQ profile. We review the potential quantified aspects of scan image quality and propose a method of characterization with examples.

  17. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  18. The effects of alcohol on the recognition of facial expressions and microexpressions of emotion: enhanced recognition of disgust and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisberti, Fatima; Terry, Philip

    2015-09-01

    The study compared alcohol's effects on the recognition of briefly displayed facial expressions of emotion (so-called microexpressions) with expressions presented for a longer period. Using a repeated-measures design, we tested 18 participants three times (counterbalanced), after (i) a placebo drink, (ii) a low-to-moderate dose of alcohol (0.17 g/kg women; 0.20 g/kg men) and (iii) a moderate-to-high dose of alcohol (0.52 g/kg women; 0.60 g/kg men). On each session, participants were presented with stimuli representing six emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust and contempt) overlaid on a generic avatar in a six-alternative forced-choice paradigm. A neutral expression (1 s) preceded and followed a target expression presented for 200 ms (microexpressions) or 400 ms. Participants mouse clicked the correct answer. The recognition of disgust was significantly better after the high dose of alcohol than after the low dose or placebo drinks at both durations of stimulus presentation. A similar profile of effects was found for the recognition of contempt. There were no effects on response latencies. Alcohol can increase sensitivity to expressions of disgust and contempt. Such effects are not dependent on stimulus duration up to 400 ms and may reflect contextual modulation of alcohol's effects on emotion recognition. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Despite disorganized synapse structure, Th2 cells maintain directional delivery of CD40L to antigen-presenting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Gardell

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of peptide displayed on MHC molecules, Th1 and Th2 cells form distinct immunological synapse structures. Th1 cells have a bull's eye synapse structure with TCR/ MHC-peptide interactions occurring central to a ring of adhesion molecules, while Th2 cells have a multifocal synapse with small clusters of TCR/MHC interactions throughout the area of T cell/antigen-presenting cell interaction. In this study, we investigated whether this structural difference in the immunological synapse affects delivery of T cell help. The immunological synapse is thought to ensure antigen-specific delivery of cytolytic granules and killing of target cells by NK cells and cytolytic T cells. In helper T cells, it has been proposed that the immunological synapse may direct delivery of other effector molecules including cytokines. CD40 ligand (CD40L is a membrane-bound cytokine essential for antigen-specific T cell help for B cells in the antibody response. We incubated Th1 and Th2 cells overnight with a mixture of antigen-presenting and bystander B cells, and the delivery of CD40L to B cells and subsequent B cell responses were compared. Despite distinct immunological synapse structures, Th1 and Th2 cell do not differ in their ability to deliver CD40L and T cell help in an antigen-specific fashion, or in their susceptibility to inhibition of help by a blocking anti-CD40L antibody.

  20. Despite disorganized synapse structure, Th2 cells maintain directional delivery of CD40L to antigen-presenting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardell, Jennifer L; Parker, David C

    2017-01-01

    Upon recognition of peptide displayed on MHC molecules, Th1 and Th2 cells form distinct immunological synapse structures. Th1 cells have a bull's eye synapse structure with TCR/ MHC-peptide interactions occurring central to a ring of adhesion molecules, while Th2 cells have a multifocal synapse with small clusters of TCR/MHC interactions throughout the area of T cell/antigen-presenting cell interaction. In this study, we investigated whether this structural difference in the immunological synapse affects delivery of T cell help. The immunological synapse is thought to ensure antigen-specific delivery of cytolytic granules and killing of target cells by NK cells and cytolytic T cells. In helper T cells, it has been proposed that the immunological synapse may direct delivery of other effector molecules including cytokines. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a membrane-bound cytokine essential for antigen-specific T cell help for B cells in the antibody response. We incubated Th1 and Th2 cells overnight with a mixture of antigen-presenting and bystander B cells, and the delivery of CD40L to B cells and subsequent B cell responses were compared. Despite distinct immunological synapse structures, Th1 and Th2 cell do not differ in their ability to deliver CD40L and T cell help in an antigen-specific fashion, or in their susceptibility to inhibition of help by a blocking anti-CD40L antibody.

  1. Distinct patterns of blood-stage parasite antigens detected by plasma IgG subclasses from individuals with different level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Cathrine Holm; Brahimi, Karima; Vandahl, Brian

    2010-01-01

    then gradually develop into protective response dominated by cytophilic IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies. METHODS: Naturally occurring IgG antibodies against P. falciparum blood-stage antigens were analysed from plasma samples collected from four groups of individuals differing in age and level of exposure to P....... falciparum infections. Western Blot profiling of blood-stage parasite antigens displaying reactivity with individual plasma samples in terms of their subclass specificities was conducted. Parasite antigens detected by IgG were grouped based on their apparent molecular sizes resolved by SDS-PAGE as high...... groups of individuals with different levels of exposure to P. falciparum infections. RESULTS: IgG4 and IgM antibodies in plasma samples from all groups detected very few parasite antigens. IgG2 antibodies from all groups detected a common pattern of high molecular weight parasite antigens. Cytophilic Ig...

  2. Speech Recognition: Its Place in Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szul, Linda F.; Bouder, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Suggests uses of speech recognition devices in the classroom for students with disabilities. Compares speech recognition software packages and provides guidelines for selection and teaching. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  3. HLA antigens, epilepsy and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, P; Morellini, M; Raucci, U; Cappellacci, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-one epileptic patients, selected from among 900 children with previous febrile convulsions and subsequent epilepsy, were typed for HLA antigens. In 16 of the 31 patients CMV was isolated from the urine shortly after the appearance of spontaneous fits; in the remaining 15 patients the virus was never detected. All the examined children were typed for 14 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B, 7 HLA-C and 9 HLA-DR specificities, and compared with a group of healthy subjects. The HLA-A11 antigen was present in 25% of the children with chronic CMV infection and epilepsy, and absent in patients with epilepsy but without CMV infection (p less than 0.02). The possibility that the A11 antigen is a marker of the predisposing genes for CMV infection in children with epilepsy following FC is proposed.

  4. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  5. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  6. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  7. Defective HLA class I antigen processing machinery in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lei; Michelakos, Theodoros; Yamada, Teppei; Fan, Song; Wang, Xinhui; Schwab, Joseph H; Ferrone, Cristina R; Ferrone, Soldano

    2018-02-27

    Malignant transformation of cells is frequently associated with defective HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) component expression. This abnormality may have functional relevance, since it may have a negative impact on tumor cell recognition by cognate T cells. Furthermore, HLA class I APM abnormalities appear to have clinical significance, since they are associated with poor prognosis in several malignant diseases and may play a role in the resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature describing abnormalities in HLA class I APM component expression in many types of cancer. These abnormalities have been reported in all types of cancer analyzed with a frequency ranging between a minimum of 35.8% in renal cancer and a maximum of 87.9% in thyroid cancer for HLA class I heavy chains. In addition, we have described the molecular mechanisms underlying defects in HLA class I APM component expression and function by malignant cells. Lastly, we have discussed the clinical significance of HLA class I APM component abnormalities in malignant tumors.

  8. Data structures, computer graphics, and pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, A; Kunii, T L

    1977-01-01

    Data Structures, Computer Graphics, and Pattern Recognition focuses on the computer graphics and pattern recognition applications of data structures methodology.This book presents design related principles and research aspects of the computer graphics, system design, data management, and pattern recognition tasks. The topics include the data structure design, concise structuring of geometric data for computer aided design, and data structures for pattern recognition algorithms. The survey of data structures for computer graphics systems, application of relational data structures in computer gr

  9. Recognition of an Independent Self-Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Henrik Jøker

    2009-01-01

    Hegel's concept in the Phenomenology of the Spirit of the "recognition of an independent self-consciousness" is investigated as a point of separation for contemporary philosophy of recognition. I claim that multiculturalism and the theories of recognition (such as Axel Honneth's) based on empirical...... psychology neglect or deny crucial metaphysical aspects of the Hegelian legacy. Instead, I seek to point at an additional, "spiritual", level of recognition, based on the concept of the subject in Lacanian psychoanalysis....

  10. Recognition of human oncogenic viruses by host pattern recognition receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C Di Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human oncogenic viruses include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, human papilloma virus (HPV, human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1, Kaposi’s associated sarcoma virus (KSHV, and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. It would be expected that during virus-host interaction, the immune system would recognize these pathogens and eliminate them. However, through evolution, these viruses have developed a number of strategies to avoid such an outcome and successfully establish chronic infections. The persistent nature of the infection caused by these viruses is associated with their oncogenic potential. In this article, we will review the latest information on the interaction between oncogenic viruses and the innate immune system of the host. In particular, we will summarize the available knowledge on the recognition by host pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs present in the incoming viral particle or generated during the virus’ life cycle. We will also review the data on the recognition of cell-derived danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs generated during the virus infection that may impact the outcome of the host-pathogen interaction and the development cancer.

  11. Original antigenic sin: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatti, Anup; Monsalve, Diana M; Pacheco, Yovana; Chang, Christopher; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gershwin, M Eric

    2017-09-01

    The concept of "original antigenic sin" was first proposed by Thomas Francis, Jr. in 1960. This phenomenon has the potential to rewrite what we understand about how the immune system responds to infections and its mechanistic implications on how vaccines should be designed. Antigenic sin has been demonstrated to occur in several infectious diseases in both animals and humans, including human influenza infection and dengue fever. The basis of "original antigenic sin" requires immunological memory, and our immune system ability to autocorrect. In the context of viral infections, it is expected that if we are exposed to a native strain of a pathogen, we should be able to mount a secondary immune response on subsequent exposure to the same pathogen. "Original antigenic sin" will not contradict this well-established immunological process, as long as the subsequent infectious antigen is identical to the original one. But "original antigenic sin" implies that when the epitope varies slightly, then the immune system relies on memory of the earlier infection, rather than mount another primary or secondary response to the new epitope which would allow faster and stronger responses. The result is that the immunological response may be inadequate against the new strain, because the immune system does not adapt and instead relies on its memory to mount a response. In the case of vaccines, if we only immunize to a single strain or epitope, and if that strain/epitope changes over time, then the immune system is unable to mount an accurate secondary response. In addition, depending of the first viral exposure the secondary immune response can result in an antibody-dependent enhancement of the disease or at the opposite, it could induce anergy. Both of them triggering loss of pathogen control and inducing aberrant clinical consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Embedded Face Detection and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Günlü

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The need to increase security in open or public spaces has in turn given rise to the requirement to monitor these spaces and analyse those images on-site and on-time. At this point, the use of smart cameras – of which the popularity has been increasing – is one step ahead. With sensors and Digital Signal Processors (DSPs, smart cameras generate ad hoc results by analysing the numeric images transmitted from the sensor by means of a variety of image-processing algorithms. Since the images are not transmitted to a distance processing unit but rather are processed inside the camera, it does not necessitate high-bandwidth networks or high processor powered systems; it can instantaneously decide on the required access. Nonetheless, on account of restricted memory, processing power and overall power, image processing algorithms need to be developed and optimized for embedded processors. Among these algorithms, one of the most important is for face detection and recognition. A number of face detection and recognition methods have been proposed recently and many of these methods have been tested on general-purpose processors. In smart cameras – which are real-life applications of such methods – the widest use is on DSPs. In the present study, the Viola-Jones face detection method – which was reported to run faster on PCs – was optimized for DSPs; the face recognition method was combined with the developed sub-region and mask-based DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform. As the employed DSP is a fixed-point processor, the processes were performed with integers insofar as it was possible. To enable face recognition, the image was divided into sub-regions and from each sub-region the robust coefficients against disruptive elements – like face expression, illumination, etc. – were selected as the features. The discrimination of the selected features was enhanced via LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis and then employed for recognition. Thanks to its

  13. C-type lectins: their network and roles in pathogen recognition and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sabine; Raulf, Marie-Kristin; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) represent the most complex family of animal/human lectins that comprises 17 different groups. During evolution, CTLs have developed by diversification to cover a broad range of glycan ligands. However, ligand binding by CTLs is not necessarily restricted to glycans as some CTLs also bind to proteins, lipids, inorganic molecules, or ice crystals. CTLs share a common fold that harbors a Ca 2+ for contact to the sugar and about 18 invariant residues in a phylogenetically conserved pattern. In vertebrates, CTLs have numerous functions, including serum glycoprotein homeostasis, pathogen sensing, and the initiation of immune responses. Myeloid CTLs in innate immunity are mainly expressed by antigen-presenting cells and play a prominent role in the recognition of a variety of pathogens such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, myeloid CTLs such as the macrophage inducible CTL (Mincle) or Clec-9a may also bind to self-antigens and thus contribute to immune homeostasis. While some CTLs induce pro-inflammatory responses and thereby lead to activation of adaptive immune responses, other CTLs act as inhibitory receptors and dampen cellular functions. Since CTLs are key players in pathogen recognition and innate immunity, targeting CTLs may be a promising strategy for cell-specific delivery of drugs or vaccine antigens and to modulate immune responses.

  14. Immunolocalization and immunodetection of the excretory/secretory (ES antigens of Fasciola gigantica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Hannan Khan

    Full Text Available The digenetic trematode Fasciola gigantica is a parasite of great agricultural and economic importance. Along with Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica incurs huge economic losses to the agricultural sector. Because of unavailability of an effective and commercial vaccine, the earliest diagnosis of the disease is the only way to control the disease. The conventional coprological techniques are able to detect the disease only after the parasites get matured and starts releasing their eggs with the faeces of host, therefore prepatent infection remain undiagnosed. The alternative method is by serological tests that uses circulatory antigens. Despite high sensitivity, their reliability is quite low because of the common antigens shared between different helminth parasites. To overcome this, investigation was shifted to identify the copro-antigens which could be more sensitive and reliable. In the present study, we tried to identify some of the immunodominant proteins from the Excretory Secretory (ES product of F. gigantica which can be further characterized and used for early detection of infection and also as drug and vaccine candidates. The ES products of F. gigantica were collected and used for raising the polyclonal antibody in rabbit. The polypeptide profile was generated as well as immunogenic polypeptides were identified. The Source of ES antigen was immunolocalized using confocal microscopy and dot blot assay was performed to diagnose field infection. The polypeptide profile of ES products revealed a total of 24 polypeptides out of which 12 immunogenic polypeptides were identified by western blotting. Confocal micrographs showed the immunolocalization of antigens in the intestinal caecae, vitalline glands, gonads as well as in the tegument of the worm. The dot blot assay confirmed the utility of ES products for the detection of field infection. Subsequently, cross reactivity was found negative with Gigantocotyle explanatum; an amphitome parasite

  15. Hidden neural networks: application to speech recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate the hidden neural network HMM/NN hybrid on two speech recognition benchmark tasks; (1) task independent isolated word recognition on the Phonebook database, and (2) recognition of broad phoneme classes in continuous speech from the TIMIT database. It is shown how hidden neural networks...

  16. Outer membrane protein antigens of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostle, A G; Rosenbusch, R F

    1986-07-01

    Outer membranes were isolated from bovine isolates and type strains of Moraxella bovis, M phenylpyruvica, M lacunata, and M ovis by sodium N lauroyl sarcosinate extraction and differential centrifugation. Analysis of outer membranes from these organisms by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that all M bovis isolates shared a common polypeptide pattern that was readily distinguishable from other Moraxella spp. Nine major outer membrane protein bands were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis analysis of M bovis. Immunoblotting of protein antigens of M bovis revealed several outer membrane proteins that seemed to be common antigens of all M bovis isolates.

  17. Structure and immune recognition of trimeric prefusion HIV-1 Env

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancera, Marie; Zhou, Tongqing; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Soto, Cinque; Gorman, Jason; Huang, Jinghe; Acharya, Priyamvada; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Ofek, Gilad; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Stuckey, Jonathan; Bailer, Robert T.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Louder, Mark K.; Tumba, Nancy; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Cohen, Myron S.; Haynes, Barton F.; Mascola, John R.; Morris, Lynn; Munro, James B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Mothes, Walther; Connors, Mark; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1-envelope (Env) spike, comprising three gp120 and three gp41 subunits, is a conformational machine that facilitates HIV-1 entry by rearranging from a mature unliganded state, through receptor-bound intermediates, to a postfusion state. As the sole viral antigen on the HIV-1-virion surface, Env is both the target of neutralizing antibodies and a focus of vaccine efforts. Here we report the structure at 3.5-Å resolution for an HIV-1-Env trimer captured in a mature closed state by antibodies PGT122 and 35O22. This structure reveals the prefusion conformation of gp41, indicates rearrangements needed for fusion activation, and defines parameters of immune evasion and immune recognition. Prefusion gp41 encircles N- and C-terminal strands of gp120 with four helices that form a membrane-proximal collar, fastened by insertion of a fusion peptide-proximal methionine into a gp41-tryptophan clasp. Spike rearrangements required for entry likely involve opening the clasp and expelling the termini. N-linked glycosylation and sequence-variable regions cover the prefusion closed spike: we used chronic cohorts to map the prevalence and location of effective HIV-1-neutralizing responses, which were distinguished by their recognition of N-linked glycan and tolerance for epitope-sequence variation. PMID:25296255

  18. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Animal Sciences. Nair, Prof. Narayana Balakrishnan Ph.D and D.Sc. (Madras), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 6 July 1927. Date of death: 21 April 2010. Specialization: Aquatic Biology & Fisheries and Ecology Last known address: Swathi, ...

  19. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Animal Sciences. Nair, Prof. Narayana Balakrishnan Ph.D and D.Sc. (Madras), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 6 July 1927. Date of death: 21 April 2010. Specialization: Aquatic Biology & Fisheries and Ecology Last known address: Swathi, Residency Road, ...

  20. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Koteswaram, Prof. Pancheti D.Sc. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 25 March 1915. Date of death: 11 January 1997. Specialization: Atmospheric Physics Meteorology and Hydrology Last known address: 'Varsha', 8-1-11, University Road, Waltair Uplands, ...

  1. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1957 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rao, Mr Mandagere Bharadwaj Ramachandra M.Sc. (Mysore). Date of birth: 5 August 1906. Date of death: 4 September 1992. Specialization: Geology and Exploration Geophysics Last known address: 669, Third Block, Rajajinagar, Bengaluru 560 010.

  2. Prediction of antigenic sites on ALS1 and HWP1 protein sequences in vaginal isolated C. albicans of using bioinformatics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Pakdel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The ability to predict antigenic sites on proteins is of major importance for medication. The aim of this study was to predict the antigenic sites on Agglutin in Like Sequence (ALS1 and Hyphal Wall Protein Sequences (HWP1 in Candida albicans isolated of vaginal infections using Physico-Chemical Profiles server. Materials and Methods: 7 isolates were obtained from women with vaginal infection which were collected from various medical centers of Tehran in 2011 and 2012. At the first,DNA was extracted  by Phenol-Chloroform method. Multiplex PCR was performed by using specific primers. In order to do bioinformatic studies, the genes were sequenced and then translated. Antigenic sites of protein sequences were identified by Physico-Chemical Profiles program. Results: The results showed that the presence of two genes als1 and hwp1 in isolates. In ALS1 and HWP1, respectively 2 and 1 antigenic site with the most antigenicity were identified. Conclusions: According to previous studies, Serine and Threonine phosphorylation is an important mechanism in pathogenesis of ALS1 and HWP1 proteins. Results in this study showed that serine and threonine are the most amino acids in the antigenic sites with high antigenicity property.

  3. TCRα-TCRβ pairing controls recognition of CD1d and directs the development of adipose NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, Joshua A; Das, Joy; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M; Comoletti, Davide; Denzin, Lisa K; Sant'Angelo, Derek B

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) expressed by natural killer T cells (NKT cells) and the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d is distinct from interactions between the TCR and major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our molecular modeling suggested that a hydrophobic patch created after TCRα-TCRβ pairing has a role in maintaining the conformation of the NKT cell TCR. Disruption of this patch ablated recognition of CD1d by the NKT cell TCR but not interactions of the TCR with MHC. Partial disruption of the patch, while permissive to the recognition of CD1d, significantly altered NKT cell development, which resulted in the selective accumulation of adipose-tissue-resident NKT cells. These results indicate that a key component of the TCR is essential for the development of a distinct population of NKT cells.

  4. Structural Basis for Degenerate Recognition of Natural HIV Peptide Variants by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Anikeeva, N.; Kalams, S.; Walker, B.; Hendrickson, W.; Sykulev, Y.

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that even small changes in amino acid side chains of antigenic peptide bound to MHC protein may completely abrogate recognition of the peptide-MHC (pMHC) complex by the T-cell receptor (TCR). Often, however, several non-conservative substitutions in the peptide antigen are accommodated and do not impair its recognition by TCR. For example, a preponderance of natural sequence variants of the HIV p17 Gag-derived peptide SLYNTVATL (SL9) are recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), which implies that interactions with SL9 variants are degenerate both with respect to the class I MHC molecule and with respect to TCR. Here we study the molecular basis for this degenerate recognition of SL9 variants. We show that several SL9 variants bind comparably well to soluble HLA-A2 and to a particular soluble TCR and that these variants are active in the cognate cytotoxicity assay. Natural SL9 variation is restricted by its context in the HIV p17 matrix protein, and we have used synthetic variants to explore the wider spectrum of recognition. High-resolution crystal structures of seven selected SL9 variants bound to HLA-A2 all have remarkably similar peptide conformations and side-chain dispositions outside sites of substitution. This preservation of the peptide conformation despite epitope variations suggests a mechanism for the observed degeneracy in pMHC recognition by TCR, and may contribute to the persistence of SL9-mediated immune responses in chronically infected individuals

  5. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  6. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  8. Monitoring antigenic variations of enterovirus 71: implications for virus surveillance and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yuan Chia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 causes life-threatening epidemics in Asia and can be phylogenetically classified into three major genogroups (A ∼ C including 11 genotypes (A, B1 ∼ B5, and C1 ∼ C5. Recently, EV71 epidemics occurred cyclically in Taiwan with different genotypes. In recent years, human studies using post-infection sera obtained from children have detected antigenic variations among different EV71 strains. Therefore, surveillance of enterovirus 71 should include phylogenetic and antigenic analysis. Due to limitation of sera available from children with EV71 primary infection, suitable animal models should be developed to generate a panel of antisera for monitoring EV71 antigenic variations. Twelve reference strains representing the 11 EV71 genotypes were grown in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Infectious EV71 particles were purified and collected to immunize rabbits. The rabbit antisera were then employed to measure neutralizing antibody titers against the 12 reference strains and 5 recent strains. Rabbits immunized with genogroup B and C viruses consistently have a lower neutralizing antibody titers against genogroup A (≧ 8-fold difference and antigenic variations between genogroup B and C viruses can be detected but did not have a clear pattern, which are consistent with previous human studies. Comparison between human and rabbit neutralizing antibody profiles, the results showed that ≧ 8-fold difference in rabbit cross-reactive antibody ratios could be used to screen EV71 isolates for identifying potential antigenic variants. In conclusion, a rabbit model was developed to monitor antigenic variations of EV71, which are critical to select vaccine strains and predict epidemics.

  9. Physical model for recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Predrag; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recognition tunneling (RT) identifies target molecules trapped between tunneling electrodes functionalized with recognition molecules that serve as specific chemical linkages between the metal electrodes and the trapped target molecule. Possible applications include single molecule DNA and protein sequencing. This paper addresses several fundamental aspects of RT by multiscale theory, applying both all-atom and coarse-grained DNA models: (1) we show that the magnitude of the observed currents are consistent with the results of non-equilibrium Green’s function calculations carried out on a solvated all-atom model. (2) Brownian fluctuations in hydrogen bond-lengths lead to current spikes that are similar to what is observed experimentally. (3) The frequency characteristics of these fluctuations can be used to identify the trapped molecules with a machine-learning algorithm, giving a theoretical underpinning to this new method of identifying single molecule signals. (paper)

  10. Slow molecular recognition by RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleitsman, Kristin R; Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biological processes, function, and specificity. Proteins associate with ligands with a wide range of association rate constants, with maximal values matching the theoretical limit set by the rate of diffusional collision. As less is known about RNA association, we compiled association rate constants for all RNA/ligand complexes that we could find in the literature. Like proteins, RNAs exhibit a wide range of association rate constants. However, the fastest RNA association rates are considerably slower than those of the fastest protein associations and fall well below the diffusional limit. The apparently general observation of slow association with RNAs has implications for evolution and for modern-day biology. Our compilation highlights a quantitative molecular property that can contribute to biological understanding and underscores our need to develop a deeper physical understanding of molecular recognition events. © 2017 Gleitsman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Physics of Automatic Target Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, Firooz

    2007-01-01

    Physics of Automatic Target Recognition addresses the fundamental physical bases of sensing, and information extraction in the state-of-the art automatic target recognition field. It explores both passive and active multispectral sensing, polarimetric diversity, complex signature exploitation, sensor and processing adaptation, transformation of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in their interactions with targets, background clutter, transmission media, and sensing elements. The general inverse scattering, and advanced signal processing techniques and scientific evaluation methodologies being used in this multi disciplinary field will be part of this exposition. The issues of modeling of target signatures in various spectral modalities, LADAR, IR, SAR, high resolution radar, acoustic, seismic, visible, hyperspectral, in diverse geometric aspects will be addressed. The methods for signal processing and classification will cover concepts such as sensor adaptive and artificial neural networks, time reversal filt...

  12. Automatic Recognition of Road Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuo; Kohashi, Yuuichirou; Ishikawa, Naoto; Nakajima, Masato

    2002-11-01

    The increase in traffic accidents is becoming a serious social problem with the recent rapid traffic increase. In many cases, the driver"s carelessness is the primary factor of traffic accidents, and the driver assistance system is demanded for supporting driver"s safety. In this research, we propose the new method of automatic detection and recognition of road signs by image processing. The purpose of this research is to prevent accidents caused by driver"s carelessness, and call attention to a driver when the driver violates traffic a regulation. In this research, high accuracy and the efficient sign detecting method are realized by removing unnecessary information except for a road sign from an image, and detect a road sign using shape features. At first, the color information that is not used in road signs is removed from an image. Next, edges except for circular and triangle ones are removed to choose sign shape. In the recognition process, normalized cross correlation operation is carried out to the two-dimensional differentiation pattern of a sign, and the accurate and efficient method for detecting the road sign is realized. Moreover, the real-time operation in a software base was realized by holding down calculation cost, maintaining highly precise sign detection and recognition. Specifically, it becomes specifically possible to process by 0.1 sec(s)/frame using a general-purpose PC (CPU: Pentium4 1.7GHz). As a result of in-vehicle experimentation, our system could process on real time and has confirmed that detection and recognition of a sign could be performed correctly.

  13. Automated road marking recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyatdinov, R. R.; Shigabiev, R. R.; Talipov, D. N.

    2017-09-01

    Development of the automated road marking recognition systems in existing and future vehicles control systems is an urgent task. One way to implement such systems is the use of neural networks. To test the possibility of using neural network software has been developed with the use of a single-layer perceptron. The resulting system based on neural network has successfully coped with the task both when driving in the daytime and at night.

  14. Symbol Recognition using Spatial Relations

    OpenAIRE

    K.C., Santosh; Lamiroy, Bart; Wendling, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present a method for symbol recognition based on the spatio-structural description of a 'vocabulary' of extracted visual elementary parts. It is applied to symbols in electrical wiring diagrams. The method consists of first identifying vocabulary elements into different groups based on their types (e.g., circle, corner ). We then compute spatial relations between the possible pairs of labelled vocabulary types which are further used as a basis for bui...

  15. Thermal to visible face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Davis, Larry S.

    2012-06-01

    In low light conditions, visible light face identification is infeasible due to the lack of illumination. For nighttime surveillance, thermal imaging is commonly used because of the intrinsic emissivity of thermal radiation from the human body. However, matching thermal images of faces acquired at nighttime to the predominantly visible light face imagery in existing government databases and watch lists is a challenging task. The difficulty arises from the significant difference between the face's thermal signature and its visible signature (i.e. the modality gap). To match the thermal face to the visible face acquired by the two different modalities, we applied face recognition algorithms that reduce the modality gap in each step of face identification, from low-level analysis to machine learning techniques. Specifically, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based approaches were used to correlate the thermal face signatures to the visible face signatures, yielding a thermal-to-visible face identification rate of 49.9%. While this work makes progress for thermal-to-visible face recognition, more efforts need to be devoted to solving this difficult task. Successful development of a thermal-to-visible face recognition system would significantly enhance the Nation's nighttime surveillance capabilities.

  16. Multithread Face Recognition in Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshina Ranjan Kisku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faces are highly challenging and dynamic objects that are employed as biometrics evidence in identity verification. Recently, biometrics systems have proven to be an essential security tools, in which bulk matching of enrolled people and watch lists is performed every day. To facilitate this process, organizations with large computing facilities need to maintain these facilities. To minimize the burden of maintaining these costly facilities for enrollment and recognition, multinational companies can transfer this responsibility to third-party vendors who can maintain cloud computing infrastructures for recognition. In this paper, we showcase cloud computing-enabled face recognition, which utilizes PCA-characterized face instances and reduces the number of invariant SIFT points that are extracted from each face. To achieve high interclass and low intraclass variances, a set of six PCA-characterized face instances is computed on columns of each face image by varying the number of principal components. Extracted SIFT keypoints are fused using sum and max fusion rules. A novel cohort selection technique is applied to increase the total performance. The proposed protomodel is tested on BioID and FEI face databases, and the efficacy of the system is proven based on the obtained results. We also compare the proposed method with other well-known methods.

  17. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Fingerprint recognition using image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholay, Surekha; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-06-01

    Finger Print Recognition is concerned with the difficult task of matching the images of finger print of a person with the finger print present in the database efficiently. Finger print Recognition is used in forensic science which helps in finding the criminals and also used in authentication of a particular person. Since, Finger print is the only thing which is unique among the people and changes from person to person. The present paper describes finger print recognition methods using various edge detection techniques and also how to detect correct finger print using a camera images. The present paper describes the method that does not require a special device but a simple camera can be used for its processes. Hence, the describe technique can also be using in a simple camera mobile phone. The various factors affecting the process will be poor illumination, noise disturbance, viewpoint-dependence, Climate factors, and Imaging conditions. The described factor has to be considered so we have to perform various image enhancement techniques so as to increase the quality and remove noise disturbance of image. The present paper describe the technique of using contour tracking on the finger print image then using edge detection on the contour and after that matching the edges inside the contour.

  19. Visual recognition of permuted words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Sheikh Faisal; Shafait, Faisal; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2010-02-01

    In current study we examine how letter permutation affects in visual recognition of words for two orthographically dissimilar languages, Urdu and German. We present the hypothesis that recognition or reading of permuted and non-permuted words are two distinct mental level processes, and that people use different strategies in handling permuted words as compared to normal words. A comparison between reading behavior of people in these languages is also presented. We present our study in context of dual route theories of reading and it is observed that the dual-route theory is consistent with explanation of our hypothesis of distinction in underlying cognitive behavior for reading permuted and non-permuted words. We conducted three experiments in lexical decision tasks to analyze how reading is degraded or affected by letter permutation. We performed analysis of variance (ANOVA), distribution free rank test, and t-test to determine the significance differences in response time latencies for two classes of data. Results showed that the recognition accuracy for permuted words is decreased 31% in case of Urdu and 11% in case of German language. We also found a considerable difference in reading behavior for cursive and alphabetic languages and it is observed that reading of Urdu is comparatively slower than reading of German due to characteristics of cursive script.

  20. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.