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Sample records for antigen enhances protection

  1. Advax-Adjuvanted Recombinant Protective Antigen Provides Protection against Inhalational Anthrax That Is Further Enhanced by Addition of Murabutide Adjuvant

    OpenAIRE

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita; Tod J Merkel

    2014-01-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax a...

  2. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  3. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Pickering, Darren A; McSorley, Henry J; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Tribolet, Leon; Dougall, Annette M; Hotez, Peter J; Loukas, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1) and IgG(3) from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1), suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic. PMID:22428079

  4. A dual TLR agonist adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the tuberculosis vaccine antigen ID93.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Orr

    Full Text Available With over eight million cases of tuberculosis each year there is a pressing need for the development of new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Subunit vaccines consisting of recombinant proteins are an attractive vaccine approach due to their inherent safety compared to attenuated live vaccines and the uniformity of manufacture. Addition of properly formulated TLR agonist-containing adjuvants to recombinant protein vaccines enhances the antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell response characterized by IFN-γ and TNF, both of which are critical for the control of TB. We have developed a clinical stage vaccine candidate consisting of a recombinant fusion protein ID93 adjuvanted with the TLR4 agonist GLA-SE. Here we examine whether ID93+GLA-SE can be improved by the addition of a second TLR agonist. Addition of CpG containing DNA to ID93+GLA-SE enhanced the magnitude of the multi-functional TH1 response against ID93 characterized by co-production of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2. Addition of CpG also improved the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Finally we demonstrate that this adjuvant synergy between GLA and CpG is independent of TRIF signaling, whereas TRIF is necessary for the adjuvant activity of GLA-SE in the absence of CpG.

  5. DNA encoding individual mycobacterial antigens protects mice against tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Silva

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, some of our experiments in which mycobacterial antigens were presented to the immune system as if they were viral antigens have had a significant impact on our understanding of protective immunity against tuberculosis. They have also markedly enhanced the prospects for new vaccines. We now know that individual mycobacterial protein antigens can confer protection equal to that from live BCG vaccine in mice. A critical determinant of the outcome of immunization appears to be the degree to which antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells are generated by the immune response. Our most recent studies indicate that DNA vaccination is an effective way to establish long-lasting cytotoxic T cell memory and protection against tuberculosis.

  6. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-Immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachura, Melissa A; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50-nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing >100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using recombinant protective Ag (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing Abs in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 wk compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially colocalized with rPA in key APC populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important. PMID:26608924

  7. Efficacy of a Vaccine Based on Protective Antigen and Killed Spores against Experimental Inhalational Anthrax▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, Yves P.; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Paucod, Jean-Charles; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Mock, Michèle; Goossens, Pierre L.; Vidal, Dominique R.

    2008-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA)-based anthrax vaccines acting on toxins are less effective than live attenuated vaccines, suggesting that additional antigens may contribute to protective immunity. Several reports indicate that capsule or spore-associated antigens may enhance the protection afforded by PA. Addition of formaldehyde-inactivated spores (FIS) to PA (PA-FIS) elicits total protection against cutaneous anthrax. Nevertheless, vaccines that are effective against cutaneous anthrax may not be so...

  8. Optimization, Production, and Characterization of a CpG-Oligonucleotide-Ficoll Conjugate Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Enhanced Immunogenicity of Anthrax Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, Bob; Kiwan, Radwan; Ott, Gary S; Calacsan, Carlo; Kachura, Melissa; Campbell, John D; Kanzler, Holger; Coffman, Robert L

    2016-05-18

    We have synthesized and characterized a novel phosphorothioate CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN)-Ficoll conjugated nanoparticulate adjuvant, termed DV230-Ficoll. This adjuvant was constructed from an amine-functionalized-Ficoll, a heterobifunctional linker (succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-hexaethylene glycol] ester) and the CpG-ODN DV230. Herein, we describe the evaluation of the purity and reactivity of linkers of different lengths for CpG-ODN-Ficoll conjugation, optimization of linker coupling, and conjugation of thiol-functionalized CpG to maleimide-functionalized Ficoll and process scale-up. Physicochemical characterization of independently produced lots of DV230-Ficoll reveal a bioconjugate with a particle size of approximately 50 nm and covalent attachment of more than 100 molecules of CpG per Ficoll. Solutions of purified DV230-Ficoll were stable for at least 12 months at frozen and refrigerated temperatures and stability was further enhanced in lyophilized form. Compared to nonconjugated monomeric DV230, the DV230-Ficoll conjugate demonstrated improved in vitro potency for induction of IFN-α from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and induced higher titer neutralizing antibody responses against coadministered anthrax recombinant protective antigen in mice. The processes described here establish a reproducible and robust process for the synthesis of a novel, size-controlled, and stable CpG-ODN nanoparticle adjuvant suitable for manufacture and use in vaccines. PMID:27074387

  9. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation. PMID:25974877

  10. Coadministration of Gamma Interferon with DNA Vaccine Expressing Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus (WHV) Core Antigen Enhances the Specific Immune Response and Protects against WHV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Felix; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2001-01-01

    DNA vaccinations are able to induce strong cellular immune responses in mice and confer protection against infectious agents. However, DNA vaccination of large animals appears to be less effective and requires repeated injections of large amounts of plasmid DNA. Enhancement of the efficiency of DNA vaccines may be achieved by coapplication of cytokine-expressing plasmids. Here we investigated, with woodchucks, whether coadministration of an expression plasmid for woodchuck gamma interferon (I...

  11. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses. PMID:27110810

  12. Enhancing the recognition of tumor associated antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Irvine, Kari R.; Minev, Boris R.; Taggarse, Akash S.; McFariand, Barbra J.; Wang, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Activated CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) can directly recognize malignant cells because processed fragments of tumor associated antigens (TAA), 8-10 amino acids in length and complexed with MHC class I molecules, are displayed on tumor cell surfaces. Tumor cells have been genetically modified in a variety of ways in efforts to enhance the immune recognition of TAA. An alternative strategy is the expression of TAA in recombinant or synthetic form. This has been made possible by the recent cloning of TAA...

  13. Montanide ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-ediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, and host imm...

  14. rBCG30-Induced Immunity and Cross-Protection against Mycobacterium leprae Challenge Are Enhanced by Boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-Kilodalton Antigen 85B

    OpenAIRE

    Gillis, Thomas P.; Tullius, Michael V.; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine m...

  15. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  16. Production and purification of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity and virulence of Bacillus anthracis. Animals or human immunised with the protein acquire a complete protection against the disease. In addition to vaccine, PA can also be developed into a sensitive diagnostic test for anthrax. The purpose of this study was to produce PA using a culture medium easily obtained, and to develop a simple and effective technique for purification of the protein. To produce PA, B. anthracis Sterne 34F2 ...

  17. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the “next-generation” recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA...

  18. Antigen-binding site protection during radiolabeling leads to a higher immunoreactive fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that the immunointegrity of an antibody (Ab) depends on the preservation of its antigen-binding sites. Our goal was to radiolabel an antibody at several iodine:antibody molar ratios under conditions protecting its combining site and to compare its immunoreactive fraction (IRF) and electrophoretic mobility with those of the same antibody radiolabeled without protection. The data indicate that an antibody radiolabeled while its antigen-binding site is occupied by its antigen had the same IRF, regardless of the number of iodine atoms per antibody molecule. On the other hand, even at an I:Ab ratio of 1:1, the IRF of the same antibody radiolabeled without protection was lower than that of a protected one and decreased with increasing I:Ab ratios. In addition, the iodination of these Ab changes their electrophoretic mobility; however, when the Ab is labeled in the protected state, the degree of change is less. The binding of an antibody to its antigen prior to radiolabeling, therefore, enhances its immuno-integrity and prevents major conformational changes as reflected by electrophoresis

  19. Enhancing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a new radiotherapy center in Gezira, Sudan, delivers its first therapeutic dose to a cancer patient, two things happen: A young man begins to regain his health and looks forward to being better able to support his family and contribute to his community; and a developing nation realizes an important step toward deriving the social and economic benefits of nuclear science. The strategic application of nuclear technology in particular fields- human health, industry, food and agriculture, energy, water resources and environmental protection - has enormous potential to help shape the future of developing countries. But past radiological incidents, several of which involved high levels of exposure or death (Bolivia, Brazil, Cost Rica, Georgia, Ghana, Morocco, Panama and Thailand), underscore the inherent and very serious risks. For this reason, the IAEA's Departments of Technical Cooperation and Nuclear Safety and Security partner closely, particularly in the area of radiation protection. They strive to consider every minute detail in the equation that brings together radiation sources, modern technologies, people and the environment. Launched in 1996, the Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure (the Model Project) aimed to help Member States: achieve capacities that underpin the safe and secure application of nuclear technologies; establish a legislative framework and regulatory infrastructure; develop exposure control mechanisms to protect workers, medical patients, the public and the environment; and achieve preparedness and planned response to radiological emergencies. In fact, the hospital scenario above typically marks several years of intense collaboration amongst scientists, legislators, regulators, politicians and administrators from both Member States and the IAEA, orchestrated and aided by regional managers and technical experts from the IAEA. As radiation protection team members can attest, every application of nuclear technology

  20. Selection of protective antigens in Lawsonia intracellularis by reverse vaccinology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadekær, Dorte Fink; Lundegaard, Claus; Riber, Ulla;

    Lawsonia intracellularis is a bacterial pathogen that infects intestinal epithelial cells in pigs. This causes proliferative enteropathy, which is characterized by diarrhea and reduced growth, and L. intracellularis infection is one of the main reasons for antibiotic treatment of production pigs in...... protection against L. intracellularis. To this end, a reverse vaccinology approach was applied: the entire L. intracellularis genome encoding 1340 proteins was screened in silico using bioinformatics tools to identify potential protein antigens. Advanced software algorithms predicted 150 secreted and outer...

  1. Identification of two new protective pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine antigen candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Noelle

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite years of effort, a licensed malaria vaccine is not yet available. One of the obstacles facing the development of a malaria vaccine is the extensive heterogeneity of many of the current malaria vaccine antigens. To counteract this antigenic diversity, an effective malaria vaccine may need to elicit an immune response against multiple malaria antigens, thereby limiting the negative impact of variability in any one antigen. Since most of the malaria vaccine antigens that have been evaluated in people have not elicited a protective immune response, there is a need to identify additional protective antigens. In this study, the efficacy of three pre-erythrocytic stage malaria antigens was evaluated in a Plasmodium yoelii/mouse protection model. Methods Mice were immunized with plasmid DNA and vaccinia virus vectors that expressed one, two or all three P. yoelii vaccine antigens. The immunized mice were challenged with 300 P. yoelii sporozoites and evaluated for subsequent infection. Results Vaccines that expressed any one of the three antigens did not protect a high percentage of mice against a P. yoelii challenge. However, vaccines that expressed all three antigens protected a higher percentage of mice than a vaccine that expressed PyCSP, the most efficacious malaria vaccine antigen. Dissection of the multi-antigen vaccine indicated that protection was primarily associated with two of the three P. yoelii antigens. The protection elicited by a vaccine expressing these two antigens exceeded the sum of the protection elicited by the single antigen vaccines, suggesting a potential synergistic interaction. Conclusions This work identifies two promising malaria vaccine antigen candidates and suggests that a multi-antigen vaccine may be more efficacious than a single antigen vaccine.

  2. Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Recognize Epitopes of Protective Antigen following Vaccination with an Anthrax Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Laughlin, Elsa M.; Miller, Joseph D.; James, Eddie; Fillos, Dimitri; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Mittler, Robert S.; Akondy, Rama; Kwok, William; Ahmed, Rafi; Nepom, Gerald,

    2007-01-01

    Detection of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is facilitated by the use of fluorescently labeled soluble peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimers which mirror the antigen specificity of T-cell receptor recognition. We have used soluble peptide-MHC class II tetramers containing peptides from the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis to detect circulating T cells in peripheral blood of subjects vaccinated with an anthrax vaccine. PA-specific HLA class II-restricted T lympho...

  3. Radiolabelled parasite antigens as tools for diagnosis and identification of protective antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabelling specific compartments and molecules of parasites provides a valuable tool for establishing parasite antigen-host response systems with utility and/or importance in protection, diagnosis and pathology. The combined immunological, biochemical and molecular biological expertise currently available forms a sufficient basis for a relatively logical and effective programme directed towards the ultimate eradication of tropical diseases. The organization of carefully selected and clinically well characterized sera and patients, representing the range of commonly occurring parasitic infections, would be of great practical value in the pursuance of this goal. (author)

  4. Membrane Insertion by Anthrax Protective Antigen in Cultured Cells†

    OpenAIRE

    Qa'Dan, Maen; Christensen, Kenneth A; Zhang, Lei; Roberts, Thomas M.; Collier, R. John

    2005-01-01

    The enzymatic moieties of anthrax toxin enter the cytosol of mammalian cells via a pore in the endosomal membrane formed by the protective antigen (PA) moiety. Pore formation involves an acidic pH-induced conformational rearrangement of a heptameric precursor (the prepore), in which the seven 2β2-2β3 loops interact to generate a 14-strand transmembrane β-barrel. To investigate this model in vivo, we labeled PA with the fluorophore 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD) at cysteine residues intro...

  5. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  6. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems

  7. Enhanced luminescence enzyme immunoassay for factor VIII related antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.X.; George, J; Thorpe, G H; Stott, R A; Kricka, L J; Whitehead, T. P.

    1985-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme immunoassay for plasma factor VIII related antigen has been developed which exploits a para-iodophenol enhanced chemiluminescent reaction to detect the horseradish peroxidase label. The assay entailed 15 min incubations with sample and with conjugate and had a detection limit of 0.12 mU. It showed good within batch precision (coefficient of variation = 2.95-5.8%) and results on a series of 57 specimens agreed with results obtained by immunoelectrophoresis (correlation coeffi...

  8. Immunization of Mice with Anthrax Protective Antigen Limits Cardiotoxicity but Not Hepatotoxicity Following Lethal Toxin Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Scott Devera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protective immunity against anthrax is inferred from measurement of vaccine antigen-specific neutralizing antibody titers in serum samples. In animal models, in vivo challenges with toxin and/or spores can also be performed. However, neither of these approaches considers toxin-induced damage to specific organ systems. It is therefore important to determine to what extent anthrax vaccines and existing or candidate adjuvants can provide organ-specific protection against intoxication. We therefore compared the ability of Alum, CpG DNA and the CD1d ligand α-galactosylceramide (αGC to enhance protective antigen-specific antibody titers, to protect mice against challenge with lethal toxin, and to block cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. By measurement of serum cardiac Troponin I (cTnI, and hepatic alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, it was apparent that neither vaccine modality prevented hepatic intoxication, despite high Ab titers and ultimate survival of the subject. In contrast, cardiotoxicity was greatly diminished by prior immunization. This shows that a vaccine that confers survival following toxin exposure may still have an associated morbidity. We propose that organ-specific intoxication should be monitored routinely during research into new vaccine modalities.

  9. Scalable purification of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, William; Zhang, Mei; Mon, Sandii; Sampey, Darryl; Zukauskas, David; Kassebaum, Corby; Zmuda, Jonathan F; Tsai, Amos; Laird, Michael W

    2006-01-01

    The anthrax toxin consists of three proteins, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor, and edema factor that are produced by the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus anthracis. Current vaccines against anthrax use PA as their primary component. In this study, we developed a scalable process to produce and purify multi-gram quantities of highly pure, recombinant PA (rPA) from Escherichia coli. The rPA protein was produced in a 50-L fermentor and purified to >99% purity using anion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The final yield of purified rPA from medium cell density fermentations resulted in approximately 2.7 g of rPA per kg of cell paste (approximately 270 mg/L) of highly pure, biologically active rPA protein. The results presented here exhibit the ability to generate multi-gram quantities of rPA from E. coli that may be used for the development of new anthrax vaccines and anthrax therapeutics. PMID:15935696

  10. CD71 targeting boosts immunogenicity of sublingually delivered influenza haemagglutinin antigen and protects against viral challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jamie F S; Tregoning, John S; Aldon, Yoann; Shattock, Robin J; McKay, Paul F

    2016-06-28

    The delivery of vaccines to the sublingual mucosa is an attractive prospect due to the ease and acceptability of such an approach. However, novel adjuvant and delivery approaches are required to optimally vaccinate at this site. We have previously shown that conjugation of protein antigen to the iron transport molecule, transferrin, can significantly enhance mucosal immune responses. We tested whether conjugating influenza haemagglutinin to transferrin could improve the immune response to sublingually delivered antigen. Transferrin conjugated haemagglutinin induced a significant antibody and T cell response in both naïve animals and previously immunized animals. The immune response generated was able to protect mice against influenza virus challenge. Sublingually administered antigen dispersed more widely through the gastro-intestinal tract than intranasally delivered antigen and transferrin conjugation had a more marked effect on sublingually delivered antigen than intranasal immunisation. From these studies we conclude that transferrin conjugation of antigen is effective at boosting immune responses to sublingually delivered antigen and may be an attractive approach for influenza vaccines, particularly when mass campaigns are required. PMID:27094605

  11. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Crispe, I Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nanoscale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The conjugation of fluoresceinated ovalbumin (FLUO-OVA) and lactobionic acid with LDL resulted in a substantially increased uptake of FLUO-OVA by murine macrophage-like ANA1 cells in preference to NIH3T3 cells, and by primary peritoneal macrophages in preference to primary hepatic stellate cells. Such preferential uptake led to enhanced proliferation of OVA specific T cells, showing that the galactosylated LDL nanoscale platform is a successful antigen carrier, targeting antigen to macrophages but not to all categories of antigen presenting cells. This system will allow targeted delivery of antigen to macrophages in the liver and elsewhere, addressing the question of the role of Kupffer cells in liver immunology. It may also be an effective way of delivering drugs or vaccines directly at macrophages. PMID:19637876

  12. Incorporation of 4-1BB ligand into an adenovirus vaccine vector increases the number of functional antigen-specific CD8 T cells and enhances the duration of protection against influenza-induced respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Theo J; Lin, Gloria H Y; Wen, Tao; Watts, Tania H

    2011-08-26

    T cell based influenza vaccines offer the potential for cross protective immunity to multiple clades of influenza virus. Here we explored the effect of increasing CD8 T cell responses during intranasal vaccination by incorporating a T cell costimulator, 4-1BBL. Inclusion of 4-1BBL in an influenza nucleoprotein (NP)-containing adenoviral vector increased the number of NP-specific CD8 T cells and lowered the vaccine dose required for short-term protection from influenza-induced disease in mice. At higher vaccine doses, the inclusion of 4-1BBL increased the duration of protection of mice from influenza-induced mortality. Bone marrow chimera experiments revealed that the major effects of 4-1BBL were directly on αβ T cells with minor additional effects through cells other than αβ T cells. The implications of these findings are that including 4-1BBL or adjuvants that induce 4-1BBL expression may be of benefit in a vaccine setting for enhancing the magnitude and duration of T cell responses to influenza virus. PMID:21704101

  13. Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  14. Ether lipid vesicle-based antigens impart protection against experimental listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari MA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mairaj Ahmed Ansari,1 Swaleha Zubair,2 Saba Tufail,1 Ejaj Ahmad,1 Mohsin Raza Khan,1 Zainuddin Quadri,1 Mohammad Owais,11Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, 2Women's College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, UP, IndiaBackground: Incidence of food-borne infections from Listeria monocytogenes, a parasite that has adapted intracellular residence to avoid antibody onslaught, has increased dramatically in the past few years. The apparent lack of an effective vaccine that is capable of evoking the desired cytotoxic T cell response to obliterate this intracellular pathogen has encouraged the investigation of alternate prophylactic strategies. It should also be noted that Archaebacteria (Archae lipid-based adjuvants enhance the efficacy of subunit vaccines. In the present study, the adjuvant properties of archaeosomes (liposomes prepared from total polar lipids of archaebacteria, Halobacterium salinarum combined with immunogenic culture supernatant antigens of L. monocytogenes have been exploited in designing a vaccine candidate against experimental listeriosis in murine model.Methods: Archaeosome-entrapped secretory protein antigens (SAgs of L. monocytogenes were evaluated for their immunological responses and tendency to deplete bacterial burden in BALB/c mice challenged with sublethal listerial infection. Various immunological studies involving cytokine profiling, lymphocyte proliferation assay, detection of various surface markers (by flowcytometric analysis, and antibody isotypes (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for establishing the vaccine potential of archaeosome-entrapped secretory proteins.Results: Immunization schedule involving archaeosome-encapsulated SAgs resulted in upregulation of Th1 cytokine production along with boosted memory in BALB/c mice. It also showed protective effect by reducing listerial burden in various vital organs (liver and spleen of the infected mice. However, the soluble form of the antigens (SAgs

  15. Protective efficacy of vaccination with Neospora caninum multiple recombinant antigens against experimental Neospora caninum infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jung-Hwa; Chung, Woo-Suk; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Na, Byoung-kuk; Kang, Seung-Won; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Protective efficacy of vaccination with Neospora caninum multiple recombinant antigens against N. caninum infection was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Two major immunodominant surface antigens (NcSAG1 and NcSRS2) and two dense granule proteins (NcDG1 and NcDG2) of N. caninum tachyzoites were expressed in E. coli, respectively. An in vitro neutralization assay using polyclonal antisera raised against each recombinant antigen showed inhibitory effects on the invasion of N. caninum tachyzoites ...

  16. Proteome-wide antigen discovery of novel protective vaccine candidates against Staphylococcus aureus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Pilely, Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    is an urgent need to institute non-antimicrobial measures, such as vaccination, against the spread of MRSA. With the aim of finding new protective antigens for vaccine development, this study used a proteome-wide in silico antigen prediction platform to screen the proteome of S. aureus strain MRSA252...

  17. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  18. An efficient fusion protein system for expression ofBacillus anthracis protective antigen as immunogenic and diagnostic antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Bagheri; Hossein Motamedi; Masoud Reza Seifiabad Shapouri

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To produce high quantities of recombinant protective antigen (rPA) for human vaccine and diagnosis.Methods: ThePAgene was amplified byPCR with pXO1 plasmid as template. ThePCR product was cloned into pMAL-c2X vector using theBamHI andSalI restriction enzymes. The recombinant plasmid was transformed intoEscherichia coliDH5α strain and then screened for transformation. The expression of protective antigen was analyzed bySDS-PAGE and Western blotting after isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside(IPTG) induction.Results:The full-length PA gene (2.2kb) was cloned into pMAL vector system. The recombinant vector was confirmed by restriction enzyme andPCRanalysis. The expression of cytoplasmic maltose-binding protein-protective (MBP-P) antigen fusion protein was detected bySDS-PAGE and Western blotting, and obtained a125 kDa protein band, which was similar to expected size of fusion protein.Conclusions: This expression system can be used in the high production of rPA. After purification and immunization studies, the purified rPA may be used in the development of the human recombinant anthrax vaccine and also in diagnosis of anthrax disease.

  19. Cancer-germline antigen vaccines and epigenetic enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Burns, Jorge; Ditzel, Henrik Jorn

    2010-01-01

    can be achieved using epigenetic modifiers. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: We provide an overview of the potential of CG antigens as targets for cancer immunotherapy, including advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the current state of development of CG antigen vaccines, and the potential...... synergistic effect of combining CG antigen immunotherapeutic strategies with epigenetic modifiers. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: The reader will gain an overview of the past, present and future role of CG antigens in cancer immunotherapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Chemoimmunotherapy using epigenetic drugs and CG...

  20. Serological Correlate of Protection in Guinea Pigs for a Recombinant Protective Antigen Anthrax Vaccine Produced from Bacillus brevis

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Choi, On-Jee; Cho, Min-Hee; Hong, Kee-Jong; Seong, Won Keun; Oh, Hee-Bok; Rhie, Gi-eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Recombinant protective antigen (rPA) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient of a second generation anthrax vaccine undergoing clinical trials both in Korea and the USA. By using the rPA produced from Bacillus brevis pNU212 expression system, correlations of serological immune response to anthrax protection efficacy were analyzed in a guinea pig model. Methods Serological responses of rPA anthrax vaccine were investigated in guinea pigs that were given single or two injections (inte...

  1. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  2. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of a Novel Recombinant BCG Strain Overexpressing Antigens Ag85A and Ag85B

    OpenAIRE

    Chun Wang; Ruiling Fu; Xionglin Fan; Chunwei Shi; Jia Lu; Xindong Teng; Lingxia Chen; Kun Tan; Zhenhua Chen

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (rBCG) strain is the promising vaccine candidate for tuberculosis (TB) prevention, which aims at providing more enduring and enhanced protection than the parental BCG vaccine. In this study, three rBCG strains overexpressing immunodominant antigens Ag85B (rBCG::85B), Ag85A (rBCG::85A), or both (rBCG::AB) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were constructed, respectively. rBCG strains showed higher level of overexpression of Ag85A and/or Ag85B proteins than BCG c...

  3. Dose of Incorporated Immunodominant Antigen in Recombinant BCG Impacts Modestly on Th1 Immune Response and Protective Efficiency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach for improving BCG efficacy is to utilize BCG as vehicle to develop recombinant BCG (rBCG strains overexpressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb antigens. Also expression level of a candidate antigen should impact the final T cell responses conferred by rBCG. In this study, based on our previously constructed differential expression system, we developed two rBCG strains overexpressing M. tb chimeric antigen Ag856A2 (coding a recombinant ag85a with 2 copies of esat-6 inserted at Acc I site of ag85a at differential levels under the control of the subtly modified furA promoters. These two rBCG strains were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice and exploit dose of incorporated antigen in rBCG to optimize immune response and protective efficiency against M. tb challenge in mouse model. The results showed that rBCG strains overexpressing Ag856A2 at differential levels induced different antigen-specific IFN-γ production and comparable number of M. tb-specific CD4 T cells expressing IL-2. M. tb challenge experiment showed that rBCG strains afforded enhanced but comparable immune protection characterized by reduced bacillary load, lung pathology, and inflammation. These results suggested that the dose of antigens incorporated in rBCG can impact T cell immune responses but imposed no significantly differential protective efficacies.

  4. Immunization of Mice with Anthrax Protective Antigen Limits Cardiotoxicity but Not Hepatotoxicity Following Lethal Toxin Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    T. Scott Devera; Prusator, Dawn K.; Joshi, Sunil K.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Lang, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against anthrax is inferred from measurement of vaccine antigen-specific neutralizing antibody titers in serum samples. In animal models, in vivo challenges with toxin and/or spores can also be performed. However, neither of these approaches considers toxin-induced damage to specific organ systems. It is therefore important to determine to what extent anthrax vaccines and existing or candidate adjuvants can provide organ-specific protection against intoxication. We therefo...

  5. Combination of Two Candidate Subunit Vaccine Antigens Elicits Protective Immunity to Ricin and Anthrax Toxin in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    David J Vance; Rong, Yinghui; Brey, Robert N.; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop combination vaccines for biodefense, we evaluated a ricin subunit antigen, RiVax, given in conjunction with an anthrax protective antigen, DNI. The combination led to high endpoint titer antibody response, neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity against ricin and anthrax lethal toxin. This is a natural combination vaccine, since both antigens are recombinant subunit proteins that would be given to the same target population.

  6. Combination of two candidate subunit vaccine antigens elicits protective immunity to ricin and anthrax toxin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, David J; Rong, Yinghui; Brey, Robert N; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to develop combination vaccines for biodefense, we evaluated a ricin subunit antigen, RiVax, given in conjunction with an anthrax protective antigen, DNI. The combination led to high endpoint titer antibody response, neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity against ricin and anthrax lethal toxin. This is a natural combination vaccine, since both antigens are recombinant subunit proteins that would be given to the same target population. PMID:25475957

  7. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  8. Unpolarized release of vaccinia virus and HIV antigen by colchicine treatment enhances intranasal HIV antigen expression and mucosal humoral responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available The induction of a strong mucosal immune response is essential to building successful HIV vaccines. Highly attenuated recombinant HIV vaccinia virus can be administered mucosally, but even high doses of immunization have been found unable to induce strong mucosal antibody responses. In order to solve this problem, we studied the interactions of recombinant HIV vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (rVTT-gagpol in mucosal epithelial cells (specifically Caco-2 cell layers and in BALB/c mice. We evaluated the impact of this virus on HIV antigen delivery and specific immune responses. The results demonstrated that rVTT-gagpol was able to infect Caco-2 cell layers and both the nasal and lung epithelia in BALB/c mice. The progeny viruses and expressed p24 were released mainly from apical surfaces. In BALB/c mice, the infection was limited to the respiratory system and was not observed in the blood. This showed that polarized distribution limited antigen delivery into the whole body and thus limited immune response. To see if this could be improved upon, we stimulated unpolarized budding of the virus and HIV antigens by treating both Caco-2 cells and BALB/c mice with colchicine. We found that, in BALB/c mice, the degree of infection and antigen expression in the epithelia went up. As a result, specific immune responses increased correspondingly. Together, these data suggest that polarized budding limits antigen delivery and immune responses, but unpolarized distribution can increase antigen expression and delivery and thus enhance specific immune responses. This conclusion can be used to optimize mucosal HIV vaccine strategies.

  9. Enhanced expression of beta2-microglobulin and HLA antigens on human lymphoid cells by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1979-01-01

    Mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy normal humans were kept in cultures under nonstimulating conditions for 16 hr in the presence or absence of human interferon. The relative quantities of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulin on the cultured cells were determined by quantitative...... immunofluorescence (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) and by the capacity of cells to absorb out cytotoxic antibodies against the relevant antigens. Interferons of different origin and purities enhanced the expression of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulins, whereas membrane immunoglobulins and antigens...... recognized by antiserum raised against human brain and T cells were the same on interferon-treated and control cells. Similar interferon effects were observed on an Epstein-Barrvirus-negative Burkitt lymphoma cell line. The enhanced expression of histocompatibility antigen subsequent to intereferon treatment...

  10. Clustered epitopes within the Gag-Pol fusion protein DNA vaccine enhance immune responses and protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have generated a codon-optimized hGagp17p24-Polp51 plasmid DNA expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag-Pol fusion protein that consists of clusters of highly conserved cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes presented by multiple MHC class I alleles. In the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct, the ribosomal frameshift site had been deleted together with the potentially immunosuppressive Gag nucleocapsid (p15) as well as Pol protease (p10) and integrase (p31). Analyses of the magnitude and breadth of cellular responses demonstrated that immunization of HLA-A2/Kb transgenic mice with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 construct induced 2- to 5-fold higher CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag p17-, p24-, and Pol reverse transcriptase (RT)-specific CTL epitopes than the full-length hGag-PolΔFsΔPr counterpart. The increases were correlated with higher protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVVs) expressing gag and pol gene products. Consistent with the profile of Gag- and Pol-specific CD8+ T cell responses, an elevated level of type 1 cytokine production was noted in p24- and RT-stimulated splenocyte cultures established from hGagp17p24-Polp51-immunized mice compared to responses induced with the hGag-PolΔFsΔPr vaccine. Sera of mice immunized with the hGagp17p24-Polp51 vaccine also exhibited an increased titer of p24- and RT-specific IgG2 antibody responses. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting the breadth of Gag- and Pol-specific immune responses

  11. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

  12. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L-lactide) (PLA) polymers have been considered as promising tools for in vivo delivery of antigens and drugs. Here we describe PLA microspheres synthesized by premix membrane emulsification method and their application in formulating a new microsphere based HB vaccine. To evaluate the immunogenicity of this microsphere vaccine, BALB/c mice were immunized with microsphere vaccine and a series of immunological assays were conducted. Results of Enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot (ELISPOT) assays revealed that the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing splenocytes and CD8(+) T cells increased significantly in the microsphere vaccine group. Microsphere vaccine group showed enhanced specific cell lysis when compared with HB surface antigen (HBsAg) only group in (51)Cr cytotoxicity assays. Moreover, microsphere vaccine elicited a comparable level of antibody production as that of HB vaccine administered with alum adjuvant. We show that phagocytosis of HBsAg by dendritic cells is more pronounced in microsphere vaccine group when compared with other control groups. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of using PLA microspheres as effective HB vaccine adjuvants for an enhanced Th1 immune response. PMID:25424942

  13. A single-dose PLGA encapsulated protective antigen domain 4 nanoformulation protects mice against Bacillus anthracis spore challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Manish

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is a major bioterror agent. Vaccination is the most effective prophylactic measure available against anthrax. Currently available anthrax vaccines have issues of the multiple booster dose requirement, adjuvant-associated side effects and stability. Use of biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles to deliver the antigens to immune cells could solve the issues associated with anthrax vaccines. We hypothesized that the delivery of a stable immunogenic domain 4 of protective antigen (PAD4 of Bacillus anthracis encapsulated in a poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA--an FDA approved biocompatible and biodegradable material, may alleviate the problems of booster dose, adjuvant toxicity and stability associated with anthrax vaccines. We made a PLGA based protective antigen domain 4 nanoparticle (PAD4-NP formulation using water/oil/water solvent evaporation method. Nanoparticles were characterized for antigen content, morphology, size, polydispersity and zeta potential. The immune correlates and protective efficacy of the nanoparticle formulation was evaluated in Swiss Webster outbred mice. Mice were immunized with single dose of PAD4-NP or recombinant PAD4. The PAD4-NP elicited a robust IgG response with mixed IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes, whereas the control PAD4 immunized mice elicited low IgG response with predominant IgG1 subtype. The PAD4-NP generated mixed Th1/Th2 response, whereas PAD4 elicited predominantly Th2 response. When we compared the efficacy of this single-dose vaccine nanoformulation PAD4-NP with that of the recombinant PAD4 in providing protective immunity against a lethal challenge with Bacillus anthracis spores, the median survival of PAD4-NP immunized mice was 6 days as compared to 1 day for PAD4 immunized mice (p<0.001. Thus, we demonstrate, for the first time, the possibility of the development of a single-dose and adjuvant-free protective antigen based anthrax vaccine in the form

  14. Self-Adjuvanting Bacterial Vectors Expressing Pre-Erythrocytic Antigens Induce Sterile Protection against Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eBergmann-Leitner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inactivated, Gram-negative bacteria that express malaria vaccine candidates represent a promising novel self-adjuvanting vaccine approach. Antigens expressed on particulate bacterial carriers not only target directly to antigen-presenting cells but also provide a strong danger signal thus circumventing the requirement for potent extraneous adjuvants. E. coli expressing malarial antigens resulted in the induction of either Th1 or Th2 biased responses that were dependent on both antigen and sub-cellular localization. Some of these constructs induced higher quality humoral responses compared to recombinant protein and most importantly they were able to induce sterile protection against sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria. In light of these encouraging results, two major Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine targets, the Cell-Traversal protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites (CelTOS fused to the Maltose-binding protein in the periplasmic space and the Circumsporozoite Protein (CSP fused to the Outer membrane protein A in the outer membrane were expressed in a clinically relevant, attenuated Shigella strain (Shigella flexneri 2a. This type of live attenuated vector has previously undergone clinical investigations as a vaccine against shigellosis. Using this novel delivery platform for malaria, we find that vaccination with the whole organism represents an effective vaccination alternative that induces protective efficacy against sporozoite challenge. Shigella GeMI-Vax expressing malaria targets warrant further evaluation to determine their full potential as a dual disease, multivalent, self-adjuvanting vaccine system, against both shigellosis and malaria.

  15. Study of Immunization against Anthrax with the Purified Recombinant Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh,Yogendra; Ivins, Bruce E.; Leppla, Stephen H.

    1998-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) of anthrax toxin is the major component of human anthrax vaccine. Currently available human vaccines in the United States and Europe consist of alum-precipitated supernatant material from cultures of toxigenic, nonencapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Immunization with these vaccines requires several boosters and occasionally causes local pain and edema. We previously described the biological activity of a nontoxic mutant of PA expressed in Bacillus subtilis. In ...

  16. Analysis of Antibody Responses to Protective Antigen-Based Anthrax Vaccines through Use of Competitive Assays▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca A Brady; Verma, Anita; Meade, Bruce D.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2010-01-01

    The licensed anthrax vaccine and many of the new anthrax vaccines being developed are based on protective antigen (PA), a nontoxic component of anthrax toxin. For this reason, an understanding of the immune response to PA vaccination is important. In this study, we examined the antibody response elicited by PA-based vaccines and identified the domains of PA that contribute to that response in humans as well as nonhuman primates (NHPs) and rabbits, animal species that will be used to generate ...

  17. Soluble Expression and Characterization of Biologically Active Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Nagendra Suryanarayana; Vanlalhmuaka,; Bharti Mankere; Monika Verma; Kulanthaivel Thavachelvam; Urmil Tuteja

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis secretory protein protective antigen (PA) is primary candidate for subunit vaccine against anthrax. Attempts to obtain large quantity of PA from Escherichia coli expression system often result in the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. Therefore, it is always better to produce recombinant proteins in a soluble form. In the present study, we have obtained biologically active recombinant PA in small scale E. coli shake culture system using three different expression cons...

  18. Identification of protective and broadly conserved vaccine antigens from the genome of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Bertoldi, Isabella; Spagnuolo, Angela; Marchi, Sara; Rosini, Roberto; Nesta, Barbara; Pastorello, Ilaria; Corea, Vanja A Mariani; Torricelli, Giulia; Cartocci, Elena; Savino, Silvana; Scarselli, Maria; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hacker, Jörg; Tettelin, Hervé; Tallon, Luke J; Sullivan, Steven; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa; Pickard, Derek; Dougan, Gordon; Fontana, Maria Rita; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serino, Laura

    2010-05-18

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a common cause of disease in both mammals and birds. A vaccine to prevent such infections would be desirable given the increasing antibiotic resistance of these bacteria. We have determined the genome sequence of ExPEC IHE3034 (ST95) isolated from a case of neonatal meningitis and compared this to available genome sequences of other ExPEC strains and a few nonpathogenic E. coli. We found 19 genomic islands present in the genome of IHE3034, which are absent in the nonpathogenic E. coli isolates. By using subtractive reverse vaccinology we identified 230 antigens present in ExPEC but absent (or present with low similarity) in nonpathogenic strains. Nine antigens were protective in a mouse challenge model. Some of them were also present in other pathogenic non-ExPEC strains, suggesting that a broadly protective E. coli vaccine may be possible. The gene encoding the most protective antigen was detected in most of the E. coli isolates, highly conserved in sequence and found to be exported by a type II secretion system which seems to be nonfunctional in nonpathogenic strains. PMID:20439758

  19. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A.; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Crispe, I. Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nano-scale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The con...

  20. Enhancement of protective action of radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of radioprotector WR-2721 (300 mg/kg ip, 20 min before irradiation), alone or in combination with an extract of Ginkgo biloba (TeboninR) (17.5 mg/kg ip, 20 min before, and then 1 hr and 24 hr after irradiation), an extract of thymus (ThymolipR) (10 mg/kg sc, 24 hr before and 15 min after irradiation), herbal mitogen agrostemin (0.1 mg/kg ip. 24 before and immediately after irradiation) and calcium antagonist verapamil (1 mg/kg ip, immediately before irradiation), was studied in adult male Wistar rats irradiated by 9 Gy and 12 Gy of X-rays. It was established that above mentioned compounds, except wr-2721, failed to protect irradiated animals. Given in combination with WR-2721 only agrostemin and verapamil enhanced the efficacy of the protector. The combination with verapamil was more effective providing protection even in supralethal irradiated rats. (author)

  1. DNA immunization: ubiquitination of a viral protein enhances cytotoxic T-lymphocyte induction and antiviral protection but abrogates antibody induction.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, F.; Zhang, J.; Whitton, J L

    1997-01-01

    DNA immunization can induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), antibodies, and protection against microbial challenge. The underlying mechanisms remain obscure and must be understood to permit rational manipulation and optimization of the technique. We set out to enhance the intracellular degradation of a viral antigen, with the intent of improving antigen entry into, and presentation by, the class I major histocompatibility complex pathway. We achieved this goal by cotranslational ubiquitination...

  2. Delivery of a multivalent scrambled antigen vaccine induces broad spectrum immunity and protection against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicholas P; Thomson, Scott A; Triccas, James A; Medveczky, C Jill; Ramshaw, Ian A; Britton, Warwick J

    2011-10-13

    The development of effective anti-Tuberculosis (TB) vaccines is an important step towards improved control of TB in high burden countries. Subunit vaccines are advantageous in terms of safety, particularly in the context of high rates of HIV co-infection, but they must contain sufficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens to stimulate immunity in genetically diverse human populations. We have used a novel approach to develop a synthetic scrambled antigen vaccine (TB-SAVINE), comprised of overlapping, recombined peptides from four M. tuberculosis proteins, Ag85B, ESAT-6, PstS3 and Mpt83, each of which is immunogenic and protective against experimental TB. This polyvalent TB-SAVINE construct stimulated CD4 and CD8T cell responses against the individual proteins and M. tuberculosis in C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice, when delivered as DNA, Fowl Pox Virus or Vaccinia Virus vaccines. In addition, the DNA-TBS vaccine induced protective immunity against pulmonary M. tuberculosis infection in C57BL/6 mice. Co-immunization of Balb/c mice with virally expressed TBS and HIV1-SAVINE vaccine stimulated strong T cell responses to both the M. tuberculosis and HIV proteins, indicating no effects of antigenic competition. Further development of this TB-SAVINE vaccine expressing components from multiple M. tuberculosis proteins may prove an effective vaccine candidate against TB, which could potentially form part of a safe, combined preventative strategy together with HIV immunisations. PMID:21846485

  3. Comparative efficacy of Bacillus anthracis live spore vaccine and protective antigen vaccine against anthrax in the guinea pig.

    OpenAIRE

    Little, S F; Knudson, G B

    1986-01-01

    Several strains of Bacillus anthracis have been reported previously to cause fatal infection in immunized guinea pigs. In this study, guinea pigs were immunized with either a protective antigen vaccine or a live Sterne strain spore vaccine, then challenged with virulent B. anthracis strains isolated from various host species from the United States and foreign sources. Confirmation of previously reported studies (which used only protective antigen vaccines) was made with the identification of ...

  4. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Employing a Recombinant Antigen for Detection of Protective Antibody against Swine Erysipelas

    OpenAIRE

    Imada, Yumiko; Mori, Yasuyuki; Daizoh, Masaji; Kudoh, Kazuma; Sakano, Tetsuya

    2003-01-01

    The specificities and sensitivities of five recombinant proteins of the surface protective antigen (SpaA) of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae were examined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the aim of developing a reliable serological test for the detection of protective antibody against E. rhusiopathiae. Fully mature protein and the N-terminal 416 amino acids (SpaA416) showed sufficient antigenicities, and further examination was done with SpaA416 because of its higher y...

  5. Identification and characterization of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus candidate protective antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations

    OpenAIRE

    Almazan, C.; Lagunes, R.; Villar, M.; Canales, M.; R Rosario-Cruz; Jongejan, F; de la Fuente, J.

    2009-01-01

    The cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp., affect cattle production in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Tick vaccines constitute a cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative to tick control. The recombinant Rhipicephalus microplus Bm86 antigen has been shown to protect cattle against tick infestations. However, variable efficacy of Bm86-based vaccines against geographic tick strains has encouraged the research for additional tick-protective antigens. Herein, ...

  6. Identification of an OmpW homologue in Burkholderia pseudomallei, a protective vaccine antigen against melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, William T; Spink, Natasha; Cia, Felipe; Collins, Cassandra; Romano, Maria; Berisio, Rita; Bancroft, Gregory J; McClean, Siobhán

    2016-05-17

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which is associated with a range of clinical manifestations, including sepsis and fatal pneumonia and is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Treatment can be challenging and control of infection involves prolonged antibiotic therapy, yet there are no approved vaccines available to prevent infection. Our aim was to develop and assess the potential of a prophylactic vaccine candidate targeted against melioidosis. The identified candidate is the 22kDa outer membrane protein, OmpW. We previously demonstrated that this protein was immunoprotective in mouse models of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) infections. We cloned Bp_ompW in Escherichia coli, expressed and purified the protein. Endotoxin free protein administered with SAS adjuvant protected Balb/C mice (75% survival) relative to controls (25% survival) (p<0.05). A potent serological response was observed with IgG2a to IgG1 ratio of 6.0. Furthermore C57BL/6 mice were protected for up to 80 days against a lethal dose of B. pseudomallei and surpassed the efficacy of the live attenuated 2D2 positive control. BpompW is homologous across thirteen sequenced B. pseudomallei strains, indicating that it should be broadly protective against B. pseudomallei. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that BpOmpW is able to induce protective immunity against melioidosis and is likely to be an effective vaccine antigen, possibly in combination with other subunit antigens. PMID:27091689

  7. The circumsporozoite protein is an immunodominant protective antigen in irradiated sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kota Arun; Sano, Gen-ichiro; Boscardin, Silvia; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Zavala, Fidel; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2006-12-14

    Malaria infection starts when mosquitoes inject sporozoites into the skin. The parasites enter the blood stream and make their way to the liver where they develop into the exo-erythrocytic forms (EEFs). Immunization with irradiated sporozoites (IrSp) leads to robust protection against malaria infection in rodents, monkeys and humans by eliciting antibodies to circumsporozoite protein (CS) that inhibit sporozoite infectivity, and T cells that destroy the EEFs. To study the role of non-CS antigens in protection, we produced CS transgenic mice that were tolerant to CS T-cell epitopes. Here we show that in the absence of T-cell-dependent immune responses to CS, protection induced by immunization with two doses of IrSp was greatly reduced. Thus, although hundreds of other Plasmodium genes are expressed in sporozoites and EEFs, CS is a dominant protective antigen. Nevertheless, sterile immunity could be obtained by immunization of CS transgenics with three doses of IrSp. PMID:17151604

  8. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation. PMID:26628378

  9. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipper, Donald J; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%. PMID:27213160

  10. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Tipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs. YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1 subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%.

  11. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipper, Donald J.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%.

  12. Immunological Correlates for Protection against Intranasal Challenge of Bacillus anthracis Spores Conferred by a Protective Antigen-Based Vaccine in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Shay; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim; Marcus, Hadar; Pass, Avi; Rothschild, Nili; Altboum, Zeev

    2006-01-01

    Correlates between immunological parameters and protection against Bacillus anthracis infection in animals vaccinated with protective antigen (PA)-based vaccines could provide surrogate markers to evaluate the putative protective efficiency of immunization in humans. In previous studies we demonstrated that neutralizing antibody levels serve as correlates for protection in guinea pigs (S. Reuveny et al., Infect. Immun. 69:2888-2893, 2001; H. Marcus et al., Infect. Immun. 72:3471-3477, 2004). ...

  13. Synergistic effect of silencing the expression of tick protective antigens 4D8 and Rs86 in Rhipicephalus sanguineus by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, José; Almazán, Consuelo; Naranjo, Victoria; Blouin, Edmour F; Kocan, Katherine M

    2006-07-01

    Tick proteins have been shown to be useful for the development of vaccines which reduce tick infestations. Potential tick protective antigens have been identified and characterized, in part, by use of RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi allows for analysis of gene function by characterizing the impact of loss of gene expression on tick physiology. Herein, we used RNAi in Rhipicephalus sanguineus to evaluate gene functions of two tick protective antigens, 4D8 and Rs86, the homologue of Bm86, on tick infestation, feeding and oviposition. Silencing of 4D8 alone resulted in decreased tick attachment, survival, feeding and oviposition. Although the effect of Rs86 RNAi was less pronounced, silencing of this gene also reduced tick weight and oviposition. Most notably, simultaneous silencing of 4D8 and Rs86 by RNAi resulted in a synergistic effect in which tick survival, attachment, feeding, weight and oviposition were profoundly reduced. Microscopic evaluation of tick tissues revealed that guts from dual injected ticks were distended with epithelial cells sparsely distributed along the basement membrane. These results demonstrated the synergistic effect of the silencing expression of two tick protective genes. Inclusion of multiple tick protective antigens may, therefore, enhance the efficacy of tick vaccines. PMID:16518610

  14. Production and purification of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Michael W; Zukauskas, David; Johnson, Kelly; Sampey, Gavin C; Olsen, Henrik; Garcia, Andy; Karwoski, Jeffrey D; Cooksey, Bridget A; Choi, Gil H; Askins, Janine; Tsai, Amos; Pierre, Jennifer; Gwinn, William

    2004-11-01

    Anthrax is caused by the gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus anthracis. The anthrax toxin consists of three proteins, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor, and edema factor. Current vaccines against anthrax use PA as their primary component since it confers protective immunity. In this work, we expressed soluble, recombinant PA in relatively high amounts in the periplasm of E. coli from shake flasks and bioreactors. The PA protein was purified using Q-Sepharose-HP and hydroxyapatite chromatography, and routinely found to be 96-98% pure. Yields of purified PA varied depending on the method of production; however, medium cell density fermentations resulted in approximately 370 mg/L of highly pure biologically active PA protein. These results exhibit the ability to generate gram quantities of PA from E. coli. PMID:15477093

  15. Protective efficacy of bacterial membranes containing surface-exposed BM95 antigenic peptides for the control of cattle tick infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Mario; Labruna, Marcelo B; Soares, João F; Prudencio, Carlos R; de la Fuente, José

    2009-12-01

    The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that the recombinant chimeric protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region for presentation on the Escherichia coli membrane was protective against R. microplus infestations in rabbits. This system provides a novel and simple approach for the production of tick protective antigens by surface display of antigenic protein chimera on live E. coli and suggests the possibility of using recombinant bacterial membrane fractions for vaccination against cattle tick infestations. PMID:19835826

  16. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine;

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well...

  17. Developing Peptide Mimotopes of Capsular Polysaccharides and Lipopolysaccharides Protective Antigens of Pathogenic Burkholderia Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengfei; Zhang, Jing; Tsai, Shien; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP) and Burkholderia mallei (BM) are two species of pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria. Our laboratory previously identified four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that reacted against Burkholderia capsular polysaccharides (PS) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and effectively protected against a lethal dose of BP/BM infections in mice. In this study, we used phage display panning against three different phage peptide libraries to select phage clones specifically recognized by each of the four protective MAbs. After sequencing a total of 179 candidate phage clones, we examined in detail six selected phage clones carrying different peptide inserts for the specificity of binding by the respective target MAbs. Chemically synthesized peptides corresponding to those displayed by the six phage clones were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein and tested for their binding specificity to the respective protective MAbs. The study revealed that four of the six peptides, all derived from the library displaying dodecapeptides, functioned well as "mimotopes" of Burkholderia PS and LPS as demonstrated by a high degree of specific competition against the binding of three protective MAbs to BP and BM. Our results suggest that the four selected peptide mimics corresponding to PS/LPS protective antigens of BP and BM could potentially be developed into peptide vaccines against pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria. PMID:27328059

  18. Effect of particulation on the immunogenic and protective properties of the recombinant Bm86 antigen expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, J C; Montero, C; Rodríguez, M; Soto, A; Redondo, M; Valdés, M; Méndez, L; de la Fuente, J

    1998-02-01

    The recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in Pichia pastoris is obtained in a highly particulated form, as a distinguish feature of this expression system. This particulated protein, the active principle of the recombinant vaccine Gavac against the cattle tick, have shown high immunogenic and protective properties, probably associated with its own characteristics. To evaluate the effects of particulation on the properties of Bm86, three groups of calves were immunized with particulated or non-particulated recombinant Bm86 and the anti-Bm86 antibody response determined. Animals were challenged with a controlled tick infestation and the protective capacities of both proteins assessed. Humoral immune response and protection in cattle vaccinated with the particulated antigen were higher. These experiments suggested that particulation of the Bm86 expressed in P. pastoris is an important feature for the protective properties of the antigen in vaccine preparations. PMID:9607058

  19. Expression and Purification of the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Receptor-binding Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛猛; 徐俊杰; 李冰; 董大勇; 宋小红; 郭强; 赵剑; 陈薇

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to express the receptor-binding domain of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in E. coli. Signal sequence of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli was attached to the 5' end of the gene encoding protective antigen receptor-binding domain (the 4th domain of PA, PALM). The plasmid carrying the fusion gene was then transformed into E. coli and induced to express recombinant PAlM by IFFG. The recombinant protein was purified by chromatography and then identified by N-terrainal sequencing and Western blot. The recombinant protein, about 10% of the total bacterial protein in volume, was secreted to the periplasmic space of the cell. After a purification procedure including ionexchange chromatography and gel filtration, about 10 mg of homogenous recombinant PAD4 was obtained from 1 L culture. Data from N-terminal sequencing suggested that the amino acid sequence of recombinant PAD4 was identical with its natural counterpart. And the result of Western blot showed the recombinant protein could bind with anti-PA serum from rabbit. High level secreted expression of PAD4 was obtained in E. coli. The results reported here are parts of a continuing research to evaluate PAD4 as a potential drug for anthrax therapy or a candidate of new vaccine.

  20. Heterosubtypic protection against pathogenic human and avian influenza viruses via in vivo electroporation of synthetic consensus DNA antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick J Laddy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The persistent evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI highlights the need for novel vaccination techniques that can quickly and effectively respond to emerging viral threats. We evaluated the use of optimized consensus influenza antigens to provide broad protection against divergent strains of H5N1 influenza in three animal models of mice, ferrets, and non-human primates. We also evaluated the use of in vivo electroporation to deliver these vaccines to overcome the immunogenicity barrier encountered in larger animal models of vaccination. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice, ferrets and non-human primates were immunized with consensus plasmids expressing H5 hemagglutinin (pH5HA, N1 neuraminidase (pN1NA, and nucleoprotein antigen (pNP. Dramatic IFN-gamma-based cellular immune responses to both H5 and NP, largely dependent upon CD8+ T cells were seen in mice. Hemaggutination inhibition titers classically associated with protection (>1:40 were seen in all species. Responses in both ferrets and macaques demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus antigens to induce antibodies capable of inhibiting divergent strains of the H5N1 subtype, and studies in the mouse and ferret demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus vaccines to induce protection even in the absence of such neutralizing antibodies. After challenge, protection from morbidity and mortality was seen in mice and ferrets, with significant reductions in viral shedding and disease progression seen in vaccinated animals. CONCLUSIONS: By combining several consensus influenza antigens with in vivo electroporation, we demonstrate that these antigens induce both protective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice, ferrets and non-human primates. We also demonstrate the ability of these antigens to protect from both morbidity and mortality in a ferret model of HPAI, in both the presence and absence of neutralizing antibody, which will be critical in responding to the

  1. Anthrax protective antigen delivered by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a protects mice from a lethal anthrax spore challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Manuel; Wu, Yanping; Singh, Sunil; Merkel, Tod J; Bhattacharyya, Siba; Blake, Milan S; Kopecko, Dennis J

    2009-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax disease, is a proven weapon of bioterrorism. Currently, the only licensed vaccine against anthrax in the United States is AVA Biothrax, which, although efficacious, suffers from several limitations. This vaccine requires six injectable doses over 18 months to stimulate protective immunity, requires a cold chain for storage, and in many cases has been associated with adverse effects. In this study, we modified the B. anthracis protective antigen (PA) gene for optimal expression and stability, linked it to an inducible promoter for maximal expression in the host, and fused it to the secretion signal of the Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin protein (HlyA) on a low-copy-number plasmid. This plasmid was introduced into the licensed typhoid vaccine strain, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty21a, and was found to be genetically stable. Immunization of mice with three vaccine doses elicited a strong PA-specific serum immunoglobulin G response with a geometric mean titer of 30,000 (range, 5,800 to 157,000) and lethal-toxin-neutralizing titers greater than 16,000. Vaccinated mice demonstrated 100% protection against a lethal intranasal challenge with aerosolized spores of B. anthracis 7702. The ultimate goal is a temperature-stable, safe, oral human vaccine against anthrax infection that can be self-administered in a few doses over a short period of time. PMID:19179420

  2. Hsp70 enhances presentation of FMDV antigen to bovine CD4+ T cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Kerry; Seago, Julian; Robinson, Lucy; Kelly, Charles; Charleston, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    International audience Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious acute vesicular disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals, including cattle, sheep and pigs. The current vaccine induces a rapid humoral response, but the duration of the protective antibody response is variable, possibly associated with a variable specific CD4+ T cell response. We investigated the use of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) as a molecular chaperone to target viral antigen to th...

  3. A plant-produced protective antigen vaccine confers protection in rabbits against a lethal aerosolized challenge with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores

    OpenAIRE

    Chichester, Jessica A.; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Rhee, Amy; Coffin, Megan V.; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Mett, Vadim; Shamloul, Moneim; Norikane, Joey; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-01-01

    The potential use of Bacillus anthracis as a bioterrorism weapon threatens the security of populations globally, requiring the immediate availability of safe, efficient and easily delivered anthrax vaccine for mass vaccination. Extensive research efforts have been directed toward the development of recombinant subunit vaccines based on protective antigen (PA), the principal virulence factor of B. anthracis. Among the emerging technologies for the production of these vaccine antigens is our la...

  4. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  5. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Berlier, Willy; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas. PMID:26344891

  6. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonie E. Rocke

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307—a truncated version of the V protein provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  7. Identification and characterization of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus candidate protective antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazán, Consuelo; Lagunes, Rodolfo; Villar, Margarita; Canales, Mario; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Jongejan, Frans; de la Fuente, José

    2010-01-01

    The cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp., affect cattle production in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Tick vaccines constitute a cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative to tick control. The recombinant Rhipicephalus microplus Bm86 antigen has been shown to protect cattle against tick infestations. However, variable efficacy of Bm86-based vaccines against geographic tick strains has encouraged the research for additional tick-protective antigens. Herein, we describe the analysis of R. microplus glutathione-S transferase, ubiquitin (UBQ), selenoprotein W, elongation factor-1 alpha, and subolesin (SUB) complementary DNAs (cDNAs) by RNA interference (RNAi) in R. microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus. Candidate protective antigens were selected for vaccination experiments based on the effect of gene knockdown on tick mortality, feeding, and fertility. Two cDNA clones encoding for UBQ and SUB were used for cattle vaccination and infestation with R. microplus and R. annulatus. Control groups were immunized with recombinant Bm86 or adjuvant/saline. The highest vaccine efficacy for the control of tick infestations was obtained for Bm86. Although with low immunogenic response, the results with the SUB vaccine encourage further investigations on the use of recombinant subolesin alone or in combination with other antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations. The UBQ peptide showed low immunogenicity, and the results of the vaccination trial were inconclusive to assess the protective efficacy of this antigen. These experiments showed that RNAi could be used for the selection of candidate tick-protective antigens. However, vaccination trials are necessary to evaluate the effect of recombinant antigens in the control of tick infestations, a process that requires efficient recombinant protein production and formulation systems. PMID:19943063

  8. Prophylaxis and Therapy of Inhalational Anthrax by a Novel Monoclonal Antibody to Protective Antigen That Mimics Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Laura; Blanset, Diann; Lowy, Israel; O'Neill, Thomas; Goldstein, Joel; Little, Stephen F.; Andrews, Gerard P.; Dorough, Gary; Taylor, Ronald K.; Keler, Tibor

    2006-01-01

    The neutralizing antibody response to the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin elicited by approved anthrax vaccines is an accepted correlate for vaccine-mediated protection against anthrax. We reasoned that a human anti-PA monoclonal antibody (MAb) selected on the basis of superior toxin neutralization activity might provide potent protection against anthrax. The fully human MAb (also referred to as MDX-1303 or Valortim) was chosen from a large panel of anti-PA human MAbs gener...

  9. Carnauba wax nanoparticles enhance strong systemic and mucosal cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-gp140 antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Arias, M. A.; Loxley, A; Eatmon, C; Van Roey, G; Fairhurst, D; Mitchnick, M; Dash, Philip; Cole, T.; Wegmann, F; Sattentau, Q; Shattock, R

    2011-01-01

    Induction of humoral responses to HIV at mucosal compartments without inflammation is important for vaccine design. We developed charged wax nanoparticles that efficiently adsorb protein antigens and are internalized by DC in the absence of inflammation. HIV-gp140-adsorbed nanoparticles induced stronger in vitro T-cell proliferation responses than antigen alone. Such responses were greatly enhanced when antigen was co-adsorbed with TLR ligands. Immunogenicity studies in mice showed that intra...

  10. Complement C3d conjugation to anthrax protective antigen promotes a rapid, sustained, and protective antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V Kolla

    Full Text Available B. anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Pathogenesis is primarily mediated through the exotoxins lethal factor and edema factor, which bind protective antigen (PA to gain entry into the host cell. The current anthrax vaccine (AVA, Biothrax consists of aluminum-adsorbed cell-free filtrates of unencapsulated B. anthracis, wherein PA is thought to be the principle target of neutralization. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the natural adjuvant, C3d, versus alum in eliciting an anti-PA humoral response and found that C3d conjugation to PA and emulsion in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA imparted superior protection from anthrax challenge relative to PA in IFA or PA adsorbed to alum. Relative to alum-PA, immunization of mice with C3d-PA/IFA augmented both the onset and sustained production of PA-specific antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies to the receptor-binding portion (domain 4 of PA. C3d-PA/IFA was efficacious when administered either i.p. or s.c., and in adolescent mice lacking a fully mature B cell compartment. Induction of PA-specific antibodies by C3d-PA/IFA correlated with increased efficiency of germinal center formation and plasma cell generation. Importantly, C3d-PA immunization effectively protected mice from intranasal challenge with B. anthracis spores, and was approximately 10-fold more effective than alum-PA immunization or PA/IFA based on dose challenge. These data suggest that incorporation of C3d as an adjuvant may overcome shortcomings of the currently licensed aluminum-based vaccine, and may confer protection in the early days following acute anthrax exposure.

  11. Control of tick infestations in cattle vaccinated with bacterial membranes containing surface-exposed tick protective antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazán, Consuelo; Moreno-Cantú, Orlando; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Galindo, Ruth C; Canales, Mario; Villar, Margarita; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines containing the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 antigens protect cattle against tick infestations. Tick subolesin (SUB), elongation factor 1a (EF1a) and ubiquitin (UBQ) are new candidate protective antigens for the control of cattle tick infestations. Previous studies showed that R. microplus BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the Anaplasma marginale major surface protein (MSP) 1a N-terminal region (BM95-MSP1a) for presentation on the Escherichia coli membrane were protective against R. microplus infestations in rabbits. In this study, we extended these results by expressing SUB-MSP1a, EF1a-MSP1a and UBQ-MSP1a fusion proteins on the E. coli membrane using this system and demonstrating that bacterial membranes containing the chimeric proteins BM95-MSP1a and SUB-MSP1a were protective (>60% vaccine efficacy) against experimental R. microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus infestations in cattle. This system provides a novel, simple and cost-effective approach for the production of tick protective antigens by surface display of antigenic protein chimera on the E. coli membrane and demonstrates the possibility of using recombinant bacterial membrane fractions in vaccine preparations to protect cattle against tick infestations. PMID:22085549

  12. Protein coated microcrystals formulated with model antigens and modified with calcium phosphate exhibit enhanced phagocytosis and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Kmiec, Dorota; Irvine, June; Fleck, Roland; Xing, Dorothy; Moore, Barry; Parton, Roger; Coote, John

    2014-07-16

    Protein-coated microcrystals (PCMCs) were investigated as potential vaccine formulations for a range of model antigens. Presentation of antigens as PCMCs increased the antigen-specific IgG responses for all antigens tested, compared to soluble antigens. When compared to conventional aluminium-adjuvanted formulations, PCMCs modified with calcium phosphate (CaP) showed enhanced antigen-specific IgG responses and a decreased antigen-specific IgG1:IgG2a ratio, indicating the induction of a more balanced Th1/Th2 response. The rate of antigen release from CaP PCMCs, in vitro, decreased strongly with increasing CaP loading but their immunogenicity in vivo was not significantly different, suggesting the adjuvanticity was not due to a depot effect. Notably, it was found that CaP modification enhanced the phagocytosis of fluorescent antigen-PCMC particles by J774.2 murine monocyte/macrophage cells compared to soluble antigen or soluble PCMCs. Thus, CaP PCMCs may provide an alternative to conventional aluminium-based acellular vaccines to provide a more balanced Th1/Th2 immune response. PMID:24120484

  13. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Lopez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV, resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  14. Cancer testis antigen vaccination affords long-term protection in a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati

    Full Text Available Sperm protein (Sp17 is an attractive target for ovarian cancer (OC vaccines because of its over-expression in primary as well as in metastatic lesions, at all stages of the disease. Our studies suggest that a Sp17-based vaccine can induce an enduring defense against OC development in C57BL/6 mice with ID8 cells, following prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. This is the first time that a mouse counterpart of a cancer testis antigen (Sp17 was shown to be expressed in an OC mouse model, and that vaccination against this antigen significantly controlled tumor growth. Our study shows that the CpG-adjuvated Sp17 vaccine overcomes the issue of immunologic tolerance, the major barrier to the development of effective immunotherapy for OC. Furthermore, this study provides a better understanding of OC biology by showing that Th-17 cells activation and contemporary immunosuppressive T-reg cells inhibition is required for vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these results indicate that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations can induce long-standing protection against OC and delay tumor growth, suggesting that this strategy may provide additional treatments of human OC and the prevention of disease onset in women with a family history of OC.

  15. Adjuvant effects of liposomes containing lipid A: enhancement of liposomal antigen presentation and recruitment of macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, J N; Rao, M.; Amselem, S; Krzych, U; Alving, C R; Green, S J; Wassef, N M

    1992-01-01

    Liposomes containing lipid A induced potent humoral immune responses in mice against an encapsulated malaria antigen (R32NS1) containing NANP epitopes. The immune response was not enhanced by lipid A alone or by empty liposomes containing lipid A. Experiments to investigate the adjuvant mechanisms of liposomes and lipid A revealed that liposome-encapsulated R32NS1 was actively presented by bone marrow-derived macrophages to NANP-specific cloned T cells. The degree of presentation was related ...

  16. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs), such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria. The...... evidence is increasingly being underpinned by specific molecular understanding of the pathogenic processes involved. Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) caused by placenta-sequestering IEs expressing the PfEMP1 variant VAR2CSA is a particularly striking example of this. These findings have raised hopes that...... development of PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect specifically against severe malaria syndromes-in particular PAM-is feasible. This review summarizes the evidence that VSAs are important targets of NAI, discusses why VSA-based vaccines might be feasible despite the extensive intra- and interclonal variation of...

  17. Examination of serological memory in rabbits injected with Bacillus anthracis protective antigen adsorbed to Alhydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F. Little

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serological memory after inoculation of protective antigen (PA combined with Alhydrogel adjuvant (PA/Alhydrogel was examined in New Zealand white rabbits, an animal model for anthrax. A threshold dose of 0.1 μg of PA/Alhydrogel was identified which resulted in an ELISA titer 2 weeks after a primary immunization of only 0.168 μg anti-PA IgG per ml and a toxin-neutralizing antibody titer (TNA ED50 of 1.8 (n = 40. A significant increase in anti-PA IgG and TNA ED50 titers were measured (p < 0.0001 2 weeks after a booster immunization with 0.1 μg of PA/Alhydrogel at 14 days (n = 10; 40.9 μg anti-PA IgG per ml; 522 TNA ED50 and 28 days (n = 10; 63.8 μg anti-PA IgG per ml; 501 TNA ED50. At this threshold dose of PA/Alhydrogel, protection against an aerosol exposure to Bacillus anthracis Ames spores improved as the booster immunization was administered from 4 days (40% survival, to 8 days (50% survival, and to 12 days (80% survival before challenge. The partial protection of rabbits, even in the absence of protective antibody titers (0.9 μg anti-PA IgG per ml and 26 TNA ED50 when the booster immunization was administered 4 days before challenge, suggested a protective potential for serologic memory.

  18. Gene cloning, expression and immunogenicity of the protective antigen subolesin in Dermacentor silvarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yonghong; Zeng, Hua; Zhang, Jincheng; Wang, Duo; Li, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantian; Yang, Shujie; Liu, Jingze

    2014-02-01

    Subolesin (4D8), the ortholog of insect akirins, is a highly conserved protective antigen and thus has the potential for development of a broad-spectrum vaccine against ticks and mosquitoes. To date, no protective antigens have been characterized nor tested as candidate vaccines against Dermacentor silvarum bites and transmission of associated pathogens. In this study, we cloned the open reading frame (ORF) of D. silvarum 4D8 cDNA (Ds4D8), which consisted of 498 bp encoding 165 amino acid residues. The results of sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that D. silvarum 4D8 (Ds4D8) is highly conserved showing more than 81% identity of amino acid sequences with those of other hard ticks. Additionally, Ds4D8 containing restriction sites was ligated into the pET-32(a+) expression vector and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli rosetta. The recombinant Ds4D8 (rDs4D8) was induced by isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and purified using Ni affinity chromatography. The SDS-PAGE results showed that the molecular weight of rDs4D8 was 40 kDa, which was consistent with the expected molecular mass considering 22 kDa histidine-tagged thioredoxin (TRX) protein from the expression vector. Western blot results showed that rabbit anti-D. silvarum serum recognized the expressed rDs4D8, suggesting an immune response against rDs4D8. These results provided the basis for developing a candidate vaccine against D. silvarum ticks and transmission of associated pathogens. PMID:24623890

  19. Limitations of plasmid vaccines to complex viruses: selected myxoma virus antigens as DNA vaccines were not protective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mathew M; van Leeuwen, Barbara H; Kerr, Peter J

    2004-11-25

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus of the genus Leporipoxvirus, is the causative agent of the disease myxomatosis which is highly lethal in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Current vaccines to protect against myxomatosis are either attenuated live strains of the virus or the antigenically related rabbit fibroma virus. We examined the immune response of outbred domestic rabbits to the individual myxoma virus antigens M055R, M073R, M115L and M121R, delivered as DNA vaccines co-expressing rabbit interleukin-2 or interleukin-4. M115L and M121R were also delivered simultaneously. None of the vaccine constructs were able to protect the rabbits from disease or reduce mortality after challenge with virulent myxoma virus, despite induction of antigen-specific cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. PMID:15531037

  20. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søren; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    to identify TAA, mice were immunized with mixtures of peptides representing putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from one of the gene products. Indeed, such immunized mice were partially protected against subsequent tumor challenge. Despite being immunized with bona fide self antigens, no...

  1. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity. PMID:26278659

  2. Protection against heterologous infection by using cross antigenicity between schistosoma mansoni and fasciola hepatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis in many areas in America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. There is an urgent need for improved methods to control the parasite's transmission. The present study is parasitological, immunological (interleukine-1β and interleukine-6) and histopathological investigations on the immunizing effect of cross antigenicity between S. mansoni and F. hepatica against schistosomiasis and fasciolosis in mice. Parasitological study showed that vaccination with irradiated cercariae of S. mansoni or vaccination by F. hepatica whole worm extract (FhWWE) before challenged with encysted metacercariae of F. hepatica or cercariae of S. mansoni played a significant control on the parasitic infection manifested by a remarkable reduction in the means of worm count. Assessment of IL-1β and IL-6 in sera of the experimental groups showed that there are cross reactivity between fasciola / schistosoma and its relation to cross protection. Histopathological examination of vaccinated mice livers showed protection against parasite maturation and liver damage after challenged, as compared to mice infected only without vaccination

  3. Preparation and Evaluation of Human-Murine Chimeric Antibody against Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Hao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a human/murine chimeric Fab antibody which neutralizes the anthrax toxin, protective antigen (PA. The chimeric Fab was constructed using variable regions of murine anti-PA monoclonal antibody in combination with constant regions of human IgG. The chimeric PA6-Fab was expressed in E. coli. BL21 and evaluated by ELISA and co-immunoprecipitation- mass spectra. The potency of PA6-Fab to neutralize LeTx was examined in J774A.1 cell viability in vitro and in Fisher 344 rats in vivo. The PA6-Fab did not have domain similarity corresponding to the current anti PA mAbs, but specifically bound to anthrax PA at an affinity of 1.76 nM, and was able to neutralize LeTx in vitro and protected 56.9% cells at 20 μg/mL against anthrax LeTx. One hundred μg PA6-Fab could neutralize 300 μg LeTx in vivo. The PA6-Fab has potential as a therapeutic mAb for treatment of anthrax.

  4. IL-13 Production by Regulatory T Cells Protects Against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) Independent of Auto-Antigen1

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Rynda, Agnieszka; Ascón, Miguel A.; YANG, Xinghong; Kochetkova, Irina; Riccardi, Carol; Callis, Gayle; Trunkle, Theresa; Pascual, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with an anti-inflammatory Salmonella vaccine expressing enterotoxigenic E. coli colonization factor antigen 1 (CFA/I) proved effective in stimulating protective, potent CD25+ CD4+ T (Treg) cells in susceptible mice challenged with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Since the Salmonella vector was considerably less protective, we questioned whether altering the fimbrial subunit expression to resemble conventional Salmonella expression may impact Treg cell potency. The S...

  5. Development of antibodies to protective antigen and lethal factor components of anthrax toxin in humans and guinea pigs and their relevance to protective immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, P. C.; Broster, M G; Carman, J A; Manchee, R J; Melling, J

    1986-01-01

    A competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies in serum to the protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF) components of anthrax toxin. Current human vaccination schedules with an acellular vaccine induce predictable and lasting antibody titers to PA and, when present in the vaccine, to LF. Live spore vaccine administered to guinea pigs in a single dose conferred significantly better protection than the human vaccines (P less than 0.00...

  6. Exposure to ozone enhances antigen-presenting activity concentration dependently in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ozone (O3) on the symptoms of allergic asthma and the mechanisms underlying have not yet been fully elucidated. Antigen presentation is one of the factors contributing to the allergic reaction. Therefore, we investigated the effects of repeated exposure to O3 on antigen-presenting (AP) activity, on the expression of cell-surface molecules associated with antigen presentation (Ia, B7.1, B7.2 and CD11b/c) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells (BAL cells), and on allergic asthma-like symptoms. Rats were exposed to 0.3, 0.56, 1 ppm O3 or filtered air for a 3-day period every 2 weeks, this was replicated three times. AP activity was assessed by measuring antigen-specific T-cell proliferation; and the expression of cell-surface molecules, by flow cytometry. Rats were also made to inhale aerosolized 1% ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 10 min post-exposure to O3, and allergic asthma-like symptoms were measured by determining the increase in enhanced pause (Penh), which correlates well with lung resistance. O3 increased both AP activity and expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules in BAL cells concentration dependently. It also increased lung resistance, and the increase in lung resistance after O3 exposure was significantly higher in the OVA-inhaled group than in the saline-inhaled group. The present results show that O3 increased AP activity concentration dependently and suggest that O3 might aggravate allergy symptoms by enhancing AP activity

  7. Antibody to a conserved antigenic target is protective against diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Skurnik, David; Zaidi, Tanweer; Roux, Damien; Deoliveira, Rosane B; Garrett, Wendy S; Lu, Xi; O'Malley, Jennifer; Kinzel, Kathryn; Zaidi, Tauqeer; Rey, Astrid; Perrin, Christophe; Fichorova, Raina N; Kayatani, Alexander K K; Maira-Litràn, Tomas; Gening, Marina L; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Pelton, Stephen I; Golenbock, Douglas T; Pier, Gerald B

    2013-06-11

    Microbial capsular antigens are effective vaccines but are chemically and immunologically diverse, resulting in a major barrier to their use against multiple pathogens. A β-(1→6)-linked poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) surface capsule is synthesized by four proteins encoded in genetic loci designated intercellular adhesion in Staphylococcus aureus or polyglucosamine in selected Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. We report that many microbial pathogens lacking an identifiable intercellular adhesion or polyglucosamine locus produce PNAG, including Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal pathogens, as well as protozoa, e.g., Trichomonas vaginalis, Plasmodium berghei, and sporozoites and blood-stage forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Natural antibody to PNAG is common in humans and animals and binds primarily to the highly acetylated glycoform of PNAG but is not protective against infection due to lack of deposition of complement opsonins. Polyclonal animal antibody raised to deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG and a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that both bind to native and deacetylated glycoforms of PNAG mediated complement-dependent opsonic or bactericidal killing and protected mice against local and/or systemic infections by Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, Candida albicans, and P. berghei ANKA, and against colonic pathology in a model of infectious colitis. PNAG is also a capsular polysaccharide for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and nontypable Hemophilus influenzae, and protects cells from environmental stress. Vaccination targeting PNAG could contribute to immunity against serious and diverse prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, and the conserved production of PNAG suggests that it is a critical factor in microbial biology. PMID:23716675

  8. Immune Responses Induced by the Leishmania (Leishmania) donovani A2 Antigen, but Not by the LACK Antigen, Are Protective against Experimental Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; TAVARES Carlos Alberto Pereira; Carvalho, Fernando Aécio de Amorim; Chaves, Karina Figueiredo; Teixeira, Kadima Nayara; Rodrigues, Rafaela Chitarra; Charest, Hugues; Matlashewski, Greg; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2003-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiologic agents of a broad spectrum of clinical forms of leishmaniasis and has a wide geographical distribution in the Americas, which overlaps with the areas of transmission of many other Leishmania species. The LACK and A2 antigens are shared by various Leishmania species. A2 was previously shown to induce a potent Th1 immune response and protection against L. donovani infection in BALB/c mice. LACK is effective against L. major infection, but no ...

  9. Expression and refolding of the protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis: A model for high-throughput screening of antigenic recombinant protein refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, María Elisa; Pavan, Esteban Enrique; Cairó, Fabián Martín; Pettinari, María Julia

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) is a well known and relevant immunogenic protein that is the basis for both anthrax vaccines and diagnostic methods. Properly folded antigenic PA is necessary for these applications. In this study a high level of PA was obtained in recombinant Escherichia coli. The protein was initially accumulated in inclusion bodies, which facilitated its efficient purification by simple washing steps; however, it could not be recognized by specific antibodies. Refolding conditions were subsequently analyzed in a high-throughput manner that enabled nearly a hundred different conditions to be tested simultaneously. The recovery of the ability of PA to be recognized by antibodies was screened by dot blot using a coefficient that provided a measure of properly refolded protein levels with a high degree of discrimination. The best refolding conditions resulted in a tenfold increase in the intensity of the dot blot compared to the control. The only refolding additive that consistently yielded good results was L-arginine. The statistical analysis identified both cooperative and negative interactions between the different refolding additives. The high-throughput approach described in this study that enabled overproduction, purification and refolding of PA in a simple and straightforward manner, can be potentially useful for the rapid screening of adequate refolding conditions for other overexpressed antigenic proteins. PMID:26777581

  10. Amiloride enhances antigen specific CTL by faciliting HBV DNA vaccine entry into cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Geng

    Full Text Available The induction of relatively weak immunity by DNA vaccines in humans can be largely attributed to the low efficiency of transduction of somatic cells. Although formulation with liposomes has been shown to enhance DNA transduction of cultured cells, little, if any, effect is observed on the transduction of somatic tissues and cells. To improve the rate of transduction, DNA vaccine delivery by gene gun and the recently developed electroporation techniques have been employed. We report here that to circumvent requirement for such equipment, amiloride, a drug that is prescribed for hypertension treatment, can accelerate plasmid entry into antigen presenting cells (APCs both in vitro and in vivo. The combination induced APCs more dramatically in both maturation and cytokine secretion. Amiloride enhanced development of full CD8 cytolytic function including induction of high levels of antigen specific CTL and expression of IFN-γ+perforin+granzymeB+ in CD8+ T cells. Thus, amiloride is a facilitator for DNA transduction into host cells which in turn enhances the efficiency of the immune responses.

  11. 75 FR 36300 - Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... Airline Passenger Protections (75 FR 32318), which, among other things, solicits comment, without... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78), or you may visit http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov . Docket: For access to the... the current practice of not prescribing carrier practices concerning the serving of peanuts. (75...

  12. Soluble Expression and Characterization of Biologically Active Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Suryanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis secretory protein protective antigen (PA is primary candidate for subunit vaccine against anthrax. Attempts to obtain large quantity of PA from Escherichia coli expression system often result in the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. Therefore, it is always better to produce recombinant proteins in a soluble form. In the present study, we have obtained biologically active recombinant PA in small scale E. coli shake culture system using three different expression constructs. The PA gene was cloned in expression vectors bearing trc, T5, and T7 promoters and transformed into their respective E. coli hosts. The growth conditions were optimized to obtain maximum expression of PA in soluble form. The expression construct PA-pET32c in DE3-pLysS E. coli host resulted in a maximum production of soluble PA (15 mg L−1 compared to other combinations. Purified PA was subjected to trypsin digestion and binding assay with lethal factor to confirm the protein’s functionality. Biological activity was confirmed by cytotoxicity assay on J774.1 cells. Balb/c mice were immunized with PA and the immunogenicity was tested by ELISA and toxin neutralization assay. This study highlights the expression of soluble and biologically active recombinant PA in larger quantity using simpler E. coli production platform.

  13. Soluble Expression and Characterization of Biologically Active Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, Nagendra; Vanlalhmuaka; Mankere, Bharti; Verma, Monika; Thavachelvam, Kulanthaivel; Tuteja, Urmil

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis secretory protein protective antigen (PA) is primary candidate for subunit vaccine against anthrax. Attempts to obtain large quantity of PA from Escherichia coli expression system often result in the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. Therefore, it is always better to produce recombinant proteins in a soluble form. In the present study, we have obtained biologically active recombinant PA in small scale E. coli shake culture system using three different expression constructs. The PA gene was cloned in expression vectors bearing trc, T5, and T7 promoters and transformed into their respective E. coli hosts. The growth conditions were optimized to obtain maximum expression of PA in soluble form. The expression construct PA-pET32c in DE3-pLysS E. coli host resulted in a maximum production of soluble PA (15 mg L(-1)) compared to other combinations. Purified PA was subjected to trypsin digestion and binding assay with lethal factor to confirm the protein's functionality. Biological activity was confirmed by cytotoxicity assay on J774.1 cells. Balb/c mice were immunized with PA and the immunogenicity was tested by ELISA and toxin neutralization assay. This study highlights the expression of soluble and biologically active recombinant PA in larger quantity using simpler E. coli production platform. PMID:26966576

  14. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  15. Human Monoclonal Anti-Protective Antigen Antibody Completely Protects Rabbits and Is Synergistic with Ciprofloxacin in Protecting Mice and Guinea Pigs against Inhalation Anthrax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Kang, Angray S.; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of inhalation anthrax requires early and extended antibiotic therapy, and therefore, alternative treatment strategies are needed. We investigated whether a human monoclonal antibody (AVP-21D9) to protective antigen (PA) would protect mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits against anthrax. Control animals challenged with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores by the intranasal route died within 3 to 7 days. AVP-21D9 alone provided minimal protection against anthrax in the murine model, but its efficacy was notably better in guinea pigs. When Swiss-Webster mice, challenged with five 50% lethal doses (LD50s) of anthrax spores, were given a single 16.7-mg/kg of body weight AVP-21D9 antibody dose combined with ciprofloxacin (30 mg/kg/day for 6 days) 24 h after challenge, 100% of the mice were protected for more than 30 days, while ciprofloxacin or AVP-21D9 alone showed minimal protection. Similarly, when AVP-21D9 antibody (10 to 50 mg/kg) was combined with a low, nonprotective dose of ciprofloxacin (3.7 mg/kg/day) and administered to guinea pigs for 6 days, synergistic protection against anthrax was observed. In contrast, a single dose of AVP-21D9 antibody (1, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) but not 0.2 mg/kg alone completely protected rabbits against challenge with 100 LD50s of B. anthracis Ames spores, and 100% of the rabbits survived rechallenge. Further, administration of AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) to rabbits at 0, 6, and 12 h after challenge with anthrax spores resulted in 100% survival; however, delay of antibody treatment by 24 and 48 h reduced survival to 80% and 60%, respectively. Serological analysis of sera from various surviving animals 30 days postprimary infection showed development of a species-specific PA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titer that correlated with protection against reinfection. Taken together, the effectiveness of human anti-PA antibody alone or in combination with low ciprofloxacin levels may provide the basis for an improved strategy for

  16. Protection of mice against Japanese encephalitis virus group II strain infections by combinations of monoclonal antibodies to different antigenic domains on glycoprotein E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of at least three hemagglutination- inhibition-positive (HAI and virus-specific (Hs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs to glycoprotein E (gpE of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV fully protected (100% mice against JEV strain 733913 infections (group 1. However, these representative epitopes are reported to have been lost on JEV group II strains. In the present study, therefore, the protective effect of various combinations of anti-gpE MAbs representing antigenic epitopes other than Hs was studied on mice infections with JEV group II strains: JEV strains 641686 and 691004. MAbs used in the protective experiments were characterized as HAI-negative virus-specific (NHs and HAI-positive flavivirus cross-reactive (Hx. Additionally, one of the Hs MAbs (MAb Hs-3 was included in the experiments. Mice were first administered single MAbs or their combinations intraperitoneally and 24 h later, infected with the virus intracerebrally. Protection rates of 70-75% were obtained with a combination of four MAbs: MAbs NHs-1, Hx-1, Hx-3 and Hs-3. However, protection rates of only 20-40% were obtained with three MAbs but none was observed with single or two MAbs. There was, however, a substantial increase in mice survival. The protective effect of several combinations of anti-gpE MAbs representing different antigenic epitopes might be due to the enhancement of binding within the same group and also between different MAb groups. The present results indicate that NHs and Hx epitopes should be incorporated with three Hs epitopes in a JEV vaccine that would have an added advantage, particularly in the flaviviral endemic areas with JEV strain variations.

  17. Introduction to Enhanced Protective Film Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunlin; DAVID Palermo; LI Guoqiang; SUN Jianyun; CHEN Suwen

    2008-01-01

    An explosive blast mitigation alternative has increased the safety of structures by using "catcher" systems.These systems " catch" or repel the failure of the window or in-fill wall protecting life and property from ballistic shards or fragments.They can be designed to be standalone in new construction and structural retrofits or used to augment structural hardening techniques.Cables,fabrics,and thin gauge sheet steel are examples of catcher systems used in the past.A new and evolving category of catcher systems are based on polymeric materials that can be used for both wall and window upgrades.These products are a proven blast mitigation concept and K&C Protective Technologies Pte Ltd (KCPT) together with Sherwin-Williams(SW) use KCPT's blast engineering capacity and SW's material engineering principles to create engineered systems for even greater in-use performance.

  18. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vintiñi Elisa O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV and heat-killed (LcM was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Results Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I. These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and

  19. Mimotope-based vaccines of Leishmania infantum antigens and their protective efficacy against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourena Emanuele Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of cost-effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high-priority. The present study has used the phage display technology to identify new immunogens, which were evaluated as vaccines in the murine model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Epitope-based immunogens, represented by phage-fused peptides that mimic Leishmania infantum antigens, were selected according to their affinity to antibodies from asymptomatic and symptomatic VL dogs' sera. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDINGS: Twenty phage clones were selected after three selection cycles, and were evaluated by means of in vitro assays of the immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive and chronically infected with L. infantum BALB/c mice. Clones that were able to induce specific Th1 immune response, represented by high levels of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 were selected, and based on their selectivity and specificity, two clones, namely B10 and C01, were further employed in the vaccination protocols. BALB/c mice vaccinated with clones plus saponin showed both a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with individual clones or L. infantum extracts. Additionally, these animals, when compared to control groups (saline, saponin, wild-type phage plus saponin, or non-relevant phage clone plus saponin, showed significant reductions in the parasite burden in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, mainly by CD8+ T cells, against parasite proteins. These animals also presented decreased parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 responses, and increased levels of parasite-specific IgG2a antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes two phage clones that mimic L. infantum antigens, which were directly used as immunogens in vaccines and presented Th1-type immune responses, and that significantly reduced the

  20. Effect of particulate adjuvant on the anthrax protective antigen dose required for effective nasal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Dulce; Staats, Herman F; Borges, Olga

    2015-07-17

    Successful vaccine development is dependent on the development of effective adjuvants since the poor immunogenicity of modern subunit vaccines typically requires the use of potent adjuvants and high antigen doses. In recent years, adjuvant formulations combining both immunopotentiators and delivery systems have emerged as a promising strategy to develop effective and improved vaccines. In this study we investigate if the association of the mast cell activating adjuvant compound 48/80 (C48/80) with chitosan nanoparticles would promote an antigen dose sparing effect when administered intranasally. Even though the induction of strong mucosal immunity required higher antigen doses, incorporation of C48/80 into nanoparticles provided significant dose sparing when compared to antigen and C48/80 in solution with no significant effect on serum neutralizing antibodies titers. These results suggest the potential of this novel adjuvant combination to improve the immunogenicity of a vaccine and decrease the antigen dose required for vaccination. PMID:26087299

  1. Enhanced personal protection system for the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    During the first long shutdown (LS1) a new safety system will be installed in the primary beam areas of the PS complex in order to bring the standard of personnel radiation protection at the PS into line with that of the LHC.   Pierre Ninin, deputy group leader of GS-ASE and responsible for the installation of the new PS complex safety system, in front of a new access control system. The LHC access control systems are state-of-the-art, whereas those of the injection chain accelerators were running the risk of becoming obsolete. For the past two years a project to upgrade the access and safety systems of the first links in the LHC accelerator chain has been underway to bring them into compliance with nuclear safety standards. These systems provide the personnel with automatic protection by limiting access to hazardous areas and by ensuring that nobody is present in the areas when the accelerator is in operation. By the end of 2013, the project teams will ha...

  2. Anthrax Vaccine Antigen-Adjuvant Formulations Completely Protect New Zealand White Rabbits against Challenge with Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Peachman, Kristina K.; Li, Qin; Matyas, Gary R.; Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Lovchik, Julie; Lyons, Rick C.; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rao, Mangala

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop an improved anthrax vaccine that shows high potency, five different anthrax protective antigen (PA)-adjuvant vaccine formulations that were previously found to be efficacious in a nonhuman primate model were evaluated for their efficacy in a rabbit pulmonary challenge model using Bacillus anthracis Ames strain spores. The vaccine formulations include PA adsorbed to Alhydrogel, PA encapsulated in liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A, stable liposomal PA oil-in-wa...

  3. Plant-Based Vaccine: Mice Immunized with Chloroplast-Derived Anthrax Protective Antigen Survive Anthrax Lethal Toxin Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Koya, Vijay; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H.; Daniell, Henry

    2005-01-01

    The currently available human vaccine for anthrax, derived from the culture supernatant of Bacillus anthracis, contains the protective antigen (PA) and traces of the lethal and edema factors, which may contribute to adverse side effects associated with this vaccine. Therefore, an effective expression system that can provide a clean, safe, and efficacious vaccine is required. In an effort to produce anthrax vaccine in large quantities and free of extraneous bacterial contaminants, PA was expre...

  4. In vivo persistence and protective efficacy of the bacille Calmette Guerin vaccine overexpressing the HspX latency antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Spratt, Joanne M.; Britton, Warwick J; Triccas, James A.

    2010-01-01

    New strategies to control infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, are urgently required, particularly in areas where acquired immunodeficiencies are prevalent. In this report we have determined if modification of the current tuberculosis vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, to constitutively express the mycobacterial HspX latency antigen altered its protective effect against challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis. Overexpression of M. tuberculosis HspX in...

  5. Ultraviolet-Blocking Lenses Protect, Enhance Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To combat the harmful properties of light in space, as well as that of artificial radiation produced during laser and welding work, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) scientists developed a lens capable of absorbing, filtering, and scattering the dangerous light while not obstructing vision. SunTiger Inc. now Eagle Eyes Optics, of Calabasas, California was formed to market a full line of sunglasses based on the JPL discovery that promised 100-percent elimination of harmful wavelengths and enhanced visual clarity. The technology was recently inducted into the Space Technology Hall of Fame.

  6. Enhanced immune stimulation by a therapeutic lymphoma tumor antigen vaccine produced in insect cells involves mannose receptor targeting to antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betting, David J; Mu, Xi Y; Kafi, Kamran; McDonnel, Desmond; Rosas, Francisco; Gold, Daniel P; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination of lymphoma patients with tumor-specific immunoglobulin (idiotype, Id) coupled to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Id-KLH) is undergoing clinical investigation, and methods to improve the immunogenicity of these and other protein tumor antigen vaccines are being sought. Id proteins can be produced via tumor-myeloma hybridomas or recombinant methods in mammalian, bacteria, or insect cells. We now demonstrate that terminal mannose residues, characteristic of recombinant proteins produced in insect cells, yield Id proteins with significantly enhanced immunostimulatory properties compared to Id proteins derived from mammalian cells. Recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cell-derived Id showed higher binding to and activation of human dendritic cells mediated by mannose receptors. In vivo, insect cell-derived Id elicited higher levels of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and improved eradication of pre-established murine lymphoma. Insect cell and mammalian Id generated similar levels of tumor-specific antibodies, showing no impairment in antibody responses to native tumor antigen despite the glycoslylation differences in the immunogen. Combining insect cell production and maleimide-based KLH conjugation offered the highest levels of anti-tumor immunity. Our data comparing sources of recombinant Id protein tumor antigens used in therapeutic cancer vaccines demonstrate that insect cell-derived antigens can offer several immunologic advantages over proteins derived from mammalian sources. PMID:19000731

  7. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Matthew D.; Wilder, Julie A.; Mega, William M.; Hutt, Julie A.; Kuehl, Philip J.; Valderas, Michelle W.; Chew, Lawrence L.; Liang, Bertrand C.; Squires, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse inject...

  8. Intramuscular Delivery of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vector Expressing Humanized Protective Antigen Induces Rapid Protection against Anthrax That May Bypass Intranasally Originated Preexisting Adenovirus Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; YI, SHAOQIONG; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a s...

  9. Mechanistic Analysis of the Effect of Deamidation on the Immunogenicity of Anthrax Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anita; Ngundi, Miriam M; Burns, Drusilla L

    2016-05-01

    The spontaneous modification of proteins, such as deamidation of asparagine residues, can significantly affect the immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines. Using a "genetically deamidated" form of recombinant protective antigen (rPA), we have previously shown that deamidation can decrease the immunogenicity of rPA, the primary component of new-generation anthrax vaccines. In this study, we investigated the biochemical and immunological mechanisms by which deamidation of rPA might decrease the immunogenicity of the protein. We found that loss of the immunogenicity of rPA vaccine was independent of the presence of adjuvant. We assessed the effect of deamidation on the immunodominant neutralizing B-cell epitopes of rPA and found that these epitopes were not significantly affected by deamidation. In order to assess the effect of deamidation on T-cell help for antibody production elicited by rPA vaccine, we examined the ability of the wild-type and genetically deamidated forms of rPA to serve as hapten carriers. We found that when wild-type and genetically deamidated rPA were modified to similar extents with 2,4-dinitrophenyl hapten (DNP) and then used to immunize mice, higher levels of anti-DNP antibodies were elicited by wild-type DNP-rPA than those elicited by the genetically deamidated DNP-rPA, indicating that wild-type rPA elicits more T-cell help than the genetically deamidated form of the protein. These results suggest that a decrease in the ability of deamidated rPA to elicit T-cell help for antibody production is a possible contributor to its lower immunogenicity. PMID:26912784

  10. Intranasal vaccination with adjuvant-free S. aureus antigens effectively protects mice against experimental sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmiller, Nataly Pescinalli; Barcelos, Estevão Carlos; Leal, Janine Miranda; Covre, Luciana Polaco; Donatele, Dirlei Molinari; de Matos Guedes, Herbet Leonel; Cunegundes, Marco Cesar; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Gomes, Daniel Cláudio Oliviera

    2016-06-24

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a Gram-positive coccal bacterium comprising part of the human skin, nares and gastrointestinal tract normal microbiota. It is also an important cause of nosocomial/community-acquired infections in humans and animals, which can cause a diverse array of infections, including sepsis, which is a progressive systemic inflammation response syndrome that is frequently fatal. The emergence of drug-resistant strains and the high toxicity of the treatments used for these infections point out the need to develop an effective, inexpensive and safe vaccine that can be used prophylactically. In this work, we used an experimental sepsis model to evaluate the effectiveness of whole antigens from S. aureus (SaAg) given by the intranasal route to induce protective immunity against S. aureus infection in mice. BALB/c mice were vaccinated via intranasal or intramuscular route with two doses of SaAg, followed by biocompatibility and immunogenicity evaluations. Vaccinated animals did not show any adverse effects associated with the vaccine, as determined by transaminase and creatinine measurements. Intranasal, but not intramuscular vaccination with SaAg led to a significant reduction in IL-10 production and was associated with increased level of IFN-γ and NO. SaAg intranasal vaccination was able to prime cellular and humoral immune responses and inducing a higher proliferation index and increased production of specific IgG1/IgG2, which contributed to decrease the bacterial load in both liver and the spleen and improve survival during sepsis. These findings present the first evidence of the effectiveness of whole Ag intranasal-based vaccine administration, which expands the vaccination possibilities against S. aureus infection. PMID:27091687

  11. Inhalation of the reactive aldehyde acrolein promotes antigen sensitization to ovalbumin and enhances neutrophilic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Edmund; Spiess, Page C; Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Bauer, Robert A; Randall, Matthew J; Poynter, Matthew E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein (ACR), an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde and a major component of tobacco smoke, is a highly reactive electrophilic respiratory irritant implicated in asthma pathogenesis and severity. However, few studies have directly investigated the influence of ACR exposure on allergen sensitization and pulmonary inflammation. The present study was designed to examine the impact of ACR inhalation on allergic sensitization to the inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), as well as pulmonary inflammation during subsequent OVA challenge. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to inhaled OVA (1%, 30 min/day, 4 days/week) and/or ACR (5 ppm, 4 h/day, 4 days/week) over 2 weeks and subsequently challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 30 min/day) over three consecutive days. Serum anti-OVA IgG1 levels were increased significantly in animals exposed to both OVA and ACR, compared to animals exposed to either OVA or ACR alone. In addition, differential cell counts and histological analysis revealed an increase in BAL neutrophils in animals exposed to both OVA and ACR. However, exposure to both OVA and ACR did not influence mRNA expression of the cytokines il5, il10, il13 or tnfa, but significantly increased mRNA expression of ccl20. Moreover, ACR exposure enhanced lung mRNA levels of il17f and tgfb1, suggesting development of enhanced inhalation tolerance to OVA. Overall, the findings indicate that ACR inhalation can promote airway-mediated sensitization to otherwise innocuous inhaled antigens, such as OVA, but also enhances immune tolerance, thereby favoring neutrophilic airway inflammation. PMID:25875327

  12. Pentamers not found in the universal proteome can enhance antigen specific immune responses and adjuvant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ami; Dong, Jessica C; Trost, Brett; Richardson, Jason S; Tohme, Sarah; Babiuk, Shawn; Kusalik, Anthony; Kung, Sam K P; Kobinger, Gary P

    2012-01-01

    Certain short peptides do not occur in humans and are rare or non-existent in the universal proteome. Antigens that contain rare amino acid sequences are in general highly immunogenic and may activate different arms of the immune system. We first generated a list of rare, semi-common, and common 5-mer peptides using bioinformatics tools to analyze the UniProtKB database. Experimental observations indicated that rare and semi-common 5-mers generated stronger cellular responses in comparison with common-occurring sequences. We hypothesized that the biological process responsible for this enhanced immunogenicity could be used to positively modulate immune responses with potential application for vaccine development. Initially, twelve rare 5-mers, 9-mers, and 13-mers were incorporated in frame at the end of an H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) antigen and expressed from a DNA vaccine. The presence of some 5-mer peptides induced improved immune responses. Adding one 5-mer peptide exogenously also offered improved clinical outcome and/or survival against a lethal H5N1 or H1N1 influenza virus challenge in BALB/c mice and ferrets, respectively. Interestingly, enhanced anti-HBsAg antibody production by up to 25-fold in combination with a commercial Hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B, GSK) was also observed in BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, NK cell activation and dependency was observed with enhancing peptides ex vivo and in NK-depleted mice. Overall, the data suggest that rare or non-existent oligopeptides can be developed as immunomodulators and supports the further evaluation of some 5-mer peptides as potential vaccine adjuvants. PMID:22937099

  13. Pentamers not found in the universal proteome can enhance antigen specific immune responses and adjuvant vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami Patel

    Full Text Available Certain short peptides do not occur in humans and are rare or non-existent in the universal proteome. Antigens that contain rare amino acid sequences are in general highly immunogenic and may activate different arms of the immune system. We first generated a list of rare, semi-common, and common 5-mer peptides using bioinformatics tools to analyze the UniProtKB database. Experimental observations indicated that rare and semi-common 5-mers generated stronger cellular responses in comparison with common-occurring sequences. We hypothesized that the biological process responsible for this enhanced immunogenicity could be used to positively modulate immune responses with potential application for vaccine development. Initially, twelve rare 5-mers, 9-mers, and 13-mers were incorporated in frame at the end of an H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA antigen and expressed from a DNA vaccine. The presence of some 5-mer peptides induced improved immune responses. Adding one 5-mer peptide exogenously also offered improved clinical outcome and/or survival against a lethal H5N1 or H1N1 influenza virus challenge in BALB/c mice and ferrets, respectively. Interestingly, enhanced anti-HBsAg antibody production by up to 25-fold in combination with a commercial Hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B, GSK was also observed in BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, NK cell activation and dependency was observed with enhancing peptides ex vivo and in NK-depleted mice. Overall, the data suggest that rare or non-existent oligopeptides can be developed as immunomodulators and supports the further evaluation of some 5-mer peptides as potential vaccine adjuvants.

  14. O-antigen protects gram-negative bacteria from histone killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Chaput

    Full Text Available Beyond their traditional role of wrapping DNA, histones display antibacterial activity to Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. To identify bacterial components that allow survival to a histone challenge, we selected resistant bacteria from homologous Escherichia coli libraries that harbor plasmids carrying pieces of the chromosome in different sizes. We identified genes required for exopolysaccharide production and for the synthesis of the polysaccharide domain of the lipopolysaccharide, called O-antigen. Indeed, O-antigen and exopolysaccharide conferred further resistance to histones. Notably, O-antigen also conferred resistance to histones in the pathogens Shigella flexneri and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  15. Protective Effect of Vaccination with a Combination of Recombinant Surface Antigen 1 and Interleukin-12 against Toxoplasmosis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Letscher-Bru, Valerie; Villard, Odile; Risse, Bernhard; Zauke, Michael; Klein, Jean-Paul; Kien, Truong T.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the immune response induced in mice by recombinant Toxoplasma gondii surface antigen 1 (rSAG1) protein, alone or combined with interleukin-12 (IL-12) as an adjuvant, and the protective effect against toxoplasmosis. Immunization with rSAG1 alone induced a specific humoral type 2 immunity and did not protect the animals from infection. In contrast, immunization with rSAG1 plus IL-12 redirected humoral and cellular immunity toward a type 1 pattern and reduced the brain parasite load b...

  16. Enhanced immunogenicity of DNA fusion vaccine encoding secreted hepatitis B surface antigen and chemokine RANTES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To increase the potency of DNA vaccines, we constructed genetic fusion vaccines encoding antigen, secretion signal, and/or chemokine RANTES. The DNA vaccines encoding secreted hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were constructed by inserting HBsAg gene into an expression vector with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeting secretory signal sequence. The plasmid encoding secretory HBsAg (pER/HBs) was fused to cDNA of RANTES, generating pER/HBs/R. For comparison, HBsAg genes were cloned into pVAX1 vector with no signal sequence (pHBs), and further linked to the N-terminus of RANTES (pHBs/R). Immunofluorescence study showed the cytoplasmic localization of HBsAg protein expressed from pHBs and pHBs/R, but not from pER/HBs and pER/HBs/R at 48 h after transfection. In mice, RANTES-fused DNA vaccines more effectively elicited the levels of HBsAg-specific IgG antibodies than pHBs. All the DNA vaccines induced higher levels of IgG2a rather than IgG1 antibodies. Of RANTES-fused vaccines, pER/HBs/R encoding the secreted fusion protein revealed much higher humoral and CD8+ T cell-stimulating responses compared to pHBs/R. These results suggest that the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines could be enhanced by genetic fusion to a secretory signal peptide sequence and RANTES

  17. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards. PMID:25675873

  18. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tipper, Donald J.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolde...

  19. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances the protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Junpeng; Niu, Xinli; Smith, Donald; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2014-02-01

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Although wolfberry (goji berry) has been shown to improve immune response, including enhanced antibody production, after vaccination in the aged, it is not known if this effect would translate to better protection after influenza infection, nor is its underlying mechanism well understood. To address these issues, we conducted a study using a 2 × 2 design in which aged male mice (20-22 mo) were fed a control or a 5% wolfberry diet for 30 d, then immunized with an influenza vaccine or saline (control) on days 31 and 52 of the dietary intervention, and finally challenged with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus. Mice fed wolfberry had higher influenza antibody titers and improved symptoms (less postinfection weight loss) compared with the mice treated by vaccine alone. Furthermore, an in vitro mechanistic study showed that wolfberry supplementation enhanced maturation and activity of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in aged mice, as indicated by phenotypic change in expression of DC activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD) 40, CD80, and CD86, and functional change in DC production of cytokines interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α as well as DC endocytosis. Also, adoptive transfer of wolfberry-treated bone marrow DCs (loaded with ovalbumin(323-339)-peptide) promoted antigen-specific T cell proliferation as well as interleukin-4 and interferon-γ production in CD4(+) T cells. In summary, our data indicate that dietary wolfberry enhances the efficacy of influenza vaccination, resulting in better host protection to prevent subsequent influenza infection; this effect may be partly attributed to improved DC function. PMID:24336457

  20. Co-administration of certain DNA vaccine combinations expressing different H5N1 influenza virus antigens can be beneficial or detrimental to immune protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ami; Gray, Michael; Li, Yan; Kobasa, Darwyn; Yao, Xiaojian; Kobinger, Gary P

    2012-01-11

    Achieving broad-spectrum immunity against emerging zoonotic viruses such as avian influenza H5N1 and other possible pandemic viruses will require generation of cross-protective immune responses. Strong antibody responses generated against the H5HA protein are protective, however, antigenic variation between diverging isolates can interfere with virus neutralization. The current study investigates co-administration of an H5 HA DNA vaccine with other variable and conserved influenza antigens (NA, NP, and M2). All antigens were derived from the A/Hanoi/30408/2005 (H5N1) virus and the contribution towards overall protection and immune activation was assessed against lethal homologous and heterologous challenges. An (HA+NA) combination afforded the best protection against homologous challenge and (HA+NP) was comparable to HA alone against heterologous A/Hong Kong/483/1997 challenge. Interestingly, combining all four H5 antigens at a single site did not improve protection against matched challenge and unexpectedly reduced survival by 30% against a heterologous challenge. Survival was also significantly decreased against heterologous challenge following combination of (HA+NP) with an unrelated antigen. Although there were no significant changes in antibody titres, significantly lower T-cell responses were detected against all antigens except HA in each combination. Co-administration of the vaccines at different injection sites restored T-cell responses but did not improve overall protection. Similar observations were also recorded following combination of HA and NP antigens using two different adenovirus-based backbones. Overall, the data suggest that co-administering certain H5N1 antigens offer better or comparable protection to HA alone, however, combining extra antigens may be unnecessary and lead to unfavourable immune responses. PMID:22119588

  1. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskyi, A P; Khudiakova, S S; Alexuk, P G; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Barfield, R C; Fetterer, R H

    2010-01-20

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen concentration of ISCOMs, containing Eimeria tenella antigens and saponins from native plants, were evaluated in their ability to stimulate humoral immunity and to protect chickens against a challenge infection with E. tenella. Broiler chickens were immunized with ISCOM preparations containing E. tenella antigens and the purified saponins Gg6, Ah6 and Gp7 isolated from Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aesculus hippocastanum and Gipsophila paniculata, respectively. The effects of the route of administration, dose of antigen and type of saponin used for construction of ISCOMs were evaluated for ability to stimulate serum IgG and IgM and to protect chickens against a homologous challenge. A single intranasal immunization was the most effective route for administering ISCOMs although the in ovo route was also quite effective. Dose titration experiments demonstrated efficacy after single immunization with various ISCOM doses but maximum effects were observed when ISCOMs contain 5-10mug antigen. Immunization of birds by any of the three routes with E. tenella antigens alone or antigens mixed with alum hydroxide adjuvant resulted in lower serum antibody and reduced protection to challenge relative to immunization with ISCOMs. Overall the results of this study confirm that significant immunostimulation and protection to challenge are achieved by immunization of chickens with ISCOMs containing purified saponins and native E. tenella antigens and suggest that ISCOMs may be successfully used to develop a safe and effective vaccine for prevention of avian coccidiosis. PMID:19879050

  2. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  3. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  4. Protection of Mice with a Divalent Tuberculosis DNA Vaccine Encoding Antigens Ag85B and MPT64

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia TIAN; Hong CAI; Yu-Xian ZHU

    2004-01-01

    DNA vaccine may be a promising tool for controlling tuberculosis development. However,vaccines encoding single antigens of mycobacterium did not produce protective effect as BCG did. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a divalent DNA vaccine encoding two immunodominant antigens Ag85B and MPT64 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that both humoral and Th1-type (high IFN-γ, low IL-4) cellular responses obtained from the divalent DNA vaccine group were significantly higher than that conferred by BCG. RT-PCR results showed that antigens were expressed differentially in various organs in divalent DNA vaccine group. The survival rate for mice treated with the divalent DNA vaccine after challenging with high doses of virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv was significantly higher than that of the BCG group or any of the single DNA vaccine group. Significant differences were also found between the single and divalent DNA vaccinated mice in terms of body, spleen and lung weight. Bacterial loading decreased about 2000-fold in lungs and about 100-fold in spleens of divalent DNA vaccinated mice when compared with that of the control group. We conclude that our divalent DNA vaccine may be a better choice for controlling tuberculosis disease in animals.

  5. Naturally acquired antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in vultures of southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C.B. Turnbull

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available TURNBULLP, P.C.B. DIEKMANNM,M., KILIAN, J.W., VERSFELDW, W.,DE VOS, V., ARNTZENL, L.,WOLTER, K., BARTELS, P. & KOTZE, A. 2008.N aturally acquired antibodies to Bacillusa nthracisp rotective antigeni n vultureso f southern Africa. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research, T5:95-102 Sera from 19 wild caught vultures in northern Namibia and 15 (12 wild caught and three captive bred but with minimal histories in North West Province, South Africa, were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbenats say( ELISAf or antibodiesto the Bacillus anthracis toxin protective antigen (PA. As assessed from the baseline established with a control group of ten captive reared vultures with well-documented histories, elevated titres were found in 12 of the 19 (63% wild caught Namibian birds as compared with none of the 15 South African ones. There was a highly significant difference between the Namibian group as a hole and the other groups (P < 0.001 and no significant difference between the South African and control groups (P > 0.05. Numbers in the Namibian group were too small to determine any significances in species-, sex- or age-related differences within the raw data showing elevated titres in four out of six Cape Vultures, Gyps coprotheress, six out of ten Whitebacked Vultures, Gyps africanus, and one out of three Lappet-faced Vultures, Aegypiust racheliotus, or in five of six males versus three of seven females, and ten of 15 adults versus one of four juveniles. The results are in line with the available data on the incidence of anthrax in northern Namibia and South Africa and the likely contact of the vultures tested with anthrax carcasses. lt is not known whether elevated titre indicates infection per se in vultures or absorption of incompletely digested epitopes of the toxin or both. The results are discussed in relation to distances travelled by vultures as determined by new tracking techniques, how serology can reveal anthrax activity in an area and

  6. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Andrea da; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: andreacosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Medicina Tropical; Zorgi, Nahiara Estevez [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19{sup +} B, CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  7. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19+ B, CD3+CD4+ or CD3+CD8+ T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19+ or CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3+CD4+ (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  8. Immobilization antigen vaccine adjuvanted by parasitic heat shock protein 70C confers high protection in fish against cryptocaryonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josepriya, T A; Chien, Kuo-Hsuan; Lin, Hsin-Yun; Huang, Han-Ning; Wu, Chang-Jer; Song, Yen-Ling

    2015-08-01

    The immobilization antigen (iAg) has been demonstrated as a protective immunogen against Cryptocaryon irritans infection. In this study, C-terminal domain of heat shock protein 70 cloned from C. irritans (Hsp70C) was tested for its immuno-stimulatory effects. The iAg and Hsp70C cDNAs were constructed independently in secretory forms and were encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles. In the first immunization trial, grouper fingerlings orally intubated with iAg and iAg:Hsp70C presented 96% and 100% relative percent survival (RPS), respectively, after a lethal challenge. In the second trial, both iAg and iAg:Hsp70C groups showed 100% RPS and the skin trophont burden was significantly lowered. The iAg:Hsp70C still provides a significantly high protection of 51% RPS at 49 days post immunization, when an even more serious lethal infection occurs. RT-qPCR results showed that Hsp70C could up-regulate the expression of i) T cell markers: Cluster of Differentiation 8 alpha (CD8α) and CD4, ii) cytokine genes: Interferon gamma (IFNγ), Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin 12 p40 (IL-12/P40), iii) antibody genes: Immunoglobulin M heavy chain (IgMH) and IgTH, and iv) major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I & MHC-II), in the spleen of iAg:Hsp70C group. Furthermore, significantly high levels of iAg-specific IgM was detected in skin mucus which efficiently immobilized live theronts in iAg- and iAg:Hsp70C-immunized fish at 5 weeks post immunization. Hsp70C significantly increased the number of nonspecific CD8(+) skin leucocytes which exerted cytotoxicity against theronts, although cytotoxic activity showed no difference among the various groups. Because of this complementary cooperation of cellular and humoral immune responses, Hsp70C enhances the efficacy of iAg vaccine and constrains C. irritans infection. In view of the severe loss caused by cryptocaryonosis, application of this parasitic vaccine in farmed and ornamental fish, is worthy to be considered. PMID

  9. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Petitdidier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA, from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA, combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to the distinct antigenic sites on glycoproteins C and B and their protective abilities in herpes simplex virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative importance of the humoral immune response to various antigenic sites on the glycoproteins C and B (gC, gB) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) was evaluated in BALB/c and DBA/2 mice passively immunized with monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and then challenged with lethal dose of infectious virus. Eight MoAbs to three topographically distinct antigenic sites on gC and eight MoAbs to two distinct antigenic sites on gB were selected. The results indicated that any antigenic site on gC and gB contains epitopes for the protective immunity. However, individual MoAbs to different epitopes of the same antigenic site (i.e. antigenic site III on gC, and antigenic site II on gB) varied extremely in their protective ability. The protection did not correlate with the virus neutralization in vitro whereas it correlated significantly with the immune cytolysis in the presence of complement. The information about protective epitopes is essential for understanding the immunology of HSV infection at molecular level and may have implications for the design of HSV vaccine. (authors)

  11. Dietary Fiber and Bacterial SCFA Enhance Oral Tolerance and Protect against Food Allergy through Diverse Cellular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs, which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103+ DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103+ DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens.

  12. Dietary Fiber and Bacterial SCFA Enhance Oral Tolerance and Protect against Food Allergy through Diverse Cellular Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jian; McKenzie, Craig; Vuillermin, Peter J; Goverse, Gera; Vinuesa, Carola G; Mebius, Reina E; Macia, Laurence; Mackay, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs), which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103(+) DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103(+) DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens. PMID:27332875

  13. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of multiple viral antigens using magnetic capture of SERS-active nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A highly sensitive immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has been developed for multiplex detection of surface envelope and capsid antigens of the viral zoonotic pathogens West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Detection was mediated by antibo...

  15. Exploiting in situ antigen generation and immune modulation to enhance chemotherapy response in advanced melanoma: A combination nanomedicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Haynes, Matthew; Xiang, Guangya; Huang, Leaf

    2016-08-28

    Therapeutic anticancer vaccine development must address a number of barriers to achieve successful tumor specific killing, including effective antigen presentation and antigen-specific T-cell activation to mediate cytotoxic cellular effects, inhibition of an immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment in order to facilitate and enhance CTL activity, and induction of memory T-cells to prolong tumor rejection. While traditional as well as modern vaccines rely upon delivery of both antigen and adjuvant, a variety of clinically relevant cancers lack ideal immunogenic antigens. Building upon recent efforts, we instead chose to exploit chemotherapy-induced apoptosis to allow for in situ antigen generation in a combination, nanomedicine-based approach. Specifically, lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles (LPC) and CpG-encapsulated liposomes (CpG-Lipo) were prepared for the temporally-controlled and multifaceted treatment of an advanced in vivo model of melanoma. Such combination therapy established strong synergistic effects, both in apoptotic extent and subsequent abrogation of tumor growth, which were due largely to both an enhanced cytotoxic T-cell recruitment and a reduction of immune-suppressive mediators in the microenvironments of both spleens and tumor. These results underlie a prolonged host lifespan in the combination approach (45 days) as compared with control (25 days, p < 0.02), providing promise toward a personalized approach to nanomedicine by establishing effect synergy in host-specific immunotherapy following chemotherapy. PMID:27235608

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticle-enhanced ultrasensitive chemiluminescence immunoassay for the carcinoma embryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is reported for the determination of carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum. It was realized using a microplate reader using a 384-well plate. Monoclonal antibody (Ab) against CEA (1° Ab) acting as the capture probe was immobilized on zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) in the form of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). CEA captured by 1° Ab was quantified using a sandwich ELISA wherein a polyclonal second antibody against CEA (2° Ab) was used for detection and quantified using an HRP-labeled secondary antibody (3° Ab). The ZnO-NPs-CEA capture probe was deposited on the bottom of the wells in order to enhance capture of CEA. A 3-fold enhancement in the chemiluminescence (CL) signal of luminol is found (compared to a conventional ELISA). CEA can be quantified by this method in concentrations as low as 1 pg · mL−1. The upper limit of detection is 20 ng · mL−1. The use of ZnO-NPs also imparts improved thermal stability. When stored at 4 °C in phosphate-buffered saline of pH 7.4, the probe displays stability of up to 30 days. (author)

  17. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012

  18. Implementing Physical Protection Education for an Enhanced Nuclear Security Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Kim, Hyun Chul; Shin, Ick Hyun; Lee, Hyung Kyung; Choe, Kwan Kyoo [KINAC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we are going to outline our efforts and experiences at implementing physical protection education. KINAC (as the only designated educational institute) places great effort in delivering an effective and a high-quality education program for physical protection. We have also provided a way for nuclear operators to share the lessons they have gained through their own experiences. We made physical protection education an important communication channel, not only among nuclear operators but also between operators and a regulatory body. There is growing attention given to education and training on the subject of physical protection in order to enhance the nuclear security culture. The IAEA recommends that all personnel in organizations directly involved with the nuclear industry receive regularly education in physical protection according to the recently revised INFCIRC/225/Rev.5. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), which are mainly responsible for the national nuclear security regime, have already recognized the importance of education and training in physical protection. The NSSC enacted its decree on physical protection education and training in 2010. KINAC was designated as the first educational institute in 2011 and implemented physical protection education as mandatory from 2012.

  19. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bryan E; Hale, Laura P; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  20. Cloning and Characterization of Surface-Localized α-Enolase of Streptococcus iniae, an Effective Protective Antigen in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus iniae is a major fish pathogen that can also cause human bacteremia, cellulitis and meningitis. Screening for and identification of protective antigens plays an important role in developing therapies against S. iniae infections. In this study, we indicated that the α-enolase of S. iniae was not only distributed in the cytoplasm and associated to cell walls, but was also secreted to the bacterial cell surface. The functional identity of the purified recombinant α-enolase protein was verified by its ability to catalyze the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PGE to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP, and both the recombinant and native proteins interacted with human plasminogen. The rabbit anti-rENO serum blockade assay shows that α-enolase participates in S. iniae adhesion to and invasion of BHK-21 cells. In addition, the recombinant α-enolase can confer effective protection against S. iniae infection in mice, which suggests that α-enolase has potential as a vaccine candidate in mammals. We conclude that S. iniae α-enolase is a moonlighting protein that also associates with the bacterial outer surface and functions as a protective antigen in mice.

  1. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs) such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive-determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria. The evide...

  2. Sculpting humoral immunity through dengue vaccination to enhance protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne eCrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important mosquito transmitted viral pathogens infecting humans. DENV infection produces a spectrum of disease, most commonly causing a self-limiting flu-like illness known as dengue fever; yet with increased frequency, manifesting as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Waning cross-protective immunity from any of the four dengue serotypes may enhance subsequent infection with another heterologous serotype to increase the probability of DHF. Decades of effort to develop dengue vaccines are reaching the finishing line with multiple candidates in clinical trials. Nevertheless, concerns remain that imbalanced immunity, due to the prolonged prime-boost schedules currently used in clinical trials, could leave some vaccinees temporarily unprotected or with increased susceptibility to enhanced disease. Here we develop a DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 DNA vaccine with the immunodominant cross-reactive B cell epitopes associated with immune enhancement removed. We compare wild-type (WT with this cross-reactivity reduced (CRR vaccine and demonstrate that both vaccines are equally protective against lethal homologous DENV-1 challenge. Under conditions mimicking natural exposure prior to acquiring protective immunity, WT vaccinated mice enhanced a normally sub-lethal heterologous DENV-2 infection resulting in DHF-like disease and 95% mortality in AG129 mice. However, CRR vaccinated mice exhibited redirected serotype-specific and protective immunity, and significantly reduced morbidity and mortality not differing from naïve mice. Thus, we demonstrate in an in vivo DENV disease model, that non-protective vaccine-induced immunity can prime vaccinees for enhanced DHF-like disease and that CRR DNA immunization significantly reduces this potential vaccine safety concern. The sculpting of immune memory by the modified vaccine and resulting redirection of humoral immunity provide insight into DENV vaccine induced immune

  3. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Reed

    Full Text Available Protective antigen (PA, one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax. Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel, elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg.

  4. Antigen Delivery with Poly(Propylacrylic Acid) Conjugation Enhances MHC-1 Presentation and T-Cell Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Flanary, Suzanne; Hoffman, Allan S.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    While many infectious diseases are controlled by vaccine strategies, important limitations continue to motivate the development of better antigen delivery systems. This study focuses on the use of a pH-sensitive polymeric carrier based on poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) to address the need for more potent CD8 cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses. An MHC-1/CD8 CTL cell model system with ovalbumin as the protein antigen was used to test whether PPAA could enhance the delivery of ovalbumin into the ...

  5. Neutralizing antibody and functional mapping of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen-The first step toward a rationally designed anthrax vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Ryan C; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a Category A pathogen for its potential use as a bioweapon. Current prevention treatments include Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA). AVA is an undefined formulation of Bacillus anthracis culture supernatant adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide. It has an onerous vaccination schedule, is slow and cumbersome to produce and is slightly reactogenic. Next-generation vaccines are focused on producing recombinant forms of anthrax toxin in a well-defined formulation but these vaccines have been shown to lose potency as they are stored. In addition, studies have shown that a proportion of the antibody response against these vaccines is focused on non-functional, non-neutralizing regions of the anthrax toxin while some essential functional regions are shielded from eliciting an antibody response. Rational vaccinology is a developing field that focuses on designing vaccine antigens based on structural information provided by neutralizing antibody epitope mapping, crystal structure analysis, and functional mapping through amino acid mutations. This information provides an opportunity to design antigens that target only functionally important and conserved regions of a pathogen in order to make a more optimal vaccine product. This review provides an overview of the literature related to functional and neutralizing antibody epitope mapping of the Protective Antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin. PMID:26611201

  6. An Antibody Screen of a Plasmodium vivax Antigen Library Identifies Novel Merozoite Proteins Associated with Clinical Protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila T França

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design.In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure, and socioeconomic and clinical indicators. 29 antigenic targets of natural immunity were identified. Of these, 12 highly-immunogenic proteins were strongly associated with age and thus cumulative lifetime exposure in Solomon Islanders (P<0.001-0.027. A subset of 6 proteins, selected on the basis of immunogenicity and expression levels, were used to examine antibody levels in plasma samples from a population of young Papua New Guinean children with well-characterized individual differences in exposure. This analysis identified a strong association between reduced risk of clinical disease and antibody levels to P12, P41, and a novel hypothetical protein that has not previously been studied, PVX_081550 (IRR 0.46-0.74; P<0.001-0.041.These data emphasize the benefits of an unbiased screening approach in identifying novel vaccine candidate antigens. Functional studies are now required to establish whether PVX_081550 is a key component of the naturally-acquired protective immune response, a biomarker of immune status, or both.

  7. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Devendra K; Segundo, Fayna Diaz-San; Schafer, Elizabeth; Burrage, Thomas G; Rodriguez, Luis L; de Los Santos, Teresa; Hoeprich, Paul D; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses with histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co(2+) affinity columns. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays showed that the 6xHis FMDVs readily assembled into antigen: adjuvant complexes in solution, by conjugating with Ni(2+)-chelated nanolipoprotein and monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant (MPLA:NiNLP). Animals Immunized with the inactivated 6xHis-FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine acquired enhanced protective immunity against FMDV challenge compared to virions alone. Induction of anti-6xHis and anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies in the immunized animals could be exploited in the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals needed for the improvement of FMD control measures. The novel marker vaccine/nanolipid technology described here has broad applications for the development of distinctive and effective immune responses to other pathogens of importance. PMID:27209448

  8. IgE/FcεRI-Mediated Antigen Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Enhances Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Platzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies discovered an inverse association between immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergies and cancer, implying tumor-protective properties of IgE. However, the underlying immunologic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is of key importance for anti-tumor immunity because it induces the generation of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs with specificity for tumor antigens. We demonstrate that DCs use IgE and FcεRI, the high-affinity IgE receptor, for cross-presentation and priming of CTLs in response to free soluble antigen at low doses. Importantly, IgE/FcεRI-mediated cross-presentation is a distinct receptor-mediated pathway because it does not require MyD88 signals or IL-12 induction in DCs. Using passive immunization with tumor antigen-specific IgE and DC-based vaccination experiments, we demonstrate that IgE-mediated cross-presentation significantly improves anti-tumor immunity and induces memory responses in vivo. Our findings suggest a cellular mechanism for the tumor-protective features of IgE and expand the known physiological functions of this immunoglobulin.

  9. Vivotif--a 'magic shield' for protection against typhoid fever and delivery of heterologous antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentschev, Ivaylo; Spreng, Simone; Sieber, Heike; Ures, Jose; Mollet, Fabian; Collioud, Andre; Pearman, Jon; Griot-Wenk, Monika E; Fensterle, Joachim; Rapp, Ulf R; Goebel, Werner; Rothen, Simon A; Dietrich, Guido

    2007-01-01

    The attenuated Salmonella typhi strain Ty21a is the main constituent of Vivotif, the only attenuated live oral vaccine against typhoid fever. In comparison with antibiotics, the 'magic bullets' which Paul Ehrlich was striving for to treat infectious diseases, this vaccine should be viewed as a 'magic shield', because rather than treating typhoid fever after the infection has started, immunisation with this vaccine strain prevents infection and disease by the induction of specific immune responses. Ty21a is also an attractive carrier for the delivery of heterologous antigens. Recently, we successfully used Ty21a for antigen delivery via the haemolysin secretion system of Escherichia coli, which allows efficient protein secretion from the carrier bacteria. PMID:17347563

  10. Identification of a LolC Homologue in Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Novel Protective Antigen for Melioidosis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Harland, David N; Chu, Karen; Haque, Ashraful; Nelson, Michelle; Walker, Nicola J.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Timothy P.; Moore, Benjamin; Brown, Katherine A.; Bancroft, Gregory; Titball, Richard W.; Atkins, Helen S.

    2007-01-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging disease of humans in Southeast Asia and tropical Australia. The bacterium causing this disease, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is also considered a bioterrorism agent, and as yet there is no licensed vaccine for preventing B. pseudomallei infection. In this study, we evaluated selected proteins (LolC, PotF, and OppA) of the ATP-binding cassette systems of B. pseudomallei as candidate vaccine antigens. Nonmembrane regions of the B. pseudomallei proteins were expressed an...

  11. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 10(7) tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. PMID:24128071

  12. Identification of protective pneumococcal T(H17 antigens from the soluble fraction of a killed whole cell vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Moffitt

    Full Text Available Mucosal or parenteral immunization with a killed unencapsulated pneumococcal whole cell antigen (WCA with an adjuvant protects mice from colonization by a T(H17 CD4+ cell-mediated mechanism. Using preparative SDS gels, we separated the soluble proteins that compose the WCA in order to identify fractions that were immunogenic and protective. We screened these fractions for their ability to stimulate IL-17A secretion from splenocytes obtained from mice immunized with WCA and adjuvant. We identified 12 proteins within the stimulatory fractions by mass spectrometry; these proteins were then cloned, recombinantly expressed and purified using an Escherichia coli expression system. The ability of these proteins to induce IL-17A secretion was then evaluated by stimulation of mouse splenocytes. Of the four most stimulatory proteins, three were protective in a mouse pneumococcal serotype 6B colonization model. This work thus describes a method for identifying immunogenic proteins from the soluble fraction of pneumococcus and shows that several of the proteins identified protect mice from colonization when used as mucosal vaccines. We propose that, by providing protection against pneumococcal colonization, one or more of these proteins may serve as components of a multivalent pneumococcal vaccine.

  13. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  14. Presentation of peptides from Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an epitope targeted anthrax vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Ryan C; Ho, Chi-Lee; Bradley, Kenneth A; Grill, Laurence K; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-11-27

    The current anthrax vaccine requires improvements for rapidly invoking longer-lasting neutralizing antibody responses with fewer doses from a well-defined formulation. Designing antigens that target neutralizing antibody epitopes of anthrax protective antigen, a component of anthrax toxin, may offer a solution for achieving a vaccine that can induce strong and long lasting antibody responses with fewer boosters. Here we report implementation of a strategy for developing epitope focused virus nanoparticle vaccines against anthrax by using immunogenic virus particles to present peptides derived from anthrax toxin previously identified in (1) neutralizing antibody epitope mapping studies, (2) toxin crystal structure analyses to identify functional regions, and (3) toxin mutational analyses. We successfully expressed two of three peptide epitopes from anthrax toxin that, in previous reports, bound antibodies that were partially neutralizing against toxin activity, discovered cross-reactivity between vaccine constructs and toxin specific antibodies raised in goats against native toxin and showed that antibodies induced by our vaccine constructs also cross-react with native toxin. While protection against intoxication in cellular and animal studies were not as effective as in previous studies, partial toxin neutralization was observed in animals, demonstrating the feasibility of using plant-virus nanoparticles as a platform for epitope defined anthrax vaccines. PMID:26514421

  15. No protection in chickens immunized by the oral or intra-muscular immunization route with Ascaridia galli soluble antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Janne Pleidrup; Norup, Liselotte R; Dalgaard, Tina S; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Fink, Dorte R; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Poul; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2013-01-01

    In chickens, the nematode Ascaridia galli is found with prevalences of up to 100% causing economic losses to farmers. No avian nematode vaccines have yet been developed and detailed knowledge about the chicken immune response towards A. galli is therefore of great importance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the induction of protective immune responses to A. galli soluble antigen by different immunization routes. Chickens were immunized with a crude extract of A. galli via an oral or intra-muscular route using cholera toxin B subunit as adjuvant and subsequently challenged with A. galli. Only chickens immunized via the intra-muscular route developed a specific A. galli antibody response. Frequencies of γδ T cells in spleen were higher 7 days after the first immunization in both groups but only significantly so in the intra-muscularly immunized group. In addition, systemic immunization had an effect on both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in caecal tonsils and Meckel's diverticulum. Thus both humoral and cellular immune responses are inducible by soluble A. galli antigen, but in this study no protection against the parasite was achieved. PMID:23718808

  16. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guohong; Wang, Shixia; Han, Yaping; Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L), expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T), which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T) DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens. PMID:22844502

  17. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Ge

    Full Text Available Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L, expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T, which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens.

  18. Design concepts to enhance nuclear power plant protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a modern design for a nuclear power plant as a point of departure, this study examines the enhancement of protection which may be achieved by changes to the design. These changes include concepts such as complete physical separation of redundant trains of safety equipment, hardened enclosures for water storage tanks, and hardened shutdown heat removal systems. The degree of enhancement (value) is examined in terms such as the potential reduction in the number of vital areas and the increase in probability of adversary sequence interruption. The impacts considered include constraints imposed upon operations and maintenance personnel and increased capital and operating costs. The study concludes that structural design changes alone do not provide significant increases in protection

  19. Regular Exercise Enhances the Immune Response Against Microbial Antigens Through Up-Regulation of Toll-like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishi Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Regular physical exercise can enhance resistance to many microbial infections. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the changes in the immune system induced by regular exercise. Methods: We recruited members of a university badminton club as the regular exercise (RE group and healthy sedentary students as the sedentary control (SC group. We investigated the distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC subsets and functions in the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences in plasma cytokine levels between the RE and SC groups in the true resting state. However, enhanced levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-α and IL-12 were secreted by PBMCs in the RE group following microbial antigen stimulation, when compared to the SC group. In contrast, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 secreted by PBMC in the RE group were suppressed compared with those in SC group following non-microbial antigen stimulation (concanavalin A or α-galactosylceramide. Furthermore, PBMC expression of TLR2, TLR7 and MyD88 was significantly increased in the RE group in response to microbial antigen stimulation. Conclusion: Regular exercise enhances immune cell activation in response to pathogenic stimulation leading to enhanced cytokine production mediated via the TLR signaling pathways.

  20. Phase variable O antigen biosynthetic genes control expression of the major protective antigen and bacteriophage receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley D Seed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage.

  1. Induction of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection by antigens purified from PIII, a fraction of adult worm, associated to the downregulation of granuloma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavson Shauma

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed in order to define Schistosoma mansoni antigens able to function as modulator agents in BALB/c mice granulomatous hypersensitivity to parasite egg. The antigens P-24, P-35 and P-97 were purified by affinity chromatography from a fraction of S. mansoni adult worm antigenic preparation, denominated PIII, involved in the inhibition of granulomatous response to eggs. Immunization of mice with these antigens, in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum and Al(OH3 as adjuvant, induced a significant protection degree against challenge infection, as observed by the decrease on worm burden recovered from portal system. In vitro blastogenesis assays revealed that purified antigens were able to induce significant proliferation of spleen cells from S. mansoni-infected mice. This protection was correlated to significant decrease in granuloma size induced by PIII. From these results, we concluded that PIII preparation contains antigens capable of mediating protective anti-parasite immunity and down-regulating granulomatous hypersensitivity to S. mansoni eggs.

  2. Identification of broadly conserved cross-species protective Leishmania antigen and its responding CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Zhirong; Li, Jintao; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Hamana, Hiroshi; Ezzati, Peyman; Hu, Chuanmin; Yi, Weijing; Liu, Dong; Khadem, Forough; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Shitaoka, Kiyomi; Wang, Shufeng; Ndao, Momar; Petersen, Christine; Chen, Jianping; Rafati, Sima; Louzir, Hechmi; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Wilkins, John A; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-10-21

    There is currently no clinically effective vaccine against leishmaniasis because of poor understanding of the antigens that elicit dominant T cell immunity. Using proteomics and cellular immunology, we identified a dominant naturally processed peptide (PEPCK335-351) derived from Leishmania glycosomal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK was conserved in all pathogenic Leishmania, expressed in glycosomes of promastigotes and amastigotes, and elicited strong CD4(+) T cell responses in infected mice and humans. I-A(b)-PEPCK335-351 tetramer identified protective Leishmania-specific CD4(+) T cells at a clonal level, which comprised ~20% of all Leishmania-reactive CD4(+) T cells at the peak of infection. PEPCK335-351-specific CD4(+) T cells were oligoclonal in their T cell receptor usage, produced polyfunctional cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor), and underwent expansion, effector activities, contraction, and stable maintenance after lesion resolution. Vaccination with PEPCK peptide, DNA expressing full-length PEPCK, or rPEPCK induced strong durable cross-species protection in both resistant and susceptible mice. The effectiveness and durability of protection in vaccinated mice support the development of a broadly cross-species protective vaccine against different forms of leishmaniasis by targeting PEPCK. PMID:26491077

  3. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. PMID:24773322

  4. IgG2 antibodies against a clinical grade Plasmodium falciparum CSP vaccine antigen associate with protection against transgenic sporozoite challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schwenk

    Full Text Available The availability of a highly purified and well characterized circumsporozoite protein (CSP is essential to improve upon the partial success of recombinant CSP-based malaria vaccine candidates. Soluble, near full-length, Plasmodium falciparum CSP vaccine antigen (CS/D was produced in E. coli under bio-production conditions that comply with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP. A mouse immunogenicity study was conducted using a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE of CS/D in combination with the Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4 agonist Glucopyranosyl Lipid A (GLA/SE, or one of two TLR7/8 agonists: R848 (un-conjugated or 3M-051 (covalently conjugated. Compared to Alum and SE, GLA/SE induced higher CS/D specific antibody response in Balb/c mice. Subclass analysis showed higher IgG2:IgG1 ratio of GLA/SE induced antibodies as compared to Alum and SE. TLR synergy was not observed when soluble R848 was mixed with GLA/SE. Antibody response of 3M051 formulations in Balb/c was similar to GLA/SE, except for the higher IgG2:IgG1 ratio and a trend towards higher T cell responses in 3M051 containing groups. However, no synergistic enhancement of antibody and T cell response was evident when 3M051 conjugate was mixed with GLA/SE. In C57Bl/6 mice, CS/D adjuvanted with 3M051/SE or GLA/SE induced higher CSP repeat specific titers compared to SE. While, 3M051 induced antibodies had high IgG2c:IgG1 ratio, GLA/SE promoted high levels of both IgG1 and IgG2c. GLA/SE also induced more potent T-cell responses compared to SE in two independent C57/BL6 vaccination studies, suggesting a balanced and productive T(H1/T(H2 response. GLA and 3M-051 similarly enhanced the protective efficacy of CS/D against challenge with a transgenic P. berghei parasite and most importantly, high levels of cytophilic IgG2 antibodies were associated with protection in this model. Our data indicated that the cGMP-grade, soluble CS/D antigen combined with the TLR4-containing adjuvant GLA/SE warrants

  5. IgG2 Antibodies against a Clinical Grade Plasmodium falciparum CSP Vaccine Antigen Associate with Protection against Transgenic Sporozoite Challenge in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Robert; Nikki, Jennifer; Rein, Lisa; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Wightman, Paul D.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Dutta, Sheetij

    2014-01-01

    The availability of a highly purified and well characterized circumsporozoite protein (CSP) is essential to improve upon the partial success of recombinant CSP-based malaria vaccine candidates. Soluble, near full-length, Plasmodium falciparum CSP vaccine antigen (CS/D) was produced in E. coli under bio-production conditions that comply with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). A mouse immunogenicity study was conducted using a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) of CS/D in combination with the Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist Glucopyranosyl Lipid A (GLA/SE), or one of two TLR7/8 agonists: R848 (un-conjugated) or 3M-051 (covalently conjugated). Compared to Alum and SE, GLA/SE induced higher CS/D specific antibody response in Balb/c mice. Subclass analysis showed higher IgG2:IgG1 ratio of GLA/SE induced antibodies as compared to Alum and SE. TLR synergy was not observed when soluble R848 was mixed with GLA/SE. Antibody response of 3M051 formulations in Balb/c was similar to GLA/SE, except for the higher IgG2:IgG1 ratio and a trend towards higher T cell responses in 3M051 containing groups. However, no synergistic enhancement of antibody and T cell response was evident when 3M051 conjugate was mixed with GLA/SE. In C57Bl/6 mice, CS/D adjuvanted with 3M051/SE or GLA/SE induced higher CSP repeat specific titers compared to SE. While, 3M051 induced antibodies had high IgG2c:IgG1 ratio, GLA/SE promoted high levels of both IgG1 and IgG2c. GLA/SE also induced more potent T-cell responses compared to SE in two independent C57/BL6 vaccination studies, suggesting a balanced and productive TH1/TH2 response. GLA and 3M-051 similarly enhanced the protective efficacy of CS/D against challenge with a transgenic P. berghei parasite and most importantly, high levels of cytophilic IgG2 antibodies were associated with protection in this model. Our data indicated that the cGMP-grade, soluble CS/D antigen combined with the TLR4-containing adjuvant GLA/SE warrants further

  6. High antibody titer against apical membrane antigen-1 is required to protect against malaria in the Aotus model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetij Dutta

    Full Text Available A Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1 vaccine, formulated with AS02(A adjuvant, slowed parasite growth in a recent Phase 1/2a trial, however sterile protection was not observed. We tested this AS02(A, and a Montanide ISA720 (ISA formulation of 3D7 AMA1 in Aotus monkeys. The 3D7 parasite does not invade Aotus erythrocytes, hence two heterologous strains, FCH/4 and FVO, were used for challenge, FCH/4 AMA1 being more homologous to 3D7 than FVO AMA1. Following three vaccinations, the monkeys were challenged with 50,000 FCH/4 or 10,000 FVO parasites. Three of the six animals in the AMA+ISA group were protected against FCH/4 challenge. One monkey did not become parasitemic, another showed only a short period of low level parasitemia that self-cured, and a third animal showed a delay before exhibiting its parasitemic phase. This is the first protection shown in primates with a recombinant P. falciparum AMA1 without formulation in Freund's complete adjuvant. No animals in the AMA+AS02(A group were protected, but this group exhibited a trend towards reduced growth rate. A second group of monkeys vaccinated with AMA+ISA vaccine was not protected against FVO challenge, suggesting strain-specificity of AMA1-based protection. Protection against FCH/4 strain correlated with the quantity of induced antibodies, as the protected animals were the only ones to have in vitro parasite growth inhibitory activity of >70% at 1:10 serum dilution; immuno-fluorescence titers >8,000; ELISA titers against full-length AMA1 >300,000 and ELISA titer against AMA1 domains1+2 >100,000. A negative correlation between log ELISA titer and day 11 cumulative parasitemia (Spearman rank r = -0.780, p value = 0.0001, further confirmed the relationship between antibody titer and protection. High titers of cross-strain inhibitory antibodies against AMA1 are therefore critical to confer solid protection, and the Aotus model can be used to down-select future AMA1

  7. An Antibody Screen of a Plasmodium vivax Antigen Library Identifies Novel Merozoite Proteins Associated with Clinical Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Camila T.; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; White, Michael T.; Lin, Enmoore; Kiniboro, Benson; Waltmann, Andreea; Darcy, Andrew W.; Li Wai Suen, Connie S. N.; Siba, Peter; King, Christopher L.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Background Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure, and socioeconomic and clinical indicators. 29 antigenic targets of natural immunity were identified. Of these, 12 highly-immunogenic proteins were strongly associated with age and thus cumulative lifetime exposure in Solomon Islanders (P<0.001–0.027). A subset of 6 proteins, selected on the basis of immunogenicity and expression levels, were used to examine antibody levels in plasma samples from a population of young Papua New Guinean children with well-characterized individual differences in exposure. This analysis identified a strong association between reduced risk of clinical disease and antibody levels to P12, P41, and a novel hypothetical protein that has not previously been studied, PVX_081550 (IRR 0.46–0.74; P<0.001–0.041). Conclusion/Significance These data emphasize the benefits of an unbiased screening approach in identifying novel vaccine candidate antigens. Functional studies are now required to establish whether PVX_081550 is a key component of the naturally-acquired protective immune response, a biomarker of immune status, or both. PMID:27182597

  8. Genetic disruption of KSHV major latent nuclear antigen LANA enhances viral lytic transcriptional program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following primary infection, KSHV establishes a lifelong persistent latent infection in the host. The mechanism of KSHV latency is not fully understood. The latent nuclear antigen (LANA or LNA) encoded by ORF73 is one of a few viral genes expressed during KSHV latency, and is consistently detected in all KSHV-related malignancies. LANA is essential for KSHV episome persistence, and regulates the expression of viral lytic genes through epigenetic silencing, and inhibition of the expression and transactivation function of the key KSHV lytic replication initiator RTA (ORF50). In this study, we used a genetic approach to examine the role of LANA in regulating KSHV lytic replication program. Deletion of LANA did not affect the expression of its adjacent genes vCyclin (ORF72) and vFLIP (ORF71). In contrast, the expression levels of viral lytic genes including immediate-early gene RTA, early genes MTA (ORF57), vIL-6 (ORF-K2) and ORF59, and late gene ORF-K8.1 were increased before and after viral lytic induction with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium butyrate. This enhanced expression of viral lytic genes was also observed following overexpression of RTA with or without simultaneous chemical induction. Consistent with these results, the LANA mutant cells produced more infectious virions than the wild-type virus cells did. Furthermore, genetic repair of the mutant virus reverted the phenotypes to those of wild-type virus. Together, these results have demonstrated that, in the context of viral genome, LANA contributes to KSHV latency by regulating the expression of RTA and its downstream genes

  9. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  10. Cloning and characterization of a potentially protective chitinase-like recombinant antigen from Wuchereria bancrofti.

    OpenAIRE

    N. Raghavan; Freedman, D O; Fitzgerald, P C; Unnasch, T R; Ottesen, E A; Nutman, T B

    1994-01-01

    While there is no direct evidence demonstrating the existence of protective immunity to Wuchereria bancrofti infection in humans, the presence of individuals, in populations in areas where infection is endemic, with no clinical evidence of past or current infection despite appreciable exposure to the infective larvae, suggests that protective immunity to filarial parasites may occur naturally. Earlier work indicated that such putatively immune individuals generated antibodies to a 43-kDa anti...

  11. Cloning,expression,and protective immunity in mice of a gene encoding the diagnostic antigen P-29 of Echinococcus granulosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyun Shi; Yana Wang; Zongji Li; Zhaoyu Li; Yang Bo; Rui Ma; Wei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Taeniid tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of Echinococcosis,an important zoonosis with worldwide distribution.In this study,a diagnostic antigen P-29 was cloned from E.granulosus and expressed in Escherichia coli.Sequence analysis showed that EgP-29 contains 717-bp open reading frame and encodes a protein of 238 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 27.1 kDa.The recombinant EgP-29(rEgP-29)could be recognized with antimice sera in Western blotting.The specific antibody was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Mice vaccinated with rEgP-29 and challenged intraperitoneally with E.granulosus protoscoleces revealed significant protective immunity of 96.6%(P<0.05),compared with the control group.Thus,rEgP-29protein is a promising candidate for an effective vaccine to prevent secondary echinococcosis.

  12. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-01

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27060051

  13. Partial Protection of Mice against Trypanosoma cruzi after Immunizing with the TcY 72 Antigenic Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara M Gomes

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available A 72 kDa Trypanosoma cruzi glycoprotein recognized by the 164C11 monoclonal antibody (IgM isotype was purified by preparative electrophoresis. The antigenic preparation obtained, named TcY 72, was used to immunize C57Bl/10 mice. The following results were observed after immunization: (1 induction of higher titres of IgG than IgM antibodies, as evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence; (2 significant DTH after injection of epimastigotes in mice footpads; (3 peak parasitemia in immunized mice was significantly reduced and animals were negative by 13 days post-infection, although the mice still succumb to infection; (4 the phenotypic analysis of spleen cell populations showed a decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio in immunized mice. Taken as a whole, these findings indicate that TcY 72 is immunogenic and potentially important for protective immunity.

  14. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  15. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Hewitson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4 larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel

  16. NLRC5 elicits antitumor immunity by enhancing processing and presentation of tumor antigens to CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Bobbala, Diwakar; Serrano, Daniel; Mayhue, Marian; Champagne, Audrey; Saucier, Caroline; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A; Menendez, Alfredo; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-06-01

    Cancers can escape immunesurveillance by diminishing the expression of MHC class-I molecules (MHC-I) and components of the antigen-processing machinery (APM). Developing new approaches to reverse these defects could boost the efforts to restore antitumor immunity. Recent studies have shown that the expression of MHC-I and antigen-processing molecules is transcriptionally regulated by NOD-like receptor CARD domain containing 5 (NLRC5). To investigate whether NLRC5 could be used to improve tumor immunogenicity, we established stable lines of B16-F10 melanoma cells expressing NLRC5 (B16-5), the T cell co-stimulatory molecule CD80 (B16-CD80) or both (B16-5/80). Cells harboring NLRC5 constitutively expressed MHC-I and LMP2, LMP7 and TAP1 genes of the APM. The B16-5 cells efficiently presented the melanoma antigenic peptide gp10025-33 to Pmel-1 TCR transgenic CD8(+) T cells and induced their proliferation. In the presence of CD80, B16-5 cells stimulated Pmel-1 cells even without the addition of gp100 peptide, indicating that NLRC5 facilitated the processing and presentation of endogenous tumor antigen. Upon subcutaneous implantation, B16-5 cells showed markedly reduced tumor growth in C57BL/6 hosts but not in immunodeficient hosts, indicating that the NLRC5-expressing tumor cells elicited antitumor immunity. Following intravenous injection, B16-5 and B16-5/80 cells formed fewer lung tumor foci compared to control cells. In mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells, B16-5 cells formed large subcutaneous and lung tumors. Finally, immunization with irradiated B16-5 cells conferred protection against challenge by parental B16 cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that NLRC5 could be exploited to restore tumor immunogenicity and to stimulate protective antitumor immunity. PMID:27471621

  17. Multi-antigen vaccines based on complex adenovirus vectors induce protective immune responses against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, David H; Wang, Danher; Raja, Nicholas U; Luo, Min; Moore, Kevin M; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Mytle, Nutan; Dong, John Y

    2008-05-19

    There are legitimate concerns that the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus could adapt for human-to-human transmission and cause a pandemic similar to the 1918 "Spanish flu" that killed 50 million people worldwide. We have developed pandemic influenza vaccines by incorporating multiple antigens from both avian and Spanish influenza viruses into complex recombinant adenovirus vectors. In vaccinated mice, these vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses against pandemic influenza virus antigens, and protected vaccinated mice against lethal H5N1 virus challenge. These results indicate that this multi-antigen, broadly protective vaccine may serve as a safer and more effective approach than traditional methods for development of a pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:18395306

  18. Constructing vulnerabilty and protective measures indices for the enhanced critical infrastructure protection program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R. E.; Buehring, W. A.; Whitfield, R. G.; Bassett, G. W.; Dickinson, D. C.; Haffenden, R. A.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; LANL

    2009-10-14

    The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has directed its Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) to form partnerships with the owners and operators of assets most essential to the Nation's well being - a subclass of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) - and to conduct site visits for these and other high-risk assets as part of the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) Program. During each such visit, the PSA documents information about the facility's current CIKR protection posture and overall security awareness. The primary goals for ECIP site visits (DHS 2009) are to: (1) inform facility owners and operators of the importance of their facilities as an identified high-priority CIKR and the need to be vigilant in light of the ever-present threat of terrorism; (2) identify protective measures currently in place at these facilities, provide comparisons of CIKR protection postures across like assets, and track the implementation of new protective measures; and (3) enhance existing relationships among facility owners and operators; DHS; and various Federal, State, local tribal, and territorial partners. PSAs conduct ECIP visits to assess overall site security; educate facility owners and operators about security; help owners and operators identify gaps and potential improvements; and promote communication and information sharing among facility owners and operators, DHS, State governments, and other security partners. Information collected during ECIP visits is used to develop metrics; conduct sector-by-sector and cross-sector vulnerability comparisons; identify security gaps and trends across CIKR sectors and subsectors; establish sector baseline security survey results; and track progress toward improving CIKR security through activities, programs, outreach, and training (Snyder 2009). The data being collected are used in a framework consistent with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) risk criteria (DHS 2009). The

  19. Adenoviral Expression of a Bispecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Agent That Targets Protective Antigen Provides Prophylactic Protection from Anthrax in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Debatis, Michelle; Dmitriev, Igor P; Kashentseva, Elena A; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Curiel, David T; Leppla, Stephen; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, secretes three polypeptides, which form the bipartite lethal and edema toxins (LT and ET, respectively). The common component in these toxins, protective antigen (PA), is responsible for binding to cellular receptors and translocating the lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) enzymatic moieties to the cytosol. Antibodies against PA protect against anthrax. We previously isolated toxin-neutralizing variable domains of camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies (VHHs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy. In this work, gene therapy with an adenoviral (Ad) vector (Ad/VNA2-PA) (VNA, VHH-based neutralizing agents) promoting the expression of a bispecific VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA), consisting of two linked VHHs targeting different PA-neutralizing epitopes, was tested in two inbred mouse strains, BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J, and found to protect mice against anthrax toxin challenge and anthrax spore infection. Two weeks after a single treatment with Ad/VNA2-PA, serum VNA2-PA levels remained above 1 μg/ml, with some as high as 10 mg/ml. The levels were 10- to 100-fold higher and persisted longer in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ mice. Mice were challenged with a lethal dose of LT or spores at various times after Ad/VNA2-PA administration. The majority of BALB/cJ mice having serum VNA2-PA levels of >0.1 μg/ml survived LT challenge, and 9 of 10 C57BL/6J mice with serum levels of >1 μg/ml survived spore challenge. Our findings demonstrate the potential for genetic delivery of VNAs as an effective method for providing prophylactic protection from anthrax. We also extend prior findings of mouse strain-based differences in transgene expression and persistence by adenoviral vectors. PMID:26740390

  20. Cloning and expression of a protective antigen from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus.

    OpenAIRE

    Rand, K N; Moore, T.; Sriskantha, A; Spring, K; Tellam, R; P. Willadsen; Cobon, G S

    1989-01-01

    Glycoproteins located on the luminal surface of the plasma membrane of tick gut epithelial cells, when used to vaccinate cattle, are capable of stimulating an immune response that protects cattle against subsequent tick infestation. One such tick gut glycoprotein, designated Bm86, has been purified to homogeneity and the amino acid sequences of peptide fragments generated by endoproteinase Lys-C digestion have been determined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a cDNA that e...

  1. Antigenicity and protective effects of type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, G R; Worley, S E; Degener, C E; Clark, G M

    1980-01-01

    The response to type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination, the protective effect of type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination, and the ability of hemagglutinating antibody to type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide to cross the blood-brain barrier were studied in rats. Hemagglutinating antibody response to vaccination with type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide was found to be dependent on the dose and route of inoculation. Intraperitoneal vaccination with type 3 pneumococcal polysaccharide ...

  2. Immunogenicity and Protection Efficacy of Subunit-based Smallpox Vaccines Using Variola Major Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chou, Te-Hui; Kishko, Michael; Lu, Shan

    2007-01-01

    The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the ide...

  3. EXPRESSION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS PROTECTIVE ANTIGEN IN VACCINE STRAIN BRUCELLA ABORTUS RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Poff, Sherry Ann

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that can cause cutaneous, gastrointestinal or respiratory disease in many vertebrates, including humans. Commercially available anthrax vaccines for immunization of humans are of limited duration and do not protect against the respiratory form of the disease. Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes chronic infection in animals and humans. As with other intracellular pathogens, cell mediated im...

  4. Temperature-mediated recombinant anthrax protective antigen aggregate development: Implications for toxin formation and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Molina, Juan C; Valerdi-Madrigal, Esther D; Domínguez-Castillo, Rocío I; Sirota, Lev A; Arciniega, Juan L

    2016-07-29

    Anthrax vaccines containing recombinant PA (rPA) as the only antigen face a stability issue: rPA forms aggregates in solution after exposure to temperatures ⩾40°C, thus losing its ability to form lethal toxin (LeTx) with Lethal Factor. To study rPA aggregation's impact on immune response, we subjected rPA to several time and temperature combinations. rPA treated at 50°C for 30min formed high mass aggregates when analyzed by gel electrophoresis and failed to form LeTx as measured by a macrophage lysis assay (MLA). Aggregated rPA-formed LeTx was about 30 times less active than LeTx containing native rPA. Mice immunized with heat-treated rPA combined with Al(OH)3 developed antibody titers about 49 times lower than mice immunized with native rPA, as measured by a Toxicity Neutralization Assay (TNA). Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) of the same immune sera showed anti-rPA titers only 2-7 times lower than titers elicited by native rPA. Thus, rPA's ability to form LeTx correlates with its production of neutralizing antibodies, and aggregation significantly impairs the protein's antibody response. However, while these findings suggest MLA has some value as an in-process quality test for rPA in new anthrax vaccines, they also confirm the superiority of TNA for use in vaccine potency. PMID:27364097

  5. Negative Regulation of TGFβ Signaling by Stem Cell Antigen-1 Protects against Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy D Camarata

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury, often caused by an ischemic insult, is associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality, and increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The factors affecting the renal response to injury following ischemia and reperfusion remain to be clarified. We found that the Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1, commonly used as a stem cell marker, is heavily expressed in renal tubules of the adult mouse kidney. We evaluated its potential role in the kidney using Sca-1 knockout mice submitted to acute ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI, as well as cultured renal proximal tubular cells in which Sca-1 was stably silenced with shRNA. IRI induced more severe injury in Sca-1 null kidneys, as assessed by increased expression of Kim-1 and Ngal, rise in serum creatinine, abnormal pathology, and increased apoptosis of tubular epithelium, and persistent significant renal injury at day 7 post IRI, when recovery of renal function in control animals was nearly complete. Serum creatinine, Kim-1 and Ngal were slightly but significantly elevated even in uninjured Sca-1-/- kidneys. Sca-1 constitutively bound both TGFβ receptors I and II in cultured normal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Its genetic loss or silencing lead to constitutive TGFβ receptor-mediated activation of canonical Smad signaling even in the absence of ligand and to KIM-1 expression in the silenced cells. These studies demonstrate that by normally repressing TGFβ-mediated canonical Smad signaling, Sca-1 plays an important in renal epithelial cell homeostasis and in recovery of renal function following ischemic acute kidney injury.

  6. Recombinant Adenovirus Delivery of Calreticulin-ESAT-6 Produces an Antigen-Specific Immune Response but no Protection Against a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esparza-Gonzalez, S. C.; Troy, A.; Troudt, J.; Loera-Arias, M. J.; Villatoro Hernandez, Julio; Torres-Lopez, E.; Ancer-Rodriguez, J.; Gutierrez-Puente, Y.; Munoz-Maldonado, G.; Saucedo-Cardenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.; Izzo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus CalmetteGuerin (BCG) has failed to efficaciously control the worldwide spread of the disease. New vaccine development targets virulence antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Immunization with ESAT-6 and CFP10 provides protection against M. tuber

  7. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: Am779 is subdominant in the anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and p...

  8. Phase I Study of Safety and Immunogenicity of an Escherichia coli-Derived Recombinant Protective Antigen (rPA) Vaccine to Prevent Anthrax in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Bruce K.; Josephine Cox; Anita Gillis; VanCott, Thomas C.; Mary Marovich; Mark Milazzo; Tanya Santelli Antonille; Lindsay Wieczorek; Mckee, Kelly T.; Karen Metcalfe; Mallory, Raburn M.; Deborah Birx; Polonis, Victoria R.; Merlin L Robb

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The fatal disease caused by Bacillus anthracis is preventable with a prophylactic vaccine. The currently available anthrax vaccine requires a lengthy immunization schedule, and simpler and more immunogenic options for protection against anthrax are a priority for development. In this report we describe a phase I clinical trial testing the safety and immunogenicity of an anthrax vaccine using recombinant Escherichia coli-derived, B. anthracis protective antigen (rPA). METHODOLOGY/P...

  9. Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques with the Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Vaccine Produces a Serum Antibody Response That Effectively Neutralizes Receptor-Bound Protective Antigen In Vitro ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Kristin H.; Rudge, Thomas L.; Mayfield, Heather J.; Carlton, Lena A.; Hester, Arelis; Niemuth, Nancy A.; Sabourin, Carol L.; Brys, April M.; Quinn, Conrad P.

    2010-01-01

    Anthrax toxin (ATx) is composed of the binary exotoxins lethal toxin (LTx) and edema toxin (ETx). They have separate effector proteins (edema factor and lethal factor) but have the same binding protein, protective antigen (PA). PA is the primary immunogen in the current licensed vaccine anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA [BioThrax]). AVA confers protective immunity by stimulating production of ATx-neutralizing antibodies, which could block the intoxication process at several steps (binding of PA t...

  10. Protecting environmental flows through enhanced water licensing and water markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, T.; Binions, O.; Harou, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    To enable economically efficient future adaptation to water scarcity some countries are revising water management institutions such as water rights or licensing systems to more effectively protect ecosystems and their services. However, allocating more flow to the environment can mean less abstraction for economic production, or the inability to accommodate new entrants (diverters). Modern licensing arrangements should simultaneously enhance environmental flows and protect water abstractors who depend on water. Making new licensing regimes compatible with tradable water rights is an important component of water allocation reform. Regulated water markets can help decrease the societal cost of water scarcity whilst enforcing environmental and/or social protections. In this article we simulate water markets under a regime of fixed volumetric water abstraction licenses with fixed minimum flows or under a scalable water license regime (using water "shares") with dynamic environmental minimum flows. Shares allow adapting allocations to available water and dynamic environmental minimum flows vary as a function of ecological requirements. We investigate how a short-term spot market manifests within each licensing regime. We use a river-basin-scale hydroeconomic agent model that represents individual abstractors and can simulate a spot market under both licensing regimes. We apply this model to the Great Ouse River basin in eastern England with public water supply, agricultural, energy and industrial water-using agents. Results show the proposed shares with dynamic environmental flow licensing system protects river flows more effectively than the current static minimum flow requirements during a dry historical year, but that the total opportunity cost to water abstractors of the environmental gains is a 10-15% loss in economic benefits.

  11. Enhancement of human natural cytotoxicity by Plasmodium falciparum antigen activated lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, I C;

    1987-01-01

    Mononuclear cells (MNC) isolated from malaria immune donors and from donors never exposed to malaria were stimulated in vitro with soluble purified Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPag) or PPD. After 7 days of culture the proliferative response and the cytotoxic activity against the natural killer...

  12. Bm86 antigen induces a protective immune response against Boophilus microplus following DNA and protein vaccination in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, R; McKenna, R V; Cobon, G; Tennent, J; Zakrzewski, H; Gale, K; Wood, P R; Scheerlinck, J P; Willadsen, P

    1999-11-30

    Vaccination of sheep with a plasmid bearing the full length gene for the tick antigen Bm86 either alone or co-administered with plasmid carrying the ovine genes for the cytokines, granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin (IL)-1beta induced a relatively low level of protection against subsequent tick infestation. This tick damage reached statistical significance only for the groups which were vaccinated with plasmid encoding for Bm86, co-administered with plasmid encoding for ovine GM-CSF. Antibody titres measured against Bm86 were also low in all groups injected with the Bm86 DNA vaccine. Antibody production and anti-tick effect were significantly less than that achieved by two vaccinations with recombinant Bm86 protein. In all cases only a low level of antigen-specific stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded, as measured either by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the release of IFN-gamma. Injection of DNA encoding for Bm86, either alone or with co-administered cytokine genes, did however prime for a strong subsequent antibody response following a single injection of recombinant Bm86 protein in adjuvant. Antibody production nevertheless appeared to be slightly less effective than following two vaccinations with recombinant protein. The persistence of antibody following vaccination was the same regardless of the method of primary sensitization. In all cases the half-life of the antibody response was approximately 40-50 days indicating that, in contrast to results reported in mice, DNA vaccination in sheep did not result in sustained antibody production. PMID:10587297

  13. Histamine release factor from Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer): characterization and in vitro assessment as a protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Kathryn; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Offer, Jill E; Sparks, Nicholas H C; Wright, Harry W; Huntley, John F

    2009-03-01

    A cDNA encoding a 174-amino-acid orthologue of a tick histamine release factor (HRF) was identified from the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. The predicted D. gallinae HRF protein (Dg-HRF-1) sequence is highly conserved with the tick HRFs (identity 52-54%) and to a lesser degree with translationally controlled tumour proteins (TCTP) from mammals and other invertebrates (range 38-47%). Phylogenetically, Dg-HRF-1 partitions with the tick HRF clade suggesting a shared linage and potentially similar function(s). A recombinant Dg-HRF-1 protein (rDg-HRF-1) was produced and shown to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, confirming conservation of the histamine-releasing function in D. gallinae. Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits and hens to rDg-HRF-1. Western blotting demonstrated that native Dg-HRF is a soluble protein and immunohistochemical staining of mite sections revealed that the distribution of Dg-HRF, although ubiquitous, is more common in mite reproductive, digestive and synganglion tissues. A survey of hens housed continuously in a mite-infested commercial poultry unit failed to identify IgY specific for recombinant or native Dg-HRF, indicating that Dg-HRF is not exposed to the host during infestation/feeding and may therefore have potential as a vaccine using the concealed antigen approach. To test the protective capability of rDg-HRF-1, fresh heparinised chicken blood was enriched with yolk-derived anti-Dg-HRF IgY antibodies and fed to semi-starved mites using an in vitro feeding system. A statistically significant increase in mortality was shown (P=0.004) in mites fed with anti-Dg-HRF IgY after just one blood meal. The work presented here demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, the feasibility of vaccinating hens with recombinant D. gallinae antigens to control mite infestation and the potential of rDg-HRF-1 as a vaccine antigen. PMID:18938170

  14. A microwave antigen retrieval method using two heating steps for enhanced immunostaining on aldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Cong, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Ying-Ying; Zhai, Xiao-Yue

    2016-06-01

    Antigen retrieval is an immunohistochemical procedure that results in better exposure of target antigens in aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections to antibodies. However, the commercially recommended or conventional protocols for antigen retrieval do not always succeed in expressing the target antigen. Here, an improved method was developed for antigen retrieval from aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded histological sections. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), tight junction proteins Claudin-2 and Claudin-7, and water channel aquaporins in kidney tissue were selected as test antigens. Typically, PCNA and Claudin-2 and Claudin-7 show negative, weak, or nonspecific immunoreactions with conventional antigen retrieval methods using microwave heating. In the present study, microwave heating was performed twice with an interval of 30 min between the two steps to allow the buffer solution to cool. Sodium citrate buffer (10 mM sodium citrate, pH 6.0) was used for PCNA, and Tris-EDTA buffer (10 mM Tris, 1 mM EDTA, pH 9.0) was used for the Claudins. Compared with conventionally prepared tissues, the tissues exhibited both enhanced and specific immunostaining, and well-preserved morphology. In conclusion, the conventional protocol could be supplemented with a second microwave heating step to improve the expression of antigens that do not respond well to the conventional method. PMID:27002723

  15. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  16. The Immunogenicity of the Tumor-Associated Antigen α-Fetoprotein Is Enhanced by a Fusion with a Transmembrane Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Tran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA vector to induce an immune response against a well-tolerated self-antigen. Methods. rMVA vectors expressing different form of α-fetoprotein (AFP were produced and characterized. Naïve mice were vaccinated with MVA vectors expressing the AFP antigen in either a secreted, or a membrane-bound, or an intracellular form. The immune response was monitored by an IFNΓ ELISpot assay and antibody detection. Results. Vaccination with the membrane-associated form of AFP induced a stronger CD8+ T-cell response compared to the ones obtained with the MVA encoding the secreted or the intracellular forms of AFP. Moreover, the vaccination with the membrane-bound AFP elicited the production of AFP-specific antibodies. Conclusions. The AFP transmembrane form is more immunogenic. Expressing a membrane-bound form in the context of an MVA vaccination could enhance the immunogenicity of a self-antigen.

  17. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or...... CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps...

  18. A Distinct Lung-Interstitium-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cell Subset Confers Enhanced Protection to Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo Gilchuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature and anatomic location of the protective memory CD8+ T cell subset induced by intranasal vaccination remain poorly understood. We developed a vaccination model to assess the anatomic location of protective memory CD8+ T cells and their role in lower airway infections. Memory CD8+ T cells elicited by local intranasal, but not systemic, vaccination with an engineered non-replicative CD8+ T cell-targeted antigen confer enhanced protection to a lethal respiratory viral challenge. This protection depends on a distinct CXCR3LO resident memory CD8+ T (Trm cell population that preferentially localizes to the pulmonary interstitium. Because they are positioned close to the mucosa, where infection occurs, interstitial Trm cells act before inflammation can recruit circulating memory CD8+ T cells into the lung tissue. This results in a local protective immune response as early as 1 day post-infection. Hence, vaccine strategies that induce lung interstitial Trm cells may confer better protection against respiratory pathogens.

  19. Enhancement of Immune Effector Functions by Modulating IgG’s Intrinsic Affinity for Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Yang, Chunning; Borrok, M. Jack; Ayriss, Joanne; Aherne, Karen; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immune effector functions play an essential role in the anti-tumor efficacy of many therapeutic mAbs. While much of the effort to improve effector potency has focused on augmenting the interaction between the antibody-Fc and activating Fc-receptors expressed on immune cells, the role of antibody binding interactions with the target antigen remains poorly understood. We show that antibody intrinsic affinity to the target antigen clearly influences the extent and efficiency of Fc-mediated effector mechanisms, and report the pivotal role of antibody binding valence on the ability to regulate effector functions. More particularly, we used an array of affinity modulated variants of three different mAbs, anti-CD4, anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 against a panel of target cell lines expressing disparate levels of the target antigen. We found that at saturating antibody concentrations, IgG variants with moderate intrinsic affinities, similar to those generated by the natural humoral immune response, promoted superior effector functions compared to higher affinity antibodies. We hypothesize that at saturating concentrations, effector function correlates most directly with the amount of Fc bound to the cell surface. Thus, high affinity antibodies exhibiting slow off-rates are more likely to interact bivalently with the target cell, occupying two antigen sites with a single Fc. In contrast, antibodies with faster off-rates are likely to dissociate each binding arm more rapidly, resulting in a higher likelihood of monovalent binding. Monovalent binding may in turn increase target cell opsonization and lead to improved recruitment of effector cells. This unpredicted relationship between target affinity and effector function potency suggests a careful examination of antibody design and engineering for the development of next-generation immunotherapeutics. PMID:27322177

  20. Antigenic deletion and malignant enhancement induced in lymphoma cells by passage through X-irradiated hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are reported in which lymphoma cells were induced to delete strong virus-associated membrane antigens, and as a result considerably increase their capacity for metastasis, by X-irradiation of the hosts. The studies involved injecting rats at birth with leukaemia virus cells. The cells expressed strong murine leukaemia virus surface antigens and were consistently rejected when transplanted into normal adult syngeneic rats. When the rats were given 300 to 350 R total body X-irradiation, however, lymphoma cells transplanted within 24 hours subcutaneously or intraperitoneally grow progressively at the site of the graft, occasionally spread to distant sites and eventually cause death of the hosts. Examined under the electron microscope the transplanted lymphoma cells appeared devoid of both mature and immature virus particles. The loss of surface antigens was consistently accompanied by increased malignancy of the lymphoma cells. Explanations for the results are offered. Implications for radiotherapy in man are discussed, and it is suggested that whilst such treatment might be effective in the control of local recurrences, it could possibly induce an increase in the number of distant metastases. Some fluorescence studies of the cells are also described. (U.K.)

  1. Protective immune mechanisms against pre-erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium berghei depend on the target antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke S. Bergmann-Leitner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines are believed to either stop the injected sporozoites from reaching the liver or to direct cellular immune responses towards eliminating infected hepatocytes. The present study reveals for the first time the anatomical sites at which these immune mechanisms act against the malaria parasites. To determine the mechanisms leading to protection mediated by two previously characterized vaccines against either the circumsporozoite protein (CSP or the cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS, mice were immunized and subsequently challenged by subcutaneous injection of salivary gland sporozoites of luciferase-transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites. The In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS was used to identify the anatomical site where the vaccine-induced immune response eliminates sporozoites after injection. The data demonstrate that CSP-based immunity acts at the site of infection (skin whereas CelTOS-based immunity is only partially efficient in the skin and allows reduced levels of liver infection that can be subsequently cleared. The results of this study challenge assumptions regarding CSP-mediated immune mechanisms and call into question the validity of some commonly used assays to evaluate anti-CSP immune responses. The knowledge of the mechanism and events leading to infection or immune defense will guide supportive treatment with drugs or combination therapies and thus accelerate the development of effective antimalarial strategies.

  2. Extracted protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis. I. Preparation and properties of the solubilized surface of components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helting, T B; Blackkolb, F

    1981-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis microorganisms were treated with several extracting agents followed by ultracentrifugation to remove particulate matter. Analysis of the resulting supernatants by SDS gel electrophoresis showed one major component after simple salt extraction, and much more complex, although consistent pattern following detergent treatment. The yield of the solubilized protein in detergent extracts exceeded by far the values recorded for salt extracts. In order to prevent irreversible precipitation of the solubilized proteins upon removal of the denaturing agent, a novel procedure was developed. After extraction with urea-salt, the solubilized material was absorbed on a mineral carrier prior to the separation of the denaturing agent. The resulting absorbed vaccine was highly potent in the mouse-protection test, whereas the toxic reactions, elicited upon injection into experimental animals, were reduced in the comparison to the starting material. This diminished reactogenic potential was accompanied by the partial loss of the leukocytosis-promiting factor, whose activity was greatly diminished by urea-salt at alkaline pH-values. The procedure described may be applied to large-scale processing of Bordetella persussis microorganisms. Clinical trials now in progress should confirm or rebut the thesis that increased tolerability of the product, inferred from animal experiments, is reflected by fewer adverse reactions in humans. In the former case, the detergent extract vaccine may constitute a realistic alternative to conventional whole-cell vaccines against whooping-cough. PMID:6266198

  3. Noncapsulated toxinogenic Bacillus anthracis presents a specific growth and dissemination pattern in naive and protective antigen-immune mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomski, Ian J; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Mock, Michèle; Goossens, Pierre L

    2007-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax. B. anthracis has three major virulence factors, namely, lethal toxin, edema toxin, and a poly-gamma-D-glutamic acid capsule. The toxins modulate host immune responses, and the capsule inhibits phagocytosis. With the goal of increasing safety, decreasing security concerns, and taking advantage of mammalian genetic tools and reagents, mouse models of B. anthracis infection have been developed using attenuated bacteria that produce toxins but no capsule. While these models have been useful in studying both toxinogenic infections and antitoxin vaccine efficacy, we questioned whether eliminating the capsule changed bacterial growth and dissemination characteristics. Thus, the progression of infection by toxinogenic noncapsulated B. anthracis was analyzed and compared to that by previously reported nontoxinogenic capsulated bacteria, using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The influence of immunization with the toxin component protective antigen (PA) on the development of infection was also examined. The toxinogenic noncapsulated bacteria were initially confined to the cutaneous site of infection. Bacteria then progressed to the draining lymph nodes and, finally, late in the infection, to the lungs, kidneys, and frequently the gastrointestinal tract. There was minimal colonization of the spleen. PA immunization reduced bacterial growth from the outset and limited infection to the site of inoculation. These in vivo observations show that dissemination by toxinogenic noncapsulated strains differs markedly from that by nontoxinogenic capsulated strains. Additionally, PA immunization counters bacterial growth and dissemination in vivo from the onset of infection. PMID:17635863

  4. Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Kinetics in Inhalation Spore-Challenged Untreated or Levofloxacin/ Raxibacumab-Treated New Zealand White Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecil Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled Bacillus anthracis spores germinate and the subsequent vegetative growth results in bacteremia and toxin production. Anthrax toxin is tripartite: the lethal factor and edema factor are enzymatic moieties, while the protective antigen (PA binds to cell receptors and the enzymatic moieties. Antibiotics can control B. anthracis bacteremia, whereas raxibacumab binds PA and blocks lethal toxin effects. This study assessed plasma PA kinetics in rabbits following an inhaled B. anthracis spore challenge. Additionally, at 84 h post-challenge, 42% of challenged rabbits that had survived were treated with either levofloxacin/placebo or levofloxacin/raxibacumab. The profiles were modeled using a modified Gompertz/second exponential growth phase model in untreated rabbits, with added monoexponential PA elimination in treated rabbits. Shorter survival times were related to a higher plateau and a faster increase in PA levels. PA elimination half-lives were 10 and 19 h for the levofloxacin/placebo and levofloxacin/raxibacumab groups, respectively, with the difference attributable to persistent circulating PA-raxibacumab complex. PA kinetics were similar between untreated and treated rabbits, with one exception: treated rabbits had a plateau phase nearly twice as long as that for untreated rabbits. Treated rabbits that succumbed to disease had higher plateau PA levels and shorter plateau duration than surviving treated rabbits.

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara candidate vaccines delivering West Nile virus envelope antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Asisa; Lim, Stephanie; Kaserer, Martina; Lülf, Anna; Marr, Lisa; Jany, Sylvia; Deeg, Cornelia A; Pijlman, Gorben P; Koraka, Penelope; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E; Sutter, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) cycles between insects and wild birds, and is transmitted via mosquito vectors to horses and humans, potentially causing severe neuroinvasive disease. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is an advanced viral vector for developing new recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we generated and evaluated recombinant MVA candidate vaccines that deliver WNV envelope (E) antigens and fulfil all the requirements to proceed to clinical testing in humans. Infections of human and equine cell cultures with recombinant MVA demonstrated efficient synthesis and secretion of WNV envelope proteins in mammalian cells non-permissive for MVA replication. Prime-boost immunizations in BALB/c mice readily induced circulating serum antibodies binding to recombinant WNV E protein and neutralizing WNV in tissue culture infections. Vaccinations in HLA-A2.1-/HLA-DR1-transgenic H-2 class I-/class II-knockout mice elicited WNV E-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Moreover, the MVA-WNV candidate vaccines protected C57BL/6 mice against lineage 1 and lineage 2 WNV infection and induced heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate these recombinant MVA-WNV vaccines in other preclinical models and use them as candidate vaccine in humans. PMID:26939903

  6. Protective Antigen-Specific Memory B Cells Persist Years after Anthrax Vaccination and Correlate with Humoral Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Garman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA generates short-lived protective antigen (PA specific IgG that correlates with in vitro toxin neutralization and protection from Bacillus anthracis challenge. Animal studies suggest that when PA-specific IgG has waned, survival after spore challenge correlates with an activation of PA-specific memory B cells. Here, we characterize the quantity and the longevity of AVA-induced memory B cell responses in humans. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from individuals vaccinated ≥3 times with AVA (n = 50 were collected early (3–6 months, n = 27 or late after their last vaccination (2–5 years, n = 23, pan-stimulated, and assayed by ELISPOT for total and PA-specific memory B cells differentiated into antibody secreting cells (ASCs. PA-specific ASC percentages ranged from 0.02% to 6.25% (median: 1.57% and did not differ between early and late post-vaccination individuals. PA-specific ASC percentages correlated with plasma PA-specific IgG (r = 0.42, p = 0.03 and toxin neutralization (r = 0.52, p = 0.003 early post vaccination. PA-specific ASC percentages correlated with supernatant anti-PA both early (r = 0.60, p = 0.001 and late post vaccination (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001. These data suggest PA-specific memory B cell responses are long-lived and can be estimated after recent vaccination by the magnitude and neutralization capacity of the humoral response.

  7. Immunogenicity and protective role of antigenic regions from five outer membrane proteins of Flavobacterium columnare in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhang; Liu, Zhixin; Fu, Jianping; Zhang, Qiusheng; Huang, Bei; Nie, Pin

    2016-02-01

    Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in freshwater fish. In the present study, the antigenic regions of five outer membrane proteins (OMPs), including zinc metalloprotease, prolyl oligopeptidase, thermolysin, collagenase and chondroitin AC lyase, were bioinformatically analyzed, fused together, and then expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein of 95.6 kDa, as estimated by 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was consistent with the molecular weight deduced from the amino acid sequence. The purified recombinant protein was used to vaccinate the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. Following vaccination of the fish their IgM antibody levels were examined, as was the expression of IgM, IgD and IgZ immunoglobulin genes and other genes such as MHC Iα and MHC IIβ, which are also involved in adaptive immunity. Interleukin genes (IL), including IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10, and type I and type II interferon (IFN) genes were also examined. At 3 and 4 weeks post-vaccination (wpv), significant increases in IgM antibody levels were observed in the fish vaccinated with the recombinant fusion protein, and an increase in the expression levels of IgM, IgD and IgZ genes was also detected following the vaccinations, thus indicating that an adaptive immune response was induced by the vaccinations. Early increases in the expression levels of IL and IFN genes were also observed in the vaccinated fish. At four wpv, the fish were challenged with F. columnare, and the vaccinated fish showed a good level of protection against this pathogen, with 39% relative percent survival (RPS) compared with the control group. It can be concluded, therefore, that the five OMPs, in the form of a recombinant fusion protein vaccine, induced an immune response in fish and protection against F. columnare.

  8. Enhancement of antigen-induced eosinophilic inflammation in the airways of mast-cell deficient mice by diesel exhaust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to clarify the involvement of mast cells in the exacerbating effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) toward allergic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Airway inflammation by the infiltration of cosinophils with goblet cell proliferation and AHR, as well as by the production of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE, in plasma were examined using mast cell-deficient mice (W/Wv) and normal mice (W/W+). Both groups of mice received ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA+DEP intratracheally. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell proliferation promoted by OVA were significantly greater in W/W+ than in W/Wv. A similar result was observed in AHR, but was not significant among both groups of mice. DEP enhanced OVA induced-allergic airway inflammation, goblet cell proliferation, and development of AHR in W/Wv, but not in W/W+. DEP decreased production of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE in both groups of mice. Mast cells were observed in the submucosal layer of the main bronchus in W/Wv. The number of mast cells was significantly decreased by OVA treatment. The results indicate that mast cells are not necessary to enhance airway damage and development of AHR in W/Wv by DEP. However, mast cells may be required for the OVA-induced cosinophilic inflammation, airway damage with goblet cell proliferation, and AHR in W/W+

  9. Ultrasensitive immunoassay for free prostate-specific antigen based on ferrocene carboxylate enhanced cathodic electrochemiluminescence of peroxydisulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic effect of ferrocene carboxylate (FCC; in the form of nanocrystals) on the cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of peroxodisulfate was studied and applied to an ECL immunoassay to quantify free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA). The nanocrystals were entrapped in graphene previously functionalized with poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) to give a solid-state nanohybrid referred to as FCC-Gr-PDDA. When cast onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE), the ECL of peroxodisulfate is strongly enhanced. An immunoelectrode was then constructed by coating the positively charged nanohybrids matrix of FCC-Gr-PDDA with negatively charged gold nanoparticles and then immobilizing antibody against fPSA on the Au-NPs. The resulting electrode is then incubated with samples containing fPSA. An immunocomplex is formed in the presence of fPSA, and this prevents the solid-state nanohybrid film to enhance the ECL of the peroxodisulfate luminophor. The observed decrease in ECL intensity is directly related to the concentration of fPSA antigen in the range from 0.005 to 5 ng mL−1, and the detection limit is as low as 1.7 pg mL−1. The method is deemed to provide a widely applicable and general platform for ECL-based immunoassays. (author)

  10. Feasibility of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation as a method for detecting protective antigen by direct recognition of size-increased target-captured nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kayeong; Choi, Jaeyeong; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Yoon, Moon-Young; Lee, Seungho; Chung, Hoeil

    2015-11-27

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) was evaluated as a potential analytical method for detection of a protective antigen (PA), an Anthrax biomarker. The scheme was based on the recognition of altered AF4 retention through the generation of the size-increased Au nanoparticle probes as a result of PA binding, in which a PA-selective peptide was conjugated on the probe surface. In the visible absorption-based AF4 fractograms, the band position shifted to a longer retention time as the PA concentration increased due to the presence of probe bound with PAs. The shift was insignificant when the concentration was relatively low at 84.3pM. To improve sensitivity, two separate probes conjugated with two different peptides able to bind on different PA epitopes were used together. The band shift then became distinguishable even at 84.3pM of PA sample. The formation of larger PA-probe inter-connected species using the dual-probe system was responsible for the enhanced band shift. In parallel, the feasibility of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a potential AF4 detection method was also evaluated. In the off-line SERS fractogram constructed using fractions collected during AF4 separation, a band shift was also observed for the 84.3pM PA sample, and the band intensity was higher when using the dual-probe system. The combination of AF4 and SERS is promising for the detection of PA and will become a potential tool if the reproducibility of SERS measurement is improved. PMID:26482872

  11. Enhanced performance of an innovative dengue IgG/IgM rapid diagnostic test using an anti-dengue EDI monoclonal antibody and dengue virus antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Jihoo Lee; Young-Eun Kim; Hak-Yong Kim; Mangalam Sinniah; Chom-Kyu Chong; Hyun-Ok Song

    2015-01-01

    High levels of anti-dengue IgM or IgG can be detected using numerous rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). However, the sensitivity and specificity of these tests are reduced by changes in envelope glycoprotein antigenicity that inevitably occur in limited expression systems. A novel RDT was designed to enhance diagnostic sensitivity. Dengue viruses cultured in animal cells were used as antigens to retain the native viral coat protein. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were then developed, for the first ...

  12. Bifidobacteria Enhance Antigen Sampling and Processing by Dendritic Cells in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strisciuglio, Caterina; Miele, Erasmo; Giugliano, Francesca P; Vitale, Serena; Andreozzi, Marialuisa; Vitale, Alessandra; Catania, Maria R; Staiano, Annamaria; Troncone, Riccardo; Gianfrani, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Bifidobacteria have been reported to reduce inflammation and contribute to intestinal homeostasis. However, the interaction between these bacteria and the gut immune system remains largely unknown. Because of the central role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in immune responses, we examined in vitro the effects of a Bifidobacteria mixture (probiotic) on DC functionality from children with inflammatory bowel disease. DCs obtained from peripheral blood monocytes of patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis, and noninflammatory bowel disease controls (HC) were incubated with fluorochrome-conjugated particles of Escherichia coli or DQ-Ovalbumin (DQ-OVA) after a pretreatment with the probiotic, to evaluate DC phenotype, antigen sampling and processing. Moreover, cell supernatants were collected to measure tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, interleukin 17, and interleukin 10 production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DCs from CD children showed a higher bacteria particles uptake and DQ-OVA processing after incubation with the probiotic; in contrast, DC from both ulcerative colitis and HC showed no significant changes. Moreover, a marked tumor necrosis factor alpha release was observed in DC from CD after exposure to E. coli particles, whereas the probiotic did not affect the production of this proinflammatory cytokine. In conclusion, the Bifidobacteria significantly improved the antigen uptake and processing by DCs from patients with CD, which are known to present an impaired autophagic functionality, whereas, in DCs from ulcerative colitis and HC, no prominent effect of probiotic mixture was observed. This improvement of antigen sampling and processing could partially solve the impairment of intestinal innate immunity and reduce uncontrolled microorganism growth in the intestine of children with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25895109

  13. Pentamers Not Found in the Universal Proteome Can Enhance Antigen Specific Immune Responses and Adjuvant Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Ami Patel; Dong, Jessica C.; Brett Trost; Richardson, Jason S.; Sarah Tohme; Shawn Babiuk; Anthony Kusalik; Kung, Sam K. P.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    Certain short peptides do not occur in humans and are rare or non-existent in the universal proteome. Antigens that contain rare amino acid sequences are in general highly immunogenic and may activate different arms of the immune system. We first generated a list of rare, semi-common, and common 5-mer peptides using bioinformatics tools to analyze the UniProtKB database. Experimental observations indicated that rare and semi-common 5-mers generated stronger cellular responses in comparison wi...

  14. In situ Delivery of Antigen to DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+) Dermal Dendritic Cells Results in Enhanced CD8(+) T-Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehres, Cynthia M; van Beelen, Astrid J; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Unger, Wendy W J; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Storm, Gert; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-09-01

    CD14(+) dendritic cells (DCs) present in the dermis of human skin represent a large subset of dermal DCs (dDCs) that are considered macrophage-like cells with poor antigen (cross)-presenting capacity and limited migratory potential to the lymph nodes. CD14(+) dDC highly express DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor containing potent endocytic capacity, facilitating intracellular routing of antigens to major histocompatibility complex I and II (MHC-I andII) loading compartments for the presentation to antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Here we show using a human skin explant model that the in situ targeting of antigens to DC-SIGN using glycan-modified liposomes enhances the antigen-presenting capacity of CD14(+) dDCs. Intradermal vaccination of liposomes modified with the DC-SIGN-targeting glycan Lewis(X), containing melanoma antigens (MART-1 or Gp100), accumulated in CD14(+) dDCs and resulted in enhanced Gp100- or MART-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. Simultaneous intradermal injection of the cytokines GM-CSF and IL-4 as adjuvant enhanced the migration of the skin DCs and increased the expression of DC-SIGN on the CD14(+) and CD1a(+) dDCs. These data demonstrate that human CD14(+) dDCs exhibit potent cross-presenting capacity when targeted in situ through DC-SIGN. PMID:25885805

  15. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  16. Targeted Delivery of VP1 Antigen of Foot-and-mouth Disease Virus to M Cells Enhances the Antigen-specific Systemic and Mucosal Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Lee, Ha-Yan; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Application of vaccine materials through oral mucosal route confers great economical advantage in animal farming industry due to much less vaccination cost compared with that of injection-based vaccination. In particular, oral administration of recombinant protein antigen against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an ideal strategy because it is safe from FMDV transmission during vaccine production and can induce antigen-specific immune response in mucosal compartments, where FMDV infecti...

  17. Vaccination with BM86, subolesin and akirin protective antigens for the control of tick infestations in white tailed deer and red deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, Diana; de la Lastra, José M Pérez; Almazán, Consuelo; Canales, Mario; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Boadella, Mariana; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; Reglero, Manuel; Villarreal, Ricardo; de la Fuente, José

    2012-01-01

    Red deer (Cervus elaphus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are hosts for different tick species and tick-borne pathogens and play a role in tick dispersal and maintenance in some regions. These factors stress the importance of controlling tick infestations in deer and several methods such as culling and acaricide treatment have been used. Tick vaccines are a cost-effective alternative for tick control that reduced cattle tick infestations and tick-borne pathogens prevalence while reducing the use of acaricides. Our hypothesis is that vaccination with vector protective antigens can be used for the control of tick infestations in deer. Herein, three experiments were conducted to characterize (1) the antibody response in red deer immunized with recombinant BM86, the antigen included in commercial tick vaccines, (2) the antibody response and control of cattle tick infestations in white-tailed deer immunized with recombinant BM86 or tick subolesin (SUB) and experimentally infested with Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and (3) the antibody response and control of Hyalomma spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. field tick infestations in red deer immunized with mosquito akirin (AKR), the SUB ortholog and candidate protective antigen against different tick species and other ectoparasites. The results showed that deer produced an antibody response that correlated with the reduction in tick infestations and was similar to other hosts vaccinated previously with these antigens. The overall vaccine efficacy was similar between BM86 (E=76%) and SUB (E=83%) for the control of R. microplus infestations in white-tailed deer. The field trial in red deer showed a 25-33% (18-40% when only infested deer were considered) reduction in tick infestations, 14-20 weeks after the first immunization. These results demonstrated that vaccination with vector protective antigens could be used as an alternative method for the control of tick infestations in deer to reduce tick populations

  18. Prior infection with influenza virus but not vaccination leaves a long-term immunological imprint that intensifies the protective efficacy of antigenically drifted vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Liepkalns, Justine; Reber, Adrian J; Lu, Xiuhua; Music, Nedzad; Jacob, Joshy; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-01-20

    The role of pre-existing immunity for influenza vaccine responses is of great importance for public health, and thus has been studied in various contexts, yet the impact of differential priming on vaccine responses in the midst of antigenic drift remains to be elucidated. To address this with antigenically related viruses, mice were first primed by either infection or immunization with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus, then immunized with whole-inactivated A/Fort Monmouth/1/47 (FM1) virus. The ensuing vaccine responses and the protective efficacy of FM1 were superior in PR8 infection-primed mice compared to PR8 immunization-primed or unprimed mice. Increased FM1-specific Ab responses of PR8 infection-primed mice also broadened cross-reactivity against contemporary as well as antigenically more drifted strains. Further, prior infection heightened the protective efficacy of antigenically distant strains, such as A/Brisbane/59/2006 infection followed by immunization with split pandemic H1N1 vaccine (A/California/07/2009). Therefore, influenza infection is a significant priming event that intensifies future vaccine responses against drift strains. PMID:26706277

  19. Protection induced by Plasmodium falciparum MSP1(42 is strain-specific, antigen and adjuvant dependent, and correlates with antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Lyon

    Full Text Available Vaccination with Plasmodium falciparum MSP1(42/complete Freund's adjuvant (FA followed by MSP1(42/incomplete FA is the only known regimen that protects Aotus nancymaae monkeys against infection by erythrocytic stage malaria parasites. The role of adjuvant is not defined; however complete FA cannot be used in humans. In rodent models, immunity is strain-specific. We vaccinated Aotus monkeys with the FVO or 3D7 alleles of MSP1(42 expressed in Escherichia coli or with the FVO allele expressed in baculovirus (bv combined with complete and incomplete FA, Montanide ISA-720 (ISA-720 or AS02A. Challenge with FVO strain P. falciparum showed that suppression of cumulative day 11 parasitemia was strain-specific and could be induced by E. coli expressed MSP1(42 in combination with FA or ISA-720 but not with AS02A. The coli42-FVO antigen induced a stronger protective effect than the bv42-FVO antigen, and FA induced a stronger protective effect than ISA-720. ELISA antibody (Ab responses at day of challenge (DOC were strain-specific and correlated inversely with c-day 11 parasitemia (r = -0.843. ELISA Ab levels at DOC meeting a titer of at least 115,000 ELISA Ab units identified the vaccinees not requiring treatment (noTx with a true positive rate of 83.3% and false positive rate of 14.3 %. Correlation between functional growth inhibitory Ab levels (GIA and cumulative day 11 parasitemia was weaker (r = -0.511, and was not as predictive for a response of noTx. The lowest false positive rate for GIA was 30% when requiring a true positive rate of 83.3%. These inhibition results along with those showing that antigen/FA combinations induced a stronger protective immunity than antigen/ISA-720 or antigen/AS02 combinations are consistent with protection as ascribed to MSP1-specific cytophilic antibodies. Development of an effective MSP1(42 vaccine against erythrocytic stage P. falciparum infection will depend not only on antigen quality, but also upon the selection of

  20. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plan, Palisades Project: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1986-11-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho and Wyoming to mitigate the losses of wildlife habitat and annual production due to the development and operation of the Palisades Project. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the preferred mitigation plan to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost with inundation of the reservoir area as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering needs of wildlife in eastern Idaho and western Wyoming. A total of 37,068 HU's were estimated to be lost as a result of the inundation of the Palisades Reservoir area. Through a series of protection/enhancement projects, the preferred mitigation plan will provide benefits of an estimated 37,066 HU's. Target species to be benefited by this mitigation plan include bald eagle, mule deer, elk, mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, and peregrine falcon.

  1. Vaccination with replication-deficient recombinant adenoviruses encoding the main surface antigens of toxoplasma gondii induces immune response and protection against infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Bráulia C; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fux, Blima; Mendes, Erica A; Penido, Marcus L O; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2006-04-01

    We have generated recombinant adenoviruses encoding three genetically modified surface antigens (SAGs) of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, that is, AdSAG1, AdSAG2, and AdSAG3. Modifications included the removal of their glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring motifs and, in some cases, the exchange of the native signal peptide for influenza virus hemagglutinin signal sequence. Adenovirus immunization of BALB/c mice elicited potent antibody responses against each protein, displaying a significant bias toward a helper T cell type 1 (Th1) profile in animals vaccinated with AdSAG1. Furthermore, the presence of parasite-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells was analyzed by proliferation assays and enzyme-linked immunospot assays in the same animals. Splenocytes from immunized mice secreted IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation with tachyzoite lysate antigen or with a fraction enriched for membrane-purified GPI-anchored proteins (F3) from the T. gondii tachyzoite surface. Epitopes recognized by CD8+ T cells were identified in SAG1 and SAG3, but not SAG2, sequences, although this protein also induced a specific response. We also tested the capacity of the immune responses detected to protect mice against a challenge with live T. gondii parasites. Although no protection was observed against tachyzoites of the highly virulent RH strain, a significant reduction in cyst loads in the brain was observed in animals challenged with the P-Br strain. Thus, up to 80% of the cysts were eliminated from animals vaccinated with a mixture of the three recombinant viruses. Because adenoviruses seemed capable of inducing Th1-biased protective immune responses against T. gondii antigens, other parasite antigens should be tested alone or in combination with those described here to further develop a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. PMID:16610929

  2. Whole recombinant Pichia pastoris expressing HPV16 L1 antigen is superior in inducing protection against tumor growth as compared to killed transgenic Leishmania

    OpenAIRE

    Bolhassani, Azam; Muller, Martin; Roohvand, Farzin; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Agi, Elnaz; Shokri, Mehdi; Rad, Mahdieh Motamedi; Hosseinzadeh, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The development of an efficient vaccine against high-risk HPV types can reduce the incidence rates of cervical cancer by generating anti-tumor protective responses. Traditionally, the majority of prophylactic viral vaccines are composed of live, attenuated or inactivated viruses. Among them, the design of an effective and low-cost vaccine is critical. Inactivated vaccines especially heat-killed yeast cells have emerged as a promising approach for generating antigen-specific immunotherapy. Rec...

  3. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Expressing the Outer Membrane Protein 26-Kilodalton Antigen Confers Prophylactic Protection against Helicobacter pylori Infection ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lü, Lin; Zeng, Han-qing; Wang, Pi-Long; Shen, Wei; Xiang, Ting-xiu; Mei, Zhe-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is prevalent worldwide and results in chronic gastritis, which may lead to gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. We have previously reported that oral immunization with recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing the H. pylori outer membrane protein 26-kilodalton (Omp26) antigen affords therapeutic protection against H. pylori infection in mice. In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of this vaccine cand...

  4. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis, toxicity, and kinetics of in vitro production of the protective antigen and lethal factor components of Bacillus anthracis toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzell, J W; Ivins, B E; Leppla, S H

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of Bacillus anthracis toxin production in culture and its lethal activity in rats, mice, and guinea pigs were investigated. Lethal toxin activity was produced in vitro throughout exponential growth at essentially identical rates in both encapsulated virulent and nonencapsulated avirulent strains. The two toxin proteins which produce lethality when in combination, lethal factor (LF) and protective antigen (PA), could be quantitated directly from culture fluids by rocket immunoelec...

  5. Enhanced Protective Efficacy of a Chimeric Form of the Schistosomiasis Vaccine Antigen Sm-TSP-2

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Mark S.; Pickering, Darren A.; McSorley, Henry J.; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Tribolet, Leon; Dougall, Annette M.; Hotez, Peter J.; Loukas, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG1 and IgG3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubilit...

  6. Iridium Oxide Film-Enhanced Impedance Immunosensor for Rapid Detection of Carcinoembyronic Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING,Yan-Jun; WANG,Hua; JIANG,Jian-Hui; SHEN,Guo-Li; YU,Ru-Qin

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive impedance immunosensor based on iridium oxide (IrOx) thin film for the detection of carcinoembyronic antigen (CEA) in human sera has been proposed. Gold electrode was electrochemically modified with IrOx thin film and simultaneously functionalized with protein A (PA) to bind anti-CEA antibodies in an orientated way. It has been found that the antibody loading amount was dependent on the PA concentration and the deposition time of IrOx matrix. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the electron transfer resistances obtained were linearly related to the CEA concentration ranging from 36.2 to 460.0 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 28.0 ng/mL. Analytical results of clinical samples from cancer patients show that the proposed immunoassay is reasonably comparable with the chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA), indicating the feasibility of using the proposed method for CEA immunoassay in clinical laboratory.

  7. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. PMID:24857756

  8. Vaccination focusing immunity on conserved antigens protects mice and ferrets against virulent H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Graeme E; Soboleski, Mark R; Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A; Pappas, Claudia; Houser, Katherine V; Tumpey, Terrence M; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2009-11-01

    Immunization against conserved virus components induces broad, heterosubtypic protection against diverse influenza A viruses, providing a strategy for controlling unexpected outbreaks or pandemics until strain-matched vaccines become available. This study characterized immunization to nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 2 (M2) by DNA priming followed by parenteral or mucosal boosting in mice and ferrets. DNA vaccination followed by boosting with antigen-matched recombinant adenovirus (rAd) or cold-adapted (ca) influenza virus provided robust protection against virulent H1N1 and H5N1 challenges. Compared to other boosts, mucosal rAd induced stronger IgA responses, more virus-specific activated T-cells in the lung, and better protection against morbidity following challenge even eight months post-boost. In ferrets, both mucosal and parenteral rAd boosting protected from lethal H5N1 challenge. These findings demonstrate potent protection by vaccination highly focused on conserved antigens and identify immune response measures in mice that differed among vaccinations and correlated with outcome. PMID:19729082

  9. Parenteral adenoviral boost enhances BCG induced protection, but not long term survival in a murine model of bovine TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Webb, Paul R; Wooff, Esen E; Bachy, Véronique S; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-07-25

    Boosting BCG using heterologous prime-boost represents a promising strategy for improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, and adenovirus (Ad) delivery is established as an efficacious boosting vehicle. Although studies demonstrate that intranasal administration of Ad boost to BCG offers optimal protection, this is not currently possible in cattle. Using Ad vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigen TB10.4 (BCG/Ad-TB10.4), we demonstrate, parenteral boost of BCG immunised mice to induce specific CD8(+) IFN-γ producing T cells via synergistic priming of new epitopes. This induces significant improvement in pulmonary protection against Mycobacterium bovis over that provided by BCG when assessed in a standard 4week challenge model. However, in a stringent, year-long survival study, BCG/Ad-TB10.4 did not improve outcome over BCG, which we suggest may be due to the lack of additional memory cells (IL-2(+)) induced by boosting. These data indicate BCG-prime/parenteral-Ad-TB10.4-boost to be a promising candidate, but also highlight the need for further understanding of the mechanisms of T cell priming and associated memory using Ad delivery systems. That we were able to generate significant improvement in pulmonary protection above BCG with parenteral, rather than mucosal administration of boost vaccine is critical; suggesting that the generation of effective mucosal immunity is possible, without the risks and challenges of mucosal administration, but that further work to specifically enhance sustained protective immunity is required. PMID:27317453

  10. IAEA outlines measures to enhance protection against nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr. ElBaradei, head of the IAEA presented a report today to the Agency's Board of Governors, outlining plans for substantially expanding and strengthening IAEA programmes relevant to improving nuclear security. The report addresses the IAEA's response to the following threats from acts of nuclear terrorism by a subnational group: acquisition of a nuclear weapon; acquisition of nuclear material to construct a nuclear weapon or to cause a radiological hazard; acquisition of other radioactive materials to cause a radiological hazard; and violent acts against nuclear facilities to cause a radiological hazard. The report puts a price tag on its proposed programme upgrades at $30-50 million per year, representing an initial 10-15% increase in the IAEA's overall resources. Additionally, Mr. ElBaradei said the IAEA's budget is currently underfeed by about $40 million due to a budgetary policy over many years of 'zero real growth', and called on Member States to provide the resources required to cope with the newly emerging threat. 'In addition to the resources required for urgent international assistance,' Mr. ElBaradei said, 'the necessary global upgrades to meet the full range of possible threats would be in the range of hundreds of millions of dollars and would have to be carried out by individual States and through bilateral and multilateral assistance'. The IAEA would play a coordinating role in delivering this assistance.If States provide adequate funding, Mr. ElBaradei predicts that the enhanced and additional activities proposed in his report should lead over time to a powerful national and international security framework for nuclear facilities and material. The Summary of Report on 'Protection Against Nuclear Terrorism' presented to the IAEA Board of Governors on 30.11.2001 is attached

  11. Fibronectin EDA and CpG synergize to enhance antigen-specific Th1 and cytotoxic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julier, Ziad; de Titta, Alexandre; Grimm, Alizée J; Simeoni, Eleonora; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2016-05-01

    Subunit vaccines, employing purified protein antigens rather than intact pathogens, require the addition of adjuvants for enhanced immunogenicity with a correct balance between strong activation of the immune system and low toxicity. Here we show that the endogenous (i.e., autologous) non-toxic TLR4 agonist extra domain A type III repeat of fibronectin (FNIII EDA) can synergize with the exogenous (i.e., bacterial), toxic-at-high-dose, TLR9 agonist CpG to induce efficient cellular immune responses while keeping the dose of CpG low. The efficacy of the combined TLR agonists, even at half-doses, led to stronger dendritic cell activation, enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation as well as stronger humoral response, compared to the individual agonists given at full doses. Immune cells induced after vaccination with the co-adjuvanted formulation could mediate tumor regression in an E.G7-OVA tumor model, and eradicate circulating hepatitis B virus (HBV) in a transgenic HBV model. Together, these results show that endogenous TLR agonists, such as variants of FNIII EDA, can synergize with exogenous TLR ligands, such as CpG, and strongly enhance cellular immune responses, while improving their safety profile. PMID:27016652

  12. Induction of protective T-helper 1 immune responses against Echinococcus granulosus in mice by a multi-T-cell epitope antigen based on five proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Esmaelizad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we designed an experiment to predict a potential immunodominant T-cell epitope and evaluate the protectivity of this antigen in immunised mice. The T-cell epitopes of the candidate proteins (EgGST, EgA31, Eg95, EgTrp and P14-3-3 were detected using available web-based databases. The synthesised DNA was subcloned into the pET41a+ vector and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion to glutathione-S-transferase protein (GST. The resulting chimeric protein was then purified by affinity chromatography. Twenty female C57BL/6 mice were immunised with the antigen emulsified in Freund's adjuvant. Mouse splenocytes were then cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium in the presence of the antigen. The production of interferon-γ was significantly higher in the immunised mice than in the control mice (> 1,300 pg/mL, but interleukin (IL-10 and IL-4 production was not statistically different between the two groups. In a challenge study in which mice were infected with 500 live protoscolices, a high protectivity level (99.6% was demonstrated in immunised BALB/C mice compared to the findings in the control groups [GST and adjuvant (Adj ]. These results demonstrate the successful application of the predicted T-cell epitope in designing a vaccine against Echinococcus granulosus in a mouse model.

  13. Long-lived antigen-induced IgM plasma cells demonstrate somatic mutations and contribute to long-term protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Caitlin; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Cui, Ang; Tipton, Christopher; Michaeli, Miri; Skountzou, Ioanna; Mittler, Robert S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Mehr, Ramit; Lee, Francis Eun-Yun; Sanz, Ignacio; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells are critical to humoral immunity as a lifelong source of protective antibodies. Antigen-activated B cells-with T-cell help-undergo affinity maturation within germinal centres and persist as long-lived IgG plasma cells in the bone marrow. Here we show that antigen-specific, induced IgM plasma cells also persist for a lifetime. Unlike long-lived IgG plasma cells, which develop in germinal centres and then home to the bone marrow, IgM plasma cells are primarily retained within the spleen and can develop even in the absence of germinal centres. Interestingly, their expressed IgV loci exhibit somatic mutations introduced by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). However, these IgM plasma cells are probably not antigen-selected, as replacement mutations are spread through the variable segment and not enriched within the CDRs. Finally, antibodies from long-lived IgM plasma cells provide protective host immunity against a lethal virus challenge. PMID:27270306

  14. Protective immunity induced in mice by F8.1 and F8.2 antigens purified from Schistosoma mansoni eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Campra Ferreira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA were fractionated by isoelectric focusing, resulting in 20 components, characterized by pH, absorbance and protein concentration. The higher absorbance fractions were submitted to electrophoresis, and fraction 8 (F8 presented a specific pattern of bands on its isoelectric point. Protein 3 was observed only on F8, and so, it was utilized to rabbit immunization, in order to evaluate its capacity of inducing protective immunity. IgG antibodies from rabbit anti-F8 serum were coupled to Sepharose, and used to obtain the specific antigen by affinity chromatography. This antigen, submitted to electrophoresis, presented two proteic bands (F8.1 and F8.2, which were transferred to nitrocellulose membrane (PVDF and sequenciated. The homology of F8.2 to known proteins was determined using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program (BLASTp. Significant homologies were obtained for the rabbit cytosolic Ca2+ uptake inhibitor, and for the bird a1-proteinase inhibitor. Immunization of mice with F8.1 and F8.2, in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum and Al(OH3 as adjuvant, induced a significant protection degree against challenge infection, as observed by the decrease on worm burden recovered from portal system.

  15. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang (Ethan); Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L...

  16. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology i

  17. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously identified the mycobacterial high G+C codon usage bias as a limiting factor in heterologous expression of MAP proteins from Lb.salivarius, and demonstrated that codon optimisation of a synthetic coding gene greatly enhances MAP protein production. Here, we effectively demonstrate ...

  18. Detergent pretreatment of solid phase globular proteins in ELISA`s. Enhanced antigenicity and subsequent sensitivity. Final report, September 1989-September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, G.C.; Bouhmadouche, M.; Williamson, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    Methods for pretreatment and rejuvenation of preimmobilized globular proteins used in immunodiagnostics were investigated using reagents routinely used in ELISA`s. Rabbit and goat gamma globulins, functioning as antigens, and antibodies on non-covalent, and covalent solid surfaces, were monitored for detergent mediated desorption, denaturation, non-specific binding and altered antigenicity. The results from fourteen commercially supplied polyvinyl- and polystyrene-derivatized microtiter plates coated with antibody or antigenic lgG were compared with commercial microtiter diagnostic plates with preimmobilized lgG. Wash solutions had no effect on immobilized gamma globulins when the solid phase protein functioned as an antibody on covalent or noncovalent surfaces. In addition to tween 20 removing up to 50% of noncovalently bound protein additional binding sites are apparently exposed on solid phase antigens, evident by an increase in signal, which cannot be explained by nonspecific binding. However, no increase in signal was evident when antigen was preimmobilized covalently. The role of between 20 and other reagent components in ELISA-based assays are explored. The screening of noncovalent preimmobilized antigen coated surfaces prior to use for deteraent mediated enhancement is suggested.

  19. 76 FR 54408 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... current regulations for protecting human subjects who participate in research might be modernized and... comments of September 26, 2011. The ANPRM requests comments on how current regulations for protecting human... protect human subjects who are involved in research, while facilitating valuable research and...

  20. Immunochemical characterization and purification of Sm-97 a Schistosoma manosin antigen monospecifically recognized by antibodies from mice protectively immunized with a nonliving vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice protected against Shistosoma mansoni infection by intradermal (i.d.) vaccination with nonliving schistosomula or soluble extracts of larval or adult schistosomes (SCHLARP and SWAP, respectively) produce antibodies that react by Western blot analysis with one antigen of M/sub r/ (x 10-3) 97 in SWAP prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors and two antigens of M/sub r/ (x 10-3) 95 and 78 in SWAP prepared in their absence. Vaccine antibodies also immunoprecipitated a single 97k molecule, with a pI of 5.5, from detergent extracts of [35S]methionine-labeled schistosomes. Three hybridomas, produced from spleen cells of i.d. immunized mice, all recognized both the 95k/78k doublet and one 97k antigen, indicating that the two lower M/sub r/ components are degradation products of the same 97k molecule. 125I-concanavalin a bound weakly to purified Sm-97, indicating that this antigen is minimally glycosylated. Competitive radioimmunoassays performed with 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies and purified antigen defined at least two distinct epitopes on Sm-97. Antibodies from i.d. vaccinated mice recognized both monoclonal antibody-defined epitopes, whereas anti-Sm-97 antibodies in chronic infection sera recognized neither. Finally, purified Sm-97 was shown to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity in i.d. vaccinated mice, suggesting that this molecule is also capable of evoking cell-mediated responses, a finding consistent with its proposed function as a vaccine immunogen

  1. Pegylated interferon α enhances recovery of memory T cells in e antigen positive chronic hepatitis B patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons (IFNs are a group of cytokines commonly used in the clinical treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients. Their therapeutic effects are highly correlated with recovery of host antiviral immunity. Clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV is mediated partially by activated functional memory T cells. The aims of the present study were to investigate memory T cell status in patients with different outcomes following pegylated interferon-α (IFN-α therapy and to identify new biomarkers for predicting antiviral immune responses. Methods Peripheral blood cells were isolated from 23 CHB patients who were treated with pegylated IFN-α at week 0 (baseline and week 24. Co-expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1 and CD244 in CD45RO positive T cells, as well as a subset of CD127 and CXCR4 positive memory T cells were assessed. In addition, perforin, granzyme B, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ expressions were also analyzed by flow cytometric analysis after intracytoplasmic cytokine staining (ICCS. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC isolated at week 24 were re-challenged with exogenous HBV core antigen, and the percentage of IFN-γ expression, serum HBV DNA loads, and ALT (alanine aminotransferase levels were evaluated. Results At week 24, PD-1 and CD244 expression in CD8 memory T cells were down-regulated (P P P P P P r = −0.47, P = 0.001. The responders had a higher IFN-γ expression in memory T cells than the non-responders did after HBV antigen re-stimulation in vitro. Conclusion Pegylated IFN-α treatment enhanced recovery of memory T cells in CHB patients by down-regulating inhibitory receptors and up-regulating effector molecules. The expressions of CXCR4 and CD127 in CD8 memory T cell may be used as biomarkers for predicting the outcome of treatment.

  2. BCG Δzmp1 vaccine induces enhanced antigen specific immune responses in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Whelan, Adam; Clifford, Derek; Petrera, Agnese; Sander, Peter; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes major economy and public health problem in numerous countries. In Great Britain, despite the use of a test-and-slaughter strategy, the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle has steadily risen in recent years. One strategy being considered to reduce the burden of bTB in cattle is the development of an efficient vaccine. The only current potentially available vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), has demonstrated variable efficacy in both humans and cattle and the development of improved vaccination strategies for cattle is a research priority. In this study we assessed the immunogenicity in cattle of two recombinant BCG strains, namely BCG Pasteur Δzmp1::aph and BCG Danish Δzmp1. By applying a recently defined predictive immune-correlate of protection (T cell memory responses measured by cultured ELISPOT), we have compared these two recombinant BCG with wild-type BCG Danish SSI. Our results demonstrated that both strains induced superior T cell memory responses compared to wild-type BCG. These data provide support for the prioritisation of testing BCG Danish Δzmp1 in vaccination/M. bovis challenge studies to determine its protective efficacy. PMID:24394444

  3. A study on the enhancement of Westinghouse DNB protection logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the conventional Westinghouse DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) protection logic is implemented on analog circuits, the logic must be very simple. However, if the DNB protection logic is implemented in a digital processor, a little bit of complexity can be allowed to increase the thermal (or operation) margin. The Westinghouse OTΔΓ DNB protection logic heavily restricts the operation region by applying the same logic for a full range of pressure in order to maintain its simplicity. In this work, the different DNB protection logic is used for several regions of pressure. The proposed method is applied to Yonggwang 1 and 2 nuclear power plants and it is calculated that the improved OTΔΓ can have 5.07% percent more thermal margin than the conventional OTΔΓ trip logic

  4. Local active gingival immunization by a 3,800-molecular-weight streptococcal antigen in protection against dental caries.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehner, T.; Mehlert, A; Caldwell, J

    1986-01-01

    Local gingival immunization was attempted in an effort to confine the immune response to the oral cavity and bypass the systemic immune response. A low-molecular-weight (3.8K) streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II was applied 10 times over a period of 1 year to the gingival crevices of rhesus monkeys. The antigen was maintained in situ by means of silicone rubber appliances. Serial examinations over a period of 1 year showed that topical gingival immunization with the 3.8K SA results in a significa...

  5. Antibodies to variant antigens on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes are associated with protection from malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodoo, D; Staalsoe, T; Giha, H;

    2001-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Each parasite genome contains about 40 PfEMP1 genes, but only 1 PfEMP1 gene is expressed at a given time. PfEMP1 serves as a parasite-sequestering ligand to endoth...

  6. Enhanced T cell responses to antigenic peptides targeted to B cell surface Ig, Ia, or class I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The helper T cell recognition of soluble globular protein antigens requires that the proteins be processed by an APC, releasing a peptide that is transported to and held on the APC surface where it is recognized by the specific T cell in conjunction with Ia. When cellular processing functions are blocked, APC lose their ability to present native antigens while retaining the capacity to activate T cells when provided with a cognate peptide fragment that contains the T cell antigenic determinan...

  7. Modeling the presentation of C3d-coated antigen by B lymphocytes: enhancement by CR1/2-BCR co-ligation is selective for the co-ligating antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Baiu, Dana C; Horváth, Attila; Erdei, Anna

    2002-03-01

    We have used a set of single-chain variable fragment antibodies (sc) genetically fused with an influenza hemagglutinin-derived peptide as a means to investigate the role of CR1 and CR2 in antigen presentation by B cells. When incubated with the B cell lymphoma 2PK3, peptide-containing sc specific for either CR1 or CR1/2 mediated activation of the hemagglutinin peptide-specific T cell line IP-12-7, as assessed by IL-2 production. Efficient presentation was dependent on the binding of the constructs to CR1/2, implying that receptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for the effect. Cross-linkage of CR1/2 or CD19 by mAb did not increase the extent of T cell activation. However, when CR1/2 was co-ligated with the BCR--using either polyclonal goat anti-mouse IgG or recombinant protein LA--the antigen concentration required to activate T cells decreased by two orders of magnitude. Moreover, this enhancement was selective for the antigen included in these complexes and did not affect the presentation of a free peptide or of antigen bound to CR1/2 excluded from the complexes. These results suggest that B cells may bind various C3d-coated antigens at a time, but only the one which reacts with the BCR will be processed with high efficiency. This mechanism may ensure the specificity of cognate T cell help. PMID:11867560

  8. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertran, Kateri; Thomas, Colleen; Guo, Xuan; Bublot, Michel; Pritchard, Nikki; Regan, Jeffrey T; Cox, Kevin M; Gasdaska, John R; Dickey, Lynn F; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2015-07-01

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.2μg or 2.3 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) mean chicken embryo infectious doses (EID50) of homologous virus strain. Both dosages of rLemna-HA conferred clinical protection and dramatically reduced viral shedding. Almost all the birds immunized with either dosage of rLemna-HA elicited HA antibody titers against Indo/03 antigen, suggesting an association between levels of anti-Indo/03 antibodies and protection. In Experiment 2, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.9 μg or 2.2 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) EID50 of heterologous H5N1 virus strains A/chicken/Vietnam/NCVD-421/2010 (VN/10) or A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Birds challenged with VN/10 exhibited 100% survival regardless of immunization dosage, while birds challenged with PWT/06 had 50% and 30% mortality at 0.9 μg HA and 2.2 μg HA, respectively. For each challenge virus, viral shedding titers from 2.2 μg HA vaccinated birds were significantly lower than those from 0.9μg HA vaccinated birds, and titers from both immunized groups were in turn significantly lower than those from sham vaccinated birds. Even if immunized birds elicited HA titers against the vaccine antigen Indo/03, only the groups challenged with VN/10 developed humoral immunity against the challenge antigen. None (rLemna-HA 0.9 μg HA) and 40% (rLemna-HA 2.2 μg HA) of the immunized birds challenged with PWT/06 elicited pre-challenge antibody titers, respectively. In conclusion, Lemna-expressed HA demonstrated complete protective immunity against homologous challenge and suboptimal protection against heterologous challenge, the latter being similar to results from inactivated whole virus vaccines. Transgenic duckweed-derived HA could be a

  9. Gene silencing of the tick protective antigens, Bm86, Bm91 and subolesin, in the one-host tick Boophilus microplus by RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    Nijhof, A. M.; Taoufik, A.; de la Fuente, M.R.; Kocan, K M; de Vries, E; Jongejan, F

    2007-01-01

    The use of RNA interference (RNAi) to assess gene function has been demonstrated in several three-host tick species but adaptation of RNAi to the one-host tick, Boophilus microplus, has not been reported. We evaluated the application of RNAi in B. microplus and the effect of gene silencing on three tick-protective antigens: Bm86, Bm91 and subolesin. Gene-specific double-stranded (dsRNA) was injected into two tick stages, freshly molted unfed and engorged females, and specific gene silencing w...

  10. Antibodies to variable Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte surface antigens are associated with protection from novel malaria infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D;

    2000-01-01

    In areas of unstable transmission malaria affects all age groups, but the malaria incidence is lower in adults compared to children and teenagers. Under such conditions subclinical Plasmodium falciparum infections are common and some infections are controlled, because blood parasitaemia is...... susceptible and protected individuals. Together, the results indicate that pre-existing anti-PfEMP1 antibodies can reduce the risk of contracting clinical malaria when challenged by novel parasite clones expressing homologous, but not heterologous variable surface antigens. The results also confirm that...

  11. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornbluth Richard S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR and CD40 ligands (CD40L as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C.

  12. Security enhanced BioEncoding for protecting iris codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouda, Osama; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya

    2011-06-01

    Improving the security of biometric template protection techniques is a key prerequisite for the widespread deployment of biometric technologies. BioEncoding is a recently proposed template protection scheme, based on the concept of cancelable biometrics, for protecting biometric templates represented as binary strings such as iris codes. The main advantage of BioEncoding over other template protection schemes is that it does not require user-specific keys and/or tokens during verification. Besides, it satisfies all the requirements of the cancelable biometrics construct without deteriorating the matching accuracy. However, although it has been shown that BioEncoding is secure enough against simple brute-force search attacks, the security of BioEncoded templates against more smart attacks, such as record multiplicity attacks, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper, a rigorous security analysis of BioEncoding is presented. Firstly, resistance of BioEncoded templates against brute-force attacks is revisited thoroughly. Secondly, we show that although the cancelable transformation employed in BioEncoding might be non-invertible for a single protected template, the original iris code could be inverted by correlating several templates used in different applications but created from the same iris. Accordingly, we propose an important modification to the BioEncoding transformation process in order to hinder attackers from exploiting this type of attacks. The effectiveness of adopting the suggested modification is validated and its impact on the matching accuracy is investigated empirically using CASIA-IrisV3-Interval dataset. Experimental results confirm the efficacy of the proposed approach and show that it preserves the matching accuracy of the unprotected iris recognition system.

  13. DNA-Launched Alphavirus Replicons Encoding a Fusion of Mycobacterial Antigens Acr and Ag85B Are Immunogenic and Protective in a Murine Model of TB Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmia, Neha; Klimstra, William B; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for effective prophylactic measures against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, particularly given the highly variable efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Most studies indicate that cell-mediated immune responses involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are necessary for effective immunity against Mtb. Genetic vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses, including CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, against a variety of bacterial, viral, parasitic and tumor antigens, and this strategy may therefore hold promise for the development of more effective TB vaccines. Novel formulations and delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines have recently been evaluated, and have shown varying degrees of success. In the present study, we evaluated DNA-launched Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons (Vrep) encoding a novel fusion of the mycobacterial antigens α-crystallin (Acr) and antigen 85B (Ag85B), termed Vrep-Acr/Ag85B, for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary TB. Vrep-Acr/Ag85B generated antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that persisted for at least 10 wk post-immunization. Interestingly, parenterally administered Vrep-Acr/Ag85B also induced T cell responses in the lung tissues, the primary site of infection, and inhibited bacterial growth in both the lungs and spleens following aerosol challenge with Mtb. DNA-launched Vrep may, therefore, represent an effective approach to the development of gene-based vaccines against TB, particularly as components of heterologous prime-boost strategies or as BCG boosters. PMID:26317509

  14. DNA-Launched Alphavirus Replicons Encoding a Fusion of Mycobacterial Antigens Acr and Ag85B Are Immunogenic and Protective in a Murine Model of TB Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Dalmia

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for effective prophylactic measures against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection, particularly given the highly variable efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB. Most studies indicate that cell-mediated immune responses involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are necessary for effective immunity against Mtb. Genetic vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses, including CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, against a variety of bacterial, viral, parasitic and tumor antigens, and this strategy may therefore hold promise for the development of more effective TB vaccines. Novel formulations and delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines have recently been evaluated, and have shown varying degrees of success. In the present study, we evaluated DNA-launched Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons (Vrep encoding a novel fusion of the mycobacterial antigens α-crystallin (Acr and antigen 85B (Ag85B, termed Vrep-Acr/Ag85B, for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary TB. Vrep-Acr/Ag85B generated antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that persisted for at least 10 wk post-immunization. Interestingly, parenterally administered Vrep-Acr/Ag85B also induced T cell responses in the lung tissues, the primary site of infection, and inhibited bacterial growth in both the lungs and spleens following aerosol challenge with Mtb. DNA-launched Vrep may, therefore, represent an effective approach to the development of gene-based vaccines against TB, particularly as components of heterologous prime-boost strategies or as BCG boosters.

  15. Co-Administration of Molecular Adjuvants Expressing NF-Kappa B Subunit p65/RelA or Type-1 Transactivator T-bet Enhance Antigen Specific DNA Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon J. Shedlock

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA vaccine-induced immunity can be enhanced by the co-delivery of synthetic gene-encoding molecular adjuvants. Many of these adjuvants have included cytokines, chemokines or co-stimulatory molecules that have been demonstrated to enhance vaccine-induced immunity by increasing the magnitude or type of immune responses and/or protective efficacy. In this way, through the use of adjuvants, immune responses can be highly customizable and functionally tailored for optimal efficacy against pathogen specific (i.e., infectious agent or non-pathogen (i.e., cancer antigens. In the novel study presented here, we examined the use of cellular transcription factors as molecular adjuvants. Specifically the co-delivery of (a RelA, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription complex or (b T-bet, a Th1-specific T box transcription factor, along with a prototypical DNA vaccine expressing HIV-1 proteins was evaluated. As well, all of the vaccines and adjuvants were administered to mice using in vivo electroporation (EP, a technology demonstrated to dramatically increase plasmid DNA transfection and subsequent transgene expression with concomitant enhancement of vaccine induced immune responses. As such, this study demonstrated that co-delivery of either adjuvant resulted in enhanced T and B cell responses, specifically characterized by increased T cell numbers, IFN-γ production, as well as enhanced antibody responses. This study demonstrates the use of cellular transcription factors as adjuvants for enhancing DNA vaccine-induced immunity.

  16. Site-specific mutagenesis of Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen enhances its effects on calf thymus DNA polymerase δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Holly

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have shown four distinct and presumably related effects of mammalian proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA on DNA synthesis catalyzed by mammalian DNA polymerase δ(pol δ. In the presence of homologous PCNA, pol δ exhibits 1 increased absolute activity; 2 increased processivity of DNA synthesis; 3 stable binding of synthetic oligonucleotide template-primers (t1/2 of the pol δ•PCNA•template-primer complex ≥2.5 h; and 4 enhanced synthesis of DNA opposite and beyond template base lesions. This last effect is potentially mutagenic in vivo. Biochemical studies performed in parallel with in vivo genetic analyses, would represent an extremely powerful approach to investigate further, both DNA replication and repair in eukaryotes. Results Drosophila PCNA, although highly similar in structure to mammalian PCNA (e.g., it is >70% identical to human PCNA in amino acid sequence, can only substitute poorly for either calf thymus or human PCNA (~10% as well in affecting calf thymus pol δ. However, by mutating one or only a few amino acids in the region of Drosophila PCNA thought to interact with pol δ, all four effects can be enhanced dramatically. Conclusions Our results therefore suggest that all four above effects depend at least in part on the PCNA-pol δ interaction. Moreover unlike mammals, Drosophila offers the potential for immediate in vivo genetic analyses. Although it has proven difficult to obtain sufficient amounts of homologous pol δ for parallel in vitro biochemical studies, by altering Drosophila PCNA using site-directed mutagenesis as suggested by our results, in vitro biochemical studies may now be performed using human and/or calf thymus pol δ preparations.

  17. Yohimbine Enhances Protection of Berberine against LPS-Induced Mouse Lethality through Multiple Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Li; Yiyang Wang; Haoqing Zhang; Baoyin Jia; Daan Wang; Hongmei Li; Daxiang Lu; Renbin Qi; Yuxia Yan; Huadong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care units, better therapies are urgently needed. Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important trigger of sepsis. We have demonstrated that berberine (Ber) protects against lethality induced by LPS, which is enhanced by yohimbine (Y) pretreatment, and Ber combined with Y also improves survival in septic mice. However, the precise mechanisms by which Y enhances protection of Ber against LPS - induced lethality remain un...

  18. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  19. The diagnostic sensitivity of dengue rapid test assays is significantly enhanced by using a combined antigen and antibody testing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Fry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serological tests for IgM and IgG are routinely used in clinical laboratories for the rapid diagnosis of dengue and can differentiate between primary and secondary infections. Dengue virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 has been identified as an early marker for acute dengue, and is typically present between days 1-9 post-onset of illness but following seroconversion it can be difficult to detect in serum. AIMS: To evaluate the performance of a newly developed Panbio® Dengue Early Rapid test for NS1 and determine if it can improve diagnostic sensitivity when used in combination with a commercial IgM/IgG rapid test. METHODOLOGY: The clinical performance of the Dengue Early Rapid was evaluated in a retrospective study in Vietnam with 198 acute laboratory-confirmed positive and 100 negative samples. The performance of the Dengue Early Rapid in combination with the IgM/IgG Rapid test was also evaluated in Malaysia with 263 laboratory-confirmed positive and 30 negative samples. KEY RESULTS: In Vietnam the sensitivity and specificity of the test was 69.2% (95% CI: 62.8% to 75.6% and 96% (95% CI: 92.2% to 99.8 respectively. In Malaysia the performance was similar with 68.9% sensitivity (95% CI: 61.8% to 76.1% and 96.7% specificity (95% CI: 82.8% to 99.9% compared to RT-PCR. Importantly, when the Dengue Early Rapid test was used in combination with the IgM/IgG test the sensitivity increased to 93.0%. When the two tests were compared at each day post-onset of illness there was clear differentiation between the antigen and antibody markers. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights that using dengue NS1 antigen detection in combination with anti-glycoprotein E IgM and IgG serology can significantly increase the sensitivity of acute dengue diagnosis and extends the possible window of detection to include very early acute samples and enhances the clinical utility of rapid immunochromatographic testing for dengue.

  20. Synthetic RORγt Agonists Enhance Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mi Ra; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Doebelin, Christelle; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Novick, Scott J; Kuruvilla, Dana S; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2016-04-15

    The T cell specific RORγ isoform RORγt has been shown to be the key lineage-defining transcription factor to initiate the differentiation program of TH17 and TC17 cells, cells that have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. RORγt controls gene networks that enhance immunity including increased IL17 production and decreased immune suppression. Both synthetic and putative endogenous agonists of RORγt have been shown to increase the basal activity of RORγt enhancing TH17 cell proliferation. Here, we show that activation of RORγt using synthetic agonists drives proliferation of TH17 cells while decreasing levels of the immune checkpoint protein PD-1, a mechanism that should enhance antitumor immunity while blunting tumor associated adaptive immune resistance. Interestingly, putative endogenous agonists drive proliferation of TH17 cells but do not repress PD-1. These findings suggest that synthetic agonists of RORγt should activate TC17/TH17 cells (with concomitant reduction in the Tregs population), repress PD-1, and produce IL17 in situ (a factor associated with good prognosis in cancer). Enhanced immunity and blockage of immune checkpoints has transformed cancer treatment; thus such a molecule would provide a unique approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26785144

  1. Antigenicity and protective efficacy of a Leishmania amastigote-specific protein, member of the super-oxygenase family, against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian T Martins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to evaluate a hypothetical Leishmania amastigote-specific protein (LiHyp1, previously identified by an immunoproteomic approach performed in Leishmania infantum, which showed homology to the super-oxygenase gene family, attempting to select a new candidate antigen for specific serodiagnosis, as well as to compose a vaccine against VL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The LiHyp1 DNA sequence was cloned; the recombinant protein (rLiHyp1 was purified and evaluated for its antigenicity and immunogenicity. The rLiHyp1 protein was recognized by antibodies from sera of asymptomatic and symptomatic animals with canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL, but presented no cross-reactivity with sera of dogs vaccinated with Leish-Tec, a Brazilian commercial vaccine; with Chagas' disease or healthy animals. In addition, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rLiHyp1 plus saponin was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged subcutaneously with virulent L. infantum promastigotes. rLiHyp1 plus saponin vaccinated mice showed a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with the recombinant protein. Immunized and infected mice, as compared to the control groups (saline and saponin, showed significant reductions in the number of parasites found in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and in the paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, produced mainly by CD4 T cells. In these mice, a decrease in the parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 response could also be observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study showed that this Leishmania oxygenase amastigote-specific protein can be used for a more sensitive and specific serodiagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic CVL and, when combined with a Th1-type adjuvant, can also be employ as a candidate antigen to develop vaccines against VL.

  2. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  3. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Young Kim

    Full Text Available Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4 of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2 type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ. The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats.

  4. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  5. Adsorption of recombinant poxvirus L1-protein to aluminum hydroxide/CpG vaccine adjuvants enhances immune responses and protection of mice from vaccinia virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuhong; Zeng, Yuhong; Alexander, Edward; Mehta, Shyam; Joshi, Sangeeta B.; Buchman, George W.; Volkin, David B.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Isaacs, Stuart N.

    2012-01-01

    The stockpiling of live vaccinia virus vaccines has enhanced biopreparedness against the intentional or accidental release of smallpox. Ongoing research on future generation smallpox vaccines is providing key insights into protective immune responses as well as important information about subunit vaccine design strategies. For protein-based recombinant subunit vaccines, the formulation and stability of candidate antigens with different adjuvants are important factors to consider for vaccine design. In this work, a non-tagged secreted L1-protein, a target antigen on mature virus, was expressed using recombinant baculovirus technology and purified. To identify optimal formulation conditions for L1, a series of biophysical studies was performed over a range of pH and temperature conditions. The overall physical stability profile was summarized in an empirical phase diagram. Another critical question to address for development of an adjuvanted-vaccine was if immunogenicity and protection could be affected by the interactions and binding of L1 to aluminum salts (Alhydrogel) with and without a second adjuvant, CpG. We thus designed a series of vaccine formulations with different binding interactions between the L1 and the two adjuvants, and then performed a series of vaccination-challenge experiments in mice including measurement of antibody responses and post-challenge weight-loss and survival. We found that better humoral responses and protection were conferred with vaccine formulations when the L1-protein was adsorbed to Alhydrogel. These data demonstrate that designing vaccine formulation conditions to maximize antigen-adjuvant interactions is a key factor in smallpox subunit vaccine immunogenicity and protection. PMID:23153450

  6. Enhancing blockade of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion: assessing combinations of antibodies against PfRH5 and other merozoite antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Williams

    Full Text Available No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC(50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines.

  7. Partial Regulatory T Cell Depletion Prior to Schistosomiasis Vaccination Does Not Enhance the Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Fan; Zhou, Sha; Xu, Zhipeng; Hoellwarth, Jason; Chen, Xiaojun; He, Lei; Zhang, Rongbo; Feng LIU; Wang, Jun; Su, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not only influence self-antigen specific immune responses, but also dampen the protective effect induced by a number of vaccines. The impact of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on vaccines against schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that is a major public health concern, however, has not been examined. In this study, a DNA vaccine encoding a 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum (pVAX1-Sj26GST) was constructed and its potential effects were...

  8. [UV Protection Law. Enhancing the protection of minors against health risks from solaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, M

    2006-12-01

    The article reports on a petition to the German Bundestag in the field of UV protection for persons under the age of 18 against the dangers of artificial sunbed tanning for cosmetic purposes. On 16 March 2006 the Parliament agreed to adopt the proposal of the author, after the Ministry of Environment announced it is working on a UV Protection Law for Germany. Furthermore the committee recommended the petition to the government and the parliamentary parties. The UV Protection Law is still in progress, and no draft has yet been published. Therefore, the author explains the difficulties in creating such law from a legal and a public health perspective, pointing out that the split of competence between the federation and the states poses difficulties. He concludes that the German Constitution would allow a sunbed prohibition for minors in public studios and explains why a complete prohibition for the adult population would be disproportionate and unconstitutional. PMID:17043832

  9. A Vectored Measles Virus Induces Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Antibodies While Protecting Macaques against Measles Virus Challenge▿

    OpenAIRE

    del Valle, Jorge Reyes; Devaux, Patricia; Hodge, Gregory; Wegner, Nicholas J.; McChesney, Michael B.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) acute and chronic infections remain a major worldwide health problem. Towards developing an anti-HBV vaccine with single-dose scheme potential, we engineered infectious measles virus (MV) genomic cDNAs with a vaccine strain background and expression vector properties. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expression cassettes were inserted into this cDNA and three MVs expressing HBsAg at different levels generated. All vectored MVs, which secrete HBsAg as subviral partic...

  10. The role of protective scales in enhancing oxidation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been steady progress in the development of wrought nickel-containing alloys for use in high temperature oxidizing environments. Contributing significantly to this progress is a growing knowledge base on the role of scales in enhancing oxidation resistance. Future improvements in oxidation resistance must build upon this understanding. This paper seeks to survey a portion of the wealth of information regarding scale characteristics of commercial wrought nickel-containing alloys and how scales are influenced by environment and alloy composition. Some suggestions as to the future direction of alloy development with regard to scale optimization and increased oxidation resistance are proposed

  11. Protecting Ligands Enhance Selective Targeting of Multivalent Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programmed to bind biological targets, e.g. cells, depending on the receptors they express, providing a general platform for the development of different technologies, from selective drug-delivery to biosensing. In order to be highly selective ligands should exclusively bind to specific targeted receptors, since formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to non-specific binding and potentially harmful behaviour. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is presented here to describe the extent to which bond strength and nanoparticle valency can induce non-selective adsorption. The same model is used to describe a possible solution: functionalization of the nanoparticles with "protective" receptors. The latter compete with cell receptors for the targeting ligands, and can be optimized to strongly reduce the effect of u...

  12. Phase-noise protection in quantum-enhanced differential interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential interferometry (DI) with two coupled sensors is a most powerful approach for precision measurements in the presence of strong phase noise. However, DI has been studied and implemented only with classical resources. Here we generalize the theory of differential interferometry to the case of entangled probe states. We demonstrate that, for perfectly correlated interferometers and in the presence of arbitrary large phase noise, sub-shot noise sensitivities—up to the Heisenberg limit—are still possible with a special class of entangled states in the ideal lossless scenario. These states belong to a decoherence free subspace where entanglement is passively protected. Our work paves the way to the full exploitation of entanglement in precision measurements. (paper)

  13. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB1 receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis attenuates

  14. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, Luciano R. [Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H. [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Doria, Juliana G. [Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Flávia [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aguiar, Daniele C. [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R. [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, Fabíola M. [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moraes, Marcio F.D., E-mail: mfdm@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Physiology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moreira, Fabricio A., E-mail: fabriciomoreira@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  15. 76 FR 44512 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ..., psychological, and informational risks. (Although there are other harms, such as legal, social, and economic... weaker protections for subjects than if there were fewer reviews but greater responsibility on the part... ordinarily encountered in daily life or during the performance of routine physical or...

  16. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen conce...

  17. Fusion of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85A to an oligomerization domain enhances its immunogenicity in both mice and non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available To prevent important infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria and HIV, vaccines inducing greater T cell responses are required. In this study, we investigated whether fusion of the M. tuberculosis antigen 85A to recently described adjuvant IMX313, a hybrid avian C4bp oligomerization domain, could increase T cell responses in pre-clinical vaccine model species. In mice, the fused antigen 85A showed consistent increases in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses after DNA and MVA vaccination. In rhesus macaques, higher IFN-γ responses were observed in animals vaccinated with MVA-Ag85A IMX313 after both primary and secondary immunizations. In both animal models, fusion to IMX313 induced a quantitative enhancement in the response without altering its quality: multifunctional cytokines were uniformly increased and differentiation into effector and memory T cell subsets was augmented rather than skewed. An extensive in vivo characterization suggests that IMX313 improves the initiation of immune responses as an increase in antigen 85A specific cells was observed as early as day 3 after vaccination. This report demonstrates that antigen multimerization using IMX313 is a simple and effective cross-species method to improve vaccine immunogenicity with potentially broad applicability.

  18. The extradomain A of fibronectin (EDA) combined with poly(I:C) enhances the immune response to HIV-1 p24 protein and the protection against recombinant Listeria monocytogenes-Gag infection in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, Beatriz; De Andrés, Ximena; Muñoz, Pilar-María; Obregón, Patricia; Asensio, Aaron-C; Garrido, Victoria; Mansilla, Cristina; Arribillaga, Laura; Lasarte, Juan-José; De Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz; Grilló, María-Jesús

    2012-03-28

    The development of effective vaccines against HIV-1 infection constitutes one of the major challenges in viral immunology. One of the protein candidates in vaccination against this virus is p24, since it is a conserved HIV antigen that has cytotoxic and helper T cell epitopes as well as B cell epitopes that may jointly confer enhanced protection against infection when used in immunization-challenge approaches. In this context, the adjuvant effect of EDA (used as EDAp24 fusion protein) and poly(I:C), as agonists of TLR4 and TLR3, respectively, was assessed in p24 immunizations using a recombinant Listeria monocytogenes HIV-1 Gag proteins (Lm-Gag, where p24 is the major antigen) for challenge in mice. Immunization with EDAp24 fusion protein together with poly(I:C) adjuvant induced a specific p24 IFN-γ production (Th1 profile) as well as protection against a Lm-Gag challenge, suggesting an additive or synergistic effect between both adjuvants. The combination of EDA (as a fusion protein with the antigen, which may favor antigen targeting to dendritic cells through TLR4) and poly(I:C) could thus be a good adjuvant candidate to enhance the immune response against HIV-1 proteins and its use may open new ways in vaccine investigations on this virus. PMID:22326778

  19. Matrix-M adjuvant enhances antibody, cellular and protective immune responses of a Zaire Ebola/Makona virus glycoprotein (GP) nanoparticle vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Karin Lövgren; Song, Haifeng; Stertman, Linda; Liu, Ye; Flyer, David C; Massare, Michael J; Xu, Ren-Huan; Zhou, Bin; Lu, Hanxin; Kwilas, Steve A; Hahn, Timothy J; Kpamegan, Eloi; Hooper, Jay; Carrion, Ricardo; Glenn, Gregory; Smith, Gale

    2016-04-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes severe hemorrhagic fever for which there is no approved treatment or preventive vaccine. Immunological correlates of protective immunity against EBOV disease are not well understood. However, non-human primate studies have associated protection of experimental vaccines with binding and neutralizing antibodies to the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) as well as EBOV GP-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In this report a full length, unmodified Zaire EBOV GP gene from the 2014 EBOV Makona strain (EBOV/Mak) was cloned into a baculovirus vector. Recombinant EBOV/Mak GP was produced in Sf9 insect cells as glycosylated trimers and, when purified, formed spherical 30-40nm particles. In mice, EBOV/Mak GP co-administered with the saponin adjuvant Matrix-M was significantly more immunogenic, as measured by virus neutralization titers and anti-EBOV/Mak GP IgG as compared to immunization with AlPO4 adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted EBOV/Mak GP. Similarly, antigen specific T cells secreting IFN-γ were induced most prominently by EBOV/Mak GP with Matrix-M. Matrix-M also enhanced the frequency of antigen-specific germinal center B cells and follicular helper T (TFH) cells in the spleen in a dose-dependent manner. Immunization with EBOV/Mak GP with Matrix-M was 100% protective in a lethal viral challenge murine model; whereas no protection was observed with the AlPO4 adjuvant and only 10% (1/10) mice were protected in the EBOV/Mak GP antigen alone group. Matrix-M adjuvanted vaccine induced a rapid onset of specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies, increased frequency of multifunctional CD4+ and CD8(+) T cells, specific TFH cells, germinal center B cells, and persistence of EBOV GP-specific plasma B cells in the bone marrow. Taken together, the addition of Matrix-M adjuvant to the EBOV/Mak GP nanoparticles enhanced both B and T-cell immune stimulation which may be critical for an Ebola subunit vaccine with broad and long lasting protective immunity. PMID:26921779

  20. Molecular Adjuvant Ag85A Enhances Protection against Influenza A Virus in Mice Following DNA Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel DNA vaccine vector encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis secreted antigen Ag85A fused with the influenza A virus (IAV HA2 protein epitopes, pEGFP/Ag85A-sHA2 (pAg85A-sHA2, was designed to provide protection against influenza. The antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine vector was efficiently expressed in mammalian cells, as determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and fluorescence analyses. Mice were immunized with the vaccine vector by intramuscular injection before challenge with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (PR8 virus. Sera and the splenocyte culture IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in immunized mice compared with the control mice. The novel vaccine group showed a high neutralization antibody titer in vitro. The novel vaccine vector also reduced the viral loads, increased the survival rates in mice after the PR8 virus challenge and reduced the alveolar inflammatory cell numbers. Sera IL-4 concentrations were significantly increased in mice immunized with the novel vaccine vector on Day 12 after challenge with the PR8 virus. These results demonstrated that short HA2 (sHA2 protein epitopes may provide protection against the PR8 virus and that Ag85A could strengthen the immune response to HA2 epitopes, thus, Ag85A may be developed as a new adjuvant for influenza vaccines.

  1. A new dimension in improved radiation protection by enhanced DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioprotection and photo protection were dependent until now on measures to reduce the amount of damage formed by ionizing and ultraviolet radiations. In both cases the measures are not completely satisfactory: the classical radioprotectors are toxic arid exert serious side effects, and afford a protection factor not higher than around 2. The sunscreens filters are effective for certain wavelength ranges only, and not enough is known about the possible effects of the filters when they absorb light and turn into other chemical entities. Both approaches do not give an answer to damages which are formed in spite of the partial reduction of damage. A new approach offered here is dealing with the damage on a cellular / molecular level, by enhancing the activity of the natural repair enzymes whose task is to remove radiation and photoproducts, rejoin DNA strand breaks and repair the DNA. A combination of vitamins and antioxidants is fulfilling these tasks and provides protection from both ionizing and ultraviolet radiations by enhancing several folds the repair of DNA in living cells. Such a combination which contains the repair enhancers niacinamide and nordihydroguaiaretic acid is employed in preparations named EDNAR ( Enhanced DNA Repair, Patent pending) which demonstrate excellent results of enhancing DNA repair as measured by repair synthesis, and protecting the skin from sunburns as well as skin burns following radiotherapy. These lotions and creams, when not containing any chemical filters yet demonstrating a protective effect, may be called 'the sunscreens without sunscreens'. (author)

  2. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax. PMID:24430302

  3. The Leishmania HSP20 Is Antigenic during Natural Infections, but, as DNA Vaccine, It does not Protect BALB/c Mice against Experimental L. amazonensis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Montalvo-Álvarez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoa of the genus Leishmania are causative agents of leishmaniasis, an important health problem in both human and veterinary medicine. Here, we describe a new heat shock protein (HSP in Leishmania, belonging to the small HSP (sHSP family in kinetoplastids. The protein is highly conserved in different Leishmania species, showing instead significant divergence with sHSP's from other organisms. The humoral response elicited against this protein during Leishmania infection has been investigated in natural infected humans and dogs, and in experimentally infected hamsters. Leishmania HSP20 is a prominent antigen for canine hosts; on the contrary, the protein seems to be a poor antigen for human immune system. Time-course analysis of appearance of anti-HSP20 antibodies in golden hamsters indicated that these antibodies are produced at late stages of the infection, when clinical symptoms of disease are patent. Finally, the protective efficacy of HSP20 was assessed in mice using a DNA vaccine approach prior to challenge with Leishmania amazonensis.

  4. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M;

    2001-01-01

    clinical signs of autoimmune reactions were observed. Thus, it appears possible to evaluate the entire metabolism of any given tumor and use this information rationally to identify multiple epitopes of value in the generation of tumor-specific immunotherapy. We expect that human tumors express similar......Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...... examined for gene expression by mRNA microarray scanning. This analysis revealed heterogeneity of the tumors in agreement with the assumption that they represent different tumorigenic events. Several genes were overexpressed in one or more of the tumors. To examine whether overexpressed genes might be used...

  5. Key epitopes on the ESAT-6 antigen recognized in mice during the recall of protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, L; Oettinger, T; Holm, A; Andersen, A B; Andersen, P

    1996-10-15

    The recall of long-lived immunity in a mouse model of tuberculosis (TB) is defined as an accelerated accumulation of reactive T cells in the target organs. We have recently identified Ag 85B and a 6-kilodalton early secretory antigenic target, designated ESAT-6, as key antigenic targets recognized by these cells. In the present study, preferential recognition of the ESAT-6 Ag during the recall of immunity was found to be shared by five of six genetically different strains of mice. Overlapping peptides spanning the sequence of ESAT-6 were used to map two T cell epitopes on this molecule. One epitope recognized in the context of H-2b,d was located in the N-terminal part of the molecule, whereas an epitope recognized in the context of H-2a,k covered amino acids 51 to 60. Shorter versions of the N-terminal epitope allowed the precise definition of a 13-amino acid core sequence recognized in the context of H-2b. The peptide covering the N-terminal epitope was immunogenic, and a T cell response with the same fine specificity as that induced during TB infection was generated by immunization with the peptide in IFA. In the C57BL/6j strain, this single epitope was recognized by an exceedingly high frequency of splenic T cells (approximately 1:1000), representing 25 to 35% of the total culture filtrate-reactive T cells recruited to the site of infection during the first phase of the recall response. These findings emphasize the relevance of this Ag in the immune response to TB and suggest that immunologic recognition in the first phase of infection is a highly restricted event dominated by a limited number of T cell clones. PMID:8871652

  6. Anthrax Protective Antigen Delivered by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Ty21a Protects Mice from a Lethal Anthrax Spore Challenge▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, Manuel; Wu, Yanping; Singh, Sunil; Tod J Merkel; Bhattacharyya, Siba; Blake, Milan S.; Kopecko, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax disease, is a proven weapon of bioterrorism. Currently, the only licensed vaccine against anthrax in the United States is AVA Biothrax, which, although efficacious, suffers from several limitations. This vaccine requires six injectable doses over 18 months to stimulate protective immunity, requires a cold chain for storage, and in many cases has been associated with adverse effects. In this study, we modified the B. anthracis protective ant...

  7. Variant surface antigen-specific IgG and protection against clinical consequences of pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, Trine; Shulman, Caroline E; Bulmer, Judith N;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy-associated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum adherence to chondroitin sulfate A in the placental intervillous space is a major cause of low birthweight and maternal anaemia in areas of endemic P falciparum transmission. Adhesion-blocking antibodies that specifically...... recognise parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) are associated with resistance to pregnancy-associated malaria. We looked for a possible relation between VSA-specific antibody concentrations, placental infection, and protection from low birthweight and maternal anaemia. METHODS: We used flow...... cytometry to measure VSA-specific IgG concentrations in plasma samples taken during child birth from 477 Kenyan women selected from a cohort of 910 women on the basis of HIV-1 status, gravidity, and placental histology. We measured VSA expressed by one placental P falciparum isolate and two isolates...

  8. Protection Induced by Simultaneous Subcutaneous and Endobronchial Vaccination with BCG/BCG and BCG/Adenovirus Expressing Antigen 85A against Mycobacterium bovis in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Gillian S; Clifford, Derek; Whelan, Adam O; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L; Salguero, Francisco J; Xing, Zhou; Vordermeier, Hans M; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in the GB has been increasing since the 1980s. Immunisation, alongside current control measures, has been proposed as a sustainable measure to control bTB. Immunisation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to protect against bTB. Furthermore, much experimental data indicates that pulmonary local immunity is important for protection against respiratory infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that pulmonary immunisation is highly effective. Here, we evaluated protection against M. bovis, the main causative agent of bTB, conferred by BCG delivered subcutaneously, endobronchially or by the new strategy of simultaneous immunisation by both routes. We also tested simultaneous subcutaneous immunisation with BCG and endobronchial delivery of a recombinant type 5 adenovirus expressing mycobacterial antigen 85A. There was significantly reduced visible pathology in animals receiving the simultaneous BCG/BCG or BCG/Ad85 treatment compared to naïve controls. Furthermore, there were significantly fewer advanced microscopic granulomata in animals receiving BCG/Ad85A compared to naive controls. Thus, combining local and systemic immunisation limits the development of pathology, which in turn could decrease bTB transmission. PMID:26544594

  9. Immunization with pre-erythrocytic antigen CelTOS from Plasmodium falciparum elicits cross-species protection against heterologous challenge with Plasmodium berghei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke S Bergmann-Leitner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Plasmodium protein Cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS plays an important role in cell traversal of host cells in both, mosquito and vertebrates, and is required for successful malaria infections. CelTOS is highly conserved among the Plasmodium species, suggesting an important functional role across all species. Therefore, targeting the immune response to this highly conserved protein and thus potentially interfering with its biological function may result in protection against infection even by heterologous species of Plasmodium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we developed a recombinant codon-harmonized P. falciparum CelTOS protein that can be produced to high yields in the E. coli expression system. Inbred Balb/c and outbred CD-1 mice were immunized with various doses of the recombinant protein adjuvanted with Montanide ISA 720 and characterized using in vitro and in vivo analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Immunization with PfCelTOS resulted in potent humoral and cellular immune responses and most importantly induced sterile protection against a heterologous challenge with P. berghei sporozoites in a proportion of both inbred and outbred mice. The biological activity of CelTOS-specific antibodies against the malaria parasite is likely linked to the impairment of sporozoite motility and hepatocyte infectivity. The results underscore the potential of this antigen as a pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate and demonstrate for the first time a malaria vaccine that is cross-protective between species.

  10. Intramuscular immunization of mice with irradiated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites. Enhancement of protection with albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies have confirmed a previous report which demonstrated that intramuscularly injected irradiated sporozoites of Plasmodium berghei are far less effective than those injected intravenously in protectively immunizing mice against sporozoite-induced malaria. Because albumin has been shown to induce motility in Plasmodium sporozoites, attempts were made to determine whether the use of albumin in immunizing inocula given intramuscularly might enhance the protection thus obtained. The results showed that albumin did indeed significantly enhance the development of protective immunity, though this protection was still considerably less than that obtained by intravenous immunization. This effect of albumin may be due to its ability to induce motility in the injected sporozoites, thereby permitting them to reach and enter blood vessels more readily

  11. Social Norms Information Enhances the Efficacy of an Appearance-based Sun Protection Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Kulik, James A.; Butler, Heather; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Mahler, Heike

    2008-01-01

    This experiment examined whether the efficacy of an appearance-based sun protection intervention could be enhanced by the addition of social norms information. Southern California college students (N=125, predominantly female) were randomly assigned to either an appearance-based sun protection intervention-that consisted of a photograph depicting underlying sun damage to their skin (UV photo) and information about photoaging or to a control condition. Those assigned to the intervention were f...

  12. Induction of mucosal immune responses and protection of cattle against direct-contact challenge by intranasal delivery with foot-and-mouth disease virus antigen mediated by nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Pan,1,2 Zhongwang Zhang,1,2 Jianliang Lv,1,2 Peng Zhou,1,2 Wenfa Hu,1,2 Yuzhen Fang,1,2 Haotai Chen,1,2 Xinsheng Liu,1,2 Junjun Shao,1,2 Furong Zhao,1,2 Yaozhong Ding,1,2 Tong Lin,1,2 Huiyun Chang,1,2 Jie Zhang,1,2 Yongguang Zhang,1,2 Yonglu Wang1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, National Foot-and-Mouth Disease Reference Laboratory, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS, Lanzhou, Gansu, People’s Republic of China; 2Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The aim of this study was to enhance specific mucosal, systemic, and cell-mediated immunity and to induce earlier onset of protection against direct-contact challenge in cattle by intranasal delivery of a nanoparticle-based nasal vaccine against type A foot-and-mouth disease (FMD. In this study, two kinds of nanoparticle-based nasal vaccines against type A FMD were designed: (1 chitosan-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA loaded with plasmid DNA (Chi-PLGA-DNA and (2 chitosan-trehalose and inactivated foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV (Chi-Tre-Inactivated. Cattle were immunized by an intranasal route with nanoparticles and then challenged for 48 hours by direct contact with two infected donor cattle per pen. Donors were inoculated intradermally in the tongue 48 hours before challenge, with 0.2 mL cattle-passaged FMDV. Serological and mucosal antibody responses were evaluated, and virus excretion and the number of contact infections were quantified. FMDV-specific secretory immunoglobulin (IgA (sIgA antibodies in nasal washes were initially detected at 4 days postvaccination (dpv with two kinds of nanoparticles. The highest levels of sIgA expression were observed in nasal washes, at 10 dpv, from animals with Chi-PLGA-DNA nanoparticles, followed by animals immunized once by intranasal route with

  13. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients. PMID:27019998

  14. Enhancement by ampicillin of antibody responses induced by a protein antigen and a DNA vaccine carried by live-attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, P C; Tsoi, H W; Leung, H C; Wong, L P; Wong, S S; Chan, E; Yuen, K Y

    2000-07-01

    Live-attenuated Salmonella species are effective carriers of microbial antigens and DNA vaccines. In a mouse model, the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and total antibody levels directed toward the lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were significantly enhanced at day 21 after oral immunization with live-attenuated serovar Typhi (strain Ty21a) when ampicillin was concomitantly administered (P Ty21a-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation indices for the ampicillin group at day 21 were significantly higher than those for the normal saline (NS) group (P Ty21a per well, respectively). The 50% lethal doses for mice from the ampicillin and NS groups immunized with Ty21a with pBR322 after wild-type serovar Typhi challenge on day 24 were 3.4 x 10(7) and 5.0 x 10(6) CFU, respectively. The fecal bacterial counts for the ampicillin group at days 1, 3, and 5 were significantly lower than those for the NS group (P Ty21a in a larger number of mice from the ampicillin group than from the NS group. Furthermore, the IgG2a levels directed toward tetanus toxoid were significantly enhanced at days 7 and 21 after oral immunization with Ty21a that carried the fragment c of tetanus toxoid when ampicillin was concomitantly administered (P Ty21a that carried the DNA vaccine that encodes hepatitis B surface antigen when ampicillin was concomitantly administered. The present observation may improve the efficacy of the protein antigens and DNA vaccines carried in live-attenuated bacteria, and further experiments should be carried out to determine the best antibiotics and dosage regimen to be used, as well as the best carrier system for individual protein antigens and DNA vaccines. PMID:10882658

  15. Blood stage malaria vaccine eliciting high antigen-specific antibody concentrations confers no protection to young children in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhards R Ogutu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The antigen, falciparum malaria protein 1 (FMP1, represents the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1 of the 3D7 clone of P. falciparum. Formulated with AS02 (a proprietary Adjuvant System, it constitutes the FMP1/AS02 candidate malaria vaccine. We evaluated this vaccine's safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in African children. METHODS: A randomised, double-blind, Phase IIb, comparator-controlled trial.The trial was conducted in 13 field stations of one mile radii within Kombewa Division, Nyanza Province, Western Kenya, an area of holoendemic transmission of P. falciparum. We enrolled 400 children aged 12-47 months in general good health.Children were randomised in a 1ratio1 fashion to receive either FMP1/AS02 (50 microg or Rabipur(R rabies vaccine. Vaccinations were administered on a 0, 1, and 2 month schedule. The primary study endpoint was time to first clinical episode of P. falciparum malaria (temperature >/=37.5 degrees C with asexual parasitaemia of >/=50,000 parasites/microL of blood occurring between 14 days and six months after a third dose. Case detection was both active and passive. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for eight months after first immunisations; vaccine efficacy (VE was measured over a six-month period following third vaccinations. RESULTS: 374 of 400 children received all three doses and completed six months of follow-up. FMP1/AS02 had a good safety profile and was well-tolerated but more reactogenic than the comparator. Geometric mean anti-MSP-1(42 antibody concentrations increased from1.3 microg/mL to 27.3 microg/mL in the FMP1/AS02 recipients, but were unchanged in controls. 97 children in the FMP1/AS02 group and 98 controls had a primary endpoint episode. Overall VE was 5.1% (95% CI: -26% to +28%; p-value = 0.7. CONCLUSIONS: FMP1/AS02 is not a promising candidate for further development as a monovalent malaria vaccine. Future MSP-1(42 vaccine development should focus

  16. A method to identify protein antigens of Dermanyssus gallinae for the protection of birds from poultry mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makert, Gustavo R; Vorbrüggen, Susanne; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Voss, Matthias; Sohn, Kai; Buschmann, Tilo; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    The poultry red mite (PRM) Dermanyssus gallinae causes high economic losses and is among the most important parasites in poultry farming worldwide. Different chemical, physical, and biological strategies try to control the expansion of PRM. However, effective solutions to this problem still have to be found. Here, we present a method for the development of an immunological control strategy, based on the identification of mite protein antigens which elicit antibodies with anti-mite activity in the immunized chicken. Hens were immunized with different PRM protein extracts formulated with two different adjuvants, and IgY-antibodies were isolated from the eggs. A PRM in vitro feeding assay which used chicken blood spiked with these IgY-preparations was used to detect antibodies which caused PRM mortality. In vitro feeding of mites with IgY isolated from hens immunized with PRM extract formulated with one of the adjuvants showed a statistically significant increase in the mortality as compared to control mites. After the separation of total PRM extracts in two-dimensional gels, several protein spots were recognized by such IgY preparations. Ten protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the identification of the corresponding proteins. Complete protein sequences were deduced from genomic and transcriptomic assemblies derived from high throughput sequencing of total PRM DNA and RNA. The results may contribute to the development of an immunological control strategy of D. gallinae. PMID:27026505

  17. Polyethylene glycol-coated graphene oxide attenuates antigen-specific IgE production and enhanced antigen-induced T-cell reactivity in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu HY

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Ying Wu,1,* Kun-Ju Lin,2,* Ping-Yen Wang,1 Chi-Wen Lin,3 Hong-Wei Yang,3 Chen-Chi M Ma,3 Yu-Jen Lu,4 Tong-Rong Jan1 1Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Animal Molecular Imaging Center and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Graphene oxide (GO is a promising nanomaterial for potential application in the versatile field of biomedicine. Graphene-based nanomaterials have been reported to modulate the functionality of immune cells in culture and to induce pulmonary inflammation in mice. Evidence pertaining to the interaction between graphene-based nanomaterials and the immune system in vivo remains scarce. The present study investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol-coated GO (PEG-GO on antigen-specific immunity in vivo. Methods: BALB/c mice were intravenously administered with a single dose of PEG-GO (0.5 or 1 mg/kg 1 hour before ovalbumin (OVA sensitization, and antigen-specific antibody production and splenocyte reactivity were measured 7 days later. Results: Exposure to PEG-GO significantly attenuated the serum level of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E. The production of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 by splenocytes restimulated with OVA in culture was enhanced by treatment with PEG-GO. In addition, PEG-GO augmented the metabolic activity of splenocytes restimulated with OVA but not with the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that systemic exposure to PEG-GO modulates several aspects of antigen-specific immune responses, including the serum production of immunoglobulin E and T-cell functionality. Keywords: graphene oxide, T

  18. Human Monoclonal Antibody AVP-21D9 to Protective Antigen Reduces Dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain from the Lungs in a Rabbit Model▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Baze, Wallace B.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-01-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  19. Human monoclonal antibody AVP-21D9 to protective antigen reduces dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain from the lungs in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W; Comer, Jason E; Baze, Wallace B; Noffsinger, David M; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-07-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  20. Construction of a triple modified p53 containing DNA vaccine to enhance processing and presentation of the p53 antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, Geke A. P.; Meijer, Coby; Dam, Wendy A.; Roossink, Frank; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2009-01-01

    More effective and less toxic treatments are urgently needed in the treatment of patients with cancer. The turnout suppressor protein p53 is a tumour-associated antigen that could serve that purpose when applied in an immunologic approval to cancer. It is mutated in similar to 50% of the tumours res

  1. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through linkage of antigen to filamentous bacteriophage coat protein III domain I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Àngel M; Suárez, Eduardo; Larsen, Martin; Jensen, Kim Bak; Sanz, Laura; Compte, Marta; Kristensen, Peter; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Although DNA-based cancer vaccines have been successfully tested in mouse models, a major drawback of cancer vaccination still remains, namely that tumour antigens are weak and fail to generate a vigorous immune response in tumour-bearing patients. Genetic technology offers strategies for promoti...

  2. Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin: evaluation as a protective antigen and colonization factor in a mouse respiratory infection model.

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, A; Mountzouros, K T; Relman, D.A.; Falkow, S; Cowell, J L

    1990-01-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a cell surface protein of Bordetella pertussis which functions as an adhesin for this organism. It is a component of many new acellular pertussis vaccines. The proposed role of FHA in immunity to pertussis is based on animal studies which have produced some conflicting results. To clarify this situation, we reexamined the protective activity of FHA in an adult mouse respiratory infection model. Four-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with one or two doses o...

  3. Protective human leucocyte antigen haplotype, HLA-DRB1*01-B*14, against chronic Chagas disease in Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia del Puerto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by the flagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi affects 8-10 million people in Latin America. The mechanisms that underlie the development of complications of chronic Chagas disease, characterized primarily by pathology of the heart and digestive system, are not currently understood. To identify possible host genetic factors that may influence the clinical course of Chagas disease, Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA regional gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients presenting with differing clinical symptoms. METHODOLOGY: Two hundred and twenty nine chronic Chagas disease patients in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were examined by serological tests, electrocardiogram (ECG, and Barium enema colon X-ray. 31.4% of the examinees showed ECG alterations, 15.7% megacolon and 58.1% showed neither of them. A further 62 seropositive megacolon patients who had undergone colonectomy due to acute abdomen were recruited. We analyzed their HLA genetic polymorphisms (HLA-A, HLA-B, MICA, MICB, DRB1 and TNF-alpha promoter region mainly through Sequence based and LABType SSO typing test using LUMINEX Technology. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The frequencies of HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-B*14:02 were significantly lower in patients suffering from megacolon as well as in those with ECG alteration and/or megacolon compared with a group of patients with indeterminate symptoms. The DRB1*0102, B*1402 and MICA*011 alleles were in strong Linkage Disequilibrium (LD, and the HLA-DRB1*01-B*14-MICA*011 haplotype was associated with resistance against chronic Chagas disease. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of HLA haplotype association with resistance to chronic Chagas disease.

  4. Lethal Factor and Anti-Protective Antigen IgG Levels Associated with Inhalation Anthrax, Minnesota, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Sprenkle, Mark D.; Griffith, Jayne; Marinelli, William; Boyer, Anne E.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Pesik, Nicki T.; Hoffmaster, Alex; Keenan, Joseph; Billie A. Juni; Blaney, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis was identified in a 61-year-old man hospitalized in Minnesota, USA. Cooperation between the hospital and the state health agency enhanced prompt identification of the pathogen. Treatment comprising antimicrobial drugs, anthrax immune globulin, and pleural drainage led to full recovery; however, the role of passive immunization in anthrax treatment requires further evaluation.

  5. Mechanism of Lethal Toxin Neutralization by a Human Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the PA20 Region of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Camacho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary immunogenic component of the currently approved anthrax vaccine is the protective antigen (PA unit of the binary toxin system. PA-specific antibodies neutralize anthrax toxins and protect against infection. Recent research has determined that in humans, only antibodies specific for particular determinants are capable of effecting toxin neutralization, and that the neutralizing epitopes recognized by these antibodies are distributed throughout the PA monomer. The mechanisms by which the majority of these epitopes effect neutralization remain unknown. In this report we investigate the process by which a human monoclonal antibody specific for the amino-terminal domain of PA neutralizes lethal toxin in an in vitro assay of cytotoxicity, and find that it neutralizes LT by blocking the requisite cleavage of the amino-terminal 20 kD portion of the molecule (PA20 from the remainder of the PA monomer. We also demonstrate that the epitope recognized by this human monoclonal does not encompass the 166RKKR169 furin recognition sequence in domain 1 of PA.

  6. Core-linked LPS expression of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 O-antigen in live Salmonella Typhi vaccine vector Ty21a: preclinical evidence of immunogenicity and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De Qi; Cisar, John O; Osorio, Manuel; Wai, Tint T; Kopecko, Dennis J

    2007-08-14

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae 1) causes severe shigellosis that is typically associated with high mortality. Antibodies against Shigella serotype-specific O-polysaccharide (O-Ps) have been shown to be host protective. In this study, the rfb locus and the rfp gene with their cognate promoter regions were PCR-amplified from S. dysenteriae 1, cloned, and sequenced. Deletion analysis showed that eight rfb ORFs plus rfp are necessary for biosynthesis of this O-Ps. A tandemly-linked rfb-rfp gene cassette was cloned into low copy plasmid pGB2 to create pSd1. Avirulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) Ty21a harboring pSd1 synthesized S. Typhi 9, 12 LPS as well as typical core-linked S. dysenteriae 1 LPS. Animal immunization studies showed that Ty21a (pSd1) induces protective immunity against high stringency challenge with virulent S. dysenteriae 1 strain 1617. These data further demonstrate the utility of S. Typhi Ty21a as a live, bacterial vaccine delivery system for heterologous O-antigens, supporting the promise of a bifunctional oral vaccine for prevention of shigellosis and typhoid fever. PMID:17629369

  7. 76 FR 45181 - Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections: Limited Delay of Effective Date for Certain Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... received a request from Allegiant Air and Spirit Airlines as well as Southwest Airlines to postpone or stay... Federal Register (76 FR 23110), titled ``Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections,'' containing many new... July 28, 2011. The effective date of the final rule published at 76 FR 23110, April 25, 2011,...

  8. Evaluation of a Resilience Intervention to Enhance Coping Strategies and Protective Factors and Decrease Symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Mary; Dolbier, Christyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In this pilot study, the authors examined the effectiveness of a 4-week resilience intervention to enhance resilience, coping strategies, and protective factors, as well as decrease symptomatology during a period of increased academic stress. Participants and Methods: College students were randomly assigned to experimental (n = 30) and…

  9. Coimmunization with IL-15 plasmid enhances the longevity of CD8 T cells induced by DNA encoding hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Sheng-Fu Dong; Shu-Hui Sun; Yuan Wang; Guang-Di Li; Di Qu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the feasibility of delivering a plasmid encoding IL-15 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for improving the immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine.METHODS: We used RT-PCR based strategies to develop IL-15 expression constructs. We first confirmed that the gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli due to the poor expression of IL-15. Then the bioactivity of IL-15 plasmid expression product was identified by CTLL-2 proliferation assay. One hundred micrograms of DNA from each of the IL-15 eukaryotic expressed plasmid and the recombinant plasmid harboring DNA encoding the 144 amino acids of the N-terminus of HBV core gene (abbreviated pHBc144) was used to co-immunize C57 BL/6 mice. The titer of anti-HBcIgG was detected by ELISA and the antigen-specific CD8+T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells) were detected by intracellular cytokine staining at different time points.RESULTS: After co-immunization by pIL-15 and pHBc144 DNA vaccine the antigen-specific CD8+ cells of mice increased gradually, the first peak of immune response appeared 14 d later, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ Ts cells decreased gradually and maintained at a steady level in 3 mo. After boosting, the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells reached the second peak 10 d later with a double of the 1st peak, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+T cells decreased slowly. IL-15 as a gene adjuvant had no significant effect on humoral immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine, but increased the memory antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine.CONCLUSION: DNA vaccine constructed by HBc Ag 1-144 amino acid induces effective cell immunity, and cytokine plasmid-delivered IL-15 enhances the longevity of CD8+ T cells.

  10. Upgrading and enhancing the generator protection system by making use of current digital systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upgrading of power plant systems and equipment is becoming a major theme for many utilities. Due to operational cost pressures, competitiveness, life extension, and the desire for better productivity, condition assessment programs are being implemented. One aspect of this is the enhancement/upgrade of existing generator protection schemes with digital systems. Traditionally this protection has been provided by a complement of discrete component relays. These relays have included both electromechanical and static types. Considering a digital enhancement/upgrade offers the owner of installed generation equipment several unique advantages. These include more complete machine protection, diagnostics capabilities for greater productivity and maintenance optimization, life extension with minimal implementation, and the operational advantages of sequence of events, present values and communications capabilities

  11. Equivalence of human and mouse CD4 in enhancing antigen responses by a mouse class II-restricted T cell hybridoma

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the ability of hCD4 to interact functionally with mouse class II MHC molecules using the mouse T cell hybridoma BI-141, specific for beef insulin. We have previously shown that expression of mouse CD4 results in a marked enhancement of IL-2 release by BI-141 cells in response to beef insulin or, in a cross-reactive response, to pork insulin, on the appropriate mouse APCs. We now demonstrate that expression of hCD4 results in an equivalent stimulation of antigen responses by t...

  12. Phage displaying peptides mimic schistosoma antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies and protective immunity induced by their immunization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Xin-Yuan Yi; Xian-Ping Li; Dong-Ming Zhou; McReynolds Larry; Xian-Fang Zeng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To obtain the short peptides mimic antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies to schistosomes, and to explore their immunoprotection against schistosomiasis in mice.METHODS: Adults worm antigens (AWA) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzyme-linked transferred immunoblotting methods with normal SD rat sera (NRS). The killing effects on schistosomula with fresh and heat-inactivated sera from SD rats were observed. Then the purified IgG from sera of SD rats was used to biopan a phage random peptide library and 20 randomly selected positive clones were detected by ELISA and 2 of them were sequenced.Sixty female mice were immunized thrice with positive phage clones (0, 2nd, 4th wk). Each mouse was challenged with 40 cercariae, and all mice were killed 42 d after challenge. The worms and the liver eggs were counted. RESULTS: NRS could specifically react to the molecules of 75 000, 47 000, 34 500 and 23 000 of AWA. Sera from SD rats showed that the mortality rate of schistosomula was 76.2%, and when the sera were heat-inactivated in vitro, the mortality rate was decreased to 41.0% after being cultured for 48 h. The specific phages bound to IgG were enriched about 300-folds after three rounds of biopanning. Twenty clones were detected by ELISA, 19 of them bound to the specific IgG of rat sera. Immunization with these epitopes was carried out in mice. Compared with the control groups, the mixture of two mimic peptides could induce 34.9% (P = 0.000) worm reduction and 67.6% (P = 0.000) total liver egg reduction in mice. Two different mimic peptides could respectively induce 31.0% (P = 0.001), 14.5% (P = 0.074) worm reduction and 61.2% (P = 0.000), 35.7% (P = 0.000) total liver egg reduction. The specific antibody could be induced by immunization of the mimic peptides, and the antibody titer in immunized mice reached more than 1:6 400 as detected by ELISA.CONCLUSION: Specific peptides mimic antigenic

  13. How to Make a Non-Antigenic Protein (Auto) Antigenic: Molecular Complementarity Alters Antigen Processing and Activates Adaptive-Innate Immunity Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that complementary proteins and peptides form complexes with increased antigenicity and/or autoimmunogenicity. Five case studies are highlighted: 1) diphtheria toxin-antitoxin (antibody), which induces immunity to the normally non-antigenic toxin, and autoimmune neuritis; 2) tryptophan peptide of myelin basic protein and muramyl dipeptide ("adjuvant peptide"), which form a complex that induces experimental allergic encephalomyelitis; 3) an insulin and glucagon complex that is far more antigenic than either component individually; 4) various causes of experimental autoimmune myocarditis such as C protein in combination with its antibody, or coxsackie B virus in combination with the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor; 5) influenza A virus haemagglutinin with the outer membrane protein of the Haemophilus influenzae, which increases antigenicity. Several mechanisms cooperate to alter immunogenicity. Complexation alters antigen processing, protecting the components against proteolysis, altering fragmentation and presenting novel antigens to the immune system. Complementary antigens induce complementary adaptive immune responses (complementary antibodies and/or T cell receptors) that produce circulating immune complexes (CIC). CIC stimulate innate immunity. Concurrently, complementary antigens stimulate multiple Toll-like receptors that synergize to over-produce cytokines, which further stimulate adaptive immunity. Thus innate and adaptive immunity form a positive feedback loop. If components of the complex mimic a host protein, then autoimmunity may result. Enhanced antigenicity for production of improved vaccines and/or therapeutic autoimmunity (e.g., against cancer cells) might be achieved by using information from antibody or TCR recognition sites to complement an antigen; by panning for complements in randomized peptide libraries; or using antisense peptide strategies to design complements. PMID:26179268

  14. Selection of glutamate-rich protein long synthetic peptides for vaccine development: antigenicity and relationship with clinical protection and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, M; Dodoo, D; Toure-Balde, A; Soe, S; Corradin, G; Koram, K K; Kurtzhals, J A; Hviid, L; Theander, T; Akanmori, B; Ndiaye, M; Druilhe, P

    2001-09-01

    Antibodies against three long synthetic peptides (LSPs) derived from the glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) of Plasmodium falciparum were analyzed in three cohorts from Liberia, Ghana, and Senegal. Two overlapping LSPs, LR67 and LR68, are derived from the relatively conserved N-terminal nonrepeat region (R0), and the third, LR70, is derived from the R2 repeat region. A high prevalence of antibody responses to each LSP was observed in all three areas of endemic infection. Levels of cytophilic immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against both GLURP regions were significantly correlated with protection from clinical P. falciparum malaria. Protected children from the Ghana cohort possessed predominantly IgG1 antibodies against the nonrepeat epitope and IgG3 antibodies against the repeat epitope. T-cell proliferation responses, studied in the cohort from Senegal, revealed that T-helper-cell epitopes were confined to the nonrepeat region. When used as immunogens, the LR67 and LR68 peptides elicited strong IgG responses in outbred mice and LR67 also induced antibodies in mice of different H-2 haplotypes, confirming the presence of T-helper-cell epitopes in these constructs. Mouse antipeptide antisera recognized parasite proteins as determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. This indicates that synthetic peptides derived from relatively conserved epitopes of GLURP might serve as useful immunogens for vaccination against P. falciparum malaria. PMID:11500389

  15. Age-dependent association between IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses to Pf332-C231 antigen and protection from malaria, and induction of protective antibodies by sub-patent malaria infections, in Daraweesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, Hayder A; Nasr, Amre; Iriemenam, Nnaemeka C;

    2010-01-01

    The certainty of the protective role of acquired immunity in malaria is the major drive for malaria vaccine development. In this study, we measured the levels of total IgG and IgG subclasses to four candidate malaria vaccine antigens; MSP2-3D7, MSP2-FC27, AMA-1 and Pf332-C231, in plasma obtained.......211, p=0.014, respectively), and also with age (CC - 0.311, p<0.001). Unexpectedly, equal levels of Pf332-C231 antibodies were induced by both patent and sub-patent infections regardless of the number of previous malaria episodes (1-7). Combining the correlation analysis with a multi-linear regression...

  16. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested. PMID:26886513

  17. Supercritical Fluid Extraction Provides an Enhancement to the Immune Response for Orally-Delivered Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Hayden, Celine A; Smith, Emily M.; Turner, Debra D.; Keener, Todd K.; Wong, Jeffrey C.; Walker, John H.; Tizard, Ian R.; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Howard, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus continues to be a major pathogen worldwide despite the availability of an effective parenteral vaccine for over 20 years. Orally-delivered subunit vaccines produced in maize may help to alleviate the disease burden by providing a low-cost, heat stable alternative to the parenteral vaccine. Oral subunit vaccination has been an elusive goal due to the large amounts of antigen required to induce an immunologic response when administered through the digesti...

  18. An Enhanced ELISPOT Assay for Sensitive Detection of Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Kellermann, Gottfried H.; Lehmann, Paul V; Diana R. Roen; Chenggang Jin

    2013-01-01

    Lyme Borreliosis is an infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi that is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks. Both B cell-mediated humoral immunity and T cell immunity develop during natural Borrelia infection. However, compared with humoral immunity, the T cell response to Borrelia infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, a novel T cell-based assay was developed and validated for the sensitive detection of antigen-specific T cell response to B....

  19. Protein Array Profiling of Tic Patient Sera Reveals a Broad Range and Enhanced Immune Response against Group A Streptococcus Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Bombaci, Mauro; Grifantini, Renata; Mora, Marirosa; Reguzzi, Valerio; Petracca, Roberto; Meoni, Eva; Balloni, Sergio; Zingaretti, Chiara; Falugi, Fabiana; Manetti, Andrea G. O.; Margarit, Immaculada; Musser, James M.; Cardona, Francesco; Orefici, Graziella; Grandi, Guido

    2009-01-01

    The human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS) is widely recognized as a major cause of common pharyngitis as well as of severe invasive diseases and non-suppurative sequelae associated with the existence of GAS antigens eliciting host autoantibodies. It has been proposed that a subset of paediatric disorders characterized by tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms would exacerbate in association with relapses of GAS-associated pharyngitis. This hypothesis is however st...

  20. Clinical experience with cytomegalovirus isolation using conventional cell cultures and early antigen detection in centrifugation-enhanced shell vial cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Leland, D S; Hansing, R L; French, M L

    1989-01-01

    A total of 1,915 clinical samples was inoculated by low-speed centrifugation into shell vials (Bartels Immunodiagnostics, Bellvue, Wash.) containing cover slip monolayers of MRC-5 fibroblasts. At 1 and 2 days postinoculation, one cover slip was stained by an indirect immunofluorescence technique using a monoclonal antibody (Biotech Research Laboratories for Dupont, Billerica, Mass.) to cytomegalovirus (CMV) early antigen (EA). Clinical samples were also inoculated into three MRC-5 or MRHF cel...

  1. An Enhanced ELISPOT Assay for Sensitive Detection of Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried H. Kellermann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lyme Borreliosis is an infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi that is transmitted through the bite of infected ticks. Both B cell-mediated humoral immunity and T cell immunity develop during natural Borrelia infection. However, compared with humoral immunity, the T cell response to Borrelia infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, a novel T cell-based assay was developed and validated for the sensitive detection of antigen-specific T cell response to B. burgdorferi. Using interferon-g as a biomarker, we developed a new enzyme-linked immunospot method (iSpot Lyme™ to detect Borrelia antigen-specific effector/memory T cells that were activated in vivo by exposing them to recombinant Borrelia antigens ex vivo. To test this new method as a potential laboratory diagnostic tool, we performed a clinical study with a cohort of Borrelia positive patients and healthy controls. We demonstrated that the iSpot Lyme assay has a significantly higher specificity and sensitivity compared with the Western Blot assay that is currently used as a diagnostic measure. A comprehensive evaluation of the T cell response to Borrelia infection should, therefore, provide new insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Lyme disease.

  2. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/- Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Franceschi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Monkeypox virus (MPXV is the etiological agent of human (MPX. It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV, and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/- mice

  3. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Valentina; Parker, Scott; Jacca, Sarah; Crump, Ryan W; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D; Wong, Scott W; Buller, Mark R; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-06-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  4. 旋毛虫成虫抗原的免疫保护性研究进展%Advances in study on protective immunity of Trichinella spiralis adult worm antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马鸣旺; 申丽洁

    2008-01-01

    The advances in study on protective immunity of Trichinella spiralis adult WOlln antigen were reviewed in this paper.Acording to the comparison of the three antigens of Trichinella spiralis,adult worm anti-gens can produce stronger protective immunity, which may serve as an important candidate of the vaccine a-gainst trichinellosis.With DNA recombination technology to clone the gene of the strong protective antigens of a-duh worm and to express them in vitro are important ways to get the vaccine against trichinellosis.%该文介绍了旋毛虫成虫抗原免疫保护性研究的进展.通过比较三期抗原的免疫保护性,表明旋毛虫成虫抗原具有较强的免疫保护作用,该抗原可能是研制旋毛虫病疫苗的重要候选抗原.利用DNA重组技术将保护性强的成虫抗原的基因克隆并在体外表达,将是获得旋毛虫病疫苗抗原的重要方法.

  5. Transboundary Collaborations to Enhance Wildfire Suppression in Protected Areas of the Black Sea Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zaimes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For the most effective and efficient management of certain natural resources (e.g. protected areas and disasters (e.g. wildfires transboundary approaches are needed. In addition in the management of protected areas, the role of wildfire should be incorporated, something that was ignored in the past and led to catastrophic wildfires. The Black Sea is a region that wildfires in the protected areas are expected to increase. This has to do with the abandonment of rural areas and the higher temperatures, especially during summer, due to climate change. Interesting is also the fact that some countries of the region have extensive experience while other do not have neither the experience nor the necessary infrastructures to face large wildfires. A transboundary collaboration would be very beneficial to the countries with limited experiences and capacities to suppress wildfires. The objective of this study is to be proactive by developing innovative tools to help suppress wildfires and enhancing the knowledge on wildfires and protected areas. The innovative tools included 4 different research activities and products. Firstly, an online Digital Geodatabase for the six pilot areas was developed. Next forest fire fuels and maps were developed while a forest fire behavior model was run to create the overall fire risk maps for the pilot areas. To estimate water resources and watershed streamflows the hydrologic model SWAT was validated and calibrated for the pilot areas. The final activities included a multi-criteria decision analysis to select the optimal location of the water reservoirs and the use of spatial analyst to provide the optimal routes to reach reservoirs by the fire vehicles. To enhance the responsible agency personnel along with stakeholders knowledge of the region, a Neighborhood Network with regular quarterly meetings was established. Participants for all six project countries were present in the meetings. Overall, new tool that will enhance

  6. A Novel Synthetic TLR-4 Agonist Adjuvant Increases the Protective Response to a Clinical-Stage West Nile Virus Vaccine Antigen in Multiple Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeven, Neal; Joshi, Sharvari Waghmare; Nana, Ghislain Ismael; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Fox, Christopher; Bowen, Richard A; Clements, David E; Martyak, Timothy; Parks, D Elliot; Baldwin, Susan; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-transmitted member of the Flaviviridae family that has emerged in recent years to become a serious public health threat. Given the sporadic nature of WNV epidemics both temporally and geographically, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that can rapidly provide effective immunity. Protection from WNV infection is correlated with antibodies to the viral envelope (E) protein, which encodes receptor binding and fusion functions. Despite many promising E-protein vaccine candidates, there are currently none licensed for use in humans. This study investigates the ability to improve the immunogenicity and protective capacity of a promising clinical-stage WNV recombinant E-protein vaccine (WN-80E) by combining it with a novel synthetic TLR-4 agonist adjuvant. Using the murine model of WNV disease, we find that inclusion of a TLR-4 agonist in either a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) or aluminum hydroxide (Alum) formulation provides both dose and dosage sparing functions, whereby protection can be induced after a single immunization containing only 100 ng of WN-80E. Additionally, we find that inclusion of adjuvant with a single immunization reduced viral titers in sera to levels undetectable by viral plaque assay. The enhanced protection provided by adjuvanted immunization correlated with induction of a Th1 T-cell response and the resultant shaping of the IgG response. These findings suggest that inclusion of a next generation adjuvant may greatly enhance the protective capacity of WNV recombinant subunit vaccines, and establish a baseline for future development. PMID:26901122

  7. A Novel Synthetic TLR-4 Agonist Adjuvant Increases the Protective Response to a Clinical-Stage West Nile Virus Vaccine Antigen in Multiple Formulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Van Hoeven

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-transmitted member of the Flaviviridae family that has emerged in recent years to become a serious public health threat. Given the sporadic nature of WNV epidemics both temporally and geographically, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that can rapidly provide effective immunity. Protection from WNV infection is correlated with antibodies to the viral envelope (E protein, which encodes receptor binding and fusion functions. Despite many promising E-protein vaccine candidates, there are currently none licensed for use in humans. This study investigates the ability to improve the immunogenicity and protective capacity of a promising clinical-stage WNV recombinant E-protein vaccine (WN-80E by combining it with a novel synthetic TLR-4 agonist adjuvant. Using the murine model of WNV disease, we find that inclusion of a TLR-4 agonist in either a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE or aluminum hydroxide (Alum formulation provides both dose and dosage sparing functions, whereby protection can be induced after a single immunization containing only 100 ng of WN-80E. Additionally, we find that inclusion of adjuvant with a single immunization reduced viral titers in sera to levels undetectable by viral plaque assay. The enhanced protection provided by adjuvanted immunization correlated with induction of a Th1 T-cell response and the resultant shaping of the IgG response. These findings suggest that inclusion of a next generation adjuvant may greatly enhance the protective capacity of WNV recombinant subunit vaccines, and establish a baseline for future development.

  8. Beta-defensin 2 enhances immunogenicity and protection of an adenovirus-based H5N1 influenza vaccine at an early time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sai V; Amen, Omar; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2013-12-26

    Reports of human infections with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses in many countries in Asia and Africa with varying case fatality rates highlight the pandemic potential of these viruses. In order to contain a rapidly spreading influenza virus in a pandemic scenario, a vaccine which can induce rapid and robust immune responses, preferably in a single dose, is necessary. Murine beta-defensin 2 (Mbd2), a small molecular weight protein expressed by epithelial cells, has been shown to enhance antigen-specific immune responses by recruiting and activating professional antigen presenting cells to the site of vaccination. This study assessed the potential of Mbd2 to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a human adenovirus (HAd)-based vaccine expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) [HAd-HA-NP] of an H5N1 influenza virus. A single inoculation of mice with both HAd-HA-NP and a HAd vector expressing Murine β-defensin 2 (HAd-Mbd2) resulted in significantly higher levels of both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses compared to the groups vaccinated only with HAd-HA-NP. These responses were evident even at day 7 post-immunization. Furthermore, the HAd-HA-NP+HAd-Mbd2-immunized group receiving the lowest vector dose (2 × 10(7)+1 × 10(7)) was completely protected against an rgH5N1 virus challenge on day 7 post-vaccination. These results highlight the potential of Mbd2 as a genetic adjuvant in inducing rapid and robust immune responses to a HAd-based vaccine. PMID:24051000

  9. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule...... "adamantyl-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental...

  10. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  11. Myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein from Bifidobacterium breve is a FAD-dependent fatty acid hydratase which has a function in stress protection

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rosberg-Cody, Eva

    2011-02-17

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the catalytic activity and physiological role of myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) from Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258. MCRA from B. breve NCIMB 702258 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in heterologous hosts (Lactococcus and Corynebacterium) and the recombinant proteins assessed for enzymatic activity against fatty acid substrates. Results MCRA catalysed the conversion of palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acids to the corresponding 10-hydroxy fatty acids, but shorter chain fatty acids were not used as substrates, while the presence of trans-double bonds and double bonds beyond the position C12 abolished hydratase activity. The hydroxy fatty acids produced were not metabolised further. We also found that heterologous Lactococcus and Corynebacterium expressing MCRA accumulated increasing amounts of 10-HOA and 10-HOE in the culture medium. Furthermore, the heterologous cultures exhibited less sensitivity to heat and solvent stresses compared to corresponding controls. Conclusions MCRA protein in B. breve can be classified as a FAD-containing double bond hydratase, within the carbon-oxygen lyase family, which may be catalysing the first step in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) production, and this protein has an additional function in bacterial stress protection.

  12. Expression, purification, and characterization of protective MPT64 antigen protein and identification of its multimers isolated from nontoxic Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Teng-Ping J; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P

    2011-05-01

    MPT64, a secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), stimulates the immune reactions within cells and is a protective antigen that is lost by the bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine during propagation. To minimize the toxicity caused by MTB, we used the MPT64 gene encoded by nontoxic H37Ra MTB to carry out genetic expansion via polymerase chain reaction and gene clone MPT64. The plasmid DNA encoded MPT64 was expressed at 20°C for 22 H, and a large quantity of MPT64 was obtained. In the absence of urea, MPT64 multimers with subunits being covalently connected via disulfide bonds were detected by Western blot showing strong protein-protein interactions, as evidenced by the formation of MPT64 tetramers. Finally, with urea of decreasing concentrations, we refolded MPT64 purified in the presence of urea and determined its secondary structures using circular dichroism. MPT64 was found to contain 2.2% α-helix, 50.9% β-sheet, 19.5% turn, and 27.4% random coil. The molecular weight of MPT64 was determined by a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer and found to be 23,497 Da, very close to the theoretical molecular weight of MPT64. The results presented here provide a sound basis for future biochemical and biophysical studies of MPT64 or any other proteins encoded by nontoxic H37Ra MTB. PMID:21679242

  13. Gene silencing of the tick protective antigens, Bm86, Bm91 and subolesin, in the one-host tick Boophilus microplus by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Ard M; Taoufik, Amar; de la Fuente, José; Kocan, Katherine M; de Vries, Erik; Jongejan, Frans

    2007-05-01

    The use of RNA interference (RNAi) to assess gene function has been demonstrated in several three-host tick species but adaptation of RNAi to the one-host tick, Boophilus microplus, has not been reported. We evaluated the application of RNAi in B. microplus and the effect of gene silencing on three tick-protective antigens: Bm86, Bm91 and subolesin. Gene-specific double-stranded (dsRNA) was injected into two tick stages, freshly molted unfed and engorged females, and specific gene silencing was confirmed by real time PCR. Gene silencing occurred in injected unfed females after they were allowed to feed. Injection of dsRNA into engorged females caused gene silencing in the subsequently oviposited eggs and larvae that hatched from these eggs, but not in adults that developed from these larvae. dsRNA injected into engorged females could be detected by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in eggs 14 days from the beginning of oviposition, demonstrating that unprocessed dsRNA was incorporated in the eggs. Eggs produced by engorged females injected with subolesin dsRNA were abnormal, suggesting that subolesin may play a role in embryonic development. The injection of dsRNA into engorged females to obtain gene-specific silencing in eggs and larvae is a novel method which can be used to study gene function in tick embryogenesis. PMID:17196597

  14. Development of an edema factor-mediated cAMP-induction bioassay for detecting antibody-mediated neutralization of anthrax protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuda, Jonathan F; Zhang, Linyi; Richards, Terri; Pham, Quyen; Zukauskas, David; Pierre, Jennifer L; Laird, Michael W; Askins, Janine; Choi, Gil H

    2005-03-01

    Intoxication of mammalian cells by Bacillus anthracis requires the coordinate activity of three distinct bacterial proteins: protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF). Among these proteins, PA has become the major focus of work on monoclonal antibodies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent anthrax infection since neither EF nor LF is capable of inducing cellular toxicity in its absence. Here, we present the development of a sensitive, precise, and biologically relevant bioassay platform capable of quantifying antibody-mediated PA neutralization. This bioassay is based on the ability of PA to bind and shuttle EF, a bacterial adenylate cyclase, into mammalian cells leading to an increase in cAMP that can be quantified using a sensitive chemiluminescent ELISA. The results of this study indicate that the cAMP-induction assay possesses the necessary performance characteristics for use as both a potency-indicating release assay in a quality control setting and as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker for ensuring the continued bioactivity of therapeutic antibodies against PA during clinical trials. PMID:15847796

  15. Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2001-2002 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Mattie H.; Sellman, Jake (Shoshone-Paiute Nation, Duck Valley Indian Reservation, Owyhee, NV)

    2003-03-01

    The Duck Valley Indian Reservation's Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect critical riparian areas, natural springs, the Owhyee River and its tributaries, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project commenced in 1997 and addresses the Northwest Power Planning Council's measures 10.8C.2, 10.8C.3, and 10.8C.5 of the 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The performance period covers dates from April 2001 through August 2002.

  16. Phase I study of safety and immunogenicity of an Escherichia coli-derived recombinant protective antigen (rPA vaccine to prevent anthrax in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce K Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fatal disease caused by Bacillus anthracis is preventable with a prophylactic vaccine. The currently available anthrax vaccine requires a lengthy immunization schedule, and simpler and more immunogenic options for protection against anthrax are a priority for development. In this report we describe a phase I clinical trial testing the safety and immunogenicity of an anthrax vaccine using recombinant Escherichia coli-derived, B. anthracis protective antigen (rPA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 73 healthy adults ages 18-40 were enrolled and 67 received 2 injections separated by 4 weeks of either buffered saline placebo, or rPA formulated with or without 704 µg/ml Alhydrogel® adjuvant in increasing doses (5, 25, 50, 100 µg of rPA. Participants were followed for one year and safety and immunologic data were assessed. Tenderness and warmth were the most common post-injection site reactions. No serious adverse events related to the vaccine were observed. The most robust humoral immune responses were observed in subjects receiving 50 µg of rPA formulated with Alhydrogel® with a geometric mean concentration of anti-rPA IgG antibodies of 283 µg/ml and a toxin neutralizing geometric 50% reciprocal geometric mean titer of 1061. The highest lymphoproliferative peak cellular response (median Lymphocyte Stimulation Index of 29 was observed in the group receiving 25 µg Alhydrogel®-formulated rPA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The vaccine was safe, well tolerated and stimulated a robust humoral and cellular response after two doses. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00057525.

  17. Improved vaccine protection against retrovirus infection after co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding viral antigens and type I interferon subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groitl Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type I interferons (IFNs exhibit direct antiviral effects, but also distinct immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we analyzed type I IFN subtypes for their effect on prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccination of mice against Friend retrovirus (FV or HIV. Results Mice were vaccinated with adenoviral vectors encoding FV Env and Gag proteins alone or in combination with vectors encoding IFNα1, IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα5, IFNα6, IFNα9 or IFNβ. Only the co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα6 and IFNα9 resulted in strongly improved immune protection of vaccinated mice from subsequent FV challenge infection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. The level of protection correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses and enhanced antibody titers. Similar results were obtained when mice were vaccinated against HIV with adenoviral vectors encoding HIV Env and Gag-Pol in combination with various type I IFN encoding vectors. Here mainly CD4+ T cell responses were enhanced by IFNα subtypes. Conclusions Our results indicate that certain IFNα subtypes have the potential to improve the protective effect of adenovirus-based vaccines against retroviruses. This correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses. Thus, co-expression of select type I IFNs may be a valuable tool for the development of anti-retroviral vaccines.

  18. Enhanced and enduring protection against tuberculosis by recombinant BCG-Ag85C and its association with modulation of cytokine profile in lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Jain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The variable efficacy (0-80% of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette Guréin (BCG vaccine against adult tuberculosis (TB necessitates development of alternative vaccine candidates. Development of recombinant BCG (rBCG over-expressing promising immunodominant antigens of M. tuberculosis represents one of the potential approaches for the development of vaccines against TB. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A recombinant strain of BCG - rBCG85C, over expressing the antigen 85C, a secretory immuno-dominant protein of M. tuberculosis, was evaluated for its protective efficacy in guinea pigs against M. tuberculosis challenge by aerosol route. Immunization with rBCG85C resulted in a substantial reduction in the lung (1.87 log(10, p<0.01 and spleen (2.36 log(10, p<0.001 bacillary load with a commensurate reduction in pathological damage, when compared to the animals immunized with the parent BCG strain at 10 weeks post-infection. rBCG85C continued to provide superior protection over BCG even when post-challenge period was prolonged to 16 weeks. The cytokine profile of pulmonary granulomas revealed that the superior protection imparted by rBCG85C was associated with the reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines - interleukin (IL-12, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, moderate levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine - transforming growth factor (TGF-beta along with up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. In addition, the rBCG85C vaccine induced modulation of the cytokine levels was found to be associated with reduced fibrosis and antigen load accompanied by the restoration of normal lung architecture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results clearly indicate the superiority of rBCG85C over BCG as a promising prophylactic vaccine against TB. The enduring protection observed in this study gives enough reason to postulate that if an open-ended study is carried out with low dose of infection, rBCG85C vaccine in all

  19. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E; Baillie, Les W J; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-08-23

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  20. Armed oncolytic virus enhances immune functions of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Nobuhiro; Diaconu, Iulia; Liu, Hao; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Caruana, Ignazio; Hoyos, Valentina; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2014-09-15

    The clinical efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells remains marginal in solid tumors compared with leukemias. Failures have been attributed to insufficient T-cell migration and to the highly immunosuppressive milieu of solid tumors. To overcome these obstacles, we have combined CAR-T cells with an oncolytic virus armed with the chemokine RANTES and the cytokine IL15, reasoning that the modified oncolytic virus will both have a direct lytic effect on infected malignant cells and facilitate migration and survival of CAR-T cells. Using neuroblastoma as a tumor model, we found that the adenovirus Ad5Δ24 exerted a potent, dose-dependent, cytotoxic effect on tumor cells, whereas CAR-T cells specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2.CAR-T cells) were not damaged. When used in combination, Ad5Δ24 directly accelerated the caspase pathways in tumor cells exposed to CAR-T cells, whereas the intratumoral release of both RANTES and IL15 attracted CAR-T cells and promoted their local survival, respectively, increasing the overall survival of tumor-bearing mice. These preclinical data support the use of this innovative biologic platform of immunotherapy for solid tumors. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5195-205. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060519

  1. When is social protection productivity-enhancing? Costs and benefits on economic performances

    OpenAIRE

    Tomassi, Federico

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to contribute to the contingency view of the relationships between social protection and economic performances, by exploring under what conditions social expenditure is productivity-enhancing or not. Well-designed welfare states and fit socio-economic contexts can yield direct and positive relationships between equality and efficiency. Social expenditure plays a twofold role: short-term financial cost notably in traditional economic sectors, and long-term social investment espe...

  2. Thiopalmitoylation of altered peptide ligands enhances their protective effects in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloake, Nancy C; Beaino, Wissam; Trifilieff, Elisabeth; Greer, Judith M

    2014-03-01

    Previously, we have shown that conjugation of a palmitic chain via a thioester bond to a cysteine residue in weakly or nonencephalitogenic or neuritogenic peptides markedly enhances their ability to induce autoimmune disease in an MHC class II-restricted manner. From those studies, however, it was not clear whether thiopalmitoylation of the peptides was merely enhancing their disease-inducing potential or whether the lipid was itself playing a pathogenic role. To investigate this further, we have now tested the effects of thiopalmitoylation on MHC class II-restricted altered peptide ligands (APLs), which are normally protective in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. We hypothesized that if thiopalmitoylation of a peptide merely enhances its innate potential, then thiopalmitoylated APLs (S-palmAPLs) should show enhanced protective effects. Alternatively, if thiopalmitoylation itself can make a peptide pathogenic, then S-palmAPLs should have decreased therapeutic potential. We synthesized APLs and corresponding S-palmAPLs and showed that the S-palmAPLs were much more effective than the nonconjugated APL at inhibiting the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This was due to several features of the S-palmAPL:S-palmAPL-primed cells show an enhanced ability to proliferate and produce the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in vitro. Furthermore, the bioavailability of S-palmAPL was greatly enhanced, compared with the nonpalmitoylated APL, and S-palm APL was taken up more rapidly into dendritic cells and channeled into the MHC class II processing pathway. These results show that thiopalmitoylation of MHC class II-restricted peptides is a simple way to enhance their effects in vivo and could have wide therapeutic application. PMID:24489099

  3. Yohimbine enhances protection of berberine against LPS-induced mouse lethality through multiple mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of mortality in intensive care units, better therapies are urgently needed. Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS is an important trigger of sepsis. We have demonstrated that berberine (Ber protects against lethality induced by LPS, which is enhanced by yohimbine (Y pretreatment, and Ber combined with Y also improves survival in septic mice. However, the precise mechanisms by which Y enhances protection of Ber against LPS-induced lethality remain unclear. The present study confirmed that simultaneously administered Y also enhanced protection of Ber against LPS-induced lethality. Ber or/and Y attenuated liver injury, but not renal injury in LPS-challenged mice. Ber or/and Y all inhibited LPS-stimulated IκBα, JNK and ERK phosphorylation, NF-κB activation as well as TNF-α production. Ber also increased IL-10 production in LPS-challenged mice, which was enhanced by Y. Furthermore, Ber or/and Y all suppressed LPS-induced IRF3, TyK2 and STAT1 phosphorylation, as well as IFN-β and IP-10 mRNA expression in spleen of mice at 1 h after LPS challenge. Especially, Y enhanced the inhibitory effect of Ber on LPS-induced IP-10 mRNA expression. In vitro experiments further demonstrated that Y significantly enhanced the inhibitory effect of Ber on TNF-α production in LPS-treated peritoneal macrophages, Ber combined with Y promoted LPS-induced IL-10 production and LPS-stimulated IκBα, JNK, ERK and IRF3 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation were also suppressed by Ber or/and Y pretreatment in peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Y enhances the protection of Ber against LPS-induced lethality in mice via attenuating liver injury, upregulating IL-10 production and suppressing IκBα, JNK, ERK and IRF3 phosphorylation. Ber combined with Y may be an effective immunomodulator agent for the prevention of sepsis.

  4. Constructing a resilience index for the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R. E.; Bassett, G. W.; Buehring, W. A.; Collins, M. J.; Dickinson, D. C.; Eaton, L. K.; Haffenden, R. A.; Hussar, N. E.; Klett, M. S.; Lawlor, M. A.; Millier, D. J.; Petit, F. D.; Peyton, S. M.; Wallace, K. E.; Whitfield, R. G.; Peerenboom, J P

    2010-10-14

    Following recommendations made in Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7, which established a national policy for the identification and increased protection of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) by Federal departments and agencies, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2006 developed the Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection (ECIP) program. The ECIP program aimed to provide a closer partnership with state, regional, territorial, local, and tribal authorities in fulfilling the national objective to improve CIKR protection. The program was specifically designed to identify protective measures currently in place in CIKR and to inform facility owners/operators of the benefits of new protective measures. The ECIP program also sought to enhance existing relationships between DHS and owners/operators of CIKR and to build relationships where none existed (DHS 2008; DHS 2009). In 2009, DHS and its protective security advisors (PSAs) began assessing CIKR assets using the ECIP program and ultimately produced individual protective measure and vulnerability values through the protective measure and vulnerability indices (PMI/VI). The PMI/VI assess the protective measures posture of individual facilities at their 'weakest link,' allowing for a detailed analysis of the most vulnerable aspects of the facilities (Schneier 2003), while maintaining the ability to produce an overall protective measures picture. The PMI has six main components (physical security, security management, security force, information sharing, protective measures assessments, and dependencies) and focuses on actions taken by a facility to prevent or deter the occurrence of an incident (Argonne National Laboratory 2009). As CIKR continue to be assessed using the PMI/VI and owners/operators better understand how they can prevent or deter incidents, academic research, practitioner emphasis, and public policy formation have increasingly focused on resilience as a

  5. Silencing B7-H1 enhances the anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer antigen-loaded dendritic cell vaccine in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Wang,1 Yonghua Wang,1 Jing Liu,2 Shixiu Shao,1 Xianjun Li,1 Jiannan Gao,1 Haitao Niu,1 Xinsheng Wang1 1Department of Urology, 2Department of Pediatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to examine whether short hairpin RNA (shRNA expressing lentiviral particles targeting B7-H1 infection could result in B7-H1 knockdown on dendritic cells (DCs and to investigate whether B7-H1 silencing could augment the immune function of DCs and further elicit a more potent anti-tumor immune effect against bladder cancer cells in vitro. Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, were infected by a recombinant lentivirus containing shRNA sequence aimed at B7-H1. After that, the infected DCs were pulsed by tumor antigens and used to stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocytes-based anti-tumor effect in vitro. Results: The lentivirus-mediated shRNA delivery method efficiently and effectively silenced B7-H1 in DCs. Furthermore, the B7-H1 silencing enhanced the stimulatory capacity and the secretion of interleukin-12, but down-regulated interleukin-10 secretion. And more importantly, the anti-tumor effect of bladder cancer antigen-loaded DC vaccine in vitro was also potentially augmented. Conclusion: This study suggests that a combination of B7-H1 knockdown and target antigen delivery could augment anti-tumor effects in vitro, which potentially provides a novel strategy in the immunotherapy of bladder cancer. Keywords: B7-H1, bladder cancer, dendritic cell, vaccine, immunotherapy

  6. Contribution of enhanced engagement of antigen presentation machinery to the clinical immunogenicity of a human interleukin (IL)-21 receptor-blocking therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L; Hickling, T; Song, R; Nowak, J; Rup, B

    2016-01-01

    Reliable risk assessment for biotherapeutics requires accurate evaluation of risk factors associated with immunogenicity. Immunogenicity risk assessment tools were developed and applied to investigate the immunogenicity of a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody, ATR-107 [anti-interleukin (IL)-21 receptor] that elicited anti-drug antibodies (ADA) in 76% of healthy subjects in a Phase 1 study. Because the ATR-107 target is expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), the immunogenicity risk related to engagement with DC and antigen presentation pathways was studied. Despite the presence of IL-21R on DCs, ATR-107 did not bind to the DCs more extensively than the control therapeutic antibody (PF-1) that had elicited low clinical ADA incidence. However, ATR-107, but not the control therapeutic antibody, was translocated to the DC late endosomes, co-localized with intracellular antigen-D related (HLA-DR) molecules and presented a dominant T cell epitope overlapping the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR2) of the light chain. ATR-107 induced increased DC activation exemplified by up-regulation of DC surface expression of CD86, CD274 (PD-L1) and CD40, increased expansion of activated DC populations expressing CD86(hi), CD40(hi), CD83(hi), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)(hi), HLA-DR(hi) or CCR7(hi), as well as elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by DCs. DCs exposed to ATR-107 stimulated an autologous T cell proliferative response in human donor cells, in concert with the detection of immunoglobulin (Ig)G-type anti-ATR-107 antibody response in clinical samples. Collectively, the enhanced engagement of antigen presentation machinery by ATR-107 was suggested. The approaches and findings described in this study may be relevant to identifying lower immunogenicity risk targets and therapeutic molecules. PMID:26400440

  7. Antigenicity, Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Three Proteins Expressed in the Promastigote and Amastigote Stages of Leishmania infantum against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Tamietti Martins

    Full Text Available In the present study, two Leishmania infantum hypothetical proteins present in the amastigote stage, LiHyp1 and LiHyp6, were combined with a promastigote protein, IgE-dependent histamine-releasing factor (HRF; to compose a polyproteins vaccine to be evaluated against L. infantum infection. Also, the antigenicity of the three proteins was analyzed, and their use for the serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL was evaluated. The LiHyp1, LiHyp6, and HRF DNA coding sequences were cloned in prokaryotic expression vectors and the recombinant proteins were purified. When employed in ELISA assays, all proteins were recognized by sera from visceral leishmaniasis (VL dogs, and presented no cross-reactivity with either sera from dogs vaccinated with a Brazilian commercial vaccine, or sera of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected or Ehrlichia canis-infected animals. In addition, the antigens were not recognized by antibodies from non-infected animals living in endemic or non-endemic areas for leishmaniasis. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three proteins administered in the presence of saponin, individually or in combination (composing a polyproteins vaccine, were evaluated in a VL murine model: BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual proteins or with the polyproteins vaccine plus saponin showed a protein-specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after an in vitro stimulation, which was maintained after infection. These animals presented significant reductions in the parasite burden in different evaluated organs, when compared to mice inoculated with saline or saponin. The decrease in parasite burden was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ against parasite total extracts (produced mainly by CD4+ T cells, correlated to the induction of parasite proteins-driven NO production. Mice inoculated with the recombinant protein-based vaccines showed also high levels of

  8. Live attenuated influenza A virus vaccine protects against A(H1N1)pdm09 heterologous challenge without vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Khurana, Surender; Lorusso, Alessio; Perez, Daniel R; Kehrli, Marcus E; Roth, James A; Golding, Hana; Vincent, Amy L

    2014-12-01

    Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines may provide cross-protection against contemporary influenza A virus (IAV) in swine. Conversely, whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines have the potential risk of vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) when challenged with IAV of substantial antigenic drift. A temperature sensitive, intranasal H1N2 LAIV was compared to wild type exposure (WT) and an intramuscular WIV vaccine in a model shown to induce VAERD. WIV vaccinated swine challenged with pandemic A/H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) were not protected from infection and demonstrated severe respiratory disease consistent with VAERD. Lung lesions were mild and challenge virus was not detected in the respiratory tract of LAIV vaccinates. High levels of post-vaccination IgG serum antibodies targeting the H1N1pdm09 HA2 stalk domain were exclusively detected in the WIV group and associated with increased H1N1pdm09 virus infectivity in MDCK cells. In contrast, infection-enhancing antibodies were not detected in the serum of LAIV vaccinates and VAERD was not observed. PMID:25461535

  9. Fusion of the mouse IgG1 Fc domain to the VHH fragment (ARP1) enhances protection in a mouse model of rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Yu, Shengze; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2016-01-01

    A variable fragment of a heavy chain antibody (VHH) directed against rotavirus, also referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 (ARP1), was shown to confer protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea in infant mouse model of rotavirus induced diarrhea. In this study, we have fused the mouse IgG1 Fc to ARP1 to improve the protective capacity of ARP1 by inducing an Fc-mediated effector function. We have shown that the Fc-ARP1 fusion protein confers significantly increased protection against rotavirus in a neonatal mouse model of rotavirus-induced diarrhea by reducing the prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and the viral load in the small intestines, suggesting that the Fc part of immunoglobulins may be engaged in Fc-mediated neutralization of rotavirus. Engineered conventional-like antibodies, by fusion of the Fc part of immunoglobulins to antigen-specific heavy-chain only VHH fragments, might be applied to novel antibody-based therapeutic approaches to enhance elimination of pathogens by activation of distinct effector signaling pathways. PMID:27439689

  10. Enhancement in number and function of antigen-presenting cells in the lymphatic tissue of rats after in vivo administration of diphenylhydantoin (DPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasch, S; Wacker, H H; Zou, P; Bechtold, D; Brittinger, G

    1989-01-01

    We present a monoclonal IgG1 antibody, KiMy1R, which is specific for macrophages and their derivatives in the lymphatic tissue of the rat, and evaluate the distribution of subsets of mononuclear cells in popliteal and para-aortal lymph nodes of Wistar rats after injection of 50 mg DPH into the hindpads. Compared with resting lymphatic tissue and lymph nodes of animals treated with phenobarbital, DPH induced a significant increase (P less than 0.01) of the proportion of phagocytic cells. Furthermore, the soluble antigen alkaline phosphatase was traced after inoculation into the footpads of rats: in locoregional lymph nodes the percentage (mean 12.8/10(3] and the total number (mean 476 x 10(3) cells/lymph node) of cells with membrane-bound or intracytoplasmic alkaline phosphatase, as detected by a monoclonal anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody, were significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in animals pretreated with DPH than in rats pretreated with phenobarbital (mean 2.1/10(3); 31.2 x 10(3) cells/lymph node) and in untreated animals (mean 1.9/10(3); 4.1 x 10(3) cells/lymph node). If verified in humans, the effect of DPH in enhancing the number and function of macrophages and other antigen-presenting cells may exert favourable effects in patients with impairment of the mononuclear phagocytic system. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2805417

  11. Enhanced protective immune response to PCV2 subunit vaccine by co-administration of recombinant porcine IFN-γ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Dan; Guo, Long-Jun; Tang, Qing-Hai; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Liu, Jian-Bo; Li, Sheng-Bin; Huang, Li-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2013-01-21

    The capsid (Cap) protein of PCV2 is the major immunogenic protein that is crucial to induce PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity; thus, it is a suitable target antigen for the research and development of genetically engineered vaccines against PCV2 infection. IFN-γ has exhibited potential efficacy as an immune adjuvant that enhances the immunogenicity of certain vaccines in experimental animal models. In this study, three recombinant proteins: PCV2-Cap protein, porcine IFN-γ (PoIFN-γ), and the fusion protein (Cap-PoIFN-γ) of PCV2-Cap protein and PoIFN-γ were respectively expressed in the baculovirus system, and analyzed by Western blot and indirect ELISA. Additionally, we evaluated the enhancement of the protective immune response to the Cap protein-based PCV2 subunit vaccine elicited by co-administration of PoIFN-γ in mice. Vaccination of mice with the PCV2-Cap+PoIFN-γ vaccine elicited significantly higher levels of PCV2-specific IPMA antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and lymphocyte proliferative responses compared to the Cap-PoIFN-γ vaccine, the PCV2-Cap vaccine, and LG-strain. Following virulent PCV2 challenge, no viraemia was detected in all immunized groups, and the viral loads in lungs of the PCV2-Cap+PoIFN-γ group were significantly lower compared to the Cap-PoIFN-γ group, the LG-strain group, and the mock group, but slightly lower compared to the PCV2-Cap group. These findings suggested that PoIFN-γ substantially enhanced the protective immune response to the Cap protein-based PCV2 subunit vaccine, and that the PCV2-Cap+PoIFN-γ subunit vaccine potentially serves as an attractive candidate vaccine for the prevention and control of PCV2-associated diseases. PMID:23219694

  12. A vulnerability assessment process and enhancements in nuclear material protection control and accountability programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories have conducted Vulnerability Analysis (VA) workshops at several Russian nuclear institutes over the past year and a half. These workshops present quantitative probabilistic risk analysis techniques used by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the protection systems for category 1 and 2 and Special Nuclear Material (SNM) facilities in the US. The VA workshops focus on utilizing the computer-based analysis tool, Analytical System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS), to quantify the detection, delay and neutralization probabilities for the protection systems. The workshops provide instruction to Russian organizations responsible for nuclear Material Protection Control and Accountability (MPC and A) in an effort to communicate how DOE assesses the status of protection systems, and how to use the assessments to evaluate and prioritize potential MPC and A enhancements. The VA methodology introduced in the workshops is now being used to provide an initial quantification of risk at each institute where the workshop is conducted. Further, MPC and A enhancements and upgrades, identified by the class participants during the workshop or as a follow-on activity, have been or will be implemented at several nuclear facilities within Russian. This paper will discuss the vulnerability assessment and computer modeling techniques presented at the Russian nuclear facilities by the US DOE National Laboratories, review the issues associated with adopting a US evaluation methodology in Russia, and explain how the application of this methodology could lead to more cost effective MPC and A program enhancements throughout Russia

  13. Trichinella spiralis: intranasal immunization with attenuated Salmonella enterica carrying a gp43 antigen-derived 30mer epitope elicits protection in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompa-Mera, E N; Yépez-Mulia, L; Ocaña-Mondragón, A; García-Zepeda, E A; Ortega-Pierres, G; González-Bonilla, C R

    2011-12-01

    Trichinellosis is a public health problem and is considered an emergent/re-emergent disease in various countries. The etiological agent of trichinellosis is the nematode Trichinella, which infects domestic animals such as pigs and horses, as well as wild animals and humans. A veterinary vaccine could be an option to control the disease in domestic animals. Although several vaccine candidates have shown promising results, a vaccine against trichinellosis remains unavailable to date. Attenuated Salmonella strains are especially attractive live vectors because they elicit mucosal immunity, which is known to be important for the control of Trichinella spiralis infection at the intestinal level and can be administered by oral or intranasal routes. In this study, the autotransporter ShdA was used to display, on the surface of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261, the 210-239 amino acid epitope, (designated as Ag30) derived from the 43 kDa glycoprotein of T. spiralis muscle larvae. The fusion protein elicited antibodies in BALB/c mice that were able to recognize the native epitope on the surface of T. spiralis muscle larvae. Mice immunized by intranasal route with the recombinant Salmonella induced a protective immune response against the T. spiralis challenge, reducing by 61.83% the adult burden at day eight postinfection. This immune response was characterized by the induction of antigen-specific IgG1 and of IL-5 production. This study demonstrates the usefulness of Salmonella as a carrier of nematode epitopes providing a surface display system for intestinal parasite vaccine applications. PMID:21907709

  14. Electrochemical immunosensor based on bismuth nanocomposite film and cadmium ions functionalized titanium phosphates for the detection of anthrax protective antigen toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh K; Narayanan, J; Upadhyay, Sanjay; Goel, Ajay K

    2015-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis is a bioterrorism agent classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Herein, a novel electrochemical immunosensor for the sensitive, specific and easy detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) toxin in picogram concentration was developed. The immunosensor consists of (i) a Nafion-multiwall carbon nanotubes-bismuth nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrodes (BiNPs/Nafion-MWCNTs/GCE) as a sensing platform and (ii) titanium phosphate nanoparticles-cadmium ion-mouse anti-PA antibodies (TiP-Cd(2+)-MαPA antibodies) as signal amplification tags. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), thermogravimmetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), zeta-potential analysis, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed to characterize the synthesized TiP nanoparticles and modified electrode surfaces. The immunosensing performance of BiNPs/Nafion-MWCNTs/GCE was evaluated based on sandwich immunoassay protocol. A square wave voltammetry (SWV) scan from -1.2 to -0.3 V in HAc-NaAc buffer solution (pH 4.6) without stripping process was performed to record the electrochemical responses at -0.75 V corresponding to high content of Cd(2+) ions loaded in TiP nanoparticles for the measurement of PA toxin. Under optimal conditions, the currents increased with increasing PA toxin concentrations in spiked human serum samples and showed a linear range from 0.1 ng/ml to 100 ng/ml. The limit of detection of developed immunosensor was found to be 50 pg/ml at S/N=3. The total time of analysis was 35 min. PMID:26148674

  15. Development & validation of a quantitative anti-protective antigen IgG enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of cutaneous anthrax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Anthrax caused by Bacillus anthracis is primarily a disease of herbivorous animals, although several mammals are vulnerable to it. ELISA is the most widely accepted serodiagnostic assay for large scale surveillance of cutaneous anthrax. The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate a quantitative ELISA for determination of IgG antibodies against B. anthracis protective antigen (PA in human cutaneous anthrax cases. Methods: Quantitative ELISA was developed using the recombinant PA for coating and standard reference serum AVR801 for quantification. A total of 116 human test and control serum samples were used in the study. The assay was evaluated for its precision, accuracy and linearity. Results: The minimum detection limit and lower limit of quantification of the assay for anti-PA IgG were 3.2 and 4 µg/ml, respectively. The serum samples collected from the anthrax infected patients were found to have anti-PA IgG concentrations of 5.2 to 166.3 µg/ml. The intra-assay precision per cent CV within an assay and within an operator ranged from 0.99 to 7.4 per cent and 1.7 to 3.9 per cent, respectively. The accuracy of the assay was high with a per cent error of 6.5 - 24.1 per cent. The described assay was found to be linear between the range of 4 to 80 ng/ml (R [2] =0.9982; slope=0.9186; intercept = 0.1108. Interpretation & conclusions: The results suggested that the developed assay could be a useful tool for quantification of anti-PA IgG response in human after anthrax infection or vaccination.

  16. Ubiquitin-hepatitis B core antigen-cytoplasmic transduction peptide enhances HBV-specific humoral and CTL immune responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linlin; Zhuo, Meng; Tang, Yuyan; Chen, Xiaohua; Tang, Zhenghao; Zang, Guoqing

    2014-11-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on an enhanced hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity may eradicate HBV. We previously verified that a fusion protein ubiquitin (Ub)-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) can enter the cytoplasm of dendritic cells and enhance T cell response to generate HBV-specific CTLs efficiently in vitro. Ub, a marker of protein degradation, may promote the generation of peptides appropriate for major histocompatibility complex class I presentation. In the present study, the specific immune responses of the fusion protein Ub-HBcAg-CTP in BALB/c mice were evaluated and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Results showed that Ub-HBcAg-CTP increased the anti-HBcAg titer and produced the cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2. This fusion protein also induced higher percentages of IFN-γ(+)CD8(+) cells and specific CTL responses. Ub-HBcAg-CTP could also upregulate the expressions of Jak2, Tyk2, STAT1, and STAT4 in T lymphocytes. In conclusion, Ub-HBcAg-CTP enhanced cellular and humoral immune responses and induced robust HBV-specific CTL activities in BALB/c mice. PMID:25135878

  17. Reliability enhancement of APR + diverse protection system regarding common cause failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Y. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yim, H. S. [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Inc., 1045 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. J. [Chungnam National Univ., 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR +) nuclear power plant design has been developed on the basis of the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) to further enhance safety and economics. For the mitigation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) as well as Common Cause Failures (CCF) within the Plant Protection System (PPS) and the Emergency Safety Feature - Component Control System (ESF-CCS), several design improvement features have been implemented for the Diverse Protection System (DPS) of the APR + plant. As compared to the APR1400 DPS design, the APR + DPS has been designed to provide the Safety Injection Actuation Signal (SIAS) considering a large break LOCA accident concurrent with the CCF. Additionally several design improvement features, such as channel structure with redundant processing modules, and changes of system communication methods and auto-system test methods, are introduced to enhance the functional reliability of the DPS. Therefore, it is expected that the APR + DPS can provide an enhanced safety and reliability regarding possible CCF in the safety-grade I and C systems as well as the DPS itself. (authors)

  18. Reliability enhancement of APR + diverse protection system regarding common cause failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR +) nuclear power plant design has been developed on the basis of the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) to further enhance safety and economics. For the mitigation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) as well as Common Cause Failures (CCF) within the Plant Protection System (PPS) and the Emergency Safety Feature - Component Control System (ESF-CCS), several design improvement features have been implemented for the Diverse Protection System (DPS) of the APR + plant. As compared to the APR1400 DPS design, the APR + DPS has been designed to provide the Safety Injection Actuation Signal (SIAS) considering a large break LOCA accident concurrent with the CCF. Additionally several design improvement features, such as channel structure with redundant processing modules, and changes of system communication methods and auto-system test methods, are introduced to enhance the functional reliability of the DPS. Therefore, it is expected that the APR + DPS can provide an enhanced safety and reliability regarding possible CCF in the safety-grade I and C systems as well as the DPS itself. (authors)

  19. Research on Hydrodynamic Force Enhancement and Water Environment Protection Measures of Dachan Bay, Shenzhen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the research purpose of protection of water environmental quality in Dachan Bay Area in Shenzhen City, especially in National Development Zone in Qianhai Area, this paper establishes a horizontal two-dimensional water quality model of Dachan Bay and its branches by the use of WQ Module of Delft 3D. And this paper respectively simulates distribution of water quality in full high flow year, normal flow year and low flow year before and after the implementation of protection measures, predicts the effect of the water environment protection measures and focuses on the analysis of two kinds of hydrodynamic force enhancement pat-terns, that is, “water replenishing in dead zones” and “pollution discharge at back doors”, and finally recommends water environment protection measures with the core of “pollution discharge at back gates” by taking full advantage of natural dynamic, thus obtaining a better effect than that of the traditional “water replenishing in dead zones”.

  20. Enhanced cell disruption strategy in the release of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen from Pichia pastoris using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Yew

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell disruption strategies by high pressure homogenizer for the release of recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg from Pichia pastoris expression cells were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM based on the central composite design (CCD. The factors studied include number of passes, biomass concentration and pulse pressure. Polynomial models were used to correlate the above mentioned factors to project the cell disruption capability and specific protein release of HBsAg from P. pastoris cells. Results The proposed cell disruption strategy consisted of a number of passes set at 20 times, biomass concentration of 7.70 g/L of dry cell weight (DCW and pulse pressure at 1,029 bar. The optimized cell disruption strategy was shown to increase cell disruption efficiency by 2-fold and 4-fold for specific protein release of HBsAg when compared to glass bead method yielding 75.68% cell disruption rate (CDR and HBsAg concentration of 29.20 mg/L respectively. Conclusions The model equation generated from RSM on cell disruption of P. pastoris was found adequate to determine the significant factors and its interactions among the process variables and the optimum conditions in releasing HBsAg when validated against a glass bead cell disruption method. The findings from the study can open up a promising strategy for better recovery of HBsAg recombinant protein during downstream processing.

  1. Recombinant bovine interleukin 2 enhances immunity and protection induced by Brucella abortus vaccines in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, John H; Howland, Jeri L; Scott, Catherine M O'Connell; Smith, Robert A; Confer, Anthony W

    2005-11-30

    Augmentation of immunization of cattle Brucella abortus S19 or a B. abortus soluble protein extract (SPEBA) vaccine through administration of recombinant bovine IL 2 (rBoIL 2) was evaluated. Seventy-five heifers were divided among 6 groups that were treated with the following: Group 1, no treatment; Group 2, rBoIL 2 (1microg/kg) on day 0; Group 3, SPEBA (2 mg) on day 0 and week 9; Group 4, SPEBA + rBoIL 2 on day 0, SPEBA on week 9; Group 5, S19 (10(7) CFU) on day 0 and week 9; Group 6, S19 + rBoIL 2 on day 0, S19 only on week 9. Approximately, 6 months after vaccination, cattle were bred by natural service, and at mid-gestation pregnant cattle were challenged intraconjunctivally with 9.1 x 10(5) CFU of virulent B. abortus S2308. Pre- and post-challenge antibody responses were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a particle concentration fluorescence assay, and the card test. Lymphoproliferation (LP) responses to gamma-irradiated B. abortus and SPEBA antigens were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After vaccination, antibody responses to B. abortus elevated rapidly in SPEBA- and S19-vaccinates with and without rBoIL 2, however, these responses were significantly (P S19 resulted in significant (P abortus antigens following challenge. Characterization of the cytokine response of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages by real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that in vitro stimulation of these cells with rBoIL 2 resulted in a profound up-regulation of genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL 12p40, and interferon-gamma reflecting activation of the cells. Overall, rBoIL 2-treatment was associated with fewer infections, sero-conversions and a significant (P = 0.02) level of protection against abortion as compared to vaccination alone or no treatment. PMID:16242273

  2. Evaluation of Low and High Frequency Sound for Enhancing Fish Screening Facilities to Protect Outmigrating Salmonids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

    1998-02-01

    The need to provide passage and protective screens at irrigation diversions has always been a necessary part of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1984, 1987, 1994). From 1985 through 1990, fish protection facilities in large irrigation diversions throughout the Columbia Basin, especially in the Yakima Basin, were updated. After 1990, fish protection efforts turned to installation of new facilities on unscreened diversions and to repair and upgrade of older facilities. The screening program also includes funds to monitor and evaluate the facilities. The screen evaluations indicate they are an effective means for protecting juvenile fish larger than 40 mm in length. As state and federal agencies change screening criteria to protect smaller fish (e.g., bull trout fry), the physical barrier may not always be effective. Screen mesh small enough to protect fish may be vulnerable to frequent plugging. Gap tolerances on side and bottom seals may be difficult to install and maintain. Physical barrier screens can be enhanced with behavioral barriers that cause fish to avoid a hazard. Behavioral barriers may consist of sound generator, strobe lights, bubble curtains, or electrical barriers. State of Oregon House Bill 3112 states that "Standards and criteria shall address the overall level of protection necessary at a given water diversion and shall not favor one technology or technique over another." Additionally, it goes on to say, "Screening device means a fish screen or behavior barrier." Other Northwest states, in particular Washington, have taken a comprehensive program to install barriers at all unscreened diversions by 1999. Protecting all fish at all water withdrawals will probably require both physical and behavioral barriers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of using an underwater sound-generator as a behavioral barrier for possible use at fish diversion facilities. This study did not include engineering and economic

  3. Cloning and Expression of Fusion Genes of Domain A-1 Protective Antigen of Bacillus Anthracis and Shigella Enterotoxin B Subunit (Stxb In E. Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH ahmadi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The findings of the current study revealed that this antigen can be raised as an anti-cancer and recombinant vaccine candidate against types of Shigella, Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis which can be due to such factors as identification of antigen(PA by antibody PA20, its apoptosis induction properties, property of immunogenicity, adjuvant and delivery of STxB protein and high expression levels of Gb3 in human cancer cells.

  4. A Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain That Improves Stimulation of Antigen-Presenting Cells Does Not Enhance Vaccine Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Deanna M; Dawn M O'Dee; Joseph Horzempa; Paul E Carlson; Russo, Brian C.; Bales, Jacqueline M.; Brown, Matthew J.; Nau, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited s...

  5. Towards a universal vaccine for avian influenza: protective efficacy of modified Vaccinia virus Ankara and Adenovirus vaccines expressing conserved influenza antigens in chickens challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Amy C; Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Peroval, Marylene Y; Carson, Connor; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Turner, Alison V; Hill, Adrian V S; Gilbert, Sarah C; Butter, Colin

    2013-01-11

    Current vaccines targeting surface proteins can drive antigenic variation resulting either in the emergence of more highly pathogenic viruses or of antigenically distinct viruses that escape control by vaccination and thereby persist in the host population. Influenza vaccines typically target the highly mutable surface proteins and do not provide protection against heterologous challenge. Vaccines which induce immune responses against conserved influenza epitopes may confer protection against heterologous challenge. We report here the results of vaccination with recombinant modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and Adenovirus (Ad) expressing a fusion construct of nucleoprotein and matrix protein (NP+M1). Prime and boost vaccination regimes were trialled in different ages of chicken and were found to be safe and immunogenic. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) ELISpot was used to assess the cellular immune response post secondary vaccination. In ovo Ad prime followed by a 4 week post hatch MVA boost was identified as the most immunogenic regime in one outbred and two inbred lines of chicken. Following vaccination, one inbred line (C15I) was challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H7N7 (A/Turkey/England/1977). Birds receiving a primary vaccination with Ad-NP+M1 and a secondary vaccination with MVA-NP+M1 exhibited reduced cloacal shedding as measured by plaque assay at 7 days post infection compared with birds vaccinated with recombinant viruses containing irrelevant antigen. This preliminary indication of efficacy demonstrates proof of concept in birds; induction of T cell responses in chickens by viral vectors containing internal influenza antigens may be a productive strategy for the development of vaccines to induce heterologous protection against influenza in poultry. PMID:23200938

  6. White button mushroom enhances maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and their antigen presenting function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) (WBM) constitute 90 percent of the total mushrooms consumed in the United States; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well studied...

  7. Characterization of foot- and mouth disease virus antigen by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry in aqueous and oil-emulsion formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Jansen, J.; Westra, D.F.; Coco-Martin, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We have used a novel method, surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS), to characterize foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine antigens. Using specific capture with FMDV binding recombinant antibody fragments and tryptic digestion of FMDV antig

  8. Enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by dendritic cells loaded with Tat-protein transduction domain-fused hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of human immuno-deficiency virus-1-Tat protein has a unique potency to pen-etrate the cellular membranes. To synthesize the sequence of Tat-PTD and hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg), we spliced these sequences and linked a fusion gene into the pMAL-c2x vector. The fusion proteins were purified by affin-ity chromatography and pulsed with bone marrow -derived den-dritic cells (DCs), and the transduction of recombinant pro-tein was detected by immunofluorescence antibody assay.Results showed that recombinant PTD-HBcAg could pen-etrate into DC cytoplasm while recombinant HBcAg was de-tected on the surface of cells. The percentage of DC surface molecules, such as CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibii-ity complex Ⅱ, and production of cytokine (IL-12pT0) induced by recombinant PTD-HBcAg were significantly higher than those induced by recombinant HBcAg or tumor necrosis fac-tor-α. DCs treated with PTD-HBcAg induced T cells to dif-ferentiate into specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and enhanced the CTL killing response. In conclusion, the ex-pressed and purified PTD-HBcAg fusion protein could pen-etrate into cells through the plasma membrane, promote DC maturation, and enhance T cells response to generate HBcAg-specific CTLs efficiently.

  9. MAGE-C2-Specific TCRs Combined with Epigenetic Drug-Enhanced Antigenicity Yield Robust and Tumor-Selective T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Andre; van Brakel, Mandy; van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; da Silva, Marvin; Coulie, Pierre G; Lamers, Cor; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2016-09-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has shown significant clinical success for patients with advanced melanoma and other tumors. Further development of T cell therapy requires improved strategies to select effective, yet nonself-reactive, TCRs. In this study, we isolated 10 TCR sequences against four MAGE-C2 (MC2) epitopes from melanoma patients who showed clinical responses following vaccination that were accompanied by significant frequencies of anti-MC2 CD8 T cells in blood and tumor without apparent side effects. We introduced these TCRs into T cells, pretreated tumor cells of different histological origins with the epigenetic drugs azacytidine and valproate, and tested tumor and self-reactivities of these TCRs. Pretreatment of tumor cells upregulated MC2 gene expression and enhanced recognition by T cells. In contrast, a panel of normal cell types did not express MC2 mRNA, and similar pretreatment did not result in recognition by MC2-directed T cells. Interestingly, the expression levels of MC2, but not those of CD80, CD86, or programmed death-ligand 1 or 2, correlated with T cell responsiveness. One of the tested TCRs consistently recognized pretreated MC2(+) cell lines from melanoma, head and neck, bladder, and triple-negative breast cancers but showed no response to MHC-eluted peptides or peptides highly similar to MC2. We conclude that targeting MC2 Ag, combined with epigenetic drug-enhanced antigenicity, allows for significant and tumor-selective T cell responses. PMID:27489285

  10. Cholera toxin enhances vaccine-induced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Griffiths

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-17 is emerging as an important cytokine in vaccine-induced protection against tuberculosis disease in animal models. Here we show that compared to parenteral delivery, BCG delivered mucosally enhances cytokine production, including interferon gamma and IL-17, in the lungs. Furthermore, we find that cholera toxin, delivered mucosally along with BCG, further enhances IL-17 production by CD4(+ T cells over mucosal BCG alone both in the lungs and systemically. This boosting effect of CT is also observed using a vaccine regimen of BCG followed by the candidate vaccine MVA85A. Using a murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb aerosol challenge model, we demonstrate the ability of cholera toxin delivered at the time of a priming BCG vaccination to improve protection against tuberculosis disease in a manner at least partially dependent on the observed increase in IL-17. This observed increase in IL-17 in the lungs has no adverse effect on lung pathology following M.tb challenge, indicating that IL-17 can safely be boosted in murine lungs in a vaccine/M.tb challenge setting.

  11. Combination of Circulating Tumor Cells with Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Enhances Clinical Prediction of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Xu Wang; Hua He; Ziling Liu; Ji-Fan Hu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and surveillance of lung cancer. However, CTC detection is not only costly, but its sensitivity is also low, thus limiting its usage and the collection of robust data regarding the significance of CTCs in lung cancer. We aimed to seek clinical variables that enhance the prediction of CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical samples and pathological data were c...

  12. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, whic...

  13. Cross-protective potential of a novel monoclonal antibody directed against antigenic site B of the hemagglutinin of influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Yoshida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The hemagglutinin (HA of influenza A viruses has been classified into sixteen distinct subtypes (H1-H16 to date. The HA subtypes of influenza A viruses are principally defined as serotypes determined by neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition tests using polyclonal antisera to the respective HA subtypes, which have little cross-reactivity to the other HA subtypes. Thus, it is generally believed that the neutralizing antibodies are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. In this study, we generated a novel monoclonal antibody (MAb specific to HA, designated MAb S139/1, which showed heterosubtypic cross-reactive neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition of influenza A viruses. This MAb was found to have broad reactivity to many other viruses (H1, H2, H3, H5, H9, and H13 subtypes in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We further found that MAb S139/1 showed neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition activities against particular strains of H1, H2, H3, and H13 subtypes of influenza A viruses. Mutant viruses that escaped neutralization by MAb S139/1 were selected from the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2, A/Adachi/2/57 (H2N2, and A/WSN/33 (H1N1 strains, and sequence analysis of the HA genes of these escape mutants revealed amino acid substitutions at positions 156, 158, and 193 (H3 numbering. A molecular modeling study showed that these amino acids were located on the globular head of the HA and formed a novel conformational epitope adjacent to the receptor-binding domain of HA. Furthermore, passive immunization of mice with MAb S139/1 provided heterosubtypic protection. These results demonstrate that MAb S139/1 binds to a common antigenic site shared among a variety of HA subtypes and neutralizes viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo by affecting viral attachment to cells. The present study supports the notion that cross-reactive antibodies play some roles in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus infection, and underscores the

  14. Production of Functionally Active and Immunogenic Non-Glycosylated Protective Antigen from Bacillus anthracis in Nicotiana benthamiana by Co-Expression with Peptide-N-Glycosidase F (PNGase F) of Flavobacterium meningosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Tarlan; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, R Mark; Ghosh, Ananya; Coffin, Megan V; Herschbach, Kristina; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I; Streatfield, Stephen J; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis has long been considered a potential biological warfare agent, and therefore, there is a need for a safe, low-cost and highly efficient anthrax vaccine with demonstrated long-term stability for mass vaccination in case of an emergency. Many efforts have been made towards developing an anthrax vaccine based on recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of B. anthracis, a key component of the anthrax toxin, produced using different expression systems. Plants represent a promising recombinant protein production platform due to their relatively low cost, rapid scalability and favorable safety profile. Previous studies have shown that full-length rPA produced in Nicotiana benthamiana (pp-PA83) is immunogenic and can provide full protection against lethal spore challenge; however, further improvement in the potency and stability of the vaccine candidate is necessary. PA of B. anthracis is not a glycoprotein in its native host; however, this protein contains potential N-linked glycosylation sites, which can be aberrantly glycosylated during expression in eukaryotic systems including plants. This glycosylation could affect the availability of certain key epitopes either due to masking or misfolding of the protein. Therefore, a non-glycosylated form of pp-PA83 was engineered and produced in N. benthamiana using an in vivo deglycosylation approach based on co-expression of peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) from Flavobacterium meningosepticum. For comparison, versions of pp-PA83 containing point mutations in six potential N-glycosylation sites were also engineered and expressed in N. benthamiana. The in vivo deglycosylated pp-PA83 (pp-dPA83) was shown to have in vitro activity, in contrast to glycosylated pp-PA83, and to induce significantly higher levels of toxin-neutralizing antibody responses in mice compared with glycosylated pp-PA83, in vitro deglycosylated pp-PA83 or the mutated versions of pp-PA83. These results suggest that pp-dPA83 may offer advantages

  15. Relationship between liver disorders and protection against Eimeria stiedai infection in rabbits immunized with soluble antigens from the bile of infected rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, S; Omata, Y; Umemoto, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Furuoka, H; Matsui, T; Maeda, R; Saito, A

    2003-02-13

    Soluble antigens exist in the bile of rabbits infected with Eimeria stiedai (E. stiedai) in the acute phase, and rabbits immunized with the antigens show resistance against the infection. In this study, the liver function of rabbits immunized either with the soluble antigens or PBS were examined following the parasite challenge. Rabbits immunized with PBS shed a number of oocysts and showed an increase in r-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity and a decrease in blood Indocyanine green (ICG) clearance. However, rabbits immunized with the soluble antigens shed a lower number of oocysts and showed a transient increase of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) activity on Day 8 post-challenge (p.c.). The blood Indocyanine green clearance of the rabbits showed no change throughout the experiment. By histopathological observation of the liver, a number of merozoites were found in the biliary ducts on Day 8 post-challenge in the non-immunized rabbits. In contrast, a number of lymphocytes and neutrophilic leukocytes assembled around the biliary ducts of the immunized rabbits, but few parasites were found there on Day 8 post-challenge. These results suggest that the soluble antigens stimulate local immune reactions, for example around the biliary ducts, resulting in elimination of the parasite's development. PMID:12531300

  16. CNSC response to Fukushima and enhancements to the regulatory framework for the protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) responded immediately to the accident at Fukushima Daiichi with several actions including the establishment of a multidisciplinary CNSC Fukushima Task Force with the objective of reviewing all major nuclear facilities in Canada, including Canadian nuclear power plants (NPPs). The review, led by the Task Force, confirmed the facilities' ability to withstand and respond to credible external events, such as earthquakes. In response to Task Force recommendations and following extensive consultation activities, the CNSC established an integrated action plan to further strengthen the safety of NPPs and other major nuclear facilities. The CNSC Integrated Action Plan also includes measures to enhance communication and public education. Both the Task Force Report and the Action Plan were subject to several rounds of public consultation, as well as two independent evaluations, which confirmed that the CNSC response to the events in Fukushima was prompt, appropriate and comprehensive. This presentation outlines several enhancements to the CNSC regulatory framework for the protection of emergency workers, members of the public and the environment as a result of Task Force Recommendations and the CNSC Integrated Action Plan on lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident, including: - Amendments to the Radiation Protection Regulations to ensure consistency with international guidance and to describe the regulatory requirements needed to address radiological hazards during the phases of an emergency in greater detail. - Strengthening Federal and Provincial nuclear emergency planning through the establishment of a formal, transparent, national-level oversight process for offsite nuclear emergency plans, programs and performance, and through the scheduling of regularly planned full-scale exercises. - Upgrading onsite emergency facilities and equipment at Canadian NPPs. - Updating Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of NPPs to

  17. Motor Skills Enhance Procedural Memory Formation and Protect against Age-Related Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nils C. J.; Genzel, Lisa; Konrad, Boris N.; Pawlowski, Marcel; Neville, David; Fernández, Guillén; Steiger, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to consolidate procedural memories declines with increasing age. Prior knowledge enhances learning and memory consolidation of novel but related information in various domains. Here, we present evidence that prior motor experience–in our case piano skills–increases procedural learning and has a protective effect against age-related decline for the consolidation of novel but related manual movements. In our main experiment, we tested 128 participants with a sequential finger-tapping motor task during two sessions 24 hours apart. We observed enhanced online learning speed and offline memory consolidation for piano players. Enhanced memory consolidation was driven by a strong effect in older participants, whereas younger participants did not benefit significantly from prior piano experience. In a follow up independent control experiment, this compensatory effect of piano experience was not visible after a brief offline period of 30 minutes, hence requiring an extended consolidation window potentially involving sleep. Through a further control experiment, we rejected the possibility that the decreased effect in younger participants was caused by training saturation. We discuss our results in the context of the neurobiological schema approach and suggest that prior experience has the potential to rescue memory consolidation from age-related cognitive decline. PMID:27333186

  18. CD8+ T cells prevent antigen-induced antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellweger, Raphaël M; Eddy, William E; Tang, William W; Miller, Robyn; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-10-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes pathologies ranging from the febrile illness dengue fever to the potentially lethal severe dengue disease. A major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease is the presence of subprotective DENV-reactive Abs from a previous infection (or from an immune mother), which can induce Ab-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE). However, infection in the presence of subprotective anti-DENV Abs does not always result in severe disease, suggesting that other factors influence disease severity. In this study we investigated how CD8(+) T cell responses influence the outcome of Ab-mediated severe dengue disease. Mice were primed with aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted UV-inactivated DENV prior to challenge with DENV. Priming failed to induce robust CD8(+) T cell responses, and it induced nonneutralizing Ab responses that increased disease severity upon infection. Transfer of exogenous DENV-activated CD8(+) T cells into primed mice prior to infection prevented Ab-dependent enhancement and dramatically reduced viral load. Our results suggest that in the presence of subprotective anti-DENV Abs, efficient CD8(+) T cell responses reduce the risk of Ab-mediated severe dengue disease. PMID:25217165

  19. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K;

    1985-01-01

    .1 and P greater than 0.5, respectively) by day-to-day analysis of an untreated healthy control group. An increased expression of both HLA-ABC (mean 55%, P less than 0.0005) and beta 2m (mean 23%, P less than 0.01) was also observed prior to treatment in the lung cancer patients when compared to a group....... A significant increase in the mean fluorescence intensity of HLA-ABC (median 59%, P less than 0.001) and beta 2m (median 57%, P less than 0.001) on small lymphoid cells was observed 24 h after initiation of IFN-alpha treatment (50 X 10(6) units IFN-alpha/m2 three times a week). The enhanced...... of age matched healthy individuals. Treatment with IFN-alpha caused a significant redistribution of mononuclear cells resulting in both absolute and relative lymphopenia. Pre-treatment lymphocyte counts were 1.09 X 10(9)/1 (range 0.49-1.73), post-treatment counts were 0.55 X 10(9)/1 (range 0.39-1.06)....

  20. A role for autoantibodies in enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to a self-antigen, thyroid peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Leslie, R Graham Q; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    individuals with no familiar disposition to AITD, and mixed each serum with normal mononuclear cells (MNCs). Following challenge with TPO, the MNCs' production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, correlated with the TPOAb content of the...... serum present in the culture (p=0.0002-0.05). Enrichment of foetal calf serum-containing media with IgG with a high content of TPOAbs enhanced the TPO-elicited production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma by normal MNCs in a dose- and Fcgamma-receptor dependent manner (p<0.0002-0.05). The data indicate...

  1. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines. PMID:25265876

  2. A cathodic arc enhanced middle-frequency magnetron sputter system for deposition of hard protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cathode arc enhanced magnetron sputter system for deposition of hard protective coatings is reported in this article. This system consists of eight targets: four outer targets are mounted on the wall of the chamber and four inner targets are placed around the center of the chamber. The outer and inner targets form four pair targets and are powered by four middle frequency power supplies. One of the outer targets can run either in the cathode arc mode or in the magnetron sputter mode. The Ti-containing diamond-like carbon nanocomposite coatings were deposited by using this system. The prepared coating exhibits high hardness (∼20 GPa), good adhesion (critical load is 50 N), very low friction coefficient (∼0.07); and excellent tribological performance with a wear rate of 1.4 x 10-16 m3·N-l·m-1. (authors)

  3. Highly stable gelatin layer-protected gold nanoparticles as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changwon; Zhang, Peng

    2014-06-01

    Amine and carboxylic groups rich gelatin was used as reducing and stabilizing agent to form highly stable gold nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. The size of the particle was determined to be 13 nm by TEM with mono-dispersity. The size of the gold nanoparticles was little affected by the initial gelatin concentration. The gelatin-gold nanoparticles show strong SERS activity with Rhodamine 6G and Ruthenium bipyridine as reporter molecules. Both carboxylic acid groups and amine groups were identified by FT-IR to be present on the gelatin-gold nanoparticle surface, providing the possibility of further conjugation with other molecules. The gelatin-protected gold nanoparticles prepared by this simple, green, method displayed very good solubility and stability in many solvents, and good monodispersity, all desirable features as good SERS substrates. PMID:24738391

  4. Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi that are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breganó, José Wander; Picão, Renata Cristina; Graça, Viviane Krominski; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Itow Jankevicius, Shiduca; Pinge Filho, P; Jankevicius, José Vítor

    2003-12-01

    The immune cross-reactivity between Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, and Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid that infects tomatoes, was studied. Sera from patients with Chagas' disease presented a strong reactivity with P. serpens antigens by conventional serological assays such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and direct agglutination test (DAT), confirmed after cross-absorption experiments. The results show that this protozoan is highly immunogenic and that rabbit and mouse hyperimmune serum raised against T. cruzi or P. serpens was able to recognize both T. cruzi and P. serpens antigens in immunofluorescence and agglutination assays. The antigenic cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and P. serpens was also demonstrated in vivo. BALB/c mice immunized by the intraperitoneal or oral route with P. serpens and later challenged with a lethal inoculum of T. cruzi blood forms showed a significant decrease in parasitemia and increase in survival compared to controls. A practical implication of these findings is that the ingestion by humans or animals of living plant trypanosomatids present in naturally infected edible fruits could potentially prime the immune response to T. cruzi antigens and interfere with the development of T. cruzi infection. PMID:14642311

  5. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses and histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co2...

  6. Enhancement of Leishmania amazonensis infection in BCG non-responder mice by BCG-antigen specific vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia da Silva Calabrese

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Different patterns of cutaneous leishmaniasis can be induced when a challenge of alike dose of Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes in various inbred strains was applied. Two strains of mice, the Balb/c and C57 BL/10J, showed exceptional suscepbility, and 10(elevado a sexta potência amastigotes infective dose lead, to ulcerative progressive lesions with cutaneous metastasis and loss by necrosis of leg on wich the footpad primary lesion occured. Lesions were also progressive but in a lower degree when C3H/HeN and C57BL/6 were infected. Lesions progress slowly in DBA/2 mice presenting lesions wich reach a discreet peack after 12 weeks, do not heal but do not uncerate. DBA/2 mice is, therefore, a good model for immunomodualtion. In attempt to determine the influence of BCG in vaccination schedule using microsomal fraction, DBA/2 became an excellent model, since it is also a non-responder to BCG. Vaccination of DBA/2 mice, receiving the same 10(elevado a sexta potência BCG viable dose and 10 *g or 50 *g of protein content of microsomal fraction, lead to a progressive disease with time course similar to those observed in susceptible non-vaccinated C57BL/10J mice after 6 months of observation. An enhancement of infection in BCG non-responder mice suggests that use of BCG as immunostimulant in humans could be critical for both vaccination and immunoprophylactic strategies.

  7. A Brucella spp. Protease Inhibitor Limits Antigen Lysosomal Proteolysis, Increases Cross-Presentation, and Enhances CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Tkach, Mercedes; Sabbione, Florencia; Bruno, Laura; Carabajal, Marianela V; Berguer, Paula M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Schillaci, Roxana; Trevani, Analía S; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the unlipidated (U) outer membrane protein (Omp) 19 from Brucella spp. is a competitive inhibitor of human cathepsin L. U-Omp19 inhibits lysosome cathepsins and APC-derived microsome activity in vitro and partially inhibits lysosomal cathepsin L activity within live APCs. Codelivery of U-Omp19 with the Ag can reduce intracellular Ag digestion and increases Ag half-life in dendritic cells (DCs). U-Omp19 retains the Ag in Lamp-2(+) compartments after its internalization and promotes a sustained expression of MHC class I/peptide complexes in the cell surface of DCs. Consequently, U-Omp19 enhances Ag cross-presentation by DCs to CD8(+) T cells. U-Omp19 s.c. delivery induces the recruitment of CD11c(+)CD8α(+) DCs and monocytes to lymph nodes whereas it partially limits in vivo Ag proteolysis inside DCs. Accordingly, this protein is able to induce CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo against codelivered Ag. Antitumor responses were elicited after U-Omp19 coadministration, increasing survival of mice in a murine melanoma challenge model. Collectively, these results indicate that a cysteine protease inhibitor from bacterial origin could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against tumors. PMID:27084100

  8. Allicin enhances host pro-inflammatory immune responses and protects against acute murine malaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yonghui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malaria infection, multiple pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, TNF and nitric oxide (NO play a crucial role in the protection against the parasites. Modulation of host immunity is an important strategy to improve the outcome of malaria infection. Allicin is the major biologically active component of garlic and shows anti-microbial activity. Allicin is also active against protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, which is thought to be mediated by inhibiting cysteine proteases. In this study, the immunomodulatory activities of allicin were assessed during acute malaria infection using a rodent malaria model Plasmodium yoelii 17XL. Methods To determine whether allicin modulates host immune responses against malaria infection, mice were treated with allicin after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Mortality was checked daily and parasitaemia was determined every other day. Pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-4 were quantified by ELISA, while NO level was determined by the Griess method. The populations of dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, CD4+ T and regulatory T cells (Treg were assessed by FACS. Results Allicin reduced parasitaemia and prolonged survival of the host in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is at least partially due to improved host immune responses. Results showed that allicin treatment enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12p70 and NO. The absolute numbers of CD4+ T cells, DCs and macrophages were significantly higher in allicin-treated mice. In addition, allicin promoted the maturation of CD11c+ DCs, whereas it did not cause major changes in IL-4 and the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Conclusions Allicin could partially protect host against P. yoelii 17XL through enhancement of the host innate and adaptive immune responses.

  9. Demethylation of Cancer/Testis Antigens and CpG ODN Stimulation Enhance Dendritic Cell and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Function in a Mouse Mammary Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhong Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy in virtue of their restricted expression profile in normal tissues. However, CTA-targeted immunotherapy has been rather disappointing clinical setting for CTAs are downregulated by cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG methylation in their promoter regions, so that tumor cells have low immunogenicity. Methods. We reinduced mouse CTA P1A through demethylation process and generated P1A-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs by immunizing BALB/c (H-2d mice with dendritic cells pulsed with a P1A-specific peptide and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN immune adjuvant. Results. We found that demethylation and CpG ODN immune adjuvant stimulation facilitated DC maturation and enhanced the allogenic capacity of P1A-specific CTLs against target cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions. Our results suggested that CTA induction and immune adjuvant stimulation is a feasible strategy in cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  11. Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value

  12. Getting more from visual working memory: Retro-cues enhance retrieval and protect from visual interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alessandra S; Rerko, Laura; Oberauer, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) has a limited capacity. This limitation can be mitigated by the use of focused attention: if attention is drawn to the relevant working memory content before test, performance improves (the so-called retro-cue benefit). This study tests 2 explanations of the retro-cue benefit: (a) Focused attention protects memory representations from interference by visual input at test, and (b) focusing attention enhances retrieval. Across 6 experiments using color recognition and color reproduction tasks, we varied the amount of color interference at test, and the delay between a retrieval cue (i.e., the retro-cue) and the memory test. Retro-cue benefits were larger when the memory test introduced interfering visual stimuli, showing that the retro-cue effect is in part because of protection from visual interference. However, when visual interference was held constant, retro-cue benefits were still obtained whenever the retro-cue enabled retrieval of an object from VWM but delayed response selection. Our results show that accessible information in VWM might be lost in the processes of testing memory because of visual interference and incomplete retrieval. This is not an inevitable state of affairs, though: Focused attention can be used to get the most out of VWM. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26752731

  13. Aegle Marmelos Enhances Gastric Mucosal Protection: Relevance for NSAIDS-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Singh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In order to study the gastroprotective effect of Aegle marmelos extract (AM, this study was undertaken on aspirin-induced ulcerogenesis in cannulated free-moving rats. Background: Most of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs including aspirin (ASP cause gastric ulcer. The efficacy of several plants for the treatment of gastroduodenal disease is confirmed by clinical research, while basic scientific research helps us to uncover the mechanisms by which these plants exert their therapeutic effects. Method: To assess the possible antiulcer effect of AM, lesion index, gastric secretions glycoprotein levels and mucosal histopathology were determined in ASP induced gastric mucosal injury in cannulated free-moving rats. Results: Pretreatment with AM significantly prevented the development of gastric mucosal lesion and decreased the gastric toxicity produced by ulcerogen. In addition, ulcerated rats showed depletion of gastric wall mucus, glycoproteins and enhanced gastric acid secretion whereas treatment with AM prevented these ASP induced responses in cannulated free-moving rats. Histological studies confirmed the results. Conclusion: The present finding suggests that AM promotes ulcer protection by the decrease in ulcer index, gastric secretions and increase in the glycoprotein level, gastric mucin content and maintenance of mucosal epithelium. AM protects the gastric mucosa against ulceration by its antisecretory and cytoprotective property.

  14. Human monoclonal antibodies against anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen act independently to protect against Bacillus anthracis infection and enhance endogenous immunity to anthrax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Mark T.; Li, Han; Williamson, E. Diane; LeButt, Chris S.; Flick-Smith, Helen C.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Westra, Hans; Galloway, Darrell; Mateczun, Alfred; Goldman, Stanley; Groen, Herman; Baillie, Les W. J.

    2007-01-01

    The unpredictable nature of bioterrorism and the absence of real-time detection systems have highlighted the need for an efficient postexposure therapy for Bacillus anthracis infection. One approach is passive immunization through the administration of antibodies that mitigate the biological action

  15. Functional enhancement and protection of dopaminergic terminals by RAB3B overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chee Yeun; Koprich, James B; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2009-12-29

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN, A9) are particularly vulnerable, compared to adjacent DA neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA, A10). Here, we show that in rat and human, one RAB3 isoform, RAB3B, has higher expression levels in A10 compared to A9 neurons. RAB3 is a monomeric GTPase protein that is highly enriched in synaptic vesicles and is involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking and synaptic transmission, disturbances of which have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. These findings prompted us to further investigate the biology and neuroprotective capacity of RAB3B both in vitro and in vivo. RAB3B overexpression in human dopaminergic BE (2)-M17 cells increased neurotransmitter content, [(3)H] dopamine uptake, and levels of presynaptic proteins. AAV-mediated RAB3B overexpression in A9 DA neurons of the rat SN increased striatal dopamine content, number and size of synaptic vesicles, and levels of the presynaptic proteins, confirming in vitro findings. Measurement of extracellular DOPAC, a dopamine metabolite, following l-DOPA injection supported a role for RAB3B in enhancing the dopamine storage capacity of synaptic terminals. RAB3B overexpression in BE (2)-M17 cells was protective against toxins that simulate aspects of PD in vitro, including an oxidative stressor 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and a proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Furthermore, RAB3B overexpression in rat SN both protected A9 DA neurons and resulted in behavioral improvement in a 6-OHDA retrograde lesion model of PD. These results suggest that RAB3B improves dopamine handling and storage capacity at presynaptic terminals, and confers protection to vulnerable DA neurons. PMID:20007772

  16. Plasmids enriched with CpG motifs activate human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro and enhance th-1 immune responses to hepatitis B surface antigen in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihui; Cao, Jie; Liao, Xiaoling; Ke, Jinshan; Zhu, Shiying; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhongtian

    2011-06-01

    T helper-1 (Th-1)-type immune responses play an important role in viral clearance during infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Unmethylated CpG motifs present in bacterial DNA can activate toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) signals and act as potent adjuvants to induce Th-1-type immune responses. Here, a mini-plasmid with 812 base pairs in length was constructed and used as a vector to prepare a series of plasmids containing 3-21 copies of D-type CpG motifs. In vitro, these CpG-enriched plasmids strongly stimulated proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and enhanced secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). The responses of the PBMCs from healthy individuals to the plasmids were stronger than those obtained from HBV-infected individuals. Contrary to the strong Th-2-biased response induced by surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) plus alum adjuvant, immunization of BALB/c mice with HBsAg plus these plasmids induced a strong Th-1-biased response. The plasmids increased the titers of HBsAg-specific total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG(2a). HBsAg-specific IL-2 and IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity were also enhanced in the presence of the plasmids. The strength of the immune responses positively correlated with the number of CpG motifs in the plasmids. These results indicate that the use of CpG-enriched plasmids as an adjuvant to recombinant HBsAg could provide a promising and cost-effective approach for the development of efficacious therapeutic vaccines against HBV infection. PMID:21668361

  17. Antigen transfer from exosomes to dendritic cells as an explanation for the immune enhancement seen by IgE immune complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K Martin

    Full Text Available IgE antigen complexes induce increased specific T cell proliferation and increased specific IgG production. Immediately after immunization, CD23(+ B cells capture IgE antigen complexes, transport them to the spleen where, via unknown mechanisms, dendritic cells capture the antigen and present it to T cells. CD23, the low affinity IgE receptor, binds IgE antigen complexes and internalizes them. In this study, we show that these complexes are processed onto B-cell derived exosomes (bexosomes in a CD23 dependent manner. The bexosomes carry CD23, IgE and MHC II and stimulate antigen specific T-cell proliferation in vitro. When IgE antigen complex stimulated bexosomes are incubated with dendritic cells, dendritic cells induce specific T-cell proliferation in vivo, similar to IgE antigen complexes. This suggests that bexosomes can provide the essential transfer mechanism for IgE antigen complexes from B cells to dendritic cells.

  18. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc - phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases

  19. Deletion modification enhances anthrax specific immunity and protective efficacy of a hepatitis B core particle-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Chenguang; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Dayong; Guo, Qiang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is one of the major virulence factors of anthrax and is also the major constituent of the current anthrax vaccine. Previously, we found that the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA contains a dominant neutralizing epitope, the SFFD. We successfully inserted the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The resulting fusion protein, termed HBc-N144-PA-loop2 (HBcL2), can effectively produce anthrax specific protective antibodies in an animal model. However, the protective immunity caused by HBcL2 could still be improved. In this research, we removed amino acids 79-81 from the HBc MIR of the HBcL2. This region was previously reported to be the major B cell epitope of HBc, and in keeping with this finding, we observed that the short deletion in the MIR not only diminished the intrinsic immunogenicity of HBc but also stimulated a higher titer of anthrax specific immunity. Most importantly, this deletion led to the full protection of the immunized mice against a lethal dose anthrax toxin challenge. We supposed that the conformational changes which occurred after the short deletion and foreign insertion in the MIR of HBc were the most likely reasons for the improvement in the immunogenicity of the HBc-based anthrax epitope vaccine. PMID:24054942

  20. Role of Escherichia coli type 1 pilus in colonization of porcine ileum and its protective nature as a vaccine antigen in controlling colibacillosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jayappa, H G; Goodnow, R. A.; Geary, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of Escherichia coli type 1 pili in adherence of the organism to porcine small intestines and the efficacy of pili as a vaccine antigen in controlling neonatal colibacillosis. Our results demonstrated that an E. coli phase cloned to express type 1 pili readily attached to the small intestines of colostrum-deprived newborn pigs. Immunofluorescent staining of intestine sections revealed the presence of E. coli expressing type 1 pili only on the brush ...

  1. Risk analysis and protective measures for occupationally workers with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Elevated concentrations of these radionuclides are often found in certain geological materials, namely igneous rocks and ores. Human activities that exploit these resources may lead to enhanced concentrations of radionuclides (often referred to as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TE-NORM). Enhanced levels of natural background radiation are encountered in many occupational industrial activities involving a large number of workers. Uncontrolled activities associated with TE-NORM can contaminate the environment and pose a risk to human health. This risk can be alleviated by the adoption of controls to identify where NORM is present; and cleaning the NORM-contaminated equipment and waste management while protecting workers. The main objective of this study is to investigate the natural radioactivity and the hazard parameters in the TE-NORM samples from different industrial activities. Also to describe the models and develop the computer codes that allow one to estimate the risk of cancer resulting from any specified dose of ionizing radiation for occupationally workers in different industrial activities. The present study deals with 50 different samples. This waste generated from petroleum fields, phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples. The radon exhalation rates calculated using solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39). The value of radon exhalation rate 58.82±5.3 x103, 4.28±0.49 x103 and 0.306±0.025 x103 Bq/m2 h for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The value of radon exhalation rate 82.67±7.98, 62.58 ±5.7, 46.16 ±3.91 and 198.51±18.68 Bq/m2 h for phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples, respectively. The 226Ra activity concentrations were 301.4±771.5, 52.1±438 and 2.56±55.37 kBq/kg for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The 226Ra

  2. Antigen pulsed CpG-ODN activated dendritic cells induce host-protective immune response by regulating the T regulatory cell functioning in Leishmania donovani-infected mice: critical role of CXCL10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat eMajumder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, caused by Leishmania donovani, is a systemic infection of reticulo-endothelial system. There is currently no protective vaccine against VL and chemotherapy is increasingly limited due to appearance of drug resistance to first line drugs such as antimonials and amphotericin B. In the present study, by using a murine model of leishmaniasis we evaluated the function played by soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA pulsed-CpG-ODN stimulated dendritic cells (SLA-CpG-DCs in restricting the intracellular parasitic growth. We establish that a single dose of SLA-CpG-DCs vaccination is sufficient in rendering complete protection against Leishmania donovani infection. In probing the possible mechanism, we observed that SLA-CpG-DCs vaccination results in the significant decrease in Foxp3+GITR+CTLA4+CD4+CD25+ Treg cell population in Leishmania-infected mice. Vaccination with these antigen stimulated dendritic cells results in the decrease in the secretion of TGF-β by these Treg cells by possible regulation of the SMAD signalling. Moreover, we demonstrated that a CXC chemokine, IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10, has a direct role in the regulation of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in SLA-CpG-DCs vaccinated parasitized mice as Treg cells isolated from IP-10 depleted vaccinated mice showed significantly increased TGF-β production and suppressive activity.

  3. Nizatidine, a small molecular compound, enhances killed H5N1 vaccine cell-mediated responses and protects mice from lethal viral challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Wang, Ming; Chen, Ruiai; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Nizatidine (NIZ), closely related to Cimetidine, is a histamine H2 receptor inverse agonist used primarily as an anti-acid drug. Recent studies showed that this class of compounds may also modulate immune responses. To evaluate adjuvant effects of NIZ on vaccine immune modulation, we formulated NIZ with a H5N1 killed viral antigen and tested in vitro and in vivo. NIZ activated DC maturation and stimulated Th1 and Th2 immune responses to H5N1 vaccine. As a result, it enhanced both antibody and T cell-mediated immune responses. We also observed that a single immunization into C57BL/6 mice blocked IL-10 upregulation and potentiated Th1/Th2 dual polarization. Importantly, the inoculation of H5N1 vaccine with NIZ significantly improved protection of animals from death after challenge and reduced virus loads in the lung tissues. Considering its water-soluble nature, compared with Cimetidine, Nizatidine may be a better choice to use as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:24253609

  4. Enhanced effect of BCG vaccine against pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice with lung Th17 response to mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Masayuki; Shinjo, Kikuko; Umemura, Masayuki; Shigeno, Satoko; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Arakawa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-01

    Although the BCG vaccine can prevent tuberculosis (TB) in infants, its ability to prevent adult pulmonary TB is reportedly limited. Therefore, development of a novel effective vaccine against pulmonary TB has become an international research priority. We have previously reported that intranasal vaccination of mice with a mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) plus mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) enhances production of IFN-γ and anti-HBHA antibody and suppresses extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination after intranasal infection with BCG. In the present study, the effects of intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine on murine pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection were examined. Intranasal HBHA + CT vaccination alone failed to reduce the bacterial burden in the infected lung. However, a combination vaccine consisting of s.c. BCG priming and an intranasal HBHA + CT booster significantly enhanced protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection on day 14 compared with BCG vaccine alone. Further, it was found that intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine enhanced not only IFN-γ but also IL-17A production by HBHA-specific T cells in the lung after pulmonary Mtb infection. Therefore, this combination vaccine may be a good candidate for a new vaccine strategy against pulmonary TB. PMID:26577130

  5. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered cytokine-induced killer cells overcome treatment resistance of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and enhance survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelsner, Sarah; Wagner, Juliane; Friede, Miriam E; Pfirrmann, Verena; Genßler, Sabrina; Rettinger, Eva; Buchholz, Christian J; Pfeifer, Heike; Schubert, Ralf; Ottmann, Oliver G; Ullrich, Evelyn; Bader, Peter; Wels, Winfried S

    2016-10-15

    Pre-emptive cancer immunotherapy by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may be beneficial to prevent relapse with a reduced risk of causing graft-versus-host-disease. CIK cells are a heterogeneous effector cell population including T cells (CD3(+) CD56(-) ), natural killer (NK) cells (CD3(-) CD56(+) ) and natural killer T (T-NK) cells (CD3(+) CD56(+) ) that exhibit non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity and are generated by ex vivo expansion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-CD3 antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-15 (IL-15). To facilitate selective target-cell recognition and enhance specific cytotoxicity against B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we transduced CIK cells with a lentiviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that carries a composite CD28-CD3ζ domain for signaling and a CD19-specific scFv antibody fragment for cell binding (CAR 63.28.z). In vitro analysis revealed high and specific cell killing activity of CD19-targeted CIK/63.28.z cells against otherwise CIK-resistant cancer cell lines and primary B-ALL blasts, which was dependent on CD19 expression and CAR signaling. In a xenograft model in immunodeficient mice, treatment with CIK/63.28.z cells in contrast to therapy with unmodified CIK cells resulted in complete and durable molecular remissions of established primary pre-B-ALL. Our results demonstrate potent antileukemic activity of CAR-engineered CIK cells in vitro and in vivo, and suggest this strategy as a promising approach for adoptive immunotherapy of refractory pre-B-ALL. PMID:27253354

  6. Development of tools to target antigen through mannose receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Zaigham

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are unique antigen presenting cells which play a major role in antigen presentation and initiation of the immune response by regulating B- and T- cell activation. Antigen targeting to DC receptors is an effective, safe and specific method for vaccine development. The mannose receptor (MR) is an endocytic receptor expressed by subpopulations of DC and antigen targeting through MR leads to enhanced antigen uptake and presentation to T -cells. This makes MR a favourite recep...

  7. Ubiquitin Conjugation of Hepatitis B Virus Core Antigen DNA Vaccine Leads to Enhanced Cell-Mediated Immune Response in BALB/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Hong; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Xi, Min; ZANG, GUO-QING; Tang, Zheng-Hao

    2011-01-01

    Background Nearly 350 million persons worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Ubiquitin (Ub) is a highly conserved small regulatory protein, ubiquitous in eukaryotes, that usually serves as a signal for the target protein that is recognised and degraded in proteasomes . The Ub-mediated processing of antigens is rapid and efficient and stimulates cell-mediated immune responses. Accordingly, Ub-mediated processing of antigens has been widely used in chronic-infection an...

  8. Rapid Antigen Processing and Presentation of a Protective and Immunodominant HLA-B*27-restricted Hepatitis C Virus-specific CD8+ T-cell Epitope

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Schmidt; Iversen, Astrid K N; Stefan Tenzer; Emma Gostick; Price, David A.; Volker Lohmann; Ute Distler; Paul Bowness; Hansjörg Schild; Blum, Hubert E.; Paul Klenerman; Christoph Neumann-Haefelin; Robert Thimme

    2012-01-01

    HLA-B*27 exerts protective effects in hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. While the immunological and virological features of HLA-B*27-mediated protection are not fully understood, there is growing evidence that the presentation of specific immunodominant HLA-B*27-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes contributes to this phenomenon in both infections. Indeed, protection can be linked to single immunodominant CD8+ T-cell epitopes and functional constraints on e...

  9. miR-133a Enhances the Protective Capacity of Cardiac Progenitors Cells after Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Izarra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available miR-133a and miR-1 are known as muscle-specific microRNAs that are involved in cardiac development and pathophysiology. We have shown that both miR-1 and miR-133a are early and progressively upregulated during in vitro cardiac differentiation of adult cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs, but only miR-133a expression was enhanced under in vitro oxidative stress. miR-1 was demonstrated to favor differentiation of CPCs, whereas miR-133a overexpression protected CPCs against cell death, targeting, among others, the proapoptotic genes Bim and Bmf. miR-133a-CPCs clearly improved cardiac function in a rat myocardial infarction model by reducing fibrosis and hypertrophy and increasing vascularization and cardiomyocyte proliferation. The beneficial effects of miR-133a-CPCs seem to correlate with the upregulated expression of several relevant paracrine factors and the plausible cooperative secretion of miR-133a via exosomal transport. Finally, an in vitro heart muscle model confirmed the antiapoptotic effects of miR-133a-CPCs, favoring the structuration and contractile functionality of the artificial tissue.

  10. PKCa Agonists Enhance the Protective Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis of Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-lin Zhou

    2013-12-01

    The results may be showed that PKCa regulate the expresion of caspase-3, which contribute to the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by NO. PKC α agonists enhance the protective effect of hyaluronic acid on nitric oxide-induced articular chondrocytes apoptosis.

  11. Novel Radiation Protection System Enabled by Hydrogen Enhanced Nano Fibers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for radiation protection in humans is critical to the success of the nation's continued presence in space. A new radiation protection system will be...

  12. Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plan, Final Report 1987.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Robert C.

    1988-08-01

    A wildlife impact assessment and mitigation plan has been developed for the US Army Corps of Engineers Albeni Falls Project in northern Idaho. The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions at the Albeni Falls Project. There were 6617 acres of wetlands converted to open water due to development and operation of the project. Eight evaluation species were selected with impacts expressed in numbers of Habitat Units (HU's). For a given species, one HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The Albeni Falls Project resulted in estimated losses of 5985 mallard HU's, 4699 Canada goose HU's, 3379 redhead HU's, 4508 breeding bald eagle HU's, 4365 wintering bald eagle HU's, 2286 black-capped chickadee HU's, 1680 white-tailed deer HU's, and 1756 muskrat HU's. The yellow warbler gained 71 HU's. Therefore, total target species estimated impacts were 28,587 HU's. Impacts on peregrine falcons were not quantified in terms of HU's. Projects have been proposed by an interagency team of biologists to mitigate the impacts of Albeni Falls on wildlife. The HEP was used to estimate benefits of proposed mitigation projects to target species. Through a series of proposed protection and enhancement actions, the mitigation plan will provide benefits of an estimated 28,590 target species HU's to mitigate Albeni Falls wildlife habitat values lost. 52 refs., 9 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Protection Induced by Simultaneous Subcutaneous and Endobronchial Vaccination with BCG/BCG and BCG/Adenovirus Expressing Antigen 85A against Mycobacterium bovis in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, GS; Clifford, D.; Whelan, AO; Tchilian, EZ; Beverley, PCL; Salguero, FJ; Z. Xing; Vordermeier, HM; Villarreal-Ramos, B

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in the GB has been increasing since the 1980s. Immunisation, alongside current control measures, has been proposed as a sustainable measure to control bTB. Immunisation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to protect against bTB. Furthermore, much experimental data indicates that pulmonary local immunity is important for protection against respiratory infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that pulmonary...

  14. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  15. Prime and boost immunization with influenza and adenovirus encoding the Toxoplasma gondii surface antigen 2 (SAG2) induces strong protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alexandre V; Caetano, Bráulia C; Barbosa, Rafael P; Salgado, Ana Paula C; Rabelo, Renata H; Garcia, Cristiana C; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Escriou, Nicolas; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2010-04-19

    In this work, we explored an original vaccination protocol using recombinant influenza and adenovirus. We constructed recombinant influenza viruses harboring dicistronic NA segments containing the surface antigen 2 (SAG2) from Toxoplasma gondii under control of the duplicated 3' promoter. Recombinant influenza viruses were able to drive the expression of the foreign SAG2 sequence in cell culture and to replicate efficiently both in cell culture and in lungs of infected mice. In addition, mice primed with recombinant influenza virus and boosted with a recombinant adenovirus encoding SAG2 elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses specific for SAG2. Moreover, when immunized animals were challenged with the cystogenic P-Br strain of T. gondii, they displayed up to 85% of reduction in parasite burden. These results demonstrate the potential use of recombinant influenza vectors harboring the dicistronic segments in the development of vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:20189485

  16. Role for elevated H-2 antigen expression in resistance to neoplasia caused by radiation-induced leukemia virus. Enhancement of effective tumor surveillance by killer lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to neoplasia caused by radiation-induced leukemia virus (RadLV) is mediated by gene(s) in the H-2D region of the major histocompatibility complex. The previous observation that rapid increases in cellular synthesis and cell-surface expression of H-2 antigens are detectable immediately after virus inoculation has suggested that altered expression of H-2 antigens may play a significant role in the mechanism(s) of host defense to virus infection. This concept is supported by the following observations. First, cell-mediated immunity against RadLV transformed or infected cells can be detected with ease when H-2-positive target cells are used in the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assay. Second, resistant mice develop greater numbers of effectors when infected with RadLV than do susceptible mice. Third, injection of normal (uninfected) thymocytes into syngeneic recipients of resistant or susceptible H-2 type does not stimulate a CML response. However, injection of RadLV infected thymocytes from resistant mice produces a vigorous CMI response, and such thymocytes elicit the strongest response at a time when both H-2 and viral antigen expression is elevated. By contrast, injection of infected thymocytes from susceptible mice, which express viral antigens, but low levels of H-2 antigens, does not stimulate a CML reaction. These findings may explain the easier induction of leukemia found by many investigators when virus is inoculated into neonatal mice and the preferential thymus tropism of some oncogenic type-C RNA virus. Cells expressing very low levels of H-2, such as thymocytes, may serve as permissive targets for virus infection because they lack an important component (H-2 antigens) of the dual or altered recognition signal required to trigger a defensive host immune response

  17. DNA-based nanoparticle tension sensors reveal that T-cell receptors transmit defined pN forces to their antigens for enhanced fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Blanchfield, Lori; Ma, Victor Pui-Yan; Andargachew, Rakieb; Galior, Kornelia; Liu, Zheng; Evavold, Brian; Salaita, Khalid

    2016-05-17

    T cells are triggered when the T-cell receptor (TCR) encounters its antigenic ligand, the peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC), on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Because T cells are highly migratory and antigen recognition occurs at an intermembrane junction where the T cell physically contacts the APC, there are long-standing questions of whether T cells transmit defined forces to their TCR complex and whether chemomechanical coupling influences immune function. Here we develop DNA-based gold nanoparticle tension sensors to provide, to our knowledge, the first pN tension maps of individual TCR-pMHC complexes during T-cell activation. We show that naïve T cells harness cytoskeletal coupling to transmit 12-19 pN of force to their TCRs within seconds of ligand binding and preceding initial calcium signaling. CD8 coreceptor binding and lymphocyte-specific kinase signaling are required for antigen-mediated cell spreading and force generation. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) mediated adhesion modulates TCR-pMHC tension by intensifying its magnitude to values >19 pN and spatially reorganizes the location of TCR forces to the kinapse, the zone located at the trailing edge of migrating T cells, thus demonstrating chemomechanical crosstalk between TCR and LFA-1 receptor signaling. Finally, T cells display a dampened and poorly specific response to antigen agonists when TCR forces are chemically abolished or physically "filtered" to a level below ∼12 pN using mechanically labile DNA tethers. Therefore, we conclude that T cells tune TCR mechanics with pN resolution to create a checkpoint of agonist quality necessary for specific immune response. PMID:27140637

  18. Multiple enhanced self-protected spanning trees based architecture for recovery from single failure in metro ethernet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Wentao; Jin, Depeng; Su, Li; Zeng, Lieguang

    2008-11-01

    Carriers and service providers are rushing to provide Ethernet-based virtual private network services in metro area network (MAN) as the most cost effective way to address the needs of the enterprise network market. To address the fast recovery from any signal failure issue in the Metro Ethernet, we propose a metro Ethernet architecture based on multiple Enhanced Self-protected Spanning Trees (ESST). The recovery mechanism, named Birthday-based Link Replacing Mechanism (BLRM), in this architecture is able to transform a self-protected spanning tree into another spanning tree after any signal link or node failure. Simulation result demonstrates the effectiveness of the BLRM in achieving fast recovery.

  19. Targeting human dendritic cells via DEC-205 using PLGA nanoparticles leads to enhanced cross-presentation of a melanoma-associated antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja SS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sandeep S Saluja,1 Douglas J Hanlon,1 Fiona A Sharp,2 Enping Hong,2 David Khalil,1 Eve Robinson,1 Robert Tigelaar,1 Tarek M Fahmy,2,3 Richard L Edelson1 1Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, 3Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs is a powerful and novel strategy for vaccination. Priming or loading DCs with antigen controls whether subsequent immunity will develop and hence whether effective vaccination can be achieved. The goal of our present work was to increase the potency of DC-based antitumor vaccines by overcoming inherent limitations associated with antigen stability and cross-presentation. Nanoparticles prepared from the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid have been extensively used in clinical settings for drug delivery and are currently the subject of intensive investigation as antigen delivery vehicles for vaccine applications. Here we describe a nanoparticulate delivery system with the ability to simultaneously carry a high density of protein-based antigen while displaying a DC targeting ligand on its surface. Utilizing a targeting motif specific for the DC-associated surface ligand DEC-205, we show that targeted nanoparticles encapsulating a MART-127–35 peptide are both internalized and cross-presented with significantly higher efficiency than isotype control-coated nanoparticles in human cells. In addition, the DEC-205-labeled nanoparticles rapidly escape from the DC endosomal compartment and do not colocalize with markers of early (EEA-1 or late endosome/lysosome (LAMP-1. This indicates that encapsulated antigens delivered by nanoparticles may have direct access to the class I cytoplasmic major histocompatibility complex loading machinery, overcoming the need for “classical” cross-presentation and facilitating heightened DC

  20. IgG subclass and heavy chain domains contribute to binding and protection by mAbs to the poly γ-D-glutamic acid capsular antigen of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hovenden

    Full Text Available Bacterial capsules are common targets for antibody-mediated immunity. The capsule of Bacillus anthracis is unusual among capsules because it is composed of a polymer of poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (γdPGA. We previously generated murine IgG3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to γdPGA that were protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. IgG3 antibodies are characteristic of the murine response to polysaccharide antigens. The goal of the present study was to produce subclass switch variants of the γdPGA mAbs (IgG3 → IgG1 → IgG2b → IgG2a and assess the contribution of subclass to antibody affinity and protection. Subclass switch antibodies had identical variable regions but differed in their heavy chains. The results showed that a switch from the protective IgG3 to IgG1, IgG2b or IgG2a was accompanied by i a loss of protective activity ii a change in mAb binding to the capsular matrix, and iii a loss of affinity. These results identify a role for the heavy chain constant region in mAb binding. Hybrid mAbs were constructed in which the CH1, CH2 or CH3 heavy chain constant domains from a non-protective, low binding IgG2b mAb were swapped into the protective IgG3 mAb. The IgG3 mAb that contained the CH1 domain from IgG2b showed no loss of affinity or protection. In contrast, swapping the CH2 or CH3 domains from IgG2b into IgG3 produced a reduction in affinity and a loss of protection. These studies identify a role for the constant region of IgG heavy chains in affinity and protection against an encapsulated bacterial pathogen.

  1. Influence of protein formulation and carrier solution on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation: a case study of the plant-produced recombinant anthrax protective antigen pp-PA83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, Caroline; Chichester, Jessica A; Manceva, Slobodanka; Yusibov, Vidadi; Arvinte, Tudor

    2015-02-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (afFFF) was used to investigate the properties of a plant-produced anthrax toxin protective antigen, pp-PA83. The afFFF fractogram consisted of two main peaks with molar masses similar to the molecular mass of pp-PA83 monomer. afFFF carrier solutions strongly influenced the ratio and the intensity of the two main peaks. These differences indicate that conformation changes in the pp-PA83 molecule occurred during the afFFF analysis. Similar fractograms were obtained for different pp-PA83 formulations when the afFFF carrier solution and the protein formulation were the same (or very similar). The data show that in specific cases, afFFF could be used to study protein conformation and document the importance of studying the influence of the carrier solution on afFFF. PMID:25417936

  2. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  3. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Provides Superior Protection from Heterologous Infection in Pigs with Maternal Antibodies without Inducing Vaccine-Associated Enhanced Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Amy L.; Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Richt, Jürgen A.; Janke, Bruce H.; Sandbulte, Matthew R.; Gauger, Philip C.; Loving, Crystal L.; Webby, Richard J; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the United States is hindered because inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants cocirculating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be limited further for vaccines administered to young pigs that possess maternally derived immunity. We previously demonstrated that a recombinant A/sw/Texas/4199-2/1998 (TX98) (H3N2) virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein is attenuated in swine and has potential ...

  4. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  5. In situ Delivery of Antigen to DC-SIGN + CD14 + Dermal Dendritic Cells Results in Enhanced CD8 + T-Cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehres, Cynthia M.; Van Beelen, Astrid J.; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Van Bloois, Louis; Unger, Wendy W J; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Storm, G; De Gruijl, Tanja D.; Van Kooyk, Yvette V.

    2015-01-01

    CD14 + dendritic cells (DCs) present in the dermis of human skin represent a large subset of dermal DCs (dDCs) that are considered macrophage-like cells with poor antigen (cross)-presenting capacity and limited migratory potential to the lymph nodes. CD14 + dDC highly express DC-specific ICAM-3-grab

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoelectrochemical performance enhancement of TiO2/graphene composite in photo-generated cathodic protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Guo, Hanlin; Sun, Haiqing; Zeng, Rong-Chang

    2016-09-01

    TiO2/graphene composites were synthesized through one-step hydrothermal method. The composites show an enhancement in photo-generated cathodic protection as the time-dependent profiles of photocurrent responses has confirmed. XRD data show that a bicrystalline framework of anatase and brookite formed as graphene provided donor groups in the hydrothermal process. The transfer of photoinduced electrons in the biphasic TiO2 results in effective electron-hole separation. Moreover, graphene lead to a negative shift of the Fermi level as evidenced by Mott-Schottky analysis, which decreases the Schottky barrier formed in the TiO2 and 304 stainless steel interface and results in the enhancement of photo-generated cathodic protection.

  7. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  8. Problems of the inclusion of workplaces with enhanced radon and radon daughter concentrations into occupational radiation protection control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New international recommendations (ICRP-60) on inclusion of workplaces with enhanced radon and radon daughter concentrations into occupational control are expected. Based on present regulations in Germany the problems of their implementation into radiation protection practice will be discussed. For underground workplaces and workplaces in radon spas and waterworks problems may be exist in particular points, whereas inclusion of workplaces in buildings seems to be problematicly in general. (orig./HP)

  9. Enhanced target-specific signal detection using an Escherichia coli lysate in multiplex microbead immunoassays with E. coli-derived recombinant antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Sandra; Leitolis, Amanda; Lima, Lucianna Freitas Oliveira; Krieger, Marco A; Foti, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Diverse techniques have been developed to analyze antibody-mediated responses to infections. However, the most common tests, i.e., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, require separate reactions for each antigen and consequently necessitate large sample volumes. Luminex technology allows the detection of multiple antibodies in a single experiment, but nonspecific binding can impair the results. Therefore, we examined the use of Escherichia coli lysates to reduce nonspecific binding and improve the results of liquid microarrays based on Luminex technology. Anti-bacteria antibodies were detected in human serum samples, as evidenced by high median fluorescence intensity (MFI) in assays performed with paramagnetic microspheres coupled with E. coli lysates. Moreover, the addition of an E. coli lysate as a blocker reduced the nonspecific binding of antigens produced by E. coli in a concentration-dependent manner. Tris-HCl reduced MFI values in negative samples, but did not affect MFI for positive samples. For microspheres coupled with different antigens, an E. coli lysate blocker significantly improved the fluorescence signals from positive samples. The addition of Tris-HCl and the E. coli lysate induced antigen-specific differences in MFI. This combination of the E. coli lysate blocker and Tris-HCl yielded a statistically significant improvement in MFI in the assays for Chagas disease and hepatitis C virus samples. However, for the Treponema pallidum p47 antigen improvement in MFI was only observed for the preparation with the E. coli blocker at a concentration of 3%. In conclusion, the addition of an E. coli lysate and Tris-HCl to the microarray assay reduced the nonspecific binding of human anti-bacteria antibodies and, therefore, increased the specific MFI. PMID:27156997

  10. Synthetic Cationic Peptide IDR-1002 Provides Protection against Bacterial Infections through Chemokine Induction and Enhanced Leukocyte Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua;

    2010-01-01

    aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor and the...... activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study, an...... defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity....

  11. Delivery of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Empty Capsid Subunit Antigen with Nonstructural Protein 2B Improves Protection of Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously demonstrated that a replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector carrying the capsid (P1-2A) and 3C protease coding regions as well as a portion of the 2B coding region of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) (Ad5-A24) protects cattle and swine from direct inocula...

  12. Enhanced corrosion protective PANI-PAA/PEI multilayer composite coatings for 316SS by spin coating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PANI-PAA/PEI multilayers with controllable thickness were fabricated by spin assembly. • PAA matrix results in the homogeneous dispersion of PANI in the composite coatings. • Spin coating combined with heating assures the linear increase in thickness with n. • The corrosion protection property of PANI-PAA/PEI coatings were optimized at n = 20. • Enhanced protection owing to multilayer structure that lengthens the diffusion pathway of ions. - Abstract: In the present study, polyaniline-polyacrylic acid/polyethyleneimine (PANI-PAA/PEI) composite coatings with a multilayer structure for corrosion protection of 316 stainless steels (316SS) were prepared by an alternate deposition. Spin coating combined with heating assists removal of residual water that result in a linear increase in thickness with layer number (n). The combination of PANI-PAA composite with PEI and their multilayer structure provides a synergistic enhancement of corrosion resistance properties as determined by electrochemical measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution. Importantly, the PANI-PAA/PEI coating with an optimized layer number of n = 20 shows improved corrosion protection. The superior performance was attributed to the formation of an interfacial oxide layer as well as the multilayer structure that extend the diffusion pathway of corrosive ions

  13. Melatonin Protects N2a against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Autophagy Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国艳春; 王剑飞; 王忠强; 杨易; 王西明; 段秋红

    2010-01-01

    Researches have shown that melatonin is neuroprotectant in ischemia/reperfusion-mediated injury.Although melatonin is known as an effective antioxidant,the mechanism of the protection cannot be explained merely by antioxidation.This study was devoted to explore other existing mechanisms by investigating whether melatonin protects ischemia/reperfusion-injured neurons through elevating autophagy,since autophagy has been frequently suggested to play a crucial role in neuron survival.To find it out,an ischemia/...

  14. A Live Oral Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Vaccine Expressing Clostridium perfringens Antigens Confers Protection against Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Parreira, V. R.; Jiang, Y.-F.; Prescott, J F

    2009-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens, and there is currently no effective vaccine for NE. We previously showed that in broiler chickens protection against NE can be achieved through intramuscular immunization with alpha toxin (AT) and hypothetical protein (HP), and we subsequently identified B-cell epitopes in HP. In the present study, we identified B-cell epitopes in AT recognized by chickens immune to NE. The gene fragments encoding immunodominant...

  15. Enhancement of Th1-biased protective immunity against avian influenza H9N2 virus via oral co-administration of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interferon-α and interleukin-18 along with an inactivated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Md

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of currently circulating re-assorted low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI H9N2 is a major concern for both animal and human health. Thus, an improved LPAI H9N2 vaccination strategy is needed to induce complete immunity in chickens against LPAI H9N2 virus strains. Cytokines play a crucial role in mounting both the type and extent of an immune response generated following infection with a pathogen or after vaccination. To improve the efficacy of inactivated LPAI H9N2 vaccine, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was used for oral co-administration of chicken interferon-α (chIFN-α and chicken interleukin-18 (chIL-18 as natural immunomodulators. Results Oral co-administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18, prior to vaccination with inactivated AI H9N2 vaccine, modulated the immune response of chickens against the vaccine antigen through enhanced humoral and Th1-biased cell-mediated immunity, compared to chickens that received single administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing either chIFN-α or chIL-18. To further test the protective efficacy of this improved vaccination regimen, immunized chickens were intra-tracheally challenged with a high dose of LPAI H9N2 virus. Combined administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18 showed markedly enhanced protection compared to single administration of the construct, as determined by mortality, clinical severity, and feed and water intake. This enhancement of protective immunity was further confirmed by reduced rectal shedding and replication of AIV H9N2 in different tissues of challenged chickens. Conclusions Our results indicate the value of combined administration of chIFN-α and chIL-18 using a Salmonella vaccine strain to generate an effective immunization strategy in chickens against LPAI H9N2.

  16. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J; Beeson, James G; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-12-22

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines. PMID:26475447

  17. Fusion of a viral antigen to invariant chain leads to augmented T-cell immunity and improved protection in gene-gun DNA-vaccinated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P;

    2009-01-01

    against lethal peripheral challenge. The current study questioned whether the same strategy, i.e. linkage of GP to an Ii chain, could be applied to a naked DNA vaccine. Following gene-gun immunization with the linked construct (DNA-IiGP), GP-specific CD4(+) T cells could not be detected by flow cytometry...... with the unlinked construct. In contrast, substantial protection against peripheral challenge was not observed. Additional experiments with T-cell subset-depleted or perforin-deficient mice revealed that virus control in vaccinated mice depends critically on cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Finally, priming...

  18. A review of protective factors and causal mechanisms that enhance the mental health of Indigenous Circumpolar youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Petrasek MacDonald

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . To review the protective factors and causal mechanisms which promote and enhance Indigenous youth mental health in the Circumpolar North. Study design . A systematic literature review of peer-reviewed English-language research was conducted to systematically examine the protective factors and causal mechanisms which promote and enhance Indigenous youth mental health in the Circumpolar North. Methods . This review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines, with elements of a realist review. From 160 records identified in the initial search of 3 databases, 15 met the inclusion criteria and were retained for full review. Data were extracted using a codebook to organize and synthesize relevant information from the articles. Results . More than 40 protective factors at the individual, family, and community levels were identified as enhancing Indigenous youth mental health. These included practicing and holding traditional knowledge and skills, the desire to be useful and to contribute meaningfully to one's community, having positive role models, and believing in one's self. Broadly, protective factors at the family and community levels were identified as positively creating and impacting one's social environment, which interacts with factors at the individual level to enhance resilience. An emphasis on the roles of cultural and land-based activities, history, and language, as well as on the importance of social and family supports, also emerged throughout the literature. Conclusions . Healthy communities and families foster and support youth who are resilient to mental health challenges and able to adapt and cope with multiple stressors, be they social, economic, or environmental. Creating opportunities and environments where youth can successfully navigate challenges and enhance their resilience can in turn contribute to fostering healthy Circumpolar communities. Looking at the

  19. Vaccination with virus-like particles containing H5 antigens from three H5N1 clades protects chickens from H5N1 and H5N8 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Tumpey, Terrence M; Hidajat, Rachmat; Zsak, Aniko; Chrzastek, Klaudia; Tretyakova, Irina; Pushko, Peter

    2016-03-18

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, especially H5N1 strains, represent a public health threat and cause widespread morbidity and mortality in domestic poultry. Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a promising novel vaccine approach to control avian influenza including HPAI strains. Influenza VLPs contain viral hemagglutinin (HA), which can be expressed in cell culture within highly immunogenic VLPs that morphologically and antigenically resemble influenza virions, except VLPs are non-infectious. Here we describe a recombinant VLP containing HA proteins derived from three distinct clades of H5N1 viruses as an experimental, broadly protective H5 avian influenza vaccine. A baculovirus vector was configured to co-express the H5 genes from recent H5N1 HPAI isolates A/chicken/Germany/2014 (clade 2.3.4.4), A/chicken/West Java/Subang/29/2007 (clade 2.1.3) and A/chicken/Egypt/121/2012 (clade 2.2.1). Co-expression of these genes in Sf9 cells along with influenza neuraminidase (NA) and retrovirus gag genes resulted in production of triple-clade H555 VLPs that exhibited hemagglutination activity and morphologically resembled influenza virions. Vaccination of chickens with these VLPs resulted in induction of serum antibody responses and efficient protection against experimental challenges with three different viruses including the recent U.S. H5N8 HPAI isolate. We conclude that these novel triple-clade VLPs represent a feasible strategy for simultaneously evoking protective antibodies against multiple variants of H5 influenza virus. PMID:26868083

  20. Sensitivity and specificity enhanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by rational hapten modification and heterogeneous antibody/coating antigen combinations for the detection of melamine in milk, milk powder and feed samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Biyun; Yang, Hong; Song, Juan; Chang, Huafang; Li, Shuqun; Deng, Anping

    2013-11-15

    The adulteration of food products with melamine has led to an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, rapid and reliable quantitative/screening methods. To enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of melamine in milk, milk powder and feed samples, rational hapten modification and heterogeneous antibody/coating antigen combinations were adopted. Three melamine derivatives with different length of carboxylic spacer at the end were synthesized and linked to carrier proteins for the production of immunogens and coating antigens. Monoclonal antibody against melamine was produced by hybridoma technology. Under optimal experimental conditions, the standard curves of the ELISAs for melamine were constructed in range of 0.1-100 ng mL(-1). The sensitivity was 10-300 times enhanced compared to those in the published literatures. The cross-reactivity values of the ELISAs also demonstrated the assays exhibited high specificity. Five samples were spiked with melamine at different concentrations and detected by the ELISA. The recovery rates of 72.8-123.0% and intra-assay coefficients of variation of 0.8-18.9% (n=3) were obtained. The ELISA for milk sample was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a high correlation coefficient of 0.9902 (n=6). The proposed ELISA was proven to be a feasible quantitative/screening method for melamine analysis. PMID:24148389

  1. 77 FR 67865 - Enhancing Protections Afforded Customers and Customer Funds Held by Futures Commission Merchants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... procedures for computing a targeted amount required under the new risk management provisions in Sec. 1.11... customer protections, risk management programs, internal monitoring and controls, capital and liquidity... better risk management systems and controls, along with an increase in risk-oriented oversight...

  2. Limb ischemic preconditioning protects endothelium from oxidative stress by enhancing nrf2 translocation and upregulating expression of antioxidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available Remote ischemic preconditioning is often performed by limb ischemic preconditioning (LIPC, which has been demonstrated to be beneficial to various cells, including endothelial cells. The mechanisms underlying the protection have not been well clarified. The present study was designed to observe the effects of sera derived from rats after LIPC on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs injured by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 -induced oxidative stress and explore the involvement of redox state in the protection. Incubation with 1 mM H2O2 for 2 h induced a significant reduction in HUVECs' viability with increased production of malondialdehyde (MDA and reactive oxygen species (ROS. Preincubation with early preconditioning serum (EPS or delayed preconditioning serum (DPS derived from rats subjected to LIPC alleviated these changes. Both EPS and DPS increased the nuclear translocation of transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and the expression of antioxidases. The protective effects of EPS and DPS were blocked neither by MEK/ERK inhibitors U0126 nor by PI3K/Akt inhibitors LY294002. In conclusion, the present study provides the evidence that LIPC protects the HUVECs from H2O2-induced injury by, at least partially, enhancement of Nrf2 translocation and upregulation of antioxidases via signaling pathways independent of MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt.

  3. Barriers to antigenic escape by pathogens: trade-off between reproductive rate and antigenic mutability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bush Robin M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single measles vaccination provides lifelong protection. No antigenic variants that escape immunity have been observed. By contrast, influenza continually evolves new antigenic variants, and the vaccine has to be updated frequently with new strains. Both measles and influenza are RNA viruses with high mutation rates, so the mutation rate alone cannot explain the differences in antigenic variability. Results We develop a new hypothesis to explain antigenic stasis versus change. We first note that the antigenically static viruses tend to have high reproductive rates and to concentrate infection in children, whereas antigenically variable viruses such as influenza tend to spread more widely across age classes. We argue that, for pathogens in a naive host population that spread more rapidly in younger individuals than in older individuals, natural selection weights more heavily a rise in reproductive rate. By contrast, pathogens that spread more readily among older individuals gain more by antigenic escape, so natural selection weights more heavily antigenic mutability. Conclusion These divergent selective pressures on reproductive rate and antigenic mutability may explain some of the observed differences between pathogens in age-class bias, reproductive rate, and antigenic variation.

  4. CD1d-dependent NKT cells play a protective role in acute and chronic arthritis models by ameliorating antigen-specific Th1 responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Hasan, Maruf;

    2010-01-01

    A protective and anti-inflammatory role for CD1d-dependent NKT cells (NKTs) has been reported in experimental and human autoimmune diseases. However, their role in arthritis has been unclear, with conflicting reports of CD1d-dependent NKTs acting both as regulatory and disease-promoting cells...... in arthritis. These differing modes of action might be due to genetic differences of inbred mice and incomplete backcrossing of gene-modified mice. We therefore put special emphasis on controlling the genetic backgrounds of the mice used. Additionally, we used two different murine arthritis models, Ag......-induced arthritis (AIA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), to evaluate acute and chronic arthritis in CD1d knockout mice and mice depleted of NK1.1(+) cells. CD1d-deficient mice developed more severe AIA compared with wild-type littermates, with a higher degree of inflammation and proteoglycan depletion. Chronic...

  5. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  6. Characterization of an antigenically distinct porcine rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, J C; Clarke, I. N.; McCrae, M A

    1982-01-01

    A porcine virus with rotavirus morphology, which was antigenically unrelated to previously described rotaviruses, is described. Particles with an outer capsid layer measured 75 nm and those lacking the outer layer were 63 nm in diameter. Particles which resembled cores were also identified. The virus was shown to be antigenically distinct from other rotaviruses as judged by immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy, and it failed to protect piglets from challenge with porcine rotaviru...

  7. Enhanced protective properties of epoxy/polyaniline-camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating on an ultrafine-grained metallic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour-Ali, Sadegh; Kiani-Rashid, Alireza; Babakhani, Abolfazl; Davoodi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    An ultrafine-grained surface layer on mild steel substrate with average grain size of 77 nm was produced through wire brushing process. Surface grain size was determined through transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. This substrate was coated with epoxy and an in situ synthesized epoxy/polyaniline-camphorsulfonate (epoxy/PANI-CSA) nanocomposite. The corrosion behavior was studied by open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements. Results of electrochemical tests evidenced the enhanced protective properties of epoxy/PANI-CSA coating on the substrate with ultrafine-grained surface.

  8. Oxic microshield and local pH enhancement protects Zostera muelleri from sediment derived hydrogen sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Kasper Elgetti; Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Ralph, Peter J; Kühl, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Seagrass is constantly challenged with transporting sufficient O₂ from above- to belowground tissue via aerenchyma in order to maintain aerobic metabolism and provide protection against phytotoxins. Electrochemical microsensors were used in combination with a custom-made experimental chamber to analyse the belowground biogeochemical microenvironment of Zostera muelleri under changing environmental conditions. Measurements revealed high radial O₂ release of up to 500 nmol O2 cm(-2) h(-1) from the base of the leaf sheath, maintaining a c. 300-μm-wide plant-mediated oxic microzone and thus protecting the vital meristematic regions of the rhizome from reduced phytotoxic metabolites such as hydrogen sulphide (H₂S). H₂S intrusion was prevented through passive diffusion of O₂ to belowground tissue from leaf photosynthesis in light, as well as from the surrounding water column into the flow-exposed plant parts during darkness. Under water column hypoxia, high belowground H₂S concentrations at the tissue surface correlated with the inability to sustain the protecting oxic microshield around the meristematic regions of the rhizome. We also found increased pH levels in the immediate rhizosphere of Z. muelleri, which may contribute to further detoxification of H₂S through shifts in the chemical speciation of sulphide. Zostera muelleri can modify the geochemical conditions in its immediate rhizosphere, thereby reducing its exposure to H₂S. PMID:25367685

  9. Thermal Aggregation of Calcium-Fortified Skim Milk Enhances Probiotic Protection during Convective Droplet Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Song; Fu, Nan; Jeantet, Romain; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2016-08-01

    Probiotic bacteria have been reported to confer benefits on hosts when delivered in an adequate dose. Spray-drying is expected to produce dried and microencapsulated probiotic products due to its low production cost and high energy efficiency. The bottleneck in probiotic application addresses the thermal and dehydration-related inactivation of bacteria during process. A protective drying matrix was designed by modifying skim milk with the principle of calcium-induced protein thermal aggregation. The well-defined single-droplet drying technique was used to monitor the droplet-particle conversion and the protective effect of this modified Ca-aggregated milk on Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The Ca-aggregated milk exhibited a higher drying efficiency and superior protection on L. rhamnosus GG during thermal convective drying. The mechanism was explained by the aggregation in milk, causing the lower binding of water in the serum phase and, conversely, local concentrated milk aggregates involved in bacteria entrapment in the course of drying. This work may open new avenues for the development of probiotic products with high bacterial viability and calcium enrichment. PMID:27420726

  10. Dendritic cell-based vaccination with lentiviral vectors encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen enhances hepatitis B virus-specific immune responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Tang, Zhenghao; Zang, Guoqing

    2015-11-01

    The activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a predominant role in the clearance of HBV. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen-presenting cells and play an important role in the initiation of immune responses. We previously verified that lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (LV-Ub-HBcAg) effectively transduced DCs to induce maturation, and the mature DCs efficiently induced T cell polarization to Th1 and generated HBcAg-specific CTLs ex vivo. In this study, HBV-specific immune responses of LV-Ub-HBcAg in BALB/c mice (H-2Kd) were evaluated. It was shown that direct injection of LV-Ub-HBcAg increased the production of cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ, elicited strong antibody responses, and remarkably generated a high percentage of IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells with HBV-specific CTL responses in BALB/c mice. In addition, direct injection of LV-Ub-HBcAg induced potent anti-HBV immune responses, similar to those elicited by in vitro-transduced DCs. In conclusion, the DC-based therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg elicited specific antibody immune responses and induced robust specific CTL activity in vivo. PMID:26373843

  11. Histocompatibility antigen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common in certain autoimmune diseases . For example, HLA-B27 antigen is found in many people (but not ... More Ankylosing spondylitis Autoimmune disorders Bone marrow transplant HLA-B27 antigen Kidney transplant Reactive arthritis Update Date 2/ ...

  12. Vaccination with soluble headless hemagglutinin protects mice from challenge with divergent influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlbold, Teddy John; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Margine, Irina; Tan, Gene S; Hirsh, Ariana; Krammer, Florian

    2015-06-26

    Current influenza virus vaccines provide solid protection from infection with viruses that are well matched with the vaccine strains. However, they do not protect efficiently against drifted or shifted strains. We developed an antigen based on the conserved stalk domain of the influenza virus hemagglutinin and tested its efficacy as a vaccine in a mouse virus challenge model. Although the antigen lacked the correct conformation of the native stalk domain and was not recognized by a panel of neutralizing stalk-reactive antibodies, it did induce considerable protection against H1N1, H5N1 and H6N1 challenge strains. Protection was enhanced when mice had pre-existing immunity against the stalk domain. Since pre-existing immunity is also present in the human population, we hypothesize that a similar antigen could show efficacy in humans as well. PMID:26026378

  13. Chimeric Epitope Vaccine from Multistage Antigens for Lymphatic Filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugraha, G; Madhumathi, J; Prince, P R; Prita, P J Jeya; Khatri, V K; Amdare, N P; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne parasitic disease, affects more than 120 million people worldwide. Vaccination for filariasis by targeting different stages of the parasite will be a boon to the existing MDA efforts of WHO which required repeated administration of the drug to reduce the infection level and sustained transmission. Onset of a filaria-specific immune response achieved through antigen vaccines can act synergistically with these drugs to enhance the parasite killing. Multi-epitope vaccine approach has been proved to be successful against several parasitic diseases as it overcomes the limitations associated with the whole antigen vaccines. Earlier results from our group suggested the protective efficacy of multi-epitope vaccine comprising two immunodominant epitopes from Brugia malayi antioxidant thioredoxin (TRX), several epitopes from transglutaminase (TGA) and abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2). In this study, the prophylactic efficacy of the filarial epitope protein (FEP), a chimera of selective epitopes identified from our earlier study, was tested in a murine model (jird) of filariasis with L3 larvae. FEP conferred a significantly (P < 0.0001) high protection (69.5%) over the control in jirds. We also observed that the multi-epitope recombinant construct (FEP) induces multiple types of protective immune responses, thus ensuring the successful elimination of the parasite; this poses FEP as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:26179420

  14. Enhancement of physical protection measures and observation on future JAEA's measures reflecting INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft) under consideration at IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revised Nuclear Reactor Regulation Law is aimed at strengthening of the physical protection taking into account of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 (Corrected) requirements by focusing on introducing confidentiality of secret information concerning the protection of the specific nuclear fuel material, physical protection inspection, and Design Basis Threat (DBT) following latest recommendations by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), enforced in December, 2005. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) possesses many facilities using Plutonium that fulfill the requirements of Category I and applicable DBT. In order to respond to the revised law, JAEA has conducted (a) development of information management manual for the reinforcement of the physical protection information control, (b) evaluation of the implementation of physical protection measures based on the DBT presented by the competent authority, and (c) enhancement of physical protection measures based on the evaluation result. Moreover, the inspection of physical protection measures and the verification of compliance with the physical protection regulation by competent authority were conducted for each JAEA facility, and the additional corresponding measures to reflect an inspection result were conducted. In this paper,we brief the requirements for the facility using Plutonium, an overview of the instruction by competent authority, an overview of corresponding measures by JAEA. Furthermore, we describe an image of a future physical protection system of JAEA's plutonium facilities influenced by the enhancement of physical protection measures following the recommendation document for the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities (INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft)) currently under consideration by IAEA. (author)

  15. Enhancement of Physical Protection Measures and Observation on Future JAEA's Measures Reflecting INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft) under Consideration at IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The revised Nuclear Reactor Regulation Act was aimed at strengthening of the physical protection taking into account of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 (Corrected) requirements by focusing on introducing confidentiality of secret information concerning the protection of the specific nuclear material, physical protection inspection, and Design Basis Threat (DBT) following latest recommendations by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), enforced in December, 2005. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) possesses many facilities using Plutonium that fulfill the requirements of Category I and applicable DBT. In order to respond to the revised law, JAEA has conducted (a) development of information management manual for the reinforcement of the physical protection information control, (b) evaluation of the implementation of physical protection measures based on the DBT presented by the competent authority, and (c) enhancement of physical protection measures based on the evaluation result. Moreover, the inspection of physical protection measures and the verification of compliance with the physical protection regulation by competent authority were conducted for each JAEA facility, and the additional corresponding measures to reflect an inspection result were conducted. In this paper, we brief the requirements for the facility using Plutonium, an overview of the instruction by competent authority, an overview of corresponding measures by JAEA. Furthermore, we describe an image of a future physical protection system of JAEA's plutonium facilities influenced by the enhancement of physical protection measures following the recommendation document for the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities (INFCIRC/225/Rev.5 (Draft)) currently under consideration by IAEA. (author)

  16. Human Leukocyte Antigen and Systemic Sclerosis in Japanese: The Sign of the Four Independent Protective Alleles, DRB1*13:02, DRB1*14:06, DQB1*03:01, and DPB1*02:01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Kawasaki, Aya; Shimada, Kota; Sugii, Shoji; Matsushita, Takashi; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Kobayashi, Kouji; Osada, Atsumu; Ihata, Atsushi; Kondo, Yuya; Nagai, Tatsuo; Setoguchi, Keigo; Okamoto, Akiko; Okamoto, Akira; Chiba, Noriyuki; Suematsu, Eiichi; Kono, Hajime; Katayama, Masao; Hirohata, Shunsei; Sumida, Takayuki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi; Nagaoka, Shouhei; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Several studies on associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies and susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc) have been reported. Anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) and anti-topoisomerase I antibodies (ATA) are found in SSc patients. Here, we sought to identify HLA alleles associated with SSc in Japanese, and explored their associations with SSc phenotypes including the presence of autoantibodies. Methods Associations of HLA-DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 were analyzed in 463 Japanese SSc patients and 413 controls. Results We found that DRB1*13:02 (P = 0.0011, Pc = 0.0319, odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29–0.73), DRB1*14:06 (P = 6.60X10-5, Pc = 0.0020, OR 0.05, 95%CI 0.01–0.41), DQB1*03:01 (P = 0.0009, Pc = 0.0150, OR 0.56, 95%CI 0.40–0.79), and DPB1*02:01 (P = 5.16X10-6, Pc = 8.77X10-5, OR 0.52, 95%CI 0.39–0.69) were protectively associated with SSc. In addition, these four alleles seemed to be independently associated with the protection against the susceptibility of SSc. On the other hand, we could not find predisposing alleles for overall SSc. With respect to SSc subsets, a tendency for these four alleles to be protectively associated was observed. However, there was a significant association between DRB1*01:01, DRB1*10:01, DQB1*05:01, and DPB1*04:02 and the susceptibility to SSc with ACA. On the other hand, the presence of DRB1*15:02, DQB1*06:01, DPB1*03:01, and DPB1*09:01 was associated with SSc with ATA. Conclusion Thus, the present study has identified protective associations of the four HLA class II alleles with overall Japanese SSc and predisposing associations of HLA class II alleles with Japanese SSc subsets. PMID:27116456

  17. Enhancement of carrier mobility in MoS2 field effect transistors by a SiO2 protective layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Peng-Zhi; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Cao, Hui-Wen; Wang, Xue-Feng; Pang, Yu; Li, Yu-Xing; Deng, Ning-Qin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guang-Yu; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Sheng; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-05-01

    Molybdenum disulfide is a promising channel material for field effect transistors (FETs). In this paper, monolayer MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to fabricate top-gate FETs through standard optical lithography. During the fabrication process, charged impurities and interface states are introduced, and the photoresist is not removed cleanly, which both limit the carrier mobility and the source-drain current. We apply a SiO2 protective layer, which is deposited on the surface of MoS2, in order to avoid the MoS2 directly contacting with the photoresist and the ambient environment. Therefore, the contact property between the MoS2 and the electrodes is improved, and the Coulomb scattering caused by the charged impurities and the interface states is reduced. Comparing MoS2 FETs with and without a SiO2 protective layer, the SiO2 protective layer is found to enhance the characteristics of the MoS2 FETs, including transfer and output characteristics. A high mobility of ˜42.3 cm2/V s is achieved, which is very large among the top-gate CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 FETs.

  18. Stimulation of TLR7 with Gardiquimod Enhances Protection and Activation of Immune Cells from γ-Irradiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for cancer patients is based on the radiation-induced cell death, but high dose of radiation is able to cause break of immune system. Thus, protection of immune cells from radiation damage is required to enhance the efficiency and reduce the harmful side effects during cancer radiotherapy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important not only in initiating innate immunity against microbial infection, but also inducing Th1-mediated immunity with producing cytokines and chemokines. Cell stimulation via TLRs leads to downstream activation of NF-kB and other transcription factors. Consequently, several genes encoding mediators and effector molecules of the innate as well as the adaptive immune response are transcribed. There are several previous findings that activated immune cells via TLR9 inducing pathways are resistant to chemical or radiation exposure. But it is not clear that the other TLRs also have the same abilities to protect immune cells against cellular damages including γ-irradiation. This research was performed to evaluate protective effect of immune cells from γ-irradiation through TLR-7 activation pathway

  19. Distributed Multi-Agent-Based Protection Scheme for Transient Stability Enhancement in Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. S.; Mahmud, M. A.; Pota, H. R.; Hossain, M. J.; Orchi, T. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new distributed agent-based scheme to enhance the transient stability of power systems by maintaining phase angle cohesiveness of interconnected generators through proper relay coordination with critical clearing time (CCT) information. In this distributed multi-agent infrastructure, intelligent agents represent various physical device models to provide dynamic information and energy flow among different physical processes of power systems. The agents can communicate with each other in a distributed manner with a final aim to control circuit breakers (CBs) with CCT information as this is the key issue for maintaining and enhancing the transient stability of power systems. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated on a standard IEEE 39-bus New England benchmark system under different large disturbances such as three-phase short-circuit faults and changes in loads within the systems. From the simulation results, it is found that the proposed scheme significantly enhances the transient stability of power systems as compared to a conventional scheme of static CB operation.

  20. The Importance of Building and Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in the Areas of Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry ' s involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  1. The Importance of Enhancing Worldwide Industry Cooperation in Radiological Protection, Waste Management and Decommissioning - Views from the Global Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of great relevance.This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of Summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry's involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  2. The importance of building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in the areas of radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow or stagnant rate of nuclear power generation development in many developed countries over the last two decades has resulted in a significant shortage in the population of mid-career nuclear industry professionals. This shortage is even more pronounced in some specific areas of expertise such as radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning. This situation has occurred at a time when the renaissance of nuclear power and the globalization of the nuclear industry are steadily gaining momentum and when the industry's involvement in international and national debates in these three fields of expertise (and the industry's impact on these debates) is of vital importance. This paper presents the World Nuclear Association (WNA) approach to building and enhancing worldwide industry cooperation in radiological protection, waste management and decommissioning, which is manifested through the activities of the two WNA working groups on radiological protection (RPWG) and on waste management and decommissioning (WM and DWG). This paper also briefly describes the WNA's participatory role, as of Summer 2005, in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard development committees on radiation safety (RASSC), waste safety (WASSC) and nuclear safety (NUSSC). This participation provides the worldwide nuclear industry with an opportunity to be part of IAEA's discussions on shaping changes to the control regime of IAEA safety standards. The review (and the prospect of a revision) of IAEA safety standards, which began in October 2005, makes this WNA participation and the industry's involvement at the national level timely and important. All of this excellent industry cooperation and team effort is done through 'collegial' exchanges between key industry experts, which help tackle important issues more effectively. The WNA is continuously looking to enhance its worldwide industry representation in these fields of expertise through the RPWG and WM and DWG

  3. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine

  4. High copy numbers and N terminal insertion position of influenza A M2E fused with hepatitis B core antigen enhanced immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xincheng; Wang, Yunlong; Dong, Caiwen; Hu, Jinqiang; Yang, Liping

    2015-08-01

    The extra domain of influenza M2 protein (M2e) is almost completely conserved among all influenza A virus subtypes. M2e is a promising candidate target for the development of a broad-spectrum recombinant influenza A vaccine. However, the immunogenicity of M2e needs to be improved. Copy numbers of M2e and its fusion expression with different carrier proteins may affect its immunopotency. In this study, we designed and created different constructs through genetic fusion of M2e (MSLLTEVETPTRSEWECRCSDSSD) (A/California/05/2009 (H1N1)) with the N-terminus (HBcAg1-149aa + Cys) by insertion in the N-terminus Hepatitis B Core (HBc) antigen 1-149aa and Middle 78-81aa of HBcAg1-149aa to construct a recombinant M2e-based vaccine candidate. These chimeric sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli. We constructed fusion proteins containing influenza A H1N1 influenza virus (2009), as well as one, two, and three copies of M2e and hepatitis B core antigen1-149aa amino acid-optimized codon inserted N and its intermediate. The recombinant protein was expressed and purified. Western blot analysis was employed to evaluate the expression of the M2e recombinant protein containing different copy numbers of M2e. Mice were immunized for two times with the purified fusion protein HBc/M2e BALB/c. Serum levels of M2e antibody gradually increased along with increase in immunity. The levels of different fusion protein M2e antibodies increase with increasing M2e copy number. In addition, the protein antibody level in the N terminal fusion protein is higher than that in intermediate fusion. PMID:26355223

  5. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) signal environment is from 3,000-36,000 kilometers altitude. Current SSV specifications only capture performance provided by signals transmitted within 23.5(L1) or 26(L2-L5) off-nadir angle. Recent on-orbit data lessons learned show significant PNT (Positioning, Navigation and Timing) performance improvements when the full aggregate signal is used. Numerous military civil operational missions in High Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEOGEO) utilize the full signal to enhance vehicle PNT performance

  6. Use of thin films obtained by plasma polymerization for grain protection and germination enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. M. Carvalho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, preliminary results of the use of hydrophobic thin films obtained by plasma deposition to protect grains and seeds are presented: grains coated by the films did not present biological degradation when stored in a saturated water vapor environment, but had their germination accelerated in the presence of water. A model that explains the difference of behavior of the films when exposed to water in vapor form or in liquid form, based on the formation of microchannels within the film that lead to water uptake in seeds, is presented. The model was successfully tested using quartz crystal measurements, which showed that the microchannels within the films can favor the adsorption and permeation of water when the films are immersed in water.

  7. DNA sensor's selectivity enhancement and protection from contaminating nucleases due to a hydrated ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Pramanik, Smritimoy; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-07-01

    The thermodynamic stability of certain mismatched base pairs has made the development of DNA sequence sensing systems challenging. Thus, the stability of fully matched and mismatched DNA oligonucleotides in the hydrated ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) was investigated. Mismatched base pairs were significantly destabilized in choline dhp relative to those in aqueous buffer. A molecular beacon that forms a triplex with a conserved HIV-1 sequence was then designed and tested in choline dhp. The molecular beacon specifically detected the target duplex via triplex formation at concentrations as low as 1 pmol per 10 μL with 10,000-fold sequence selectivity. Moreover, the molecular beacon was protected from a contaminating nuclease in choline dhp, and DNAs in aqueous solutions were not sufficiently stable for practical use. PMID:25919083

  8. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D; Lai, Wi S; Stumpo, Deborah J; Hill, Georgette D; Flake, Gordon P; Mannie, Mark D; Blackshear, Perry J

    2016-02-16

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate-rich elements (AREs) in the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3'UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  9. Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Splat Bonding for CMAS and Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Yao, Shu-Wei; Wang, Li-Shuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of molten CMAS in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at high temperature is significantly affected by the microstructure of the ceramic coating. Enhancing the bonding ratio between splats can reduce the interconnected pores and suppress the infiltration of the molten CMAS into the coating. In this study, a dual-layered (DL) TBC with the dense 8YSZ on the top of the conventional porous 8YSZ was proposed to enhance CMAS corrosion of atmospheric plasma-sprayed YSZ. The dense YSZ coating with improved lamellar bonding was deposited at a higher deposition temperature. The microstructure of the coatings before and after CMAS attack test was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was clearly revealed that by adjusting the microstructure and applying a dense ceramic layer with the improved interface bonding on the top of porous TBC, the infiltration of CMAS into porous YSZ coating can be effectively suppressed. Moreover, by designing DL TBCs, the thermal conductivity of the TBC system exhibits a limited increase. Thus with the design of DL structure, the TBCs with high CMAS corrosion resistance and low thermal conductivity can be achieved.

  10. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  11. A network to enhance cooperation for research and higher education on radiation protection and nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The educational capacity of many Institutions of Higher Education in Nuclear Engineering decreased under the combined effect of a declining interest among students as well as from academic and political authorities. An increasing cooperation at the international level on educational efforts is necessary. The CHERNE network is an initiative mainly focussed on teaching and learning activities to develop a wide-scope open academic network to enhance cooperation, competence and equipment sharing between its partners. Typical activities organized within the network include workshops, intensive courses, seminars and conferences. The CHERNE network and its main objectives as well as the activities developed since its foundation are presented. Special attention is given to international intensive courses (SPERANSA, JUNCSS, ICARO, ...) organized for students of the member institutions. The common feature of these courses is a strong practical part in specialized facilities, including in some cases access to large equipment like research reactors and accelerators. (author)

  12. A network to enhance cooperation for research and higher education on radiation protection and nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The educational capacity of many Institutions of Higher Education in Nuclear Engineering decreased under the combined effect of a declining interest among students as well as from academic and political authorities. An increasing cooperation at the international level on educational efforts is necessary. The CHERNE network is an initiative mainly focussed on teaching and learning activities to develop a wide-scope open academic network to enhance cooperation, competence and equipment sharing between its partners. Typical activities organized within the network include workshops, intensive courses, seminars and conferences. The CHERNE network and its main objectives as well as the activities developed since its foundation are presented. Special attention is given to international intensive courses (SPERANSA, JUNCSS, ICARO, etc.) organized for students of the member institutions. The common feature of these courses is a strong practical part in specialized facilities, including in some cases access to large equipment like research reactors and accelerators. (author)

  13. The Symmetry Protected Piecewise Berry Phases, Enhanced Pumping and Non-reciprocity in Trimer Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xuele

    2016-01-01

    Finding new phase is a fundamental task in physics. Landau's theory explained the deep connection between symmetry breaking and phase transition commonly occurring in magnetic, superconducting and super uid systems. The discovery of the quantum Hall effect led to Z topological phases which could be different for same symmetry and are characterized by the discrete values of the Berry phases. By studying 1D trimer lattices we report new phases characterized by Berry phases which are piecewise continuous rather than discrete numbers. The phase transition occurs at the discontinuity point. With time-dependent changes, trimer lattices also give a 2D phases characterized by very specific 2D Berry phases of half period. These Berry phases change smoothly within a phase while change discontinuously at the transition point. We further demonstrate the existence of adiabatic pumping for each phase and gain assisted enhanced pumping. The non-reciprocity of the pumping process makes the system a good optical diode.

  14. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE. In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  15. Programmed cell death-10 enhances proliferation and protects malignant T cells from apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Kopp, Katharina; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn;

    2010-01-01

    , whereas an activator of Jak3 and NF-¿B, interleukin-2 (IL-2), enhances PDCD10 expression. Functional data show that PDCD10 depletion by small interfering RNA induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation of the sensitive cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first functional link between PDCD10......The programmed cell death-10 (PDCD10; also known as cerebral cavernous malformation-3 or CCM3) gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein associated with cell apoptosis. Mutations in PDCD10 result in cerebral cavernous malformations, an important cause of cerebral hemorrhage. PDCD10 is...... associated with serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases and modulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway suggesting a role in the regulation of cellular growth. Here we provide evidence of a constitutive expression of PDCD10 in malignant T cells and cell lines from peripheral blood of...

  16. A simple composite protective layer coating that enhances the cycling stability of lithium metal batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hongkyung; Lee, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun-Jung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-06-01

    Metallic lithium is the most promising negative electrode for high-energy rechargeable batteries due to its extremely high specific capacity and its extremely low redox potential. However, the low cycle efficiency and lithium dendrite formation during the charge/discharge processes consistently hinder its practical application. In this report, we present a stabilized Li electrode on which a Li+ ion conductive inorganic/organic composite protective layer (CPL) is coated. With the introduction of the CPL, the Li dendrite growth and electrolyte decomposition are effectively suppressed; consequently, stable Li plating/stripping at high current densities up to 10 mA cm-2 is possible. Nanoindentation tests demonstrate that the shear modulus of the CPL at narrow indentations is 1.8 times higher than that of the Li metal, which provides a theoretical understanding for its efficacy. Moreover, the LiCoO2/Li cell incorporating CPL exhibits excellent cycling stability up to 400 cycles at 1 mA cm-2 (1 C-rate), which demonstrates practical applicability in Li ion batteries through replacing the graphite anode with a CPL-coated Li metal anode.

  17. Nizatidine, a small molecular compound, enhances killed H5N1 vaccine cell-mediated responses and protects mice from lethal viral challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shuang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Wang, Ming; Chen, Ruiai; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Nizatidine (NIZ), closely related to Cimetidine, is a histamine H2 receptor inverse agonist used primarily as an anti-acid drug. Recent studies showed that this class of compounds may also modulate immune responses. To evaluate adjuvant effects of NIZ on vaccine immune modulation, we formulated NIZ with a H5N1 killed viral antigen and tested in vitro and in vivo. NIZ activated DC maturation and stimulated Th1 and Th2 immune responses to H5N1 vaccine. As a result, it enhanced both antibody and...

  18. Synthetic TLR4 agonists enhance functional antibodies and CD4+ T-cell responses against the Plasmodium falciparum GMZ2.6C multi-stage vaccine antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Roeffen, Will; Singh, Susheel K; Tiendrebeogo, Regis W; Christiansen, Michael; Beebe, Elyse; Carter, Darrick; Fox, Christopher B; Howard, Randall F; Reed, Steven G; Sauerwein, Robert; Theisen, Michael

    2016-04-27

    A subunit vaccine targeting both transmission and pathogenic asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum, i.e., a multi-stage vaccine, could be a powerful tool to combat malaria. Here, we report production and characterization of the recombinant protein GMZ2.6C, which contains a fragment of the sexual-stage protein Pfs48/45-6C genetically fused to GMZ2, an asexual vaccine antigen in advanced clinical development. To select the most suitable vaccine formulation for downstream clinical studies, GMZ2.6C was tested with various immune modulators in different adjuvant formulations (stable emulsions, liposomes, and alum) in C57BL/6 mice. Some, but not all, formulations containing either the synthetic TLR4 agonist GLA or SLA elicited the highest parasite-specific antibody titers, the greatest IFN-γ responses in CD4+ TH1 cells, and the highest percentage of multifunctional CD4+ T cells expressing IFN-γ and TNF in response to GMZ2.6C. Both of these agonists have good safety records in humans. PMID:26994314

  19. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27130449

  20. Hanford River Protection Project Life cycle Cost Modeling Tool to Enhance Mission Planning - 13396

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Life cycle Cost Model (LCM) Tool is an overall systems model that incorporates budget, and schedule impacts for the entire life cycle of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, and is replacing the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model as the foundation of the RPP system planning process. Currently, the DOE frequently requests HTWOS simulations of alternative technical and programmatic strategies for completing the RPP mission. Analysis of technical and programmatic changes can be performed with HTWOS; however, life cycle costs and schedules were previously generated by manual transfer of time-based data from HTWOS to Primavera P6. The LCM Tool automates the preparation of life cycle costs and schedules and is needed to provide timely turnaround capability for RPP mission alternative analyses. LCM is the simulation component of the LCM Tool. The simulation component is a replacement of the HTWOS model with new capability to support life cycle cost modeling. It is currently deployed in G22, but has been designed to work in any full object-oriented language with an extensive feature set focused on networking and cross-platform compatibility. The LCM retains existing HTWOS functionality needed to support system planning and alternatives studies going forward. In addition, it incorporates new functionality, coding improvements that streamline programming and model maintenance, and capability to input/export data to/from the LCM using the LCM Database (LCMDB). The LCM Cost/Schedule (LCMCS) contains cost and schedule data and logic. The LCMCS is used to generate life cycle costs and schedules for waste retrieval and processing scenarios. It uses time-based output data from the LCM to produce the logic ties in Primavera P6 necessary for shifting activities. The LCM Tool is evolving to address the needs of decision makers who want to understand the broad spectrum of risks facing complex organizations like DOE-RPP to understand how near